Sample records for plant antimicrobial agents

  1. Antimicrobial agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Bush; Anuwat Keerasuntonpong; B Zabriskie; Chitsanu Pancharoen; Terapong Tantawichien

    1997-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents active against multi-resistant Gram-positive bacteria are considered to be of major commercial potential. Commercially viable agents that have been included in recent successful trials include the streptogramins, novel glycopeptides, oxazolidinones and potent quinolones. Cationic peptides have generated much interest, but their utility as successful drug candidates remains questionable. Novel compound classes for possible exploitation include non-?-lactam ?-lactamaseinhibitors, inhibitors

  2. Medicinal plants and antimicrobial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Ríos; M. C. Recio

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, we analyze the past, present and future of medicinal plants, both as potential antimicrobial crude drugs as well as a source for natural compounds that act as new anti-infection agents. In the past few decades, the search for new anti-infection agents has occupied many research groups in the field of ethnopharmacology. When we reviewed the number

  3. Characterization of the bioactive metabolites from a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and their exploitation as antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting agents.

    PubMed

    George, Emrin; Kumar, S Nishanth; Jacob, Jubi; Bommasani, Bhaskara; Lankalapalli, Ravi S; Morang, P; Kumar, B S Dileep

    2015-05-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterial strain, PM 105, isolated from a tea plantation soil from the North Eastern region of India was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa through classical and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene sequencing. Further studies with this strain confirmed broad spectrum antifungal activity against ten human and plant pathogenic fungal pathogens viz. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Candida albicans, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium oxysporum, Pencillium expansum, Rhizoctonia solani, Trichophyton rubrum besides growth-promoting property in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). However, no antibacterial property was exhibited by this strain against the four test bacterial pathogens tested in agar overlay method. The crude bioactive metabolites produced by this strain were isolated with three different solvents that exhibited significant antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting activity. Chloroform extract recorded significant antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting activity. Three major compounds viz. 1-hydroxyphenazine, pyocyanin, and phenazine-1-carboxamide were purified and characterized from crude extracts of this strain by various spectral data. The purified compounds recorded prominent antimicrobial activity but failed to establish the plant growth promotion activity in test crop plants under gnotobiotic conditions. Pyocyanin recorded significant antimicrobial activity, and best activity was recorded against T. rubrum (29 mm), followed by P. expansum (28 mm). These results suggest the use of PM 105 as plant growth-promoting agent in crop plants after successful field trials. PMID:25832181

  4. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous system toxicities occurring most commonly, but only rarely necessitating discontinuance of therapy. In 17 of 18 prospective, randomized, double-blind comparisons with another agent or placebo, fluoroquinolones were tolerated as well as or better than the comparison regimen. Bacterial resistance has been uncommonly documented but occurs, most notably with P. aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and occasionally other species for which the therapeutic ratio is less favorable. Fluoroquinolones offer an efficacious, well-tolerated, and cost-effective alternative to parenteral therapies of selected infections. PMID:2680058

  5. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future. PMID:21707313

  6. Investigational Antimicrobial Agents of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel ?-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  7. Proarrhythmic Potential of Antimicrobial Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Simkó; A. Csilek; J. Karászi; I. L?rincz

    2008-01-01

    Several antiarrhythmic and non-cardiovascular drug therapies including antimicrobial agents have been implicated as the causes\\u000a for QT interval prolongation, torsades de pointes (TdP) ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death. Most of the drugs\\u000a that have been associated with the lengthening of the QT interval or development of TdP can also block the rapidly activating\\u000a component of the delayed rectifier potassium

  8. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  9. Combating microbial resistance to antimicrobial agents through dosing regimen optimization

    E-print Network

    Nikolaou, Michael

    - 1 - Combating microbial resistance to antimicrobial agents through dosing regimen optimization. Antimicrobial resistance and the need to optimize dosing regimens...................................... 3 2............................................................................................................................. 26 #12;- 3 - 1. Antimicrobial resistance and the need to optimize dosing regimens Microbial

  10. Mechanisms of biofilm resistance to antimicrobial agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thien-Fah C. Mah; George A. O'Toole

    2001-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms attached to a surface. It has become clear that biofilm-grown cells express properties distinct from planktonic cells, one of which is an increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. Recent work has indicated that slow growth and\\/or induction of an rpoS-mediated stress response could contribute to biocide resistance. The physical and\\/or chemical structure of exopolysaccharides or other

  11. Linezolid: an oxazolidinone antimicrobial agent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Horatio B. Fung; Harold L. Kirschenbaum; Babatunde O. Ojofeitimi

    2001-01-01

    Background: Linezolid is the first oxazolidinone anti-infective agent marketed in the United States. It is indicated for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia, complicated skin and skin-structure infections caused by methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other susceptible organisms, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium infections. It also is indicated for the treatment of uncomplicated skin and skin-structure infections caused by methicillin-sensitive S

  12. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus : A future antimicrobial agent?

    PubMed

    Harini, K; Ajila, Vidya; Hegde, Shruthi

    2013-11-01

    Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) are small, predatory, Deltaproteobacteria that prey on other Gram-negative pathogens. Many authors have unfolded the possible use of BALOs as biological control agents in environmental as well as medical microbiological settings. They are found strongly associated with natural biofilms and recent studies have shown that effective predation occurs in these naturally occurring bacterial communities. Periodontal infections could also be an interesting target for the application of BALOs as biological Gram-negative bacteria and therefore potentially susceptible to BALOs antimicrobial agents. This proposition is based on the fact that almost all periodontal pathogens are predation. Accordingly, this review aims to present the evolution toward applying Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus as an antibacterial agent to deal with oral infections, general medical conditions, environmental and industrial issues. PMID:24554900

  13. The use of antimicrobial agents in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Landoni, M F; Albarellos, G

    2015-07-01

    Antimicrobial agents are essential tools for treating and controlling bacterial infections in poultry production. Veterinarians have a huge responsibility when using antimicrobials in poultry producing meat and eggs for human consumption. The term 'judicious use' of antimicrobials implies the optimal selection of drug, dose and duration of antimicrobial treatment, along with a reduction in inappropriate and excessive use as a means of slowing the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The proper use of antimicrobials depends on the knowledge of interrelationships between bacteria, antimicrobial, host and consumer. This article reviews the anatomical-physiological features of poultry relating to drug disposition as well as the pharmacological and therapeutic characteristics of the most commonly used antimicrobials in broiler chickens. Doses frequently employed for flock treatment are presented as are accepted withdrawal times. PMID:25981931

  14. De-Novo Design of Antimicrobial Peptides for Plant Protection

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Benjamin; Herrera Diaz, Areli; Dangel, Alexandra; Thellmann, Martha; Meyer, Helge; Sattler, Michael; Lindermayr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the de-novo design of peptides that inhibit a broad range of plant pathogens. Four structurally different groups of peptides were developed that differ in size and position of their charged and hydrophobic clusters and were assayed for their ability to inhibit bacterial growth and fungal spore germination. Several peptides are highly active at concentrations between 0,1 and 1 µg/ml against plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria. Importantly, no hemolytic activity could be detected for these peptides at concentrations up to 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the peptides are also active after spraying on the plant surface demonstrating a possible way of application. In sum, our designed peptides represent new antimicrobial agents and with the increasing demand for antimicrobial compounds for production of “healthy” food, these peptides might serve as templates for novel antibacterial and antifungal agents. PMID:23951222

  15. Use of antimicrobial agents in a novel cattle washing system

    E-print Network

    Covington, Brian Reed

    2001-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents, 0.5% L-lactic acid and 50 ppm chlorine, along with water wash treatments (single or double) were evaluated in a cattle washing system for their effectiveness in reducing Aerobic Plate Counts (APC), coliforms, generic...

  16. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Gigučre, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-01

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. PMID:26051479

  17. Antimicrobial agents rationale and monitoring in an Italian hospital.

    PubMed

    De Lalla, F

    1996-10-01

    Optimizing the use of antimicrobial agents may impact considerably on the total pharmaceutical costs sustained by any given hospital. At the San Bortolo Hospital in Vicenza, Italy, antimicrobial usage was monitored over an 18-month period and a cost analysis was performed. In 1993 the cost for antimicrobial agents was 20.3% of the total pharmaceutical costs of the hospital budget. Third-generation cephalosporins were the most frequently used class of drugs. In order to rationalize costs, actions put into place in the first few months of 1993 included, among others, an update of the hospital formulary and adoption of a request procedure for obtaining antimicrobial agents outside the formulary. There was a trend towards a reduction in the cost of antimicrobial therapy (6 to 7% savings for the acquisition of antimicrobial agents) in the first semester of 1994 compared with the same time period in 1993. This cost reduction was accomplished mainly by an increase in the use of some less expensive agents, in particular first- and second-generation cephalosporins, but also by a decrease in the use of teicoplanin, imipenem-cilastatin, ceftazidime and ureidopenicillins. PMID:8957713

  18. Improvement in shelf-life and safety of perishable foods by plant essential oils and smoke antimicrobials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Holley; Dhaval Patel

    2005-01-01

    This review examines the potency of natural antimicrobial agents from plants, outlining the ranges of microbial susceptibility and factors affecting antimicrobial action. Methods used for estimation of inhibitory activity are evaluated and currently understood mechanisms of their action are described. The potential value of these agents as secondary preservatives is considered as well as the effectiveness and use of similar

  19. Antimicrobial Spectrum of Triclosan, a Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Agent for Topical Application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Regös; O. Zak; R. Solf; W. A. Vischer; E. G. Weirich

    1979-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of 5-chloro-2(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol (triclosan, one of the active ingredients of Logamel®, Ciba-Geigy) was compared in vitro with that of other antimicrobials exclusively or occasionally used as topical agents in dermatology: hexachlorophene, clioquinol, chlorquinaldol. gentamicin, neomycin, nystatin, econazole, clotrimazole and salicylic acid. Upon determination of the MICs for 53 strains of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, yeasts and fungi,

  20. Mushrooms as Possible Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kosani?, Marijana; Rankovi?, Branislav; Daši?, Marko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine in-vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the acetonic and methanolic extracts of the mushrooms Boletus aestivalis, Boletus edulis and Leccinum carpini. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using free radical scavenging activity and reducing power. In addition, total content of phenol and flavonoid in extracts were determined as pyrocatechol equivalent, and as rutin equivalent, respectively. As a result of the study acetonic extracts from Boletus edulis was more powerful antioxidant activity with IC50 value of 4.72 ?g/mL which was similar or greater than the standard antioxidants, ascorbic acid (IC50 = 4.22 ?g/mL), BHA (IC50 = 6.42 ?g/mL) and ?-tocopherol (IC50 = 62.43 ?g/mL). Moreover, the tested extracts had effective reducing power. A significant relationship between total phenolic and flavonoid contents and their antioxidative activities was significantly observed. The antimicrobial activity of each extract was estimated by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration by using microdilution plate method against five species of bacteria and five species of fungi. Generally, the tested mushroom extracts had relatively strong antimicrobial activity against the tested microorganisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration for both extracts related to the tested bacteria and fungi were 1.25 - 10 mg/ mL. The present study shows that tested mushroom species demonstrated a strong antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. It suggests that mushroom may be used as good sources of natural antioxidants and for pharmaceutical purposes in treating of various deseases. PMID:24250542

  1. Antimicrobial agents in aquaculture: Practice, needs and issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Rodgers; M. D. Furones

    2009-01-01

    Aquaculture is a fast-growing food production sector and the need for antimicrobial agents varies markedly between countries. Intensification of aquaculture has led to the promotion of conditions that favour the use of a wide range of chemicals, including antibiotics, pesticides, hormones, anaesthetics and various pigments. The quantities used and the usage patterns also vary between countries and individual aquaculture operations.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides as Infection Imaging Agents: Better Than Radiolabeled Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Muammad Saeed; Imran, Muhammad Babar; Nadeem, Muhammad Afzal; Shahid, Abubaker

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging techniques offer whole body imaging for localization of number and site of infective foci inspite of limitation of spatial resolution. The innate human immune system contains a large member of important elements including antimicrobial peptides to combat any form of infection. However, development of antibiotics against bacteria progressed rapidly and gained popularity over antimicrobial peptides but even powerful antimicrobials failed to reduce morbidity and mortality due to emergence of mutant strains of bacteria resulting in antimicrobial resistance. Differentiation between infection and inflammation using radiolabeled compounds with nuclear medicine techniques has always been a dilemma which is still to be resolved. Starting from nonspecific tracers to specific radiolabeled tracers, the question is still unanswered. Specific radiolabeled tracers included antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides which bind directly to the bacteria for efficient localization with advanced nuclear medicine equipments. However, there are merits and demerits attributed to each. In the current paper, radiolabeled antibiotics and radiolabeled peptides for infection localization have been discussed starting with the background of primitive nonspecific tracers. Radiolabeled antimicrobial peptides have certain merits compared with labeled antibiotics which make them superior agents for localization of infective focus. PMID:22675369

  3. Chemerin Is an Antimicrobial Agent in Human Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Banas, Magdalena; Zabieglo, Katarzyna; Kasetty, Gopinath; Kapinska-Mrowiecka, Monika; Borowczyk, Julia; Drukala, Justyna; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Zabel, Brian A.; Butcher, Eugene C.; Schroeder, Jens M.; Schmidtchen, Artur; Cichy, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Chemerin, a chemoattractant ligand for chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) is predicted to share similar tertiary structure with antibacterial cathelicidins. Recombinant chemerin has antimicrobial activity. Here we show that endogenous chemerin is abundant in human epidermis, and that inhibition of bacteria growth by exudates from organ cultures of primary human skin keratinocytes is largely chemerin-dependent. Using a panel of overlapping chemerin-derived synthetic peptides, we demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of chemerin is primarily mediated by Val66-Pro85, which causes direct bacterial lysis. Therefore, chemerin is an antimicrobial agent in human skin. PMID:23527010

  4. The Role of Unregulated Sale and Dispensing of Antimicrobial Agents on the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Developing Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric S. Mitema

    \\u000a Antimicrobial resistance has become a major medical and public health problem worldwide. This has been brought about by overuse\\u000a and\\/or misuse of these drugs especially in developing countries. The role of unregulated sale and dispensing of antimicrobial\\u000a agents on the development of resistance is presented in this chapter.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Developing countries use both branded and generic antimicrobial agents which include major

  5. Antityrosinase and antimicrobial activities from Thai medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Dej-Adisai, Sukanya; Meechai, Imron; Puripattanavong, Jindaporn; Kummee, Sopa

    2014-04-01

    Various dermatological disorders and microbial skin infection can cause hyperpigmentation. Therefore, screenings for whitening and antimicrobial agents from Thai medicinal plants have been of research interest. Seventy-seven ethanol plant extracts were investigated for antityrosinase activity, eleven samples showed the tyrosinase inhibition more than 50 % were further preliminary screening for antimicrobial activity by agar disc diffusion and broth micro-dilution methods. Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr. (Moraceae) root extract, which showed the potential of tyrosinase inhibition with 90.57 ± 2.93 % and antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Trichophyton mentagophytes with inhibition zone as 9.10 ± 0.00, 10.67 ± 0.09, 15.25 ± 0.05 and 6.60 ± 0.17 mm, respectively was selected for phytochemical investigation. Three pure compounds were isolated as artocarpin, cudraflavone C and artocarpanone. And artocarpanone exhibited anti-tyrosinase effect; artocarpin and cudraflavone C also showed the potential of antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis and P. acnes with MIC at 2, 4 and 2 ?g/ml, respectively and MBC at 32 ?g/ml for these bacteria. So, these pure compounds are interesting for further study in order to provide possibilities of new whitening and antibacterial development. This will be the first report of phytochemical investigation of A. integer root. PMID:23835832

  6. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  7. [Use of antimicrobial agents in Norway 1980-92].

    PubMed

    Andrew, M; Solberg, C O

    1994-01-20

    Use of systemic antimicrobial agents in Norway shows a moderate increase from 1980 to 1992, from 13.5 to 16.9 defined daily doses (DDDs) per 1,000 inhabitants per day. Comparing the Nordic countries, the use of these drugs is second lowest in Norway, after Denmark. In relative terms the use of tetracyclines is highest in Norway. Use of co-trimoxazole is also relatively high, while use of macrolides is low. The share of penicillin V and G is highest in Sweden. Several new and important antimicrobial agents have been introduced on the Norwegian market during the period, while almost as many have been withdrawn. Penicillin V and G constitutes the main subgroup. However, the use of tetracyclines is almost as high, for a short period in fact higher. Taking into account the development of drug resistance and adverse events, it is recommended that use of tetracyclines and co-trimoxazole be reduced, mainly to the advantage of penicillins. The use of cephalosporins seems to be reasonable, but penicillins should be considered more often as an alternative. The use of antimycotic and antiviral drugs is low in terms of DDDs. In 1992 the cost of antimicrobial agents for systemic use was in 1992 approx. NOK 400 million, retail price. The largest subgroup, cephalosporins, constituted almost 20%, as against only 2% of DDDs. Antimicrobial agents represent a substantial part of the total drug budget in hospitals. A shift from expensive to cheaper alternatives should be considered as a routine. Moreover, an optimal change from parenteral to oral administration could help to reduce costs. PMID:8122197

  8. Current and future challenges in the development of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Micro-organisms exist to survive. Even in the absence of antimicrobial agents, many have determinants of resistance that may be expressed phenotypically, should the need arise. With the advent of the antibiotic age, as more and more drugs were developed to treat serious infections, micro-organisms (particularly bacteria) rapidly developed resistance determinants to prevent their own demise.The most important determinants of resistance have been in the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Among Gram-positive bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) have taxed researchers and pharmaceutical companies to develop new agents that are effective against these resistant strains. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes, carbapenemases (CREs) and the so-called amp-C enzymes that may be readily transferred between species of enterobacteriaceae and other facultative species have created multi-drug resistant organisms that are difficult to treat. Other resistance determinants have been seen in other clinically important bacterial species such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Clostridium difficile, Haemophilus influenzae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These issues have now spread to fungal agents of infection.A variety of modalities have been used to stem the tide of resistance. These include the development of niche compounds that target specific resistance determinants. Other approaches have been to find new targets for antimicrobial activity, use of combination agents that are effective against more than one target in the cell, or new delivery mechanism to maximize the concentration of antimicrobial agents at the site of infection without causing toxicity to the host. It is important that such new modalities have been proved effective for clinical therapy. Animal models and non-mammalian systems have been developed to determine if new agents will reach sufficient concentrations at infection sites to predict clinical efficacy without toxicity. It will also be key to consider antimicrobial stewardship as an important component of the continuing battle to prevent the development of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23090595

  9. Improved agar diffusion method for detecting residual antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C E; Kondo, F

    2001-03-01

    The improved agar diffusion method for determination of residual antimicrobial agents was investigated, and the sensitivities of various combinations of test organisms and assay media were determined using 7 organisms, 5 media, and 31 antimicrobial agents. Bacillus stearothermophilus and synthetic assay medium (SAM) showed the greatest sensitivity for screening penicillins (penicillin G and ampicillin). The combination of Bacillus subtilis and minimum medium (MM) was the most sensitive for tetracyclines (oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline), B. stearothermophilus and SAM or Micrococcus luteus and Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA) for detecting tylosin and erythromycin, B. subtilis and MHA for aminoglycosides (streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and dihydrostreptomycin), B. stearothermophilus and SAM for polyethers (salinomycin and lasalocid), and B. subtilis and MM or Clostridium perfringens and GAM for polypeptides (thiopeptin, enramycin, virginiamycin, and bacitracin). However, gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli ATCC 27166 and MM were better for screening for colistin and polymixin-B. For detecting the synthetic drugs tested, the best combination was B. subtilis and MM for sulfonamides, E. coli 27166 and MM for quinolones (oxolinic acid and nalidixic acid), B. subtilis and MM for furans (furazolidone), and the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum and luminescence assay medium for chloramphenicol and oxolinic acid. The results showed that the use of four assay plates, B. stearothermophilus and SAM, B. subtilis and MM, M. luteus and MHA, and E. coli 27166 and MM, was superior to the currently available techniques for screening for residual antimicrobial agents in edible animal tissues. PMID:11252480

  10. Essential oils as natural food antimicrobial agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Vergis, Jess; Gokulakrishnan, P; Agarwal, R K; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Food-borne illnesses pose a real scourge in the present scenario as the consumerism of packaged food has increased to a great extend. Pathogens entering the packaged foods may survive longer, which needs a check. Antimicrobial agents either alone or in combination are added to the food or packaging materials for this purpose. Exploiting the antimicrobial property, essential oils are considered as a "natural" remedy to this problem other than its flavoring property instead of using synthetic agents. The essential oils are well known for its antibacterial, antiviral, antimycotic, antiparasitic, and antioxidant properties due to the presence of phenolic functional group. Gram-positive organisms are found more susceptible to the action of the essential oils. Essential oils improve the shelf-life of packaged products, control the microbial growth, and unriddle the consumer concerns regarding the use of chemical preservatives. This review is intended to provide an overview of the essential oils and their role as natural antimicrobial agents in the food industry. PMID:24915323

  11. Comparison of the Pharmacological and Antimicrobial Action of Commercial Plant Essential Oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Lis-Balchin; S. Hart; S. G. Deans; E. Eaglesham

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacology and antimicrobial action of selected commercial, plant essential oils was studied to relate bioactivity with the chemical components. Spasmogenic action induced by oils on Guinea-pig ileum in vitro was related to a high terpene content, mainly the pinenes, ?-cymene, and limonene. Many of the essential oils that induced spasmogenic activity were also strong antibacterial agents. A correlation was

  12. Bacterial cell wall compounds as promising targets of antimicrobial agents I. Antimicrobial peptides and lipopolyamines

    PubMed Central

    de Tejada, Guillermo Martinez; Sánchez-Gómez, Susana; Kowalski, Ina; Kaconis, Yani; Andrä, Jörg; Schürholz, Tobias; Hornef, Mathias; Dupont, Aline; Garidel, Patrick; Gutsmann, Thomas; David, Sunil A.; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The first barrier that an antimicrobial agent must overcome when interacting with its target is the microbial cell wall. In the case of Gram-negative bacteria, additional to the cytoplasmic membrane and the peptidoglycan layer, an outer membrane (OM) is the outermost barrier. The OM has an asymmetric distribution of the lipids with phospholipids and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) located in the inner and outer leaflets, respectively. In contrast, Gram-positive bacteria lack OM and possess a much thicker peptidoglycan layer compared to their Gram-negative counterparts. An additional class of amphiphiles exist in Gram-positives, the lipoteichoic acids (LTA), which may represent important structural components. These long molecules cross-bridge the entire cell envelope with their lipid component inserting into the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane and the teichoic acid portion penetrating into the peptidoglycan layer. Furthermore, both classes of bacteria have other important amphiphiles, such as lipoproteins, whose importance has become evident only recently. It is not known yet whether any of these amphiphilic components are able to stimulate the immune system under physiological conditions as constituents of intact bacteria. However, all of them have a very high pro-inflammatory activity when released from the cell. Such a release may take place through the interaction with the immune system, or with antibiotics (particularly with those targeting cell wall components), or simply by the bacterial division. Therefore, a given antimicrobial agent must ideally have a double character, namely, it must overcome the bacterial cell wall barrier, without inducing the liberation of the pro-inflammatory amphiphiles. Here, new data are presented which describe the development and use of membrane-active antimicrobial agents, in particular antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lipopolyamines. In this way, essential progress was achieved, in particular with respect to the inhibition of deleterious consequences of bacterial infections such as severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:22664072

  13. Essential oils and their principal constituents as antimicrobial agents for synthetic packaging films.

    PubMed

    Kuorwel, Kuorwel K; Cran, Marlene J; Sonneveld, Kees; Miltz, Joseph; Bigger, Stephen W

    2011-01-01

    Spices and herbal plant species have been recognized to possess a broad spectrum of active constituents that exhibit antimicrobial (AM) activity. These active compounds are produced as secondary metabolites associated with the volatile essential oil (EO) fraction of these plants. A wide range of AM agents derived from EOs have the potential to be used in AM packaging systems which is one of the promising forms of active packaging systems aimed at protecting food products from microbial contamination. Many studies have evaluated the AM activity of synthetic AM and/or natural AM agents incorporated into packaging materials and have demonstrated effective AM activity by controlling the growth of microorganisms. This review examines the more common synthetic and natural AM agents incorporated into or coated onto synthetic packaging films for AM packaging applications. The focus is on the widely studied herb varieties including basil, oregano, and thyme and their EOs. PMID:22416718

  14. Antimicrobial activity of some ethnomedicinal plants used by Paliyar tribe from Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Ayyanar, Muniappan; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2006-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial activity of 18 ethnomedicinal plant extracts were evaluated against nine bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ervinia sp, Proteus vulgaris) and one fungal strain (Candida albicans). The collected ethnomedicinal plants were used in folk medicine in the treatment of skin diseases, venereal diseases, respiratory problems and nervous disorders. Methods Plants were collected from Palni hills of Southern Western Ghats and the ethnobotanical data were gathered from traditional healers who inhabit the study area. The hexane and methanol extracts were obtained by cold percolation method and the antimicrobial activity was found using paper disc diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India. Results The results indicated that out of 18 plants, 10 plants exhibited antimicrobial activity against one or more of the tested microorganisms at three different concentrations of 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/disc. Among the plants tested, Acalypha fruticosa, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Toddalia asiatica,Cassia auriculata, Punica granatum and Syzygium lineare were most active. The highest antifungal activity was exhibited by methanol extract of Peltophorum pterocarpum and Punica granatum against Candida albicans. Conclusion This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the some ethnomedicinal plants used in folkloric medicine. Compared to hexane extract, methanol extract showed significant activity against tested organisms. This study also showed that Toddalia asiatica, Syzygium lineare, Acalypha fruticosa and Peltophorum pterocarpum could be potential sources of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:17042964

  15. Evaluation of dalbavancin in combination with nine antimicrobial agents to detect enhanced or antagonistic interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Johnson; Thomas R. Fritsche; Helio S. Sader; Ronald N. Jones

    2006-01-01

    Dalbavancin is a potent, once-weekly administered lipoglycopeptide that is active against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive species. Synergy studies were performed with dalbavancin and each of nine antimicrobial agents (90 tests in total) representing nine antimicrobial classes using the broth microdilution checkerboard method to establish in vitro interactive categories. Antagonism was not observed between dalbavancin and any of the antimicrobials

  16. Prescription of antimicrobial agents to elderly people in relation to the type of infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TIINA LEISTEVUO; RAIMO ISOAHO; TIMO KLAUKKA; SIRKKA-LIISA KIVELÄ; PENTTI HUOVINEN

    1997-01-01

    Objective: to describe how frequently antimicrobial agents are prescribed for elderly people and to examine the prescribing practice of treating physicians. Design: for each of the 1196 subjects examined, a review of the medical records was carried out for the year preceding the examination and data on antimicrobial prescriptions, including types of infections, were recorded. The sales statistics of antimicrobial

  17. Peptidomimetics as a new generation of antimicrobial agents: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing public health concern around the world. Rapid increase in the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has been the target of extensive research efforts to develop a novel class of antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small cationic amphiphilic peptides, which play an important role in the defense against bacterial infections through disruption of their membranes. They have been regarded as a potential source of future antibiotics, owing to a remarkable set of advantageous properties such as broad-spectrum activity, and they do not readily induce drug-resistance. However, AMPs have some intrinsic drawbacks, such as susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, toxicity, and high production cost. Currently, a new class of AMPs termed “peptidomimetics” have been developed, which can mimic the bactericidal mechanism of AMPs, while being stable to enzymatic degradation and displaying potent activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria. This review will focus on current findings of antimicrobial peptidomimetics. The potential future directions in the development of more potent analogs of peptidomimetics as a new generation of antimicrobial agents are also presented. PMID:25210467

  18. Native Brazilian plants against nosocomial infections: a critical review on their potential and the antimicrobial methodology.

    PubMed

    H Moreno, Paulo Roberto; da Costa-Issa, Fabiana Inácio; Rajca-Ferreira, Agnieszka K; Pereira, Marcos A A; Kaneko, Telma M

    2013-01-01

    The growing incidences of drug-resistant pathogens have increased the attention on several medicinal plants and their metabolites for antimicrobial properties. These pathogens are the main cause of nosocomial infections which led to an increasing mortality among hospitalized patients. Taking into consideration those factors, this paper reviews the state-of-the-art of the research on antibacterial agents from native Brazilian plant species related to nosocomial infections as well as the current methods used in the investigations of the antimicrobial activity and points out the differences in techniques employed by the authors. The antimicrobial assays most frequently used were broth microdilution, agar diffusion, agar dilution and bioautography. The broth microdilution method should be the method of choice for testing new antimicrobial agents from plant extracts or isolated compounds due to its advantages. At the moment, only a small part of the rich Brazilian flora has been investigated for antimicrobial activity, mostly with unfractionated extracts presenting a weak or moderate antibacterial activity. The combination of crude extract with conventional antibiotics represents a largely unexploited new form of chemotherapy with novel and multiple mechanisms of action that can overcome microbial resistance that needs to be further investigated. The antibacterial activity of essential oil vapours might also be an interesting alternative treatment of hospital environment due to their ability in preventing biofilm formation. However, in both alternatives more studies should be done on their mode of action and toxicological effects in order to optimize their use. PMID:24200361

  19. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents, alone and in combinations, against Burkholderia cepacia isolated from blood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel C.-T. Lu; Shan-Chwen Chang; Yee-Chun Chen; Kwen-Tay Luh; Wei-Chuan Hsieh

    1997-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a widespread, environmental gram-negative bacillus that is associated with nosocomial infections. This bacterium is considered to be an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients and is inherently resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. To compare the activity of different antimicrobial agents and the potential of combinations against invasive strains of B. cepacia, we collected 36 isolates of B. cepacia

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Seven Essential Oils From Iranian Aromatic Plants Against Common Causes of Oral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Ghadiri, Pooria; Saharkhiz, Mohammad Jamal; Moein, Mohammad Reza; Mehriar, Peiman; Bahrani, Farideh; Golzar, Tahereh; Pakshir, Keyvan; Fani, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the past two decades, there has been a growing trend in using oral hygienic products originating from natural resources such as essential oils (EOs) and plant extracts. Seven aromatic plants used in this study are among popular traditional Iranian medicinal plants with potential application in modern medicine as anti-oral infectious diseases. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of essential oils from seven medicinal plants against pathogens causing oral infections. Materials and Methods: The chemical compositions of EOs distilled from seven plants were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These plants included Satureja khuzestanica, S. bachtiarica, Ocimum sanctum, Artemisia sieberi, Zataria multiflora, Carum copticum and Oliveria decumbens. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was evaluated by broth micro-dilution in 96 well plates as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. Results: The tested EOs inhibited the growth of examined oral pathogens at concentrations of 0.015-16 µL/mL. Among the examined oral pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis had the highest Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) and Minimum Microbicidal Concentrations (MMCs). Of the examined EOs, S. khuzestanica, Z. multiflora and S. bachtiarica, showed the highest antimicrobial activities, respectively, while Artemisia sieberi exhibited the lowest antimicrobial activity. Conclusions: The excellent antimicrobial activities of the tested EOs might be due to their major phenolic or alcoholic monoterpenes with known antimicrobial activities. Hence, these EOs can be possibly used as an antimicrobial agent in treatment and control of oral pathogens. PMID:25793100

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants Against Enterococcus

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Antimicrobial Activity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants Against Enterococcus faecalis By Daniel The knowledge of medicinal plant use by indigenous populations constitutes the most understudied medical the medicinal plants for antibiotic properties. The groups focused on were the Shipibo Indians of the Peruvian

  2. Salicylanilide ester prodrugs as potential antimicrobial agents--a review.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Vinsová, Jarmila

    2011-01-01

    Salicylanilides have been a subject of interest in medicinal chemistry as a group with a wide range of biological activities. The antibacterial (including antimycobacterial) and antifungal activities have come to be viewed as very significant. The synthesis of new prodrugs to counter a number of problematic properties of salicylanilides is a current trend. This article brings together the known basic facts about these prodrugs, particularly about the different mechanisms of the antimicrobial action of salicylanilides, including salicylanilide toxicity and undesired effects. The largest part of this group consists of antimicrobial salicylanilide esters with different organic acids, e.g. acetates, carbamates, esters with N-protected amino acids, and mutual antibacterial compounds with known antibacterial agents (?-lactames and linezolid), with the activity and structure-activity relationships of these compounds being of particular interest. This review summarizes the activity of salicylanilides as potential virulence inhibitors attributable to a blockade of the type III secretion pathway. Many salicylanilide ester derivatives have been demonstrated an effective and promising treatment against pathogenic fungi and bacteria (especially against Gram-positive, tuberculous and atypical mycobacterial strains), including strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and isoniazid-resistant mycobacteria which are resistant to one or more clinically used drugs. PMID:22074422

  3. Novel Zinc(II) Complexes of Heterocyclic Ligands as Antimicrobial Agents: Synthesis, Characterisation, and Antimicrobial Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yamgar, Ramesh S.; Nivid, Y.; Nalawade, Satish; Mandewale, Mustapha; Atram, R. G.; Sawant, Sudhir S.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and antimicrobial activity of novel Zn(II) metal complexes derived from three novel heterocyclic Schiff base ligands 8-[(Z)-{[3-(N-methylamino)propyl]imino}methyl]-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-2H-chromen-2-one, 2-[(E)-{[4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)phenyl]imino}methyl]phenol, and (4S)-4-{4-[(E)-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino]benzyl}-1,3-oxazolidin-2-one have been described. These Schiff base ligands and metal complexes are characterised by spectroscopic techniques. According to these data, we propose an octahedral geometry to all the metal complexes. Antimicrobial activity of the Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes was studied against Gram negative bacteria: E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens, Gram positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, and also against fungi, that is, C. albicans and A. niger. Some of the metal complexes show significant antifungal activity (MIC < 0.2??g/mL). The “in vitro” data has identified [Zn(NMAPIMHMC)2]·2H2O, [Zn(TMPIMP)2]·2H2O, and [Zn(HBABO)2]·2H2O as potential therapeutic antifungal agents against C. albicans and A. niger. PMID:24707242

  4. Novel Zinc(II) Complexes of Heterocyclic Ligands as Antimicrobial Agents: Synthesis, Characterisation, and Antimicrobial Studies.

    PubMed

    Yamgar, Ramesh S; Nivid, Y; Nalawade, Satish; Mandewale, Mustapha; Atram, R G; Sawant, Sudhir S

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and antimicrobial activity of novel Zn(II) metal complexes derived from three novel heterocyclic Schiff base ligands 8-[(Z)-{[3-(N-methylamino)propyl]imino}methyl]-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-2H-chromen-2-one, 2-[(E)-{[4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)phenyl]imino}methyl]phenol, and (4S)-4-{4-[(E)-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino]benzyl}-1,3-oxazolidin-2-one have been described. These Schiff base ligands and metal complexes are characterised by spectroscopic techniques. According to these data, we propose an octahedral geometry to all the metal complexes. Antimicrobial activity of the Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes was studied against Gram negative bacteria: E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens, Gram positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, and also against fungi, that is, C. albicans and A. niger. Some of the metal complexes show significant antifungal activity (MIC < 0.2? ? g/mL). The "in vitro" data has identified [Zn(NMAPIMHMC)2]·2H2O, [Zn(TMPIMP)2]·2H2O, and [Zn(HBABO)2]·2H2O as potential therapeutic antifungal agents against C. albicans and A. niger. PMID:24707242

  5. Use of antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine and food animal production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Schwarz; C. Kehrenberg; T. R. Walsh

    2001-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing area of concern in both human and veterinary medicine. This review presents an overview of the use of antimicrobial agents in animals for therapeutic, metaphylactic, prophylactic and growth promotion purposes. In addition, factors favouring resistance development and transfer of resistance genes between different bacteria, as well as transfer of resistant bacteria between different hosts, are

  6. A Minimalist Design Approach to Antimicrobial Agents Based on a Thionin Template

    E-print Network

    Pompeu Fabra, Universitat

    A Minimalist Design Approach to Antimicrobial Agents Based on a Thionin Template Miquel Vila-hydrocarbon,3,14 or disulfide bonds.15,16 In this paper we describe how potent antimicrobial drug candidates) as potential sources of anti-infective drug leads17,18 is driven by the fact that emergence of resistance

  7. Association between the consumption of antimicrobial agents in animal husbandry and the occurrence of resistant bacteria among food animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Mřller Aarestrup

    1999-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are used in food animals for therapy and prophylaxis of bacterial infections and in feed to promote growth. The use of antimicrobial agents for food animals may cause problems in the therapy of infections by selecting for resistance among bacteria pathogenic for animals or humans. The emergence of resistant bacteria and resistance genes following the use of antimicrobial

  8. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources. PMID:25774105

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Corynebacterium species and other non-spore-forming gram-positive bacilli to 18 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, F; Zapardiel, J; Nieto, E

    1995-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 265 strains of Corynebacterium species and other non-spore-forming gram-positive bacilli to 18 antimicrobial agents were tested. Most strains were susceptible to vancomycin, doxycycline, and fusidic acid. Corynebacterium jeikeium and Corynebacterium urealyticum were the most resistant organisms tested. Resistance to beta-lactams, clindamycin, erythromycin, azythromycin, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was common among strains of Corynebacterium xerosis and Corynebacterium minutissimum. Ampicillin resistance among Listeria monocytogenes was more prevalent than previously reported. Optochin, fosfomycin, and nitrofurantoin showed very little activity against most organisms tested, but the use of nitrofurantoin as a selective agent in culture medium may prevent the recovery of some isolates. Except for the unvarying activity of vancomycin against Corynebacterium species, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of the latter to other antibiotics are usually unpredictable, such that susceptibility tests are necessary for selecting the best antimicrobial treatment. PMID:7695308

  10. Lauryl-poly-L-lysine: A New Antimicrobial Agent?

    PubMed Central

    Thuault, Véronique; Mangas, Arturo; Thienpont, Anne; Geffard, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The development of multiple antibiotic resistance is a global problem. It is necessary to find new tools whose mechanisms of action differ from those of currently used antibiotics. It is known that fatty acids and cationic polypeptides are able to fight bacteria. Here, we describe the synthesis of fatty acids linked to a polypeptide with antibacterial activity. The linkage of fatty acids to a polypeptide is reported to increase the antibacterial effect of the linked fatty acid in comparison with free fatty acids (FA) or free poly-L-lysine (PLL) or a mixture of both (FA free + PLL free). A number of C6–C18 fatty acids were linked to PLL to obtain new synthetic products. These compounds were assessed in vitro to evaluate their antibacterial activity. Some fatty acid-PLLs showed a good ability to fight bacteria. Their bactericidal activity was evaluated, and, lauryl linked to PLL was found to be the most active product against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This new active component showed a good degree of specificity and reproducibility and its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was comparatively good. The antibacterial activity of the lauryl-PLL compound suggests that it is a new and promising antimicrobial agent. PMID:24660058

  11. Evidence of an Association Between Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Food Animals and Antimicrobial Resistance Among Bacteria Isolated from Humans and the Human Health Consequences of Such Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. J. Angulo; V. N. Nargund; T. C. Chiller

    2004-01-01

    Summary Several lines of evidence indicate that the use of anti- microbial agents in food animals is associated with anti- microbial resistance among bacteria isolated from humans. The use of anti-microbial agents in food animals is most clearly associated with anti-microbial resistance among Sal- monella and Campylobacter isolated from humans, but also appears likely among enterococci, Escherichia coli and other

  12. Antimicrobial and phytochemical studies on 45 Indian medicinal plants against multi-drug resistant human pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iqbal Ahmad; Arina Z. Beg

    2001-01-01

    Ethanolic extracts of 45 Indian medicinal plants traditionally used in medicine were studied for their antimicrobial activity against certain drug-resistant bacteria and a yeast Candida albicans of clinical origin. Of these, 40 plant extracts showed varied levels of antimicrobial activity against one or more test bacteria. Anticandidal activity was detected in 24 plant extracts. Overall, broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity was observed

  13. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amal G. Al-Bakri; Fatma U. Afifi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of indigenous Jordanian plant extracts, dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide, using the rapid XTT assay and viable count methods. XTT rapid assay was used for the initial screening of antimicrobial activity for the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity of potentially active plant extracts was further assessed using the “viable plate

  14. Antimicrobial effects of Thai medicinal plants against acne-inducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej; Surassmo, Suvimol; Nukoolkarn, Veena S; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2005-10-01

    Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis have been recognized as pus-forming bacteria triggering an inflammation in acne. The present study was conducted to evaluate antimicrobial activities of Thai medicinal plants against these etiologic agents of acne vulgaris. Crude extracts were tested for antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. The results from the disc diffusion method showed that 13 medicinal plants could inhibit the growth of Propionibacterium acnes. Among those, Senna alata, Eupatorium odoratum, Garcinia mangostana, and Barleria lupulina had strong inhibitory effects. Based on a broth dilution method, the Garcinia mangostana extract had the greatest antimicrobial effect. The MIC values were the same (0.039 mg/ml) for both bacterial species and the MBC values were 0.039 and 0.156 mg/ml against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis, respectively. In bioautography assay, the Garcinia mangostana extract produced strong inhibition zones against Propionibacterium acnes. Antimicrobial activity from fractions of column chromatography revealed one of the active compounds in Garcinia mangostana could be mangostin, a xanthone derivative. Taken together, our data indicated that Garcinia mangostana had a strong inhibitory effect on Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Therefore, this plant would be an interesting topic for further study and possibly for an alternative treatment for acne. PMID:16009519

  15. Screening of some Cuban medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Martínez; J. Betancourt; N. Alonso-González; A. Jauregui

    1996-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of 23 extracts of 12 Cuban plant species reported in traditional medicine were tested. The agar diffusion method was used to assess the activity against four bacteria and one yeast: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The results, evaluated as the diameter of the inhibition zone of microbial growth, showed that nine

  16. Comparative in vitro activity of norfloxacin (MK-0366) and ten other oral antimicrobial agents against urinary bacterial isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M Y; Gruninger, R P; Nelson, S M; Klicker, R E

    1982-01-01

    The in vitro activity of a new oral antimicrobial agent, norfloxacin (MK-0366), was compared with those of nalidixic acid, nitrofurantoin, co-trimoxazole, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, cinoxacin, tetracycline, ampicillin, carbenicillin, and cephalexin against 628 urinary bacterial isolates. Norfloxacin was the most active antimicrobial agent tested against the gram-negative bacilli. It was less active than a few of the other antimicrobial agents against enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:6213200

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Compounds in Plant Extracts against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D.; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M.; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A.; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M. M.; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y.

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:23630600

  18. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M M; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:23630600

  19. Bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents used in fish farming: A critical evaluation of method and meaning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Smith; Maura Hiney; Ole Samuelsen

    1994-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents in aquaculture has resulted in the increase in the frequency of strains resistant to these agents. Potentially these resistant strains can have an impact on the therapy of fish diseases, the therapy of human diseases or the environment of the fish farms. The analysis of the extent of these impacts is hindered by the limited

  20. Antimicrobial activity of certain Indian medicinal plants used in folkloric medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Srinivasan; Sangeetha Nathan; T. Suresh; P. Lakshmana Perumalsamy

    2001-01-01

    Fifty medicinal plants belonging to 26 families were studied for their antimicrobial activity. Among 50 plants tested, 72% showed antimicrobial activity. About 22 plant extracts from 15 families exhibited activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fourteen plants belonging to 11 families did not show activity against any of the bacteria tested. Only nine plant extracts showed antifungal activity. The

  1. EDTA: An Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Agent for Use in Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, Simon; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Methods employed for preventing and eliminating biofilms are limited in their efficacy on mature biofilms. Despite this a number of antibiofilm formulations and technologies incorporating ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) have demonstrated efficacy on in vitro biofilms. The aim of this article is to critically review EDTA, in particular tetrasodium EDTA (tEDTA), as a potential antimicrobial and antibiofilm agent, in its own right, for use in skin and wound care. EDTA's synergism with other antimicrobials and surfactants will also be discussed. Recent Advances: The use of EDTA as a potentiating and sensitizing agent is not a new concept. However, currently the application of EDTA, specifically tEDTA as a stand-alone antimicrobial and antibiofilm agent, and its synergistic combination with other antimicrobials to make a “multi-pronged” approach to biofilm control is being explored. Critical Issues: As pathogenic biofilms in the wound increase infection risk, tEDTA could be considered as a potential “stand-alone” antimicrobial/antibiofilm agent or in combination with other antimicrobials, for use in both the prevention and treatment of biofilms found within abiotic (the wound dressing) and biotic (wound bed) environments. The ability of EDTA to chelate and potentiate the cell walls of bacteria and destabilize biofilms by sequestering calcium, magnesium, zinc, and iron makes it a suitable agent for use in the management of biofilms. Future Direction: tEDTA's excellent inherent antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity and proven synergistic and permeating ability results in a very beneficial agent, which could be used for the development of future antibiofilm technologies.

  2. Environmental fate of two sulfonamide antimicrobial agents in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary antimicrobials have been detected in a number of environmental samples, including agricultural soils. In this study, the persistence and sorption of the sulfonamide sulfamethazine (SMZ) and sulfachloropyridine (SCP) in soil and their potential effects on soil microorganisms were investiga...

  3. In Vitro Susceptibility of Equine-Obtained Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to Gallium Maltolate and 20 Other Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Batista, M.; Lawhon, S. D.; Zhang, S.; Kuskie, K. R.; Swinford, A. K.; Bernstein, L. R.; Cohen, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of gallium maltolate (GaM) and 20 other antimicrobial agents against clinical equine isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The growth of cultured isolates was not inhibited by any concentration of GaM. MIC data revealed susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials. PMID:24829243

  4. Intravascular catheters impregnated with antimicrobial agents: a milestone in the prevention of bloodstream infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Issam Raad; Hend Hanna

    1999-01-01

    Vascular catheters impregnated with antimicrobial agents have been shown to decrease the risk of catheter-related colonization\\u000a and bloodstream infections. Various antimicrobials and antiseptics have been used. In a recent meta-analysis of 12 studies,\\u000a catheters coated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine (CH\\/SS) were shown to be significantly less likely to be associated\\u000a with catheter-related bloodstream infections than uncoated catheters. However, these

  5. Effect of varying pH on the susceptibility of Campylobacter pylori to antimicrobial agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Grayson; G. M. Eliopoulos; M. J. Ferraro; R. C. Moellering

    1989-01-01

    The susceptibility of 22 clinical isolates ofCampylobacter pylori to eight antimicrobial agents was studied under varying pH conditions. Macrolides (erythromycin, dirythromycin), clindamycin and to a lesser extent quinolones lost efficacy at lowered pH. The activity of ampicillin and metronidazole remained relatively stable throughout the pH range tested. The effect of pH an antimicrobial efficacy may warrant consideration when selecting an

  6. Impact of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the normal intestinal microflora after administration of two antimicrobial agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Lidbeck; C. Edlund; J. Ĺ. Gustafsson; L. Kager; C. E. Nora

    1988-01-01

    Summary Twenty healthy volunteers participated in a comparative study concerning the influence ofLactobacillus acidophilus supplements on the normal intestinal microflora after the administration of two antimicrobial agents, enoxacin and clindamycin, respectively.L. acidophilus NCFB 1748 was given as a fermented milk product containing 5 × 108-2 × 109 CFU\\/ml to ten of the volunteers immediately after the administration of the antimicrobial

  7. Evaluation of dalbavancin in combination with nine antimicrobial agents to detect enhanced or antagonistic interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David M; Fritsche, Thomas R; Sader, Helio S; Jones, Ronald N

    2006-06-01

    Dalbavancin is a potent, once-weekly administered lipoglycopeptide that is active against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive species. Synergy studies were performed with dalbavancin and each of nine antimicrobial agents (90 tests in total) representing nine antimicrobial classes using the broth microdilution checkerboard method to establish in vitro interactive categories. Antagonism was not observed between dalbavancin and any of the antimicrobials tested. However, dalbavancin was synergistic or partially synergistic with oxacillin for staphylococci, including methicillin-resistant strains, vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci, a significant finding that warrants further investigation to establish its potential clinical relevance. PMID:16698238

  8. Collagen Patches Impregnated with Antimicrobial Agents Have High Local Antimicrobial Efficacy and Achieve Effective Tissue Gluing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Baar; C. Schörner; M. Röllinghoff; M. Radespiel-Tröger; H. P. Hümmer; R. T. Carbon

    2001-01-01

    Background: Local antimicrobial systems have gained importance, as illustrated by current, research on drug delivery systems (DDS). We\\u000a aimed to develop materials that combine hemostatic and antimicrobial efficacy as well as adhesiveness for use in surgical\\u000a tissue management.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods: Materials were evaluated by in vitro studies employing microbiological and technological methods.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results: Antimicrobial impregnation of a collagen fleece,

  9. Evaluation of three medicinal plants for anti-microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Gowd M J S; Manoj, Kumar M G; Sai, Shankar A J; Sujatha, B; Sreedevi, E

    2012-07-01

    Herbal remedies have a long history of use for gum and tooth problems such as dental caries. The present microbiological study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of three medicinal plants (Terminalia chebula Retz., Clitoria ternatea Linn., and Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck.) Merr.) on three pathogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Staphylococcus aureus). Aqueous extract concentrations (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%) were prepared from the fruits of Terminalia chebula, flowers of Clitoria ternatea, and leaves of Wedelia chinensis. The antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extract concentrations of each plant was tested using agar well diffusion method and the size of the inhibition zone was measured in millimeters. The results obtained showed that the diameter of zone of inhibition increased with increase in concentration of extract and the antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extracts of the three plants was observed in the increasing order - Wedelia chinensis < Clitoria ternatea < Terminalia chebula. It can be concluded that the tested extracts of all the three plants were effective against dental caries causing bacteria. PMID:23723653

  10. Evaluation of three medicinal plants for anti-microbial activity

    PubMed Central

    Pratap, Gowd M. J. S; Manoj, Kumar M. G.; Sai, Shankar A. J.; Sujatha, B.; Sreedevi, E.

    2012-01-01

    Herbal remedies have a long history of use for gum and tooth problems such as dental caries. The present microbiological study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of three medicinal plants (Terminalia chebula Retz., Clitoria ternatea Linn., and Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck.) Merr.) on three pathogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Staphylococcus aureus). Aqueous extract concentrations (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%) were prepared from the fruits of Terminalia chebula, flowers of Clitoria ternatea, and leaves of Wedelia chinensis. The antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extract concentrations of each plant was tested using agar well diffusion method and the size of the inhibition zone was measured in millimeters. The results obtained showed that the diameter of zone of inhibition increased with increase in concentration of extract and the antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extracts of the three plants was observed in the increasing order – Wedelia chinensis < Clitoria ternatea < Terminalia chebula. It can be concluded that the tested extracts of all the three plants were effective against dental caries causing bacteria. PMID:23723653

  11. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of selected antimicrobial compounds against Flavobacterium psychrophilum the causal agent of rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Rangdale; R. H. Richards; D. J. Alderman

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 48 isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causal agent of rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS), to the major fish farming antimicrobial agents and to a selection of other antimicrobials were assessed using a broth microdilution method. These data were used along with previous published antibiograms for F. psychrophilum, drug serum and tissue levels and reports clinical

  12. Antimicrobial Activities of Three Medicinal Plants and Investigation of Flavonoids of Tripleurospermum disciforme.

    PubMed

    Tofighi, Zahra; Molazem, Maryam; Doostdar, Behnaz; Taban, Parisa; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Samadi, Nasrin; Yassa, Narguess

    2015-01-01

    Rosa damascena, Tripleurospermum disciforme and Securigera securidaca were used as disinfectant agents and for treatment of some disease in folk medicine of Iran. The antimicrobial effects of different fractions of seeds extract of S. securidaca, petals extract of R. damascena and aerial parts extract of T. disciforme were examined against some gram positive, gram negative and fungi by cup plate diffusion method. The petroleum ether and chloroform fractions of S. securidaca showed antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while its methanol fraction had no antibacterial effects. R. damascena petals extract demonstrated antibacterial activities against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. T. disciforme aerial parts extract exhibited antimicrobial effects only against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. None of the fractions had any antifungal activities. Therefore, present study confirmed utility of these plants as disinfectant agents. Six flavonoids were isolated from T. disciforme: Luteolin, Quercetin-7-O-glucoside, Kaempferol, Kaempferol-7-O-glucoside, Apigenin and Apigenin-7-O-glucoside. The flavonoids and the antimicrobial activity of T. disciforme are reported for the first time. PMID:25561928

  13. In vitro antimicrobial activity of mangrove plant Sonneratia alba

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Shahbudin; Taher, Muhammad; Susanti, Deny; Qaralleh, Haitham; Awang, Anis Fadhlina Izyani Bt

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antimicrobial property of mangrove plant Sonneratia alba (S. alba). Methods The antimicrobial activity was evaluated using disc diffusion and microdilution methods against six microorganisms. Soxhlet apparatus was used for extraction with a series of solvents, n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol in sequence of increasing polarity. Results Methanol extract appeared to be the most effective extract while n-hexane extract showed no activity. The antimicrobial activities were observed against the gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Bacillus cereus (B. cereus), the gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans appeared to be not sensitive to the concentrations tested since no inhibition zone was observed. E. coli (17.5 mm) appeared to be the most sensitive strain followed by S. aureus (12.5 mm) and B. cereus (12.5 mm). Conclusions From this study, it can be concluded that S. alba exhibits antimicrobial activities against certain microorganisms. PMID:23569943

  14. Plants belonging to the genus Thymus as antibacterial agents: from farm to pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Marchese, Anna; Izadi, Morteza; Curti, Valeria; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel

    2015-04-15

    In traditional medicine, plants have been used since ancient times for the prevention and/or protection against infectious diseases. In recent years, the use of herbal medicines and food supplements containing botanical ingredients, as alternative therapy for infectious diseases, has been intensified due to their high content of antimicrobial agents such as polyphenols, i.e. flavonoids, tannins, and alkaloids. Plants from the genus Thymus are important medicinal herbs, which are known to contain antimicrobial agents, and are rich in different active substances such as thymol, carvacrol, p-cymene and terpinene. In this review, we summarise the available literature data about the in vitro antibacterial effects of the main plants belonging to the genus Thymus. We also provide information about cultivation, chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from these plants, and their use for medicinal purposes. PMID:25466031

  15. Susceptibility of Bifidobacteria of Animal Origin to Selected Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Sigrid; Mair, Christiane; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J.

    2011-01-01

    Strains of the genus Bifidobacterium are frequently used as probiotics, for which the absence of acquired antimicrobial resistance has become an important safety criterion. This clarifies the need for antibiotic susceptibility data for bifidobacteria. Based on a recently published standard for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bifidobacteria with broth microdilution method, the range of susceptibility to selected antibiotics in 117 animal bifidobacterial strains was examined. Narrow unimodal MIC distributions either situated at the low-end (chloramphenicol, linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin) or high-end (kanamycin, neomycin) concentration range could be detected. In contrast, the MIC distribution of trimethoprim was multimodal. Data derived from this study can be used as a basis for reviewing or verifying present microbiological breakpoints suggested by regulatory agencies to assess the safety of these micro-organisms intended for the use in probiotics. PMID:22312561

  16. Synthesis of ?-ionone derived chalcones as potent antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Singh, Gurpreet; Kaur, Harpreet; Saxena, Ajit K; Ishar, Mohan Paul S

    2012-10-15

    A series of chalcones (3a-v) have been synthesized by condensation of ?-ionone (1) with a variety of aldehydes (2a-v). The synthesized compounds have been screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against five bacterial and five fungal strains, using disc diffusion assay. The evaluated compounds display a wide range of activities, from completely inactive to the highly active compounds. Some of the compounds are also active against methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). PMID:22999415

  17. In vitro activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against bacteria isolated from cows with clinical mastitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Guérin-Faublée; G. Carret; P. Houffschmitt

    2003-01-01

    The susceptibility of 495 strains of bacteria, recently isolated in France from cows with clinical mastitis, to 10 antimicrobial agents - penicillin G, cloxacillin, oxacillin, cephalexin, cefazolin, cephapirin, cefquinome, neomycin, ampicillin and colistin - was determined by measuring their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Overall, the levels of resistance were very low except for staphylococci and penicillin G. The 167 streptococcal

  18. Inactivation of staphylococcal virulence factors using a light-activated antimicrobial agent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Tubby; Michael Wilson; Sean P Nair

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the limitations of antibiotic therapy is that even after successful killing of the infecting microorganism, virulence factors may still be present and cause significant damage to the host. Light-activated antimicrobials show potential for the treatment of topical infections; therefore if these agents can also inactivate microbial virulence factors, this would represent an advantage over conventional antibiotic therapy.

  19. Exploring the potential of magnetic antimicrobial agents for water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Pina, Ana S; Batalha, Iris L; Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Aoki, Matheus A; Roque, Ana C A

    2014-12-01

    Industrial and urban activities yield large amounts of contaminated groundwater, which present a major health issue worldwide. Infectious diseases are the most common health risk associated with drinking-water and wastewater remediation is a major concern of our modern society. The field of wastewater treatment is being revolutionized by new nano-scale water disinfection devices which outperform most currently available technologies. In particular, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been widely used in environmental applications due to their unique physical-chemical properties. In this work, poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG)-coated MNPs have been functionalized with (RW)3, an antimicrobial peptide, to yield a novel magnetic-responsive support with antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli K-12 DSM498 and Bacillus subtilis 168. The magnetic-responsive antimicrobial device showed to be able to successfully disinfect the surrounding solution. Using a rapid high-throughput screening platform, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined to be 500 ?M for both strains with a visible bactericidal effect. PMID:25201339

  20. Antimicrobial activity of selected South African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nearly 3,000 plant species are used as medicines in South Africa, with approximately 350 species forming the most commonly traded and used medicinal plants. In the present study, twelve South African medicinal plants were selected and tested for their antimicrobial activities against eight microbial species belonging to fungi, Mycobacteria, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods The radiometric respiratory technique using the BACTEC 460 system was used for susceptibility testing against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for other antimicrobial assays. Results The results of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations indicated that the methanol extracts from Acacia karoo, Erythrophleum lasianthum and Salvia africana were able to prevent the growth of all the tested microorganisms. All other samples showed selective activities. MIC values below 100??g/ml were recorded with A. karoo, C. dentate, E. lasianthum, P. obligun and S. africana on at least one of the nine tested microorganisms. The best activity (MIC value of 39.06??g/ml) was noted with S. africana against E. coli, S. aureus and M. audouinii, and Knowltonia vesitoria against M. tuberculosis. Conclusion The overall results of the present work provide baseline information for the possible use of the studied South African plant extracts in the treatment of microbial infections. PMID:22704594

  1. Animals living in polluted environments are potential source of antimicrobials against infectious agents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Simon; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobials crisis is a ticking time bomb which could lead to millions of people dying from untreatable infections. With the worsening trends of antimicrobial resistance, we are heading towards a pre-antibiotic era. Thus, there is a need for newer and more powerful antibiotic agents. The search for new antibiotic compounds originating from natural resources is a promising research area. Animals living in germ-infested environments are a potent source of antimicrobials. Under polluted milieus, organisms such as cockroaches encounter different types of bacteria, including superbugs. Such creatures survive the onslaught of superbugs and are able to ward off disease by producing antimicrobial substances which show potent activity in the nervous system. We hope that the discovery of antimicrobial activity in the cockroach brain will stimulate research in finding antimicrobials from unusual sources, and has potential for the development of novel antibiotics. Nevertheless, intensive research in the next few years will be required to approach or realize these expectations. PMID:23265422

  2. Preliminary screening of some traditional zulu medicinal plants for anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Lin; A. R. Opoku; M. Geheeb-Keller; A. D. Hutchings; S. E. Terblanche; A. K. Jager; J. van Staden

    1999-01-01

    Aqueous and methanolic extracts from different parts of nine traditional Zulu medicinal plants, of the Vitaceae from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa were evaluated for therapeutic potential as anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial agents. Of the twenty-nine crude extracts assayed for prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors, only five methanolic extracts of Cyphostemma natalitium-root, Rhoicissus digitata-leaf, R. rhomboidea-root, R. tomentosa-leaf\\/stem and R. tridentata-root showed significant inhibition of

  3. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents. PMID:24454817

  4. Metabolic Network Analysis-Based Identification of Antimicrobial Drug Targets in Category A Bioterrorism Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents. PMID:24454817

  5. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration.

    PubMed

    Al-Bakri, Amal G; Afifi, Fatma U

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of indigenous Jordanian plant extracts, dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide, using the rapid XTT assay and viable count methods. XTT rapid assay was used for the initial screening of antimicrobial activity for the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity of potentially active plant extracts was further assessed using the "viable plate count" method. Four degrees of antimicrobial activity (high, moderate, weak and inactive) against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively, were recorded. The plant extracts of Hypericum triquetrifolium, Ballota undulata, Ruta chalepensis, Ononis natrix, Paronychia argentea and Marrubium vulgare had shown promising antimicrobial activity. This study showed that while both XTT and viable count methods are comparable when estimating the overall antimicrobial activity of experimental substances, there is no strong linear correlation between the two methods. PMID:16831479

  6. AApeptides as a new class of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Niu, Youhong; Wu, Haifan; Li, Yaqiong; Hu, Yaogang; Padhee, Shruti; Li, Qi; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2013-07-14

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing public health concern around the world, and is recognized as one of the greatest threats facing humankind in the 21(st) century. Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small cationic amphiphilic peptides found in virtually all living organisms, and play a key role in the defense against bacterial infections. Compared with conventional antibiotics, which target specific metabolic processes, AMPs are able to adopt globally amphipathic conformations, and kill bacteria through disruption of their membranes. As such, AMPs do not readily induce drug-resistance. However, AMPs are associated with intrinsic drawbacks such as low-to-moderate activity, susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, and inconvenience for optimization. Recently, we have developed a new class of peptidomimetics termed "AApeptides". Such peptide mimics are highly resistant to protease degradation and are straightforward for chemical diversification and development. Our current studies show that AApeptides with globally amphipathic structures can mimic the bactericidal mechanism of AMPs, and display potent and broad-spectrum activity against both Gram-positive and -negative multi-drug-resistant bacteria. In this review, we summarize our current findings of antimicrobial AApeptides, and discuss potential future directions on the development of more potent and specific analogues. PMID:23722277

  7. [Adverse ocular drug reactions of systemic antimicrobial agents].

    PubMed

    Huber, M; Stahlmann, R

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy can cause adverse ocular drug reactions. They are most often noticed by changes of the eyes' anterior segments or by pain and visual disturbances. It is important that physicians but also patients are watchful for the symptoms and know about their potential dangerous consequences because the chance for reversibility may depend on their early detection. During therapy with voriconazol about one third of patients complain of visual disturbances soon after the first doses but symptoms generally resolve after a short period of time without sequelae. Telithromycin may impair accommodation due to its anticholinergic activity. Neuropathies of the optic nerve may be caused by ethambutol, isoniazid, streptomycin, and linezolid. The first symptoms, such as disturbances in colour vision, typically occur with a latency of several weeks after start of therapy. This adverse effect may result in serious long term impairment of visual function. Toxic effects on the mitochondria in retinal ganglion cells are discussed as underlying mechanisms. Rifabutin and cidofovir may cause intraocular inflammatory reactions. In addition cidofovir may induce a pronounced reduction of the ocular pressure. Adverse drug reactions are often dose dependent and therefore influenced by impaired kidney or liver function, pharmacogenetics, or by drug-drug interactions. Potential serious drug induced ocular side effects require close cooperation with an ophthalmologist for evaluation of the individual risk benefit ratio, if possible, even before beginning of antimicrobial therapy. PMID:22241448

  8. Essential oils from aromatic herbs as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Solórzano-Santos, Fortino; Miranda-Novales, Maria Guadalupe

    2012-04-01

    Bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics is a health problem. Essential oils (EOs) possess antibacterial properties and have been screened as potential sources of novel antimicrobial compounds. Terpenes and terpenoids are components derived from EOs. Some of these EOs show inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Carvacrol has specific effects on S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Perilla oil suppresses expression of ?-toxin, Staphylococcus enterotoxin A and B and toxic shock syndrome toxin. Geraniol shows good activity in modulating drug resistance in several gram-negative species. EOs could act as biopreservatives, reducing or eliminating pathogenic bacteria and increasing the overall quality of animal and vegetable food products. Although clinical studies are scarce, the uses of EOs for topical administration and as penetration enhancers for antiseptics are promising. Little information exists for oral administration. PMID:21903378

  9. Inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents against Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hideaki; Inuzuka, Hiroko; Hori, Nobuhide; Takahashi, Nobumichi; Ishida, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Muraosa, Yasunori; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents against Fusarium spp. Seven Fusarium spp: four F. falciforme (Fusarium solani species complex), one Fusarium spp, one Fusarium spp. (Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex), and one F. napiforme (Gibberella fujikuroi species complex), isolated from eyes with fungal keratitis were used in this study. Their susceptibility to antibacterial agents: flomoxef, imipenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and Tobracin® (contained 3,000 ?g/ml of tobramycin and 25 ?g/ml of benzalkonium chloride (BAK), a biocidal agent: BAK, and antifungal agents: amphotericin B, pimaricin (natamycin), fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin, was determined by broth microdilution tests. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), 100% inhibitory concentration (IC100), and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the Fusarium isolates were determined. BAK had the highest activity against the Fusarium spp. except for the antifungal agents. Three fluoroquinolones and two aminoglycosides had inhibitory effects against the Fusarium spp. at relatively high concentrations. Tobracin® had a higher inhibitory effect against Fusarium spp. than tobramycin alone. Amphotericin B had the highest inhibitory effect against the Fusarium spp, although it had different degrees of activity against each isolate. Our findings showed that fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and BAK had some degree of inhibitory effect against the seven Fusarium isolates, although these agents had considerably lower effect than amphotericin B. However, the inhibitory effects of amphotericin B against the Fusarium spp. varied for the different isolates. Further studies for more effective medications against Fusarium, such as different combinations of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents are needed. PMID:25841054

  10. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, Cytotoxic Activities and Phytochemical Screening of Some Algerian Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Souâd Akroum; Dalila Satta; Korrichi Lalaoui

    The current study represents the investigation of 16 Algerian plants usually utilized. The methanolic and ethanolic extracts of these plants were tested for their antimicrobial activity (against three Gram-positive bacteria, three Gram-negative bacteria and three yeasts species), their antioxidant activity and cytotoxic activity. Then, a phytochemical screening was realized for the extracts. Our results showed that the highest antimicrobial activity

  11. Synergism between plant extract and antimicrobial drugs used on Staphylococcus aureus diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce Elaine Cristina Betoni; Rebeca Passarelli Mantovani; Lidiane Nunes Barbosa; Luiz Claudio Di Stasi; Ary Fernandes Junior

    2006-01-01

    Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent, and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the synergism between 13 antimicrobial drugs and 8 plant extracts - \\

  12. A Study of Utilization of Antimicrobial Agents in Patients on Ventilator in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital, India

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Anuradha M; Patel, Prakruti P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the use of antimicrobial agents in patients on ventilator in ICU. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted at tertiary care teaching hospital Ahmedabad, India. Total 300 patients admitted in ICU and prescribed antimicrobial agents were included in the study. The data were recorded in preformed Case Record Form (CRF) and were analysed by Z and x2 Test. Results: Patients were divided into group A (patients on ventilator support) and group B (patients without ventilator support). In all the patients antimicrobial agents were prescribed empirically and more than two antimicrobial agents were prescribed in both groups. It was observed that above 60% antimicrobial agents were prescribed according to WHO, National and State Essential Medicine List (EML). Restricted antimicrobial agents (according to antimicrobial policy of tertiary care teaching hospital) were prescribed significantly (p<0.05) higher in group A as compared to group B. Resistance to antimicrobial agents by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Kleibsella shown significantly (p<0.05) higher in group A as compared to group B. Change of antimicrobial therapy after Culture Sensitivity Test (CST) was significantly (p<0.05) higher in group A as compared to group B. Conclusion: Number of antimicrobial agents, antimicrobial resistance and change of antimicrobial therapy after CST were higher in patients on ventilator support. PMID:25584243

  13. Agricultural Application of Higher Plants for Their Antimicrobial Potentials in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes published research into Chinese medicinal and aromatic plants as sources of new crop protectants. Literature was reviewed based on our personal experience, reported antimicrobial activity against plant pathogens, novel chemical structures, and potential for agricultural utiliz...

  14. Peptidotriazoles with antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Güell, Imma; Micaló, Lluís; Cano, Laura; Badosa, Esther; Ferre, Rafael; Montesinos, Emilio; Bardají, Eduard; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta

    2012-01-01

    We designed and prepared peptidotriazoles based on the antimicrobial peptide BP100 (LysLysLeuPheLysLysIleLeuLysTyrLeu-NH(2)) by introducing a triazole ring in the peptide backbone or onto the side chain of a selected residue. These compounds were screened for their in vitro growth inhibition of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and for their cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells and tobacco leaves. Their proteolytic susceptibility was also analyzed. The antibacterial activity and the hemolysis were influenced by the amino acid that was modified with the triazole as well as by the absence of presence of a substituent in this heterocyclic ring. We identified sequences active against the bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (MIC of 1.6-12.5 ?M), and against the fungi Fusarium oxysporum (MIC<6.2-12.5 ?M) with low hemolytic activity (0-23% at 50 ?M), high stability to protease digestion and no phytotoxicity. These peptidotriazoles constitute good candidates to design new antimicrobial agents. PMID:22198367

  15. Antimicrobial and toxicological activities of five medicinal plant species from Cameroon Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases caused by multiresistant microbial strains are on the increase. Fighting these diseases with natural products may be more efficacious. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanolic, ethylacetate (EtOAc) and hexanic fractions of five Cameroonian medicinal plants (Piptadeniastum africana, Cissus aralioides, Hileria latifolia, Phyllanthus muellerianus and Gladiolus gregasius) against 10 pathogenic microorganisms of the urogenital and gastrointestinal tracts. Methods The fractions were screened for their chemical composition and in vivo acute toxicity was carried out on the most active extracts in order to assess their inhibitory selectivity. The agar well-diffusion and the micro dilution methods were used for the determination of the inhibition diameters (ID) and Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) respectively on 8 bacterial species including two Gram positive species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis), and six Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi) and two fungal isolates (Candida albicans, Candida krusei). The chemical composition was done according to Harbone (1976), the acute toxicity evaluation according to WHO protocol and the hepatic as well as serum parameters measured to assess liver and kidney functions. Results The chemical components of each plant's extract varied according to the solvent used, and they were found to contain alkaloids, flavonoids, polyphenols, triterpens, sterols, tannins, coumarins, glycosides, cardiac glycosides and reducing sugars. The methanolic and ethylacetate extracts of Phyllanthus muellerianus and Piptadeniastum africana presented the highest antimicrobial activities against all tested microorganisms with ID varying from 8 to 26 mm and MIC from 2.5 to 0.31 mg/ml. The in vivo acute toxicity study carried out on the methanolic extracts of Phyllanthus muellerianus and Piptadeniastrum africana indicated that these two plants were not toxic. At the dose of 4 g/kg body weight, kidney and liver function tests indicated that these two medicinal plants induced no adverse effect on these organs. Conclusion These results showed that, all these plant's extracts can be used as antimicrobial phytomedicines which can be therapeutically used against infections caused by multiresistant agents. Phyllanthus muellerianus, Piptadeniastum africana, antimicrobial, acute toxicity, kidney and liver function tests, Cameroon Traditional Medicine PMID:21867554

  16. Plant antimutagenic agents, 3. Coumarins.

    PubMed

    Wall, M E; Wani, M C; Manikumar, G; Hughes, T J; Taylor, H; McGivney, R; Warner, J

    1988-01-01

    Several coumarins were isolated from crude plant extracts by means of an antimutagenic assay procedure. These coumarins included psoralen from Psoralea corylifolia and imperatorin and osthol from Selinum monniere. Studies of structure-activity relationships of these and several other available coumarins were carried out with four mutagens. All of the coumarins were nontoxic and in particular showed high activity in the inhibition of the mutagenicity of benzo[a]pyrene. PMID:3069958

  17. The effect of antimicrobial agents and modified atmosphere packaging on the microbial shelf life of corn tortillas 

    E-print Network

    Tellez-Giron, Alfredo

    1988-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING ON THE MICROBIAL SHELF LIFE OF CORN TORTILLAS A Thesis by ALFREDO TELLEZ-GIRON, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology THE EFFECT OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING ON THE MICROBIAL SHELF LIFE OF CORN TORTILLAS A Thesis by ALFREDO TELLEZ...

  18. Functionalized alkyl and aryl diselenides as antimicrobial and antiviral agents: synthesis and properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Wójtowicz; M Chojnacka; J M?ochowski; J Palus; L Syper; D Hudecova; M Uher; E Piasecki; M Rybka

    2003-01-01

    The different dialkyl and diaryl diselenides with carbamoyl and sulfamoyl moieties 2, 3, 5 and other substituents in the ortho position of benzene ring 4, 7, 8 as well as derivatives of 1,2,4-benzoselenadiazine (6) were designed as antiviral and antimicrobial agents and synthesized. Some of them, particularly 8a and 8b, were found in the antiviral assay in vitro to be

  19. Inhibition of triazolam clearance by macrolide antimicrobial agents: In vitro correlates and dynamic consequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Greenblatt; Lisa L. von Moltke; Jerold S. Harmatz; Molly Counihan; Jennifer A. Graf; Anna Liza B. Durol; Polyxane Mertzanis; Su Xiang Duan; C. Eugene Wright; Richard I. Shader

    1998-01-01

    Background: Macrolide antimicrobial agents may impair hepatic clearance of drugs metabolized by cytochrome P4503A isoforms. Potential interactions of triazolam, a substrate metabolized almost entirely by cytochrome P4503A in humans, with 3 commonly prescribed macrolides were identified using an in vitro metabolic model. The actual interactions, and their pharmacodynamic consequences, were verified in a controlled clinical study.Methods: In an in vitro

  20. Inhibition of biofilm formation on silicone rubber samples using various antimicrobial agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Atarijabarzadeh; E. Strömberg; S. Karlsson

    2011-01-01

    High-temperature-cured silicone rubber samples (silicone rubber (SIR) based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)) and SIR samples containing three different antimicrobial agents, sodium benzoate (NaB), DCOIT (4,5 Dichloro-2-octyl-2H-isothiazolone-one) and p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) were inoculated with fungal spore suspensions and incubated for 28 days at 29±1°C and ?90% humidity, according to the ISO 846:1997(E) protocol. Prior to the biodegradation test, a powder test was

  1. Effect of ionizing energy on extracts of Quillaja saponaria to be used as an antimicrobial agent on irradiated edible coating for fresh strawberries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zúńiga, G. E.; Junqueira-Gonçalves, M. P.; Pizarro, M.; Contreras, R.; Tapia, A.; Silva, S.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating antimicrobial compounds into edible films or coatings provides a novel way to improve the safety and shelf life of ready-to-eat foods. Diverse studies with Quillaja saponaria Mol. (popularly named quillay) extracts have demonstrated their potential as antifungal agents against phytopathogenic fungi. Crosslinking induced by ionizing radiation is an effective method for the improvement of both barrier and mechanical properties of the edible films and coatings based on milk proteins. However there are few reports about the effects of ?-radiation on plant extracts. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 35 kGy) on extracts prepared from in vitro plants of Q. saponaria to be used as antimicrobial agent in irradiated edible coating based on calcium caseinate and whey protein isolated, and also to establish the concentration of Q. saponaria extract to be added as an antifungal agent in the coating. Gamma irradiation since 15 kGy affects negatively the antimicrobial activity and metabolites composition of extract of Q. saponaria by reducing compounds of phenolic nature. Otherwise no effect on saponins profile was observed even at higher doses. It was possible to conclude that the antifungal activity of Q. saponaria extract is mainly related to phenolic compounds content. In addition, our work also shows that to obtain an efficient antifungal protection is necessary to add a minimum concentration of 6% of the extract after the coating irradiation.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    1999-06-01

    The antimicrobial activity of plant oils and extracts has been recognized for many years. However, few investigations have compared large numbers of oils and extracts using methods that are directly comparable. In the present study, 52 plant oils and extracts were investigated for activity against Acinetobacter baumanii, Aeromonas veronii biogroup sobria, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia col, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium, Serratia marcescens and Staphylococcus aureus, using an agar dilution method. Lemongrass, oregano and bay inhibited all organisms at concentrations of < or = 2.0% (v/v). Six oils did not inhibit any organisms at the highest concentration, which was 2.0% (v/v) oil for apricot kernel, evening primrose, macadamia, pumpkin, sage and sweet almond. Variable activity was recorded for the remaining oils. Twenty of the plant oils and extracts were investigated, using a broth microdilution method, for activity against C. albicans, Staph. aureus and E. coli. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations were 0.03% (v/v) thyme oil against C. albicans and E. coli and 0.008% (v/v) vetiver oil against Staph. aureus. These results support the notion that plant essential oils and extracts may have a role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. PMID:10438227

  3. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  4. Antimicrobial action of chelating agents: repercussions on the microorganism development, virulence and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, A L S; Sodre, C L; Valle, R S; Silva, B A; Abi-Chacra, E A; Silva, L V; Souza-Goncalves, A L; Sangenito, L S; Goncalves, D S; Souza, L O P; Palmeira, V F; d'Avila-Levy, C M; Kneipp, L F; Kellett, A; McCann, M; Branquinha, M H

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by resistant microorganisms often fail to respond to conventional therapy, resulting in prolonged illness, increased treatment costs and greater risk of death. Consequently, the development of novel antimicrobial drugs is becoming more demanding every day since the existing drugs either have too many side-effects or they tend to lose effectiveness due to the selection of resistant strains. In view of these facts, a number of new strategies to obstruct vital biological processes of a microbial cell have emerged; one of these is focused on the use of metal-chelating agents, which are able to selectively disturb the essential metal metabolism of the microorganism by interfering with metal acquisition and bioavailability for crucial reactions. The chelation activity is able to inhibit the biological role of metal-dependent proteins (e.g., metalloproteases and transcription factors), disturbing the microbial cell homeostasis and culminating in the blockage of microbial nutrition, growth and development, cellular differentiation, adhesion to biotic (e.g., extracellular matrix components, cell and/or tissue) and abiotic (e.g., plastic, silicone and acrylic) structures as well as controlling the in vivo infection progression. Interestingly, chelating agents also potentiate the activity of classical antimicrobial compounds. The differences between the microorganism and host in terms of the behavior displayed in the presence of chelating agents could provide exploitable targets for the development of an effective chemotherapy for these diseases. Consequently, metal chelators represent a novel group of antimicrobial agents with potential therapeutic applications. This review will focus on the anti-fungal and anti-protozoan action of the most common chelating agents, deciphering and discussing their mode of action. PMID:22455582

  5. DNA minor groove binders as potential antitumor and antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Bovero, Andrea; Fruttarolo, Francesca; Preti, Delia; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Pavani, Maria Giovanna; Romagnoli, Romeo

    2004-07-01

    DNA minor groove binders constitute an important class of derivatives in anticancer therapy. Some of these compounds form noncovalent complexes with DNA (e.g., distamycin A, Hoechst 33258, and pentamidine) while others DNA-binding compounds (such as CC-1065) cause cleavages in the DNA backbone. In this article, we have reviewed the minor groove binders currently in preclinical evaluation in the last years. Diarylamidines such as DAPI, berenil, and pentamidine; bis-benzimidazoles such as Hoechst 33258; ecteinascidins, pyrrololo [2,1-c]-[1,4]-benzodiazepines (PBDs), CC-1065, and distamycins are the classes discussed in this review article. A special section has been dedicated to hybrid molecules resulted by the combination of two minor groove binders, especially for derivatives of naturally occurring antitumor agents, such as anthramycin or the alkylating unit of the antibiotic CC-1065, and distamycin frames. PMID:15170593

  6. In vitro antimicrobial effects of commercially available mouth-wetting agents.

    PubMed

    Güneri, Pelin; Alpöz, Esin; Epstein, Joel B; Çankaya, Hülya; Ate?, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Products have been developed to provide palliation for persons with dry mouth. In addition to mouth-wetting agents, some products incorporate antimicrobial constituents with the goal of improving oral microbial defenses. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the potential antimicrobial and antifungal effects of two commercially available saliva substitutes on Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans by using the agar-well diffusion method. Antimicrobial activity as measured by the size of the inhibition zone growth for S. mutans and L. acidophilus was observed only with Biotene Dry Mouth Oral Rinse® and BioXtra® gel. The zone of inhibition of Biotene Dry Mouth Oral Rinse was larger than that of BioXtra gel (p= 0.00, p < 0.01). No anticandidal effect was seen with any of the test products. The pH of the preparations, the variations between the amount of active ingredients within the products, and the potential antimicrobial effects of inactive ingredients should be investigated to determine the factors that impacted microbial inhibition. PMID:21729120

  7. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants are susceptible to light activated antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic therapy can select for small colony variants of Staphylococcus aureus that are more resistant to antibiotics and can result in persistent infections, necessitating the development of more effective antimicrobial strategies to combat small colony variant infections. Photodynamic therapy is an alternative treatment approach which utilises light in combination with a light-activated antimicrobial agent to kill bacteria via a non-specific mechanism of action. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of 665 nm laser light and the light-activated antimicrobial agent methylene blue was able to successfully kill S. aureus small colony variants. S. aureus and isogenic stable small colony variant were exposed to varying doses (1.93 to 9.65 J/cm2) of 665 nm laser light in the presence of varying concentrations (1 to 20 ?M) of methylene blue. Results The combination of 665 nm laser light and methylene blue was found to be an effective strategy for the killing of small colony variants. At the highest light dose (9.65 J/cm2) and methylene blue concentration (20 ?M) tested, the number of viable bacteria decreased by approximately 6.9 log10 for the wild type and approximately 5 log10 for the small colony variant. Conclusions These results suggest that photodynamic therapy has potential for use in the treatment of superficial infections caused by small colony variants of S. aureus and supports further research in this field. PMID:24010944

  8. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents, alone and in combinations, against Burkholderia cepacia isolated from blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, D C; Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1997-08-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a widespread, environmental gram-negative bacillus that is associated with nosocomial infections. This bacterium is considered to be an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients and is inherently resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. To compare the activity of different antimicrobial agents and the potential of combinations against invasive strains of B. cepacia, we collected 36 isolates of B. cepacia from blood cultures and checked their susceptibilities to 13 antimicrobials by broth microdilution method. Most strains tested were susceptible to minocycline (94.4%), ceftazidime (86.1%), ciprofloxacin (83.3%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (83.3%). All strains were resistant to aminoglycosides, and only some strains were susceptible to imipenem (16.7%), aztreonam (19.4%), moxalactam (25.0%), piperacillin (25.0%), and carbenicillin (47.2%). The effects of combinations of ceftazidime with amikacin, ceftazidime with ciprofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin with amikacin were assayed by checkerboard titration method. Synergistic effect was found in 28 out of 36 tested strains (77.8%), when ceftazidime was combined with amikacin, in 25 out of 36 strains (69.4%) when ceftazidime was combined with ciprofloxacin, and in only 8 out of 36 strains (22.2%) when ciprofloxacin was combined with amikacin. PMID:9327247

  9. Colonization and infection with Enterococcus faecalis in intensive care units: the role of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Bonten, M J; Gaillard, C A; van Tiel, F H; van der Geest, S; Stobberingh, E E

    1995-01-01

    We studied the influences of antimicrobial agents on the colonization of the respiratory tract and infection with Enterococcus faecalis in intensive care unit (ICU) patients receiving mechanical respiration for at least 3 days. In a matched-cohort analysis, patients receiving topical antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP) of the oropharynx and stomach with antimicrobial agents not treating E. faecalis were compared with patients not receiving TAP. Patients were matched with controls on the basis of their duration in the ICU, their use of systemic antibiotics treating and not treating E. faecalis, the administration of TAP, their APACHE II score, and surgical procedures they had undergone. In all, 276 patients were analyzed. The colonization of the oropharynx and/or trachea by E. faecalis at admission was demonstrated for 43 patients (16%). Twenty patients (9%) acquired tracheal colonization and 91 patients (40%) acquired oropharyngeal colonization with E. faecalis. In the matched-cohort analysis, 43 patients receiving TAP were matched in two controls each. TAP patients more frequently acquired tracheal colonization (15 of 43 versus 2 of 86 patients, P < 0.00001) and infections with E. faecalis (6 of 43 versus 1 of 86 patients, P < 0.01). The use of topical antibiotics and treating E. faecalis increased the risk for colonization and infection with E. faecalis. PMID:8593020

  10. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of fimbrolide-nitric oxide donor hybrids as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Samuel K; Barraud, Nicolas; Pham, Amy; Iskander, George; Rice, Scott A; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2013-12-12

    Fimbrolides from marine algae have shown promising activity against quorum sensing (QS), a chief regulatory and communication system in bacteria controlling biofilm formation and virulence factor. Nitric oxide (NO) at sublethal concentration has also been reported to induce dispersal of bacterial biofilms and increase their susceptibility toward standard biocides and antibiotics. Therefore, the combination of QS inhibitors and NO donors has the potential to control the development of biofilm and promote their dispersion via a nonbactericidal mechanism. Inspired by these ideas, novel fimbrolide-NO donor hybrid compounds were designed and synthesized. Fimbrolide-NO hybrids 6b, 6f, and 14a were found to be particularly effective as antimicrobials compared to the nonhybrid natural fimbrolides as revealed by bioluminescent P. aeruginosa QS reporter assays and biofilm inhibition assays. Significantly, these fimbrolide-NO hybrids represent the first dual-action antimicrobial agent based on the baterial QS inhibition and NO signaling. PMID:24191659

  11. In vitro activities of 36 antimicrobial agents against clinically isolated Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Teng, L J; Ho, S W; Chang, S C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1991-08-01

    Thirty-six antimicrobial agents were evaluated for in vitro activities against 100 clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each agent for each isolate was determined by the agar dilution method. Among 25 beta-lactam antibiotics, the most active agent was imipenem with an MIC90 and a geometric mean of 1 and 0.15 micrograms/ml, respectively; followed by ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. Ampicillin-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, moxalactam, and flomoxef were the next most active agents. Piperacillin, ticarcillin, ceftizoxime, cefotaxime, cefuzonam, cefoxitin, and cefmetazole were equally active with the MIC50s ranging from 4 to 16 micrograms/ml, and MIC90s ranging from 32 to greater than or equal to 256 micrograms/ml. The remaining 10 beta-lactam antibiotics, ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, cefoperazone, cefmenoxime, ceftazidime, cefpirome, aztreonam, and carumonam were less active. All isolates were resistant to cefotiam at a low breakpoint. Among 6 quinolones, ciprofloxacin was the most active agent with an MIC50 and an MIC90 of 4 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. All isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid, pipemidic acid, cinoxacin, enoxacin, and norfloxacin. Among 5 frequently used agents, chloramphenicol, ornidazole, and metronidazole were the most effective agents which inhibited 100% of the isolates at 8, 2, and 2 micrograms/ml, respectively; while clindamycin and minocycline had less activity. PMID:1683376

  12. Development of intra-vaginal matrices from polycaprolactone for sustained release of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Dang, Nhung T T; Turner, Mark S; Coombes, Allan G A

    2013-07-01

    Microporous poly(?-caprolactone) matrices were loaded with an antibacterial agent, ciprofloxacin and an antifungal agent, miconazole nitrate, respectively, for investigations of their potential as controlled vaginal delivery devices. Ciprofloxacin loadings up to 15% w/w could be obtained by increasing the drug content of the poly(?-caprolactone) solution, while the actual loadings of miconazole were much lower (1-3% w/w) due to drug partition into methanol during the solvent extraction. The kinetics of ciprofloxacin release in simulated vaginal fluid at 37 were characterised by a small burst release phase in the first 24?h, low drug release up to 7 days (10%) and gradual release of up to 80% of the drug content by day 30. Meanwhile, the release kinetics of miconazole-loaded matrices could be effectively described by the Higuchi model with 100% drug release from the highest loaded matrices (3.2% w/w) in 13 days. Ciprofloxacin or miconazole released over 30 and 13 days, respectively, from poly(?-caprolactone) matrices into simulated vaginal fluid retained high levels of antimicrobial activity in excess of 80% of the activity of the free drug. This study confirms the potential of poly(?-caprolactone) matrices for delivering antimicrobial agents in the form of an intra-vaginal device. PMID:22684517

  13. Noncytotoxic combinations of topical antimicrobial agents for use with cultured skin substitutes.

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, S T; Warden, G D; Holder, I A

    1995-01-01

    Cultured skin grafts are destroyed more easily than split-thickness skin grafts by common burn wound organisms, including gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and fungi. To increase the survival and engraftment of cultured skin grafts, formulations of antimicrobial agents were tested for cytotoxicity to cultured human keratinocytes and fibroblasts and for activity against common organisms from burn wounds. On the basis of previous studies, a base formulation containing neomycin (40 micrograms/ml), polymyxin B (700 U/ml), and mupirocin (40 micrograms/ml) was prepared, to which ciprofloxacin (20 micrograms/ml) or norfloxacin (20 micrograms/ml) and amphotericin B (0.25 microgram/ml) or nystatin (100 U/ml) were added. Toxicity to cultured human cells was determined by the growth response of cell cultures (n = 6) to each drug combination over 4 days. Activity against clinical isolates (n = 40) of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, other gram-negative bacteria, and Candida spp. was determined by the wet disc assay. Analysis of variance testing showed no significant differences in the growth of keratinocytes or fibroblasts under control or experimental conditions. Medium without antimicrobial agents was not effective against any of the 40 microbial strains tested. The base formulation was effective against all bacterial strains tested but against none of the fungi, while all experimental formulations were effective against all microbial strains tested. These findings suggest that neomycin, mupirocin, and polymyxin B may be combined with a quinolone and an antimycotic agent to provide broad antimicrobial activity for a formulation for topical use with cultured skin on burns. However, the formulations described here are strictly experimental and are not recommended for clinical use without further evaluation. PMID:7574524

  14. Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants from India.

    PubMed

    Samy, R Perumal

    2005-12-01

    The results of a preliminary antimicrobial screening of the methanol extracts of Zingiber officinale, Asteracantha longifolia, Citrus acida, Salacia microsperma and Tinospora cordifolia are reported. PMID:16229969

  15. Functionalized alkyl and aryl diselenides as antimicrobial and antiviral agents: synthesis and properties.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, H; Chojnacka, M; M?ochowski, J; Palus, J; Syper, L; Hudecova, D; Uher, M; Piasecki, E; Rybka, M

    2003-12-01

    The different dialkyl and diaryl diselenides with carbamoyl and sulfamoyl moieties 2, 3, 5 and other substituents in the ortho position of benzene ring 4, 7, 8 as well as derivatives of 1,2,4-benzoselenadiazine (6) were designed as antiviral and antimicrobial agents and synthesized. Some of them, particularly 8a and 8b, were found in the antiviral assay in vitro to be strong inhibitors of cytopathic activity encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The compound 4a and 8a were found to have a broad spectrum of acivity against bacteria, yeasts and pathogenic fungi in vitro. PMID:14630233

  16. A microbiological assessment of silver fusidate, a novel topical antimicrobial agent.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Miller, J M; Shah, S

    1996-07-01

    The silver salt of fusidic acid is a novel antimicrobial agent. Against staphylococci, in vitro tests showed silver fusidate was more active than silver sulphadiazine, and the activities of the sodium and the silver salts of fusidic acid were correlated. Against streptococci, enterococci, clostridia, Candida albicans and a range of Gram-negative bacilli, silver fusidate was of similar activity to silver sulphadiazine. Silver fusidate at 1 g/l was bactericidal against eight strains of staphylococci, irrespective of their susceptibility to sodium fusidate. Emergence of resistance to silver fusidate was rare. PMID:18611743

  17. Effects of topical antimicrobial agents on the human neutrophil respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Hansbrough, J F; Zapata-Sirvent, R L; Cooper, M L

    1991-05-01

    The neutrophil oxidative burst plays an important role in killing intracellular microorganisms. We studied the effects of topical antimicrobial agents on the N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine-stimulated oxidative burst of human peripheral blood neutrophils, using a flow cytometric assay. Mafenide acetate, sulfadiazine silver, gentamicin sulfate, neomycin sulfate-polymyxin B sulfate (Neosporin GU irrigant), acetic acid, amphotericin B, and povidone-iodine inhibited the neutrophil oxidative burst at or below clinical concentrations, while 0.25% modified diluted sodium hypochlorite (Dakin's) solution caused cell death. Bacitracin-polymyxin B sulfate (Polysporin) greatly augmented the respiratory burst; this effect was due to the bacitracin component. Diluted gentamicin and acetic acid also augmented intracellular hydrogen peroxide production, but to a lesser extent than Polysporin. Inhibition of the respiratory burst of neutrophils might be considered when these agents are used for topical wound care, although clinical correlates of these effects have not been determined. PMID:1850590

  18. Bacterial inactivation using silver-coated magnetic nanoparticles as functional antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Luo, Jin; Shan, Shiyao; Crew, Elizabeth; Yin, Jun; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Wallek, Brandi; Wong, Season

    2011-01-01

    The ability for silver nanoparticles to function as an antibacterial agent while being separable from the target fluids is important for bacterial inactivation in biological fluids. This report describes the analysis of the antimicrobial activities of silver-coated magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by wet chemical methods. The bacterial inactivation of several types of bacteria was analyzed, including Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloacae, and Escherichia coli). The results have demonstrated the viability of the silver-coated magnetic nanoparticles for achieving effective bacterial inactivation efficiency comparable to and better than silver nanoparticles conventionally used. The bacteria inactivation efficiency of our MZF@Ag nanoparticles were also determined for blood platelets samples, demonstrating the potential of utilization in inactivating bacterial growth in platelets prior to transfusion to ensure blood product safety, which also has important implications for enabling the capability of effective separation, delivery and targeting of the antibacterial agents. PMID:21999710

  19. ?-Lactone natural products and derivatives inactivate homoserine transacetylase, a target for antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    De Pascale, Gianfranco; Nazi, Ishac; Harrison, Paul H M; Wright, Gerard D

    2011-07-01

    Homoserine transacetylase (HTA) catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the hydroxyl group of homoserine. This is the first committed step in the biosynthesis of methionine (Met) from aspartic acid in many fungi, Gram-positive and some Gram-negative bacteria. The enzyme is absent in higher eukaryotes and is important for microorganism growth in Met-poor environments, such as blood serum, making HTA an attractive target for new antimicrobial agents. HTA catalyzes acetyl transfer via a double displacement mechanism facilitated by a classic Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad located at the bottom of a narrow actives site tunnel. We explored the inhibitory activity of several ?-lactones to block the activity of HTA. In particular, the natural product ebelactone A, a ?-lactone with a hydrophobic tail was found to be a potent inactivator of HTA from Haemophilus influenzae. Synthetic analogs of ebelactone A demonstrated improved inactivation characteristics. Covalent modification of HTA was confirmed by mass spectrometry, and peptide mapping identified Ser143 as the modified residue, consistent with the known structure and mechanism of the enzyme. These results demonstrate that ?-lactone inhibitors are excellent biochemical probes of HTA and potential leads for new antimicrobial agents. PMID:21522158

  20. Quantitative susceptibility of Streptococcus suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries to antimicrobial agents licenced in veterinary medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henk J. Wisselink; Kees T. Veldman; Chris Van den Eede; Sarah A. Salmon; Dik J. Mevius

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibility of Streptococcus suis strains (n=384) isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries to 10 antimicrobial agents was determined. For that purpose a microbroth dilution method was used according to CLSI recommendations. The following antimicrobial agents were tested: ceftiofur, cefquinome, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, gentamicin, penicillin, spectinomycin, tetracycline, tilmicosin and trimethoprim\\/sulphamethoxazole. Using breakpoints established by CLSI for veterinary pathogens, all

  1. Appropriateness of Gram-Negative Agent Use at a Tertiary Care Hospital in the Setting of Significant Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Neil M.; Kubin, Christine J.; Furuya, E. Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Practicing antimicrobial stewardship in the setting of widespread antimicrobial resistance among gram-negative bacilli, particularly in urban areas, is challenging. Methods.?We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study at a tertiary care hospital with an established antimicrobial stewardship program in New York, New York to determine appropriateness of use of gram-negative antimicrobials and to identify factors associated with suboptimal antimicrobial use. Adult inpatients who received gram-negative agents on 2 dates, 1 June 2010 or 1 December 2010, were identified through pharmacy records. Clinical data were collected for each patient. Use of gram-negative agents was deemed optimal or suboptimal through chart review and according to hospital guidelines. Data were compared using ?2 or Fischer's exact test for categorical variables and Student t test or Mann–Whitney U test for continuous variables. Results.?A total of 356 patients were included who received 422 gram-negative agents. Administration was deemed suboptimal in 26% of instances, with the most common reason being spectrum of activity too broad. In multivariable analysis, being in an intensive care unit (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], .49; 95% confidence interval [CI], .29–.84), having an infectious diseases consultation within the previous 7 days (aOR, .52; 95% CI, .28–.98), and having a history of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli within the past year (aOR, .24; 95% CI, .09–.65) were associated with optimal gram-negative agent use. Beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combination drug use (aOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.35–5.16) was associated with suboptimal use. Conclusions.?Gram-negative agents were used too broadly despite numerous antimicrobial stewardship program activities.

  2. Novel antimicrobial peptides that exhibit activity against select agents and other drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Divakaramenon; Klapper, David; Srouji, Antoine H; Bhonsle, Jayendra B; Borschel, Richard; Mueller, Allen; Russell, Amanda L; Williams, Brittany C; Hicks, Rickey P

    2010-07-15

    One of the greatest challenges facing modern medicine is the evolution of drug resistant strains of bacteria. In addition to traditional methods of exposure to traditional bacterial organisms there is a growing concerned of the use of bacteria as bio-terrorism agents. To counter the evolution of drug resistant and potential bio-terrorism bacterial agents new antibiotic drugs must be developed. One potential source of new therapeutic agents that act via a novel mechanism of action are natural and synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In our laboratories we have developed a series of AMPs incorporating the un-natural amino acids Tic-Oic to impart organism selectivity and potency while increasing metabolic stability. Herein the in vitro activity of these peptides, including ten new compounds, against eight potential bio-terrorism bacterial agents and three other bacterial strains is presented and discussed. These peptides exhibit a wide range of organism potency and selectivity. Calcein fluorescence leakage and circular dichroism studies were conducted to confirm that these peptides interact with zwitterionic and anionic liposomes. PMID:20558071

  3. Antimicrobial activity of Northwestern Mexican plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos A; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan C; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiologic agent of such gastric disorders as chronic active gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Over the past few years, the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to the development of better treatments, such as the use of natural products. This study evaluated the anti-H. pylori activity of 17 Mexican plants used mainly in the northwestern part of Mexico (Sonora) for the empirical treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The anti-H. pylori activity of methanolic extracts of the plants was determined by using the broth microdilution method. The 50% minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from less than 200 to 400 ?g/mL for Castella tortuosa, Amphipterygium adstringens, Ibervillea sonorae, Pscalium decompositum, Krameria erecta, Selaginella lepidophylla, Pimpinella anisum, Marrubium vulgare, Ambrosia confertiflora, and Couterea latiflora and were greater than 800??g/mL for Byophyllum pinnatum, Tecoma stans linnaeus, Kohleria deppena, Jatropha cuneata, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Taxodium macronatum. Only Equisetum gigantum showed no activity against H. pylori. This study suggests the important role that these plants may have in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori. The findings set the groundwork for further characterization and elucidation of the active compounds responsible for such activity. PMID:21663492

  4. Antimicrobial effects of Finnish plant extracts containing flavonoids and other phenolic compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jussi-Pekka Rauha; Susanna Remes; Marina Heinonen; Anu Hopia; Marja Kähkönen; Tytti Kujala; Kalevi Pihlaja; Heikki Vuorela; Pia Vuorela

    2000-01-01

    Plant phenolics, especially dietary flavonoids, are currently of growing interest owing to their supposed functional properties in promoting human health. Antimicrobial screening of 13 phenolic substances and 29 extracts prepared from Finnish plant materials against selected microbes was conducted in this study. The tests were carried out using diffusion methods with four to nine microbial species (Aspergillus niger, Bacillus subtilis,

  5. Antimicrobial activity of snakin-defensin hybrid protein in tobacco and potato plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To augment plant protection against phytopathogens, we constructed a fusion gene for the simultaneous expression of snakin-1 (SN1) and defensin-1 (PTH1) antimicrobial proteins as a hybrid protein (SAP) in plant cells. Prior to in vivo evaluation of SAP phytoprotective activity, the hybrid protein ex...

  6. Antimicrobial activities of extracts from tropical Atlantic marine plants against marine pathogens and saprophytes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian Engel; Melany P. Puglisi; Paul R. Jensen; William Fenical

    2006-01-01

    Studies investigating disease resistance in marine plants have indicated that secondary metabolites may have important defensive functions against harmful marine microorganisms. The goal of this study was to systematically screen extracts from marine plants for antimicrobial effects against marine pathogens and saprophytes. Lipophilic and hydrophilic extracts from species of 49 marine algae and 3 seagrasses collected in the tropical Atlantic

  7. Search for antibacterial and antifungal agents from selected Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V Prashanth; Chauhan, Neelam S; Padh, Harish; Rajani, M

    2006-09-19

    A series of 61 Indian medicinal plants belonging to 33 different families used in various infectious disorders, were screened for their antimicrobial properties. Screening was carried out at 1000 and 500 microg/ml concentrations by agar dilution method against Bacillus cereus var mycoides, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Twenty-eight plant extracts showed activity against at least one of the test organisms used in the screening. On the basis of the results obtained, we conclude that the crude extracts of Dorema ammoniacum, Sphaeranthus indicus, Dracaena cinnabari, Mallotus philippinensis, Jatropha gossypifolia, Aristolochia indica, Lantana camara, Nardostachys jatamansi, Randia dumetorum and Cassia fistula exhibited significant antimicrobial activity and properties that support folkloric use in the treatment of some diseases as broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. This probably explains the use of these plants by the indigenous people against a number of infections. PMID:16678369

  8. Plants' Metabolites as Potential Antiobesity Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gooda Sahib, Najla; Saari, Nazamid; Ismail, Amin; Khatib, Alfi; Mahomoodally, Fawzi; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and obesity-related complications are on the increase both in the developed and developing world. Since existing pharmaceuticals fail to come up with long-term solutions to address this issue, there is an ever-pressing need to find and develop new drugs and alternatives. Natural products, particularly medicinal plants, are believed to harbor potential antiobesity agents that can act through various mechanisms either by preventing weight gain or promoting weight loss amongst others. The inhibition of key lipid and carbohydrate hydrolyzing and metabolizing enzymes, disruption of adipogenesis, and modulation of its factors or appetite suppression are some of the plethora of targeted approaches to probe the antiobesity potential of medicinal plants. A new technology such as metabolomics, which deals with the study of the whole metabolome, has been identified to be a promising technique to probe the progression of diseases, elucidate their pathologies, and assess the effects of natural health products on certain pathological conditions. This has been applied to drug research, bone health, and to a limited extent to obesity research. This paper thus endeavors to give an overview of those plants, which have been reported to have antiobesity effects and highlight the potential and relevance of metabolomics in obesity research. PMID:22666121

  9. Edible coating as carrier of antimicrobial agents to extend the shelf life of fresh-cut apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible coatings with antimicrobial agents can extend shelf-life of fresh-cut fruits. The effect of lemongrass, oregano oil and vanillin incorporated in apple puree-alginate edible coatings, on shelf-life of fresh-cut 'Fuji' apples, was investigated. Coated apples were packed in air filled polypropyl...

  10. Edible Coating as Carrier of Antimicrobial Agents to Extend the Shelf Life of Fresh-Cut Apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible coatings with antimicrobial agents provide a novel way to improve the safety and shelf-life of fresh-cut fruit. The effect of lemongrass, oregano oil and vanillin, incorporated in apple puree-alginate edible coatings, on the shelf-life of fresh-cut Fuji apples, was investigated. Coated appl...

  11. In vitro activities of linezolid combined with other antimicrobial agents against Staphylococci, Enterococci, Pneumococci, and selected gram-negative organisms.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael T; Zurenko, Gary E

    2003-06-01

    The activities of linezolid, an oxazolidinone antibacterial agent active against gram-positive organisms, alone and in combination with 35 antimicrobial agents were tested in vitro against methicillin-sensitive (n = 1 to 2 strains) and methicillin-resistant (n = 8 to 10) Staphylococcus aureus strains; vancomycin-sensitive (n = 6) and vancomycin-resistant (n = 6 to 8) Enterococcus faecalis strains; vancomycin-sensitive (n = 5) and vancomycin-resistant (n = 6) Enterococcus faecium strains; penicillin-sensitive (n = 2 to 5), penicillin-intermediate (n = 5 to 6), and penicillin-resistant (n = 5 to 6) Streptococcus pneumoniae strains; Escherichia coli (n = 6); and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 6). The fractional inhibitory concentration indices of linezolid in combination with other antimicrobial agents for the organisms tested were generated on checkerboard broth microdilution plates prepared by a semiautomated method. Of 1,380 organism-drug combinations, 1,369 (99.2%) combinations of linezolid with 28 antimicrobial drugs were indifferent, 9 combinations (0.65%) of linezolid with 6 drugs (amoxicillin, erythromycin, imipenem, sparfloxacin, teicoplanin, and tetracycline) were synergistic, and 2 combinations (0.15%) of linezolid with 2 drugs (ofloxacin and sparfloxacin) were antagonistic. Overall, the in vitro data demonstrated that linezolid combined with other antimicrobial agents primarily produces an indifferent response, with infrequent occurrences of synergism and antagonism. PMID:12760865

  12. IN VITRO AND IN VIVO STUDY OF AN ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY DISPLAYED BY THE REDMOUTH DISEASE AGENT, YERSINIA RUCKERI

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IN VITRO AND IN VIVO STUDY OF AN ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY DISPLAYED BY THE REDMOUTH DISEASE AGENT in epide- miology of yersiniosis will be discussed. Materials and Methods In vitro studies were performed and the cultural conditions in order to obtain clearer and larger inhibition pictures. So a meat peptone (Ref19521

  13. Prevalence and Distribution of Mastitis Pathogens and their Resistance Against Antimicrobial Agents in Dairy Cows in Jordan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Azmi D. Hawari; Fawzi Al-Dabbas

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the aetiology of bovine mastitis in ten herds of Holstein Friesian cow in Jordan, the prevalence of mastitis pathogens in dairy cows and their resistance to selected antimicrobial agents. Milk samples were collected from 220 lactating cows to determine the clinical and subclinical mastitis by white side test and confirmed by

  14. In vitro activities of 47 antimicrobial agents against three Campylobacter spp. from pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Gebhart, C J; Ward, G E; Kurtz, H J

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activities of 47 antimicrobial agents against 30 isolates of Campylobacter species from pigs were determined by the agar dilution technique. The isolates were obtained from pigs with proliferative enteritis and included 10 strains each of Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter sputorum subsp. mucosalis, and "Campylobacter hyointestinalis Gebhart et al." (this name is not on the Approved Lists). Carbadox, furazolidone, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, and dimetridazole were the most active drugs, inhibiting all three Campylobacter species with a MIC for 50% of the isolates of 2 micrograms/ml or less. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, cefazolin, sulfachloropyridazine, novobiocin, vancomycin, sulfathiazole, cyclohexamide, bacitracin, p-arsanilic acid, and colistin were the least active, with MICs for 50% of the isolates ranging from 16 to greater than or equal to 128 micrograms/ml. PMID:3985597

  15. In vitro activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against bacteria isolated from cows with clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Guérin-Faublée, V; Carret, G; Houffschmitt, P

    2003-04-12

    The susceptibility of 495 strains of bacteria, recently isolated in France from cows with clinical mastitis, to 10 antimicrobial agents--penicillin G, cloxacillin, oxacillin, cephalexin, cefazolin, cephapirin, cefquinome, neomycin, ampicillin and colistin--was determined by measuring their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICS). Overall, the levels of resistance were very low except for staphylococci and penicillin G. The 167 streptococcal strains were susceptible to all of the beta-lactams tested, but six (3-6 per cent) were highly resistant to neomycin. Of the 171 staphylococcal isolates, 36.2 per cent were resistant to penicillin G, one strain of Staphylococcus sciuri was classified as methicillin-resistant, but they were all susceptible to neomycin. None of the 122 strains of Escherichia coli was resistant to colistin, but 12 had high MIC values for one or more of the cephalosporins. PMID:12723630

  16. DECOMPOSITION SUPPRESSION OF RAYON BY SURFACE COATING USING ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND POVAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittami, Tadashi; Murata, Ryota; Nakamura, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kanji; Nakamura, Kazuho

    The authors examined whether decomposition of rayon in environment is suppressed by coating it with antimicrobial agent DC5700 and poval (PVA). When the rayon samples coated with DC5700 were decomposed in activated sludge or bark compost toge ther with non-coated samples, the coated samples needed longer time for the decomposition comparing to the non-coated samples under the environmental condition whose water content is 56% or less. Moreov er, PVA coating together with DC5700 further extended the decomposition time of rayon samples under the condition whose water content is 40% or less. The dyeing test of DC5700 using bromphenol blue indicated that PVA coating together with DC5700 prevented DC5700 from removing from the rayon su rface under the low-water-con tent condition and thus the double coating sample was decomposed slowly.

  17. Antimycobacterial agents from selected Mexican medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Acevedo, Laura; Guerrero, José A; Martínez, Sergio; Bye, Robert; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Franzblau, Scott; Timmermann, Barbara N; Mata, Rachel

    2005-09-01

    As part of the ICBG program Bioactive Agents from Dryland Biodiversity of Latin America, the present investigation was undertaken to explore the possible antimycobacterial potential of compounds derived from selected Mexican medicinal plants. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude extracts of Rumex hymenosepalus (Polygonaceae), Larrea divaricata (Zygophyllaceae), Phoradendron robinsonii (Loranthaceae) and Amphipteryngium adstringens (Julianiaceae) led to the isolation of several antimycobacterial compounds. Four stilbenoids, two flavan-3-ols and three anthraquinones were isolated from R. hymenosepalus. Two flavonols and nordihydroguaiaretic acid were obtained from L. divaricata. Sakuranetin was the antimycobacterial agent isolated from P. robinsonii. Two known triterpenoids and the novel natural product 3-dodecyl-1,8-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid were obtained from A. adstringens. In general, the isolates were identified by spectral means. The antimycobacterial activity of the secondary compounds isolated from the analysed species, as well as that of nine pure compounds previously isolated in our laboratories, was investigated; the MIC values ranged from 16 to 128 microg mL-1. Among the tested compounds, the glycolipids, sesquiterpenoids and triterpenoids showed the best antimycobacterial activity. The antimycobacterial property of the glycolipids is reported for the first time. Although the tested compounds showed moderate antimycobacterial activity, their presence in the analysed species provides the rationale for their traditional use in the treatment of tuberculosis. PMID:16105233

  18. Sales of veterinary antimicrobial agents for therapeutic use in food-producing animal species in Japan between 2005 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Y; Asai, T; Koike, R; Tsuyuki, M; Sugiura, K

    2014-12-01

    The use of veterinary antimicrobial agents in animals can result in the emergence and selection of resistant bacteria in food-producing animals. This study elucidated the use of veterinary antimicrobial agents in Japan in terms of milligrams of active ingredient sold per kilogram of biomass between 2005 and 2010. Data on sales of antimicrobial agents and on the biomass of the target animal species were compiled from statistics published bythe Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. The quantities of antimicrobials used varied between animal species: the highest usage was observed in pigs (392 to 423 mg/ kg), followed by beef cattle (45 to 67 mg/kg), broiler chickens (44 to 63 mg/kg) and dairy cattle (33 to 49 mg/kg). For the animal species combined, usage of third- and fourth-generation cefalosporins, fluoroquinolones and macrolides ranged from 0.10 to 0.14 mg/kg biomass, 1.1 to 1.3 mg/kg biomass and 7.8 to 10.6 mg/kg biomass, respectively. PMID:25812223

  19. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) acting as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piruthiviraj, Prakash; Margret, Anita; Krishnamurthy, Poornima Priyadharsani

    2015-05-01

    Production of antimicrobial agents through the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using green technology has been extensively made consistent by various researchers; yet, this study uses the flower bud's aqueous extracts of Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) as a reducing agent for chloroauric acid (1 mM). After 30 min of incubation, synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) was observed by a change in extract color from pale yellow to purple color. Synthesis of AuNps was confirmed in UV-visible spectroscopy at the range of approximately 560 nm. The SEM analysis showed the average nanoparticles size of 12-22 nm. The antimicrobial activity of AuNps was analyzed by subjecting it to human pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Klebsiella pneumonia) and fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) using disc diffusion method. The broccoli-synthesized AuNps showed the efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity of above-mentioned microbes. It was confirmed that AuNps have the best antimicrobial agent compared to the standard antibiotics (Gentamicin and Fluconazole). When the concentrations of AuNps were increased (10, 25, and 50 µg/ml), the sensitivity zone also increased for all the tested microbes. The synthesized AuNps are capable of rendering high antimicrobial efficacy and, hence, have a great potential in the preparation of drugs used against major bacterial and fungal diseases in humans.

  20. Essential oils and herbal extracts as antimicrobial agents in cosmetic emulsion.

    PubMed

    Herman, Anna; Herman, Andrzej Przemys?aw; Domagalska, Beata Wanda; M?ynarczyk, Andrzej

    2013-06-01

    The cosmetic industry adapts to the needs of consumers seeking to limit the use of preservatives and develop of preservative-free or self-preserving cosmetics, where preservatives are replaced by raw materials of plant origin. The aim of study was a comparison of the antimicrobial activity of extracts (Matricaria chamomilla, Aloe vera, Calendula officinalis) and essential oils (Lavandulla officinallis, Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum zeylanicum) with methylparaben. Extracts (2.5 %), essential oils (2.5 %) and methylparaben (0.4 %) were tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Candida albicans ATCC 14053. Essentials oils showed higher inhibitory activity against tested microorganism strain than extracts and methylparaben. Depending on tested microorganism strain, all tested extracts and essential oils show antimicrobial activity 0.8-1.7 and 1-3.5 times stronger than methylparaben, respectively. This shows that tested extracts and essential oils could replace use of methylparaben, at the same time giving a guarantee of microbiological purity of the cosmetic under its use and storage. PMID:24426114

  1. Evaluation of antimicrobial agents for veterinary use in the ecotoxicity test using microalgae.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Kaoru; Nagase, Hiroyasu; Ozawa, Manao; Endoh, Yuuko S; Goto, Kisako; Hirata, Kazumasa; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Yoshimura, Haruo

    2004-12-01

    The influence of antimicrobial agents approved as veterinary drugs in Japan on the growth of green algae, Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris, was studied in accordance with the OECD guidelines for testing chemicals. Among the agents tested, growth inhibitory activity was very varied, i.e. erythromycin showed the strongest activity (EC50, 50% effective concentration, = 0.037 mg/l), sulfa drugs had activity to some extent (EC50s of sulfamethoxazole, sulfadiazine, and sulfadimethoxine were 1.5, 2.2, and 2.3 mg/l, respectively), but ampicillin and cefazolin did not inhibit growth (EC50s>1000 mg/l). We also investigated synergistic effect of combining sulfa drugs with trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, which are commonly used as a combined drug. By adding trimethoprim, the growth inhibitory activity of sulfamethoxazole and sulfadiazine was significantly enhanced. Growth inhibition by sulfa drugs was reduced by the addition of folic acid, indicating that they inhibit folate synthesis in green algae. PMID:15519420

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Romanian medicinal plants hydroalcoholic extracts on planktonic and adhered cells.

    PubMed

    Stanciuc, A M; Gaspar, A; Moldovan, L; Saviuc, C; Popa, M; M?ru?escu, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the antibacterial and antifungal potential of some Romanian medicinal plants, arnica--Arnica montana, wormwood--Artemisia absinthium and nettle--Urtica dioica. In order to perform this antimicrobial screening, we obtained the vegetal extracts and we tested them on a series of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and also against two fungal strains. The vegetal extracts showed antimicrobial activity preferentially directed against the planktonic fungal and bacterial growth, while the effect against biofilm formation and development was demonstrated only against S. aureus and C. albicans. Our in vitro assays indicate that the studied plant extracts are a significant source of natural alternatives to antimicrobial therapy, thus avoiding antibiotic therapy, the use of which has become excessive in recent years. PMID:21717806

  3. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of N-(cinnamyl) chitosan analogs as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed E I; Rabea, Entsar I

    2013-06-01

    The current study focuses on the preparation of new N-(cinnamyl) chitosan derivatives as antimicrobial agents against nine types of crop-threatening pathogens. Chitosan was reacted with a set of aromatic cinnamaldehyde analogs by reductive amination involving formation of the corresponding imines, followed by reduction with sodium borohydride to produce N-(cinnamyl) chitosan derivatives. The structural characterization was confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and the degrees of substitution ranged from 0.08 to 0.28. The antibacterial activity was evaluated in vitro by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Erwinia carotovora. A higher inhibition activity was obtained by N-(?-methylcinnamyl) chitosan with MIC 1275 and 1025 mg/L against A. tumefaciens and E. carotovora, respectively followed by N-(o-methoxycinnamyl) chitosan (MIC=1925 and 1550 mg/L, respectively). The antifungal assessment was evaluated in vitro by mycelial radial growth technique against Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Pythium debaryanum and Phytophthora infestans. N-(o-methoxycinnamyl) chitosan showed the highest antifungal activity among the tested compounds against the airborne fungi A. alternata, B. cinerea, Bd. theobromae and Ph. infestans with EC?? of 672, 796, 980 and 636 mg/L, respectively. However, N-(p-N-dimethylaminocinnamyl) chitosan was the most active against the soil born fungi F. oxysporum, F. solani and P. debaryanum (EC50=411, 566 and 404 mg/L, respectively). On the other hand, the chitosan derivatives caused significant reduction in spore germination of A. alternata, B. cinerea, F. oxysporum and F. solani compared to chitosan and the reduction in spore germination was higher than that of the mycelia inhibition. The synthesis and characterization of new chitosan derivatives are ongoing in our laboratory aiming to obtain derivatives with higher antimicrobial activities and used as safe alternatives to harmful microbicides. PMID:23511055

  4. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host and bacterial cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with AMPs can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli. In biological interactions such as occur on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore open up new possibilities to modify the implant site and tailor it to a desirable bioactivity.

  5. ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, June 2011, p. 30543057 Vol. 55, No. 6 0066-4804/11/$12.00 doi:10.1128/AAC.01516-10

    E-print Network

    Barron, Annelise E.

    ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, June 2011, p. 3054­3057 Vol. 55, No. 6 0066. Antimicrobial Peptoids Are Effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Rinki Kapoor,1 Mayken W. Wadman,2 for modification 7 December 2010/Accepted 26 February 2011 The resistance of biofilms to conventional antibiotics

  6. Mechanical, Barrier and Antimicrobial Properties of Apple Puree Edible Films Containing Plant Essential Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible films, as carriers of antimicrobial compounds, constitute an approach for incorporating plant essential oils onto fresh-cut fruit surfaces. The effect against Escherichia coli O157:H7 of oregano, cinnamon and lemongrass oils in apple puree film-forming solution (APFFS) and in an edible film ...

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides: Insights into Membrane Permeabilization, Lipopolysaccharide Fragmentation and Application in Plant Disease Control.

    PubMed

    Datta, Aritreyee; Ghosh, Anirban; Airoldi, Cristina; Sperandeo, Paola; Mroue, Kamal H; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Kundu, Pallob; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in multidrug resistance against bacterial infections has become a major concern to human health and global food security. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently received substantial attention as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics because of their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. These peptides have also been implicated in plant disease control for replacing conventional treatment methods that are polluting and hazardous to the environment and to human health. Here, we report de novo design and antimicrobial studies of VG16, a 16-residue active fragment of Dengue virus fusion peptide. Our results reveal that VG16KRKP, a non-toxic and non-hemolytic analogue of VG16, shows significant antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative E. coli and plant pathogens X. oryzae and X. campestris, as well as against human fungal pathogens C. albicans and C. grubii. VG16KRKP is also capable of inhibiting bacterial disease progression in plants. The solution-NMR structure of VG16KRKP in lipopolysaccharide features a folded conformation with a centrally located turn-type structure stabilized by aromatic-aromatic packing interactions with extended N- and C-termini. The de novo design of VG16KRKP provides valuable insights into the development of more potent antibacterial and antiendotoxic peptides for the treatment of human and plant infections. PMID:26144972

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides: Insights into Membrane Permeabilization, Lipopolysaccharide Fragmentation and Application in Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Aritreyee; Ghosh, Anirban; Airoldi, Cristina; Sperandeo, Paola; Mroue, Kamal H.; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Kundu, Pallob; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in multidrug resistance against bacterial infections has become a major concern to human health and global food security. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently received substantial attention as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics because of their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. These peptides have also been implicated in plant disease control for replacing conventional treatment methods that are polluting and hazardous to the environment and to human health. Here, we report de novo design and antimicrobial studies of VG16, a 16-residue active fragment of Dengue virus fusion peptide. Our results reveal that VG16KRKP, a non-toxic and non-hemolytic analogue of VG16, shows significant antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative E. coli and plant pathogens X. oryzae and X. campestris, as well as against human fungal pathogens C. albicans and C. grubii. VG16KRKP is also capable of inhibiting bacterial disease progression in plants. The solution-NMR structure of VG16KRKP in lipopolysaccharide features a folded conformation with a centrally located turn-type structure stabilized by aromatic-aromatic packing interactions with extended N- and C-termini. The de novo design of VG16KRKP provides valuable insights into the development of more potent antibacterial and antiendotoxic peptides for the treatment of human and plant infections. PMID:26144972

  9. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of herbal plants used in the traditional medicine of Jordan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adel M Mahasneh; Ahmad A El-Oqlah

    1999-01-01

    Petroleum ether, ethanol, butanol, and aqueous crude extracts of the whole aerial parts of nine plants exhibited variable degrees of antimicrobial activity against four bacterial and three fungal species. Methanol and hexane extracts did not show any activity. Compared with standard antibiotics, extracts had low to moderate activity. The activity spectrum is wide against gram-positive and negative bacteria as well

  10. Composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of some medicinal and spice plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Cvijovic; D. Djukic; L. Mandic; G. Acamovic-Djokovic; M. Pesakovic

    2010-01-01

    An examination was made on the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of four medicinal plants Carum carvi, Coriandrum sativum, Hyssopus officinalis, and Eucalyptus globulus, the first three of which are also used as culinary spice herbs. Carum carvi L. and Coriandrum sativum L. belong to the Apiacea family. In traditional medicine, Carum carvi is used in the form of a

  11. Antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms by extracts from herbal Jordanian plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amjad Khalil; Basem F. Dababneh; Ahmad H. Al-Gabbiesh

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to study antimicrobial activity of a group of herbal medicinal plants, including Achillea biebersteinii, Phlomis viscosa, Ainworthia trachycarpa, Solanum elaeagnifolium, Arum hygrophilum, Varthemia iphionoides, Crupina crupinastrum, Teucrium polium, Achillea santolina, Micromeria nervosa, Chenopodium murate, Ballota philistaea, Onosma roussaei, Fagonia mollis, Marrubium vulgare, Calotropis procera, Salvia hierosolymitana, Ballota undulata, Hallogeton alopecuroides, Scrophularia hierochuntica and Nonea melanocarpa, grown in

  12. The effect of antimicrobial agents and modified atmosphere packaging on the microbial shelf life of corn tortillas

    E-print Network

    Tellez-Giron, Alfredo

    1988-01-01

    . In commercial tortillerias and bakeries with good sanitary practices, molds are the primary concern since they constitute the principal group of microbial spoilage organ- isms (King 1981). Molds are present almost everywhere and they are known to disperse... criteria for the pro- ducts to be tested were based on the type of products and the type and amount of antimicrobial preservative added. Plant ?1 used fresh cooked corn and tortilla corn flour for their tortilla pro- duction, while plants ?2 and ?3...

  13. Comparison of the antimicrobial effect of heavy silicone oil and conventional silicone oil against endophthalmitis-causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Örnek, Nurgül; Apan, Teoman; O?urel, Reyhan; Örnek, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct an in vitro experimental study comparing the effectiveness of conventional silicone oil and heavy silicone oil against endophthalmitis-causing agents. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of conventional silicone oil (RS OIL 5000) and heavy silicone oil (heavySil 1500) was tested. The antimicrobial effects of both silicone oils were determined by the growing capability of the microorganism. Results: The number of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans decreased to zero levels at the second day of inoculation in heavy silicone oil. In conventional silicone oil, the microorganisms survived longer than in heavy silicone oil. Conclusion: Heavy silicone oil seems to be more effective than conventional silicone oil against endophthalmitis-causing agents. PMID:24817741

  14. Aliphatic acid-conjugated antimicrobial peptides - potential agents with anti-tumor, multidrug resistance-reversing activity and enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Wang, Xuekun; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-07-28

    Compared with traditional therapeutics, antimicrobial peptides as novel anti-tumor agents have prominent advantages of higher specificity and circumvention of multi-drug resistance. In a previous study, we found that B1, an antimicrobial peptide derived from Cathelicidin-BF15, presented specific anti-tumor activity against several tumor cells. Since aliphatic chain-conjugated peptides have shown ameliorative activity and stability, we conjugated aliphatic acids with different lengths to the amino terminal of B1. All the conjugated peptides exhibited improved anti-tumor activity over B1. Further investigations revealed that the peptides were capable of disrupting the cell membrane, stimulating cytochrome c release into the cytosol, which results in apoptosis. The peptides also acted against multidrug resistant cells and had multidrug resistance-reversing effects. Additionally, conjugation of aliphatic acid enhanced the peptide stability in plasma. In summary, aliphatic acid-modified peptides might be promising anti-tumor agents in the future. PMID:26083110

  15. The Antimicrobial Properties of Cedar Leaf (Thuja plicata) Oil; A Safe and Efficient Decontamination Agent for Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, James; Kuo, Michael; Vimalanathan, Selvarani

    2011-01-01

    Cedar leaf oil (CLO), derived from the Western red cedar, Thuja plicata, was evaluated as a safe and acceptable broad spectrum antimicrobial agent, with a view to its potential applications in buildings, including the alleviation of sick building syndrome. Various Gram-positive and Gram-negative human bacteria, and two fungal organisms, all known to be common environmental sources of potential infection, were selected and tested quantitatively, and all of them were found to be susceptible to CLO liquid and vapor. Bacterial spores and Aspergillus niger were sensitive, although less so than the vegetative bacteria. Similar tests with cultured human lung cells showed that continuous exposure to CLO vapor for at least 60 minutes was not toxic to the cells. Based on these results, CLO shows promise as a prospective safe, green, broad-spectrum anti-microbial agent for decontamination of buildings. PMID:22408584

  16. The antimicrobial properties of cedar leaf (Thuja plicata) oil; a safe and efficient decontamination agent for buildings.

    PubMed

    Hudson, James; Kuo, Michael; Vimalanathan, Selvarani

    2011-12-01

    Cedar leaf oil (CLO), derived from the Western red cedar, Thuja plicata, was evaluated as a safe and acceptable broad spectrum antimicrobial agent, with a view to its potential applications in buildings, including the alleviation of sick building syndrome. Various Gram-positive and Gram-negative human bacteria, and two fungal organisms, all known to be common environmental sources of potential infection, were selected and tested quantitatively, and all of them were found to be susceptible to CLO liquid and vapor. Bacterial spores and Aspergillus niger were sensitive, although less so than the vegetative bacteria. Similar tests with cultured human lung cells showed that continuous exposure to CLO vapor for at least 60 minutes was not toxic to the cells. Based on these results, CLO shows promise as a prospective safe, green, broad-spectrum anti-microbial agent for decontamination of buildings. PMID:22408584

  17. Assessing the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents infused in polyurethane composite rubber flooring products in the control of bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHN KENNELL; ROBERT CUNNINGHAM

    The viability of nosocomial and community-acquired bacterial pathogens was assessed on polyurethane composite rubber flooring products containing three different antimicrobial agents. Samples containing three concentrations of zinc pyrithione, N-butyl-1,2-benzisothiazolin-3-one, or inorganic silver-glass zeolite were tested in three separate assays using gram (+) and gram (-) bacterial species. A direct contact assay (JISZ 2801) was optimized to mimic real-world conditions and

  18. Resistance to antimicrobial agents among Salmonella isolates recovered from layer farms and eggs in the Caribbean region.

    PubMed

    Adesiyun, Abiodun; Webb, Lloyd; Musai, Lisa; Louison, Bowen; Joseph, George; Stewart-Johnson, Alva; Samlal, Sannandan; Rodrigo, Shelly

    2014-12-01

    This investigation determined the frequency of resistance of 84 isolates of Salmonella comprising 14 serotypes recovered from layer farms in three Caribbean countries (Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, and St. Lucia) to eight antimicrobial agents, using the disc diffusion method. Resistance among isolates of Salmonella was related to the country of recovery, type of sample, size of layer farms, and isolate serotype. Overall, all (100.0%) of the isolates exhibited resistance to one or more of seven antimicrobial agents tested, and all were susceptible to chloramphenicol. The resistance detected ranged from 11.9% to sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SXT) to 100.0% to erythromycin. The difference was, however, not statistically significant (P = 0.23). Across countries, for types of samples that yielded Salmonella, significant differences in frequency of resistance were detected only to SXT (P = 0.002) in Trinidad and Tobago and to gentamycin (P = 0.027) in St. Lucia. For the three countries, the frequency of resistance to antimicrobial agents was significantly different for ampicillin (P = 0.001) and SXT (P = 0.032). A total of 83 (98.8%) of the 84 isolates exhibited 39 multidrug resistance patterns. Farm size significantly (P = 0.032) affected the frequency of resistance to kanamycin across the countries. Overall, among the 14 serotypes of Salmonella tested, significant (P < 0.05) differences in frequency of resistance were detected to kanamycin, ampicillin, and SXT. Results suggest that the relatively high frequency of resistance to six of the antimicrobial agents (erythromycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, kanamycin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) tested and the multidrug resistance detected may pose prophylactic and therapeutic concerns for chicken layer farms in the three countries studied. PMID:25474066

  19. In vitro and in vivo analysis of antimicrobial agents alone and in combination against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    He, Songzhe; He, Hui; Chen, Yi; Chen, Yueming; Wang, Wei; Yu, Daojun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of tigecycline and other 13 common antimicrobial agents, alone or in combination, against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods: An in vitro susceptibility test of 101 A. baumannii was used to detect minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A mouse lung infection model of multi-drug resistant A. baumannii, established by the ultrasonic atomization method, was used to define in vivo antimicrobial activities. Results: Multi-drug resistant A. baumannii showed high sensitivity to tigecycline (98% inhibition), polymyxin B (78.2% inhibition), and minocycline (74.2% inhibition). However, the use of these antimicrobial agents in combination with other antimicrobial agents produced synergistic or additive effects. In vivo data showed that white blood cell (WBC) counts in drug combination groups C (minocycline + amikacin) and D (minocycline + rifampicin) were significantly higher than in groups A (tigecycline) and B (polymyxin B) (P < 0.05), after administration of the drugs 24 h post-infection. Lung tissue inflammation gradually increased in the model group during the first 24 h after ultrasonic atomization infection; vasodilation, congestion with hemorrhage were observed 48 h post infection. After 3 days of anti-infective therapy in groups A, B, C, and D, lung tissue inflammation in each group gradually recovered with clear structures. The mortality rates in drug combination groups(groups C and D) were much lower than in groups A and B. Conclusion: The combination of minocycline with either rifampicin or amikacin is more effective against multi-drug resistant A. baumannii than single-agent tigecycline or polymyxin B. In addition, the mouse lung infection by ultrasonic atomization is a suitable model for drug screening and analysis of infection mechanism. PMID:26074898

  20. Synergy Testing of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium against Quinupristin-Dalfopristin in Combination with Other Antimicrobial Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. O. MATSUMURA; L. LOUIE; M. LOUIE; A. E. SIMOR

    Using checkerboard and time-kill assays, we evaluated the in vitro activity of quinupristin-dalfopristin (RP 59500) alone and in combination with five other antimicrobial agents against 12 clinical strains of vancomycin- resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF). In time-kill studies, six VREF strains exhibited synergism with the combination of quinupristin-dalfopristin and doxycycline and three exhibited synergism with quinupristin- dalfopristin plus ampicillin-sulbactam. Combinations of

  1. Killing of the Yeast and Hyphal Forms of Candida albicans Using a Light-Activated Antimicrobial Agent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Jackson; S. Meghji; A. MacRobert; B. Henderson; M. Wilson

    1999-01-01

    .   Oral infections due to Candida albicans are a common occurrence in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this investigation was\\u000a to determine whether the yeast and hyphal forms of the organism could be killed using the light-activated antimicrobial agent\\u000a toluidine blue O (TBO). Three variables were investigated: TBO concentration, laser light dose and pre-irradiation time (PIT).

  2. Synergism between plant extract and antimicrobial drugs used on Staphylococcus aureus diseases.

    PubMed

    Betoni, Joyce Elaine Cristina; Mantovani, Rebeca Passarelli; Barbosa, Lidiane Nunes; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio; Fernandes Junior, Ary

    2006-06-01

    Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent, and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the synergism between 13 antimicrobial drugs and 8 plant extracts--"guaco" (Mikania glomerata), guava (Psidium guajava), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), garlic (Allium sativum), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus), ginger (Zingiber officinale), "carqueja" (Baccharis trimera), and mint (Mentha piperita)--against Staphylococcus aureus strains, and for this purpose, the disk method was the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed. Petri dishes were prepared with or without dilution of plant extracts at sub-inhibitory concentrations in Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA), and the inhibitory zones were recorded in millimeters. In vitro anti-Staphylococcus aureus activities of the extracts were confirmed, and synergism was verified for all the extracts; clove, guava, and lemongrass presented the highest synergism rate with antimicrobial drugs, while ginger and garlic showed limited synergistic capacity. PMID:16951808

  3. VINEGAR AS AN ANTIMICROBIAL AGENT FOR CONTROL OF Candida spp. IN COMPLETE DENTURE WEARERS

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Telma Maria Silva; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; Leăo, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2008-01-01

    The use of denture is known to increase the carriage of Candida in healthy patients, and the proliferation of Candida albicans strains can be associated with denture-induced stomatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of vinegar as an antimicrobial agent for control of Candida spp. in complete upper denture wearers. Fifty-five patients were submitted to a detailed clinical interview and oral clinical examination, and were instructed to keep their dentures immersed in a 10% vinegar solution (pH less than 3) overnight for 45 days. Before and after the experimental period, saliva samples were collected for detection of Candida, counting of cfu/mL and identification of species by phenotypical tests (germ tube formation, chlamidoconidia production, and carbohydrate fermentation and assimilation). The results were analyzed using Spearman's correlation and Student's t-test (p?0.05). Candida yeasts were present in 87.3% of saliva samples before the treatment. A significant reduction was verified in CFU/mL counts of Candida after treatment. A positive correlation between Candida and denture stomatitis was verified, since the decrease of cfu/mL counts was correlated with a reduction in cases of denture stomatitis. Although it was not able to eliminate C. albicans, the immersion of the complete denture in 10% vinegar solution, during the night, reduced the amounts (cfu/mL) of Candida spp. in the saliva and the presence of denture stomatitis in the studied patients. PMID:19082396

  4. Antimicrobial factor from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens inhibits Paenibacillus larvae , the causative agent of American foulbrood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisianne Brittes Benitez; Renata Voltolini Velho; Amanda de Souza da Motta; Jéferson Segalin; Adriano Brandelli

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LBM 5006 produces an antimicrobial factor active against Paenibacillus larvae, a major honeybee pathogen. The antagonistic effect and the mode of action of the antimicrobial factor were investigated.\\u000a The antibacterial activity was produced starting at mid-logarithmic growth phase, reaching its maximum during the stationary\\u000a phase. Exposure of cell suspensions of P. larvae to this antimicrobial resulted in loss

  5. The use of versatile plant antimicrobial peptides in agribusiness and human health.

    PubMed

    de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; e Silva Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Sousa, Daniel Amaro; Viana, Juliane Cançado; de Oliveira-Júnior, Nelson Gomes; Miranda, Vívian; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2014-05-01

    Plant immune responses involve a wide diversity of physiological reactions that are induced by the recognition of pathogens, such as hypersensitive responses, cell wall modifications, and the synthesis of antimicrobial molecules including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These proteinaceous molecules have been widely studied, presenting peculiar characteristics such as conserved domains and a conserved disulfide bond pattern. Currently, many AMP classes with diverse modes of action are known, having been isolated from a large number of organisms. Plant AMPs comprise an interesting source of studies nowadays, and among these there are reports of different classes, including defensins, albumins, cyclotides, snakins and several others. These peptides have been widely used in works that pursue human disease control, including nosocomial infections, as well as for agricultural purposes. In this context, this review will focus on the relevance of the structural-function relations of AMPs derived from plants and their proper use in applications for human health and agribusiness. PMID:24548568

  6. Screening of some Indian medicinal plants for their antimicrobial properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iqbal Ahmad; Zafar Mehmood; Faiz Mohammad

    1998-01-01

    A total of 82 Indian medicinal plants traditionally used in medicines were subjected to preliminary antibacterial screening against several pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms. Aqueous, hexane and alcoholic extracts of each plant were tested for their antibacterial activity using agar well diffusion method at sample concentration of 200 mg\\/ml. The results indicated that out of 82 plants, 56 exhibited antibacterial activity

  7. Rhamnolipids as emulsifying agents for essential oil formulations: antimicrobial effect against Candida albicans and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Haba, Ester; Bouhdid, Samira; Torrego-Solana, Noelia; Marqués, A M; Espuny, M José; García-Celma, M José; Manresa, Angeles

    2014-12-10

    This work examines the influence of essential oil composition on emulsification with rhamnolipids and their use as therapeutic antimicrobial agents against two opportunistic pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Candida albicans. Rhamnolipids, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with waste frying oil as the carbon source, were composed of eight rhamnolipid homologues. The rhamnolipid mixture was used to produce emulsions containing essential oils (EOs) of Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum verum, Origanum compactum and Lavandula angustifolia using the titration method. Ternary phase diagrams were designed to evaluate emulsion stability, which differed depending on the essential oil. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the EOs alone and the emulsions was evaluated. The antimicrobial activity presented by the essential oils alone increased with emulsification. The surface properties of rhamnolipids contribute to the positive dispersion of EOs and thus increase their availability and antimicrobial activity against C. albicans and S. aureus. Therefore, rhamnolipid-based emulsions represent a promising approach to the development of EO delivery systems. PMID:25269010

  8. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-09-28

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  9. Use of plant-derived antimicrobials for improving the safety of poultry products.

    PubMed

    Venkitanarayanan, K; Kollanoor-Johny, A; Darre, M J; Donoghue, A M; Donoghue, D J

    2013-02-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are the 2 major foodborne pathogens transmitted through poultry products. Chickens are the reservoir hosts of these pathogens, with their intestinal colonization being the most significant factor causing contamination of meat and eggs. Effective preslaughter strategies for reducing the colonization of birds with these pathogens are critical to improve the microbiological safety of poultry products. An antimicrobial treatment that can be applied through feed represents the most practical and economically viable method for adoption on farms. Additionally, a natural and safe antimicrobial will be better accepted by producers without concerns for toxicity. This symposium talk discussed the potential use of plant-derived, GRAS (generally recognized as safe)-status molecules, caprylic acid, trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, carvacrol, and thymol as feed supplements for reducing cecal populations of Salmonella Enteritidis and C. jejuni in chickens. Additionally, the effect of plant molecules on Salmonella virulence genes critical for cecal colonization in chickens was also discussed. PMID:23300319

  10. Applications of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Asín-Prieto, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Isla, Arantxazu

    2015-05-01

    The alarming increase of resistance against multiple currently available antibiotics is leading to a rapid lose of treatment options against infectious diseases. Since the antibiotic resistance is partially due to a misuse or abuse of the antibiotics, this situation can be reverted when improving their use. One strategy is the optimization of the antimicrobial dosing regimens. In fact, inappropriate drug choice and suboptimal dosing are two major factors that should be considered because they lead to the emergence of drug resistance and consequently, poorer clinical outcomes. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis in combination with Monte Carlo simulation allows to optimize dosing regimens of the antibiotic agents in order to conserve their therapeutic value. Therefore, the aim of this review is to explain the basis of the PK/PD analysis and associated techniques, and provide a brief revision of the applications of PK/PD analysis from a therapeutic point-of-view. The establishment and reevaluation of clinical breakpoints is the sticking point in antibiotic therapy as the clinical use of the antibiotics depends on them. Two methodologies are described to establish the PK/PD breakpoints, which are a big part of the clinical breakpoint setting machine. Furthermore, the main subpopulations of patients with altered characteristics that can condition the PK/PD behavior (such as critically ill, elderly, pediatric or obese patients) and therefore, the outcome of the antibiotic therapy, are reviewed. Finally, some recommendations are provided from a PK/PD point of view to enhance the efficacy of prophylaxis protocols used in surgery. PMID:25737147

  11. Prescribing Antimicrobial Agents for Dogs and Cats via University Pharmacies in Finland – Patterns and Quality of Information

    PubMed Central

    Hölsö, K; Rantala, M; Lillas, A; Eerikäinen, S; Huovinen, P; Kaartinen, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate antimicrobial use in dogs and cats in Finland. Information on veterinary prescriptions was gathered from University Pharmacies (n = 17) over a one-month period, April 2001. A total of 2719 prescriptions for veterinary use were delivered, of which the majority were for dogs (70%, n = 1898) and cats (14%, n = 384). The most prescribed therapy group was per-oral antimicrobial agents (53%, n = 1449), of which 16% (n = 237) were medicines approved for humans. The most commonly used substances for dogs and cats were betalactams, 66% and 78%, respectively. The proportion of fluoroquinolones was 3–5%. The average duration of the treatment periods was 10 days with the exception of treatment of cats with macrolide lincosamides, where the mean period was 20 days. Indication was mentioned only in 37% of the prescriptions. PMID:16108216

  12. Plant location and extraction procedure strongly alter the antimicrobial activity of murta extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carolina Shene; Agnes K. Reyes; Mario Villarroel; Jorge Sineiro; Manuel Pinelo; Mónica Rubilar

    2009-01-01

    Leaves and fruits of Murta (Ugni Molinae Turcz.) growing in three locations of Chile with diverse climatic conditions were extracted by using ethanol\\/water mixtures\\u000a at different ratios and the antimicrobial activity was assessed. Extracts containing the highest polyphenolic content were\\u000a from murta plants grown nearer to the mountain (58 mg GAE\\/g murta), subjected to extreme summer\\/winter-day\\/night temperature\\u000a changes and rainy regime.

  13. Ecotoxicity and screening level ecotoxicological risk assessment of five antimicrobial agents: triclosan, triclocarban, resorcinol, phenoxyethanol and p-thymol.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ikumi; Kagota, Kei-Ichiro; Yasuda, Yusuke; Yoneda, Saori; Morita, Junpei; Nakada, Norihide; Kameda, Yutaka; Kimura, Kumiko; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    Acute and chronic (or sub-chronic) toxicity of five selected antimicrobial agents, including triclosan (TCS), triclocarban (TCC), resorcinol, phenoxyethanol and p-thymol, was investigated using the conventional three-aquatic-organism battery. These compounds are widely used in cosmetics and other personal care products and their ecological risk has recently become a significant concern. As results of toxicity tests, TCS was found to be most strongly toxic for green algae [e.g. 72?h no observed effect concentration (NOEC) of 0.50?µg?l(-1) ] among the selected compounds, followed by TCC, while TCC was more toxic or similar to TCS for Daphnia and fish (e.g. Daphnia 8?day NOEC of 1.9?µg?l(-1) ). Having compared the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) determined from the toxicity data with measured environmental concentrations (MEC), the preliminary ecological risk assessment of these five antimicrobials was conducted. The MEC/PNEC ratios of TCS and TCC were over 1 for some monitoring data, especially in urban streams with watershed areas without sewage service coverage, and their potential risk for green algae and Daphnia might be at a level of concern, although the contribution of TCS/TCC on the total toxicity of the those sites needs to be further investigated. For the three other antimicrobials, the maximum MEC/PNEC ratio for resorcinol was 0.1-1, but those for phenoxyethanol and p-thymol were <0.1 and their risk to aquatic organisms is limited, although the additive effects with TCS, TCC and other antimicrobial agents, such as parabens, need to be further examined in future studies. PMID:22806922

  14. Screening of selected medicinal plants of Nepal for antimicrobial activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Taylor; N. P. Manandhar; G. H. N. Towers

    1995-01-01

    In an ethnopharmacological screening of selected medicinal plants used in Nepal, methanol extracts from 21 plant species were assayed for activity against 8 strains of bacteria and 5 strains of fungi. Duplicate assays were conducted with and without exposure to UV-A radiation to test for light-activated or light-enhanced activity. All 21 of the extracts showed activity against at least 2

  15. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity of Zingiberaceae Plants in Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I-Nan Chen; Chen-Chin Chang; Chang-Chai Ng; Chung-Yi Wang; Yuan-Tay Shyu; Tsu-Liang Chang

    2008-01-01

    The rhizomes of the Zingiberaceae family are a vegetable widely used in many Asian countries, and their medicinal functions\\u000a have been broadly discussed and accepted in many traditional recipes. In this study, 18 species of five genus of Zingiberaceae\\u000a plants from Taiwan area were collected and analyzed for their functional properties. Methanolic extracts of the plants were\\u000a analyzed for their

  16. The susceptibility patterns of eight antimicrobial agents for potential treatment of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals 

    E-print Network

    Daniels, Steven Antonn

    2005-02-17

    Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of severe pneumonia in foals, and is an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised humans. In combination, erythromycin and rifampin are the most commonly used antimicrobials in treating ...

  17. Screening of Amazonian plants from the Adolpho Ducke forest reserve, Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil, for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Ana Lúcia Basílio; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Oliveira, Viviana Maria Araújo de; Fernandes, Ormezinda Celeste Cristo; Cauper, Gláucia Socorro de Barros; Pohlit, Adrian Martin

    2008-02-01

    Tropical forests are species-rich reserves for the discovery and development of antimicrobial drugs. The aim of this work is to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of Amazon plants found within the National Institute on Amazon Research's Adolpho Ducke forest reserve, located in Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil. 75 methanol, chloroform and water extracts representing 12 plant species were tested for antimicrobial activity towards strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus oralis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans using the gel-diffusion method. Active extracts were further evaluated to establish minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and antimicrobial profiles using bioautography on normal-phase thin-layer chromatography plates. Diclinanona calycina presented extracts with good antimicrobial activity and S. oralis and M. smegmatis were the most sensitive bacteria. D. calycina and Lacmellea gracilis presented extracts with the lowest MIC (48.8 microg/ml). D. calycina methanol and chloroform leaf extracts presented the best overall antimicrobial activity. All test organisms were sensitive to D. calycina branch chloroform extract in the bioautography assay. This is the first evaluation of the biological activity of these plant species and significant in vitro antimicrobial activity was detected in extracts and components from two species, D. calycina and L. gracilis. PMID:18368234

  18. Plant chemical defenses: are all constitutive antimicrobial metabolites phytoanticipins?

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Yaya, Estifanos E

    2015-01-01

    A critical perspective on phytoanticipins, constitutive plant secondary metabolites with defensive roles against microbes is presented. This mini-review focuses on the chemical groups and structural types of defensive plant metabolites thus far not reviewed from the phytoanticipin perspective: i) fatty acid derivatives and polyketides, ii) terpenoids, iii) shikimates, phenylpropanoids and derivatives, and iv) benzylisoquinoline and pyrrolizidine alkaloids. The more traditional groups of phytoanticipins are briefly summarized, with particular focus on the latest results: i) benzoxazinoids, ii) cyanogenic glycosides, iii) glucosinolates and their metabolic products, and iv) saponins. Current evidence suggests that a better understanding of the functions of plant metabolites will drive their application to protect crops against microbial diseases. PMID:25920246

  19. In Vitro Activities of 15 Antimicrobial Agents against 110 Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Clinical Isolates Collected from 1983 to 2004?

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, David W.; Galang, Minerva A.; Sambol, Susan P.; Osmolski, James R.; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N.

    2007-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is increasing, and standard treatment is not always effective. Therefore, more-effective antimicrobial agents and treatment strategies are needed. We used the agar dilution method to determine the in vitro susceptibility of the following antimicrobials against 110 toxigenic clinical isolates of C. difficile from 1983 to 2004, primarily from the United States: doripenem, meropenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, OPT-80, ramoplanin, rifalazil, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, tizoxanide, tigecycline, vancomycin, tinidazole, and metronidazole. Included among the isolates tested were six strains of the toxinotype III, NAP1/BI/027 group implicated in recent U.S., Canadian, and European outbreaks. The most active agents in vitro were rifaximin, rifalazil, tizoxanide, nitazoxanide, and OPT-80 with MICs at which 50% of the isolates are inhibited (MIC50) and MIC90 values of 0.0075 and 0.015 ?g/ml, 0.0075 and 0.03 ?g/ml, 0.06 and 0.125 ?g/ml, 0.06 and 0.125 ?g/ml, 0.125 and 0.125 ?g/ml, respectively. However, for three isolates the rifalazil and rifaximin MICs were very high (MIC of >256 ?g/ml). Ramoplanin, vancomycin, doripenem, and meropenem were also very active in vitro with narrow MIC50 and MIC90 ranges. None of the isolates were resistant to metronidazole, the only agent for which there are breakpoints, with tinidazole showing nearly identical results. These in vitro susceptibility results are encouraging and support continued evaluation of selected antimicrobials in clinical trials of treatment for CDAD. PMID:17517836

  20. Antimicrobial activity of some coumarin containing herbal plants growing in Finland.

    PubMed

    Ojala, T; Remes, S; Haansuu, P; Vuorela, H; Hiltunen, R; Haahtela, K; Vuorela, P

    2000-11-01

    Antimicrobial screening against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, mold, as well as plant pathogenic fungi, with emphasis on method optimization was carried out on methanol extracts prepared from seven plants grown in Finland. Sensitivity to the extracts was found to vary considerably among the micro-organisms, the extract from Petroselinum crispum and Ruta graveolens showing the highest toxicity against Rhizoctonia solani. The growth of Heterobasidium annosum was inhibited, whereas that of Phytophtora (cactorum) was promoted by all the extracts. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of six natural coumarin compounds were weak, except for the inhibitory effect against Fusarium culmorum. PMID:11025169

  1. Effect of mixed antimicrobial agents and flavors in active packaging films.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Laura; Escudero, Ana; Batlle, Ramón; Nerín, Cristina

    2009-09-23

    Active packaging is an emerging food technology to improve the quality and safety of food products. Many works have been developed to study the antimicrobial activity of essential oils. Essential oils have been traditionally used as flavorings in food, so they have an important odor impact but they have as well antimicrobial properties that could be used to protect the food. Recent developments in antimicrobial active packaging showed the efficiency of essential oils versus bread and bakery products among other applications. However, one of the main problems to face is the odor and taste they could provide to the packaged food. Using some aromas to mask the odor could be a good approach. That is why the main objective of this paper is to develop an antimicrobial packaging material based on the combination of the most active compounds of essential oils (hydrocinnamaldehyde, oregano essential oil, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, and carvacrol) together with some aromas commonly used in the food industry. A study of the concentration required to get the antimicrobial properties, the organoleptic compatibility with typical aroma present in many food systems (vanilla, banana, and strawberry), and the right combination of both systems has been carried out. Antimicrobial tests of both the mentioned aromas, the main components of some essential oils, and the combination of both groups were carried out against bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli), yeasts (Candida albicans, Debaryomyces hansenii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii), and molds (Botrytis cinerae, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium roqueforti, Eurotium repens, Penicillium islandicum, Penicillium commune, Penicillium nalgiovensis). The sensory properties of the combinations were evaluated with a triangular test and classification was by an order test; the odor threshold of the aroma compounds was also studied. The results reveal that none of the aromas had antimicrobial properties. The most antimicrobial compounds are thymol, carvacrol, and cinnamaldehyde, but none of them could be combined with banana aroma, whereas only thymol with strawberry aroma gave the right combined organoleptic profile. All of the antimicrobials under study could be combined with vanilla aroma, providing both antimicrobial property and the odor expected. PMID:19711918

  2. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis and some other medicinal plants commonly used in South-East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lai Wah; Cheah, Emily LC; Saw, Constance LL; Weng, Wanyu; Heng, Paul WS

    2008-01-01

    Background Eight medicinal plants were tested for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different extraction methods were also tested for their effects on the bioactivities of the medicinal plants. Methods Eight plants, namely Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis (Laliaocao), Folium Murraya Koenigii (Jialiye), Rhizoma Arachis Hypogea (Huashenggen), Herba Houttuyniae (Yuxingcao), Epipremnum pinnatum (Pashulong), Rhizoma Typhonium Flagelliforme (Laoshuyu), Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis (Houpo) and Rhizoma Imperatae (Baimaogen) were investigated for their potential antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Results Extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis had the strongest activities against M. Smegmatis, C. albicans, B. subtilis and S. aureus. Boiled extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis, Folium Murraya Koenigii, Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis and Herba Houttuyniae demonstrated greater antioxidant activities than other tested medicinal plants. Conclusion Among the eight tested medicinal plants, Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis showed the highest antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different methods of extraction yield different spectra of bioactivities. PMID:19038060

  3. Marine antimicrobial peptide tachyplesin as an efficient nanocarrier for macromolecule delivery in plant and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aastha; Yadav, Bhoopesh K; Chugh, Archana

    2015-02-01

    Membrane-active peptides can be classified as cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that are known to play interchangeable roles. In this study, this dual behaviour was studied for the marine AMP, tachyplesin. It is a well-established cyclic peptide known to possess antimicrobial properties and was investigated for its cell-penetrating property and cargo delivery ability. Because of its derivation from a marine organism as well as cyclic nature, it has been shown to possess higher stability in vitro. In this study, its internalization as a cell-penetrating peptide was established and characterized in both plant and mammalian systems. It was shown to deliver cargo molecules in both living systems, emerging as an efficient nonviral macromolecule nanocarrier. PMID:25514997

  4. The effect of radiopacifiers agents on pH, calcium release, radiopacity, and antimicrobial properties of different calcium hydroxide dressings.

    PubMed

    Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; GarcÍa-Godoy, Franklin; Moldauer, Bertram Ivan; Minotti, Paloma Gagliardi; TercíLIA Grizzo, Larissa; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, pH level, calcium ion release, and radiopacity of calcium hydroxide pastes associated with three radiopacifying agents (iodoform, zinc oxide, and barium sulfate). For the pH and calcium release tests, 45 acrylic teeth were utilized and immersed in ultrapure water. After 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days the solution was analyzed by using a pH meter and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Polyethylene tubes filled with the pastes were used to perform the radiopacity test. For the antimicrobial test, 25 dentin specimens were infected intraorally in order to induce the biofilm colonization and treated with the pastes for 7 days. The Live/Dead technique and a confocal microscope were used to obtain the ratio of live cells. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were performed to show differences among the groups (P??0.05). The calcium hydroxide/iodoform samples had the highest radiopacity and antimicrobial activity against the biofilm-infected dentin in comparison to the other pastes (P?antimicrobial action versus similar samples mixed with BaSO4 or ZnO. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:620-625, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25990864

  5. Phytochemical composition and in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Jaberian, Hamideh; Piri, Khosro; Nazari, Javad

    2013-01-01

    Different parts of three plants (Primula auriculata, Fumaria vaillantii and Falcaria vulgaris) were extracted with three different solvents to yield 72 crude extracts. The phytochemical analysis (chemical screening, GC-MS) of three plants was investigated for their antioxidant and antibacterial activity using nine Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The principal antioxidant and antimicrobial components were determined using HPLC with UV detection. All extracts possessed antibacterial activity especially methanolic extracts from flowers of P. auriculata. The DPPH-radical scavenging assay exhibited high antioxidant activities in three plants (more than 80% at 50?g). The F. vulgaris showed high content of carvacrol (29.8%) as main component. The contents of carvacrol and fumaric acid in the methanolic-water extracts were 1119 and 1966mg/l respectively. Our results indicate that these plants would be able to promise sources of natural products with potential antibacterial and antioxidant activity. PMID:23017418

  6. Food Antimicrobials Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Padilla, Adriana; Soto, Karen M.; Hernández Iturriaga, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Natural food antimicrobials are bioactive compounds that inhibit the growth of microorganisms involved in food spoilage or food-borne illness. However, stability issues result in degradation and loss of antimicrobial activity. Nanoencapsulation allows protection of antimicrobial food agents from unfavorable environmental conditions and incompatibilities. Encapsulation of food antimicrobials control delivery increasing the concentration of the antimicrobials in specific areas and the improvement of passive cellular absorption mechanisms resulted in higher antimicrobial activity. This paper reviews the present state of the art of the nanostructures used as food antimicrobial carriers including nanoemulsions, nanoliposomes, nanoparticles, and nanofibers. PMID:24995363

  7. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Agents on Microbial Pathogens of Reproductive Health Importance in a Developing Country

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rasheed Bakare

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Objective: Objective: Objective: The present study was carried out to determine the most potent available antimicrobials in the treatment of pathogens of reproductive health importance in Nigeria. Mate Mate Mate Material and methods: rial and methods: rial and methods: rial and methods: Using the agar disc-diffusion and modified agar well-diffusion methods, bacterial and fungal pathogens obtained from clinical specimens

  8. Investigation of Vietnamese plants for potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lynette Bueno; Still, Patrick C; Naman, C Benjamin; Ren, Yulin; Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Van Thanh, Bui; Swanson, Steven M; Soejarto, Djaja D; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2014-12-01

    Higher plants continue to afford humankind with many new drugs, for a variety of disease types. In this review, recent phytochemical and biological progress is presented for part of a collaborative multi-institutional project directed towards the discovery of new antitumor agents. The specific focus is on bioactive natural products isolated and characterized structurally from tropical plants collected in Vietnam. The plant collection, identification, and processing steps are described, and the natural products isolated from these species are summarized with their biological activities. PMID:25395897

  9. Antimicrobial effects of Finnish plant extracts containing flavonoids and other phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rauha, J P; Remes, S; Heinonen, M; Hopia, A; Kähkönen, M; Kujala, T; Pihlaja, K; Vuorela, H; Vuorela, P

    2000-05-25

    Plant phenolics, especially dietary flavonoids, are currently of growing interest owing to their supposed functional properties in promoting human health. Antimicrobial screening of 13 phenolic substances and 29 extracts prepared from Finnish plant materials against selected microbes was conducted in this study. The tests were carried out using diffusion methods with four to nine microbial species (Aspergillus niger, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis). Flavone, quercetin and naringenin were effective in inhibiting the growth of the organisms. The most active plant extracts were purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) against Candida albicans, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim.), willow herb (Epilobium angustifolium L.), cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus L.) and raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) against bacteria, and white birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.), pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and potato (Solanum tuberosum. L.) against gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:10857921

  10. Adaptive Resistance to Biocides in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157 and Cross-Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Braoudaki, M.; Hilton, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms by which bacteria resist killing by antibiotics and biocides are still poorly defined, although repeated exposure to sublethal concentrations of antibacterial agents undoubtedly contributes to their development. This study aimed both to investigate the potential of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157 for adaptive resistance to commonly used biocides and to determine any cross-resistance to antibiotics. Strains were repeatedly passaged in media containing increasing concentrations of a biocide or antibiotic until adaptive resistance was obtained. A wide panel of antimicrobial agents was then screened by using the adapted strain to determine cross-resistance, if any. Adaptive resistance was readily achieved for both S. enterica and E. coli O157. Cross-resistance in adaptively resistant S. enterica varied with the serotype; Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis expressed cross-resistance to chloramphenicol, whereas Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressed cross-resistance to chlorhexidine. Benzalkonium chloride-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Virchow showed elevated resistance to chlorhexidine; however, chlorhexidine-resistant Salmonella serovar Virchow did not demonstrate reciprocal cross-resistance to benzalkonium chloride, suggesting specific rather than generic resistance mechanisms. E. coli O157 strains acquired high levels of resistance to triclosan after only two sublethal exposures and, when adapted, repeatedly demonstrated decreased susceptibilities to various antimicrobial agents, including chloramphenicol, erythromycin, imipenem, tetracycline, and trimethoprim, as well as to a number of biocides. These observations raise concern over the indiscriminate and often inappropriate use of biocides, especially triclosan, in situations where they are unnecessary, whereby they may contribute to the development of microbial resistance mechanisms. PMID:14715734

  11. Synthesis, molecular modeling and structural characterization of vanillin derivatives as antimicrobial agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Juan; Yin, Yong; Sheng, Gui-Hua; Yang, Zhi-Bo; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2013-05-01

    Two vanillin derivatives have been designed and synthesized and their biological activities were also evaluated for antimicrobial activity. Their chemical structures are characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies, 1H NMR, MS, and elemental analysis. Structural stabilization of them followed by intramolecular as well as intermolecular H-bonds makes these molecules as perfect examples in molecular recognition with self-complementary donor and acceptor units within a single molecule. Docking simulations have been performed to position compounds into the FtsZ active site to determine their probable binding model. Compound 3a shows the most potent biological activity, which may be a promising antimicrobial leading compound for the further research.

  12. In Vitro Activities of Various b-Lactam Antimicrobial Agents against Clinical Isolates ofEscherichia coliandKlebsiellaspp. Resistant to Oxyimino Cephalosporins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRADLEY D. JETT; DAVID J. RITCHIE; RICHARD REICHLEY; THOMAS C. BAILEY; ANDDANIEL F. SAHM

    1995-01-01

    Broth microdilution testing was used to study the activity of several beta-lactam antimicrobial agents, includingpiperacillin-tazobactamandcefepime,against108clinicallyderivedEscherichiacoliandKlebsiellasp. strains resistant to oxyimino cephalosporins (i.e., putative extended-spectrum b-lactamase producers). On the basis of the percentage of susceptible strains, imipenem (100%), cefotetan ($92%), and piperacillin-tazobac- tam ($86%) were the most active agents. Cefepime activity (52 to 64% susceptible) was comparable to that of cefotaxime (40

  13. Apple Puree-Alginate Edible Coating as Carrier of Antimicrobial Agents to Prolong Shelf-Life of Fresh-Cut Apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible coatings with antimicrobial agents can extend the shelf-life of fresh-cut fruit. The effect of lemongrass, oregano oil and vanillin incorporated in apple puree-alginate edible coatings, on the shelf-life of fresh-cut Fuji apples, was investigated. Coated apples were packed in air-filled pol...

  14. Biodiversity of genes encoding anti-microbial traits within plant associated microbes

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Walaa K.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    The plant is an attractive versatile home for diverse associated microbes. A subset of these microbes produces a diversity of anti-microbial natural products including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, heterocylic nitrogenous compounds, volatile compounds, bacteriocins, and lytic enzymes. In recent years, detailed molecular analysis has led to a better understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. New genomic and bioinformatic tools have permitted comparisons of orthologous genes between species, leading to predictions of the associated evolutionary mechanisms responsible for diversification at the genetic and corresponding biochemical levels. The purpose of this review is to describe the biodiversity of biosynthetic genes of plant-associated bacteria and fungi that encode selected examples of antimicrobial natural products. For each compound, the target pathogen and biochemical mode of action are described, in order to draw attention to the complexity of these phenomena. We review recent information of the underlying molecular diversity and draw lessons through comparative genomic analysis of the orthologous coding sequences (CDS). We conclude by discussing emerging themes and gaps, discuss the metabolic pathways in the context of the phylogeny and ecology of their microbial hosts, and discuss potential evolutionary mechanisms that led to the diversification of biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:25914708

  15. Reduced Susceptibility to Rifampicin and Resistance to Multiple Antimicrobial Agents among Brucella abortus Isolates from Cattle in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa Pauletti, Rebeca; Reinato Stynen, Ana Paula; Pinto da Silva Mol, Juliana; Seles Dorneles, Elaine Maria; Alves, Telma Maria; de Sousa Moura Souto, Monalisa; Minharro, Silvia; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the susceptibility profile of Brazilian Brucella abortus isolates from cattle to eight antimicrobial agents that are recommended for the treatment of human brucellosis and to correlate the susceptibility patterns with origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotype of the strains. Screening of 147 B. abortus strains showed 100% sensitivity to doxycycline and ofloxacin, one (0.68%) strain resistant to ciprofloxacin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to streptomycin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and five strains (3.40%) resistant to gentamicin. For rifampicin, three strains (2.04%) were resistant and 54 strains (36.73%) showed reduced sensitivity. Two strains were considered multidrug resistant. In conclusion, the majority of B. abortus strains isolated from cattle in Brazil were sensitive to the antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of human brucellosis; however, a considerable proportion of strains showed reduced susceptibility to rifampicin and two strains were considered multidrug resistant. Moreover, there was no correlation among the drug susceptibility pattern, origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotypes of these strains. PMID:26181775

  16. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and 2D-QSAR Study of Halophenyl Bis-Hydrazones as Antimicrobial and Antitubercular Agents

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A.; Eldehna, Wagdy M.; Fares, Mohamed; Al-Rashood, Sara T. A.; Al-Rashood, Khalid A.; Abdel-Aziz, Marwa M.; Soliman, Dalia H.

    2015-01-01

    In continuation of our endeavor towards the development of potent and effective antimicrobial agents, three series of halophenyl bis-hydrazones (14a–n, 16a–d, 17a and 17b) were synthesized and evaluated for their potential antibacterial, antifungal and antimycobacterial activities. These efforts led to the identification of five molecules 14c, 14g, 16b, 17a and 17b (MIC range from 0.12 to 7.81 ?g/mL) with broad antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Aspergillus fumigates; Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Bacillis subtilis; and Gram negative bacteria, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Escherichia coli. Three of the most active compounds, 16b, 17a and 17b, were also devoid of apparent cytotoxicity to lung cancer cell line A549. Amphotericin B and ciprofloxacin were used as references for antifungal and antibacterial screening, while isoniazid and pyrazinamide were used as references for antimycobacterial activity. Furthermore, three Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) models were built to explore the structural requirements controlling the different activities of the prepared bis-hydrazones. PMID:25903147

  17. Multitasking antimicrobial peptides in plant development and host defense against biotic/abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2014-11-01

    Crop losses due to pathogens are a major threat to global food security. Plants employ a multilayer defense against a pathogen including the use of physical barriers (cell wall), induction of hypersensitive defense response (HR), resistance (R) proteins, and synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Unlike a complex R gene-mediated immunity, AMPs directly target diverse microbial pathogens. Many a times, R-mediated immunity breaks down and plant defense is compromised. Although R-gene dependent pathogen resistance has been well studied, comparatively little is known about the interactions of AMPs with host defense and physiology. AMPs are ubiquitous, low molecular weight peptides that display broad spectrum resistance against bacteria, fungi and viruses. In plants, AMPs are mainly classified into cyclotides, defensins, thionins, lipid transfer proteins, snakins, and hevein-like vicilin-like and knottins. Genetic distance lineages suggest their conservation with minimal effect of speciation events during evolution. AMPs provide durable resistance in plants through a combination of membrane lysis and cellular toxicity of the pathogen. Plant hormones - gibberellins, ethylene, jasmonates, and salicylic acid, are among the physiological regulators that regulate the expression of AMPs. Transgenically produced AMP-plants have become a means showing that AMPs are able to mitigate host defense responses while providing durable resistance against pathogens. PMID:25438794

  18. Production of Phytotoxic Cationic ?-Helical Antimicrobial Peptides in Plant Cells Using Inducible Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Company, Nuri; Nadal, Anna; Ruiz, Cristina; Pla, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic ?-helical structures, such as BP100, have potent and specific activities against economically important plant pathogenic bacteria. They are also recognized as valuable therapeutics and preservatives. However, highly active BP100 derivatives are often phytotoxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants. Here we demonstrate that production of recombinant phytotoxic peptides in transgenic plants is possible by strictly limiting transgene expression to certain tissues and conditions, and specifically that minimization of this expression during transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants is essential to obtain viable plant biofactories. On the basis of whole-genome transcriptomic data available online, we identified the Os.hsp82 promoter that fulfilled this requirement and was highly induced in response to heat shock. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing moderate yields of severely phytotoxic BP100 derivatives on exposure to high temperature. In addition, a threshold for gene expression in selected tissues and stages was experimentally established, below which the corresponding promoters should be suitable for driving the expression of recombinant phytotoxic proteins in genetically modified plants. In view of the growing transcriptomics data available, this approach is of interest to assist promoter selection for specific purposes. PMID:25387106

  19. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork. PMID:23834804

  20. Screening of plants used in Argentine folk medicine for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Anesini, C; Perez, C

    1993-06-01

    Screening of 132 extracts from Argentine folk-medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity has been conducted using a penicillin G resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger as test microorganisms. Cephazolin, ampicillin and miconazole were used as standard antibiotics and concentration-response curves were obtained using the agar-well diffusion method. Boiling water extracts of plant materials were tested and 12 species were active against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas 10 were effective against Escherichia coli and 4 against Aspergillus niger. Tabebuia impetiginosa bark, Achyrocline sp. aerials parts, Larrea divaricata leaves, Rosa borboniana flowers, Punica granatum fruit pericarp, Psidium guineense fruit pericarp, Lithrea ternifolia leaves and Allium sativum bulbs produced some of the more active extracts. PMID:8412245

  1. Susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria to nine antimicrobial agents and demonstration of decreased susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens to penicillin.

    PubMed

    Marrie, T J; Haldane, E V; Swantee, C A; Kerr, E A

    1981-01-01

    The activity of moxalactam, cefoxitin, cephalothin, cefamandole, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, metronidazole, and ticarcillin was determined against 344 isolates of anaerobic bacteria. The activity of penicillin G was determined as well for 234 isolates not of the Bacteroides fragilis group. Moxalactam was more active than cephalothin and cefamandole and slightly less active than cefoxitin. Metronidazole was the most active antimicrobial agent against the B. fragilis group, whereas chloramphenicol was most active overall. Clostridium species were the most resistant group of organisms tested. Relatively high concentrations of penicillin were required to inhibit the C. perfringens strains: 80% at 0.5 U/ml and 100% at 16 U/ml. Our study demonstrates the need for periodic anaerobe susceptibility testing in order to better guide empiric antibiotic therapy. PMID:6264842

  2. Plant phenylpropanoids as emerging anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Korkina, L; Kostyuk, V; De Luca, C; Pastore, S

    2011-09-01

    Plant-derived phenylpropanoids (PPPs) compose the largest group of secondary metabolites produced by higher plants, mainly, for the protection against biotic or abiotic stresses such as infections, wounding, UV irradiation, exposure to ozone, pollutants, and herbivores. PPPs are parent molecules for biosynthesis of numerous structurally and functionally diverse plant polyphenols (simple phenolic acids and esters, glycosylated derivatives of primary PPPs, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, stilbenes, coumarins, curcuminoids, lignans, etc.), which play multiple essential roles in plant physiology. During the last few decades, extensive research has been dedicated to natural and biotechnologically produced PPPs for medicinal use as antioxidants, UV screens, anticancer, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, and antibacterial agents. In the present review, the metabolic pathways of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants and their re-construction in biotechnologically engineered systems are described. Chemical physical peculiarities of PPPs defining their antioxidant, metal chelating, and UV-protecting effects as a molecular basis for their anti-inflammatory properties are discussed as well. We focused also on the discovery of PPPs-based anti-inflammatory agents since distinct PPPs were found to modulate molecular pathways underlying inflammatory responses in human cells triggered by different pro-inflammatory stimuli in vitro and to inhibit inflammation in various tissues in vivo. The problem of low bioavailability, fast metabolism, and potential toxicity/sensitization as limiting factors for the development of PPPs-based anti-inflammatory drugs is also highlighted. PMID:21762105

  3. [Studies on suppurative lesion and bone distribution of peroral antimicrobial agents (LAPC and TFLX) to experimental infected rabbits].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Satoh, T

    1990-10-01

    The models of infection in the rabbits mandible using Streptococcus milleri and Bacteroides fragilis by the method of Satoh-Heimdahl were prepared. A penicillic peroral antimicrobial agent, lenamipicillin (LAPC), and pyridone carboxylic acid peroral antimicrobial agent, tosufloxacin tosilate (TFLX), were administered to infected and healthy groups. Drug concentrations in the serum, pus, mandible, maxilla, humerus, sternum, costa, ilium, femur, tibia, liver, and kidney were determined by a biological method. The data were submitted to pharmacodynamic analysis and compared. The following results were obtained. The concentration of LAPC in the serum and various bone tissues was 1.2-6.4 times higher in the infected group than in the healthy group. The concentration of TFLX in the serum and bone tissues was 1.1-3.7 times higher in the infected group than in the healthy group. Moreover, concentrations in the liver 1.1-fold and 2.1-fold higher in the infectious group than in the healthy group in the LAPC and TFLX administration groups, respectively, and 1.1-fold and 1.3-fold higher in the kidney in the LAPC and TFLX groups, respectively. Both LAPC and TFLX diffused to the pus more satisfactorily than to the serum. The Cmax ratios of pus to infected serum were 1.48 and 1.81 for LAPC and TFLX, respectively, and the AUC ratios of pus to infected serum were 1.31 and 1.62 in LAPC and TFLX, respectively. These results indicated that both LAPC and TFLX are distributed satisfactorily to the local foci in the mandible, and that their systemic diffusion exerted immediate clinical effects. PMID:2134803

  4. Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Jhon J; Ochoa, Veronica J; Ocampo, Saul A; Muńoz, John F

    2006-01-01

    Background The antimicrobial activity and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium H.B. & K, Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, Justicia secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum C.DC, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana Hieron were evaluated against five bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus ? hemolític, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli), and one yeast (Candida albicans). These plants are used in Colombian folk medicine to treat infections of microbial origin. Methods Plants were collected by farmers and traditional healers. The ethanol, hexane and water extracts were obtained by standard methods. The antimicrobial activity was found by using a modified agar well diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). MIC was determined in the plant extracts that showed some efficacy against the tested microorganisms. Gentamycin sulfate (1.0 ?g/ml), clindamycin (0.3 ?g/ml) and nystatin (1.0 ?g/ml) were used as positive controls. Results The water extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed a higher activity against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli than gentamycin sulfate. Similarly, the ethanol extracts of all species were active against Staphylococcus aureus except for Justicia secunda. Furthermore, Bixa orellana L, Justicia secunda Vahl. and Piper pulchrum C.DC presented the lowest MICs against Escherichia coli (0.8, 0.6 and 0.6 ?g/ml, respectively) compared to gentamycin sulfate (0.9 8g/ml). Likewise, Justicia secunda and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed an analogous MIC against Candida albicans (0.5 and 0.6 ?g/ml, respectively) compared to nystatin (0.6 ?g/ml). Bixa orellana L, exhibited a better MIC against Bacillus cereus (0.2 ?g/ml) than gentamycin sulfate (0.5 ?g/ml). Conclusion This in vitro study corroborated the antimicrobial activity of the selected plants used in folkloric medicine. All these plants were effective against three or more of the pathogenic microorganisms. However, they were ineffective against Streptococcus ? hemolytic and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Their medicinal use in infections associated with these two species is not recommended. This study also showed that Bixa orellana L, Justicia secunda Vahl. and Piper pulchrum C.DC could be potential sources of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:16483385

  5. Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Coleus amboinicus Lour Exhibited Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Astuti, Puji; Sudarsono, Sudarsono; Nisak, Khoirun; Nugroho, Giri Wisnu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Coleus amboinicus is a medicinal plant traditionally used to treat various diseases such as throat infection, cough and fever, diarrhea, nasal congestion and digestive problems. The plant was explored for endophytic fungi producing antimicrobial agents. Methods: Screening for endophytic fungi producing antimicrobial agents was conducted using agar plug method and antimicrobial activity of promising ethyl acetate extracts was determined by disc diffusion assay. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) - bioautography was performed to localize the bioactive components within the extract. TLC visualization detection reagents were used to preliminary analyze phytochemical groups of the bioactive compounds. Results: Three endophytic fungi were obtained, two of them showed promising potential. Agar diffusion method showed that endophytic fungi CAL-2 exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, B. subtilis, S. aureus and S. thypi, whilst CAS-1 inhibited the growth of B. subtilis. TLC bioautography of ethyl acetate extract of CAL-2 revealed at least three bands exhibited antimicrobial activity and at least two bands showed inhibition of B. subtilis growth. Preliminary analysis of the crude extracts suggests that bioactive compounds within CAL-2 extract are terpenoids, phenolics and phenyl propanoid compounds whilst the antimicrobial agents within CAS-1 extract are terpenoids, propylpropanoids, alkaloids or heterocyclic nitrogen compounds. Conclusion: These data suggest the potential of endophytic fungi of C. amboinicus as source for antimicrobial agents. PMID:25671195

  6. Antimicrobial and inhibitory enzyme activity of N-(benzyl) and quaternary N-(benzyl) chitosan derivatives on plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed E I; Rabea, Entsar I; Taktak, Nehad E M

    2014-10-13

    Chemical modification of a biopolymer chitosan by introducing quaternary ammonium moieties into the polymer backbone enhances its antimicrobial activity. In the present study, a series of quaternary N-(benzyl) chitosan derivatives were synthesized and characterized by (1)H-NMR, FT-IR and UV spectroscopic techniques. The antimicrobial activity against crop-threatening bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Erwinia carotovora and fungi Botrytis cinerea, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum and Phytophthora infestans were evaluated. The results proved that the grafting of benzyl moiety or quaternization of the derivatives onto chitosan molecule was successful in inhibiting the microbial growth. Moreover, increase water-solubility of the compounds by quaternization significantly increased the activity against bacteria and fungi. Exocellular enzymes including polygalacturonase (PGase), pectin-lyase (PLase), polyphenol oxidase (PPOase) and cellulase were also affected at 1000 mg/L. These compounds especially quaternary-based chitosan derivatives that have good inhibitory effect should be potentially used as antimicrobial agents in crop protection. PMID:25037402

  7. Role of AbeS, a Novel Efflux Pump of the SMR Family of Transporters, in Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents in Acinetobacter baumannii?

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vijaya Bharathi; Rajamohan, Govindan; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a chromosomally encoded putative drug efflux pump of the SMR family, named AbeS, from a multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii was characterized to elucidate its role in antimicrobial resistance. Expression of the cloned abeS gene in hypersensitive Escherichia coli host KAM32 resulted in decreased susceptibility to various classes of antimicrobial agents, detergents, and dyes. Deletion of the abeS gene in A. baumannii confirmed its role in conferring resistance to these compounds. PMID:19770280

  8. C31G, a new agent for oral use with potent antimicrobial and antiadherence properties.

    PubMed Central

    Corner, A M; Dolan, M M; Yankell, S L; Malamud, D

    1988-01-01

    C31G, an equimolar mixture of alkyl dimethyl glycine and alkyl dimethyl amine oxide, was evaluated for antimicrobial and antiadherence properties. The efficacy of C31G, its two components, and several commercial mouth rinses was determined in assays measuring inhibition of glycolysis, inhibition of bacterial adherence, and MICs. Inhibition of glycolysis was determined by using a saliva sediment model, with glycolytic activity expressed as the change in pH relative to that of a control. Adherence studies were undertaken with Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 to measure inhibition of adherence to nichrome wires. MICs were determined against selected microorganisms by standard methods. C31G demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, with activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms and Candida albicans, a yeast. C31G inhibited both glycolysis by salivary bacteria and adherence of Streptococcus strains to wire mesh. C31G was more effective in the assays conducted than any commercial formulation tested and was as effective as chlorhexidine. A synergistic effect was demonstrated between the individual components of C31G, and no loss of activity was noted when it was formulated into a mouth rinse vehicle. PMID:3364952

  9. Prevalence, Serotype, and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella on Broiler Carcasses Postpick and Postchill in 20 U. S. Processing Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to measure the effect of broiler processing on the prevalence, serotype and antimicrobial resistance profiles of salmonellae. Twenty US commercial processing plants representing eight integrators in thirteen states were included in the survey. In each of four replic...

  10. In vitro antimicrobial effects and mechanism of action of selected plant essential oil combinations against four food-related microorganisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fei Lv; Hao Liang; Qipeng Yuan; Chunfang Li

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of selected plant essential oil (EO) combinations against four food-related microorganisms. Ten EOs were initially screened against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using agar disk diffusion and broth dilution methods. The highest efficacy against all the tested strains was shown when testing the oregano EO.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of diterpenoids from hairy roots of Salvia sclarea L.: salvipisone as a potential anti-biofilm agent active against antibiotic resistant Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Ku?ma, ?; Rózalski, M; Walencka, E; Rózalska, B; Wysoki?ska, H

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of crude dichloromethane fractions from acetone extracts of Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformed roots and roots of field-grown plants of Salvia sclarea as well as four pure abietane diterpenoids isolated from the hairy root cultures were determined. The growth of Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis) but not Gram-negative ones (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) or pathogenic fungi (Candida albicans) was inhibited by fractions tested at concentrations of 37.5-75.0 microgml(-1). Abietane diterpenoids: salvipisone, aethiopinone, 1-oxoaethiopinone and ferruginol were shown to be bacteriostatic as well as bacteriocidal for the cultures of S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains, regardless of their antibiotic susceptibility profile. This was demonstrated by using simultaneously the optical density measuring method and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide-reduction assay. The highest activity was shown by salvipisone which demonstrated also a very interesting activity when its effect on 24-h-old staphylococcal biofilm cells viability was examined. It limited the survival of biofilms formed by S. aureus as well as by S. epidermidis, putting this compound to the list of potential anti-biofilm agents, better than most of known antibiotics. PMID:17190643

  12. The cytotoxic effects of commonly used topical antimicrobial agents on human fibroblasts and keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M L; Laxer, J A; Hansbrough, J F

    1991-06-01

    This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of commonly used topical agents to human dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes, which play a prominent role in wound healing. The effects of these topical agents were assessed using two separate assays for the fibroblasts--tritiated thymidine incorporation and the uptake of a vital dye (neutral red). Keratinocytes were evaluated with the neutral red assay. Serial dilutions of each of 10 commonly used topical agents produced decreases in both the uptake of neutral red and the incorporation of thymidine at clinically relevant doses. Only Neosporin G.U. irrigant showed no significant difference compared with controls in the assays for both the fibroblasts and the keratinocytes. Careful attention must be paid to which agent is used in the clinical setting, since many of these can have profound effects on cells that influence wound healing. PMID:2056541

  13. Antimicrobial activity of biodegradable polysaccharide and protein-based films containing active agents.

    PubMed

    Kuorwel, Kuorwel K; Cran, Marlene J; Sonneveld, Kees; Miltz, Joseph; Bigger, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Significant interest has emerged in the introduction of food packaging materials manufactured from biodegradable polymers that have the potential to reduce the environmental impacts associated with conventional packaging materials. Current technologies in active packaging enable effective antimicrobial (AM) packaging films to be prepared from biodegradable materials that have been modified and/or blended with different compatible materials and/or plasticisers. A wide range of AM films prepared from modified biodegradable materials have the potential to be used for packaging of various food products. This review examines biodegradable polymers derived from polysaccharides and protein-based materials for their potential use in packaging systems designed for the protection of food products from microbial contamination. A comprehensive table that systematically analyses and categorizes much of the current literature in this area is included in the review. PMID:21535854

  14. Antimicrobial Agents for Complicated Skin and Skin-Structure Infections: Justification of Noninferiority Margins in the Absence of Placebo-Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Spellberg, Brad; Talbot, George H.; Boucher, Helen W.; Bradley, John S.; Gilbert, David; Scheld, W. Michael; Edwards, John; Bartlett, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Background The United States Food and Drug Administration requires clinical trial noninferiority margins to preserve a fraction (eg, 50%) of the established comparator drug's efficacy versus placebo. Lack of placebo-controlled trials for many infections complicates noninferiority margin justification for and, hence, regulatory review of new antimicrobial agents. Noninferiority margin clarification is critical to enable new antimicrobial development. In the absence of placebo-controlled trials, we sought to define the magnitude of efficacy of antimicrobial agents and resulting noninferiority margins for studies of complicated skin and skin-structure infection (SSSI). Methods We systematically reviewed literature on complicated SSSI published during 1900–1950 (before widespread penicillin resistance) to define treatment outcomes and confidence intervals (CIs). Antimicrobial efficacy was calculated as the lower limit CI of the cure rate with antimicrobials minus the upper limit CI of the cure rate without antimicrobials. Results We identified 90 articles describing >28,000 patients with complicated SSSI. For cellulitis/erysipelas, cure rates were 66% (95% CI, 64%–68%) without antibiotics and 98% (95% CI, 96%–99%) for penicillin-treated patients, and penicillin reduced mortality by 10%. Cure rates for wound/ulcer infections were 36% (95% CI, 32%–39%) without antibiotics and 83% (95% CI, 81%–85%) for penicillin-treated patients. For major abscesses, cure rates were 76% (95% CI, 71%–80%) without antibiotics and 96% (95% CI, 94%–98%) for penicillin-treated patients; penicillin reduced mortality by 6%. Conclusion Systematic review of historical literature enables rational noninferiority margin justification in the absence of placebo-controlled trials and may facilitate regulatory review of noninferiority trials. Noninferiority margins of 14% for cellulitis/erysipelas, 21% for wound/ulcer infections, and 7% for major abscesses would preserve ?50% of antibiotic efficacy versus placebo for these complicated SSSI subsets. PMID:19555285

  15. Mitigating the antimicrobial activities of selected organic acids and commercial sanitizers with various neutralizing agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoen Ju; Chen, Jinru

    2011-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the abilities of five neutralizing agents, Dey-Engley (DE) neutralizing broth (single or double strength), morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (MOPS) buffer, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and sodium thiosulfate buffer, in mitigating the activities of acetic or lactic acid (2%) and an alkaline or acidic sanitizer (a manufacturer-recommended concentration) againt the cells of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC; n = 9). To evaluate the possible toxicity of the neutralizing agents to the STEC cells, each STEC strain was exposed to each of the neutralizing agents at room temperature for 10 min. Neutralizing efficacy was evaluated by placing each STEC strain in a mixture of sanitizer and neutralizer under the same conditions. The neutralizing agents had no detectable toxic effect on the STEC strains. PBS was least effective for neutralizing the activity of selected organic acids and sanitizers. Single-strength DE and sodium thiosulfate neutralized the activity of both acetic and lactic acids. MOPS buffer neutralized the activity of acetic acid and lactic acid against six and five STEC strains, respectively. All neutralizing agents, except double-strength DE broth, had a limited neutralizing effect on the activity of the commercial sanitizers used in the study. The double-strength DE broth effectively neutralized the activity of the two commercial sanitizers with no detectable toxic effects on STEC cells. PMID:21549055

  16. Optimization of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Channel Catfish Bones for Preparing Antimicrobial Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoqing Ren; Lizhen Ma; Ju Chu; Yonghong Wang; Yingping Zhuang; Siliang Zhang; Hongshun Yang; Hongjie An

    2012-01-01

    The bones of channel catfish, a kind of fish processing waste, were hydrolyzed with one of five proteases (alcalase, neutrase, papain, pepsin, and trypsin) in order to generate antibacterial agents. The antibacterial activity of hydrolysates recovered through enzyme hydrolysis was tested by radial diffusion assay (RDA). Pepsin hydrolysate was found to have the greatest antibacterial activity. Thus, the conditions of

  17. In vitro activities of streptomycin and 11 oral antimicrobial agents against clinical isolates of Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, B A; Hamill, R J; Musher, D M; O'Hara, C

    1992-01-01

    We tested in vitro the activities of streptomycin and tetracycline--antibiotics that have long been used to treat rhinoscleroma--as well as several newer oral agents by using 23 isolates of the causative organism Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis. All isolates were inhibited by clinically achievable concentrations of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amoxicillin-clavulanate, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, cephalexin, cefuroxime, and cefpodoxime. PMID:1416867

  18. DNA Vaccines: Technology and Application as Anti-parasite and Antimicrobial Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason B. Alarcon; Gary W. Waine; Donald P. McManus

    1999-01-01

    DNA vaccines have been termed The Third Generation of Vaccines. The recent successful immunization of experimental animals against a range of infectious agents and several tumour models of disease with plasmid DNA testifies to the powerful nature of this revolutionary approach in vaccinology. Among numerous advantages, a major attraction of DNA vaccines over conventional vaccines is that they are able

  19. Oregano essential oil-pectin edible films as anti-quorum sensing and food antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maria V; Ortega-Ramirez, Luis A; Gutierrez-Pacheco, M Melissa; Bernal-Mercado, A Thalia; Rodriguez-Garcia, Isela; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Gustavo A; Ponce, Alejandra; Moreira, Maria Del R; Roura, Sara I; Ayala-Zavala, J Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Edible films can be used as carriers for antimicrobial compounds to assure food safety and quality; in addition, pathogenesis of food bacteria is related to a cell to cell communication mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). Oregano essential oil (OEO) has proved to be useful as food antimicrobial; however, its food applications can be compromised by the volatile character of its active constituents. Therefore, formulation of edible films containing OEO can be an alternative to improve its food usages. QS inhibitory activity of OEO and pectin-OEO films was evaluated using Chromobacterium violaceum as bacterial model. Additionally, antibacterial activity was tested against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. OEO was effective to inhibit bacterial growth at MIC of 0.24 mg/mL for all tested bacteria and MBC of 0.24, 0.24, 0.48, and 0.24 mg/mL against E. coli O157:H7, S. Choleraesuis, S. aureus, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Pectin-films incorporated with 36.1 and 25.9 mg/mL of OEO showed inhibition diameters of 16.3 and 15.2 mm for E. coli O157:H7; 18.1 and 24.2 mm for S. Choleraesuis; 20.8 and 20.3 mm for S. aureus; 21.3 and 19.3 mm for L. monocytogenes, respectively. Pectin-OEO film (15.7 mg/mL) was effective against E. coli O157:H7 (9.3 mm), S. aureus (9.7 mm), and L. monocytogenes (9.2 mm), but not for S. Choleraesuis. All concentrations of OEO (0.0156, 0.0312, 0.0625 and 0.125 mg/mL) and pectin-OEO films (15.7, 25.9 and 36.1 mg/mL) showed a significant anti-QS activity expressed as inhibition of violacein production by C. violaceum. Additionally, the application of pectin-OEO films was effective reducing total coliforms, yeast, and molds of shrimp and cucumber slices stored at 4°C during 15 d. These results demonstrated the potential of pectin films enriched with OEO as food related microorganisms and QS inhibitors. PMID:25566215

  20. Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding derivatives of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide BP100: impact on rice host plant fitness

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Biopeptide BP100 is a synthetic and strongly cationic ?-helical undecapeptide with high, specific antibacterial activity against economically important plant-pathogenic bacteria, and very low toxicity. It was selected from a library of synthetic peptides, along with other peptides with activities against relevant bacterial and fungal species. Expression of the BP100 series of peptides in plants is of major interest to establish disease-resistant plants and facilitate molecular farming. Specific challenges were the small length, peptide degradation by plant proteases and toxicity to the host plant. Here we approached the expression of the BP100 peptide series in plants using BP100 as a proof-of-concept. Results Our design considered up to three tandemly arranged BP100 units and peptide accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), analyzing five BP100 derivatives. The ER retention sequence did not reduce the antimicrobial activity of chemically synthesized BP100 derivatives, making this strategy possible. Transformation with sequences encoding BP100 derivatives (bp100der) was over ten-fold less efficient than that of the hygromycin phosphotransferase (hptII) transgene. The BP100 direct tandems did not show higher antimicrobial activity than BP100, and genetically modified (GM) plants constitutively expressing them were not viable. In contrast, inverted repeats of BP100, whether or not elongated with a portion of a natural antimicrobial peptide (AMP), had higher antimicrobial activity, and fertile GM rice lines constitutively expressing bp100der were produced. These GM lines had increased resistance to the pathogens Dickeya chrysanthemi and Fusarium verticillioides, and tolerance to oxidative stress, with agronomic performance comparable to untransformed lines. Conclusions Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding short cationic ?-helical synthetic peptides can have a strong negative impact on rice fitness. However, GM plants expressing, for example, BP100 based on inverted repeats, have adequate agronomic performance and resistant phenotypes as a result of a complex equilibrium between bp100der toxicity to plant cells, antimicrobial activity and transgene-derived plant stress response. It is likely that these results can be extended to other peptides with similar characteristics. PMID:22947243

  1. Genetic diversity of Oenoccoccus oeni isolated from wines treated with phenolic extracts as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Almudena; Tabasco, Raquel; Requena, Teresa; Claisse, Olivier; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline; Bartolomé, Begońa; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2013-12-01

    Molecular techniques have been applied to study the evolution of wine-associated lactic acid bacteria from red wines produced in the absence and presence of antimicrobial phenolic extracts, eucalyptus leaves and almond skins, and to genetically characterize representative Oenococcus oeni strains. Monitoring microbial populations by PCR-DGGE targeting the rpoB gene revealed that O. oeni was, as expected, the species responsible for malolactic fermentation (MLF). Representative strains from both extract-treated and not-treated wines were isolated and all were identified as O. oeni species, by 16S rRNA sequencing. Typing of isolated O. oeni strains based on the mutation of the rpoB gene suggested a more favorable adaptation of L strains (n = 63) than H strains (n = 3) to MLF. Moreover, PFGE analysis of the isolated O. oeni strains revealed 27 different genetic profiles, which indicates a rich biodiversity of indigenous O. oeni species in the winery. Finally, a higher number of genetic markers were shown in the genome of strains from control wines than strains from wines elaborated with phenolic extracts. These results provide a basis for further investigation of the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms leading to the prevalence of O. oeni in wines treated with polyphenols as inhibitor compounds. PMID:24010607

  2. Ruthenium (II) complexes of thiosemicarbazone: synthesis, biosensor applications and evaluation as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Hatice; Guler, Emine; Yavuz, Murat; Ozturk, Nurdan; Kose Yaman, Pelin; Subasi, Elif; Sahin, Elif; Timur, Suna

    2014-11-01

    A conformationally rigid half-sandwich organoruthenium (II) complex [(?(6)-p-cymene)RuClTSC(N-S)]Cl, (1) and carbonyl complex [Ru(CO)Cl(PPh3)2TSC(N-S)] (2) have been synthesized from the reaction of [{(?(6)-p-cymene)RuCl}2(?-Cl)2] and [Ru(H)(Cl)(CO)(PPh3)3] with thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazon (TSC) respectively and both novel ruthenium (II) complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy. The peripheral TSC in the complexes acts as an electrochemical coupling unit providing the ability to carry out electrochemical deposition (ED) and to form an electro-deposited film on a graphite electrode surface. The biosensing applicability of complexes 1 and 2 was investigated by using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. Electrochemical measurements at -0.9V versus Ag/AgCl electrode by following the ED Ru(II) reduction/oxidation due to from the enzyme activity, in the presence of glucose substrate. The designed biosensor showed a very good linearity for 0.01-0.5mM glucose. The in vitro antimicrobial activities of complexes 1 and 2 were also investigated against nine bacterial strains and one fungus by the disc diffusion test method. No activity was observed against the Gram-negative strains and fungus, whereas complex 1 showed moderate antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacterial strains. PMID:25280673

  3. Genipin cross-linked nanocomposite films for the immobilization of antimicrobial agent.

    PubMed

    Khan, Avik; Salmieri, Stéphane; Fraschini, Carole; Bouchard, Jean; Riedl, Bernard; Lacroix, Monique

    2014-09-10

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) reinforced chitosan based antimicrobial films were prepared by immobilizing nisin on the surface of the films. Nanocomposite films containing 18.65 ?g/cm(2) of nisin reduced the count of L. monocytogenes by 6.73 log CFU/g, compared to the control meat samples (8.54 log CFU/g) during storage at 4 °C in a Ready-To-Eat (RTE) meat system. Film formulations containing 9.33 ?g/cm(2) of nisin increased the lag phase of L. monocytogenes on meat by more than 21 days, whereas formulations with 18.65 ?g/cm(2) completely inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes during storage. Genipin was used to cross-link and protect the activity of nisin during storage. Nanocomposite films cross-linked with 0.05% w/v genipin exhibited the highest bioactivity (10.89 ?g/cm(2)) during the storage experiment, as compared to that of the un-cross-linked films (7.23 ?g/cm(2)). Genipin cross-linked films were able to reduce the growth rate of L. monocytogenes on ham samples by 21% as compared to the un-cross-linked films. Spectroscopic analysis confirmed the formation of genipin-nisin-chitosan heterocyclic cross-linked network. Genipin cross-linked films also improved the swelling, water solubility, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films. PMID:25140839

  4. Potent antimicrobial agents against azole-resistant fungi based on pyridinohydrazide and hydrazomethylpyridine structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Backes, Gregory L; Jursic, Branko S; Neumann, Donna M

    2015-07-01

    Schiff base derivatives have recently been shown to possess antimicrobial activity, and these derivatives include a limited number of salicylaldehyde hydrazones. To further explore this structure-activity relationship between salicylaldehyde hydrazones and antifungal activity, we previously synthesized and analyzed a large series of salicylaldehyde and formylpyridinetrione hydrazones for their ability to inhibit fungal growth of both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant species of Candida. While many of these analogs showed excellent growth inhibition with low mammalian cell toxicity, their activity did not extend to azole-resistant species of Candida. To further dissect the structural features necessary to inhibit azole-resistant fungal species, we synthesized a new class of modified salicylaldehyde derivatives and subsequently identified a series of modified pyridine-based hydrazones that had potent fungicidal antifungal activity against multiple Candida spp. Here we would like to present our synthetic procedures as well as the results from fungal growth inhibition assays, mammalian cell toxicity assays, time-kill assays and synergy studies of these novel pyridine-based hydrazones on both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant fungal species. PMID:25943854

  5. Preserving ignitable liquid residues on soil using Triclosan as an anti-microbial agent.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dee A; Goodpaster, John V

    2014-06-01

    When a fire is suspected to be intentionally set, fire debris samples can be collected and analyzed for ignitable liquid residues (ILRs). In some cases, samples will contain highly organic substrates such as soil or rotting wood. These substrates will contain a high bacterial load, which can result in systematic and irreversible damage to the ILR due to microbial degradation. This paper explores ways to preserve ILR by sterilizing fire debris samples without interfering with their subsequent analysis. There are many methods reported in the literature for sterilizing soil, such as freezing, irradiation, autoclaving, and various chemical fumigation techniques. However, these methods either do not kill all bacterial species, cannot be easily applied in the field or would interfere with the analysis of the ILRs. For this work, various anti-microbial compounds including triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether) were tested for their efficacy at killing bacteria present in the soil. Triclosan was highly effective in qualitative growth studies and was therefore used to measure bacterial growth (or lack thereof) by spectroscopic analysis as well as passive headspace analysis. These experiments showed that triclosan was able to sterilize soil samples in less than 60s, maintain their sterility for at least 77h and preserve gasoline residues on a soil matrix for at least 30 days. PMID:24769222

  6. Antimicrobial and antioxidative activity of extracts and essential oils of Myrtus communis L.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Verica; Knezevic, Petar

    2014-04-01

    Since synthetic antimicrobial agents and food additives can cause a number of adverse effects, there is a growing interest from consumers in ingredients from natural sources. Medicinal plants, such as Myrtus communis L. are a source of new compounds which can be used in both the food industry and for medical purposes, primarily as antimicrobial agents. In this review, the characteristics of myrtle essential oils and extracts are summarized, with particular attention to their chemical composition, biological activities and potential applications. PMID:24291016

  7. Antimicrobial activity of isothiocyanates from cruciferous plants against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Dias, Carla; Aires, Alfredo; Saavedra, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Purified isothiocyanates from cruciferous plants (Brassicacea, Syn. Cruciferae) plants were evaluated against 15 isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolated from diabetic foot-ulcer patients aiming the study of the potential usage of allyl-isothiocyanate, benzyl-isothiocyanate and 2-phenylethyl-isothiocyanate against this important bacteria. Disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods were used to access the antimicrobial activity. The index (Ia) and rate (Ra) of the antibacterial activity for each compound were calculated. The results showed a highly dose-dependent compound and chemical structure antibacterial effectiveness. The results showed a strong relation between the chemical structure of isothiocyanates and its antibacterial effectiveness. The benzyl-isothiocyanate was the most effective with a minimum inhibitory concentration varying between 2.9 and 110 µg·mL(-1) with an antibacterial activity rate up to 87%. Moreover, their antibacterial activity was mainly bactericidal. This study provides scientific evidence that isothiocyanates have an interesting biological value and must be considered as an important tool to be used against MRSA. PMID:25353177

  8. Encapsulation of the antimicrobial and immunomodulator agent nitazoxanide within polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Glisoni, Romina J; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a highly hydrophobic nitrothiazolyl-salicylamide that displays antimicrobial activity against a variety of parasites, anaerobic bacteria and viruses. More recently, its effectiveness in the pharmacotherapy of chronic hepatitis, the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has been reported. On the other hand, the extremely low aqueous solubility of the drug challenges its administration by different routes. The present work explored for the first time the encapsulation of NTZ within pristine, lactosylated and mixed poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) (PEO-PPO) polymeric micelles (PMs) of different architectures, molecular weights and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) as a strategy to improve its aqueous solubility and to potentially target it to the liver parenchyma. The solubility was increased up to 609 times. The drug encapsulation modified the self-aggregation pattern of the different amphiphiles, resulting in a sharp growth of the micellar size. The encapsulation capacity of the lactosylated derivatives was smaller than that of the pristine counterparts, though the development of mixed PMs that combine a highly hydrophilic lactosylated amphiphile (e.g., poloxamer F127 or poloxamine T1107) that forms the micellar template and a more hydrophobic unmodified poloxamine (T904) that increases the hydrophobicity of the core resulted in the synergistic encapsulation of the drug and a substantial increase of the physical stability over time. Overall findings confirmed the extremely great versatility of the poloxamer/poloxamine mixed self-assembly systems as Trojan nanocarriers for the encapsulation of NTZ towards its targeting to the liver. PMID:24738446

  9. New type of antimicrobial protein produced by the plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanliang; Ma, Ping; Holtsmark, Ingrid; Skaugen, Morten; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Brurberg, May B

    2013-09-01

    It has previously been shown that the tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis secretes a 14-kDa protein, C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis AMP-I (CmmAMP-I), that inhibits growth of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, the causal agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. Using sequences obtained from tryptic fragments, we have identified the gene encoding CmmAMP-I and we have recombinantly produced the protein with an N-terminal intein tag. The gene sequence showed that CmmAMP-I contains a typical N-terminal signal peptide for Sec-dependent secretion. The recombinant protein was highly active, with 50% growth inhibition (IC50) of approximately 10 pmol, but was not toxic to potato leaves or tubers. CmmAMP-I does not resemble any known protein and thus represents a completely new type of bacteriocin. Due to its high antimicrobial activity and its very narrow inhibitory spectrum, CmmAMP-1 may be of interest in combating potato ring rot disease. PMID:23851100

  10. Impact of Feed Supplementation with Antimicrobial Agents on Growth Performance of Broiler Chickens, Clostridium perfringens and Enterococcus Counts, and Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes and Distribution of Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants in Escherichia coli Isolates?

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Moussa S.; Silversides, Fred G.; Diarrassouba, Fatoumata; Pritchard, Jane; Masson, Luke; Brousseau, Roland; Bonnet, Claudie; Delaquis, Pascal; Bach, Susan; Skura, Brent J.; Topp, Edward

    2007-01-01

    The effects of feed supplementation with the approved antimicrobial agents bambermycin, penicillin, salinomycin, and bacitracin or a combination of salinomycin plus bacitracin were evaluated for the incidence and distribution of antibiotic resistance in 197 commensal Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens over 35 days. All isolates showed some degree of multiple antibiotic resistance. Resistance to tetracycline (68.5%), amoxicillin (61.4%), ceftiofur (51.3%), spectinomycin (47.2%), and sulfonamides (42%) was most frequent. The levels of resistance to streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin were 33.5, 35.5, and 25.3%, respectively. The overall resistance levels decreased from day 7 to day 35 (P < 0.001). Comparing treatments, the levels of resistance to ceftiofur, spectinomycin, and gentamicin (except for resistance to bacitracin treatment) were significantly higher in isolates from chickens receiving feed supplemented with salinomycin than from the other feeds (P < 0.001). Using a DNA microarray analysis capable of detecting commonly found antimicrobial resistance genes, we characterized 104 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates from 7- to 28-day-old chickens fed different growth promoters. Results showed a decrease in the incidence of isolates harboring tet(B), blaTEM, sulI, and aadA and class 1 integron from days 7 to 35 (P < 0.01). Of the 84 tetracycline-ceftiofur-resistant E. coli isolates, 76 (90.5%) were positive for blaCMY-2. The proportions of isolates positive for sulI, aadA, and integron class 1 were significantly higher in salinomycin-treated chickens than in the control or other treatment groups (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that multiantibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates can be found in broiler chickens regardless of the antimicrobial growth promoters used. However, the phenotype and the distribution of resistance determinants in E. coli can be modulated by feed supplementation with some of the antimicrobial agents used in broiler chicken production. PMID:17827305

  11. Phenolic characterization and antimicrobial activity of folk medicinal plant extracts for their applications in olive production.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Joana; Soto Vargas, Carolina; Pizzuolo, Pablo; Lucero, Gabriela; Silva, María Fernanda

    2014-06-01

    Phytophthora spp is important in plant pathology due to the importance of the diseases it causes. In olive trees, severe damages are caused by the disease known as "dry branch" occasioned by Phytophthora nicotianae, P. citrophthora and P. palmivora. Much effort has been made to find efficient methods of control, with a low negative impact on environment. In this regard, treatment with plant extracts is a valid strategy. The aims of the present study are (i) to determine the polyphenol composition of extracts of Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, Matricaria recutita, and Larrea divaricata by CZE, (ii) correlate the analytical composition of these extracts with the inhibition on the mycelial growth, and (iii) determine the individual antimicrobial activity of the most active ingredients. A simple methodology was developed for the determination of catechin, naringenin, cinnamic acid, syringic acid, chlorogenic acid, apigenin, vanillic acid, luteolin, quercetin, and caffeic acid in plant extracts by CZE. The extraction of phenolic compounds in extract was performed by a miniaturized solid phase extraction using a home-made minicolumn packed with suitable filtering material (C18 , 50 mg). The optimized analyses conditions were: 30 mM boric acid buffer, pH 9.50; capillary, 57 cm full length, 50 cm effective length, 75 ?m id, hydrodynamic injection 30 mbar, 2 s; 25 kV; 25°C, detection by UV absorbance at 290 nm. Sample results suggest that phenolic composition seems to have a great influence on inhibition of pathogens. The highest inhibitions of mycelial growth were observed for cinnamic acid and naringenin. PMID:24668423

  12. Evaluating the toxic effect of an antimicrobial agent on single bacterial cells with optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Akbar; Zhang, Chensong; Chen, Joseph; Reihani, S. N. S.; Chen, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    We implement an optical tweezers technique to assess the effects of chemical agents on single bacterial cells. As a proof of principle, the viability of a trapped Escherichia coli bacterium is determined by monitoring its flagellar motility in the presence of varying concentrations of ethyl alcohol. We show that the “killing time” of the bacterium can be effectively identified from the correlation statistics of the positional time series recorded from the trap, while direct quantification from the time series or associated power spectra is intractable. Our results, which minimize the lethal effects of bacterial photodamage, are consistent with previous reports of ethanol toxicity that used conventional culture-based methods. This approach can be adapted to study other pairwise combinations of drugs and motile bacteria, especially to measure the response times of single cells with better precision. PMID:25657879

  13. Transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing MsrA1, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, exhibit resistance to fungal phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Anjana; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Misra, Santosh; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2014-06-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) have shown potential against broad spectrum of phytopathogens. Synthetic versions with desirable properties have been modeled on these natural peptides. MsrA1 is a synthetic chimera of cecropin A and melittin CAPs with antimicrobial properties. We generated transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing the msrA1 gene aimed at conferring fungal resistance. Five independent transgenic lines were evaluated for resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, two of the most devastating pathogens of B. juncea crops. In vitro assays showed inhibition by MsrA1 of Alternaria hyphae growth by 44-62 %. As assessed by the number and size of lesions and time taken for complete leaf necrosis, the Alternaria infection was delayed and restricted in the transgenic plants with the protection varying from 69 to 85 % in different transgenic lines. In case of S. sclerotiorum infection, the lesions were more severe and spread profusely in untransformed control compared with transgenic plants. The sclerotia formed in the stem of untransformed control plants were significantly more in number and larger in size than those present in the transgenic plants where disease protection of 56-71.5 % was obtained. We discuss the potential of engineering broad spectrum biotic stress tolerance by transgenic expression of CAPs in crop plants. PMID:24452332

  14. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from the edible aromatic plant Aristolochia delavayi.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Jian; Njateng, Guy S S; He, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Gu, Jian-Long; Chen, Shan-Na; Du, Zhi-Zhi

    2013-11-01

    The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Aristolochia delavayi Franch. (Aristolochiaceae), a unique edible aromatic plant consumed by the Nakhi (Naxi) people in Yunnan, China, was investigated using GC/MS analysis. In total, 95 components, representing more than 95% of the oil composition, were identified, and the main constituents found were (E)-dec-2-enal (52.0%), (E)-dodec-2-enal (6.8%), dodecanal (3.35%), heptanal (2.88%), and decanal (2.63%). The essential oil showed strong inhibitory activity (96% reduction) of the production of bacterial volatile sulfide compounds (VSC) by Klebsiella pneumoniae, an effect that was comparable with that of the reference compound citral (91% reduction). Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil and the isolated major compound against eight bacterial and six fungal strains were evaluated. The essential oil showed significant antibacterial activity against Providencia stuartii and Escherichia coli, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 3.9 to 62.5 ?g/ml. The oil also showed strong inhibitory activity against the fungal strains Trichophyton ajelloi, Trichophyton terrestre, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, and Cryptococcus neoformans, with MIC values ranging from 3.9 to 31.25 ?g/ml, while (E)-dec-2-enal presented a lower antifungal activity than the essential oil. PMID:24243612

  15. The fatty acid synthase inhibitor triclosan: repurposing an anti-microbial agent for targeting prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Martin C.; Pouwer, Rebecca H.; Gunter, Jennifer H.; Lubik, Amy A.; Quinn, Ronald J.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of FASN has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, and numerous inhibitors have been investigated. However, severe pharmacological limitations have challenged their clinical testing. The synthetic FASN inhibitor triclosan, which was initially developed as a topical antibacterial agent, is merely affected by these pharmacological limitations. Yet, little is known about its mechanism in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Here we compared the cellular and molecular effects of triclosan in a panel of eight malignant and non-malignant prostate cell lines to the well-known FASN inhibitors C75 and orlistat, which target different partial catalytic activities of FASN. Triclosan displayed a superior cytotoxic profile with a several-fold lower IC50 than C75 or orlistat. Structure-function analysis revealed that alcohol functionality of the parent phenol is critical for inhibitory action. Rescue experiments confirmed that end product starvation was a major cause of cytotoxicity. Importantly, triclosan, C75 and orlistat induced distinct changes to morphology, cell cycle, lipid content and the expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism, demonstrating that inhibition of different partial catalytic activities of FASN activates different metabolic pathways. These finding combined with its well-documented pharmacological safety profile make triclosan a promising drug candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:25313139

  16. Antimicrobial activity of diterpenoids from hairy roots of Salvia sclarea L.: Salvipisone as a potential anti-biofilm agent active against antibiotic resistant Staphylococci

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ?. Ku?ma; M. Ró?alski; E. Walencka; B. Ró?alska; H. Wysoki?ska

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of crude dichloromethane fractions from acetone extracts of Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformed roots and roots of field-grown plants of Salvia sclarea as well as four pure abietane diterpenoids isolated from the hairy root cultures were determined. The growth of Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis) but not Gram-negative ones (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) or pathogenic fungi

  17. The diversity and anti-microbial activity of endophytic actinomycetes isolated from medicinal plants in Panxi plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke; Penttinen, Petri; Guan, Tongwei; Xiao, Jing; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Lindström, Kristina; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xiaoping; Strobel, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicinal plants are sources of biologically active compounds, providing raw material for pharmaceutical, cosmetic and fragrance industries. The endophytes of medicinal plants participate in biochemical pathways and produce analogous or novel bioactive compounds. Panxi plateau in South-west Sichuan in China with its unique geographical and climatological characteristics is a habitat of a great variety of medicinal plants. In this study, 560 endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from 26 medicinal plant species in Panxi plateau. 60 isolates were selected for 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis and 14 representative strains were chosen for 16S rDNA sequencing. According to the phylogenetic analysis, seven isolates were Streptomyces sp., while the remainder belonged to genera Micromonospora, Oerskovia, Nonomuraea, Promicromonospora and Rhodococcus. Antimicrobial activity analysis combined with the results of amplifying genes coding for polyketide synthetase (PKS-I, PKS-II) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) showed that endophytic actinomycetes isolated from medicinal plants in Panxi plateau had broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and potential natural product diversity, which further proved that endophytic actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds. PMID:20567975

  18. Effective Phages as Green Antimicrobial Agents Against Antibiotic-Resistant Hospital Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Rana; Zarrini, Gholamreza; Sheikhzadeh, Farzam; Aghamohammadzadeh, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteriophages are viruses that attack bacteria and lead to their lysis in an efficient and highly specific manner. These natural enemies of bacteria were used as therapeutic agents before the advent of antibiotics. Currently, with the rapid spread of multi-drug resistant bacteria, phage therapy can be an effective alternative treatment for antibiotic resistant bacteria. Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of bacteriophages in removing antibiotic-resistant clinical Escherichia coli strains in vitro and in vivo. Patients and Methods: Different samples were taken from bed sore and foot ulcers of patients with diabetes. E. coli strains were isolated and identified by standard methods. The antibiogram was ascertained using the Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method for ten antibiotics. The bacteriophages were isolated from environmental water samples. They were exposed to the host bacteria by the double-layer agar technique (DLA) to observe plaques. Cross reaction of the phages on test E. coli strains was performed to determine broader-spectrum phages. Phage TPR7 was selected for animal trials. Five groups of mice including a control group, bacterial group, phage group, antibiotic therapy group and phage therapy group, were examined. Results: Ten E. coli strains were isolated from hospital samples. They showed high resistance to the used antibiotics. An effective bacteriophage was isolated for each strain. The cross-reaction showed phages which affect more than six E. coli strains. They can be a good choice for clinical therapeutic use. In animal trials the group challenged with phages after being infected showed similar results as the group treated with gentamicin after being infected. In both groups infection was removed after 48 hours. Conclusions: According to the results, six strains were resistant to six or seven antibiotics and all strains were at least resistant to two antibiotics. However, for each of these resistant bacteria one bacteriophage was isolated from environmental samples, which showed the effectiveness of bacteriophages to remove clinically resistant E. coli strains. Effective phages in vitro showed effective results in vivo as well. PMID:25834712

  19. Antimicrobial Use and Antimicrobial Resistance: A Population Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Lipsitch; Matthew H. Samore

    2002-01-01

    The need to stem the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance has prompted multiple, sometimes con- flicting, calls for changes in the use of antimicrobial agents. One source of disagreement concerns the major mechanisms by which antibiotics select resistant strains. For infections like tuberculosis, in which resistance can emerge in treated hosts through mutation, prevention of antimicrobial resistance in individ- ual

  20. Metabolization of the bacteriostatic agent triclosan in edible plants and its consequences for plant uptake assessment.

    PubMed

    Macherius, André; Eggen, Trine; Lorenz, Wilhelm; Moeder, Monika; Ondruschka, Jelka; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2012-10-01

    Persistent environmental contaminants may enter agricultural fields via the application of sewage sludge, by irrigation with treated municipal wastewater or by manuring. It has been shown that such contaminants can be incorporated into crop plants. The metabolism of the bacteriostatic agents triclocarban, triclosan, and its transformation product methyl triclosan was investigated after their uptake into carrot cell cultures. A fast metabolization of triclosan was observed and eight so far unknown phase II metabolites, conjugates with saccharides, disaccharides, malonic acid, and sulfate, were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Triclocarban and methyl triclosan lack a phenolic group and remained unaltered in the cell cultures. Phase I metabolization was not observed for any of the compounds. All eight triclosan conjugates identified in the cell cultures were also detected in extracts of intact carrot plants cultivated on triclosan contaminated soils. Their total amount in the plants was assessed to exceed the amount of the triclosan itself by a factor of 5. This study shows that a disregard of conjugates in studies on plant uptake of environmental contaminants may severely underestimates the extent of uptake into plants and, eventually, the potential human exposure to contaminants via food of plant origin. PMID:22989227

  1. In vitro activities of 16 antimicrobial agents against clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in two regional hospitals in Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-Hsing Liao; Wang-Huei Sheng; Jann-Tay Wang; Hsin-Yun Sun; Hua-Kung Wang; Po-Ren Hsueh; Yee-Chun Chen; Shan-Chwen Chang

    Background and Purpose: Infections due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-EC and ESBL-KP) have become an important clinical problem. Local knowledge of antimicrobial susceptibilities of these organisms is important for implementation of effective hospital anti-infective policies. Methods: We analyzed the activities of various antimicrobial agents against recent isolates of ESBL-EC and ESBL- KP from 2 regional

  2. Studies of the in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities of selected Thai medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional folk medicinal plants have recently become popular and are widely used for primary health care. Since Thailand has a great diversity of indigenous (medicinal) plant species, this research investigated 52 traditionally used species of Thai medicinal plants for their in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities. Methods The 55 dried samples, derived from the medicinally used parts of the 52 plant species were sequentially extracted by hexane, dichloromethane, ethanol and water. These 220 extracts were then screened for in vitro (i) cytotoxicity against four cell lines, derived from human lung (A549), breast (MDA-MB-231), cervical (KB3-1) and colon (SW480) cancers, using the MTT cytotoxicity assay; (ii) antioxidant activity, analyzed by measuring the scavenging activity of DPPH radicals; (iii) lipase inhibitory activity, determined from the hydrolytic reaction of p-nitrophenyllaurate with pancreatic lipase; and (iv) antimicrobial activity against three Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria species plus one strain of yeast using the disc-diffusion method and determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration by the broth micro-dilution assay. Results The crude dichloromethane and/or ethanol extracts from four plant species showed an effective in vitro cytotoxic activity against the human cancer cell lines that was broadly similar to that of the specific chemotherapy drugs (etoposide, doxorubicin, vinblastine and oxaliplatin). In particular, this is the first report of the strong in vitro cytotoxic activity of Bauhinia strychnifolia vines. The tested tissue parts of only six plant species (Allium sativum, Cocoloba uvifera, Dolichandrone spathacea, Lumnitzera littorea, Sonneratia alba and Sonneratia caseolaris) showed promising potential antioxidant activity, whereas lipase inhibitory activity was only found in the ethanol extract from Coscinum fenestratum and this was weak at 17-fold lower than Orlistat, a known lipase inhibitor. The highest antimicrobial activity was observed in the extracts from S. alba and S. caseolaris against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans, respectively. Conclusion The Thai medicinal plant B. strychnifolia is first reported to exert strong in vitro cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines and warrants further enrichment and characterization. The broad spectrum of the biological activities from the studied plant extracts can be applied as the guideline for the selection of Thai medicinal plant species for further pharmacological and phytochemical investigations. PMID:23145786

  3. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    PubMed

    Lixandru, Brîndu?a-Elena; Dr?cea, Nicoleta Olgu?a; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Dr?gulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Lumini?a; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codi??, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species. PMID:21462837

  4. In Vitro Model of Colonization Resistance by the Enteric Microbiota: Effects of Antimicrobial Agents Used in Food-Producing Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, R. Doug; Johnson, Shemedia J.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2008-01-01

    A bioassay was developed to measure the minimum concentration of an antimicrobial drug that disrupts the colonization resistance mediated by model human intestinal microbiota against Salmonella invasion of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The bioassay was used to measure the minimum disruptive concentrations (MDCs) of drugs used in animal agriculture. The MDCs varied from 0.125 ?g/ml for some broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs (e.g., streptomycin) to 16 ?g/ml for drugs with limited spectra of antimicrobial activity (e.g., lincomycin). The acceptable daily intake (ADI) residue concentration calculated on the basis of the MDCs were higher for erythromycin, lincomycin, and tylosin than the ADI residue concentrations calculated on the basis of the MICs. The MDC-based ADI values for apramycin, bacitracin, neomycin, novobiocin, penicillin G, streptomycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin were lower than the reported MIC-based ADI values. The effects of antimicrobial drugs at their MDCs on the bacterial composition of the microbiota were observed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA sequences amplified by PCR. Changes in the population composition of the model colonization resistance microbiota occurred simultaneously with reduced colonization resistance. The results of this study suggest that direct assessment of the effects of antimicrobial drugs on colonization resistance in an in vitro model can be useful in determining ADI values. PMID:18227184

  5. Plant-Derived Anticancer Agents Used in Western and Oriental Medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ah-Reum Han; Ye Deng; Yulin Ren; Li Pan; A. Douglas Kinghorn

    \\u000a Cancer chemotherapeutic agents derived from higher plants are used in Western medicine. Secondary metabolites from plants\\u000a are used in oriental medicine are utilized in anticancer therapy. Immunomodulatory small organic molecules from plant species\\u000a are employed in Chinese traditional medicine are renewed.

  6. Repositioning Antimicrobial Agent Pentamidine as a Disruptor of the Lateral Interactions of Transmembrane Domain 5 of EBV Latent Membrane Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Fiorini, Zeno; Smith, Christina; Zhang, Yingning; Li, Jing; Watkins, Linda R.; Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    The lateral transmembrane protein-protein interactions (PPI) have been regarded as “undruggable” despite their importance in many essential biological processes. The homo-trimerization of transmembrane domain 5 (TMD-5) of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is critical for the constitutive oncogenic activation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Herein we repurpose the antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a regulator of LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. The results of ToxR assay, tryptophan fluorescence assay, courmarin fluorescence dequenching assay, and Bis-Tris sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) consistently show pentamidine disrupts LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. Furthermore, pentamidine inhibits LMP-1 signaling, inducing cellular apoptosis and suppressing cell proliferation in the EBV infected B cells. In contrast, EBV negative cells are less susceptible to pentamidine. This study provides a novel non-peptide small molecule agent for regulating LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. PMID:23094078

  7. In vitro susceptibility of e.faecalis and c.albicans isolates from apical periodontitis to common antimicrobial agents, antibiotics and antifungal medicaments

    PubMed Central

    Yoldas, Oguz; Yilmaz, Sehnaz; Akcimen, Beril; Seydaoglu, Gulsah; Kipalev, Arzu; Koksal, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antimicrobial activity of 4 antibiotic agents (for E.faecalis) and 4 antifungal agents (for C.albicans) by agar dilution method. Additionally, modified strip diffusion method was used for detection of in vitro antimicrobial activities of 5% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX and agar diffusion method for detection of in vitro susceptibilities of three intracanal medicaments for 18 E.faecalis and 18 C.albicans isolates from primary and secondary root canal infection. Isolates were recovered from 231 endodontic samples of patients, with the need of root canal treatment and retreatment. All tested E.faecalis isolates showed resistance to antibiotics. For irrigation solutions, 2% CHX was more effective in eliminating E.faecalis but 5% NaOCl showed larger inhibition zone than 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX. For intracanal medication, Ca(OH)2-CHX worked efficiently in killing E.faecalis isolates compared to Ca(OH)2-Steril saline solution, Ca(OH)2-Glycerin. For C.albicans, 18 isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, nistatin, fluconazole but showed resistance to ketoconazole. 5% NaOCl was more effective in eliminating and produced larger inhibition zone compared to 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX. Ca(OH)2-Glycerin intracanal medication was better in eliminating C.albicans isolates and produced larger inhibition zone compared to other Ca(OH)2 medicaments. Key words:E.faecalis, C.albicans, antimicrobial, antibiotic, antifungal. PMID:24558517

  8. TiO2 nanotube arrays deposited on Ti substrate by anodic oxidation and their potential as a long-term drug delivery system for antimicrobial agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseke, Claus; Hage, Felix; Vorndran, Elke; Gbureck, Uwe

    2012-05-01

    Nanotube arrays on medical titanium surfaces were fabricated by two different anodization methods and their potential for storage and release of antimicrobial substances was evaluated. The treatment of the Ti surfaces in fluoride containing electrolytes on water as well as on polyethylene glycol basis led to the formation of TiO2 nanotubes with up to 6.54 ?m length and average diameters of up to 160 nm. Drug release experiments with the model antibiotic vancomycin and with antibacterial silver ions showed that the increased surface area of the anodized samples enabled them to be loaded with up to 450% more active agent than the untreated Ti surfaces. Significant surface-dependent differences in the release kinetics of vancomycin were observed. In comparison to surfaces anodized in an aqueous electrolyte, the release of the antibiotic from surfaces anodized in an electrolyte based on ethylene glycol was significantly retarded, with a release of noticeable amounts over a period of more than 300 days. Loading of nanotube surfaces fabricated in aqueous electrolyte with silver ions revealed increased amounts of adsorbed silver by up to 230%, while the release kinetics showed significant differences in comparison to untreated Ti. It was concluded that nanotube arrays on favored medical implant materials have a high potential for loading with antimicrobial agents and also provide the possibility of tailored release kinetics by variation of anodization parameters.

  9. Quantitative susceptibility of Streptococcus suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries to antimicrobial agents licensed in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Wisselink, Henk J; Veldman, Kees T; Van den Eede, Chris; Salmon, Sarah A; Mevius, Dik J

    2006-03-10

    The susceptibility of Streptococcus suis strains (n=384) isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries to 10 antimicrobial agents was determined. For that purpose a microbroth dilution method was used according to CLSI recommendations. The following antimicrobial agents were tested: ceftiofur, cefquinome, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, gentamicin, penicillin, spectinomycin, tetracycline, tilmicosin and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole. Using breakpoints established by CLSI for veterinary pathogens, all strains were susceptible to ceftiofur, florfenicol, enrofloxacin and penicillin. MIC-90 values of these antibiotics were < or = 0.03, 0.5, 2 and < or = 0.13 microg/mL, respectively. A low degree of resistance was observed for gentamicin (1.3%), spectinomycin (3.6%) and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (6.0%). MIC-90 values of these antibiotics were 8, 16 and 2 microg/mL, respectively. A high level of resistance was observed for tetracycline (75.1%). A MIC-90 value of 64 microg/mL was found for this antibiotic. Serotype-associated differences in MIC-90 values were observed for tetracycline, tilmicosin and trimethoprim/suphamethoxazole. PMID:16387456

  10. Absorbent silver (I) antimicrobial fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, silver in form of silver ions, has been gaining importance in the wound management as an effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. Silver has a long history as an antimicrobial agent, especially in the treatment of wounds. Alginates and carboxymethyl (CM) cotton contain carboxyl...

  11. Assessment of long-term storage on antimicrobial and cyclooxygenase-inhibitory properties of South African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Amoo, Stephen O; Aremu, Adeyemi O; Moyo, Mack; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-07-01

    In traditional medicine, plant materials are often stored by traditional healers, plant gatherers and traders before they are eventually consumed or sold. The critical point is whether stored medicinal plants are as active as freshly harvested dried material. We evaluated the effects of long-term storage (12 or 16?years) on the antimicrobial (microplate dilution method) and anti-inflammatory (COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition) potencies of 21 extensively used traditional medicinal plants in treating pain and infection-related ailments. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values obtained against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the stored plant materials were generally either lower or roughly the same as in the fresh material. Most of the stored plant material had comparable minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) values as the fresh material against S. aureus and P. aeruignosa. Similarly, the majority (71%) of the stored plant material had similar MIC and/or MMC values as fresh material against the fungus Candida albicans. The percentage inhibition of COX-1 by the majority (88%) of the stored material was not significantly different when compared to those freshly collected. Stored material of Clausena anisata, Ekebergia capensis and Trichilia dregeana showed a significantly higher COX-1 inhibition than the fresh material. The therapeutic and conservation implications of the results are discussed. PMID:22933443

  12. Efficacy of the Novel Topical Antimicrobial Agent PXL150 in a Mouse Model of Surgical Site Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hĺkansson, Joakim; Björn, Camilla; Lindgren, Kerstin; Sjöström, Emma; Sjöstrand, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have recently emerged as a promising new group to be evaluated in the therapeutic intervention of infectious diseases. This study evaluated the anti-infectious effect of the short, synthetic, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide PXL150 in a mouse model of staphylococcal surgical site infections. We found that administration of PXL150, formulated in an aqueous solution or in a hydroxypropyl cellulose gel, significantly reduced the bacterial counts in the wound compared with placebo treatment, warranting further investigations of the potential of this peptide as a novel local treatment of microbial infections. PMID:24590479

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  14. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill "superbugs" emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  15. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of Araucaria cookii and Brassaia actinophylla.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Das, A; Chakraborty, P; Suthindhiran, K; Jayasri, M A

    2014-05-01

    Araucaria cookii is an ornamental plant, which are evergreen conifer found in India and in many other European countries. Similarly Brassaia actinophylla is also an ornamental plant with its native from Java, Australia and in U.S. Though these plants are used for various purposes, the medicinal properties of the plants were not investigated. In our study, the two ornamental plants were chosen for screening both antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. The Leaves of the plants were used for preparing crude extract and was prepared by Soxhlet extraction method. For the extraction of the leave extracts, different solvents viz., methanol, chloroform and petroleum ether were used based on our preliminary data. The obtained extracts were condensed and stored. For the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity, the extractions were prepared into various concentrations. For the antioxidant activity DPPH was used as scavenger of the free radicals which showed the inhibition of percentage for Araucaria cookii was 63% and the inhibition percentage for Brassaia actinophylla 41%. For the antimicrobial activity the extracts were checked against two bacterial and two fungal pathogens. The phytochemical analysis assists in the study of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity as to the probable compounds responsible for the activity. The result thus obtained provides a report of Brassaia actinophylla as a possible source of antioxidants and also the use of both extracts as a probable antimicrobial agent. PMID:26031006

  16. Altered fungal sensitivity to a plant antimicrobial peptide through over-expression of yeast cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Camilla; Harrison, Stuart J; Kazan, Kemal; Smith, Frank W N; Goulter, Ken C; Maclean, Donald J; Manners, John M

    2005-03-01

    A yeast cDNA expression library was screened to identify genes and cellular processes that influence fungal sensitivity to a plant antimicrobial peptide. A plasmid-based, GAL1 promoter-driven yeast cDNA expression library was introduced into a yeast genotype susceptible to the antimicrobial peptide MiAMP1 purified from Macadamia integrifolia. Following a screen of 20,000 cDNAs, three yeast cDNAs were identified that reproducibly provided transformants with galactose-dependent resistance to MiAMP1. These cDNAs encoded a protein of unknown function, a component (VMA11) of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and a component (cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIa) of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, respectively. To identify genes that increased sensitivity to MiAMP1, the yeast cDNA expression library was introduced into a yeast mutant with increased resistance to MiAMP1. From 11,000 cDNAs screened, two cDNA clones corresponding to a ser/thr kinase and a ser/thr phosphatase reproducibly increased MiAMP1 susceptibility in the mutant in a galactose-dependent manner. Deletion mutants were available for three of the five genes identified but showed no change in their sensitivity to MiAMP1, indicating that these genes could not be detected by screening of yeast deletion mutant libraries. Yeast cDNA expression library screening therefore provides an alternative approach to gene deletion libraries to identify genes that can influence the sensitivity of fungi to plant antimicrobial peptides. PMID:15700139

  17. Silver nanoparticles as antimicrobial agent: a case study on E. coli as a model for Gram-negative bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan Sondi; Branka Salopek-Sondi

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles against E. coli was investigated as a model for Gram-negative bacteria. Bacteriological tests were performed in Luria–Bertani (LB) medium on solid agar plates and in liquid systems supplemented with different concentrations of nanosized silver particles. These particles were shown to be an effective bactericide. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) were used

  18. Evaluation of the in vitro anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of some Yemeni plants used in folk medicine.

    PubMed

    Mothana, R A A; Gruenert, R; Bednarski, P J; Lindequist, U

    2009-04-01

    The present research study deals with the evaluation of sixty four methanolic and aqueous extracts of thirty Yemeni plants used in traditional medicine for their in vitro antiproliferative activity against three human cancer cell lines in a microtiter plate assay based on cellular staining with crystal violet, for their antimicrobial activity against antibiotic susceptible three Gram-positive, three Gram-negative bacterial and one fungal stains and three multiresistant Staphylococcus strains by the agar diffusion method and the determination of MIC against three Gram-positive bacteria with the broth micro-dilution assay, as well as for their antioxidant activity using the DPPH radical scavenging method. Furthermore the chemical composition of the methanolic extracts was determined by using chromatographic methods. As a result of this work, 12 Yemeni herbs namely Centaurothamus maximus, Costus arabicus, Cupressus sempervirens, Dichrocephala integrifolia, Euphorbia schimperi, Gomphocarpus fruticosus, Kanahia laniflora, Meriandera benghalensis, Pulicaria inuloides, Solanum glabratum, Tarconanthus camphoratus and Vernonia leopoldii demonstrated a noteworthy growth inhibitory effect against all cancer cell lines with IC50 values <50 microg/ml. Pronounced antimicrobial activity was observed only against Gram-positive bacteria among them multiresistant bacteria with inhibition zones >15 mm and MIC values <500 microg/ml, by 9 plants especially Centaurothamus maximus, Cupressus sempervirens, Enicostemma verticillare, Meriandera benghalensis, Nepeta deflersiana, Pulicaria inuloides, Tarconanthus camphoratus, Teucrium yemense and Vernonia leopoldii. Moreover, the methanolic extracts of Cupressus sempervirens, Meriandera benghalensis, Pulicaria inuloides and Rhus retinorrhaea showed a remarkable radical scavenging effect at low concentrations. PMID:19435146

  19. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. C. Silva; L. Barbosa; L. N. Seito; A. Fernandes Junior

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to establish a phytochemical analysis of the crude extracts and performed GC-MS of the essential oils (EOs) of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) and Asteraceae species Baccharis dracunculifolia DC, Matricaria chamomilla L. and Vernonia polyanthes Less, as well as determining their antimicrobial activity. Establishment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts and EOs against 16 Staphylococcus aureus

  20. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. C. Silva; L. Barbosa; L. N. Seito; A. Fernandes Junior

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to establish a phytochemical analysis of the crude extracts and performed GC-MS of the essential oils (EOs) of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) and Asteraceae species Baccharis dracunculifolia DC, Matricaria chamomilla L. and Vernonia polyanthes Less, as well as determining their antimicrobial activity. Establishment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts and EOs against 16 Staphylococcus aureus

  1. Antimicrobial activity of nerolidol and its derivatives against airborne microbes and further biological activities.

    PubMed

    Krist, Sabine; Banovac, Daniel; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Gochev, Velizar K; Wanner, Jürgen; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Nerolidol and its derivatives, namely cis-nerolidol, O-methyl-nerolidol, O-ethyl-nerolidol, (-)-?-bisabolol, trans,trans-farnesol and its main natural source cabreuva essential oil, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against airborne microbes and antifungal properties against plant pathogens. Among the tested compounds, ?-bisabolol was the most effective antimicrobial agent and trans,trans-farnesol showed the best antifungal activity. PMID:25920237

  2. [Transgenic Belarussian-bred potato plants expressing genes for antimicrobial peptides of the cecropin-melittin type].

    PubMed

    Vutto, N L; Gapeeva, T A; Pundik, A N; Tret'iakova, T G; Volotovski?, I D

    2010-12-01

    Binary vectors for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation were constructed to express the genes for antimicrobial peptides (APs) of the cectropin-melittin type under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter in plants. It was shown with Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells that the cassettes could be cloned in pB1121-based vectors with deletion of the 3-D-glycuronidase gene only in the orientation opposite to that of the original vector. Transgenic potato plants were obtained using the Belarussian varieties Odyssey, Vetraz, and Scarb. Their cells expressed the MsrA1 or CEMA peptides of the cecropin-melittin type. The expression was shown to confer higher resistance to bacterial (Erwinia carotovora) infection and extremely high resistance to fungal (Phytophtora infestans and Alternarla solani) infections. PMID:21434415

  3. Bifunctional ethyl 2-amino-4-methylthiazole-5-carboxylate derivatives: synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation as antimicrobial and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rostom, Sherif A F; Faidallah, Hassan M; Radwan, Mohammed F; Badr, Mona H

    2014-04-01

    Thirty thiazole compounds bearing chemotherapeutically-active pharmacophores were synthesized and evaluated for their preliminary in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer activities. Nineteen compounds displayed obvious antibacterial potential, with special bactericidal activity against Gram positive bacteria, whereas, nine analogs showed moderate to weak antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The analog 12f proved to be the most active antimicrobial member identified in this study being comparable to ampicillin and gentamicin sulfate against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, together with a moderate antifungal activity. Additionally, nine derivatives were tested for their preliminary in vitro anticancer activity according to the current one-dose protocol of the NCI. Compound 9b revealed a broad spectrum of anticancer activity against 29 out of the tested 60 subpanel tumor cell lines. Collectively, compounds 4, 9b, 10b and 12f could be considered as promising dual anticancer antibiotics. PMID:24583356

  4. Potential Antiosteoporotic Agents from Plants: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Min; Nie, Yan; Cao, Da-Peng; Xue, Yun-Yun; Wang, Jie-Si; Zhao, Lu; Rahman, Khalid; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health hazard and is a disease of old age; it is a silent epidemic affecting more than 200 million people worldwide in recent years. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research many plants and their compounds have been shown to possess antiosteoporosis activity. This paper reviews the medicinal plants displaying antiosteoporosis properties including their origin, active constituents, and pharmacological data. The plants reported here are the ones which are commonly used in traditional medical systems and have demonstrated clinical effectiveness against osteoporosis. Although many plants have the potential to prevent and treat osteoporosis, so far, only a fraction of these plants have been thoroughly investigated for their physiological and pharmacological properties including their mechanism of action. An attempt should be made to highlight plant species with possible antiosteoporosis properties and they should be investigated further to help with future drug development for treating this disease. PMID:23365596

  5. Interaction and effectiveness of antimicrobials along with healing-promoting agents in a novel biocellulose wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Napavichayanun, Supamas; Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-10-01

    An ideal wound dressing should keep the wound moist, allow oxygen permeation, adsorb wound exudate, accelerate re-epithelialization for wound closure, reduce pain and healing time, and prevent infection. Our novel biocellulose-based wound dressing was composed of three components: 1) biocellulose (BC), intended to create a moist and oxygen-permeated environment with exudate adsorption; 2) silk sericin (SS) known for its enhancement of collagen type I production, which is critical for re-epithelialization; and 3) the antiseptic polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB). To deliver an effective BC wound dressing, the interactions between the components (PHMB vs. SS) needed to be thoroughly analyzed. In this study, we investigated important parameters such as the loading sequence, loading concentration, and loading amount of the active compounds to ensure that the BC wound dressing could provide both antimicrobial activity and promote collagen production during healing. The loading sequence of SS and PHMB into BC was critical to maintain PHMB antimicrobial activity; silk sericin needed to be loaded before PHMB to avoid any negative impacts. The minimum PHMB concentration was 0.3% w/v for effective elimination of all tested bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The amounts of SS and PHMB in BC were optimized to ensure that the dressings released the optimal amounts of both SS to enhance fibroblast collagen production and PHMB for effective antimicrobial activity. PMID:26117743

  6. Inhibitory and bactericidal activities of amifloxacin, a new quinolone carboxylic acid, compared with those of seven other antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Baltch, A L; Sutphen, N T; Smith, R P; Conley, P E

    1984-01-01

    The activity of amifloxacin, a new quinolone carboxylic acid compound, against 147 strains of microorganisms was studied and was compared with the activities of cinoxacin, trimethoprim, amikacin, and four beta-lactam antimicrobials. The minimal concentration at which 90% of strains were inhibited by amifloxacin was lowest for Escherichia coli and Klebsiella sp (less than or equal to 0.125 microgram/ml), followed by Proteus sp (less than or equal to 0.25 microgram/ml), Enterobacter sp and Citrobacter sp (less than or equal to 0.5 microgram/ml), Providencia sp (less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia sp, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var anitratus (less than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml). When compared with the ranges of activity of seven reference antimicrobials, the range of amifloxacin activity was lowest for P aeruginosa, Citrobacter sp, Proteus sp, and A calcoaceticus var anitratus and similar to aztreonam's activity against Enterobacter sp. For amikacin-resistant P aeruginosa, the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amifloxacin ranged from 1 to 16 micrograms/ml. The MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of amifloxacin were similar. For all strains tested, microbial susceptibilities to amifloxacin were greater than those to currently available oral antimicrobial drugs, such as cinoxacin and trimethoprim. PMID:6440708

  7. [Synergistic action of cefodizime and other antimicrobial agents on clinically isolated microorganisms. IV. Synergistic action with dibekacin].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, K; Yokota, N; Koguchi, M; Nakane, Y; Suzuki, Y; Fukayama, S; Ishihara, R

    1992-05-01

    Antimicrobial activities of cefodizime (CDZM) in combination with dibekacin (DKB) were studied in vitro against clinically isolated Gram-negative rods. The results obtained are summarized as follows. 1. Similarly to combinations of CDZM+sisomicin (SISO) and CDZM+gentamicin (GM), combined activities of CDZM and DKB were dependent on antimicrobial activities of DKB, and the combined activities were more strongly dependent on DKB concentrations than on CDZM concentrations. The obtained results suggested that synergistic or cooperative antimicrobial activities of the combination would be expected when DKB concentrations in blood are at or somewhat lower than 1 MIC, and that clinical activities would be exerted regardless of the presence of CDZM resistant organisms, similarly to CDZM+GM combination. 2. As we have suggested previously, it seems possible that, with regard to combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycoside antibiotics, there exist universal rules that combined activities are dependent on activities of aminoglycoside antibiotics, and that stronger concentration dependencies on aminoglycosides would be observed than those on beta-lactams. PMID:1512933

  8. Evidence of VX nerve agent use from contaminated white mustard plants.

    PubMed

    Gravett, Matthew R; Hopkins, Farrha B; Self, Adam J; Webb, Andrew J; Timperley, Christopher M; Baker, Matthew J

    2014-08-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by Member States. Verification of compliance and investigations into allegations of use require accurate detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and their degradation products. Detection of CWAs such as organophosphorus nerve agents in the environment relies mainly upon the analysis of soil. We now present a method for the detection of the nerve agent VX and its hydrolysis products by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry of ethanol extracts of contaminated white mustard plants (Sinapis alba) which retained the compounds of interest for up to 45 days. VX is hydrolysed by the plants to ethyl methylphosphonic acid and then to methylphosphonic acid. The utility of white mustard as a nerve agent detector and remediator of nerve agent-polluted sites is discussed. The work described will help deter the employment of VX in conflict. PMID:25104906

  9. Characterization of ?-carrageenan films incorporated plant essential oils with improved antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shojaee-Aliabadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Hedayat; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Ghasemlou, Mehran; Hosseini, Seyede Marzieh; Khaksar, Ramin

    2014-01-30

    Antioxidant and antimicrobial kappa-carrageenan-based films containing different concentrations of Zataria multiflora Boiss (ZEO) and Mentha pulegium (MEO) essential oils were developed, and their water vapor permeability (WVP), optical, microstructure, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties were characterized. ZEO and MEO decreased the WVP of the emulsified films; for example, 3% ZEO reduced WVP by around 80%. Increasing the content of ZEO or MEO from 1% to 3% (v/v) increased values for elongation at break from 37.43% to 44.74% and from 36.09% to 41.25% respectively. Carrageenan-composite films were less resistant to breakage, more flexible and more opaque with lower gloss. These properties were related to the film's microstructure as analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. ZEO affected the antioxidant properties of the films more markedly than MEO, e.g., ZEO containing films showed DPPH radical scavenging of 80.6% which were two-fold higher than those having MEO. The films' antimicrobial activities were increased by incorporating essential oils, particularly ZEO, which were more effective against the bacteria in the direct-contact method than a vapor phase. S. aureus was found to be the most sensitive bacterium to either ZEO or MEO, followed by B. cereus and E. coli. A highest inhibition zone of 544.05 mm(2) was observed for S. aureus around the films incorporated with 3% (v/v) ZEO. The total inhibitory zone of 3% (v/v) MEO formulated films was 20.43 for S. typhimurium and 10.15 mm(2) for P. aeruginosa. These results revealed that ZEO and MEO have good potential to be incorporated into ?-carrageenan to make antimicrobial and antioxidant edible films for food applications. PMID:24299814

  10. Multi-agent system based intelligent distributed control system for power plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kwang Y. Lee; Jason D. Head; Jason R. Gomes; Craig S. Williams

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for intelligent distributed control of power plants using the concept of multi- agent systems (MAS). Solving the problem of optimally controlling a power plant based on multiple objectives, such as minimizing pollution, maximizing equipment life, etc., and coordinating each of the involved tasks that must be performed in distributed environments is a challenge, which involves

  11. Plants as a Source of Bacterial Resistance Modulators and Anti-Infective Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Gibbons

    2005-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of bacteria necessitates the discovery of new classes of antibacterials and compounds that inhibit these resistance mechanisms. At present, there are no single chemical entity plant-derived antibacterials used clinically, and this chemically diverse group deserves consideration as a source for two major reasons. First, plants have exceptional ability to produce cytotoxic agents and second

  12. Impact of wastewater from different sources on the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in sewage treatment plants in South India.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Masato; Senba, Hironobu; Otagiri, Haruna; Prabhasankar, Valipparambil P; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Lee, Ken-ichi; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Ian Joshua, Derrick; Balakrishna, Keshava; Bairy, Indira; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Guruge, Keerthi S

    2015-05-01

    The sewage treatment plant (STP) is one of the most important interfaces between the human population and the aquatic environment, leading to contamination of the latter by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. To identify factors affecting the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, water samples were collected from three different STPs in South India. STP1 exclusively treats sewage generated by a domestic population. STP2 predominantly treats sewage generated by a domestic population with a mix of hospital effluent. STP3 treats effluents generated exclusively by a hospital. The water samples were collected between three intermediate treatment steps including equalization, aeration, and clarification, in addition to the outlet to assess the removal rates of bacteria as the effluent passed through the treatment plant. The samples were collected in three different seasons to study the effect of seasonal variation. Escherichia coli isolated from the water samples were tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials. The results of logistic regression analysis suggest that the hospital wastewater inflow significantly increased the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli, whereas the treatment processes and sampling seasons did not affect the prevalence of these isolates. A bias in the genotype distribution of E. coli was observed among the isolates obtained from STP3. In conclusion, hospital wastewaters should be carefully treated to prevent the contamination of Indian environment with antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. PMID:25704279

  13. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Complicated schemes of classical breeding and their drawbacks, environmental risks imposed by agrochemicals, decrease of arable land, and coincident escalating damages of pests and pathogens have accentuated the necessity for highly efficient measures to improve crop protection. During co-evolution of host-microbe interactions, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have exhibited a brilliant history in protecting host organisms against devastation by invading pathogens. Since the 1980s, a plethora of AMPs has been isolated from and characterized in different organisms. Nevertheless the AMPs expressed in plants render them more resistant to diverse pathogens, a more orchestrated approach based on knowledge of their mechanisms of action and cellular targets, structural toxic principle, and possible impact on immune system of corresponding transgenic plants will considerably improve crop protection strategies against harmful plant diseases. This review outlines the current knowledge on different modes of action of AMPs and then argues the waves of AMPs' ectopic expression on transgenic plants' immune system. PMID:21847025

  14. Synthesis of some novel 2-substituted-5-[isopropylthiazole] clubbed 1,2,4-triazole and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles as potential antimicrobial and antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, G V; Rajendraprasad, Y; Mallikarjuna, B P; Chandrashekar, S M; Kistayya, C

    2010-05-01

    In the present study a series of 2-substituted-5-[isopropylthiazole] clubbed 1,2,4-triazole and 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives have been synthesized and characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral analysis. Synthesized compounds were evaluated for their preliminary cytotoxicity, antimicrobial and antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain by broth dilution assay method. Antimycobacterial activity tested against M. tuberculosis indicated that compounds 4b and 6g exhibited twofold enhanced potency than parent compound 1 and the results indicate that some of them exhibited promising activities and they deserve more consideration as potential antitubercular agents. Compound 3c, 4b and 6c exhibited good or moderate antibacterial inhibition and compounds 3h and 7c showed excellent antifungal activity. PMID:20149496

  15. Induction of Defense Responses in Cucumber Plants (Cucumis sativus L.) by the Biocontrol Agent Trichoderma harzianum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. YEDIDIA; N. BENHAMOU; I. CHET

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum T-203 to trigger plant defense responses was investigated by inoculating roots of cucumber seedlings with Trichoderma in an aseptic, hydroponic system. Trichoderma-treated plants were more developed than nontreated plants throughout the experiment. Electron microscopy of ultrathin sections from Trichoderma-treated roots revealed penetration of Trichoderma into the roots, restricted mainly to the epidermis

  16. 1,5-Benzodiazepine derivatives as potential antimicrobial agents: design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan-Zhi; Li, Xiao-Qing; An, Ying-Shuang

    2015-05-01

    36 Novel 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives were rationally designed and synthesized according to the principle of superposition of bioactive substructures by the combination of 1,5-benzodiazepines, thiophene or thiazole and ester group. The structures of the target compounds have been characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, MS and elemental analysis. The structure of was further determined using X-ray single crystal diffraction. All synthesized 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against C. neoformans, C. neoformans clinical isolates, C. albicans, E. coli and S. aureus. The bioactive assay results revealed that most of the 1,5-benzodiazepine derivatives exhibited considerable potency against all of the tested strains. In particular, compounds and (MIC: 2-6 ?g mL(-1), MFC: 10-14 ?g mL(-1)) exhibited excellent antifungal activity and were found to be 32-64 and 9-12.8 times more potent than the reference drugs against C. neoformans, respectively. Moreover, compound (MIC: 40 ?g mL(-1)) displayed equipotent antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus compared to the reference drugs. The most potent of the synthesized compounds and were further studied by evaluating their cytotoxicities, and the results showed that they had relatively low level cytotoxicity for BV2 cell. A preliminary study of the structure-activity relationship revealed that substituents in the phenyl ring and the thiophene ring had a great effect on the antimicrobial activity of these compounds. In addition, the thiazole ring at C2 may be a pharmacophore of these compounds and COOC2H5 group at C3 is the best substituent for the maintenance of antimicrobial activities at low concentrations (1.5625 ?g per disc). PMID:25875695

  17. Nanomedicines for antimicrobial interventions.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, F; Tortora, M; Stringaro, A; Colone, M; Baldassarri, L

    2014-12-01

    The development of new antimicrobial therapeutic tools addresses the emergence of multidrug-resistant micro-organisms or clones and the need for more effective antimicrobial strategies. Overcoming the hurdles in providing early diagnosis and intervention on hard-to-reach and/or resting bacteria (i.e. biofilm-embedded cells) represents a challenging task. In this review, we identify a set of organic, inorganic, and hybrid materials that might be used for prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections. We report the current knowledge on nano- and microparticle-based antimicrobial agents and describe the possible mode of their action. PMID:25447199

  18. Antibiotic Conjugated Fluorescent Carbon Dots as a Theranostic Agent for Controlled Drug Release, Bioimaging, and Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vaibhav; Khade, Monika; Goshi, Ekta; Sharon, Madhuri

    2014-01-01

    A novel report on microwave assisted synthesis of bright carbon dots (C-dots) using gum arabic (GA) and its use as molecular vehicle to ferry ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, a broad spectrum antibiotic, is reported in the present work. Density gradient centrifugation (DGC) was used to separate different types of C-dots. After careful analysis of the fractions obtained after centrifugation, ciprofloxacin was attached to synthesize ciprofloxacin conjugated with C-dots (Cipro@C-dots conjugate). Release of ciprofloxacin was found to be extremely regulated under physiological conditions. Cipro@C-dots were found to be biocompatible on Vero cells as compared to free ciprofloxacin (1.2?mM) even at very high concentrations. Bare C-dots (?13?mg?mL?1) were used for microbial imaging of the simplest eukaryotic model—Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Bright green fluorescent was obtained when live imaging was performed to view yeast cells under fluorescent microscope suggesting C-dots incorporation inside the cells. Cipro@C-dots conjugate also showed enhanced antimicrobial activity against both model gram positive and gram negative microorganisms. Thus, the Cipro@C-dots conjugate paves not only a way for bioimaging but also an efficient new nanocarrier for controlled drug release with high antimicrobial activity, thereby serving potential tool for theranostics. PMID:24744921

  19. Antimicrobial and brine shrimp toxicity of some plants used in traditional medicine in Bukoba District, north-western Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Moshi, M J; Innocent, E; Masimba, P J; Otieno, D F; Weisheit, A; Mbabazi, P; Lynes, M; Meachem, K; Hamilton, A; Urassa, I

    2009-01-01

    Herbal medicines constitute a potentially important resource for new and safe drugs for the management of microbial infections and other diseases. In this study, dichloromethane, ethylacetate and ethanol extracts of Canarium schweinfurthii Engl., Dissotis brazzae Cong., Iboza urticifolia (Bak) E.A.Bruce, Isoglosa lacteal Lindau, Strombosia Scheffleri Engl., and Whitfieldia elongate T. Anders were tested for antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp toxicity. The objective was to validate claims that they are used to treat bacterial infections, diarrhoea and heal wounds among the Haya tribe of north-western Tanzania. At least one extract of each plant showed antibacterial activity. Dichloromethane extracts were the most active while ethanol extracts were the least active. Extracts of Whitfieldia elongate and Isoglossa lacteal were the most and least active with MICs in the range 0.08-0.62 mg/ml and 15.6-62.5 mg/ml, respectively. The dichloromethane extract of Whitfieldia elongate exhibited strong antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans. Against brine shrimp larvae, the extracts from the six plants exhibited a low to very low toxicity with LC50 values ranging from 15.35-374.0 microg/ml. However, ethanol extracts of Dissotis brazzae and Strombosia scheffleri had LC50 values of >1000 microg/ml. The seemingly innocuous nature and relatively good antibacterial activity against skin infections and gastrointestinal pathogenic bacteria support the traditional uses of the plants and deserve more detailed studies. PMID:19445101

  20. Isolation, diversity, and antimicrobial activity of rare actinobacteria from medicinal plants of tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sheng; Li, Jie; Chen, Hua-Hong; Zhao, Guo-Zhen; Zhu, Wen-Yong; Jiang, Cheng-Lin; Xu, Li-Hua; Li, Wen-Jun

    2009-10-01

    Endophytic actinobacteria are relatively unexplored as potential sources of novel species and novel natural products for medical and commercial exploitation. Xishuangbanna is recognized throughout the world for its diverse flora, especially the rain forest plants, many of which have indigenous pharmaceutical histories. However, little is known about the endophytic actinobacteria of this tropical area. In this work, we studied the diversity of actinobacteria isolated from medicinal plants collected from tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna. By the use of different selective isolation media and methods, a total of 2,174 actinobacteria were isolated. Forty-six isolates were selected on the basis of their morphologies on different media and were further characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results showed an unexpected level of diversity, with 32 different genera. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the isolation of Saccharopolyspora, Dietzia, Blastococcus, Dactylosporangium, Promicromonospora, Oerskovia, Actinocorallia, and Jiangella species from endophytic environments. At least 19 isolates are considered novel taxa by our current research. In addition, all 46 isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity and were screened for the presence of genes encoding polyketide synthetases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. The results confirm that the medicinal plants of Xishuangbanna represent an extremely rich reservoir for the isolation of a significant diversity of actinobacteria, including novel species, that are potential sources for the discovery of biologically active compounds. PMID:19648362

  1. Isolation, Diversity, and Antimicrobial Activity of Rare Actinobacteria from Medicinal Plants of Tropical Rain Forests in Xishuangbanna, China? †

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sheng; Li, Jie; Chen, Hua-Hong; Zhao, Guo-Zhen; Zhu, Wen-Yong; Jiang, Cheng-Lin; Xu, Li-Hua; Li, Wen-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Endophytic actinobacteria are relatively unexplored as potential sources of novel species and novel natural products for medical and commercial exploitation. Xishuangbanna is recognized throughout the world for its diverse flora, especially the rain forest plants, many of which have indigenous pharmaceutical histories. However, little is known about the endophytic actinobacteria of this tropical area. In this work, we studied the diversity of actinobacteria isolated from medicinal plants collected from tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna. By the use of different selective isolation media and methods, a total of 2,174 actinobacteria were isolated. Forty-six isolates were selected on the basis of their morphologies on different media and were further characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results showed an unexpected level of diversity, with 32 different genera. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the isolation of Saccharopolyspora, Dietzia, Blastococcus, Dactylosporangium, Promicromonospora, Oerskovia, Actinocorallia, and Jiangella species from endophytic environments. At least 19 isolates are considered novel taxa by our current research. In addition, all 46 isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity and were screened for the presence of genes encoding polyketide synthetases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. The results confirm that the medicinal plants of Xishuangbanna represent an extremely rich reservoir for the isolation of a significant diversity of actinobacteria, including novel species, that are potential sources for the discovery of biologically active compounds. PMID:19648362

  2. Antimicrobial properties of nitric oxide and its application in antimicrobial formulations and medical devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitchell Lawrence Jones; Jorge Gabriel Ganopolsky; Alain Labbé; Christopher Wahl; Satya Prakash

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the antimicrobial properties of nitric oxide (NO) and its application as an antimicrobial agent in different\\u000a formulations and medical devices. We depict the eukaryotic biosynthesis of NO and its physiologic functions as a cell messenger\\u000a and as an antimicrobial agent of the cell-mediated immune response. We analyze the antimicrobial activity of NO and the eukaryotic\\u000a protective mechanisms

  3. Plant-derived compounds as natural antimicrobials to control paper mill biofilms.

    PubMed

    Neyret, Christophe; Herry, Jean-Marie; Meylheuc, Thierry; Dubois-Brissonnet, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms can cause severe problems in industrial paper mills, particularly of economic and technological types (clogging of filters, sheet breaks or holes in the paper, machine breakdowns, etc.). We present here some promising results on the use of essential oil compounds to control these biofilms. Biofilms were grown on stainless-steel coupons with a microbial white water consortium sampled from an industrial paper mill. Five essential oil compounds were screened initially in the laboratory in terms of their antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells and biofilms. The three most active compounds were selected and then tested in different combinations. The combination finally selected was tested at the pilot scale to confirm its efficiency under realistic conditions. All the compounds tested were as active against biofilms as they were against planktonic cells. The most active compounds were thymol, carvacrol, and eugenol, and the most efficient combination was thymol-carvacrol. At a pilot scale, with six injections a day, 10 mM carvacrol alone prevented biocontamination for at least 10 days, and a 1 mM thymol-carvacrol combination enabled a 67 % reduction in biofilm dry matter after 11 days. The use of green antimicrobials could constitute a very promising alternative or supplement to the treatments currently applied to limit biofilm formation in the environment of paper mill machines. PMID:24170384

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries. PMID:23935642

  5. Isolation, abundance and phylogenetic affiliation of endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants and screening for their in vitro antimicrobial biosynthetic potential

    PubMed Central

    Passari, Ajit K.; Mishra, Vineet K.; Saikia, Ratul; Gupta, Vijai K.; Singh, Bhim P.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with medicinal plants are of interest as the producers of important bioactive compounds. To date, the diversity of culturable endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants is in its initial phase of exploration. In this study, 42 endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from different organs of seven selected medicinal plants. The highest number of isolates (n = 22, 52.3%) of actinomycetes was isolated from roots, followed by stems (n = 9, 21.4%), leaves (n = 6, 14.2%), flowers (n = 3, 7.1%), and petioles (n = 2, 4.7%). The genus Streptomyces was the most dominant among the isolates (66.6%) in both the locations (Dampa TRF and Phawngpuii NP, Mizoram, India). From a total of 42 isolates, 22 isolates were selected for further studies based on their ability to inhibit one of the tested human bacterial or fungal pathogen. Selected isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene analysis and subsequently the isolates were grouped to four different genera; Streptomyces, Brevibacterium, Microbacterium, and Leifsonia. Antibiotic sensitivity assay was performed to understand the responsible antimicrobials present in the isolates showing the antimicrobial activities and revealed that the isolates were mostly resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin. Further, antimicrobial properties and antibiotic sensitivity assay in combination with the results of amplification of biosynthetic genes polyketide synthase (PKS-I) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) showed that the endophytic actinomycetes associated with the selected medicinal plants have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. This is the first report of the isolation of Brevibacterium sp., Microbacterium sp., and Leifsonia xyli from endophytic environments of medicinal plants, Mirabilis jalapa and Clerodendrum colebrookianum. Our results emphasize that endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants are an unexplored resource for the discovery of biologically active compounds. PMID:25904906

  6. ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, May 2010, p. 20852095 Vol. 54, No. 5 0066-4804/10/$12.00 doi:10.1128/AAC.01460-09

    E-print Network

    Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    in both the absence and presence of an antibiotic. The global rise of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria resistance may be reversible once it has emerged. Antimicrobial-induced killing or growth suppression does of antimicrobial resistance seems to be the rule rather than the exception and has been found in many bacterial

  7. Novel ethyl 1,5-disubstituted-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylates as a new class of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Awwad A; Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; Alanazi, Fares K

    2014-09-01

    A series of pyrazole derivatives 9-22 were designed and synthesized. All the newly synthesized compounds were assayed for their antimicrobial activity against the Grampositive bacteria Staphyllococcus aureus and Bacillius subtilis and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in addition to the fungi organisms, Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. Ethyl 5-(2,5-dimethylthiophen-3-yl)-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylate (21) (MIC(E.coli) = 0.038 ?mol mL?ą, MIC(P. aerug.) = 0.067 ?mol mL?ą) is nearly as active as ampicillin (MIC = 0.033 and 0.067 ?mol mL?ą), respectively. Ethyl 5-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl)-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylate (16) (MIC = 0.015 ?mol mL?ą) is more active than fluconazole (0.020 ?mol mL?ą) as a reference drug against C. parapsilosis. PMID:25296679

  8. Cytochrome bd Protects Bacteria against Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress: A Potential Target for Next-Generation Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Borisov, V B; Forte, E; Siletsky, S A; Arese, M; Davletshin, A I; Sarti, P; Giuffrč, A

    2015-05-01

    Cytochrome bd is a terminal quinol oxidase of the bacterial respiratory chain. This tri-heme integral membrane protein generates a proton motive force at lower efficiency than heme-copper oxidases. This notwithstanding, under unfavorable growth conditions bacteria often use cytochrome bd in place of heme-copper enzymes as the main terminal oxidase. This is the case for several pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria during host colonization. This review summarizes recent data on the contribution of cytochrome bd to bacterial resistance to hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite, harmful species produced by the host as part of the immune response to microbial infections. Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that bd-type oxidases contribute to bacterial virulence by promoting microbial survival under oxidative and nitrosative stress conditions. For these reasons, cytochrome bd represents a protein target for the development of next-generation antimicrobials. PMID:26071774

  9. Contrasting effects of two antimicrobial agents (triclosan and triclocarban) on biomineralisation of an organophosphate pesticide in soils.

    PubMed

    Kookana, R S; Ali, A; Smith, L; Arshad, M

    2014-07-01

    We examined the impact of triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) antimicrobial compounds on the biomineralisation of glucose and cadusafos pesticide in three Australian soils. Mineralisations of radiolabelled ((14)C) compounds were measured over a period of up to 77 d in sterile and non-sterile soils treated with different concentrations of TCS and TCC (0-450 mg kg(-1)). The rates of mineralisation of cadusafos were found to decrease with increasing concentration of TCS in all soils, but varied with soil type. Soils treated with TCS at the highest concentration (270 mg kg(-1)) reduced cadusafos mineralisation by up to 58%. However, glucose mineralisation was not significantly affected by the presence of TCS. While TCS, significantly reduced the mineralisation of cadusafos (by 17%; p<0.05) even at the lowest studied concentration (30 mg kg(-1)), no significant effect of TCC was observed on cadusafos or glucose mineralisation even at the highest concentration used (450 mg kg(-1)). PMID:24461429

  10. High burden of antimicrobial resistance in Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shio-Shin Jean; Po-Ren Hsueh

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is associated with high mortality rates and high medical costs. Marked variations in the resistance profiles of bacterial and fungal pathogens as well as the quality of public hygiene have had a considerable impact on the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents in Asian countries. In Asia, one of the epicentres of antimicrobial drug resistance, there is an alarming number

  11. Biopolymer-Based Antimicrobial Packaging: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DONG SU CHA; MANJEET S. CHINNAN

    2004-01-01

    The term antimicrobial packaging encompasses any packaging technique(s) used to control microbial growth in a food product. These include packaging materials and edible films and coatings that contain antimicrobial agents and also techniques that modify the atmosphere within the package. In recent years, antimicrobial packaging has attracted much attention from the food industry because of the increase in consumer demand

  12. Antimicrobial effect of zinc pyrithione

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GENJI IMOKAWA; HARUO SHIMIZU

    Synopsis The antimicrobial effect of zinc pyrithione has been studied with healthy scalps in relation to its ANTIDANDRUFF effect. Use of zinc pyrithione-containing shampoo sharply reduced the CORNEOCYTE COUNTS, while the similarly active antimicrobial agent, Irgasan DP-300 © had no effect on the corneocyte counts. Quantitative estimation of scalp microorganisms revealed that corresponding to the decrease in dandruff, Pityrospbrum ovale

  13. Potential New Pharmacological Agents Derived From Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Haniye; Khakshur, Ali Asghar; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we reviewed plants and phytochemical compounds demonstrating beneficial effects in pancreatic cancer to find new sources of pharmaceutical agents. For this purpose, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched for plants or herbal components with beneficial effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Data were collected up to January 2013. The search terms were "plant," "herb," "herbal therapy," or "phytotherapy" and "pancreatic cancer" or "pancreas." All of the human in vivo and in vitro studies were included. According to studies, among diverse plants and phytochemicals, 12 compounds including apigenin, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, curcumin, thymoquinone, dihydroartemisinin, cucurbitacin B, and perillyl alcohol have beneficial action against pancreatic cancer cells through 4 or more mechanisms. Applying their plausible synergistic effects can be an imperative approach for finding new efficient pharmacological agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25493374

  14. Biochemical analysis of a multifunctional cytochrome P450 (CYP51) enzyme required for synthesis of antimicrobial triterpenes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Katrin; Hughes, Richard K.; Sainsbury, Frank; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rejzek, Martin; Fairhurst, Shirley; Olsen, Carl-Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Melton, Rachel E.; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Bak, Sřren; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Members of the cytochromes P450 superfamily (P450s) catalyze a huge variety of oxidation reactions in microbes and higher organisms. Most P450 families are highly divergent, but in contrast the cytochrome P450 14?-sterol demethylase (CYP51) family is one of the most ancient and conserved, catalyzing sterol 14?-demethylase reactions required for essential sterol synthesis across the fungal, animal, and plant kingdoms. Oats (Avena spp.) produce antimicrobial compounds, avenacins, that provide protection against disease. Avenacins are synthesized from the simple triterpene, ?-amyrin. Previously we identified a gene encoding a member of the CYP51 family of cytochromes P450, AsCyp51H10 (also known as Saponin-deficient 2, Sad2), that is required for avenacin synthesis in a forward screen for avenacin-deficient oat mutants. sad2 mutants accumulate ?-amyrin, suggesting that they are blocked early in the pathway. Here, using a transient plant expression system, we show that AsCYP51H10 is a multifunctional P450 capable of modifying both the C and D rings of the pentacyclic triterpene scaffold to give 12,13?-epoxy-3?,16?-dihydroxy-oleanane (12,13?-epoxy-16?-hydroxy-?-amyrin). Molecular modeling and docking experiments indicate that C16 hydroxylation is likely to precede C12,13 epoxidation. Our computational modeling, in combination with analysis of a suite of sad2 mutants, provides insights into the unusual catalytic behavior of AsCYP51H10 and its active site mutants. Fungal bioassays show that the C12,13 epoxy group is an important determinant of antifungal activity. Accordingly, the oat AsCYP51H10 enzyme has been recruited from primary metabolism and has acquired a different function compared to other characterized members of the plant CYP51 family—as a multifunctional stereo- and regio-specific hydroxylase in plant specialized metabolism. PMID:23940321

  15. Improvement of water treatment pilot plant with Moringa oleifera extract as flocculant agent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2009-01-01

    Moringa oleifera extract is a high?capacity flocculant agent for turbidity removal in surface water treatment. A complete study of a pilot?plant installation has been carried out. Because of flocculent sedimentability of treated water, a residual turbidity occured in the pilot plant (around 30 NTU), which could not be reduced just by a coagulation?flocculation?sedimentation process. Because of this limitation, the pilot

  16. Antimicrobial Activity of Plants Used in the Prevention and Control of Bovine Mastitis in Southern Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    César AVANCINI; José M. WIEST; Rodrigo DALL' AGNOL

    SUMMARY. Based on informal interview, ethnoveterinary information about plants used in the preven- tion and control of bovine mastitis in Southern Brazil were obtained. Alternanthera brasiliana (L.) Ktze. (\\

  17. Antimicrobial Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Doron, Shira; Davidson, Lisa E.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is increasing; however, antimicrobial drug development is slowing. Now more than ever before, antimicrobial stewardship is of the utmost importance as a way to optimize the use of antimicrobials to prevent the development of resistance and improve patient outcomes. This review describes the why, what, who, how, when, and where of antimicrobial stewardship. Techniques of stewardship are summarized, and a plan for implementation of a stewardship program is outlined. PMID:22033257

  18. Antimicrobial peptides in 2014.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human ?-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human ?-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  20. Editorial of the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Piozzi, Antonella; Francolini, Iolanda

    2013-01-01

    The special issue “Antimicrobial Polymers” includes research and review papers concerning the recent advances on preparation of antimicrobial polymers and their relevance to industrial settings and biomedical field. Antimicrobial polymers have recently emerged as promising candidates to fight microbial contamination onto surfaces thanks to their interesting properties. In this special issue, the main strategies pursued for developing antimicrobial polymers, including polymer impregnation with antimicrobial agents or synthesis of polymers bearing antimicrobial moieties, were discussed. The future application of these polymers either in industrial or healthcare settings could result in an extremely positive impact not only at the economic level but also for the improvement of quality of life. PMID:24005863

  1. Screening of hundred Rwandese medicinal plants for antimicrobial and antiviral properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Vlietinck; L. Van Hoof; J. Totté; A. Lasure; D. Vanden Berghe; P. C. Rwangabo; J. Mvukiyumwami

    1995-01-01

    A series of 100 Rwandese medicinal plants (267 plant extracts), used by traditional healers to treat infections, were screened for antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. The results of the testing showed that 45% were active against Staphylococcus aureus, 2% against Escherichia coli, 16% against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 7% against Candida albicans, 80% against Microsporum canis and 60% against Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Not

  2. Strategies for controlling plant diseases and mycotoxin contamination using antimicrobial synthetic peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of disease-resistant transgenic crops is very difficult due to the fact that host plant-pathogen interaction is a very complex phenomenon and it is often crop/variety or pathogen/strain-specific. Synthetic peptides are useful in controlling a broad spectrum of plant pathogens including ...

  3. Effect of mechanical damage on emission of volatile organic compounds from plant leaves and implications for evaluation of host plant specificity of prospective biological control agents of weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of host plant specificity is a critical step in the evaluation of classical biological control agents of weeds, which is necessary for avoiding possible damage to nontarget plants. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by plants likely play an important role in determining which plant...

  4. Plant-mediated interactions: considerations for agent selection in weed biological control programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-mediated indirect interactions among herbivores (arthropods and pathogens) are common and extensively reported in the ecological literature. However, they are not well-documented with respect to weed biological control. Such interactions between biological control agents can have net positive...

  5. The mode of action of the plant antimicrobial peptide MiAMP1 differs from that of its structural homologue, the yeast killer toxin WmKT.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Camilla; Kazan, Kemal; Goulter, Ken C; Maclean, Donald J; Manners, John M

    2005-02-01

    The plant antimicrobial peptide MiAMP1 from Macadamia integrifolia and the yeast killer toxin peptide WmKT from Williopsis mrakii are structural homologues. Comparative studies of yeast mutants were performed to test their sensitivity to these two antimicrobial peptides. No differences in susceptibility to MiAMP1 were detected between wild-type and several WmKT-resistant mutant yeast strains. A yeast mutant MT1, resistant to MiAMP1 but unaffected in its susceptibility to plant defensins and hydrogen peroxide, also did not show enhanced tolerance towards WmKT. It is therefore probable that the Greek key beta-barrel structure shared by MiAMP1 and WmKT provides a robust structural framework ensuring stability for the two proteins but that the specific action of the peptides depends on other motifs. PMID:15668020

  6. Identification of penicillinase producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Chile during clinical and microbiological study of gonococcal susceptibility to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Moreno, J; Dillon, J R; Arroyave, R; Maldonado, A; Fich, F; Salvo, A; Villalobos, D; Vincent, P; Pauze, M

    1987-01-01

    The first penicillinase producing isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) identified in Chile were discovered during a clinical and microbiological study to compare the efficacy of penicillin (4.8 MIU aqueous procaine penicillin G plus 1 g oral probenecid) and tetracycline (1.5 g followed by 500 mg four times daily for four days) treatment regimens for acute uncomplicated gonorrhoea. Penicillin treatment was effective in 93.1% (282) of 303 patients, whereas tetracycline was effective in 98.3% (233) of 237 patients. Six of the penicillin treatment failures were attributable to PPNG strains. In all, 21 PPNG strains were identified during the study. They were genetically identical, having a wild type auxotype, a WII/III serotype (serovar Bajk), and carrying cryptic and transfer plasmids and an Asian type penicillinase producing plasmid. In addition, 674 non-PPNG isolates were tested for their susceptibility to eight antimicrobials. Over 95% were sensitivie to 1 mg/l of penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, cefuroxime, and erythromycin, over 90% were sensitive to 1 mg/l of tetracycline and 2 mg/l of thiamphenicol, and all were sensitive to spectinomycin. Of 226 non-PPNG isolates characterised for plasmid content and auxotype, 90% (205) were either wild type or proline requiring, 67% (153) carried only the cryptic plasmid, and a further 31% (71) carried both cryptic and transfer plasmids. Unusually, three of four isolates lacking the cryptic plasmid carried only the transfer plasmid. Images PMID:3102348

  7. Expression of an Engineered Heterologous Antimicrobial Peptide in Potato Alters Plant Development and Mitigates Normal Abiotic and Biotic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ravinder K.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Mattoo, Autar K.; Misra, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs) are ubiquitous small proteins used by living cells to defend against a wide spectrum of pathogens. Their amphipathic property helps their interaction with negatively charged cellular membrane of the pathogen causing cell lysis and death. AMPs also modulate signaling pathway(s) and cellular processes in animal models; however, little is known of cellular processes other than the pathogen-lysis phenomenon modulated by AMPs in plants. An engineered heterologous AMP, msrA3, expressed in potato was previously shown to cause resistance of the transgenic plants against selected fungal and bacterial pathogens. These lines together with the wild type were studied for growth habits, and for inducible defense responses during challenge with biotic (necrotroph Fusarium solani) and abiotic stressors (dark-induced senescence, wounding and temperature stress). msrA3-expression not only conferred protection against F. solani but also delayed development of floral buds and prolonged vegetative phase. Analysis of select gene transcript profiles showed that the transgenic potato plants were suppressed in the hypersensitive (HR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) responses to both biotic and abiotic stressors. Also, the transgenic leaves accumulated lesser amounts of the defense hormone jasmonic acid upon wounding with only a slight change in salicylic acid as compared to the wild type. Thus, normal host defense responses to the pathogen and abiotic stressors were mitigated by msrA3 expression suggesting MSRA3 regulates a common step(s) of these response pathways. The stemming of the pathogen growth and mitigating stress response pathways likely contributes to resource reallocation for higher tuber yield. PMID:24147012

  8. Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia, mortality and all intensive care unit acquired infections by topically applied antimicrobial or antiseptic agents: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in intensive care units

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudia Pileggi; Aida Bianco; Domenico Flotta; Carmelo GA Nobile; Maria Pavia

    2011-01-01

    Introduction  Given the high morbidity and mortality attributable to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in intensive care unit (ICU)\\u000a patients, prevention plays a key role in the management of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. One of the candidate\\u000a preventive interventions is the selective decontamination of the digestive or respiratory tract (SDRD) by topical antiseptic\\u000a or antimicrobial agents. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the

  9. Bio-synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. and its therapeutic evaluation as anticancer and antimicrobial agent.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Tripathy, Debabrata; Choudhary, Alka; Aili, Pavan Kumar; Chatterjee, Anupam; Singh, Inder Pal; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2015-08-01

    The present study aims to develop an easy and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using extracts from the medicinal plant, Potentilla fulgens and evaluation of its anticancer and antimicrobial properties. The various parts of P. fulgens were screened and the root extract was found to have the highest potential for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The root extracts were able to quickly reduce Ag(+) to Ag(0) and stabilized the nanoparticles. The synthesis of nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-Visible spectrophotometry and further characterized using Zeta sizer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electron microscopic study showed that the size of the nanoparticle was in the range of 10 to 15nm and spherical in shape. The studies of phytochemical analysis of nanoparticles indicated that the adsorbed components on the surface of nanoparticles were mainly flavonoid in nature. Furthermore, nanoparticles were evaluated as cytotoxic against various cancer cell lines and 0.2 to 12?g/mL nanoparticles showed good toxicity. The IC50 value of nanoparticles was found to be 4.91 and 8.23?g/mL against MCF-7 and U-87 cell lines, respectively. Additionally, the apoptotic effect of synthesized nanoparticles on normal and cancer cells was studied using trypan blue assay and flow-cytometric analysis. The results indicate the synthesized nanoparticle ability to kill cancer cells compared to normal cells. The nanoparticles also exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26042698

  10. Molecular characterization of rhizospheric soil streptomycetes isolated from indigenous Turkish plants and their antimicrobial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ebru Ince Yilmaz; Murat Yavuz; Murat Kizil

    2008-01-01

    As part of a research program whose aim is to determine the diversity of streptomycetes in order to discover new bioactive\\u000a secondary metabolites, rhizosphere soils of three indigenous plants were analyzed. A total of 55 actinomycetes were isolated\\u000a using three different medium from the samples. The rhizospheric soil of the plant Aethionema dumanii gave the highest number of actinomycetes, i.e.,

  11. Synthesis of thiosemicarbazones derived from N-(4-hippuric acid)thiosemicarbazide and different carbonyl compounds as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    El-Sharief, Marwa A M Sh; Abbas, Samir Y; El-Bayouki, Khairy A M; El-Gammal, Eman W

    2013-09-01

    New series of thiosemicarbazone derivatives incorporating a hippuric acid moiety have been synthesized through the reaction of N-(4-hippuric acid)thiosemicarbazide with various carbonyl compounds such as aldehydes, ketones and cyclic ketones. The synthesized compounds were tested against bacterial and fungal strains. Most of compounds, such as 2-(4-(2-(4-fluorobenzylidene)hydrazinecarbothioamido)benzamido)acetic acid showed significant antibacterial and antifungal activities. These compounds comprise a new class of promising broad-spectrum antibacterial and antifungal agents. PMID:23871906

  12. T4-Like Phage Bp7, a Potential Antimicrobial Agent for Controlling Drug-Resistant Escherichia coli in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Can; Li, Wenli; Liu, Wenhua; Zou, Ling; Yan, Chen; Lu, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Chicken-pathogenic Escherichia coli is severely endangering the poultry industry in China and worldwide, and antibiotic therapy is facing an increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. Bacteriophages can kill bacteria with no known activity in human or animal cells, making them an attractive alternative to antibiotics. In this study, we present the characteristics of a novel virulent bacteriophage, Bp7, specifically infecting pathogenic multidrug-resistant E. coli. Phage Bp7 was isolated from chicken feces. Bp7 belongs to the family Myoviridae, possessing an elongated icosahedral head and contractile sheathed tail. It has a 168-kb double-stranded DNA genome. For larger yields, its optimal multiplicity of infection (MOI) to infect E. coli was about 0.001. The latent period was 10 to 15 min, and the burst size was 90 PFU/infected cell. It was stable both at pH 5.0 to 10.0 and at 40°C or 50°C for at least 1 h. Bp7 could infect 46% of pathogenic clinical E. coli strains. Bp7 harbored 791 open reading frames (ORFs) and 263 possible genes. Among the 263 genes, 199 possessed amino acid sequence identities with ORFs of phage T4, 62 had identities with other T4-like phages, and only one lacked any database match. The genome of Bp7 manifested obvious division and rearrangement compared to phages T4, JS98, and IME08. Bp7 is a new member of the “T4-like” genus, family Myoviridae. Its wide host range, strong cell-killing activity, and high stability to pH make it an alternative to antimicrobials for controlling drug-resistant E. coli in chickens. PMID:23835183

  13. Distribution characteristics of clarithromycin and azithromycin, macrolide antimicrobial agents used for treatment of respiratory infections, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of clarithromycin (CAM) and azithromycin (AZM), macrolide antimicrobial agents, in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were evaluated. In the in vivo animal experiments, the time-courses of the concentrations of CAM and AZM in ELF and AMs following oral administration (50?mg/kg) to rats were markedly higher than those in plasma, and the area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios of ELF/plasma of CAM and AZM were 12 and 2.2, and the AUC ratios of AMs/ELF were 37 and 291, respectively. In the in vitro transport experiments, the basolateral-to-apical transport of CAM and AZM through model lung epithelial cell (Calu-3) monolayers were greater than the apical-to-basolateral transport. MDR1 substrates reduced the basolateral-to-apical transport of CAM and AZM. In the in vitro uptake experiments, the intracellular concentrations of CAM and AZM in cultured AMs (NR8383) were greater than the extracellular concentrations. The uptake of CAM and AZM by NR8383 was inhibited by ATP depletors. These data suggest that the high distribution of CAM and AZM to AMs is due to the sustained distribution to ELF via MDR1 as well as the high uptake by the AMs themselves via active transport mechanisms. PMID:21812004

  14. Distribution characteristics of telithromycin, a novel ketolide antimicrobial agent applied for treatment of respiratory infection, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The distribution characteristics of telithromycin (TEL), a novel ketolide antimicrobial agent, in lung epithelial fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were evaluated. In vivo animal experiments, the time-courses of the concentrations of TEL in ELF and AMs following oral administration of TEL solution (50 mg/4 mL/kg) to rats were markedly higher than in plasma, and areas under drug concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios of ELF/plasma and AMs/plasma were 2.4 and 65.3, respectively. In vitro transport experiments, the basolateral-to-apical transport of TEL through model lung epithelial cell (Calu-3) monolayers was greater than apical-to-basolateral transport. Rhodamine123 and verapamil, MDR1 substrates, reduced the basolateral-to-apical transport of TEL. In vitro uptake experiments, the intracellular equilibrated concentration of TEL in cultured AMs (NR8383) was approximately 40 times the extracellular concentration. The uptake of TEL by NR8383 was inhibited by rotenone and FCCP, ATP depletors and was temperature-dependent. These data suggest that the high distribution of TEL to AMs is due to the sustained distribution to ELF via MDR1 as well as the high uptake by AMs themselves via active transport mechanisms. PMID:19881252

  15. Determining the ecological impacts of organic contaminants in biosolids using a high-throughput colorimetric denitrification assay: a case study with antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Holzem, R M; Stapleton, H M; Gunsch, C K

    2014-02-01

    Land application accounts for ? 50% of wastewater solid disposal in the United States. Still, little is known regarding the ecological impacts of nonregulated contaminants found in biosolids. Because of the myriad of contaminants, there is a need for a rapid, high-throughput method to evaluate their ecotoxicity. Herein, we developed a novel assay that measures denitrification inhibition in a model denitrifier, Paracoccus denitrificans Pd1222. Two common (triclosan and triclocarban) and four emerging (2,4,5 trichlorophenol, 2-benzyl-4-chlorophenol, 2-chloro-4-phenylphenol, and bis(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)methane) antimicrobial agents found in biosolids were analyzed. Overall, the assay was reproducible and measured impacts on denitrification over 3 orders of magnitude exposure. The lowest observable adverse effect concentrations (LOAECs) were 1.04 ?M for triclosan, 3.17 ?M for triclocarban, 0.372 ?M for bis-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)methane, 4.89 ?M for 2-chloro-4-phenyl phenol, 45.7 ?M for 2-benzyl-4-chorophenol, and 50.6 ?M for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. Compared with gene expression and cell viability based methods, the denitrification assay was more sensitive and resulted in lower LOAECs. The increased sensitivity, low cost, and high-throughput adaptability make this method an attractive alternative for meeting the initial testing regulatory framework for the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, and recommended for the Toxic Substances Control Act, in determining the ecotoxicity of biosolids-derived emerging contaminants. PMID:24410196

  16. Biological screening of some Turkish medicinal plant extracts for antimicrobial and toxicity activities.

    PubMed

    Turker, A U; Usta, C

    2008-01-20

    Screening of antibacterial activity and toxicity of 22 aqueous plant extracts from 17 Turkish plants was conducted. Antibacterial activity was performed with six bacteria including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Extracts of Tussilago farfara leaves, Helichyrsum plicatum flowers, Solanum dulcamara aerial parts and Urtica dioica leaves gave the best inhibitory activity against S. pyogenes, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Of the 22 plant extracts, 20 extracts displayed toxicity (LC50 was <1000 mg L(-1)) in the brine shrimp bioassay. For radish seed bioassay, two different determinations (root length and seed germination) were performed with a comparison between two concentrations (50,000 mg L(-1) and 10,000 mg L(-1)). At low concentration (10,000 mg L(-1)), S. dulcamara aerial parts and Primula vulgaris leaf extracts were observed to inhibit the root length more than the other plant extracts. Also, the most inhibitive plant extract for seed germination was obtained with S. dulcamara aerial parts. PMID:18075897

  17. Antimicrobial activity of carvacrol: current progress and future prospectives.

    PubMed

    Nostro, Antonia; Papalia, Teresa

    2012-04-01

    During the last few years the scientific community has shown a considerable interest in the study of plant materials as sources of new compounds to be processed into antimicrobial agents. In this context, carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol, has emerged for its wide spectrum activity extended to food spoilage or pathogenic fungi, yeast and bacteria as well as human, animal and plant pathogenic microorganisms including drug-resistant and biofilm forming microorganisms. The antibacterial activity of carvacrol has been attributed to its considerable effects on the structural and functional properties of cytoplasmatic membrane. The data reported in this review provide an overview of the published literature regarding the antimicrobial properties of carvacrol and the recent patents claimed in order to highlight its future applications as a new antimicrobial agent. These could concern either the natural preservation in the cosmetic and food industries or an alternative which supports the conventional antimicrobial protocols. Interestingly, carvacrol alone or associated with one or more synergistic products could be incorporated in different formulations for biomedical and food packaging applications. However, more detailed safety investigations and in vivo studies should be carried out so that this molecule could be used in the future. PMID:22044355

  18. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jason A; Norris, Ross; Paterson, David L; Martin, Jennifer H

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing the prescription of antimicrobials is required to improve clinical outcome from infections and to reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance. One such method to improve antimicrobial dosing in individual patients is through application of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). The aim of this manuscript is to review the place of TDM in the dosing of antimicrobial agents, specifically the importance of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) to define the antimicrobial exposures necessary for maximizing killing or inhibition of bacterial growth. In this context, there are robust data for some antimicrobials, including the ratio of a PK parameter (e.g. peak concentration) to the minimal inhibitory concentration of the bacteria associated with maximal antimicrobial effect. Blood sampling of an individual patient can then further define the relevant PK parameter value in that patient and, if necessary, antimicrobial dosing can be adjusted to enable achievement of the target PK/PD ratio. To date, the clinical outcome benefits of a systematic TDM programme for antimicrobials have only been demonstrated for aminoglycosides, although the decreasing susceptibility of bacteria to available antimicrobials and the increasing costs of pharmaceuticals, as well as emerging data on pharmacokinetic variability, suggest that benefits are likely. PMID:21831196

  19. Characterization and evaluation of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Streptomyces sp. HUST012 isolated from medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour.

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Liu, Min-Jiao; Nimaichand, Salam; Quach, Ngoc-Tung; Chu-Ky, Son; Phi, Quyet-Tien; Vu, Thu-Trang; Nguyen, Tien-Dat; Xiong, Zhi; Prabhu, Deene M.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing endophytic strain, Streptomyces sp. HUST012 was isolated from the stems of the medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour. Strain HUST012 showed antimicrobial and antitumor activities which were significantly much higher than those of dragon's blood extracted from D. cochinchinensis Lour. On further analysis, the strain was found to produce two metabolites, SPE-B11.8 (elucidated to be a novel metabolite (Z)-tridec-7-ene-1,2,13-tricarboxylic acid) and SPE-B5.4 (elucidated as Actinomycin-D). The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration values of SPE-B11.8 against a set of test bacterial organisms (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermis ATCC 35984, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883) ranged between 15.63 and 62.5 ?g/ml while that for SPE-B5.4 ranged between 0.04 and 2.24 ?g/ml. The compound SPE-B11.8 showed cytotoxic effect at 41.63 and 29.54 ?g/ml IC50-values against Hep G2 and MCF-7, respectively, while the compound SPE-B5.4 exhibited stronger activities against them at 0.23 and 0.18 ?g/ml IC50-values.

  20. Characterization and evaluation of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Streptomyces sp. HUST012 isolated from medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour.

    PubMed

    Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Liu, Min-Jiao; Nimaichand, Salam; Quach, Ngoc-Tung; Chu-Ky, Son; Phi, Quyet-Tien; Vu, Thu-Trang; Nguyen, Tien-Dat; Xiong, Zhi; Prabhu, Deene M; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing endophytic strain, Streptomyces sp. HUST012 was isolated from the stems of the medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour. Strain HUST012 showed antimicrobial and antitumor activities which were significantly much higher than those of dragon's blood extracted from D. cochinchinensis Lour. On further analysis, the strain was found to produce two metabolites, SPE-B11.8 (elucidated to be a novel metabolite (Z)-tridec-7-ene-1,2,13-tricarboxylic acid) and SPE-B5.4 (elucidated as Actinomycin-D). The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration values of SPE-B11.8 against a set of test bacterial organisms (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermis ATCC 35984, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883) ranged between 15.63 and 62.5 ?g/ml while that for SPE-B5.4 ranged between 0.04 and 2.24 ?g/ml. The compound SPE-B11.8 showed cytotoxic effect at 41.63 and 29.54 ?g/ml IC 50-values against Hep G2 and MCF-7, respectively, while the compound SPE-B5.4 exhibited stronger activities against them at 0.23 and 0.18 ?g/ml IC 50-values. PMID:26106377

  1. Chemical and Antimicrobial Studies on the Skin of Aloe indica Leaves at Different Ages of Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ismet Ara Jahan; Fakir Shahidullah Tarek; M Shahidul Islam; Jasim Uddin Chowdhury; Fawzia Begum; M Abdus Sattar

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study on mineral profile, water content, solid content and ash contents were done on the skin of the leaves at three different ages of Aloe indica plants. Fatty acid analysis and screening of anti- bacterial sensitivity against two bacteria were also carried out. Mineral profile was evaluated by Atomic absorption spectrophotometer and Flame photometer. Whereas the esterified fatty

  2. The anti-microbial efficacy of plant essential oil combinations and interactions with food ingredients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Gutierrez; Catherine Barry-Ryan; Paula Bourke

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of plant essential oils (EOs) in combination and to investigate the effect of food ingredients on their efficacy. The EOs assessed in combination included basil, lemon balm, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage and thyme. Combinations of EOs were initially screened against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using

  3. Comparison of Essential Oils from Three Plants for Enhancement of Antimicrobial Activity of Nitrofurantoin against Enterobacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fatemeh Rafii; Ahmad R. Shahverdi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Piperitone from plant essential oils enhancesbactericidal activities of nitrofurantoin and furazolidone against bacteria from the family Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, the essential oils of spearmint (Mentha spicata L.), dill (Anethum graveolens L.) and peppermint (Mentha piperita L.)were screened for augmentation of nitrofurantoin activity and the most active components were determined. Method: The effects of essential oils and their components

  4. Antimicrobial Stewardship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil Fishman

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship is a key component of a multifaceted approach to preventing emergence of antimicrobial resistance. Good antimicrobial stewardship involves selecting an appropriate drug and optimizing its dose and duration to cure an infection while minimizing toxicity and conditions for selection of resistant bacterial strains. Studies conducted over the years indicate that antibiotic use is unnecessary or inappropriate in as

  5. Trends in the frequency of multiple drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and their susceptibility to ertapenem, imipenem, and other antimicrobial agents: data from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends 2002 to 2007

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daryl J. Hoban; Samuel K. Bouchillon; Stephen P. Hawser; Robert E. Badal

    2010-01-01

    The management of patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections has increased in complexity because of the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the development of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae implicated in this clinical infectious process. The Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends study 2002 to 2007 monitored the susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae from intra-abdominal infections to a panel of appropriate antimicrobials. During 2002 to

  6. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of the Methanol Extracts from 8 Traditional Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-Geun; Hah, Dae-Sik; Kim, Chung-Hui; Kim, Young-Hwan; Kim, Euikyung

    2011-01-01

    The methanol extract of 12 medicinal plants were evaluated for its antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (5 strains) and Gram-negative bacteria (10 strains) by assay for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bacterial concentration (MBC) . The antibacterial activity was determined by an agar dilution method (according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute) . All the compounds (12 extracts) of the 8 medicinal plants (leaf or root) were active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Gram-negative showed a more potent action than Gram positive bacteria. The MIC concentrations were various ranged from 0.6 ?g/ml to 5000 ?g/ml. The lowest MIC (0.6 ?g/ml) and MBC (1.22 ?g/ml) values were obtained with extract on 4 and 3 of the 15 microorganisms tested, respectively. PMID:24278548

  7. 21 CFR 866.1640 - Antimicrobial susceptibility test powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...antimicrobial drug powder packaged in vials in specified amounts and intended for use in clinical laboratories for determining in vitro susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to these therapeutic agents. Test results are used to determine the antimicrobial...

  8. Terrestrial Plant-Derived Anticancer Agents and Plant Species Used in Anticancer Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Spiridon E. Kintzios

    2006-01-01

    Cancer is a major cause of death and the number of new cases, as well as the number of individuals living with cancer, is expanding continuously. Due to the enormous propensity of plants that synthesize mixtures of structurally diverse bioactive compounds, the plant kingdom is potentially a very diverse source of chemical constituents with tumor cytotoxic activity. Despite the successful

  9. Efficacy of Indigenous Plant Essential Oil Andean Thyme (Acantholippia seriphioides A. Gray) to Control American Foulbrood (AFB) in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.) Hives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra R. Fuselli; S. B. García de la Rosa; M. J. Eguaras; R. Fritz; Maurice Ndagijimana; Lucia Vannini; Maria Elisabetta Guerzoni

    2007-01-01

    Headspace volatiles of an oil of an autochthonous Argentinean plant, Andean thyme (Acantholippia seriphioides A. Gray) and its in vitro antimicrobial activity against thirteen strains of Paenibacillus larvae, causal agent of American foulbrood (AFB), was determined. This disease affects honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) colonies worldwide causing great economical loses. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was evaluated using

  10. Antimicrobial activity of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Hirokazu; Endou, Fumiko; Furukawa, Soichi; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kouichi; Anzai, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Solvent extracts from the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap) were prepared using eight different organic solvents, and examined for antibacterial activity against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria. All solvent extracts showed higher antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria than against gram negative bacteria. The TLC-bioautography analysis of the extracts revealed that a yellow spot was detected at Rf value of 0.85, which showed strong antibacterial activity. The UV, MS, and NMR analyses revealed that the antibacterial compound was plumbagin. PMID:24077538

  11. Looking for the new preparations for antibacterial therapy III. New antimicrobial agents from the quinolones group in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    There is an essential need for searching for the new compounds effective in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This paper is the third part of a series associated with the exploration of new antibacterial agents and it discusses the compounds belonging to the group of quinolones and substances possessing a hybrid structure composed of the quinolone molecule and other compounds. Eleven new substances at the stage of clinical trials are presented. Three of them belong to the group of non-fluorinated quinolone (nemonoxacin, ozenoxacin and KRP-AM 1977X), while six are the quinolones containing fluorine atom at 6 position of the carbon atom in the quinoline ring (zabofloxacin, finafloxacin, delafloxacin, JNJ-Q2, WCK771 and KPI-10). The remaining two compounds possess a hybrid construction composed of the quinolone structure and other molecules (cadazolid and CBR-2092). There is a chance in the near future, that the presented compounds can extend the range of existing antibacterial drugs and provide an alternative to currently available medicinal products. PMID:24340560

  12. Sweetening agents of plant origin: Literature search for Candidate sweet plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Hussain; A. D. Klnghorn; D. D. Soejarto

    1988-01-01

    The Latin binomials of a number of plants containing sweet constituents hitherto studied bear epithets that indicate sweetness,\\u000a such asAcer saccharum, Lippia dulcis, Periandra dulcis, Saccharum officinarum, andSynsepalum dulcificum. Based on this observation, a search for plants bearing epithets that may indicate or relate to the sweetness sensation was\\u000a carried out, by perusal of Index Kewensis. As a result, a

  13. Beta-lactamase production in Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella pallens genotypes and in vitro susceptibilities to selected antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Mättö, J; Asikainen, S; Väisänen, M L; Von Troil-Lindén, B; Könönen, E; Saarela, M; Salminen, K; Finegold, S M; Jousimies-Somer, H

    1999-10-01

    The present study investigated the beta-lactamase production of 73 Prevotella intermedia, 84 Prevotella nigrescens, and 14 Prevotella pallens isolates and their in vitro susceptibilities to six antimicrobial agents. The P. intermedia and P. nigrescens isolates were recovered from oral and extraoral samples obtained from subjects in two geographic locations from 1985 to 1995. The clonality of the beta-lactamase-positive and beta-lactamase-negative isolates and the clustering of the genotypes were studied by arbitrarily primed-PCR fingerprinting. beta-Lactamase production was detected in 29% of P. intermedia isolates, 29% of P. nigrescens isolates, and 57% of P. pallens isolates. No difference in the frequencies of beta-lactamase production by P. intermedia and P. nigrescens between isolates from oral and extraoral sites, between isolates obtained at different time periods, or between P. intermedia isolates from different geographic locations was observed. However, the P. nigrescens isolates from the United States were significantly more frequently (P = 0.015) beta-lactamase positive than those from Finland. No association between the genotypes and beta-lactamase production or between the genotypes and the sources of the isolates was found. The penicillin G MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited were 8 microg/ml for P. intermedia, 8 microg/ml for P. nigrescens, and 16 microg/ml for P. pallens. For the beta-lactamase-negative isolates, the corresponding values were 0.031, 0.031, and 0.125 microg/ml, and for the beta-lactamase-positive isolates, the corresponding values were 16, 8, and 32 microg/ml. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, metronidazole, azithromycin, and trovafloxacin. The MICs of amoxicillin-clavulanate and cefoxitin were relatively higher for the beta-lactamase-positive population than for the beta-lactamase-negative population. PMID:10508011

  14. The Potential of Antimicrobial Peptides as Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides constitute a diverse class of naturally occurring antimicrobial molecules which have activity against a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms. Antimicrobial peptides are exciting leads in the development of novel biocidal agents at a time when classical antibiotics are under intense pressure from emerging resistance, and the global industry in antibiotic research and development stagnates. This review will examine the potential of antimicrobial peptides, both natural and synthetic, as novel biocidal agents in the battle against multi-drug resistant pathogen infections. PMID:22072905

  15. Probing Protein Sequences as Sources for Encrypted Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Guilherme D.; Magalhăes, Mariana T. Q.; Tinoco, Maria L. P.; Aragăo, Francisco J. L.; Nicoli, Jacques; Kelly, Sharon M.; Cooper, Alan; Bloch, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that a wealth of potentially biologically active peptides may lurk within proteins, we describe here a methodology to identify putative antimicrobial peptides encrypted in protein sequences. Candidate peptides were identified using a new screening procedure based on physicochemical criteria to reveal matching peptides within protein databases. Fifteen such peptides, along with a range of natural antimicrobial peptides, were examined using DSC and CD to characterize their interaction with phospholipid membranes. Principal component analysis of DSC data shows that the investigated peptides group according to their effects on the main phase transition of phospholipid vesicles, and that these effects correlate both to antimicrobial activity and to the changes in peptide secondary structure. Consequently, we have been able to identify novel antimicrobial peptides from larger proteins not hitherto associated with such activity, mimicking endogenous and/or exogenous microorganism enzymatic processing of parent proteins to smaller bioactive molecules. A biotechnological application for this methodology is explored. Soybean (Glycine max) plants, transformed to include a putative antimicrobial protein fragment encoded in its own genome were tested for tolerance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the Asian soybean rust. This procedure may represent an inventive alternative to the transgenic technology, since the genetic material to be used belongs to the host organism and not to exogenous sources. PMID:23029273

  16. Probing protein sequences as sources for encrypted antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Brand, Guilherme D; Magalhăes, Mariana T Q; Tinoco, Maria L P; Aragăo, Francisco J L; Nicoli, Jacques; Kelly, Sharon M; Cooper, Alan; Bloch, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that a wealth of potentially biologically active peptides may lurk within proteins, we describe here a methodology to identify putative antimicrobial peptides encrypted in protein sequences. Candidate peptides were identified using a new screening procedure based on physicochemical criteria to reveal matching peptides within protein databases. Fifteen such peptides, along with a range of natural antimicrobial peptides, were examined using DSC and CD to characterize their interaction with phospholipid membranes. Principal component analysis of DSC data shows that the investigated peptides group according to their effects on the main phase transition of phospholipid vesicles, and that these effects correlate both to antimicrobial activity and to the changes in peptide secondary structure. Consequently, we have been able to identify novel antimicrobial peptides from larger proteins not hitherto associated with such activity, mimicking endogenous and/or exogenous microorganism enzymatic processing of parent proteins to smaller bioactive molecules. A biotechnological application for this methodology is explored. Soybean (Glycine max) plants, transformed to include a putative antimicrobial protein fragment encoded in its own genome were tested for tolerance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the Asian soybean rust. This procedure may represent an inventive alternative to the transgenic technology, since the genetic material to be used belongs to the host organism and not to exogenous sources. PMID:23029273

  17. Development and characterization of antimicrobial poly(l-lactic acid) containing trans-2-hexenal trapped in cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Joo, Min Jung; Merkel, Crispin; Auras, Rafael; Almenar, Eva

    2012-02-15

    Trans-2-hexenal, a naturally occurring plant volatile with antimicrobial capacity, was encapsulated into ?-cyclodextrins (?-CDs), enzymatically modified starch, and shown effective to control main microorganisms causing food spoilage (Alternaria solani, Aspergillus niger, Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum acutatum, Penicillium sp). Loaded ?-CDs were incorporated into a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) matrix by extrusion and casting, and yielded antimicrobial polymers made from natural resources. A masterbatch was used prior to sheet casting to improve the dispersion of the antimicrobial agent in the PLA matrix. However, this increased the number of extrusion processes for the material. The concentration of the antimicrobial compound in the polymers and its antimicrobial capacity against one food spoilage microorganism (A. solani) were measured during the different processing operations. Although the concentration of trans-2-hexenal was reduced by processing by about 70 and 99% compared to the loaded ?-CDs, for the masterbatch and sheet, respectively, the polymers were still effective in reducing microbial growth. The changes of the polymer properties due to the addition of the antimicrobial agent were investigated, too. It was found that the mechanical and barrier properties of the PLA were changed (decreased by about half the tensile strength and elongation at break and nine-fold increased permeability) while the physical properties remained the same. Based on these results, the developed polymer may be a viable antimicrobial material for applications in food packaging. PMID:22177713

  18. Anti-microbial principles of selected remedial plants from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Tirupathi, Rao G; Suresh, Babu K; Ujwal, Kumar J; Sujana, P; Raoa, A Veerabhadr; Sreedhar, AS

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the anti-bacterial activity of leaf extracts of Morus alba L. (Moraceae) and Piper betel L. (Piperaceae), and seed extracts of Bombax ceiba L. (Borabacaceae). Methods We have partially purified plant extracts by solvent extraction method, and evaluated the effect of individual fractions on bacterial growth using Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial strains. Results Compared with Morus and Bombax fractions, Piper fractions showed significant growth inhibition on all the three types of bacteria studied. The EtOAc-hexane fractions of Piper leaves exhibited significant anti-bacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 50 µg/mL culture against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The EtOAc-fractions I, II, and IV inhibited bacterial colony formation on soft agar in addition to growth inhibition. A combination treatment of piper fractions with ampicillin resulted in significant growth inhibition in E. coli and P. aeruginosa, and combination with anticancer drug geldanamycin (2µg/mL) showed selective growth inhibition against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Three major compounds, i.e., eugenol, 3-hexene-ol and stigmasterol, were primarily identified from Piper betel leaf extractions. Among the individual compounds, eugenol treatment showed improved growth inhibition compared with stigmasterol and 3-hexene-ol. Conclusions We are reporting potential anti-bacterial compounds from Piper betel against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria either alone or in combination with drug treatment. PMID:23569779

  19. Expression, purification and antimicrobial activity of puroindoline A protein and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yingjie; Chen, Ling; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yajuan; Zheng, Qian; Gao, Chunbao; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2012-10-01

    Wheat puroindoline proteins, PINA and PINB, play key roles in determining wheat grain hardness as well as in defending the plant against pathogens. PINA has much greater membrane-binding property and antimicrobial activity because it contains more tryptophan residues in the unique tryptophan-rich domain (TRD). In order to obtain proteins with higher antimicrobial activity, mutants of PINA containing two or three copies of TRD, designated ABBC and ABBBC, respectively, were constructed and expressed in E. coli Rosetta-gami (DE3). Metal affinity chromatography was used to purify the soluble affinity-tagged recombinant proteins. The secondary structures of the recombinant proteins were predicted by the online program Protein Homology/analog Y Recognition Engine v2.0 and experimentally assessed using circular dichroism. Minimum inhibition concentration tests and fluorescence microscope analyses were employed to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of the mutants. The results showed that the purified recombinant ABBC was correctly folded and presented significantly higher antimicrobial activities against E. coli and S. aureus than wild-type PINA, suggesting its potential use as an antimicrobial agent. The results also confirmed that TRD is a determinant of the antimicrobial activity of PINA and demonstrated that it is feasible to enhance the antimicrobial activity of PINA by adding one copy of TRD. PMID:22402594

  20. Antimicrobial activity of enterocins from Enterococcus faecalis SL5 against Propionibacterium acnes , the causative agent in acne vulgaris, and its therapeutic effect

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bong Seon Kang; Jae-Gu Seo; Gwa-Su Lee; Jung-Hwa Kim; Sei Yeon Kim; Ye Won Han; Hoon Kang; Hyung Ok Kim; Ji Hwan Rhee; Myung-Jun Chung; Young Min Park

    2009-01-01

    A lactic acid bacterial strain was isolated from human fecal specimen and identified as Enterococcus faecalis SL-5. The isolated strain showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive pathogens assayed, especially the highest activity\\u000a against Propionibacterium acnes. The antimicrobial substance was purified and verified as a bacteriocin (named ESL5) of E. faecalis SL-5 by activity-staining using P. acnes as an indicator. N-terminal sequence

  1. Group 11 Metal Compounds with Tripodal Bis(imidazole) Thioether Ligands. Applications as Catalysts in the Oxidation of Alkenes and as Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangwei; Anis, Reema; Hwang, Eunmi; Ovalle, Rafael; Varela-Ramírez, Armando; Aguilera, Renato J; Contel, María

    2011-01-01

    New group 11 metal complexes have been prepared using the previously described tripodal bis(imidazole) thioether ligand (N-methyl-4,5-diphenyl-2-imidazolyl)2C(OMe)C(CH3)2S(tert-Bu) ({BITOMe,StBu}, 2). The pincer ligand offers a N2S donor atom set that can be used to coordinate the group 11 metals in different oxidation states [AuI, AuIII, AgI, CuI and CuII]. Thus the new compounds [Au{BITOMe,StBu}Cl][AuCl4]2 (3), [Au{BITOMe,StBu}Cl] (4), [Ag{BITOMe,StBu}X] (X = OSO2CF3- 5, PF6- 6) and [Cu{BITOMe,StBu}Cl2] (7) have been synthesized from reaction of 2 with the appropriate metal precursors, and characterized in solution. While attempting characterization in the solid state of 3, single crystals of the neutral dinuclear mixed AuIII-AuI species [Au2{BITOMe,S}Cl3] (8) were obtained and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The structure shows a AuIII center coordinated to the pincer ligand through one N and the S atom. The soft AuI center coordinates to the ligand through the same S atom that has lost the tert-butyl group, thus becoming a thiolate ligand. The short distance between the AuI-AuIII atoms (3.383 Ĺ) may indicate a weak metal-metal interaction. Complexes 2-7 and the previously described CuI compound [Cu{BITOMe,StBu}]PF6 (9) have been evaluated in the oxidation of biphenyl ethylene with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (TBHP) as the oxidant. Results have shown that the AuI and AgI complexes 4 and 6 (at 10 mol % loading) are the more active catalysts in this oxidative cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of compounds 2-5, 7 and 9 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeast has also been evaluated. The new gold and silver compounds display moderate to high antibacterial activity, while the copper derivatives are mostly inactive. The gold and silver complexes were also potent against fungi. Their cytotoxic properties have been analyzed in vitro utilizing HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells. The compounds displayed a very low cytotoxicity on this cell line (5 to 10 times lower than cisplatin) and on normal primary cells derived from C57B6 mouse muscle explants, which may make them promising candidates as potential antimicrobial agents and safer catalysts due to low toxicity in human and other mammalian tissues. PMID:25134773

  2. Effects of plant virus and its insect vector on Encarsia formosa, a biocontrol agent of whiteflies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyuan; Xiang, Wensheng; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Zhang, Youjun; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Zhou, Xuguo; Wang, Shaoli

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the tritrophic interactions among a persistently transmitted plant virus, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), its insect vector, the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci, and a parasitoid, Encarsia formosa Gahan, one of the most extensively used biological control agents. As an emerging invasive pest worldwide, the two most damaging whiteflies are B. tabaci B and Q cryptic species. On healthy tomato plants, parasitoid-induced mortality was significantly higher in B. tabaci B than in Q. In contrast, similar mortality levels of B and Q were observed on TYLCV-infected plants. A higher rate of parasitism was consistently observed in B, independent of the TYLCV infection. Similarly, the life history traits of E. formosa were influenced by both TYLCV and the two cryptic species of B. tabaci. Specifically, E. formosa parasitizing B had a greater adult longevity and shorter developmental time on healthy plants, whereas the parasitoids developing from Q has a greater adult longevity on TYLCV-infected plants. The emergence rate of E. formosa was unaffected by either B. tabaci cryptic species or the virus. These results suggest that the vector-borne pathogen can manipulate the host suitability of a parasitoid and hence the parasitoid-host interactions. PMID:25096549

  3. Design and Evaluation of Novel Antimicrobial and Anticancer Agents Among Tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-5-thione S-Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Antypenko, Lyudmyla M.; Kovalenko, Sergey I.; Antypenko, Olexii M.; Katsev, Andrey M.; Achkasova, Olena M.

    2013-01-01

    The novel heterocyclization of 5-(2-aminophenyl)-1H-tetrazole with potassium ethylxanthogenate or carbon disulfide was proposed. The potassium salt of the tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-5-thione was subsequently modified by alkylation with proper halogen derivatives to (tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)alkyls, N,N-dialkylethylamines, 1-aryl-2-ethanones, 1-(alkyl)aryl-2-ethanols, carboxylic acids, and esters. The structures of all newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by FT-IR, UV-vis, LC-MS, 1H, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis data. The substances were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities (100 ?g) against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Entrococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. Preliminary bioluminescence inhibition tests against Photobacterium leiognathi Sh1 showed that substances 5.2–5.4, 6.1, 7.1 with ethanone or carboxylic acid substituents showed toxicity against bacteria cells. The substances chosen by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) were screened for their ability to inhibit 60 different human tumor cell lines, where 2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)-1-(4-tolyl)ethanone (5.2), 3-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)propanoic and related 3-metyl-butanoic acids (6.2, 6.3), and ethyl tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)acetate (7.2) showed lethal antitumor activity (1.0 ?M) against the acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (CCRF-CEM), and substances 5.2 and 6.3 exhibited moderate anticancer properties inhibiting growth of the leukemia MOLT-4 and HL06-(TB) cell lines. The moderate antitumor activity was demonstrated in 1-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)ethanone (5.4) against the CNS cancer cell line SNB-75. Comparing the docking mode of the Gefitinib and synthesised substances on the ATP binding site of EGFR, it could be assumed that these compounds might act in the same way. The results of the investigation could be considered as a useful base for future development of potent antimicrobials and antitumor agents among tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-5-thione S-derivatives. PMID:23641327

  4. Design and Evaluation of Novel Antimicrobial and Anticancer Agents Among Tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-5-thione S-Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Antypenko, Lyudmyla M; Kovalenko, Sergey I; Antypenko, Olexii M; Katsev, Andrey M; Achkasova, Olena M

    2013-03-01

    The novel heterocyclization of 5-(2-aminophenyl)-1H-tetrazole with potassium ethylxanthogenate or carbon disulfide was proposed. The potassium salt of the tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-5-thione was subsequently modified by alkylation with proper halogen derivatives to (tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)alkyls, N,N-dialkylethylamines, 1-aryl-2-ethanones, 1-(alkyl)aryl-2-ethanols, carboxylic acids, and esters. The structures of all newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by FT-IR, UV-vis, LC-MS, (1)H, (13)C NMR, and elemental analysis data. The substances were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities (100 ?g) against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Entrococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. Preliminary bioluminescence inhibition tests against Photobacterium leiognathi Sh1 showed that substances 5.2-5.4, 6.1, 7.1 with ethanone or carboxylic acid substituents showed toxicity against bacteria cells. The substances chosen by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) were screened for their ability to inhibit 60 different human tumor cell lines, where 2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)-1-(4-tolyl)ethanone (5.2), 3-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)propanoic and related 3-metyl-butanoic acids (6.2, 6.3), and ethyl tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)acetate (7.2) showed lethal antitumor activity (1.0 ?M) against the acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (CCRF-CEM), and substances 5.2 and 6.3 exhibited moderate anticancer properties inhibiting growth of the leukemia MOLT-4 and HL06-(TB) cell lines. The moderate antitumor activity was demonstrated in 1-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)ethanone (5.4) against the CNS cancer cell line SNB-75. Comparing the docking mode of the Gefitinib and synthesised substances on the ATP binding site of EGFR, it could be assumed that these compounds might act in the same way. The results of the investigation could be considered as a useful base for future development of potent antimicrobials and antitumor agents among tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-5-thione S-derivatives. PMID:23641327

  5. Antimicrobial peptides: an alternative for innovative medicines?

    PubMed

    da Costa, Joăo Pinto; Cova, Marta; Ferreira, Rita; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules with activity against bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses, bacteria, and even tumor cells that make these molecules attractive as therapeutic agents. Due to the alarming increase of antimicrobial resistance, interest in alternative antimicrobial agents has led to the exploitation of antimicrobial peptides, both synthetic and from natural sources. Thus, many peptide-based drugs are currently commercially available for the treatment of numerous ailments, such as hepatitis C, myeloma, skin infections, and diabetes. Initial barriers are being increasingly overcome with the development of cost-effective, more stable peptides. Herein, we review the available strategies for their synthesis, bioinformatics tools for the rational design of antimicrobial peptides with enhanced therapeutic indices, hurdles and shortcomings limiting the large-scale production of AMPs, as well as the challenges that the pharmaceutical industry faces on their use as therapeutic agents. PMID:25586583

  6. Isolation of antimicrobial peptides from Apis florae and Apis carnica in Saudi Arabia and investigation of the antimicrobial properties of natural honey samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tahany H. Ayaad; Ghada H. Shaker; Amal M. Almuhnaa

    As part of the ongoing search for novel antimicrobial agents and their use in singular or combined drug therapy, peptide fractions of molecular weights about 14.500 and 15.00kDa were isolated from the hemolymph of wild (Apis florae) and carniolan (Apis carnica) bees of Saudi Arabia obtained from different regions in Riyadh (variable plant sources) during the honey seasons (spring and

  7. Antimicrobial Activities of a Plethora of Medicinal Plant Extracts and Hydrolates against Human Pathogens and Their Potential to Reverse Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Njimoh, Dieudonné Lemuh; Assob, Jules Clement N.; Mokake, Seraphine Ebenye; Nyhalah, Dinga Jerome; Yinda, Claude Kwe; Sandjon, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections till date remain a scourge of humanity due to lack of vaccine against some infections, emergence of drug resistant phenotypes, and the resurgence of infections amongst others. Continuous quest for novel therapeutic approaches remains imperative. Here we (i) assessed the effects of extracts/hydrolates of some medicinal plants on pathogenic microorganisms and (ii) evaluated the inhibitory potential of the most active ones in combination with antibiotics. Extract E03 had the highest DZI (25?mm). Extracts E05 and E06 were active against all microorganisms tested. The MICs and MBCs of the methanol extracts ranged from 16.667 × 103??g/mL to 2??g/mL and hydrolates from 0.028 to 333333?ppm. Extract E30 had the highest activity especially against S. saprophyticus (MIC of 6?ppm) and E. coli (MIC of 17?ppm). Combination with conventional antibiotics was shown to overcome resistance especially with E30. Analyses of the extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenes, steroids, phenols, and saponins. These results justify the use of these plants in traditional medicine and the practice of supplementing decoctions/concoctions with conventional antibiotics. Nauclea pobeguinii (E30), the most active and synergistic of all these extracts, and some hydrolates with antimicrobial activity need further exploration for the development of novel antimicrobials.

  8. Apple, carrot, and hibiscus edible films containing plant antimicrobials inactivate Salmonella Newport in packaged organic leafy greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increased demand for organic leafy green may raise the risk of foodborne illness outbreaks due to consumption of contaminated produce. Edible films incorporated with natural antimicrobials have the potential to be used as ingredients into organic bagged salads to control contamination from path...

  9. The chemistry and applications of antimicrobial polymers: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Kenawy, El-Refaie; Worley, S D; Broughton, Roy

    2007-05-01

    Microbial infection remains one of the most serious complications in several areas, particularly in medical devices, drugs, health care and hygienic applications, water purification systems, hospital and dental surgery equipment, textiles, food packaging, and food storage. Antimicrobials gain interest from both academic research and industry due to their potential to provide quality and safety benefits to many materials. However, low molecular weight antimicrobial agents suffer from many disadvantages, such as toxicity to the environment and short-term antimicrobial ability. To overcome problems associated with the low molecular weight antimicrobial agents, antimicrobial functional groups can be introduced into polymer molecules. The use of antimicrobial polymers offers promise for enhancing the efficacy of some existing antimicrobial agents and minimizing the environmental problems accompanying conventional antimicrobial agents by reducing the residual toxicity of the agents, increasing their efficiency and selectivity, and prolonging the lifetime of the antimicrobial agents. Research concerning the development of antimicrobial polymers represents a great a challenge for both the academic world and industry. This article reviews the state of the art of antimicrobial polymers primarily since the last comprehensive review by one of the authors in 1996. In particular, it discusses the requirements of antimicrobial polymers, factors affecting the antimicrobial activities, methods of synthesizing antimicrobial polymers, major fields of applications, and future and perspectives in the field of antimicrobial polymers. PMID:17425365

  10. Antimicrobial Agents Used on Textiles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The featured molecules of this month come from the article "Chemistry of Durable and Regenerable Biocidal Textiles" by Gang Sun and S. Dave Worley on the history and chemistry of biocidal textiles for use in the health care industry. All of these molecules can be bound to cellulose in a fabric through chemical modification, illustrating yet again the importance of such polymer-bound substrates in a wide-range of chemistries.

  11. Towards identifying novel anti-Eimeria agents: trace elements, vitamins, and plant-based natural products.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Frank; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Steinbrenner, Holger; Sies, Helmut; Dkhil, Mohamed A

    2014-10-01

    Eimeriosis, a widespread infectious disease of livestock, is caused by coccidian protozoans of the genus Eimeria. These obligate intracellular parasites strike the digestive tract of their hosts and give rise to enormous economic losses, particularly in poultry, ruminants including cattle, and rabbit farming. Vaccination, though a rational prophylactic measure, has not yet been as successful as initially thought. Numerous broad-spectrum anti-coccidial drugs are currently in use for treatment and prophylactic control of eimeriosis. However, increasing concerns about parasite resistance, consumer health, and environmental safety of the commercial drugs warrant efforts to search for novel agents with anti-Eimeria activity. This review summarizes current approaches to prevent and treat eimeriosis such as vaccination and commercial drugs, as well as recent attempts to use dietary antioxidants as novel anti-Eimeria agents. In particular, the trace elements selenium and zinc, the vitamins A and E, and natural products extracted from garlic, barberry, pomegranate, sweet wormwood, and other plants are discussed. Several of these novel anti-Eimeria agents exhibit a protective role against oxidative stress that occurs not only in the intestine of Eimeria-infected animals, but also in their non-parasitized tissues, in particular, in the first-pass organ liver. Currently, it appears to be promising to identify safe combinations of low-cost natural products with high anti-Eimeria efficacy for a potential use as feed supplementation in animal farming. PMID:25185667

  12. Improvement of water treatment pilot plant with Moringa oleifera extract as flocculant agent.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Heredia, J; Sánchez-Martín, J

    2009-05-01

    Moringa oleifera extract is a high-capacity flocculant agent for turbidity removal in surface water treatment. A complete study of a pilot-plant installation has been carried out. Because of flocculent sedimentability of treated water, a residual turbidity occured in the pilot plant (around 30 NTU), which could not be reduced just by a coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation process. Because of this limitation, the pilot plant (excluded filtration) achieved a turbidity removal up to 70%. A slow sand filter was put in as a complement to installation. A clogging process was characterized, according to Carman-Kozeny's hydraulic hypothesis. Kozeny's k parameter was found to be 4.18. Through fouling stages, this k parameter was found to be up to 6.36. The obtained data are relevant for the design of a real filter in a continuous-feeding pilot plant. Slow sand filtration is highly recommended owing to its low cost, easy-handling and low maintenance, so it is a very good complement to Moringa water treatment in developing countries. PMID:19603700

  13. Epidemiology and characteristics of antimicrobial resistance in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Hong Xiao; Christian G. Giske; Ze-Qing Wei; Ping Shen; Andreas Heddini; Lan-Juan Li

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive surveillance system for bacterial resistance in tertiary hospitals has been established in China that involves tertiary hospitals in distinct regions nationwide, enabling the collection of a large amount of antimicrobial surveillance data. Antimicrobial resistance in China has become a serious healthcare problem, with high resistance rates of most common bacteria to clinically important antimicrobial agents. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus,

  14. Use of antimicrobials in veterinary medicine and mechanisms of resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Schwarz; Elisabeth Chaslus-Dancla

    2001-01-01

    This review deals with the application of antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine and food animal production and the possible consequences arising from the widespread and multi- purpose use of antimicrobials. The various mechanisms that bacteria have developed to escape the inhibitory effects of the antimicrobials most frequently used in the veterinary field are reported in detail. Resistance of bacteria to

  15. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) – Enteric Bacteria is a national public health surveillance system in the United States that tracks changes in the susceptibility of certain enteric bacteria to antimicrobial agents of human and veterinary medical importance. The NARMS ...

  16. Expression of a Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Penaeidin4-1 in Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) Enhances Plant Fungal Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Man; Hu, Qian; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Chen, Chin-Fu; Luo, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Background Turfgrass species are agriculturally and economically important perennial crops. Turfgrass species are highly susceptible to a wide range of fungal pathogens. Dollar spot and brown patch, two important diseases caused by fungal pathogens Sclerotinia homoecarpa and Rhizoctonia solani, respectively, are among the most severe turfgrass diseases. Currently, turf fungal disease control mainly relies on fungicide treatments, which raises many concerns for human health and the environment. Antimicrobial peptides found in various organisms play an important role in innate immune response. Methodology/Principal Findings The antimicrobial peptide - Penaeidin4-1 (Pen4-1) from the shrimp, Litopenaeus setiferus has been reported to possess in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activities against various economically important fungal and bacterial pathogens. In this study, we have studied the feasibility of using this novel peptide for engineering enhanced disease resistance into creeping bentgrass plants (Agrostis stolonifera L., cv. Penn A-4). Two DNA constructs were prepared containing either the coding sequence of a single peptide, Pen4-1 or the DNA sequence coding for the transit signal peptide of the secreted tobacco AP24 protein translationally fused to the Pen4-1 coding sequence. A maize ubiquitin promoter was used in both constructs to drive gene expression. Transgenic turfgrass plants containing different DNA constructs were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and analyzed for transgene insertion and expression. In replicated in vitro and in vivo experiments under controlled environments, transgenic plants exhibited significantly enhanced resistance to dollar spot and brown patch, the two major fungal diseases in turfgrass. The targeting of Pen4-1 to endoplasmic reticulum by the transit peptide of AP24 protein did not significantly impact disease resistance in transgenic plants. Conclusion/Significance Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of Pen4-1 in a perennial species against fungal pathogens and suggest a potential strategy for engineering broad-spectrum fungal disease resistance in crop species. PMID:21931807

  17. Antimicrobial resistance: an overview.

    PubMed

    Acar, J; Röstel, B

    2001-12-01

    Increased antimicrobial resistance in bacteria that are important pathogens of humans, and spread of resistance from the closed environment of hospitals into open communities are increasingly perceived as a threat to public health. Any antimicrobial use, whether in humans, animals, plants or food processing technology, could lead to bacterial resistance. Use of antimicrobials in livestock production is suspected to significantly contribute to this phenomenon in species of bacteria which are common to humans and animals. Further research is required into the specific use conditions that govern the selection and dissemination of resistant bacteria. International travel and trade in animals and food increase the risks of antimicrobial resistance world-wide. Countries are considering import restrictions for products deemed a risk to public health. The Office International des Epizooties, a World Trade Organization reference organisation for the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures, develops international standards on antimicrobial resistance which, as is the case for national measures, must be based on risk analysis. The scientific background and problems of resistance in human medicine are reviewed. Current knowledge, missing information and actions to be taken are identified. PMID:11732423

  18. Antimicrobial peptides design by evolutionary multiobjective optimization.

    PubMed

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Nifosí, Riccardo; Cardarelli, Francesco; Signore, Giovanni; Boccardi, Claudia; Bifone, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an abundant and wide class of molecules produced by many tissues and cell types in a variety of mammals, plant and animal species. Linear alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement in innate defense. Recently, AMPs have received increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, owing to their broad activity spectrum and their reduced tendency to induce resistance. The introduction of non-natural amino acids will be a key requisite in order to contrast host resistance and increase compound's life. In this work, the possibility to design novel AMP sequences with non-natural amino acids was achieved through a flexible computational approach, based on chemophysical profiles of peptide sequences. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors were employed to code each peptide and train two statistical models in order to account for structural and functional properties of alpha-helical amphipathic AMPs. These models were then used as fitness functions for a multi-objective evolutional algorithm, together with a set of constraints for the design of a series of candidate AMPs. Two ab-initio natural peptides were synthesized and experimentally validated for antimicrobial activity, together with a series of control peptides. Furthermore, a well-known Cecropin-Mellitin alpha helical antimicrobial hybrid (CM18) was optimized by shortening its amino acid sequence while maintaining its activity and a peptide with non-natural amino acids was designed and tested, demonstrating the higher activity achievable with artificial residues. PMID:24039565

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides Design by Evolutionary Multiobjective Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Nifosí, Riccardo; Cardarelli, Francesco; Signore, Giovanni; Boccardi, Claudia; Bifone, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an abundant and wide class of molecules produced by many tissues and cell types in a variety of mammals, plant and animal species. Linear alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement in innate defense. Recently, AMPs have received increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, owing to their broad activity spectrum and their reduced tendency to induce resistance. The introduction of non-natural amino acids will be a key requisite in order to contrast host resistance and increase compound's life. In this work, the possibility to design novel AMP sequences with non-natural amino acids was achieved through a flexible computational approach, based on chemophysical profiles of peptide sequences. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors were employed to code each peptide and train two statistical models in order to account for structural and functional properties of alpha-helical amphipathic AMPs. These models were then used as fitness functions for a multi-objective evolutional algorithm, together with a set of constraints for the design of a series of candidate AMPs. Two ab-initio natural peptides were synthesized and experimentally validated for antimicrobial activity, together with a series of control peptides. Furthermore, a well-known Cecropin-Mellitin alpha helical antimicrobial hybrid (CM18) was optimized by shortening its amino acid sequence while maintaining its activity and a peptide with non-natural amino acids was designed and tested, demonstrating the higher activity achievable with artificial residues. PMID:24039565

  20. Antimicrobial, antioxidant, antitumour-promoting and cytotoxic activities of different plant part extracts of Garcinia atroviridis Griff. ex T. Anders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M Mackeen; A. M Ali; N. H Lajis; K Kawazu; Z Hassan; M Amran; M Habsah; L. Y Mooi; S. M Mohamed

    2000-01-01

    Crude extracts (methanol) of various parts, viz. the leaves, fruits, roots, stem and trunk bark, of Garcinia atroviridis were screened for antimicrobial, cytotoxic, brine shrimp toxic, antitumour-promoting and antioxidant activities. The crude extracts exhibited predominantly antibacterial activity with the root extract showing the strongest inhibition against the test bacteria at a minimum inhibitory dose (MID) of 15.6 ?g\\/disc. Although all

  1. Antimicrobial activity of spherical silver nanoparticles prepared using a biocompatible macromolecular capping agent: evidence for induction of a greatly prolonged bacterial lag phase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have evaluated the antimicrobial properties of Ag-based nanoparticles (Np) using two solid platform-based bioassays and found that 10-20 uL of 0.3-3 uM keratin-based Nps (depending on the starting bacteria concentration = CI) completely inhibited the growth of an equivalent volume of ca. 1,000 to...

  2. Phytochemical, toxicological and antimicrobial evaluation of lawsonia inermis extracts against clinical isolates of pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emerging resistance of pathogen against the currently available antimicrobial agents demands the search of new antimicrobial agents. The use of medicinal plants as natural substitute is the paramount area of research to overwhelm the drug resistance of infectious agents. Scientists have not made enough effort on the evaluation of safety of medicinal plant yet. Methods In the present study antimicrobial activity of Lawsonia inermis is investigated against clinical isolates of seven bacteria including four Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella spp., Shigella sonnei) and three Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) using disc diffusion method. Four types of Lawsonia inermis extracts were prepared using methanol, chloroform, acetone and water as extraction solvents, while DMSO (Dimethyl sulfoxide) and water as dissolution solvents. The rate and extent of bacterial killing was estimated by time-kill kinetic assay at 1× MIC of each bacterial isolate. The overall safety of Lawsonia inermis extracts was assessed in mice. Results Lawsonia inermis displayed noteworthy antimicrobial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacterial strains used in the study. The minimum value of MIC for different bacterial strains ranged from 2.31 mg/ml to 9.27 mg/ml. At 1x MIC of each bacterial isolate, 3log10 decrease in CFU was recorded after 6 hours of drug exposure and no growth was observed in almost all tested bacteria after 24 hours of exposure. No sign of toxidrome were observed during in vivo toxicity evaluation in mice at 300 mg/kg concentration. Conclusion In conclusion, the present study provides the scientific rational for medicinal use of Lawsonia inermis. The use of Lawsonia inermis extracts is of great significance as substitute antimicrobial agent in therapeutics. PMID:24289297

  3. Agent-Based Modleing of Power Plants Placement to Evaluate the Clean Energy Standard Goal

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    There is a political push for utilities to supply a specified share of their electricity sales from clean energy resources under the clean energy standard (CES). The goal is to achieve 80% clean energy by 2035. However, there are uncertainties about the ability of the utility industry to ramp up quickly even with the incentives that will be provided. Water availability from the streams is one of the major factors. The contiguous United States is divided into eighteen water regions, and multiple states share water from a single water region. Consequently, water usage decisions made in one state (located upstream of a water region that crosses multiple states) will greatly impact what is available downstream in another state. In this paper, an agent-based modeling approach is proposed to evaluate the clean energy standard goal for water-dependent energy resources. Specifically, using a water region rather than a state boundary as a bounding envelope for the modeling and starting at the headwaters, virtual power plants are placed based on the conditions that there is: (i) suitable land to site a particular power plant, (ii) enough water that meet regulatory guidelines within 20 miles of the suitable land, and (iii) a 20-mile buffer zone from an existing or a virtual power plant. The results obtained are discussed in the context of the proposed clean energy standard goal for states that overlap with one water region.

  4. Thai ethnomedicinal plants as resistant modifying agents for combating Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background Acinetobacter baumannii is well-recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen, however, due to their intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, treatment options are limited. Synergistic effects between antibiotics and medicinal plants, particularly their active components, have intensively been studied as alternative approaches. Methods Fifty-one ethanol extracts obtained from 44 different selected medicinal plant species were tested for resistance modifying agents (RMAs) of novobiocin against A. baumannii using growth inhibition assay. Results At 250??g/ml, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Punica granatum, Quisqualis indica, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia sp. that possessed low intrinsic antibacterial activity significantly enhanced the activity of novobiocin at 1??g/ml (1/8xminimum inhibitory concentration) against this pathogen. Holarrhena antidysenterica at 7.8??g/ml demonstrated remarkable resistant modifying ability against A. baumannii in combination with novobiocin. The phytochemical study revealed that constituents of this medicinal plant contain alkaloids, condensed tannins, and triterpenoids. Conclusion The use of Holarrhena antidysenterica in combination with novobiocin provides an effective alternative treatment for multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections. PMID:22536985

  5. Occupational exposure to solid chemical agents in biomass-fired power plants and associated health effects.

    PubMed

    Jumpponen, M; Rönkkömäki, H; Pasanen, P; Laitinen, J

    2014-06-01

    Occupational exposure to aluminium, arsenic, lead, cadmium, and manganese can increase the risk of numerous neurophysiological changes in workers, and may lead to conditions resembling Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. However, although the health hazard aspect of these agents has been examined, biomass-fired power plant workers' exposure to them remains a neglected issue. The purpose of this study was to measure maintenance and ash removal workers' multiple exposures to inhalable dust, metals, and crystalline silica during their work tasks in biomass-fired power plants. Maintenance and ash removal workers were exposed to high inhalable dust concentrations inside biomass-fired boilers. The median air inhalable dust concentration in workers' breathing zones were 33 mg m(-3) and 120 mg m(-3) in ash removal and maintenance tasks, respectively. The median concentration of manganese (0.31 mg m(-3)) exceeded the occupational exposure limit in worker's breathing zone samples in maintenance tasks. The most evident exposure-associated health risk from multiple exposures to metals was that of cancer, followed by central nervous system disorders, lower respiratory tract irritation, and finally upper respiratory tract irritation. To avoid the above mentioned health effects, powered air respirators with ABEK+P3 cartridges and carbon monoxide gas detectors are recommended as the minimum requirement for these work tasks. A compressed air breathing apparatus is the best form of protection for the most demanding work phases inside boilers in biomass-fired power plants. PMID:24289933

  6. Antimicrobial properties of honey.

    PubMed

    Israili, Zafar H

    2014-01-01

    Honey has been widely accepted as food and medicine by all generations, traditions, and civilizations, both ancient and modern. For at least 2700 years, honey has been used by humans to treat a variety of ailments through topical application, but only recently have the antiseptic and antimicrobial properties of honey been discovered. Honey has been reported to be effective in a number of human pathologies. Clinical studies have demonstrated that application of honey to severely infected cutaneous wounds rapidly clears infection from the wound and improves tissue healing. A large number of in vitro and limited clinical studies have confirmed the broad-spectrum antimicrobial (antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antimycobacterial) properties of honey, which may be attributed to the acidity (low pH), osmotic effect, high sugar concentration, presence of bacteriostatic and bactericidal factors (hydrogen peroxide, antioxidants, lysozyme, polyphenols, phenolic acids, flavonoids, methylglyoxal, and bee peptides), and increase in cytokine release, and to immune modulating and anti-inflammatory properties of honey; the antimicrobial action involves several mechanisms. Despite a large amount of data confirming the antimicrobial activity of honey, there are no studies that support the systemic use of honey as an antibacterial agent. PMID:23782759

  7. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity of 18 prenylated flavonoids isolated from medicinal plants: Morus alba L., Morus mongolica Schneider, Broussnetia papyrifera (L.) Vent, Sophora flavescens Ait and Echinosophora koreensis Nakai

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H.-Y. Sohn; K. H. Son; C.-S. Kwon; G.-S. Kwon; S. S. Kang

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of the 18 prenylated flavonoids, which were purified from five different medicinal plants, was evaluated by determination of MIC using the broth microdilution methods against four bacterial and two fungal microorganisms (Candida albicans, Saccaromyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus epidermis and S. aureus). Papyriflavonol A, kuraridin, sophoraflavanone D and sophoraisoflavanone A exhibited a good antifungal activity with

  8. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms among Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Kinga; Osek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  10. Enteral Antimicrobials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sanchez; B. P. Pizer; S. R. Alcock

    SDD using enteral antimicrobials is now an evidence-based protocol. It is the best-ever evaluated intervention in intensive\\u000a care medicine that reduces infectious morbidity and mortality. It is a cheap maneuver without side effects in terms of emergence\\u000a of resistance. In ICUs using enteral antimicrobials, gut carriage of potential pathogens, both sensitive and resistant, is\\u000a significantly reduced.However, hand disinfecting as a

  11. Trends in the susceptibility of commonly encountered clinically significant anaerobes and susceptibilities of blood isolates of anaerobes to 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, 2008-2012, northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, F D; Liao, C H; Lin, Y T; Sheng, W H; Hsueh, P R

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial resistance trends and profiles of clinical anaerobic isolates in northern Taiwan. Trends in the susceptibility of five commonly encountered clinical anaerobic isolates to seven agents from 2008 to 2012 were measured using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, against anaerobic blood isolates from two medical centers were determined using the agar dilution method. During the study period, susceptibility data on 11,105 isolates were evaluated. Metronidazole and chloramphenicol retained excellent activities. Around 20-30 % of isolates of Bacteroides and Prevotella species were resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam, cefmetazole, flomoxef, and clindamycin. Of the 507 tested blood isolates, the rates of resistance to commonly used agents were much higher, namely, 16.2 % for amoxicillin-clavulanate, 15.6 % for ampicillin-sulbactam, 24.7 % for cefmetazole, and 36.1 % for clindamycin. Notably, 13.5 % of B. fragilis isolates were resistant to ertapenem. Also, 15.2 % of B. uniformis, 17.2 % of other Bacteroides species, 14.3 % of Prevotella species, and 14 % of Clostridium other than C. perfringens isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin. Cefoperazone-sulbactam was active against most isolates, except for Clostridium species other than perfringens (resistance rate, 18.6 %). Fidaxomicin exerted poor activities against most anaerobes tested (MIC90 of >128 ?g/ml for B. fragilis and all isolates), except for C. perfringens (MIC90 of 0.03 ?g/ml) and Peptostreptococcus micros (MIC90 of 2 ?g/ml). However, rifaximin showed a wide range of susceptibilities against the tested anaerobes (MIC90 of 0.5 ?g/ml for B. fragilis). The emergence of resistance to ertapenem and moxifloxacin among bacteremic anaerobes highlights the need for continuous monitoring. PMID:24930042

  12. Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Zasloff

    2002-01-01

    Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to

  13. Removal of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents through advanced water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael G; Keller, Jurg; Poussade, Yvan

    2010-01-01

    Stable gadolinium (Gd) complexes have been used as paramagnetic contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for over 20 years, and have recently been identified as environmental contaminants. As the rare earth elements (REE), which include Gd, are able to be measured accurately at very low concentrations (e.g. Tb is measured at 7 fmol/kg in this study) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), it is possible to determine the fate of this class of compounds during the production of purified recycled water from effluent. Coagulation and microfiltration have negligible removal, with the major removal step occurring across the reverse osmosis membrane where anthropogenic Gd (the amount of Gd attributable to MRI contrast agents) is reduced from 0.39 nmol/kg to 0.59 pmol/kg, a reduction of 99.85%. The RO concentrate has anthropogenic Gd concentrations of 2.6 nmol/kg, an increase in concentration in line with the design characteristics of the plant. The increased concentration in the RO concentrate may allow further development of anthropogenic Gd as a tracer of the fate of the RO concentrate in the environment. PMID:20150705

  14. Antimicrobial hydrogels for the treatment of infection

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, Ana Salomé; Schneider, Joel P.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of microbial infections, especially those associated with impaired wound healing and biomedical implant failure has spurred the development of new materials having antimicrobial activity. Hydrogels are a class of highly hydrated material finding use in diverse medical applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, as wound fillers and as implant coatings, to name a few. The biocompatible nature of many gels make them a convenient starting platform to develop selectively active antimicrobial materials. Hydrogels with antimicrobial properties can be obtained through the encapsulation or covalent immobilization of known antimicrobial agents, or the material itself can be designed to possess inherent antimicrobial activity. In this review we present an overview of antimicrobial hydrogels that have recently been developed and when possible provide a discussion relevant to their mechanism of action. PMID:24122459

  15. Organic extracts from Indigofera suffruticosa leaves have antimicrobial and synergic actions with erythromycin against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra dos Santos, Ana Thereza; Araújo, Tiago Ferreira da Silva; Nascimento da Silva, Luis Cláudio; da Silva, Cleideana Bezerra; de Oliveira, Antonio Fernando Morais; Araújo, Janete Magali; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos; Lima, Vera Lúcia de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of Staphylococcus aureus is its ability to acquire resistance to antimicrobial agents. There is a need, therefore, for new approaches to combat this pathogen; for example, employing a combination of plant-derived products and antibiotics to overcome bacterial resistance. Indigofera suffruticosa is a plant popularly used to treat infections and has verified antimicrobial action. Here, we investigate the antimicrobial activity of different extracts from I. suffruticosa against S. aureus and their synergistic effects with erythromycin. Leaves of I. suffruticosa were extracted sequentially using diethyl ether, chloroform and acetone and the antimicrobial activity of each extract then tested against nine clinical isolates of S. aureus. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by microdilution tests, while the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) was assessed by checkerboard assay. All organic solvent extracts showed antimicrobial activity against S. aureus strains. The acetone extract was the most potent inhibitor of S. aureus (MIC and MBC of 0.78 and 3.12 mg/mL), followed by the chloroform extract (MIC and MBC of 3.12 and 6.25 mg/mL). Furthermore, acetone or chloroform extracts of I. suffruticosa enhanced the activity of erythromycin against S. aureus (FIC ? 0.5). We conclude that organic extracts from leaves of I. suffruticosa, alone or combined with erythromycin, are promising natural products for the development of new anti-S. aureus formulations. PMID:25699022

  16. Isolation and characterization of endophytic bacteria from Plectranthus tenuiflorus medicinal plant in Saudi Arabia desert and their antimicrobial activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bahig El-Deeb; Khalaf Fayez; Youssuf Gherbawy

    2012-01-01

    The diversity and beneficial characteristics of endophytic microorganisms have been studied in Plectranthus tenuiflorus medicinal plant. However, information regarding naturally occurring P. tenuiflorus plant associated endophytes among different organs of host is limited. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from root, stem, and leaves of P. tenuiflorus plant. Among 28 endophytic bacterial isolates from different organs of P. tenuiflorus plant, 8 isolates

  17. In-plant Validation of Two Antimicrobial Agents Applied During the Production of Tenderized and/or Enhanced Beef Products

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Kayla

    2013-08-28

    Numerous outbreaks of foodborne illness have been attributed to non-intact beef (e.g., tenderized, marinated, and enhanced) products contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7. Organic acids are commonly utilized in the beef industry...

  18. In-plant Validation of Two Antimicrobial Agents Applied During the Production of Tenderized and/or Enhanced Beef Products 

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Kayla

    2013-08-28

    Numerous outbreaks of foodborne illness have been attributed to non-intact beef (e.g., tenderized, marinated, and enhanced) products contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7. Organic acids are commonly utilized in the beef industry...

  19. ALTERNATIVES TO ANTIMICROBIAL USE IN FOOD ANIMAL PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production and its potential human health impact have captured the attention of scientists, animal producers, physicians, veterinarians, and consumers on a global level. Use of antimicrobial agents as a method to enhance animal performance or for disease pr...

  20. Efflux-mediated antimicrobial resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Poole

    2005-01-01

    biocide resistance is as yet unrealized, in vitro and in vivo episodes of reduced biocide susceptibility are common and the history of antibiotic resistance should not be ignored in the development and use of biocidal agents. Efflux mechanisms of resistance, both drug specific and multidrug, are important deter- minants of intrinsic and\\/or acquired resistance to these antimicrobials, with some accommodating

  1. A review of the in vitro activity of meropenem and comparative antimicrobial agents tested against 30,254 aerobic and anaerobic pathogens isolated world wide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Pfaller; Ronald N. Jones

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activity of meropenem (formerly SM-7738), a new carbapenem, was compared with that of imipenem and five other broad-spectrum antimicrobials (ceftazidime, cefotaxime, piperacillin, piperacillin\\/tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin) against 30,254 clinically significant pathogens isolated in nine countries worldwide. Overall, the carbapenems, meropenem and imipenem, were the most active drugs. Meropenem was four- to 64-fold more active than imipenem against Gram-negative

  2. Synthesis of some novel 2-substituted-5-[isopropylthiazole] clubbed 1,2,4-triazole and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles as potential antimicrobial and antitubercular agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. V. Suresh Kumar; Y. Rajendraprasad; B. P. Mallikarjuna; S. M. Chandrashekar; C. Kistayya

    2010-01-01

    In the present study a series of 2-substituted-5-[isopropylthiazole] clubbed 1,2,4-triazole and 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives have been synthesized and characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral analysis. Synthesized compounds were evaluated for their preliminary cytotoxicity, antimicrobial and antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain by broth dilution assay method.Antimycobacterial activity tested against M. tuberculosis indicated that compounds 4b and

  3. Comparative In Vitro Efficacies and Antimicrobial Durabilities of Novel Antimicrobial Central Venous Catheters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hend Hanna; Paul Bahna; Ruth Reitzel; Tanya Dvorak; Gassan Chaiban; Ray Hachem; Issam Raad

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the efficacies and durability of novel antimicrobial central venous catheters (CVCs) in preventing the adherence of microbial organisms to the surfaces of the CVCs. Novel antimicrobial CVCs investigated in this in vitro study were impregnated with antibiotics (minocycline and rifampin), with Oligon agent (silver, platinum, and carbon black), with approved antiseptics (chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine), or with a

  4. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy and antimicrobial stewardship: challenges and checklists.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, M; Seaton, R A

    2015-04-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) has become, for many countries, an established form of healthcare delivery. At the same time, there have been calls to ensure the prudent use of the existing antimicrobial armamentarium. For OPAT, this presents a dilemma. On one hand, stewardship principles look for the most effective agent with minimal collateral effects. In OPAT, whilst the aims of the service are similar, convenience of dosing to optimize early hospital discharge or admission avoidance may take precedence over an agent's spectrum of activity. This brief article aims to highlight the importance and explore the challenges of antimicrobial stewardship in the context of OPAT. Within the UK, the safe and effective use of antimicrobials is modelled around the IDSA/Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America stewardship practice guidelines with local customization where appropriate. Current UK stewardship practice principles were compared with published good practice recommendations for OPAT to identify how OPAT could support the broader antimicrobial stewardship agenda. It is essential that antimicrobial stewardship teams should understand the challenges faced in the non-inpatient setting and the potential benefits/lower risks associated with avoided admission or shortened hospital stay in this population. Within its limitations, OPAT should practise stewardship principles, including optimization of intravenous to oral switch and the reporting of outcomes, healthcare-associated infections and re-admission rates. OPAT should report to the antimicrobial stewardship team. Ideally the OPAT team should be formally represented within the stewardship framework. A checklist has been proposed to aid OPAT services in ensuring they meet their stewardship agenda. PMID:25538169

  5. Scaled-up testing of alternative trapping agents for radioactive constituents in plant vent streams

    SciTech Connect

    Saraceno, A.J.; Reiter, N.F.

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant vent streams are in compliance with present standards specifying radiation limits. Regulatory trends have become increasingly restrictive on the maximum permissible dose to a member of the public. This could mean more stringent controls for radioactive emissions in the future. Fixed bed activated alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) trapping is currently the principal method of limiting plant vent stream emissions of technetium and uranium to the atmosphere. Earlier small scale tests identified pure limestone (CaCO/sub 3/) and soda-lime (NaOH-CaO) as more effective than activated Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ for improved control of both radionuclides under top purge vent stream conditions. These same tests showed that soft sintered (400/sup 0/F) sodium fluoride (NaF) was best if only uranium is present. Scaled-up testing of these materials is being carried out, and preliminary data for technetium removal confirm the earlier results. Data for uranium removal efficienty are not complete as yet, but available results indicate the trapping process is capable of significant (80 to 85%) uranium reduction at the 0.5 ppM trap inlet level under prevailing test conditions. Removal efficiency for technetium is higher compared to uranium at on-stream trap times of approximately one month, irrespective of the type trapping agent examined. Factors affecting optimal control of radioactive constituents in plant vent streams by fixed bed trapping operations include: bed loading, trap change-out and recharging requirements; operating trap bank configurations in multiple-bed modes; and stability of sorbent materials. These factors will be studied, and results will be used to define available radionuclide emission control options.

  6. Effect of host-plant genotypes on the performance of three candidate biological control agents of Schinus terebinthifolius in Florida.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brazilian pepper is a weed in Florida, California and Hawaii that originates from South America. In Florida we have found two distinct types of Brazilian pepper plant and a hybrid between these two types. To control this weed, three biological control agents are being evaluated from Brazil. These ar...

  7. Plant size preference of Agapeta zoegana L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a root-feeding biological control agent of spotted knapweed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Smith; J. M. Story

    2003-01-01

    Agapeta zoegana L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is an oligophagous herbivore that was introduced to North America as a biological control agent of spotted knapweed, Centaurea stoebe L. subsp. micranthos (Gugler) Hayek (often called Centaurea maculosa Lam.). Spotted knapweed is a perennial plant that usually increases in size each year. A previous field study reported that more larvae were found on larger

  8. Effects of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent Gd-DTPA on Plant Growth and Root Imaging in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binmei; Wang, Qi; Ni, Xiaoyu; Dong, Yaling; Zhong, Kai; Wu, Yuejin

    2014-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have a wide range of applications in medical studies involving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), these agents are seldom used to enhance MRI images of plant root systems. To extend the application of MRI contrast agents to plant research and to develop related techniques to study root systems, we examined the applicability of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA to the imaging of rice roots. Specifically, we examined the biological effects of various concentrations of Gd-DTPA on rice growth and MRI images. Analysis of electrical conductivity and plant height demonstrated that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA had little impact on rice in the short-term. The results of signal intensity and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) analysis suggested that 5 mmol Gd-DTPA was the appropriate concentration for enhancing MRI signals. In addition, examination of the long-term effects of Gd-DTPA on plant height showed that levels of this compound up to 5 mmol had little impact on rice growth and (to some extent) increased the biomass of rice. PMID:24945975

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides: Old Molecules with New Ideas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teruaki Nakatsuji; Richard L Gallo

    2012-01-01

    Almost 90 years have passed since Alexander Fleming discovered the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme, the first natural antibiotic isolated from our body. Since then, various types of molecules with antibiotic activity have been isolated from animals, insects, plants, and bacteria, and their use has revolutionized clinical medicine. So far, more than 1,200 types of peptides with antimicrobial activity have been

  10. Defensins: antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomas Ganz

    2003-01-01

    The production of natural antibiotic peptides has emerged as an important mechanism of innate immunity in plants and animals. Defensins are diverse members of a large family of antimicrobial peptides, contributing to the antimicrobial action of granulocytes, mucosal host defence in the small intestine and epithelial host defence in the skin and elsewhere. This review, inspired by a spate of

  11. Antimicrobial screening of secondary metabolites from Solanaceae

    E-print Network

    Chittka, Lars

    Antimicrobial screening of secondary metabolites from Solanaceae Katarina Jane Nice This thesis of certain Solanaceae species, where the leaf tissue was noted to have the highest general antimicrobial chromatrography-mass spectrometry analysis. The Solanaceae plants which were identified to have a significant

  12. Antimicrobial food packaging: potential and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Bhanu; Keshwani, Anu; Kharkwal, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays food preservation, quality maintenance, and safety are major growing concerns of the food industry. It is evident that over time consumers’ demand for natural and safe food products with stringent regulations to prevent food-borne infectious diseases. Antimicrobial packaging which is thought to be a subset of active packaging and controlled release packaging is one such promising technology which effectively impregnates the antimicrobial into the food packaging film material and subsequently delivers it over the stipulated period of time to kill the pathogenic microorganisms affecting food products thereby increasing the shelf life to severe folds. This paper presents a picture of the recent research on antimicrobial agents that are aimed at enhancing and improving food quality and safety by reduction of pathogen growth and extension of shelf life, in a form of a comprehensive review. Examination of the available antimicrobial packaging technologies is also presented along with their significant impact on food safety. This article entails various antimicrobial agents for commercial applications, as well as the difference between the use of antimicrobials under laboratory scale and real time applications. Development of resistance amongst microorganisms is considered as a future implication of antimicrobials with an aim to come up with actual efficacies in extension of shelf life as well as reduction in bacterial growth through the upcoming and promising use of antimicrobials in food packaging for the forthcoming research down the line. PMID:26136740

  13. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  14. Complexes of Silver(I) Ions and Silver Phosphate Nanoparticles with Hyaluronic Acid and/or Chitosan as Promising Antimicrobial Agents for Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Chudobova, Dagmar; Nejdl, Lukas; Gumulec, Jaromir; Krystofova, Olga; Rodrigo, Miguel Angel Merlos; Kynicky, Jindrich; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Kopel, Pavel; Babula, Petr; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Polymers are currently widely used to replace a variety of natural materials with respect to their favourable physical and chemical properties, and due to their economic advantage. One of the most important branches of application of polymers is the production of different products for medical use. In this case, it is necessary to face a significant disadvantage of polymer products due to possible and very common colonization of the surface by various microorganisms that can pose a potential danger to the patient. One of the possible solutions is to prepare polymer with antibacterial/antimicrobial properties that is resistant to bacterial colonization. The aim of this study was to contribute to the development of antimicrobial polymeric material ideal for covering vascular implants with subsequent use in transplant surgery. Therefore, the complexes of polymeric substances (hyaluronic acid and chitosan) with silver nitrate or silver phosphate nanoparticles were created, and their effects on gram-positive bacterial culture of Staphylococcus aureus were monitored. Stages of formation of complexes of silver nitrate and silver phosphate nanoparticles with polymeric compounds were characterized using electrochemical and spectrophotometric methods. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of complexes was determined using the methods of determination of growth curves and zones of inhibition. The results of this study revealed that the complex of chitosan, with silver phosphate nanoparticles, was the most suitable in order to have an antibacterial effect on bacterial culture of Staphylococcus aureus. Formation of this complex was under way at low concentrations of chitosan. The results of electrochemical determination corresponded with the results of spectrophotometric methods and verified good interaction and formation of the complex. The complex has an outstanding antibacterial effect and this effect was of several orders higher compared to other investigated complexes. PMID:23812079

  15. Effects of Plant-Derived Extracts, Other Antimicrobials, and Their Combinations against Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Beef Systems.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung Yuk; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Kim, Kee-Tae; Sofos, John N

    2015-06-01

    The antimicrobial effects of thyme oil (TO), grapefruit seed extract (GSE), and basil essential oil, alone or in combination with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), sodium diacetate, or lactic acid, were evaluated against Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a moisture-enhanced beef model system. The model system was composed of a nonsterile beef homogenate to which NaCl (0.5%) and sodium tripolyphosphate (0.25%) were added, together with the tested antimicrobial ingredients. Beef homogenate treatments were inoculated (ca. 3 log CFU/ml) with rifampin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 (eight-strain mixture) and incubated at 15°C (48 h). The most effective individual treatments were TO (0.25 or 0.5%) and GSE (0.5 or 1.0%), which immediately reduced (P < 0.05) pathogen levels by ?3.4 log CFU/ml. Additionally, CPC (0.04%) reduced initial E. coli O157:H7 counts by 2.7 log CFU/ml. Most combinations of the tested plant-derived extracts with CPC (0.02 or 0.04%) and sodium diacetate (0.25%) had an additive effect with respect to antibacterial activity. In a second study, antimicrobial interventions were evaluated for their efficacy in reducing surface contamination of E. coli O157:H7 on beef cuts and to determine the effect of these surface treatments on subsequent internalization of the pathogen during blade tenderization. Beef cuts (10 by 8 by 3.5 cm) were inoculated (ca. 4 log CFU/g) on one side with the rifampin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 strain mixture and were then spray treated (20 lb/in(2), 10 s) with water, GSE (5 and 10%), lactic acid (5%), or CPC (5%). Untreated (control) and spray-treated surfaces were then subjected to double-pass blade tenderization. Surface contamination (4.4 log CFU/g) of E. coli O157:H7 was reduced (P < 0.05) to 3.4 (5% CPC) to 4.1 (water or 5% GSE) log CFU/g following spray treatment. The highest and lowest transfer rates of pathogen cells from the surface to deeper tissues of blade-tenderized sections were obtained in the untreated control and CPC-treated samples, respectively. PMID:26038897

  16. Antimicrobial, antioxidant, antitumour-promoting and cytotoxic activities of different plant part extracts of Garcinia atroviridis griff. ex T. anders.

    PubMed

    Mackeen, M M; Ali, A M; Lajis, N H; Kawazu, K; Hassan, Z; Amran, M; Habsah, M; Mooi, L Y; Mohamed, S M

    2000-10-01

    Crude extracts (methanol) of various parts, viz. the leaves, fruits, roots, stem and trunk bark, of Garcinia atroviridis were screened for antimicrobial, cytotoxic, brine shrimp toxic, antitumour-promoting and antioxidant activities. The crude extracts exhibited predominantly antibacterial activity with the root extract showing the strongest inhibition against the test bacteria at a minimum inhibitory dose (MID) of 15.6 microg/disc. Although all the extracts failed to inhibit the growth of most of the test fungi, significant antifungal activity against Cladosporium herbarum was exhibited by most notably the fruit (MID: 100 microg), and the leaf (MID: 400 microg) extracts. None of the extracts were significantly cytotoxic, and lethal towards brine shrimps. The root, leaf, trunk and stem bark extracts (except for the fruits) showed strong antioxidant activity exceeding that of the standard antioxidant, alpha-tocopherol. Antitumour-promoting activity (>95% inhibition) was shown by the fruit, leaf, stem and trunk bark extracts. PMID:10996278

  17. chemical composition, plant genetic differences, antimicrobial and antifungal activity investigation of the essential oil of Rosmarinus officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Angioni, Alberto; Barra, Andrea; Cereti, Elisabetta; Barile, Daniela; Coďsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco; Dessi, Sandro; Coroneo, Valentina; Cabras, Paolo

    2004-06-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil of the Sardinian Rosmarinus officinalis L. obtained by hydro distillation and steam\\hydro distillation was studied using GC-FID and MS. Samples were collected at different latitude and longitude of Sardinia (Italy). The yields ranged between 1.75 and 0.48% (v/w, volume/dry-weight). A total of 30 components were identified. The major compounds in the essential oil were alpha-pinene, borneol, (-) camphene, camphor, verbenone, and bornyl-acetate. Multivariate analysis carried out on chemical molecular markers, with the appraisal of chemical, pedological, and random amplified polymorphic DNA data, allows four different clusters to be distinguished. The antimicrobial and antifungal tests showed a weak activity of Sardinian rosemary. On the other hand, an inductive effect on fungal growth, especially toward Fusarium graminearum was observed. PMID:15161226

  18. Bacillus cereus brain abscesses occurring in a severely neutropenic patient: successful treatment with antimicrobial agents, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and surgical drainage.

    PubMed

    Sakai, C; Iuchi, T; Ishii, A; Kumagai, K; Takagi, T

    2001-07-01

    Multiple brain and liver abscesses developed immediately after Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a neutropenic patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After even 8 weeks of antimicrobial chemotherapy together with administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, every infectious process disappeared but the patient's headache has still persisted. Because the wall of one brain abscess became thin and was in danger of rupturing into the ventricle, surgical drainage was performed, resulting in disappearance of headache and resolution of brain abscess. The present case indicates that a combined medical and surgical approach is mandatory to treat patients with brain abscesses. PMID:11506311

  19. [Abnormal floral meristem development in transgenic tomato plants do not depend on the expression of genes encoding defense-related PR-proteins and antimicrobial peptides].

    PubMed

    Khaliluev, M R; Chaban, I A; Kononenko, N V; Baranova, E N; Dolgov, S V; Kharchenko, P N; Poliakov, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the morphological and cytoembryological analyses of the tomato plants transformed with the genes encoding chitin-binding proteins (ac and RS-intron-Shir) from Amaranthus caudatus L. andA. retroflexus L., respectively, as well as the gene amp2 encoding hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from Stellaria media L., have been performed. The transgenic lines were adapted to soil and grown the greenhouse. The analysis of putative transgenic tomato plants revealed several lines that did not differ phenotypically from the wild type plants and three lines with disruption in differentiation of the inflorescence shoot and the flower, as well as the fruit formation (modified plants of each line were transformed with a single gene as noted before). Abnormalities in the development of the generative organs were maintained for at least six vegetative generations. These transgenic plants were shown to be defective in the mail gametophyte formation, fertilization, and, consequently, led to parthenocarpic fruits. The detailed analysis of growing ovules in the abnormal transgenic plants showed that the replacement tissue was formed and proliferated instead of unfertilized embryo sac. The structure of the replacement tissue differed from both embryonic and endosperm tissue of the normal ovule. The formation of the replacement tissue occurred due to continuing proliferation of the endothelial cells that lost their ability for differentiation. The final step in the development of the replacement tissue was its death, which resulted in the cell lysis. The expression of the genes used was confirmed by RT-PCR in all three lines with abnormal phenotype, as well as in several lines that did not phenotypically differ from the untransformed control. This suggests that abnormalities in the organs of the generative sphere in the transgenic plants do not depend on the expression of the foreign genes that were introduced in the tomato genome. Here, we argue that agrobacterial transformation affects, directly or indirectly, expression of genes encoding for transcription factors that can activate a gene cascade responsible for the normal plant development. PMID:25720263

  20. Antimicrobial activity and probable mechanisms of action of medicinal plants of Kenya: Withania somnifera, Warbugia ugandensis, Prunus africana and Plectrunthus barbatus.

    PubMed

    Mwitari, Peter G; Ayeka, Peter A; Ondicho, Joyce; Matu, Esther N; Bii, Christine C

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera, Warbugia ugandensis, Prunus africana and Plectrunthus barbatus are used traditionally in Kenya for treatment of microbial infections and cancer. Information on their use is available, but scientific data on their bioactivity, safety and mechanisms of action is still scanty. A study was conducted on the effect of organic extracts of these plants on both bacterial and fungal strains, and their mechanisms of action. Extracts were evaluated through the disc diffusion assay. Bacteria and yeast test strains were cultured on Mueller-Hinton agar and on Sabouraud dextrose agar for the filamentous fungi. A 0.5 McFarland standard suspension was prepared. Sterile paper discs 6 mm in diameter impregnated with 10 µl of the test extract (100 mg/ml) were aseptically placed onto the surface of the inoculated media. Chloramphenicol (30 µg) and fluconazole (25 µg) were used as standards. Discs impregnated with dissolution medium were used as controls. Activity of the extracts was expressed according to zone of inhibition diameter. MIC was determined at 0.78-100 mg/ml. Safety studies were carried using Cell Counting Kit 8 cell proliferation assay protocol. To evaluate extracts mechanisms of action, IEC-6 cells and RT-PCR technique was employed in vitro to evaluate Interleukin 7 cytokine. Investigated plants extracts have both bactericidal and fungicidal activity. W. ugandensis is cytotoxic at IC50<50 µg/ml with MIC values of less than 0.78 mg/ml. Prunus africana shuts down expression of IL 7 mRNA at 50 µg/ml. W. somnifera has the best antimicrobial (1.5625 mg/ml), immunopotentiation (2 times IL 7 mRNA expression) and safety level (IC50>200 µg/ml). Fractions from W. ugandensis and W. somnifera too demonstrated antimicrobial activity. Mechanisms of action can largely be attributed to cytotoxicity, Gene silencing and immunopotentiation. Use of medicinal plants in traditional medicine has been justified and possible mechanisms of action demonstrated. Studies to isolate and characterize the bioactive constituents continue. PMID:23785437

  1. Antimicrobial Activity and Probable Mechanisms of Action of Medicinal Plants of Kenya: Withania somnifera, Warbugia ugandensis, Prunus africana and Plectrunthus barbatus

    PubMed Central

    Mwitari, Peter G.; Ayeka, Peter A.; Ondicho, Joyce; Matu, Esther N.; Bii, Christine C.

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera, Warbugia ugandensis, Prunus africana and Plectrunthus barbatus are used traditionally in Kenya for treatment of microbial infections and cancer. Information on their use is available, but scientific data on their bioactivity, safety and mechanisms of action is still scanty. A study was conducted on the effect of organic extracts of these plants on both bacterial and fungal strains, and their mechanisms of action. Extracts were evaluated through the disc diffusion assay. Bacteria and yeast test strains were cultured on Mueller-Hinton agar and on Sabouraud dextrose agar for the filamentous fungi. A 0.5 McFarland standard suspension was prepared. Sterile paper discs 6 mm in diameter impregnated with 10 µl of the test extract (100 mg/ml) were aseptically placed onto the surface of the inoculated media. Chloramphenicol (30 µg) and fluconazole (25 µg) were used as standards. Discs impregnated with dissolution medium were used as controls. Activity of the extracts was expressed according to zone of inhibition diameter. MIC was determined at 0.78–100 mg/ml. Safety studies were carried using Cell Counting Kit 8 cell proliferation assay protocol. To evaluate extracts mechanisms of action, IEC-6 cells and RT-PCR technique was employed in vitro to evaluate Interleukin 7 cytokine. Investigated plants extracts have both bactericidal and fungicidal activity. W. ugandensis is cytotoxic at IC50<50 µg/ml with MIC values of less than 0.78 mg/ml. Prunus africana shuts down expression of IL 7 mRNA at 50 µg/ml. W. somnifera has the best antimicrobial (1.5625 mg/ml), immunopotentiation (2 times IL 7 mRNA expression) and safety level (IC50>200 µg/ml). Fractions from W. ugandensis and W. somnifera too demonstrated antimicrobial activity. Mechanisms of action can largely be attributed to cytotoxicity, Gene silencing and immunopotentiation. Use of medicinal plants in traditional medicine has been justified and possible mechanisms of action demonstrated. Studies to isolate and characterize the bioactive constituents continue. PMID:23785437

  2. Synthesis, in-vitro antibacterial, antifungal, and molecular modeling of potent anti-microbial agents with a combined pyrazole and thiophene pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Kaal, Nahed Ahmed; Alterary, Seham; Al-Showiman, Salim S; Barakat, Assem; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Frey, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Ethyl 5-acetyl-4-methyl-2-(phenylamino)thiophene-3-carboxylate (2) and there derivatives 3a-c, 4, 6a-c and 9a-f were synthesized. The structure of compound 2 was deduced by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, MS, microanalysis, and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The compound crystallized in the monoclinic system, with space group P21/c and cell coordinates a = 8.5752(16) Ĺ, b = 21.046(4) Ĺ, c = 8.2941(12) Ĺ, ? = 101.131(6)°, V = 1468.7(4) Ĺ3, and Z = 4. Compounds 2, 3a-c, 4, 5a-c and 9a-f were subjected into in vitro antimicrobial activity tests. Compounds 3a and 3c were more potent than standard drug amphotericin B, showing MIC values of 23.8 ± 0.42 and 24.3 ± 0.68, respectively, against Aspergillus fumigatus while the standard drug MIC was 23.7 ± 0.1. Compound 3c was also more potent (MIC 24.8 ± 0.64) than the standard drug amphotericin B (MIC 19.7 ± 0.2) against Syncephalastrum racemosum. Compounds 4 and 9f also showed promising anti-microbial activity. Molecular modeling was performed for the most active compounds. PMID:26007175

  3. The need for antimicrobial resistance surveillance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Felmingham

    2002-01-01

    Although antimicrobial agents drastically reduced patient morbidity and mortality, bacterial resistance to these agents developed shortly after their introduction. Because the laboratory diagnosis of respiratory tract infection (RTI) is not always possible, and rarely of immediate use, treatment success or failure often depends upon the availability of reliable susceptibility infor- mation at the time of therapeutic decision-making. Hence, the need

  4. Culturable leaf-associated bacteria on tomato plants and their potential as biological control agents.

    PubMed

    Enya, Junichiro; Shinohara, Hirosuke; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Tsukiboshi, Takao; Negishi, Hiromitsu; Suyama, Kazuo; Tsushima, Seiya

    2007-05-01

    Culturable leaf-associated bacteria inhabiting a plant have been considered as promising biological control agent (BCA) candidates because they can survive on the plant. We investigated the relationship between bacterial groups of culturable leaf-associated bacteria on greenhouse- and field-grown tomato leaves and their antifungal activities against tomato diseases in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the isolated bacteria were analyzed for N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production, which have been reported to associate with bacterial colonization, and resistance to a tomato alkaloid (alpha-tomatine). Leaf washings and subsequent leaf macerates were used to estimate the population size of epiphytic and more internal bacteria. Bacterial population sizes on leaves at the same position increased as the leaves aged under both greenhouse and field conditions. Field-grown tomatoes had significantly larger population sizes than greenhouse-grown tomatoes. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequencing using 887 culturable leaf-associated bacteria revealed a predominance of the Bacillus and Pseudomonas culturable leaf-associated bacterial groups on greenhouse- and field-grown tomatoes, respectively. Curtobacterium and Sphingomonas were frequently recovered from both locations. From the 2138 bacterial strains tested, we selected several strains having in vitro antifungal activity against three fungal pathogens of tomato: Botrytis cinerea, Fulvia fulva, and Alternaria solani. Among bacterial strains with strong in vitro antifungal activities, Bacillus and Pantoea tended to show strong antifungal activities, whereas Curtobacterium and Sphingomonas were not effective. The results indicated the differences in antifungal activity among predominant bacterial groups. Analysis of alpha-tomatine resistance revealed that most bacterial strains in the dominant groups exhibited moderate or high resistance to alpha-tomatine in growth medium. Furthermore, some Sphingomonas and Pantoea strains showed AHL and IAA production activities. Strain 125NP12 (Pantoea ananatis) showed particular alpha-tomatine resistance, and AHL and IAA production had the highest protective value (91.7) against gray mold. Thus, the differences of these physiological properties among dominant bacteria may be associated with the disease suppression ability of BCAs on tomato plants. PMID:17356949

  5. Antimicrobial polypeptide multilayer nanocoatings.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Jai S; Dave, Komal; Haynie, Donald T

    2006-01-01

    A multilayer coating (or film) of nanometer-thick layers can be made by sequential adsorption of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on a solid support. The method is known as layer-by-layer assembly (LBL). No special apparatus is required for LBL and nanofilms can be prepared under mild, physiological conditions. A multilayer nanofilm in which at least one of the constituent species is a polypeptide is a polypeptide multilayer nanofilm. The present work was aimed at assessing whether polypeptide multilayer nanofilms with specific antimicrobial properties could be prepared by incorporation of a known antimicrobial agent in the film structure, in this case the edible protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). The chicken enzyme is widely employed as a human food preservative. An advantage of LBL in this context is that the nanofilm is fabricated directly on the surface of interest, eliminating the need to incorporate the antimicrobial in other packaging materials. Here, nanofilms were made of poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA), which is highly negatively charged in the mildly acidic pH range, and HEWL, which has a high net positive charge at acidic pH. We show that PLGA/HEWL nanofilms inhibit growth of the model microbe Microccocus luteus in the surrounding liquid medium. The amount of HEWL released from PLGA/HEWL films depends on the number of HEWL layers and therefore on the total quantity of HEWL in the films. This initial study provides a sketch of the scope for further development of LBL in the area of antimicrobial polypeptide multilayer films. Potential applications of such films include strategies for food preservation and coatings for implant devices. PMID:17176751

  6. Biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Cha, Dong Su; Chinnan, Manjeet S

    2004-01-01

    The term antimicrobialpackaging encompasses any packaging technique(s) used to control microbial growth in a food product. These include packaging materials and edible films and coatings that contain antimicrobial agents and also techniques that modify the atmosphere within the package. In recent years, antimicrobial packaging has attracted much attention from the food industry because of the increase in consumer demand for minimally processed, preservative-free products. Reflecting this demand, the preservative agents must be applied to packaging in such away that only low levels of preservatives come into contact with the food. The film or coating technique is considered to be more effective, although more complicated to apply. New antimicrobial packaging materials are continually being developed. Many of them exploit natural agents to control common food-borne microorganisms. Current trends suggest that, in due course, packaging will generally incorporate antimicrobial agents, and the sealing systems will continue to improve. The focus of packaging in the past has been on the appearance, size, and integrity of the package. A greater emphasis on safety features associated with the addition of antimicrobial agents is perhaps the next area for development in packaging technology. PMID:15462127

  7. Antimicrobial activity of enterocins from Enterococcus faecalis SL-5 against Propionibacterium acnes, the causative agent in acne vulgaris, and its therapeutic effect.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bong Seon; Seo, Jae-Gu; Lee, Gwa-Su; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Sei Yeon; Han, Ye Won; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok; Rhee, Ji Hwan; Chung, Myung-Jun; Park, Young Min

    2009-02-01

    A lactic acid bacterial strain was isolated from human fecal specimen and identified as Enterococcus faecalis SL-5. The isolated strain showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive pathogens assayed, especially the highest activity against Propionibacterium acnes. The antimicrobial substance was purified and verified as a bacteriocin (named ESL5) of E. faecalis SL-5 by activity-staining using P. acnes as an indicator. N-terminal sequence of ESL5 was determined (MGAIAKLVAK) and sequence analysis revealed that it is almost identical to the some of enterocins including L50A/B of E. faecium L50 and MR10A/B of E. faecalis MRR 10-3. From the sequencing data of L50A/B structural genes, the nucleotide sequence showed 100% identity with that of the MR10A/B structural genes, implying that ESL5 is an equivalent of enterocin MR10. Meanwhile, we also tested the therapeutic effect of anti-P. acnes activity in patients with mild to moderate acne because of its pathogenic role to acne vulgaris. For this purpose, a concentrated powder of CBT SL-5 was prepared using cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of E. faecalis SL-5 and included in a lotion for application in the patients. The study showed that CBT SL-5 lotion significantly reduced the inflammatory lesions like pustules compared to the placebo lotion. Therefore our results indicate that the anti-P. acnes activity produced by E. faecalis SL-5 has potential role to the treatment of acne as an alternative to topical antibiotics. PMID:19229497

  8. Biocatalytic and antimicrobial activities of gold nanoparticles synthesized by Trichoderma sp.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aradhana; Kumari, Madhuree; Pandey, Shipra; Chaudhry, Vasvi; Gupta, K C; Nautiyal, C S

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize gold nanoparticles by Trichoderma viride and Hypocrea lixii. The biosynthesis of the nanoparticles was very rapid and took 10 min at 30 °C when cell-free extract of the T. viride was used, which was similar by H. lixii but at 100 °C. Biomolecules present in cell free extracts of both fungi were capable to synthesize and stabilize the formed particles. Synthesis procedure was very quick and environment friendly which did not require subsequent processing. The biosynthesized nanoparticles served as an efficient biocatalyst which reduced 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH? and had antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles within 10 min by Trichoderma having plant growth promoting and plant pathogen control abilities, which served both, as an efficient biocatalyst, and a potent antimicrobial agent. PMID:24914997

  9. Frequency of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for pathogens isolated from Latin American patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia: results from the SENTRY antimicrobial surveillance program (1998)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Todd Lewis; Ana C Gales; Helio S Sader; Michael A Pfaller; Ronald N Jones

    2000-01-01

    The correct empiric choice of antimicrobial therapy in the treatment of pneumonia in hospitalized patients has established itself as a major therapeutic challenge to clinicians. Selection of an inappropriate antimicrobial agent could lead to increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Characteristics of pathogens responsible for this infection such as species prevalence, overall antimicrobial resistance rates, and mechanisms of detected resistance

  10. Animal Antimicrobial Peptides: An Overview

    E-print Network

    Pompeu Fabra, Universitat

    Animal Antimicrobial Peptides: An Overview David Andreu1 Luis Rivas2 1 Universitat de Barcelona concepts of nonspecific and specific de- fense systems for plants and animals, respectively, are being defense systems, while on the other hand innate (nonadaptive) immunity in animals largely de- pends

  11. Antimicrobial Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joerg C. Tiller

    \\u000a In this review, the general principles of antimicrobial surfaces will be discussed in detail. Because many common products\\u000a that keep microbes off surfaces have been banned in the past decade, the search for alternatives is in full run. In recent\\u000a research, numerous new ways to produce so-called self-sterilizing surfaces have been introduced. These technologies are discussed\\u000a with respect to their

  12. Effect of Plant Age on Endophytic Bacterial Diversity of Balloon Flower ( Platycodon grandiflorum ) Root and Their Antimicrobial Activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jong Min Kim; Myoung Geun Yun; Ji Joong Cho; Eun Jin Kim; Young Han Lee; Han Dae Yun

    2010-01-01

    Balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) is widely cultivated vegetable and used as a remedy for asthma in East Asia. Experiments were conducted to isolate endophytic\\u000a bacteria from 1-, 3-, and 6-year-old balloon flower roots and to analyze the enzymatic, antifungal, and anti-human pathogenic\\u000a activities of the potential endophytic biocontrol agents obtained. Total 120 bacterial colonies were isolated from the interior\\u000a of

  13. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono-?-AApeptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the first example of antimicrobial helical sulfono-?-AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fluorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono-?-AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure-function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-defined helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens. PMID:26020456

  14. Genome Sequence of the Plant Pathogen and Biotechnology Agent Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brad Goodner; Gregory Hinkle; Stacie Gattung; Nancy Miller; Mary Blanchard; Barbara Qurollo; Barry S. Goldman; Yongwei Cao; Manor Askenazi; Conrad Halling; Lori Mullin; Kathryn Houmiel; Jeffrey Gordon; Mark Vaudin; Oleg Iartchouk; Andrew Epp; Fang Liu; Clifford Wollam; Mike Allinger; Dahlia Doughty; Charlaine Scott; Courtney Lappas; Brian Markelz; Casey Flanagan; Chris Crowell; Jordan Gurson; Caroline Lomo; Carolyn Sear; Graham Strub; Chris Cielo; Steven Slater

    2001-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen capable of transferring a defined segment of DNA to a host plant, generating a gall tumor. Replacing the transferred tumor-inducing genes with exogenous DNA allows the introduction of any desired gene into the plant. Thus, A. tumefaciens has been critical for the development of modern plant genetics and agricultural biotechnology. Here we describe the

  15. Plant-Derived Antimicrobials Reduce E. coli O157:H7 Virulence Factors Critical for Colonization in Cattle Gastrointestinal Tract In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ananda Baskaran, Sangeetha

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of subinhibitory concentrations (SIC) of five plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs), namely, trans cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, carvacrol, thymol, and ?-resorcylic acid, on E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC) attachment and invasion of cultured bovine colonic (CO) and rectoanal junction (RAJ) epithelial cells. In addition, PDAs' effect on EHEC genes critical for colonization of cattle gastrointestinal tract (CGIT) was determined in bovine rumen fluid (RF) and intestinal contents (BICs). Primary bovine CO and RAJ epithelial cells were established and were separately inoculated with three EHEC strains with or without (control) SIC of each PDA. Following incubation, EHEC that attached and invaded the cells were determined. Furthermore, the expression of EHEC genes critical for colonization in cattle was investigated using real-time, quantitative polymerase chain reaction in RF and BICs. All the PDAs decreased EHEC invasion of CO and RAJ epithelial cells (P < 0.05). The PDAs also downregulated (P < 0.05) the expression of EHEC genes critical for colonization in CGIT. Results suggest that the PDAs could potentially be used to control EHEC colonization in cattle; however follow-up in vivo studies in cattle are warranted. PMID:25050328

  16. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Activity and Toxicity Test of Pilea microphylla

    PubMed Central

    Modarresi Chahardehi, Amir; Ibrahim, Darah; Fariza Sulaiman, Shaida

    2010-01-01

    A total of 9 plant extracts were tested, using two different kinds of extracting methods to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities from Pilea microphylla (Urticaceae family) and including toxicity test. Antioxidant activity were tested by using DPPH free radical scavenging, also total phenolic contents and total flavonoid contents were determined. Toxicity assay carried out by using brine shrimps. Methanol extract of method I (ME I) showed the highest antioxidant activity at 69.51 ± 1.03. Chloroform extract of method I (CE I) showed the highest total phenolic contents at 72.10 ± 0.71 and chloroform extract of method II (CE II) showed the highest total flavonoid contents at 60.14 ± 0.33. The antimicrobial activity of Pilea microphylla extract was tested in vitro by using disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The Pilea microphylla extract showed antibacterial activity against some Gram negative and positive bacteria. The extracts did not exhibit antifungal and antiyeast activity. The hexane extract of method I (HE I) was not toxic against brine shrimp (LC50 value was 3880??g/ml). Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antimicrobial and antioxidative agents in food industry. PMID:20652052

  17. ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, July 2010, p. 28932900 Vol. 54, No. 7 0066-4804/10/$12.00 doi:10.1128/AAC.00332-10

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    . Cross-Resistance to Nitro Drugs and Implications for Treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis (NECT) for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) has renewed interest in the potential agents of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), commonly known as sleeping sick- ness. This epidemic

  18. ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, July 2007, p. 24032411 Vol. 51, No. 7 0066-4804/07/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AAC.01184-06

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jing

    to be responsible for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. In order to find novel compounds with anti-lethal toxin rats. Bacillus anthracis is a gram-positive bacterium that is the causative agent of anthrax. Two major properties, we used a cell-based assay to screen a collection of approximately 500 small molecules. Nineteen

  19. Use of low-cost gelling agents and support matrices for industrial scale plant tissue culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parthasarathi Bhattacharya; Satyahari Dey; Bimal Chandra Bhattacharyya

    1994-01-01

    The efficacies of sago (from Metroxylon sagu Rottb.) and isubgol (from Plantago ovata Forsk.) as gelling agents and those of filter paper, nylon cloth, polystyrene foam and glass wool cloth as support matrices have been tested for the propagation of plantlets of chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev). The performances of these low-cost gelling agents and matrices were found satisfactory and could

  20. Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia, mortality and all intensive care unit acquired infections by topically applied antimicrobial or antiseptic agents: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Given the high morbidity and mortality attributable to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, prevention plays a key role in the management of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. One of the candidate preventive interventions is the selective decontamination of the digestive or respiratory tract (SDRD) by topical antiseptic or antimicrobial agents. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effect of topical digestive or respiratory tract decontamination with antiseptics or antibiotics in the prevention of VAP, of mortality and of all ICU-acquired infections in mechanically ventilated ICU patients. Methods A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials was performed. The U.S. National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database, Embase, and Cochrane Library computerized bibliographic databases, and reference lists of selected studies were used. Selection criteria for inclusion were: randomised controlled trials (RCTs); primary studies; examining the reduction of VAP and/or mortality and/or all ICU-acquired infections in ICU patients by prophylactic use of one or more of following topical treatments: 1) oropharyngeal decontamination using antiseptics or antibiotics, 2) gastrointestinal tract decontamination using antibiotics, 3) oropharyngeal plus gastrointestinal tract decontamination using antibiotics and 4) respiratory tract decontamination using antibiotics; reported enough data to estimate the odds ratio (OR) or risk ratio (RR) and their variance; English language; published through June 2010. Results A total of 28 articles met all inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The overall estimate of efficacy of topical SDRD in the prevention of VAP was 27% (95% CI of efficacy = 16% to 37%) for antiseptics and 36% (95% CI of efficacy = 18% to 50%) for antibiotics, whereas in none of the meta-analyses conducted on mortality was a significant effect found. The effect of topical SDRD in the prevention of all ICU-acquired infections was statistically significant (efficacy = 29%; 95% CI of efficacy = 14% to 41%) for antibiotics whereas the use of antiseptics did not show a significant beneficial effect. Conclusions Topical SDRD using antiseptics or antimicrobial agents is effective in reducing the frequency of VAP in ICU. Unlike antiseptics, the use of topical antibiotics seems to be effective also in preventing all ICU-acquired infections, while the effectiveness on mortality of these two approaches needs to be investigated in further research. PMID:21702946

  1. The antimicrobial activity of Azadirachta indica, Mimusops elengi, Tinospora cardifolia, Ocimum sanctum and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate on common endodontic pathogens: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Kunjal S.; Sanghvi, Zarna; Parmar, Girish; Shah, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To check the antimicrobial activity of Azadirachta indica (Neem), Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi), Mimusops elelngi (Bakul), Tinospora cardifolia (Giloy) and Chlorhexidine Gluconate (CHX) on common endodontic pathogens like Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis and staphylococcus aureus. Materials and Methods: The agar diffusion test was used to check the antimicrobial activity of the Methanolic extracts of the medicinal plants along with CHX. Six different concentrations of the tested agents were used for the study. The values of Zone of Inhibition were tabulated according to the concentration of the tested agent and data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni post- hoc tests. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentrations (MBC) values were also recorded. Results: All the plants extracts showed considerable antimicrobial activity against selected endodontic pathogens. At 3mg. concentration, O.sanctum was the most effective against S. mutans, M. elengi showed highest zone of inhibition against E.faecalis, whereas CHX was the most effective agent against S.aureus. CHX was also the most consistent of all the medicaments testes, showing inhibitory effect against all the tree pathogens at all the selected concentrations. Conclusions: The Methanolic extract of A.Indica, O.sanctum, M. Elengi, T.cardifolia and Chlorhexidine Gluconate has considerable antimicrobial activity against S. mutans, E. faecalis and S. aureus. PMID:24966766

  2. Antiulcer and antimicrobial activity of Anogeissus latifolia.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, R; Vijayakumar, M; Singh, M; Rao, Ch V; Shirwaikar, A; Rawat, A K S; Pushpangadan, P

    2006-06-15

    Ethnobotanically, the bark of Anogeissus latifolia (Roxb. ex DC.) Wall. ex Guill. and Perr.(Combretaceae) has been reported to be used in the treatment of various disorders including stomach and skin diseases. We studied the antiulcer potential and antimicrobial activity of the 50% aqueous alcoholic extract in order to validate ethnobotanical claims regarding the plant use in the above-mentioned disorders. Gastroprotective potential of the Anogeissus latifolia extract (ALE) (100 and 200mg/kg/body weight) was studied on aspirin, cold-resistant stress (CRS), pylorus ligated (PL) and ethanol-induced ulcers. Status of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase along with lipid peroxidation (LPO) was also studied in CRS-induced ulcers. The results of the present study showed for the first time that the ALE possessed gastroprotective activity as evidenced by its significant inhibition in the formation of ulcers induced by physical and chemical agents with a maximum of 84.16% curation (200mg/kg body weight) in CRS-induced ulcers. ALE decreased LPO and SOD with concomitant increase in catalase activity in CRS-induced ulcers. Moderate antibacterial activity and antifungal activity was also observed. High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) showed the presence of gallic acid and ellagic acid (0.95%, w/w, 0.25%, w/w, respectively) in the plant. These findings could justify, at least partially, the inclusion of this plant in the management of gastric disorders in traditional medicine. PMID:16413714

  3. Zinc and copper in animal feed - development of resistance and co-resistance to antimicrobial agents in bacteria of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Rudi, Knut; Bernhoft, Aksel

    2014-01-01

    Farmed animals such as pig and poultry receive additional Zn and Cu in their diets due to supplementing elements in compound feed as well as medical remedies. Enteral bacteria in farmed animals are shown to develop resistance to trace elements such as Zn and Cu. Resistance to Zn is often linked with resistance to methicillin in staphylococci, and Zn supplementation to animal feed may increase the proportion of multiresistant E. coli in the gut. Resistance to Cu in bacteria, in particular enterococci, is often associated with resistance to antimicrobial drugs like macrolides and glycopeptides (e.g. vancomycin). Such resistant bacteria may be transferred from the food-producing animals to humans (farmers, veterinarians, and consumers). Data on dose-response relation for Zn/Cu exposure and resistance are lacking; however, it seems more likely that a resistance-driven effect occurs at high trace element exposure than at more basal exposure levels. There is also lack of data which could demonstrate whether Zn/Cu-resistant bacteria may acquire antibiotic resistance genes/become antibiotics resistant, or if antibiotics-resistant bacteria are more capable to become Zn/Cu resistant than antibiotics-susceptible bacteria. Further research is needed to elucidate the link between Zn/Cu and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. PMID:25317117

  4. One-pot three-component domino protocol for the synthesis of novel pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidines as antimicrobial and anti-biofilm agents.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Lingala; Poornachandra, Y; Kanakaraju, S; Ganesh Kumar, C; Chandramouli, G V P

    2015-07-14

    A simple and facile synthesis of a series of novel pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidines has been achieved successfully via the one-pot three-component reaction of 2-amino-7-methyl-5-oxo-4-phenyl-4,5-dihydropyrano[4,3-b]pyran-3-carbonitriles, DMF-DMA and arylamines in the presence of 1-butyl-3-methylhydrogensulphate [Bmim]HSO4 ionic liquid. This method has several advantages such as high yields, clean reaction, simple methodology and short reaction times. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative and different Candida strains. Among the derivatives screened, compounds 4c, 4d, 4h and 4l were found to be active against both bacterial and Candida strains with MIC values ranging from 3.9 to 31.2 ?g mL(-1). In addition, compound 4l showed a good minimum bactericidal concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration and anti-biofilm activities. Furthermore, the mode of the antifungal action for the promising compound 4l was evaluated in C. albicans MTCC 1637 through an ergosterol biosynthesis inhibition process. PMID:26054925

  5. Zinc and copper in animal feed – development of resistance and co-resistance to antimicrobial agents in bacteria of animal origin

    PubMed Central

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Rudi, Knut; Bernhoft, Aksel

    2014-01-01

    Farmed animals such as pig and poultry receive additional Zn and Cu in their diets due to supplementing elements in compound feed as well as medical remedies. Enteral bacteria in farmed animals are shown to develop resistance to trace elements such as Zn and Cu. Resistance to Zn is often linked with resistance to methicillin in staphylococci, and Zn supplementation to animal feed may increase the proportion of multiresistant E. coli in the gut. Resistance to Cu in bacteria, in particular enterococci, is often associated with resistance to antimicrobial drugs like macrolides and glycopeptides (e.g. vancomycin). Such resistant bacteria may be transferred from the food-producing animals to humans (farmers, veterinarians, and consumers). Data on dose-response relation for Zn/Cu exposure and resistance are lacking; however, it seems more likely that a resistance-driven effect occurs at high trace element exposure than at more basal exposure levels. There is also lack of data which could demonstrate whether Zn/Cu-resistant bacteria may acquire antibiotic resistance genes/become antibiotics resistant, or if antibiotics-resistant bacteria are more capable to become Zn/Cu resistant than antibiotics-susceptible bacteria. Further research is needed to elucidate the link between Zn/Cu and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. PMID:25317117

  6. Synthesis and characterization of some novel 1,2,4-triazoles, 1,3,4-thiadiazoles and Schiff bases incorporating imidazole moiety as potential antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Aouad, Mohamed Reda; Messali, Mouslim; Rezki, Nadjet; Ali, Adeeb Al-Sheikh; Lesimple, Alain

    2015-06-01

    (1,4,5-Triphenylimidazol-2-yl-thio)butyric acid hydrazide (3) was obtained via alkylation of 1,4,5-triphenylimidazol-2- thiol (1) with ethylbromobutyrate, followed by addition of hydrazine hydrate. Treatment of acid hydrazide 3 with carbon disulfide in an ethanolic potassium hydroxide solution gave the intermediate potassium dithiocarbazinate salt, which was cyclized to 4-amino-5-[(1,4,5-triphenylimidazol- -2-yl)thiopropyl]-2H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thione (4) in the presence of hydrazine hydrate. Condensation of compound 3 with alkyl/arylisothiocyanate afforded the corresponding 1-[4-(1,4,5-triphenylimidazol-2-ylthio)butanoyl]-4-alkyl/arylthiosemicarbazides (5-7), which upon refluxing with sodium hydroxide, yielded the corresponding 1,2,4-triazole - -3-thiols 8-10. Under acidic conditions, compounds 4-6 were converted to aminothiadiazoles 11-13. Moreover, the series of Schiff bases 14-18 were synthesized from the condensation of compound 3 with different aromatic aldehydes. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral analyses. They were also preliminarily screened for their antimicrobial activity. PMID:26011929

  7. In vitro assessment of N-(benzyl)chitosan derivatives against some plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Entsar I. Rabea; Mohamed E. I. Badawy; Walter Steurbaut; Christian V. Stevens

    2009-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi negatively affect a large number of important fruit and vegetables during the growing season and throughout postharvest storage. Therefore, the current study focuses on the preparation of N-(benzyl)chitosan derivatives as antimicrobial agents to control these microorganisms. Chitosan was reacted with a set of aromatic aldehydes by reductive amination involving formation of the corresponding imines, followed

  8. Isolation, DNA fingerprint analysis, and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria monocytogenes from various cabbage farms and packing sheds in Texas

    E-print Network

    Prazak, Ann Marie

    2001-01-01

    -one isolates from cabbage, environmental, and water samples were evaluated for antimicrobial resistance by the disk diffusion method. Ninety-five percent (20 of 21) of the isolates tested were resistant to two or more antimicrobial agents. This finding...

  9. Predicting the host range of Nystalea ebalea: secondary plant chemistry and host selection by a surrogate biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The safety of weed biological control depends upon the selection and utilization of the target weed by the agent while causing minimal harm to non-target species. Selection of weed species by biological control agents is determined by the presence of behavioral cues, generally host secondary plant c...

  10. In-vitro cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activities, against clinical isolates of Campylobacter species and Entamoeba histolytica, of local medicinal plants from the Venda region, in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Samie, A; Obi, C L; Lall, N; Meyer, J J M

    2009-03-01

    In the quest for alternative treatments against Campylobacter jejuni and Entamoeba histolytica, which are both aetiological agents of diarrhoea world-wide, the in-vitro activities against the two pathogens of extracts of 18 South African medicinal plants have recently been assessed. Forty extracts from the 18 plant species were prepared and tested against 110 clinical isolates of Campylobacter spp. In addition, extracts from eight of the plant species were tested against a standard strain (HM-1:IMSS) of E. histolytica, and the cytotoxicity of each of 19 extracts from 15 of the plant species was explored using Vero cell cultures and microdilution assays. At least one extract of each plant species investigated was found to be active against some of the Campylobacter isolates. Extracts of Lippia javanica and Pterocarpus angolensis had the highest antibacterial activity, each giving a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 90 microg/ml. Of the extracts tested against E. histolytica, however, only those of P. angolensis and Syzigium cordatum were found to have anti-amoebic activity, with MIC of 1.2 and 7.5 mg/ml, respectively. Although most of the extracts showed little toxicity against Vero cells, with most of the median inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) recorded exceeding 400 microg/ml, an extract of Bauhinia galpini was quite toxic, with an IC(50) of just 2.7 microg/ml. Acetone and methanol extracts of several of the plants show promise as templates for the design of new anti-diarrhoeal therapies. PMID:19208300

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Tigecycline (GAR936), Daptomycin, and Comparative Antimicrobial Agents against Glycopeptide-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus and Other Resistant Gram-Positive Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. Petersen; Patricia A. Bradford; William J. Weiss; Timothy M. Murphy; P. E. Sum; Steven J. Projan

    2002-01-01

    Tigecycline (GAR-936) and daptomycin are potent antibacterial compounds in advanced stages of clinical trials. These novel agents target multiply resistant pathogenic bacteria. Daptomycin is principally active against gram-positive bacteria, while tigecycline has broad-spectrum activity. When tested by the standard protocols of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards in Mueller-Hinton broth II, tigecycline was more active than daptomycin (MICs at

  12. An Investigation of Two Modes of Plant Protection by the Biocontrol Agent Trichoderma virens 

    E-print Network

    Crutcher, Frankie

    2012-02-14

    The biocontrol fungus Trichoderma virens is an avirulent symbiont with the ability to control plant disease by the production of antibiotic compounds, induction of plant resistance to pathogens, and mycoparasitism of other ...

  13. Identification of viral and phytoplasmal agents responsible for diseases affecting plants of Gaillardia Foug. in Lithuania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gaillardia plants exhibiting symptoms characteristic of viral and phytoplasmal diseases were collected at botanical gardens and floriculture farms in Lithuania. Cucumber mosaic virus was isolated from diseased plants exhibiting symptoms characterized stunting, color breaking and malformation of flo...

  14. Phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolated from dairy cows with mastitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Velusamy Srinivasan; Barbara E. Gillespie; Mark J. Lewis; Lien T. Nguyen; Susan I. Headrick; Ynte H. Schukken; Stephen P. Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, susceptibility to 26 antimicrobial agents used in veterinary and human medicine, and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes of Escherichia coli isolated from cows with mastitis were evaluated. Among 135 E. coli isolates, PFGE analysis revealed 85 different genetic patterns. All E. coli were resistant to two or more antimicrobials in different combinations. Most E.

  15. Anti-microbial peptides for plaque control and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Katherine; Chen, Ping; Leung, Kai P

    2009-11-01

    Anti-microbial peptides perform many functions in the oral cavity. They may provide protection against microbial pathogens, assist in oral biofilm control, and function as an important part of the innate immune system in response to local and systemic infection. Synthetic versions of these peptides may be useful to supplement natural anti-microbial peptides or as therapeutic agents. PMID:19998654

  16. Antimicrobial resistance of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolated from swine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michele Vanni; Marianna Merenda; Giuseppe Barigazzi; Chiara Garbarino; Andrea Luppi; Rosalba Tognetti; Luigi Intorre

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance rates and the trend in resistance of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolated from pigs in Italy from 1994 to 2009. A total of 992 A. pleuropneumoniae isolates were tested for their susceptibility to a panel of antimicrobial agents in a disk diffusion method. Resistance to 7 drugs (amoxicillin, amoxicillin\\/clavulanic acid,

  17. Field experiments to evaluate host plant specificity of prospective agents of Onopordum acanthium in Bulgaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scotch thistle, Onopordum acanthium, is an invasive alien weed in North America that originates from Europe. Previous field observations in Bulgaria have confirmed the presence of prospective biological control agents including Cassida rubiginosa, Chaetostomella cylindrica, Eublemma amoena, Larinus ...

  18. Rapid 'one-pot' synthesis of a novel benzimidazole-5-carboxylate and its hydrazone derivatives as potential anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Vasantha, Kumar; Basavarajaswamy, Guru; Vaishali Rai, M; Boja, Poojary; Pai, Vinitha R; Shruthi, N; Bhat, Mahima

    2015-04-01

    A novel series of N-arylidene-2-(2,4-dichloro phenyl)-1-propyl-1H-benzo[d] imidazole-5-carbohydrazides having different substitution on the arylidene part were synthesized in good yield. The core nucleus benzimidazole-5-carboxylate (5) was efficiently synthesized by 'one-pot' nitro reductive cyclization reaction between ethyl-3-nitro-4-(propylamino)benzoate and 2,4-dichlorobenzaldehyde using sodium dithionite in dimethylsulfoxide. This 'one-pot' reaction was proceeded very smoothly, in short reaction time with an excellent yield. All the compounds (7a-r) were screened for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and in vitro antimicrobial activity. Most of the compounds exhibited remarkable paw-edema inhibition in the initial one hour of administration indicating the higher potentiality of these molecules. In particular, compounds 7a, 7d, 7f and 7g displayed a high level of carrageenan-induced paw edema inhibition compared to that of indomethacin. Compound 7p exhibited very good antibacterial activity and antifungal activity with a MIC of 3.12 ?g/mL against most of the tested organisms. Furthermore, compounds 7d, 7f, 7h and 7p found to be good inhibitors of Aspergillus niger with MIC of 3.12 ?g/mL. Cytotoxicity of the potent compounds 7d, 7f and 7p was checked using MDA MB-231 breast cancer cell line and are found to be non toxic at the highest concentration used (i.e., 10 ?g/mL). PMID:25765910

  19. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of guanylhydrazones. Synthesis of 2-(2-methylthio-2-aminovinyl)-1-methylpyridinium iodides and 2-(2-methylthio-2-aminovinyl)-1-methylquinolinium iodides as potential radioprotective and anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Almassian, B.

    1985-01-01

    The finding of appreciable antileukemic activity in a series of 2-(2-methylthio-2-amino)vinyl-1-methylquinolinium iodides (Foye et al., 1980, 1983) suggested that greater basicity, as compared with the corresponding dithioacetic acids, was contributing to the increase in activity. The addition of a greater degree of basicity in the design of anticancer possibilities in this series was considered worth investigation, particularly in view of the activity of a series of bis(quanylhydrazones) synthesized at Lederle Laboratories. Accordingly, a series of guanylhydrazones of 4-pyridine-,2-pyridine- and 4-quinolinecarboxyaldehydes was synthesized for anticancer as well as antibacterial screening. Also, substitution of additional basic functions in the 2-(2-methylthio-2-amino) vinyl-1-methylquinolinium and pyridinium iodide series has been made. Appreciable antimicrobial activities have been found with both 2-pyridine and 4-quinolinealdehyde guanylhydrazones, as well as with 2-(2-methylthio-2-amino)vinyl-1-methyl-pyridinium iodides. The overall approach to the synthesis of potential anticancer agents in this project is thus to observe the effect of increasing basicity of these compounds on DNA binding and anticancer activity.

  20. Impact of formulary restriction with prior authorization by an antimicrobial stewardship program

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Erica E.; Stevenson, Kurt B.; West, Jessica E.; Bauer, Karri A.; Goff, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance and few antimicrobials in the developmental pipeline, many institutions have developed antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) to help implement evidence-based (EB) strategies for ensuring appropriate utilization of these agents. EB strategies for accomplishing this include formulary restriction with prior authorization. Potential limitations to this particular strategy include delays in therapy, prescriber pushback, and unintended increases in use of un-restricted antimicrobials; however, our ASP found that implementing prior authorization for select antimicrobials along with making a significant effort to educate clinicians on criteria for use ensured more appropriate prescribing of these agents, hopefully helping to preserve their utility for years to come. PMID:23154323

  1. Controversies in Antimicrobial Stewardship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graeme N. Forrest

    \\u000a Antimicrobial stewardship programs are ­recommended by the Infectious Diseases Society of America as a method to control antimicrobial\\u000a costs and resistance. These programs are usually implemented hospital wide, but there is little evidence on their effects\\u000a in oncology units. Three controversial areas of antimicrobial stewardship in oncology units include whether these programs\\u000a decrease antimicrobial resistance when antimicrobial restriction is implemented,

  2. SENSIBILIDAD A LOS AGENTES ANTIMICROBIANOS DE ALGUNOS PATÓGENOS MASTITOGÉNICOS AISLADOS DE LECHE DE CUARTOS DE BOVINOS MESTIZOS DOBLE PROPÓSITO Sensitivity to antimicrobials Agents of Some Mastitogenic Pathogens Isolated from Milk Quarters of Dual Purpose Bovines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José F. Faría Reyes; Kutchynskaya Valero-Leal; Gerardo DPool; Aleida García Urdaneta; María Allara Cagnasso

    2005-01-01

    To determine sensitivity of mastitogenic pathogens to antimi- crobial agents, 158 samples were recollected from milk quar- ters of dual purpose bovines in four (4) farms of Zulia state, Venezuela. Samples were analyzed to determine presence of antibiotics by using the Delvotest® SP. The bacterial culture isolations were made following the National Mastitis Council procedures. Sensitivity was determined by Kirby-Bauer

  3. Plant extracts, isolated phytochemicals, and plant-derived agents which are lethal to arthropod vectors of human tropical diseases--a review.

    PubMed

    Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Rezende, Alex Ribeiro; Lopes Baldin, Edson Luiz; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Neto, Valter Ferreira de Andrade

    2011-04-01

    The recent scientific literature on plant-derived agents with potential or effective use in the control of the arthropod vectors of human tropical diseases is reviewed. Arthropod-borne tropical diseases include: amebiasis, Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), cholera, cryptosporidiosis, dengue (hemorrhagic fever), epidemic typhus (Brill-Zinsser disease), filariasis (elephantiasis), giardia (giardiasis), human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), isosporiasis, leishmaniasis, Lyme disease (lyme borreliosis), malaria, onchocerciasis, plague, recurrent fever, sarcocystosis, scabies (mites as causal agents), spotted fever, toxoplasmosis, West Nile fever, and yellow fever. Thus, coverage was given to work describing plant-derived extracts, essential oils (EOs), and isolated chemicals with toxic or noxious effects on filth bugs (mechanical vectors), such as common houseflies (Musca domestica Linnaeus), American and German cockroaches (Periplaneta americana Linnaeus, Blatella germanica Linnaeus), and oriental latrine/blowflies (Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius) as well as biting, blood-sucking arthropods such as blackflies (Simulium Latreille spp.), fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis Rothschild), kissing bugs (Rhodnius Stĺl spp., Triatoma infestans Klug), body and head lice (Pediculus humanus humanus Linnaeus, P. humanus capitis De Geer), mosquitoes (Aedes Meigen, Anopheles Meigen, Culex L., and Ochlerotatus Lynch Arribálzaga spp.), sandflies (Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz & Neiva, Phlebotomus Loew spp.), scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei De Geer, S. scabiei var hominis, S. scabiei var canis, S. scabiei var suis), and ticks (Ixodes Latreille, Amblyomma Koch, Dermacentor Koch, and Rhipicephalus Koch spp.). Examples of plant extracts, EOs, and isolated chemicals exhibiting noxious or toxic activity comparable or superior to the synthetic control agents of choice (pyrethroids, organophosphorous compounds, etc.) are provided in the text for many arthropod vectors of tropical diseases. PMID:21432748

  4. Comparison of antimicrobial activity of essential oils, plant extracts and methylparaben in cosmetic emulsions: 2 months study.

    PubMed

    Herman, Anna

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the preservative effectiveness of plant extracts (Matricaria chamomilla, Aloe vera, Calendula officinalis) and essential oils (Lavandulla officinalis, Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum zeylanicum) with methylparaben in cosmetic emulsions against skin microflora during 2 months of application by volunteers. Cosmetic emulsions with extracts (2.5 %), essential oils (2.5 %), methylparaben (0.4 %) or placebo were tested by 40 volunteers during 2 months of treatment. In order to determine microbial purity of the emulsions, the samples were taken after 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of application. Throughout the trial period it was revealed that only cinnamon oil completely inhibited the growth of bacteria, yeast and mould, as compared to all other essential oils, plant extracts and methylparaben in the tested emulsions. This result shows that cinnamon oil could successfully replace the use of methylparaben in cosmetics, at the same time ensuring microbiological purity of a cosmetic product under its in-use and storage conditions. PMID:24891745

  5. Soils as agents of selection: feedbacks between plants and soils alter seedling survival and performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clara C. PregitzerJoseph; Joseph K. Bailey; Stephen C. Hart; Jennifer A. Schweitzer

    2010-01-01

    Soils are one of the first selective environments a seed experiences and yet little is known about the evolutionary consequences\\u000a of plant-soil feedbacks. We have previously found that plant phytochemical traits in a model system, Populus spp., influence rates of leaf litter decay, soil microbial communities and rates of soil net nitrogen mineralization. Utilizing\\u000a this natural variation in plant-soil linkages

  6. Survey of antimicrobial effects of beef carcass intervention treatments in very small state-inspected slaughter plants.

    PubMed

    Algino, R J; Ingham, S C; Zhu, J

    2007-06-01

    U.S. beef slaughter facilities are required to use a carcass intervention treatment to reduce contamination by Escherichia coli O157:H7. Very small beef slaughter operators generally are unable to carry out challenge studies to validate intervention treatment effectiveness, and in-plant pathogen challenge studies are not permitted. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness, measured by decreases in generic E. coli, coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and aerobic plate count, of intervention treatments used at very small beef slaughter facilities in Wisconsin. Over a 9-mo period, 265 head of beef were sampled at 22 very small beef slaughter facilities before and after the intervention treatment. The interventions studied were dry-aging, low-pressure hot-water spray, high-pressure hot-water spray, 2.5% acetic acid spray, and Fresh Bloomtrade mark (a mix of citric acid, ascorbic acid, and erythorbic acid) spray. Sprays were applied using a hand-held nozzle (hot water) or a pump-type sprayer (acid). There was no significant difference (P > 0.10) between intervention treatments and all treatments caused significant reductions (P < 0.10) in indicator organisms. Ranges in average reductions for generic E. coli, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae among the treatments were 0.6 to 2.0 log CFU/cm(2), 0.7 to 2.2 log CFU/cm(2), and 0.4 to 2.2 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. For all treatments, rapid decreases in cooler temperature and relative humidity significantly affected indicator reduction, and for hot-water washing, increasing spray time led to significantly greater reductions. Further studies using actual or simulated very-small-plant intervention treatments directly against E. coli O157:H7 would provide additional validation of treatment efficacy. PMID:17995740

  7. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity of the lichens Cladonia furcata, Lecanora atra and Lecanora muralis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity of the acetone extracts of the lichens Cladonia furcata, Lecanora atra and Lecanora muralis. Methods Antioxidant activity was evaluated by five separate methods: free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power, determination of total phenolic compounds and determination of total flavonoid content. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method against six species of bacteria and ten species of fungi. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using MTT method. Results Of the lichens tested, Lecanora atra had largest free radical scavenging activity (94.7% inhibition), which was greater than the standard antioxidants. Moreover, the tested extracts had effective reducing power and superoxide anion radical scavenging. The strong relationships between total phenolic and flavonoid contents and the antioxidant effect of tested extracts were observed. Extract of Cladonia furcata was the most active antimicrobial agent with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.78 to 25 mg/mL. All extracts were found to be strong anticancer activity toward both cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 8.51 to 40.22 ?g/mL. Conclusions The present study shows that tested lichen extracts demonstrated a strong antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer effects. That suggest that lichens may be used as as possible natural antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer agents to control various human, animal and plant diseases. PMID:22013953

  8. Antimicrobial silver: An unprecedented anion effect

    PubMed Central

    Swathy, J. R.; Sankar, M. Udhaya; Chaudhary, Amrita; Aigal, Sahaja; Anshup; Pradeep, T.

    2014-01-01

    Silver is an indispensable metal but its use has to be minimised for sustainable growth. Much of the silver lost during use is unrecoverable; an example being its use as an antimicrobial agent, a property known since ages. While developing methods to create an affordable drinking water purifier especially for the developing world, we discovered that 50 parts per billion (ppb) of Ag+ released continuously from silver nanoparticles confined in nanoscale cages is enough to cause antimicrobial activity in conditions of normal water. Here we show that the antibacterial and antiviral activities of Ag+ can be enhanced ~1,000 fold, selectively, in presence of carbonate ions whose concentration was maintained below the drinking water norms. The protective layers of the organisms were affected during the carbonate-assisted antimicrobial activity. It is estimated that ~1,300 tons of silver can be saved annually using this new way to enhance its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25418185

  9. ANTIMICROBIAL EFFECT OF INTRACANAL SUBSTANCES

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Cláudia de Moura; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Lage-Marques, José Luiz

    2007-01-01

    In some situations, endodontic infections do not respond to therapeutic protocol. In these cases, it is suggested the administration of an alternative intracanal medication that presents a wide spectrum of action and has an in-depth effect on the root canal system. The purpose of this study was to assess the antimicrobial action of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and polyethylene glycol and natrosol vehicles with different associations and concentrations. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by using the agar dilution method. The culture media (Müller-Hinton agar) were prepared containing antimicrobial agents at multiple two-fold dilutions of 0.25 to 16 µg/mL, and with the vehicles at the concentrations of 50, 45, 40, 35, 30 and 25%. Twenty-three microbial strains were selected for the study. Metronidazole was not capable of eliminating any of the tested microorganisms. The association of ciprofloxacin with metronidazole resulted in a reduction of the MIC. The vehicle polyethylene glycol inhibited the growth of 100% of the tested strains, while natrosol inhibited 18% of the strains. Ciprofloxacin formulations with polyethylene glycol presented better effects than those of formulations to which metronidazole was added. It was possible to conclude that ciprofloxacin presented antimicrobial action against all tested bacterial strains, and its association with metronidazole was synergic. The vehicle polyethylene glycol showed antimicrobial effect and the ciprofloxacin/polyethylene glycol association was the most effective combination for reducing the tested bacteria and yeasts. PMID:19089178

  10. Defensins: antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Tomas

    2003-09-01

    The production of natural antibiotic peptides has emerged as an important mechanism of innate immunity in plants and animals. Defensins are diverse members of a large family of antimicrobial peptides, contributing to the antimicrobial action of granulocytes, mucosal host defence in the small intestine and epithelial host defence in the skin and elsewhere. This review, inspired by a spate of recent studies of defensins in human diseases and animal models, focuses on the biological function of defensins. PMID:12949495

  11. Bacterial biofilm formation inhibitory activity revealed for plant derived natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Artini, M; Papa, R; Barbato, G; Scoarughi, G L; Cellini, A; Morazzoni, P; Bombardelli, E; Selan, L

    2012-01-15

    Use of herbal plant remedies to treat infectious diseases is a common practice in many countries in traditional and alternative medicine. However to date there are only few antimicrobial agents derived from botanics. Based on microbiological screening tests of crude plant extracts we identified four compounds derived from Krameria, Aesculus hippocastanum and Chelidonium majus that showed a potentially interesting antimicrobial activity. In this work we present an in depth characterization of the inhibition activity of these pure compounds on the formation of biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus as well as of Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. We show that two of these compounds possess interesting potential to become active principles of new drugs. PMID:22182580

  12. Identification of 1-[4-Benzyloxyphenyl)-but-3-enyl]-1H-azoles as New Class of Antitubercular and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A series of 1-[(4-benzyloxyphenyl)-but-3-enyl]-1H-azoles has been identified as potent antitubercular agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Synthesis of compounds involved acid catalyzed ring-opening of cyclopropyl ring of phenyl cyclopropyl methanols followed by nucleophilic attack of the azoles on the carbocation intermediates. Several of the compounds 26, 34, and 36 exhibited significant antitubercular activities with MIC value as low as 1.56, 1.56, and 0.61 ?g/mL, respectively, comparable to many standard drugs. These compounds were also screened against other strains of bacteria and fungi, and few of them showed good antifungal activity against A. fumigatus, responsible for lung infection. PMID:24900592

  13. Using rapid diagnostic tests to optimize antimicrobial selection in antimicrobial stewardship programs.

    PubMed

    Goff, Debra A; Jankowski, Christopher; Tenover, Fred C

    2012-08-01

    New advances in rapid diagnostic tests provide several collaborative opportunities for stewardship teams, particularly in processes where delay in the initiation of appropriate therapy has significant consequences for patient outcomes. Rapid molecular tests enhance one of the key functions of microbiology laboratories, which is to produce accurate organism identification and timely antimicrobial susceptibility testing data. These data are used to guide the choice of antimicrobial agents for treating infections in individual patients, and the aggregate data (i.e., hospital's antibiogram) are used to guide empiric therapy for infections before the availability of the patient's culture results and antimicrobial susceptibility testing data. In addition, accurate antimicrobial susceptibility testing data are critical for the overall success of a health care institution's antimicrobial stewardship program. Tests that provide accurate organism identification and antimicrobial susceptibility not only benefit the individual patient but also increase the effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship programs. This review focuses on the use of molecular diagnostic methods to rapidly identify Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus faecalis,Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli,Klebsiella pneumoniae,Pseudomonas aeruginosa,Clostridium difficile, and Candida species from clinical samples and summarizes studies that describe the application of rapid diagnostic tests in antimicrobial stewardship programs. PMID:23307517

  14. Screening of Antimicrobial Agents for In Vitro Radiation Protection and Mitigation Capacity, Including those Used in Supportive Care Regimens for Bone Marrow Transplant Recipients*

    PubMed Central

    Epperly, Michael W.; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Rwigema, Jean-Claude; Stone, Brandon; Zhang, Xichen; McBride, William; Georges, George; Wipf, Peter; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic and antifungal agents used in supportive care regimens for bone marrow transplantation recipients contribute to a significant dose-modifying effect of otherwise lethal total body irradiation. To determine whether drugs used in supportive care and other commonly used antibiotics such as tetracycline function as radiation protectors or damage mitigators in vitro, 13 drugs were tested for radiation protection and radiation damage mitigation of 32D cl 3 hematopoietic progenitor cells in clonagenic survival curves in vitro. Antibiotic/Antifungal agents including cilastatin, amikacin, ceftazidine, vancomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, methacycline, minocycline, meclocycline, oxytetracycline and rolitetracycline were added in 1, 10, or 100 micromolar concentrations to murine interleukin-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line 32D cl 3 cells either before or after irradiation of 0 to 8 Gy. Control irradiated 32D cl 3 cells showed radiosensitivity comparable to freshly explanted mouse marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells (D0 1.1±0.1 Gy, Ń1.5±0.4). Positive control GS-nitroxide JP4-039 (known radiation mitigator) treated 32D cl 3 cells were radioresistant (D0 1.2±0.1, Ń5.8±2.4 (p=0.009)). Of the 13 drugs tested, tetracycline was found to be a significant radiation mitigator (D0 0.9±0.1, N13.9±0.4 (p=0.0027)). Thus, the radiation dose-modifying effect of some antibiotics, but not those currently used in the supportive care (antibiotic/antifungal regimens) for marrow transplant patients, may act as radiation damage mitigators for hematopoietic cells as well as decreasing the growth and inflammatory response to microbial pathogens. PMID:20133970

  15. Screening of antifungal agents using ethanol precipitation and bioautography of medicinal and food plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gracilene Schmourlo; Ricardo R. Mendonça-Filho; Celuta Sales Alviano; Sônia S. Costa

    2005-01-01

    In the search for bioactive compounds, bioautography and ethanol precipitation of macromolecules (proteins, polysaccharides, etc.) of plant aqueous extracts were associated in an antifungal screening. Thus, the supernatants, precipitates (obtained by ethanol precipitation) and aqueous extracts were investigated of medicinal and fruit bearing plants used against skin diseases by the Brazilian population. The agar diffusion and broth dilution methods were

  16. Algal bioaccumulation of triclocarban, triclosan, and methyl-triclosan in a North Texas wastewater treatment plant receiving stream

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melinda A. Coogan; Regina E. Edziyie; Barney J. Venables

    2007-01-01

    Algae comprise the greatest abundance of plant biomass in aquatic environments and are a logical choice for aquatic toxicological studies, yet have been underutilized in this capacity. The lipid content of many algal species provides a point of entry for trophic transfer of lipophilic organic contaminants. Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC), widely used antimicrobial agents found in numerous consumer products,

  17. Antimicrobial spectrum of activity for meropenem and nine broad spectrum antimicrobials: report from the MYSTIC Program (2002) in North America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R Rhomberg; Ronald N Jones

    2003-01-01

    The Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC) Program provides susceptibility data for participating medical centers where carbapenems are utilized. The activity of meropenem and nine broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents were assessed against 3,047 bacterial isolates collected during 2002 from 16 North American sites. The overall rank order of susceptibility of the 10 antimicrobial agents tested against Gram-negative isolates was: meropenem

  18. Robust diagnosis of nuclear plant anomalies through multiple neuro-agent cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, M.; Furukawa, H.; Sakuma, M.; Kozma, R. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Washio, T.

    1994-12-31

    The advantages of implementing diversity in the form of multiple neuro-agents has been demonstrated through numerical experiments. As expected, diagnostic performance was robust despite noise distortion and sensor faults. The results validate our claim that combining multiple and diverse perspectives is indeed beneficial for dependable diagnoses under complicated abnormal conditions with possible sensor faults.

  19. Update on antimicrobial resistance in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Qiong, Gao; Haihui, Huang

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea. Since 2002, the morbidity and mortality rates of C. difficile infection have increased dramatically in Europe and North America. The emergence of C. difficile strains that are resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents can complicate prevention programs and potential treatment. Although most clinical isolates are still susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin, heteroresistance to metronidazole and increasing vancomycin MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) have been reported. The prevalence of resistance to other antimicrobial agents, including erythromycin and moxifloxacin, is highly variable in different countries and regions. The exact mechanism of reduced susceptibility to metronidazole or vancomycin is still not clear. The principal mechanism of erythromycin, fluoroquinolones and rifamycins resistance in C. difficile is determined by target alterations. This review will focus primarily on the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and resistance mechanisms of C. difficile in order to provide an up-to-date review on the topic. PMID:25998434

  20. Increasing survival and efficacy of a bacterial biocontrol agent of fire blight of rosaceous plants by means of osmoadaptation.

    PubMed

    Bonaterra, Anna; Cabrefiga, Jordi; Camps, Jaume; Montesinos, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    The efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens EPS62e in the biocontrol of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight of apple and pear, depends on the colonization of plant surfaces after spray application. A procedure to increase cell survival in the phyllosphere was developed consisting of saline stress and osmolyte amendment to the growth medium during inoculum preparation. Hyperosmotic stress induced the synthesis of the osmolytes trehalose, N-acetylglutaminylglutamine amide and glucosyl-glycerol, but decreasing growth rate. Amendment of the growth medium with glycine betaine increased growth rate and cell yield and promoted its intracellular accumulation. Under controlled environment conditions, osmoadaptation increased by 10- to 100-fold cell survival to desiccation and to low relative humidity conditions on plant surfaces, in comparison with the nonosmoadapted controls. In the field, cell survival increased 100-1000 times in immature fruit upon osmoadaptation but was not significantly affected in flowers where active colonization occurs. The efficacy in the control of fire blight infections was increased 30-50% upon osmoadaptation on immature fruits but was not affected in blossoms. The method of osmoadaptation may be useful for improving the fitness and efficacy of biological control agents of phyllosphere pathogens under limiting humidity conditions. PMID:17391328

  1. Studies of plant colonisation by closely related Bacillus amyloliquefaciens biocontrol agents using strain specific quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna H; Bejai, Sarosh; Niazi, Adnan; Manzoor, Shahid; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Meijer, Johan

    2014-12-01

    Certain strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens can colonize plants and improve growth and stress management. In order to study these effects, bacterial growth dynamics on plants and in the rhizosphere are of interest calling for specific analytical tools. For that purpose, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were developed in order to differentiate among three closely related B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains (UCMB5033, UCMB5036, UCMB5113) and to determine their levels with high accuracy. Oligonucleotide primers were designed for strain unique gene sequences and used for SYBR green based qPCR analysis. Standard curves covered a wide linear range (10(6)) of DNA amounts with the lowest detection level at 50 fg. Post-reaction melting curve analysis showed only a single product. Accurate threshold cycles were obtained, even in the presence of high excess of related Bacillus strains and total bacterial DNA from soil. Analysis of Bacillus colonisation after seed treatment of two oilseed rape cultivars (Oase and Ritz) grown on agar support showed a time dependent effect but that the bacteria mostly were found on root tissues and little on green tissues. The colonisation on plants grown in soil varied among the Bacillus strains where Oase seemed to house more bacteria than Ritz. Applied as a mixture, all three Bacillus strains co-existed on the roots of plants grown in soil. The qPCR assay in combination with other techniques will be a powerful tool to study plant interactions of these B. amyloliquefaciens biocontrol agents to further understand the requirements for successful interactions and improvement of plant properties. PMID:25294724

  2. Laboratory and field experimental evaluation of host plant specificity of Aceria solstitialis, a prospective biological control agent of yellow starthistle.

    PubMed

    Stoeva, Atanaska; Harizanova, Vili; de Lillo, Enrico; Cristofaro, Massimo; Smith, Lincoln

    2012-01-01

    Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle, Asteraceae) is an invasive annual weed in the western USA that is native to the Mediterranean Region and is a target for classical biological control. Aceria solstitialis is an eriophyid mite that has been found exclusively in association with Ce. solstitialis in Italy, Greece, Turkey and Bulgaria. The mite feeds on leaf tissue and damages bolting plants, causing stunting, witch's broom and incomplete flower development. Field experiments and laboratory no-choice and two-way choice experiments were conducted to assess host plant specificity of the mite in Bulgaria. Mites showed the highest degree of host specificity in the field and lowest in the no-choice experiments. In the field, highest densities of mites occurred on Ce. solstitialis and Ce. cyanus (bachelor's button), and either no mites or trace numbers occurred on the other test plants: Ce. diffusa (diffuse knapweed), Carthamus tinctorius (safflower) and Cynara scolymus (artichoke). In no-choice experiments, mites persisted for 60 days on Ce. diffusa, Ce. cyanus, Ce. solstitialis, Ca. tinctorius and Cy. scolymus, whereas in two-way choice experiments mites persisted on 25% of Cy. scolymus plants for 60 days and did not persist on Ca. tinctorius beyond 40 days. The eight other species of plants that were tested in the laboratory were less suitable for the mite. These results suggest that although A. solstitialis can persist on some nontarget plants for as long as 60 days in the laboratory, it appears to be much more specific under natural conditions, and warrants further evaluation as a prospective biological control agent. PMID:22012302

  3. Trends in antimicrobial susceptibility in UK centres: the MYSTIC Programme (1997–2002)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert G. Masterton; Philip J. Turner

    2006-01-01

    Trends in antimicrobial susceptibilities in three UK centres participating in the MYSTIC Programme were examined from 1997 to 2002. Isolates were tested using standard methodology to determine the susceptibility breakpoints of meropenem and several other antimicrobial agents including imipenem, ceftazidime, piperacillin\\/tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. Data are grouped in 2-year blocks. The carbapenems were the most active agents tested against the

  4. In Vitro Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Bacterial Enteropathogens Causing Traveler's Diarrhea in Four Geographic Regions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HARUMI GOMI; ZHI-DONG JIANG; JAVIER A. ADACHI; DAVID ASHLEY; BRETT LOWE; MANGALA P. VERENKAR; ROBERT STEFFEN; HERBERT L. DUPONT

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of resistant enteropathogens has been reported worldwide. Few data are available on the contemporary in vitro activities of commonly used antimicrobial agents against enteropathogens causing trav- eler's diarrhea (TD). The susceptibility patterns of antimicrobial agents currently available or under evalua- tion against pathogens causing TD in four different areas of the world were evaluated. Pathogens were iden- tified

  5. Screening for antibacterial activity of some Turkish plants against fish pathogens: a possible alternative in the treatment of bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Turker, Hakan; Y?ld?r?m, Arzu Birinci

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of ethanolic and aqueous crude extracts from 36 plants in Turkey, including seven endemic species, against fish pathogens was studied using the disc diffusion assay. The extract that was most active against all microbial strains, except Aeromonas salmonicida, was that of Dorycnium pentaphyllum. Some of the extracts also showed a very broad spectrum of potent antimicrobial activity. The extract of Anemone nemorosa showed the highest antimicrobial activity against Vibrio anguillarum. V. anguillarum, a Gram-negative bacterium, appeared to be the most susceptible to the plant extracts used in this experiment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of 11 of the studied plants. The preliminary screening assay indicated that some of the Turkish plants with antibacterial properties may offer alternative therapeutic agents against bacterial infections in aquaculture industry. PMID:26019642

  6. The Potential of Thiarubrine C as a Nematicidal Agent against Plant- parasitic Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Deviala, S; Brodie, B B; Rodriguez, E; Gibson, D M

    1998-06-01

    Thiarubrine C, a polyacetylenic 1,2-dithiin isolated from the roots of Rudbeckia hirta (Asteraceae), exhibited strong nematicidal activity in in vitro and growth chamber assays. Thiarubrine C was toxic, in the absence of light, to the plant-parasitic nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and Pratylenchus penetrans at LCs of 12.4 ppm and 23.5 ppm, respectively. A minimum exposure time between 12 and 24 hours was the critical period for nematode mortality due to thiarubrine C. Although thiarubrine C was not totally dependent on light for toxicity, activity was enhanced in the presence of light, especially with the microbivorous nematode, Teratorhabditis dentifera. Upon exposure of M. incognita juveniles to 20 ppm thiarubrine C for 1 hour, infection of tomato plants was greatly reduced compared to untreated checks. Thiarubrine C was also effective in reducing plant infection when mixed with soil 24 hours prior to or at planting, unlike other related compounds such as delta-terthienyl. PMID:19274210

  7. The Potential of Thiarubrine C as a Nematicidal Agent against Plant- parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez deViala, Susanna; Brodie, Bill B.; Rodriguez, Eloy; Gibson, Donna M.

    1998-01-01

    Thiarubrine C, a polyacetylenic 1,2-dithiin isolated from the roots of Rudbeckia hirta (Asteraceae), exhibited strong nematicidal activity in in vitro and growth chamber assays. Thiarubrine C was toxic, in the absence of light, to the plant-parasitic nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and Pratylenchus penetrans at LC??s of 12.4 ppm and 23.5 ppm, respectively. A minimum exposure time between 12 and 24 hours was the critical period for nematode mortality due to thiarubrine C. Although thiarubrine C was not totally dependent on light for toxicity, activity was enhanced in the presence of light, especially with the microbivorous nematode, Teratorhabditis dentifera. Upon exposure of M. incognita juveniles to 20 ppm thiarubrine C for 1 hour, infection of tomato plants was greatly reduced compared to untreated checks. Thiarubrine C was also effective in reducing plant infection when mixed with soil 24 hours prior to or at planting, unlike other related compounds such as ?-terthienyl. PMID:19274210

  8. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Falla, Timothy J

    2006-04-01

    A significant component of the innate immune system of a wide variety of animals and plants is arbitrated by cationic host defence peptides. In man, these peptides, in addition to exhibiting a direct antimicrobial activity, seems to provide a range of non-antimicrobial bioactivities related to defence, inflammation and wound healing. Despite the fact that such peptides have so far failed to reach the market, there are continued initiatives to advance such potential therapeutics to, and through, the clinic. The reasons behind such initiatives include: reduced manufacturing costs for peptides; allowing entry into therapeutic areas previously inaccessible due to cost; the continued identification of previously unknown bioactivities of such peptides; and the resurgence of interest in peptide therapeutics. As a result, clinical programmes based on cationic host defence peptides exist in the areas of infection, dermatology, cancer and inflammation. The probability of clinical success for host defence peptide-based therapeutics is on the rise as options for a wider range of clinical indications emerge. PMID:16556083

  9. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of tea infusions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Pilar Almajano; Rosa Carbó; J. Angel López Jiménez; Michael H. Gordon

    2008-01-01

    Tea polyphenols, especially the catechins, are potent antimicrobial and antioxidant agents, with positive effects on human health. White tea is one of the less studied teas but the flavour is more accepted than that of green tea in Europe. The concentrations of various catechins in 13 different kinds of infusion were determined by capillary electrophoresis. The total polyphenol content (Folin–Ciocalteu

  10. Current Status of Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Po-Ren Hsueh; Cheng-Yi Liu; Kwen-Tay Luh

    2002-01-01

    While some trends in antimicrobial resistance rates are universal, others appear to be unique for specific regions. In Taiwan, the strikingly high prevalence of resistance to macrolides and streptogramin in clinical isolates of gram-positive bacteria correlates with the widespread use of these agents in the medical and farming communities, respectively. The relatively low rate of enterococci that are resistant to

  11. Genome Sequencing of the Plant Pathogen Taphrina deformans, the Causal Agent of Peach Leaf Curl

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Ousmane H.; Almeida, Joăo M. G. C. F.; Fonseca, Álvaro; Kumar, Ajay Anand; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Overmyer, Kirk; Hauser, Philippe M.; Pagni, Marco

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Taphrina deformans is a fungus responsible for peach leaf curl, an important plant disease. It is phylogenetically assigned to the Taphrinomycotina subphylum, which includes the fission yeast and the mammalian pathogens of the genus Pneumocystis. We describe here the genome of T. deformans in the light of its dual plant-saprophytic/plant-parasitic lifestyle. The 13.3-Mb genome contains few identifiable repeated elements (ca. 1.5%) and a relatively high GC content (49.5%). A total of 5,735 protein-coding genes were identified, among which 83% share similarities with other fungi. Adaptation to the plant host seems reflected in the genome, since the genome carries genes involved in plant cell wall degradation (e.g., cellulases and cutinases), secondary metabolism, the hallmark glyoxylate cycle, detoxification, and sterol biosynthesis, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of plant hormones. Genes involved in lipid metabolism may play a role in its virulence. Several locus candidates for putative MAT cassettes and sex-related genes akin to those of Schizosaccharomyces pombe were identified. A mating-type-switching mechanism similar to that found in ascomycetous yeasts could be in effect. Taken together, the findings are consistent with the alternate saprophytic and parasitic-pathogenic lifestyles of T. deformans. PMID:23631913

  12. Biological studies of indigenous medicinal plants--I: physicochemical and antimicrobial screening of non-alkaloidal constituents of some solanaceous seeds.

    PubMed

    Khan, F Z; Alam, M; Saleem, R; Rashid, I

    1992-01-01

    The seeds of Atropa belladonna Datura fastuosa D. stramoniurn and Hyoscyamus niger were investigated for the isolation and anti-microbial activity of non-alkaloidal constituents. The compounds were separated by column chromatography and spectral studies i.e. IR and UV were performed to ascertain their chemical nature. The anti-microbial activity of crude extracts and purified compounds was tested against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and a fungus. All the micro-organisms tested were markedly inhibited, however, the crude extracts as well as the purified compounds isolated from the seeds of A. belladonna and D. fastuosa showed little inhibitory activity. PMID:16414703

  13. Antimicrobial Treatments and Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    To limit exposure to indoor biological contamination a risk-management approach which employs various antimicrobial treatments can effectively control contaminants and reduce exposure. Antimicrobial treatment of biological contaminants, especially mold in buildings, it is often n...

  14. Current State of Topical Antimicrobial Therapy in Management of Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Jayabal, JayaBaarathi; Mahesh, Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of early childhood caries can have a significant economical burden and treatment relapses are frequent. Effective intervention by means of topical antimicrobial agents can reduce the burden of early childhood caries. The main aim in prevention and treatment should focus on inhibition of the growth of oral bacteria. This is a comprehensive review of the literature on the various antimicrobial agents which are proven to be effective in management of this carious progression. The review identified that there is a significant data to suggest use of antimicrobial agents in management of early childhood caries. Antimicrobial agents aid in better management of patients with early carious lesion. The relapse rates are less, when the treatment is combined with the use of antimicrobial agent. PMID:24701354

  15. Plant latex: a promising antifungal agent for post harvest disease control.

    PubMed

    Sibi, G; Wadhavan, Rashmi; Singh, Sneha; Shukla, Abhilasha; Dhananjaya, K; Ravikumar, K R; Mallesha, H

    2013-12-01

    Bioactive compounds from plant latex are potential source of antifungic against post harvest pathogens. Latex from a total of seven plant species was investigated for its phytochemical and antifungal properties. Six fungi namely Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger, A. terreus, F. solani, P. digitatum and R. arrhizus were isolated from infected fruits and vegetables and tested against various solvent extracts of latex. Analysis of latex extracts with phytochemical tests showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, phenols, saponins, steroids, tannins and terpenoids. Antifungal assay revealed the potential inhibitory activity of petroleum ether extracts against the postharvest fungal isolates. Various degree of sensitivity was observed irrespective of plant species studied with A. terreus and P. digitatum as the most susceptible ones. F. solani and A. fumigatus were moderately sensitive to the latex extracts tested. Among the plants, latex of Thevetia peruviana (75.2%) and Artocarpus heterophyllus (64.8%) were having potential antifungal activity against the isolates followed by Manilkara zapota (51.1%). In conclusion, use of plant latex makes interest to control postharvest fungal diseases and is fitting well with the concept of safety for human health and environment. PMID:24506041

  16. Bacillus oryzicola sp. nov., an Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from the Roots of Rice with Antimicrobial, Plant Growth Promoting, and Systemic Resistance Inducing Activities in Rice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eu Jin; Hossain, Mohammad Tofajjal; Khan, Ajmal; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2015-06-01

    Biological control of major rice diseases has been attempted in several rice-growing countries in Asia during the last few decades and its application using antagonistic bacteria has proved to be somewhat successful for controlling various fungal diseases in field trials. Two novel endophytic Bacillus species, designated strains YC7007 and YC7010(T), with anti-microbial, plant growth-promoting, and systemic resistance-inducing activities were isolated from the roots of rice in paddy fields at Jinju, Korea, and their multifunctional activities were analyzed. Strain YC7007 inhibited mycelial growth of major rice fungal pathogens strongly in vitro. Bacterial blight and panicle blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (KACC 10208) and Burkholderia glumae (KACC 44022), respectively, were also suppressed effectively by drenching a bacterial suspension (10(7) cfu/ml) of strain YC7007 on the rhizosphere of rice. Additionally, strain YC7007 promoted the growth of rice seedlings with higher germination rates and more tillers than the untreated control. The taxonomic position of the strains was also investigated. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that both strains belong to the genus Bacillus, with high similarity to the closely related strains, Bacillus siamensis KACC 15859(T) (99.67%), Bacillus methylotrophicus KACC 13105(T) (99.65%), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum KACC 17177(T) (99.60%), and Bacillus tequilensis KACC 15944(T) (99.45%). The DNA-DNA relatedness value between strain YC7010(T) and the most closely related strain, B. siamensis KACC 15859(T) was 50.4±3.5%, but it was 91.5±11.0% between two strains YC7007 and YC7010(T), indicating the same species. The major fatty acids of two strains were anteiso-C15:0 and iso C15:0. Both strains contained MK-7 as a major respiratory quinone system. The G+C contents of the genomic DNA of two strains were 50.5 mol% and 51.2 mol%, respectively. Based on these polyphasic studies, the two strains YC7007 and YC7010(T) represent novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus oryzicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YC7010(T) (= KACC 18228(T)). Taken together, our findings suggest that novel endophytic Bacillus strains can be used for the biological control of rice diseases. PMID:26060434

  17. Bacillus oryzicola sp. nov., an Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from the Roots of Rice with Antimicrobial, Plant Growth Promoting, and Systemic Resistance Inducing Activities in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eu Jin; Hossain, Mohammad Tofajjal; Khan, Ajmal; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2015-01-01

    Biological control of major rice diseases has been attempted in several rice-growing countries in Asia during the last few decades and its application using antagonistic bacteria has proved to be somewhat successful for controlling various fungal diseases in field trials. Two novel endophytic Bacillus species, designated strains YC7007 and YC7010T, with anti-microbial, plant growth-promoting, and systemic resistance-inducing activities were isolated from the roots of rice in paddy fields at Jinju, Korea, and their multifunctional activities were analyzed. Strain YC7007 inhibited mycelial growth of major rice fungal pathogens strongly in vitro. Bacterial blight and panicle blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (KACC 10208) and Burkholderia glumae (KACC 44022), respectively, were also suppressed effectively by drenching a bacterial suspension (107 cfu/ml) of strain YC7007 on the rhizosphere of rice. Additionally, strain YC7007 promoted the growth of rice seedlings with higher germination rates and more tillers than the untreated control. The taxonomic position of the strains was also investigated. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that both strains belong to the genus Bacillus, with high similarity to the closely related strains, Bacillus siamensis KACC 15859T (99.67%), Bacillus methylotrophicus KACC 13105T (99.65%), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum KACC 17177T (99.60%), and Bacillus tequilensis KACC 15944T (99.45%). The DNA-DNA relatedness value between strain YC7010T and the most closely related strain, B. siamensis KACC 15859T was 50.4±3.5%, but it was 91.5±11.0% between two strains YC7007 and YC7010T, indicating the same species. The major fatty acids of two strains were anteiso-C15:0 and iso C15:0. Both strains contained MK-7 as a major respiratory quinone system. The G+C contents of the genomic DNA of two strains were 50.5 mol% and 51.2 mol%, respectively. Based on these polyphasic studies, the two strains YC7007 and YC7010T represent novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus oryzicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YC7010T (= KACC 18228T). Taken together, our findings suggest that novel endophytic Bacillus strains can be used for the biological control of rice diseases.

  18. Oral administration of antimicrobials increase antimicrobial resistance in E. coli from chicken--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Simoneit, C; Burow, E; Tenhagen, B-A; Käsbohrer, A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobials play an important role in animal and human health care. It was the aim of this systematic review to assess the effects of oral administration of antimicrobials on the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) from chickens. Moreover, the effects of the administration of more than one antimicrobial and of different dosages were studied. Literature was searched in November 2012 from the electronic databases ISI Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus and a national literature database (DIMDI) as well as the database ProQuest LLC. The search was updated in March 2014. Original studies describing a treatment (A) and a control group of either non-treatment (C) or initial value (0) and determining AMR in E. coli at different sample points (SP) were included. The literature search resulted in 35 full text articles on the topic, seven (20%) of which contained sufficient information on the administered antimicrobial and the impact of treatment on AMR. Most papers described the use of more than one antimicrobial, several dosages, controls (non-treatment or pre-treatment) and measured AMR at different SPs leading to a total of 227 SPs on the impact of the use of antimicrobials on AMR in chickens. 74% of the SPs (168/227) described a higher AMR-rate in E. coli from treated animals than from controls. After the administration of a single antimicrobial, AMR increased at 72% of the SPs. Administration of more than one antimicrobial increased AMR at 82% of the SPs. Higher dosages were associated with similar or higher AMR rates. The limited number of studies for each antimicrobial agent and the high variability in the resistance effect call for more well designed studies on the impact of oral administration on AMR development and spread. PMID:25433717

  19. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic secondary metabolites from tropical leaf endophytes: Isolation of antibacterial agent pyrrocidine C from Lewia infectoria SNB-GTC2402.

    PubMed

    Casella, Thiago M; Eparvier, Véronique; Mandavid, Hugues; Bendelac, Audrey; Odonne, Guillaume; Dayan, Laura; Duplais, Christophe; Espindola, Laila S; Stien, Didier

    2013-12-01

    Because of the symbiotic nature of endophytes, this survey aims to investigate the probability of discovering antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activities in leaf endophytic microbes. We isolated 138 cultivable microbes (121 fungi, 3 bacteria and 14 unidentified or unknown microbes) from 24 plant species, a significant relative proportion of which exhibited antifungal and cytotoxic potential against Candida albicans ATCC 10213 and the human cell lines KB (uterine cervical carcinoma), MDA-MB-435 (melanoma), and MRC5 (normal human lung fibroblasts). Three active fungal extracts were fractionated, resulting in the isolation of eight compounds. Seven had been described in the literature including the following: acremonisol A, semicochliodinol A, cochliodinol, griseofulvin, pyrenocin A, novae zelandin A and alterperylenol. A previously unreported compound named pyrrocidine C was isolated from Lewia infectoria SNB-GTC2402 and identified by spectroscopic analysis. As in pyrrocidines A and B, this compound is a cis-substituted decahydrofluorene with a quaternary carbon at C-5 and opposite stereochemistry at C-8 corresponding to C-6 of pyrrocidines A and B. PMID:24189345

  20. Structure?Activity Relationships of Antimicrobial Gallic Acid Derivatives from Pomegranate and Acacia Fruit Extracts against Potato Bacterial Wilt Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed A; Al-Mahdy, Dalia A; Salah El Dine, Riham; Fahmy, Sherifa; Yassin, Aymen; Porzel, Andrea; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial wilts of potato, tomato, pepper, and or eggplant caused by Ralstonia solanacearum are among the most serious plant diseases worldwide. In this study, the issue of developing bactericidal agents from natural sources against R. solanacearum derived from plant extracts was addressed. Extracts prepared from 25 plant species with antiseptic relevance in Egyptian folk medicine were screened for their antimicrobial properties against the potato pathogen R. solancearum by using the disc-zone inhibition assay and microtitre plate dilution method. Plants exhibiting notable antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogen include extracts from Acacia arabica and Punica granatum. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of A. arabica and P. granatum resulted in the isolation of bioactive compounds 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid and gallic acid, in addition to epicatechin. All isolates displayed significant antimicrobial activities against R. solanacearum (MIC values 0.5-9?mg/ml), with 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid being the most effective one with a MIC value of 0.47?mg/ml. We further performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study for the inhibition of R. solanacearum growth by ten natural, structurally related benzoic acids. PMID:26080741

  1. Antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-03-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  3. Corn starch as an alternative gelling agent for plant tissue culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. E. Henderson; A. M. Kinnersley

    1988-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of plant cell cultures was increased when media were gelled with corn starch instead of agar. Dry weight of tobacco and wild carrot cell cultures on media gelled with starch was more than three times that of cultures on media gelled with agar. Higher yield of anthocyanin and dry weight of embryos were found in wild carrot

  4. Plant natural compounds: targeting pathways of autophagy as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Chen, L-X; Ouyang, L; Cheng, Y; Liu, B

    2012-10-01

    Natural compounds derived from plant sources are well characterized as possessing a wide variety of remarkable anti-tumour properties, for example modulating programmed cell death, primarily referring to apoptosis, and autophagy. Distinct from apoptosis, autophagy (an evolutionarily conserved, multi-step lysosomal degradation process in which a cell destroys long-lived proteins and damaged organelles) may play crucial regulatory roles in many pathological processes, most notably in cancer. In this review, we focus on highlighting several representative plant natural compounds such as curcumin, resveratrol, paclitaxel, oridonin, quercetin and plant lectin - that may lead to cancer cell death - for regulation of some core autophagic pathways, involved in Ras-Raf signalling, Beclin-1 interactome, BCR-ABL, PI3KCI/Akt/mTOR, FOXO1 signalling and p53. Taken together, these findings would provide a new perspective for exploiting more plant natural compounds as potential novel anti-tumour drugs, by targeting the pathways of autophagy, for future cancer therapeutics. PMID:22765290

  5. SEWAGE SLUDGE VIRAL AND PATHOGENIC AGENTS IN SOIL-PLANT-ANIMAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multidisciplinary study was carried out to determine the ultimate fate of various toxic elements or pathogens associated with Florida and Chicago municipal sludges when applied to soil-plant-water systems and to determine physiologic, pathologic, growth, and reproductive respon...

  6. Effects of Plant Essential Oils and Oil Compounds on Mechanical, Barrier and Antimicrobial Properties of Alginate-Apple Puree Edible Films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated mechanical, barrier and antimicrobial properties of 0.1-0.5% suspensions of the following essential oils (EOs)/oil compounds (OCs) against the foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 in alginate-apple puree edible film (AAPEF): oregano oil/carvacrol; cinnamon oil/cinnamaldehyde; and...

  7. Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jhon J Rojas; Veronica J Ochoa; Saul A Ocampo; John F Muńoz

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The antimicrobial activity and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium H.B. & K, Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, Justicia secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum C.DC, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana Hieron were evaluated against five bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus ? hemolític, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa,

  8. Antimicrobial properties of diacetyl.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, J M

    1982-01-01

    Diacetyl preparations from three commercial sources were found to be essentially similar when tested primarily against a set of 40 cultures, including 10 of lactic acid bacteria, 4 of yeasts, 12 of gram-positive non-lactic acid bacteria, and 14 of gram-negative bacteria. The compound was effective at pH less than or equal to 7.0 and progressively ineffective at pH greater than 7.0. The lactic acid bacteria were essentially unaffected by concentrations between 100 and 350 micrograms/ml over the pH range of 5.0 to 7.0. Of the 12 gram-positive non-lactic acid bacteria, 11 were inhibited by 300 micrograms/ml at pH less than or equal to 7.0. The three yeasts and the 13 gram-negative bacteria that grew at pH 5.5 were inhibited by 200 micrograms/ml. Diacetyl was ineffective against four clostridia under anaerobic conditions. It was lethal for gram-negative bacteria and generally inhibitory for gram-positive bacteria. Nongrowing cells were not affected. The effectiveness of diacetyl was considerably less in brain heart infusion broth, Trypticase soy agar, and cooked-meat medium than in nutrient broth or plate count agar. The antimicrobial activity was antagonized by glucose, acetate, and Tween 80 but not by gluconic acid. As an antimicrobial agent, diacetyl was clearly more effective against gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, and molds than against gram-positive bacteria. PMID:7137998

  9. Screening of antifungal agents using ethanol precipitation and bioautography of medicinal and food plants.

    PubMed

    Schmourlo, Gracilene; Mendonça-Filho, Ricardo R; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Costa, Sônia S

    2005-01-15

    In the search for bioactive compounds, bioautography and ethanol precipitation of macromolecules (proteins, polysaccharides, etc.) of plant aqueous extracts were associated in an antifungal screening. Thus, the supernatants, precipitates (obtained by ethanol precipitation) and aqueous extracts were investigated of medicinal and fruit bearing plants used against skin diseases by the Brazilian population. The agar diffusion and broth dilution methods were used to assess the activity against three fungi: Candida albicans, Trichophyton rubrum and Cryptococcus neoformans. The results, evaluated by the diameter of the inhibition zone of fungal growth, indicate that six plant species, among the 16 investigated, showed significant antifungal activity. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on plant extracts that showed high efficacy against the tested microorganisms. The most susceptible yeast was Trichophyton rubrum and the best antifungal activity was shown by Xanthosoma sagittifolium supernatant. The bioautography was performed only for the aqueous extracts and supernatants of those plants that showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, using n-butanol/acetic acid/water (BAW) 8:1:1 to develop silica gel TLC plates. Clear inhibition zones were observed for aqueous extracts of Schinus molle (R(f) 0.89) and Schinus terebinthifolius (R(f) 0.80) against Candida albicans, as for supernatant of Anacardium occidentale (R(f) 0.31) against Cryptococcus neoformans. The separation of macromolecules from metabolites, as in the case of Anacardium occidentale, Solanum sp. and Xanthosoma sagittifolium, enhances antifungal activity. In other cases, the antifungal activity is destroyed, as observed for Momordica charantia, Schinus molle and Schinus terebinthifolius. PMID:15619579

  10. Antimicrobial edible films and coatings.

    PubMed

    Cagri, Arzu; Ustunol, Zeynep; Ryser, Elliot T

    2004-04-01

    Increasing consumer demand for microbiologically safer foods, greater convenience, smaller packages, and longer product shelf life is forcing the industry to develop new food-processing, cooking, handling, and packaging strategies. Nonfluid ready-to-eat foods are frequently exposed to postprocess surface contamination, leading to a reduction in shelf life. The food industry has at its disposal a wide range of nonedible polypropylene- and polyethylene-based packaging materials and various biodegradable protein- and polysaccharide-based edible films that can potentially serve as packaging materials. Research on the use of edible films as packaging materials continues because of the potential for these films to enhance food quality, food safety, and product shelf life. Besides acting as a barrier against mass diffusion (moisture, gases, and volatiles), edible films can serve as carriers for a wide range of food additives, including flavoring agents, antioxidants, vitamins, and colorants. When antimicrobial agents such as benzoic acid, sorbic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, nisin, and lysozyme have been incorporated into edible films, such films retarded surface growth of bacteria, yeasts, and molds on a wide range of products, including meats and cheeses. Various antimicrobial edible films have been developed to minimize growth of spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms, including Listeria monocytogenes, which may contaminate the surface of cooked ready-to-eat foods after processing. Here, we review the various types of protein-based (wheat gluten, collagen, corn zein, soy, casein, and whey protein), polysaccharide-based (cellulose, chitosan, alginate, starch, pectin, and dextrin), and lipid-based (waxes, acylglycerols, and fatty acids) edible films and a wide range of antimicrobial agents that have been or could potentially be incorporated into such films during manufacture to enhance the safety and shelf life of ready-to-eat foods. PMID:15083740

  11. Antimicrobial peptides from marine invertebrates: challenges and perspectives in marine antimicrobial peptide discovery.

    PubMed

    Sperstad, Sigmund V; Haug, Tor; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Styrvold, Olaf B; Li, Chun; Stensvĺg, Klara

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pathogenic bacteria resistance to conventional antibiotics calls for an increased focus on the purification and characterization of antimicrobials with new mechanisms of actions. Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates, because their initial interaction with microbes is through binding to lipids. The interference with such a fundamental cell structure is assumed to hamper resistance development. In the present review we discuss antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine invertebrates, emphasizing the isolation and activity of these natural antibiotics. The marine environment is relatively poorly explored in terms of potential pharmaceuticals, and it contains a tremendous species diversity which evolved in close proximity to microorganisms. As invertebrates rely purely on innate immunity, including antimicrobial peptides, to combat infectious agents, it is believed that immune effectors from these animals are efficient and rapid inhibitors of microbial growth. PMID:21683779

  12. Synthetic antimicrobial peptide design.

    PubMed

    Powell, W A; Catranis, C M; Maynard, C A

    1995-01-01

    To guide the design of potential plant pathogen-resistance genes, synthetic variants of naturally occurring antimicrobial gene products were evaluated. Five 20-amino acid (ESF1, ESF4, ESF5, ESF6, ESF13), one 18-amino acid (ESF12), and one 17-amino acid (ESF17) amphipathic peptide sequences were designed, synthesized, and tested with in vitro bioassays. Positive charges on the hydrophilic side of the peptide were shown to be essential for antifungal activity, yet the number of positive charges could be varied with little or no change in activity. The size could be reduced to 18 amino acids, but at 17 amino acids a significant reduction in activity was observed. ESF1, 5, 6, and 12 peptides were inhibitory to the germination of conidia from Cryphonectria parasitica, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, and Septoria musiva but did not inhibit the germination of pollen from Castanea mollissima and Salix lucida. ESF12 also had no effect on the germination of Malus sylvestris and Lycopersicon esculentum pollen, but inhibited the growth of the bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia amylovora, and Pseudomonas syringae. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the active ESF peptides were similar to those of the naturally occurring control peptides, magainin II and cecropin B. The significant differential in sensitivity between the microbes and plant cells indicated that the active ESF peptides are potentially useful models for designing plant pathogen-resistance genes. PMID:7579625

  13. Food coloring agents and plant food supplements derived from Vitis vinifera: a new source of human exposure to ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Solfrizzo, Michele; Piemontese, Luca; Gambacorta, Lucia; Zivoli, Rosanna; Longobardi, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Grape pomaces are increasingly being used as starting material in the industrial production of plant food supplements (PFS), food coloring, and tartrates, but they are at risk of ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination, a mycotoxin with nephrotoxic and carcinogenic effects. We analyzed 24 commercial PFS and 13 food coloring samples derived from Vitis vinifera, mainly pomaces, using a HPLC-FLD method for OTA determination. OTA was found in 75% of PFS samples and 69% of food coloring samples at levels of <1.16-20.23 ?g/kg and <1.16-32.00 ?g/kg, respectively. The four commercial leavening agents containing tartrates were found to be negative for OTA. All eight samples collected in two distilleries that use grape pomaces and wine lees to produce tartrates and other byproducts contained OTA at levels of <1.16-240.93 ?g/kg. The high incidence of OTA contamination in PFS and food coloring agents derived from V. vinifera suggests that maximum permitted level(s) should be established for this mycotoxin in these products. PMID:25768038

  14. Condensed tannins from Botswanan forage plants are effective priming agents of ?? T cells in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Tibe, O; Pernthaner, A; Sutherland, I; Lesperance, L; Harding, D R K

    2012-05-15

    The potential impact of extracts from forage plants on ?? T cell activity in ruminants was evaluated using an in vitro immunoassay. This study investigated whether plant extracts could prime ?? T cells via up-regulation of CD25 (interleukin-2 receptor alpha). Purified Sephadex LH-20 fractions, isolated from Viscum rotundifolium, Viscum verrucosum, Tapinanthus oleifolius and Grewia flava, were screened against ?? T cells on kid, lamb and calf peripheral blood lymphocytes. Condensed tannins (CT) from G. flava significantly primed ?? T cells in kids up to 64.75% at 10 ?g/mL, which was statistically significant relative to the negative control at 22.66% (p=0.004). CT from T. oleifolius also induced priming of ?? T cells in kids, while fractions from V. rotundifolium and V. verrucosum induced minimal priming of ?? T cells. In contrast, there was no significant priming of ?? T cells from lambs and calves for any of the tested fractions (p>0.05). These findings suggest that CT from a selected range of Botswanan forage plants can stimulate the immune system in vivo in selected ruminant species and may participate in enhancing host innate immune responses. PMID:22483993

  15. Effects of feeding plant-derived agents on the colonization of Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Kurekci, Cemil; Al Jassim, Rafat; Hassan, Errol; Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Padmanabha, Jagadish; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to test the potential use of plant-derived extracts and compounds to control Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens. Over a 7-wk feeding period, birds were fed a commercial diet with or without plant extracts (Acacia decurrens, Eremophila glabra), essential oil [lemon myrtle oil (LMO)], plant secondary compounds [terpinene-4-ol and ?-tops (including ?-terpineol, cineole, and terpinene-4-ol)], and the antibiotic virginiamycin. Traditional culture and real-time quantitative PCR techniques were used to enumerate the numbers of C. jejuni in chicken fecal and cecal samples. In addition, BW and feed intake were recorded weekly for the calculation of BW gain and feed conversion ratio. The mean log10 counts of C. jejuni were similar (P > 0.05) across treatments. However, significantly lower levels of fecal Campylobacter counts (P < 0.05) were recorded at d 41 for the ?-tops treatment by culture methods. No differences (P > 0.05) in BW gain were obtained for dietary supplementation, except for the E. glabra extract, which had a negative impact (P < 0.001) on BW, resulting in sporadic death. Results from this study suggest that supplemental natural compounds used in the current study did not reduce the shedding of C. jejuni to desired levels. PMID:25002548

  16. Screening antimicrobial activity of various extracts of Urtica dioica.

    PubMed

    Modarresi-Chahardehi, Amir; Ibrahim, Darah; Fariza-Sulaiman, Shaida; Mousavi, Leila

    2012-12-01

    Urtica dioica or stinging nettle is traditionally used as an herbal medicine in Western Asia. The current study represents the investigation of antimicrobial activity of U. dioica from nine crude extracts that were prepared using different organic solvents, obtained from two extraction methods: the Soxhlet extractor (Method I), which included the use of four solvents with ethyl acetate and hexane, or the sequential partitions (Method II) with a five solvent system (butanol). The antibacterial and antifungal activities of crude extracts were tested against 28 bacteria, three yeast strains and seven fungal isolates by the disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. Amoxicillin was used as positive control for bacteria strains, vancomycin for Streptococcus sp., miconazole nitrate (30 microg/mL) as positive control for fungi and yeast, and pure methanol (v/v) as negative control. The disc diffusion assay was used to determine the sensitivity of the samples, whilst the broth dilution method was used for the determination of the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC). The ethyl acetate and hexane extract from extraction method I (EA I and HE I) exhibited highest inhibition against some pathogenic bacteria such as Bacillus cereus, MRSA and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A selection of extracts that showed some activity was further tested for the MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC). MIC values of Bacillus subtilis and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using butanol extract of extraction method II (BE II) were 8.33 and 16.33mg/mL, respectively; while the MIC value using ethyl acetate extract of extraction method II (EAE II) for Vibrio parahaemolyticus was 0.13mg/mL. Our study showed that 47.06% of extracts inhibited Gram-negative (8 out of 17), and 63.63% of extracts also inhibited Gram-positive bacteria (7 out of 11); besides, statistically the frequency of antimicrobial activity was 13.45% (35 out of 342) which in this among 21.71% belongs to antimicrobial activity extracts from extraction method I (33 out of 152 of crude extracts) and 6.82% from extraction method II (13 out of 190 of crude extracts). However, crude extracts from method I exhibited better antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive bacteria than the Gram-negative bacteria. The positive results on medicinal plants screening for antibacterial activity constitutes primary information for further phytochemical and pharmacological studies. Therefore, the extracts could be suitable as antimicrobial agents in pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:23342511

  17. Genetics of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Harbottle, H; Thakur, S; Zhao, S; White, D G

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant strains of bacteria are an increasing threat to animal and human health. Resistance mechanisms to circumvent the toxic action of antimicrobials have been identified and described for all known antimicrobials currently available for clinical use in human and veterinary medicine. Acquired bacterial antibiotic resistance can result from the mutation of normal cellular genes, the acquisition of foreign resistance genes, or a combination of these two mechanisms. The most common resistance mechanisms employed by bacteria include enzymatic degradation or alteration of the antimicrobial, mutation in the antimicrobial target site, decreased cell wall permeability to antimicrobials, and active efflux of the antimicrobial across the cell membrane. The spread of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons has greatly contributed to the rapid dissemination of antimicrobial resistance among several bacterial genera of human and veterinary importance. Antimicrobial resistance genes have been shown to accumulate on mobile elements, leading to a situation where multidrug resistance phenotypes can be transferred to a susceptible recipient via a single genetic event. The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacterial pathogens has severe implications for the future treatment and prevention of infectious diseases in both animals and humans. The versatility with which bacteria adapt to their environment and exchange DNA between different genera highlights the need to implement effective antimicrobial stewardship and infection control programs in both human and veterinary medicine. PMID:17127523

  18. Risk assessment of a former military base contaminated with organoarsenic-based warfare agents: uptake of arsenic by terrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Pitten, F A; Müller, G; König, P; Schmidt, D; Thurow, K; Kramer, A

    1999-02-01

    Organoarsenic-based chemical warfare agents (CWAs) such as the sternutators diphenylchloroarsine (CLARK I), diphenylcyanoarsine (CLARK II) or phenyldichloroarsine (PFIFFIKUS) still pose a notable risk in countries where former military bases that have stored these weapons have not yet been reclaimed. In fact, this is the case for many countries of Eastern Europe and the CIS. One of the most important military bases of the former Third Reich, the Heeresmunitionsanstalt I and II, is situated close to the German-Polish border at Loecknitz (Fig. 1). The German army stored and decanted different compounds of CWAs at this military base until 1945. When the Soviet Army destroyed the base in 1946, large amounts of CWAs and other organoarsenic compounds polluted the soil. Today up to 250 g (!) of arsenic may be found in 1 kg of soil at some places in this area. Since 1991, a Government Working Group has been working on the risk assessment in order to define the scope of reclamation measures. This study investigates the contamination and the uptake of arsenic by plants because little is known about the bioavailability and metabolism of sternutators and their constituents. The total arsenic concentration of nine different species of terrestrial plants with at least six samples per species is presented. In spite of the considerable arsenic contamination of the soil (mean value 923 mg arsenic/kg soil) the plant contamination remained comparably low. The median value of arsenic contamination of the above-ground organs of velvet grass, Holcus lanatus, was 0.7 mg/kg dry wt. and the mean value was 4.3 mg/kg dry wt. due to some highly contaminated samples. The highest arsenic concentration registered was 26 mg/kg dry wt. in a sample of H. lanatus, which was most probably caused by soil particles adhering to the plant. The chemical structure of the arsenic compounds carried by the above-ground plant organs has been determined by gas chromatographic investigations and showed an uptake of triphenyl arsine by the plants. PMID:10085570

  19. Triclosan in wastewaters and biosolids from Australian wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guang-Guo Ying; Rai S. Kookana

    2007-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial agent widely used in many personal care products. This study investigated the occurrence of TCS in effluents, biosolids and surface waters, and its fate in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The aqueous concentrations of TCS in nineteen effluents from Australian WWTPs ranged from 23 ng\\/L to 434 ng\\/L with a median concentration of 108 ng\\/L, while its concentrations in

  20. Antimicrobial activity of o-carboranylalanine.

    PubMed

    Oros, G; Ujváry, I; Nachman, R J

    1999-01-01

    Functionalized polyhedral carboranes, including amino acid analogs, have unique physicochemical properties and are used as experimental anticancer agents. However, our current knowledge on their effect in nonmammalian biological systems is limited. We investigated the activity spectrum in vitro of o-carboranylalanine (o-Cba), considered to be a highly lipophilic analog of phenylalanine, against representative plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi of various taxonomic position. The antibacterial effect of o-Cba against some species was comparable to that of the widely used agricultural antibiotic, streptomycin. The sensitivity of individual bacterial species to o-Cba within the same genus varied to a greater extent than the average sensitivity of various genera. In general, this carborane-containing amino acid was more toxic to Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus, Corynebacterium, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus) than to Gram negative ones (Agrobacterium, Erwinia, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Xanthomonas). Compared to the commercial fungicide, prochloraz, o-Cba was weakly toxic against various fungi (Zygo- and Ascomycota). It was also inferior to the commercial fungicide metalaxyl in inhibiting the vegetative growth of oomyceteous plant pathogens (Pythium irregulare, Phytophthora cryptogea and Plasmopara halstedii). Against the asexual spores of P. halstedii, o-Cba, however, was over a thousandfold more active than tridemorph, a selective zoospore inhibitor fungicide. For all taxonomic groups, the observed antimicrobial effect of o-Cba could be diminished with histidine, but not with phenylalanine. In studies on healthy and mildew-infected sunflower and tobacco plants o-Cba showed neither fungicidal nor phytotoxic effects at 500 ppm. This is the first report on the biological activity spectrum of a carborane-containing amino acid. PMID:10707765