Science.gov

Sample records for plant clock system

  1. BUGS system clock distributor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Thomas M.

    1991-11-01

    A printed circuit board which will provide external clocks and precisely measure the time at which events take place was designed for the Bristol University Gas Spectrometer (BUGS). The board, which was designed to interface both mechanically and electrically to the Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC) system, has been named the BUGS system clock control. The board's design and use are described.

  2. Tutorial: Clock and Clock Systems Performance Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, David W.

    1996-01-01

    This tutorial contains basic material - familiar to many. This will be used as a foundation upon which we will build - bringing forth some new material and equations that have been developed especially for this tutorial. These will provide increased understanding toward parameter estimation of clock and clock system's performance. There is a very important International Telecommunications Union (ITU) handbook being prepared at this time which goes much further than this tutorial has time to do. I highly recommend it as an excellent resource document. The final draft is just now being completed, and it should be ready late in 1996. It is an outstanding handbook; Dr. Sydnor proposed to the ITU-R several years ago, and is the editor with my assistance. We have some of the best contributors in the community from around the world who have written the ten chapters in this handbook. The title of the handbook is 'Selection and use of Precise Frequency and Time Systems'. It will be available from the ITU secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland, but NAVTEC Seminars also plans to be a distributor.

  3. Organ specificity in the plant circadian system is explained by different light inputs to the shoot and root clocks.

    PubMed

    Bordage, Simon; Sullivan, Stuart; Laird, Janet; Millar, Andrew J; Nimmo, Hugh G

    2016-10-01

    Circadian clocks allow the temporal compartmentalization of biological processes. In Arabidopsis, circadian rhythms display organ specificity but the underlying molecular causes have not been identified. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the similarities and differences between the clocks of mature shoots and roots in constant conditions and in light : dark cycles. We developed an imaging system to monitor clock gene expression in shoots and light- or dark-grown roots, modified a recent mathematical model of the Arabidopsis clock and used this to simulate our new data. We showed that the shoot and root circadian clocks have different rhythmic properties (period and amplitude) and respond differently to light quality. The root clock was entrained by direct exposure to low-intensity light, even in antiphase to the illumination of shoots. Differences between the clocks were more pronounced in conditions where light was present than in constant darkness, and persisted in the presence of sucrose. We simulated the data successfully by modifying those parameters of a clock model that are related to light inputs. We conclude that differences and similarities between the shoot and root clocks can largely be explained by organ-specific light inputs. This provides mechanistic insight into the developing field of organ-specific clocks. PMID:27240972

  4. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  5. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0100120.

  6. The plant circadian clock looks like a traditional Japanese clock rather than a modern Western clock

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Takeshi; Yamashino, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle adaptation to seasonal changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature is a major determinant of the ecological success behind the widespread domestication of flowering plants. The circadian clock plays a role in the underlying mechanism for adaptation through generating endogenous rhythms that allow plants to adapt and adjust to both the 24 h diurnal rotation and 365 d seasonal revolution. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the circadian clock tracks seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperature is a longstanding subject in the field. Recently, we have begun to understand the question of how the light and ambient temperature signals feed into the circadian clock transcriptional circuitry in day-night cycles in order to track seasonal changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature.1-4 Our results collectively indicate that the evening complex (EC) nighttime repressor consisting of LUX-ELF3-ELF4 plays a crucial role in this respect. Here, we discuss about these recent studies to add further implications. PMID:26382718

  7. Similarities in the circadian clock and photoperiodism in plants

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Hun; Ito, Shogo; Imaizumi, Takato

    2010-01-01

    Summary of recent advances Plants utilize circadian clocks to synchronize their physiological and developmental events with daily and yearly changes in the environment. Recent advances in Arabidopsis research have provided a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock and photoperiodism. One of the most important questions is whether the mechanisms studied in Arabidopsis are conserved in other plants. Homologs of many Arabidopsis clock genes have been identified in various plants and some gene functions have been characterized. It seems that the circadian clocks in plants are similar. Recent success in molecular genetics has also revealed the mechanisms of photoperiodic flowering in cereals. The day-length sensing mechanisms appear to have diverged more between long-day plants and short-day plants than the circadian clock. PMID:20620097

  8. Eliminating Tracking-System Clock Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiun-Tsong; Bertiger, William I.

    1989-01-01

    Problems of redundancy and correlation avoided. ORTHO computer program eliminates effect of clock errors in differential solutions for positions of users of Global Positioning System (GPS). Main application, elimination of clock errors in tracking system based on GPS. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  9. Clock Laser System for a Strontium Lattice Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legero, T.; Lisdat, Ch.; Vellore Winfred, J. S. R.; Schnatz, H.; Grosche, G.; Riehle, F.; Sterr, U.

    2009-04-01

    We describe the setup and the characterization of a 698 nm master-slave diode laser system to probe the 1S0-3P0 clock transition of strontium atoms confined in a 1D optical lattice. The frequency noise and the linewidth of the laser system have been measured with respect to an ultrastable 657 nm diode laser with 1 Hz linewidth. The large frequency difference of more than 25 THz was bridged using a femtosecond fiber comb as transfer oscillator. In a second step the virtual beat was used to establish a phase lock between the narrow line 657 nm laser and the strontium clock laser. This technique allowed to transfer the stability from the 657 nm to the 698 nm laser.

  10. A Compact Model for the Complex Plant Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    De Caluwé, Joëlle; Xiao, Qiying; Hermans, Christian; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Gonze, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timekeeper that allows organisms to anticipate and adapt to the daily variations of their environment. The plant clock is an intricate network of interlocked feedback loops, in which transcription factors regulate each other to generate oscillations with expression peaks at specific times of the day. Over the last decade, mathematical modeling approaches have been used to understand the inner workings of the clock in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Those efforts have produced a number of models of ever increasing complexity. Here, we present an alternative model that combines a low number of equations and parameters, similar to the very earliest models, with the complex network structure found in more recent ones. This simple model describes the temporal evolution of the abundance of eight clock gene mRNA/protein and captures key features of the clock on a qualitative level, namely the entrained and free-running behaviors of the wild type clock, as well as the defects found in knockout mutants (such as altered free-running periods, lack of entrainment, or changes in the expression of other clock genes). Additionally, our model produces complex responses to various light cues, such as extreme photoperiods and non-24 h environmental cycles, and can describe the control of hypocotyl growth by the clock. Our model constitutes a useful tool to probe dynamical properties of the core clock as well as clock-dependent processes. PMID:26904049

  11. Phase measurement system using a dithered clock

    DOEpatents

    Fairley, C.R.; Patterson, S.R.

    1991-05-28

    A phase measurement system is disclosed which measures the phase shift between two signals by dithering a clock signal and averaging a plurality of measurements of the phase differences between the two signals. 8 figures.

  12. Method and system for downhole clock synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-11-28

    A method and system for use in synchronizing at least two clocks in a downhole network are disclosed. The method comprises determining a total signal latency between a controlling processing element and at least one downhole processing element in a downhole network and sending a synchronizing time over the downhole network to the at least one downhole processing element adjusted for the signal latency. Electronic time stamps may be used to measure latency between processing elements. A system for electrically synchronizing at least two clocks connected to a downhole network comprises a controlling processing element connected to a synchronizing clock in communication over a downhole network with at least one downhole processing element comprising at least one downhole clock. Preferably, the downhole network is integrated into a downhole tool string.

  13. Navstar Global Positioning System (GPS) clock program: Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennant, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) program status are discussed and plans for ensuring the long term continuation of the program are presented. Performance of GPS clocks is presented in terms of on orbit data as portrayed by GPS master control station kalman filter processing. The GPS Clock reliability program is reviewed in depth and future plans fo the overall clock program are published.

  14. Field operations with cesium clocks in HF navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, E. H.; Clayton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Networks of HF phase comparison marine navigation stations employing cesium clocks are discussed. The largest permanent network is in the Gulf of Mexico where some fourteen base stations are continuously active and others are activated as needed. These HF phase comparison systems, which operate on a single transmission path, require a clock on the mobile unit as well. Inventory consists of upwards of 70 clocks from two different manufacturers. The maintenance of this network as an operating system requires a coordinated effort involving clock preparation, clock environment control, station performance monitoring and field service.

  15. Clock distribution system for digital computers

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Robert H.; Loomis, Jr., Herschel H.

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for eliminating, in each clock distribution amplifier of a clock distribution system, sequential pulse catch-up error due to one pulse "overtaking" a prior clock pulse. The apparatus includes timing means to produce a periodic electromagnetic signal with a fundamental frequency having a fundamental frequency component V'.sub.01 (t); an array of N signal characteristic detector means, with detector means No. 1 receiving the timing means signal and producing a change-of-state signal V.sub.1 (t) in response to receipt of a signal above a predetermined threshold; N substantially identical filter means, one filter means being operatively associated with each detector means, for receiving the change-of-state signal V.sub.n (t) and producing a modified change-of-state signal V'.sub.n (t) (n=1, . . . , N) having a fundamental frequency component that is substantially proportional to V'.sub.01 (t-.theta..sub.n (t) with a cumulative phase shift .theta..sub.n (t) having a time derivative that may be made uniformly and arbitrarily small; and with the detector means n+1 (1.ltoreq.n

  16. ORTHO- ELIMINATION OF TRACKING SYSTEM CLOCK ERRORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    ORTHO is part of the Global Positioning System (GPS) being developed by the U.S. Air Force, a navigational system that will use 18 NAVSTAR satellites to broadcast navigation messages and achieve worldwide coverage. The normal positioning technique uses one receiver which receives signals from at least four GPS satellites. For higher accuracy work it is often necessary to use a differential technique in which more than one receiver is used. The geodetic measurement has all receivers on the ground and allows the determination of the relative locations of the ground sites. The main application of the ORTHO program is in the elimination of clock errors in a GPS based tracking system. The measured distance (pseudo-range) from a GPS receiver contains errors due to differences in the receiver and satellite clocks. The conventional way of eliminating clock errors is to difference pseudo-ranges between different GPS satellites and receivers. The Householder transformation used in this program performs a function similar to the conventional single differencing or double differencing. This method avoids the problem of redundancy and correlation encountered in a differencing scheme. It is able to keep all information contained in the measurements within the scope of a least square estimation. For multiple transmitter and receiver GPS tracking network, this method is in general more accurate than the differencing technique. This program assumes that the non-clock measurement partial derivatives for the particular application are computed earlier by another program. With the partial derivatives and information to identify the transmitters and receivers as the input, the program performs the Householder transformation on the partial derivatives. The transformed partials are output by the program and may be used as an input to the filter program in the subsequent estimation process. Clock partial derivatives are generated internally and are not part of the input to the program

  17. System-wide power management control via clock distribution network

    DOEpatents

    Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Reed, Don D.

    2015-05-19

    An apparatus, method and computer program product for automatically controlling power dissipation of a parallel computing system that includes a plurality of processors. A computing device issues a command to the parallel computing system. A clock pulse-width modulator encodes the command in a system clock signal to be distributed to the plurality of processors. The plurality of processors in the parallel computing system receive the system clock signal including the encoded command, and adjusts power dissipation according to the encoded command.

  18. Clocking and synchronization circuits in multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Deog-Kyoon.

    1989-01-01

    Microprocessors based on RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) concepts have demonstrated an ability to provide more computing power at a given level of integration than conventional microprocessors. The next step is multiprocessors composed of RISC processing elements. Communication bandwidth among such microprocessors is critical in achieving efficient hardware utilization. This thesis focuses on the communication capability of VLSI circuits and presents new circuit techniques as a guide to build an interconnection network of VLSI microprocessors. Two of the most prominent problems in a synchronous system, which most of the current computer systems are based on, have been clock skew and synchronization failure. A new concept called self-timed systems solves such problems but has not been accepted in microprocessor implementations yet because of its complex design procedure and increased overhead. With this in mind, this thesis concentrates on a system in which individual synchronous subsystems are connected asynchronously. Synchronous subsystems operate with a better control over clock skew using a phase locked loop (PLL) technique. Communication among subsystems is done asynchronously with a controlled synchronization failure rate. One advantage is that conventional VLSI design methodologies which are more efficient can still be applied. Circuit techniques for PLL-based clock generation are described along with stability criteria. The main objective of the circuit is to realize a zero delay buffer. Experimental results show the feasibility of such circuits in VLSI. Synchronizer circuit configurations in both bipolar and MOS technology that best utilize each device, or overcome the technology limit using a bandwidth doubling technique are shown. Interface techniques including handshake mechanisms in such a system are also described.

  19. Heterogeneity of cellular circadian clocks in intact plants and its correction under light-dark cycles

    PubMed Central

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in single-cell analysis have revealed the stochasticity and nongenetic heterogeneity inherent to cellular processes. However, our knowledge of the actual cellular behaviors in a living multicellular organism is still limited. By using a single-cell bioluminescence imaging technique on duckweed, Lemna gibba, we demonstrate that, under constant conditions, cells in the intact plant work as individual circadian clocks that oscillate with their own frequencies and respond independently to external stimuli. Quantitative analysis uncovered the heterogeneity and instability of cellular clocks and partial synchronization between neighboring cells. Furthermore, we found that cellular clocks in the plant body under light-dark cycles showed a centrifugal phase pattern in which the effect of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in period lengths was almost masked. The inherent heterogeneity in the properties of cellular clocks observed under constant conditions is corrected under light-dark cycles to coordinate the daily rhythms of the plant body. These findings provide a novel perspective of spatiotemporal architectures in the plant circadian system. PMID:27453946

  20. Heterogeneity of cellular circadian clocks in intact plants and its correction under light-dark cycles.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in single-cell analysis have revealed the stochasticity and nongenetic heterogeneity inherent to cellular processes. However, our knowledge of the actual cellular behaviors in a living multicellular organism is still limited. By using a single-cell bioluminescence imaging technique on duckweed, Lemna gibba, we demonstrate that, under constant conditions, cells in the intact plant work as individual circadian clocks that oscillate with their own frequencies and respond independently to external stimuli. Quantitative analysis uncovered the heterogeneity and instability of cellular clocks and partial synchronization between neighboring cells. Furthermore, we found that cellular clocks in the plant body under light-dark cycles showed a centrifugal phase pattern in which the effect of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in period lengths was almost masked. The inherent heterogeneity in the properties of cellular clocks observed under constant conditions is corrected under light-dark cycles to coordinate the daily rhythms of the plant body. These findings provide a novel perspective of spatiotemporal architectures in the plant circadian system. PMID:27453946

  1. Clocking and synchronization circuits in multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Microprocessors based on RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) concepts have demonstrated an ability to provide more computing power at a given level of integration than conventional microprocessors. The next step is multiprocessors composed of RISC processing elements. Communication bandwidth among such microprocessors is critical in achieving efficient hardware utilization. This thesis focuses on the communication capability of VLSI circuits and presents new circuit techniques as a guide to build an interconnection network of VLSI microprocessors. Circuit techniques for PLL-based clock generation are described along with stability criteria. The main objective of the circuit is to realize a zero delay buffer. Experimental results show the feasibility of such circuits in VLSI. Synchronizer circuit configurations in both bipolar and MOS technology that best utilize each device, or overcome the technology limit using a bandwidth doubling technique are shown. Interface techniques including handshake mechanisms in such a system are also described.

  2. A Novel Method of Clock Synchronization in Distributed System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Niu, M. J.; Cai, Y. S.; Chen, X.; Ren, Y. Q.

    2016-03-01

    Time synchronization plays an important role in application of aircraft flying formation and constellation autonomous navigation, etc. In application of clock synchronization in the network system, it is not always true that each observed node may be interconnected, therefore, it is difficult to achieve time synchronization of network system with high precision in the condition that a certain node can only obtain the measurement information of clock from one of its corresponding neighbors, and cannot obtain from other nodes. According to this special problem, a novel method of high precision time synchronization of network system has been proposed. In this paper, we regard each clock as a node in the network system, and based on different distributed topology definition, the following three control algorithms of time synchronization under three circumstances have been designed: without a master clock (reference clock), with a master clock (reference clock), and with a fixed communication delay in the network system. The validity of the designed clock synchronization protocol has been proved both theoretically and through numerical simulation.

  3. Circadian clock system in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yoshitaka; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2002-02-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ that functions as a central circadian oscillator in a variety of nonmammalian vertebrates. In many cases, the pineal gland retains photic input and endocrinal-output pathways both linked tightly to the oscillator. This contrasts well with the mammalian pineal gland equipped only with the output of melatonin production that is subject to neuronal regulation by central circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Molecular studies on animal clock genes were performed first in Drosophila and later developed in rodents. More recently, clock genes such as Per, Cry, Clock, and Bmal have been found in a variety of vertebrate clock structures including the avian pineal gland. The profiles of the temporal change of the clock gene expression in the avian pineal gland are more similar to those in the mammalian SCN rather than to those in the mammalian pineal gland. Avian pineal gland and mammalian SCN seem to share a fundamental molecular framework of the clock oscillator composed of a transcription/translation-based autoregulatory feedback loop. The circadian time-keeping mechanism also requires several post-translational events, such as protein translocation and degradation processes, in which protein phosphorylation plays a very important role for the stable 24-h cycling of the oscillator and/or the photic-input pathway for entrainment of the clock. PMID:11890455

  4. Master Clock and Time-Signal-Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, Robert; Calhoun, Malcolm; Kuhnle, Paul; Sydnor, Richard; Lauf, John

    2007-01-01

    A timing system comprising an electronic master clock and a subsystem for distributing time signals from the master clock to end users is undergoing development to satisfy anticipated timing requirements of NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) for the next 20 to 30 years. This system has a modular, flexible, expandable architecture that is easier to operate and maintain than the present frequency and timing subsystem (FTS).

  5. Fault-tolerant clock synchronization validation methodology. [in computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Johnson, Sally C.

    1987-01-01

    A validation method for the synchronization subsystem of a fault-tolerant computer system is presented. The high reliability requirement of flight-crucial systems precludes the use of most traditional validation methods. The method presented utilizes formal design proof to uncover design and coding errors and experimentation to validate the assumptions of the design proof. The experimental method is described and illustrated by validating the clock synchronization system of the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer. The design proof of the algorithm includes a theorem that defines the maximum skew between any two nonfaulty clocks in the system in terms of specific system parameters. Most of these parameters are deterministic. One crucial parameter is the upper bound on the clock read error, which is stochastic. The probability that this upper bound is exceeded is calculated from data obtained by the measurement of system parameters. This probability is then included in a detailed reliability analysis of the system.

  6. Atomic clock augmentation for receivers using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Paul Andrew

    For receivers using the Global Positioning System (GPS), it is standard procedure to treat the receiver clock bias from GPS time as an unknown. This requires four range measurements to the satellites in order to solve for three dimensional position and clock offset. If the receiver clock could be synchronized with GPS time, the extra range measurement would not be necessary. To achieve this synchronization, a stable frequency reference must be incorporated into the GPS user set. This concept is known as clock aiding or clock augmentation of GPS receivers. Clock augmentation increases the availability of the navigation function because only three GPS satellites are required. Also, it is shown that clock augmentation improves vertical accuracy by reducing the vertical dilution of precision (VDOP), which is a unitless multiplier that translates range measurement error into vertical position error. This improvement in vertical accuracy is particularly beneficial for applications involving final approach and landing of aircraft using GPS, because GPS typically provides better horizontal accuracy than vertical accuracy. The benefits of atomic clock augmentation are limited by factors that cause a loss of synchronization either between the receiver and GPS time, or between ground station and airborne receivers processing GPS data in differential mode (DGPS). Among the error sources that cause a clock offset are antenna rotation, hardware drifts due to temperature variations, and relativistic effects for GPS receivers on moving platforms. Antenna rotation and temperature effects are addressed and supported by experimental data. It is shown that two particular relativity terms thought to be missing from GPS receiver algorithms are not evident in data collected during a flight test experiment. Upon addressing the error sources, the dissertation concludes with analysis of DGPS data collected during a flight test at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Tech Center in

  7. Reference clock parameters for digital communications systems applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartaschoff, P.

    1981-01-01

    The basic parameters relevant to the design of network timing systems describe the random and systematic time departures of the system elements, i.e., master (or reference) clocks, transmission links, and other clocks controlled over the links. The quantitative relations between these parameters were established and illustrated by means of numerical examples based on available measured data. The examples were limited to a simple PLL control system but the analysis can eventually be applied to more sophisticated systems at the cost of increased computational effort.

  8. General flat four-dimensional world pictures and clock systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J. P.; Underwood, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    We explore the mathematical structure and the physical implications of a general four-dimensional symmetry framework which is consistent with the Poincare-Einstein principle of relativity for physical laws and with experiments. In particular, we discuss a four-dimensional framework in which all observers in different frames use one and the same grid of clocks. The general framework includes special relativity and a recently proposed new four-dimensional symmetry with a nonuniversal light speed as two special simple cases. The connection between the properties of light propagation and the convention concerning clock systems is also discussed, and is seen to be nonunique within the four-dimensional framework.

  9. Elimination of clock errors in a GPD based tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J.-T.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the estimation problem for a GPS based tracking system which is used for low earth satellite orbit determination and for geodynamic research. The clock errors involved in the measurements are eliminated in order to obtain a solution. Two methods used to eliminate the clock errors, the double differencing method and the linear combination method are discussed and compared. The accuracy of the solution, the redundancy and the correlation of the differenced or the combined data are investigated. Numerical results of the two methods are presented.

  10. Validation of a fault-tolerant clock synchronization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, R. W.; Johnson, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    A validation method for the synchronization subsystem of a fault tolerant computer system is investigated. The method combines formal design verification with experimental testing. The design proof reduces the correctness of the clock synchronization system to the correctness of a set of axioms which are experimentally validated. Since the reliability requirements are often extreme, requiring the estimation of extremely large quantiles, an asymptotic approach to estimation in the tail of a distribution is employed.

  11. Digital clocks: simple Boolean models can quantitatively describe circadian systems

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Ozgur E.; Watterson, Steven; Parton, Andrew; Binns, Nigel; Millar, Andrew J.; Ghazal, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The gene networks that comprise the circadian clock modulate biological function across a range of scales, from gene expression to performance and adaptive behaviour. The clock functions by generating endogenous rhythms that can be entrained to the external 24-h day–night cycle, enabling organisms to optimally time biochemical processes relative to dawn and dusk. In recent years, computational models based on differential equations have become useful tools for dissecting and quantifying the complex regulatory relationships underlying the clock's oscillatory dynamics. However, optimizing the large parameter sets characteristic of these models places intense demands on both computational and experimental resources, limiting the scope of in silico studies. Here, we develop an approach based on Boolean logic that dramatically reduces the parametrization, making the state and parameter spaces finite and tractable. We introduce efficient methods for fitting Boolean models to molecular data, successfully demonstrating their application to synthetic time courses generated by a number of established clock models, as well as experimental expression levels measured using luciferase imaging. Our results indicate that despite their relative simplicity, logic models can (i) simulate circadian oscillations with the correct, experimentally observed phase relationships among genes and (ii) flexibly entrain to light stimuli, reproducing the complex responses to variations in daylength generated by more detailed differential equation formulations. Our work also demonstrates that logic models have sufficient predictive power to identify optimal regulatory structures from experimental data. By presenting the first Boolean models of circadian circuits together with general techniques for their optimization, we hope to establish a new framework for the systematic modelling of more complex clocks, as well as other circuits with different qualitative dynamics. In particular, we

  12. Clock synchronization of a large multiprocessor system in the presence of malicious faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Kang G.; Ramanathan, P.

    1987-01-01

    An interconnection algorithm is presented for achieving clock synchronization in a multiprocessor system. The system is assumed to be maliciously faulty, i.e., some processors are out of synchronization and lie about their clock state to other intragroup or intergroup processors. A phase-locked clock network design is proposed which groups the clocks in the system into diverse clusters. The clusters are then treated as single clock units from the perspective of the network. The algorithm minimizes the number of interconnections while permitting synchronization of large multiprocessor systems controlling time-critical applications such as aircraft, nuclear reactors and industrial processes.

  13. System and method for clock synchronization and position determination using entangled photon pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Yanhua (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for clock synchronization and position determination using entangled photon pairs is provided. The present invention relies on the measurement of the second order correlation function of entangled states. Photons from an entangled photon source travel one-way to the clocks to be synchronized. By analyzing photon registration time histories generated at each clock location, the entangled states allow for high accuracy clock synchronization as well as high accuracy position determination.

  14. Clocks for airborne systems. [performance of rubidium oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houlding, N.

    1982-01-01

    The potential performance of compact oscillators, needed for the development of accurate clocks for future airborne systems (such as Identification Friend or Foe schemes), is addressed. In particular, extensive testing of rubidium oscillators manufactured by Efratom is discussed. The results indicate that an accuracy of better than 10 microseconds should be achievable in tactical aircraft provided that appropriate measures are adopted to counter the many environmental factors. In a favorable environment a stability of better than 5 x 10 to the -13th power for one day is achievable with present commercial units, but improvements are required to suit operation in an aircraft. With further development of rubidium controlled clocks the ultimate limitation on time accuracy in aircraft will probably be associated with time dissemination, maintenance difficulties and doctrinal hurdles.

  15. Byzantine-fault tolerant self-stabilizing protocol for distributed clock synchronization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A rapid Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol that self-stabilizes from any state, tolerates bursts of transient failures, and deterministically converges within a linear convergence time with respect to the self-stabilization period. Upon self-stabilization, all good clocks proceed synchronously. The Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the clocks. Furthermore, there is neither a central clock nor an externally generated pulse system. The protocol converges deterministically, is scalable, and self-stabilizes in a short amount of time. The convergence time is linear with respect to the self-stabilization period.

  16. The climate system as a ticking clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1990-09-14

    Climate researchers are picking up a more or less regular 2-year beat to the global climate system - one that seems to be heard from every quarter. The most recently discovered example of this climatic ticking - and perhaps the most intriguing - comes from the very core of El Nino. Researchers have found that some aspects of this cycle of alternating warm and relatively cold waters along the equatorial Pacific have a tendency to repeat every 2 years. The overlying winds pulsate at the same pace, as do the globe-girdling effects of the El Nino cycle, from winter warmth in Alaska to heavy rains in Peru and drought in Australia. The climatic ticking in the tropical Pacific is hardly as reliable as the changing of the seasons. Sometimes it is muted, and occasionally it skips a beat. But some researchers nevertheless see hope of using it in the prediction of El Nino and its global effects. In any case, climate researchers are eager to determine what makes El Nino tick. The answer could be an underlying pacemaker of this crucial atmospheric cycle.

  17. An Adaptive Method for Reducing Clock Skew in an Accumulative Z-Axis Interconnect System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotin, Gary; Boyce, Lee

    1997-01-01

    This paper will present several methods for adjusting clock skew variations that occur in a n accumulative z-axis interconnect system. In such a system, delay between modules in a function of their distance from one another. Clock distribution in a high-speed system, where clock skew must be kept to a minimum, becomes more challenging when module order is variable before design.

  18. Clock Controller For Ac Self-Timing Analysis Of Logic System

    DOEpatents

    Lo, Tinchee; Flanagan, John D.

    2004-05-18

    A clock controller and clock generating method are provided for AC self-test timing analysis of a logic system. The controller includes latch circuitry which receives a DC input signal at a data input, and a pair of continuous out-of-phase clock signals at capture and launch clock inputs thereof. The latch circuitry outputs two overlapping pulses responsive to the DC input signal going high. The two overlapping pulses are provided to waveform shaper circuitry which produces therefrom two non-overlapping pulses at clock speed of the logic system to be tested. The two non-overlapping pulses are a single pair of clock pulses which facilitate AC self-test timing analysis of the logic system.

  19. Time maintenance of user clocks via the tracking and data relay satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitworth, G.; Mcintyre, J. W.; Downs, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A system is described which uses the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) itself to compare the user satellite clock with a clock at the White Sands station that is referenced to Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). No command of the spacecraft by the system is required, and actual on-board clock corrections are made by the spacecraft control center at its discretion. Computer models were constructed using basic orbital parameters for user and TDRS satellites. With only first-order corrections and simple averaging techniques for constant clock rates, error measurement precision of better than one microsecond was obtained. More sophisticated computations should allow considerable improvement over this.

  20. BMAL1-dependent circadian oscillation of nuclear CLOCK: posttranslational events induced by dimerization of transcriptional activators of the mammalian clock system

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Chernov, Mikhail V.; Kondratova, Anna A.; Gorbacheva, Victoria Y.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Antoch, Marina P.

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian CLOCK and BMAL1 are two members of bHLH-PAS-containing family of transcription factors that represent the positive elements of circadian autoregulatory feedback loop. In the form of a heterodimer, they drive transcription from E-box enhancer elements in the promoters of responsive genes. We have examined abundance, posttranslational modifications, cellular localization of endogenous and ectopically expressed CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins. Nuclear/cytoplasm distribution of CLOCK was found to be under circadian regulation. Analysis of subcellular localization of CLOCK in embryo fibroblasts of mice carrying different germ-line circadian mutations showed that circadian regulation of nuclear accumulation of CLOCK is BMAL1-dependent. Formation of CLOCK/BMAL1 complex following ectopic coexpression of both proteins is followed by their codependent phosphorylation, which is tightly coupled to CLOCK nuclear translocation and degradation. This binding-dependent coregulation is specific for CLOCK/BMAL1 interaction, as no other PAS domain protein that can form a complex with either CLOCK or BMAL1 was able to induce similar effects. Importantly, all posttranslational events described in our study are coupled with active transactivation complex formation, which argues for their significant functional role. Altogether, these results provide evidence for an additional level of circadian system control, which is based on regulation of transcriptional activity or/and availability of CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. PMID:12897057

  1. System and method for adaptively deskewing parallel data signals relative to a clock

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank N.

    2008-10-07

    A system and method of reducing skew between a plurality of signals transmitted with a transmit clock is described. Skew is detected between the received transmit clock and each of received data signals. Delay is added to the clock or to one or more of the plurality of data signals to compensate for the detected skew. The delay added to each of the plurality of delayed signals is updated to adapt to changes in detected skew.

  2. System and method for adaptively deskewing parallel data signals relative to a clock

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank N.

    2011-10-04

    A system and method of reducing skew between a plurality of signals transmitted with a transmit clock is described. Skew is detected between the received transmit clock and each of received data signals. Delay is added to the clock or to one or more of the plurality of data signals to compensate for the detected skew. The delay added to each of the plurality of delayed signals is updated to adapt to changes in detected skew.

  3. Rhythms of Life: The Plant Circadian Clock - (By Katherine Hubbard and Antony Dodd).

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/4/tpc.116.tt0416/FIG1F1fig1This teaching tool explores circadian rhythms in plants. The topic is presented as a series of concepts illustrated by examples, including the architecture of circadian clocks and the connections between the oscillator and circadian-regulated processes such as metabolism and flowering. The Teaching Tool introduces some of the techniques used to investigate circadian biology and explores how understanding circadian rhythms could lead to crop improvement. PMID:27169989

  4. Ground control system for the midcourse space experiment UTC clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragonette, Richard

    1994-01-01

    One goal of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) spacecraft Operations Planning Center is to maintain the onboard satellite UTC clock (UTC(MSX)) to within 1 millisecond of UTC(APL) (the program requirement is 10 msec). The UTC(MSX) clock employs as its time base an APL built 5 MHz quartz oscillator, which is expected to have frequency instabilities (aging rate + drift rate + frequency offset) that will cause the clock to drift approximately two to ten milliseconds per day. The UTC(MSX) clock can be advanced or retarded by the APL MSX satellite ground control center by integer multiples of 1 millisecond. The MSX Operations Planning Center is developing software which records the drift of UTC(MSX) relative to UTC(APL) and which schedules the time of day and magnitude of UTC(MSX) clock updates up to 48 hours in advance. Because of the manner in which MSX spacecraft activities are scheduled, MSX clock updates are planned 24 to 48 hours in advance, and stored in the satellite's computer controller for later execution. Data will be collected on the drift of UTC(MSX) relative to UTC(APL) over a three to five day period. Approximately six times per day, the time offset between UTC(MSX) and UTC(APL) will be measured by APL with a resolution of less than 100 microseconds. From this data a second order analytical model of the clock's drift will be derived. This model will be used to extrapolate the offset of the MSX clock in time from the present to 48 hours in the future. MSX clock updates will be placed on the spacecraft's daily schedule whenever the predicted clock offset exceeds 0.5 milliseconds. The paper includes a discussion of how the empirical model of the MSX clock is derived from satellite telemetry data, as well as the algorithm used to schedule MSX clock updates based on the model.

  5. Verge and Foliot Clock Escapement: A Simple Dynamical System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The earliest mechanical clocks appeared in Europe in the 13th century. From about 1250 CE to 1670 CE, these simple clocks consisted of a weight suspended from a rope or chain that was wrapped around a horizontal axle. To tell time, the weight must fall with a slow uniform speed, but, under the action of gravity alone, such a suspended weight would…

  6. Test of an orbiting hydrogen maser clock system using laser time transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward M.; Nystrom, G. U.; Decher, Rudolph

    1992-07-01

    We describe a joint Smithsonian Astrophysical Laboratory/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (SAO/NASA) program for flight testing a atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long-term operation in space. The clock system will be carried by a shuttle-launched EURECA spacecraft. Comparisons with earth clocks to measure the clock's long-term frequency stability (tau = 10(exp 4) seconds) will be made using laser time transfer from existing NASA laser tracking stations. We describe the design of the maser clock and its control systems, and the laser timing technique. We describe the precision of station time synchronization and the limitations in the comparison between the earth and space time scales owing to gravitational and relativistic effects. We will explore the implications of determining the spacecraft's location by an on-board Global Position System (GPS) receiver, and of using microwave techniques for time and frequency transfer.

  7. Test of an orbiting hydrogen maser clock system using laser time transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward M.; Nystrom, G. U.; Decher, Rudolph

    1992-01-01

    We describe a joint Smithsonian Astrophysical Laboratory/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (SAO/NASA) program for flight testing a atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long-term operation in space. The clock system will be carried by a shuttle-launched EURECA spacecraft. Comparisons with earth clocks to measure the clock's long-term frequency stability (tau = 10(exp 4) seconds) will be made using laser time transfer from existing NASA laser tracking stations. We describe the design of the maser clock and its control systems, and the laser timing technique. We describe the precision of station time synchronization and the limitations in the comparison between the earth and space time scales owing to gravitational and relativistic effects. We will explore the implications of determining the spacecraft's location by an on-board Global Position System (GPS) receiver, and of using microwave techniques for time and frequency transfer.

  8. Clock signal requirement for high-frequency, high dynamic range acquisition systems

    SciTech Connect

    Viscor, Ivo; Halamek, Josef; Villa, Marco

    2005-11-15

    Analog-to-digital converters (ADC's) are increasingly replacing mixers in frequency conversion schemes. To achieve superior performances, in terms of bandwidth and dynamic range, a nearly ideal ADC clock is needed, with a spectral purity higher than the reference signal of the classical mixing scheme. These requirements of spectral purity for the ADC clock are discussed by analyzing in detail the nonuniform sampling process and by characterizing an actual acquisition system. The effect of clock phase imperfections on the output is proportional to the input frequency over sampling frequency ratio. Moreover, at the output we may have a multiple folding of the phase jitter spectrum. These effects are illustrated by three sets of measurements performed using our system: transfer of spurious clock components, aliasing of these components, and transfer of clock phase noise.

  9. Systems Biology of the Clock in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wubei; Tang, Xiaojia; Yu, Yihai; Nilsen, Roger; Kim, Rosemary; Griffith, James; Arnold, Jonathan; Schüttler, H.-Bernd

    2008-01-01

    A model-driven discovery process, Computing Life, is used to identify an ensemble of genetic networks that describe the biological clock. A clock mechanism involving the genes white-collar-1 and white-collar-2 (wc-1 and wc-2) that encode a transcriptional activator (as well as a blue-light receptor) and an oscillator frequency (frq) that encodes a cyclin that deactivates the activator is used to guide this discovery process through three cycles of microarray experiments. Central to this discovery process is a new methodology for the rational design of a Maximally Informative Next Experiment (MINE), based on the genetic network ensemble. In each experimentation cycle, the MINE approach is used to select the most informative new experiment in order to mine for clock-controlled genes, the outputs of the clock. As much as 25% of the N. crassa transcriptome appears to be under clock-control. Clock outputs include genes with products in DNA metabolism, ribosome biogenesis in RNA metabolism, cell cycle, protein metabolism, transport, carbon metabolism, isoprenoid (including carotenoid) biosynthesis, development, and varied signaling processes. Genes under the transcription factor complex WCC ( = WC-1/WC-2) control were resolved into four classes, circadian only (612 genes), light-responsive only (396), both circadian and light-responsive (328), and neither circadian nor light-responsive (987). In each of three cycles of microarray experiments data support that wc-1 and wc-2 are auto-regulated by WCC. Among 11,000 N. crassa genes a total of 295 genes, including a large fraction of phosphatases/kinases, appear to be under the immediate control of the FRQ oscillator as validated by 4 independent microarray experiments. Ribosomal RNA processing and assembly rather than its transcription appears to be under clock control, suggesting a new mechanism for the post-transcriptional control of clock-controlled genes. PMID:18769678

  10. When the circadian clock meets the melanin pigmentary system.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-04-01

    Silencing of BMAL1 and PER1 stimulates melanogenic activity of follicular and epidermal melanocytes, indicating a novel role for peripheral circadian clock processes in the regulation of melanin pigmentation. Linking the expression levels of BMAL1/PER1 with changes in melanogenesis opens exciting opportunities to study the role of the local molecular clock in modulation of melanocyte functions in the hair follicle and the epidermis with attendant effects on epidermal barrier functions in general. PMID:25785947

  11. Synchronization of motor controller and PC system clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittmann, Frank; Bertram, Thomas; Briegel, Florian; Mohr, Lars; Berwein, Jürgen

    2010-07-01

    The power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with its two 8.4m primary mirrors sharing a common mount will unfold its full potential with the LINC-NIRVANA (LN) instrument. LINC-NIRVANA is a German-Italian beam combiner for the LBT and will interfere the light from the two 8.4m mirrors of the LBT in Fizeau mode. More than 140 motors have to be handled by custom developed Motor Controllers (MoCons). One important feature of the MoCon is the support of externally computed trajectories. Motion profiles provide information on the movement of the motor along a defined path over a certain period of time. Such profiles can be uploaded to the MoCon over Ethernet and can be started at a specific time. For field derotation it is critical that the derotation trajectories are executed with a very precise relative and absolute timing. This raises the problem of the synchronization of the MoCon internal clock with the system time of the servers that are hosting LINCNIRVANA's Instrument Control Software. The MoCon time should be known by the servers with an uncertainty of few milliseconds in order to match the start time of the motion profile and the field rotation trajectory. In this paper we will discuss how to synchronize the MoCon internal time and the PC system time.

  12. Circadian clock adjustment to plant iron status depends on chloroplast and phytochrome function

    PubMed Central

    Salomé, Patrice A; Oliva, Michele; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Plant chloroplasts are not only the main cellular location for storage of elemental iron (Fe), but also the main site for Fe, which is incorporated into chlorophyll, haem and the photosynthetic machinery. How plants measure internal Fe levels is unknown. We describe here a new Fe-dependent response, a change in the period of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, the period lengthens when Fe becomes limiting, and gradually shortens as external Fe levels increase. Etiolated seedlings or light-grown plants treated with plastid translation inhibitors do not respond to changes in Fe supply, pointing to developed chloroplasts as central hubs for circadian Fe sensing. Phytochrome-deficient mutants maintain a short period even under Fe deficiency, stressing the role of early light signalling in coupling the clock to Fe responses. Further mutant and pharmacological analyses suggest that known players in plastid-to-nucleus signalling do not directly participate in Fe sensing. We propose that the sensor governing circadian Fe responses defines a new retrograde pathway that involves a plastid-encoded protein that depends on phytochromes and the functional state of chloroplasts. PMID:23241948

  13. Self-stabilizing byzantine-fault-tolerant clock synchronization system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing clock synchronization are provided. The systems and methods are based on a protocol comprising a state machine and a set of monitors that execute once every local oscillator tick. The protocol is independent of specific application specific requirements. The faults are assumed to be arbitrary and/or malicious. All timing measures of variables are based on the node's local clock and thus no central clock or externally generated pulse is used. Instances of the protocol are shown to tolerate bursts of transient failures and deterministically converge with a linear convergence time with respect to the synchronization period as predicted.

  14. Spaceborne clock system: Some alternatives for a proposed NASA experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beehler, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    A spaceborne clock experiment is proposed with the objectives of improving international time and frequency comparisons, studying precise one-way Doppler tracking and one-way ranging techniques, performing relativistic studies, and developing new atomic frequency standards technology. Various alternatives are considered for accomplishing these goals, including the use of existing satellite and earth-based time dissemination systems as well as the development of a new frequency standard for this specific application. One conclusion is that several attractive alternatives already exist for meeting the goal of improved time and frequency dissemination. However, to achieve all the other 4 goals at the NASA-stated levels of accuracy, a spaceborne atomic frequency standard may be required. An analysis of achievements to date with quartz oscillators, rubidium standards, cesium beam standards, hydrogen masers, and several other possibilities leads to the conclusion that cesium and rubidium standards offer the best choices for the experiment as proposed by NASA. The greatest obstacle to a spaceborne atomic standard appears to be its electrical power requirements.

  15. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Maria L; Akman, Ozgur E; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian) rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-h day/night cycle. Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks. Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less well studied. PMID:25374576

  16. Evolution of photoperiodic time measurement is independent of the circadian clock in the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Kevin J.; Dake, Sabrina J.; Bradshaw, William E.; Holzapfel, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    For over 70 years, researchers have debated whether the ability to use day length as a cue for the timing of seasonal events (photoperiodism) is related to the endogenous circadian clock that regulates the timing of daily events. Models of photoperiodism include two components: (1) a photoperiodic timer that measures the length of the day, and (2) a photoperiodic counter that elicits the downstream photoperiodic response after a threshold number of days has been counted. Herein, we show that there is no geographical pattern of genetic association between the expression of the circadian clock and the photoperiodic timer or counter. We conclude that the photoperiodic timer and counter have evolved independently of the circadian clock in the pitcher-plant mosquito Wyeomyia smithii and hence, the evolutionary modification of photoperiodism throughout the range of W. smithii has not been causally mediated by a corresponding evolution of the circadian clock. PMID:19190920

  17. Evolution of photoperiodic time measurement is independent of the circadian clock in the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kevin J; Dake, Sabrina J; Bradshaw, William E; Holzapfel, Christina M

    2009-04-01

    For over 70 years, researchers have debated whether the ability to use day length as a cue for the timing of seasonal events (photoperiodism) is related to the endogenous circadian clock that regulates the timing of daily events. Models of photoperiodism include two components: (1) a photoperiodic timer that measures the length of the day, and (2) a photoperiodic counter that elicits the downstream photoperiodic response after a threshold number of days has been counted. Herein, we show that there is no geographical pattern of genetic association between the expression of the circadian clock and the photoperiodic timer or counter. We conclude that the photoperiodic timer and counter have evolved independently of the circadian clock in the pitcher-plant mosquito Wyeomyia smithii and hence, the evolutionary modification of photoperiodism throughout the range of W. smithii has not been causally mediated by a corresponding evolution of the circadian clock. PMID:19190920

  18. Circadian rhythmicity and photoperiodism in the pitcher-plant mosquito: can the seasonal timer evolve independently of the circadian clock?

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, W E; Holzapfel, C M; Mathias, D

    2006-04-01

    The two major rhythms of the biosphere are daily and seasonal; the two major adaptations to these rhythms are the circadian clock, mediating daily activities, and the photoperiodic timer, mediating seasonal activities. The mechanistic connection between the circadian clock and the photoperiodic timer remains unresolved. Herein, we show that the rhythmic developmental response to exotic light:dark cycles, usually used to infer a causal connection between the circadian clock and the photoperiodic timer, has evolved independently of the photoperiodic timer in the pitcher-plant mosquito Wyeomyia smithii across the climatic gradient of eastern North America from Florida to Canada and from the coastal plain to the mountains. We conclude that the photoperiodic timing of seasonal events can evolve independently of the daily circadian clock. PMID:16671002

  19. Automatic Clock and Time Signal System of the Astronomical Agency in East Asia Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Sam

    2009-09-01

    We analysed the old automatic clock and time signal system that was used by the national astronomical agency in East Asian Area. Jagyeongnu is a kind of water clock that was operated by the flowing water in Joseon Dynasty. Seowoongwan managed the water clock so as to keep the standard time system in the dynasty from the 16th year (1434) of King Sejong's reign. In 1438 the Okru that was invented in the period. Such kind of clock system already was used in China, which was Shui yun i hsiang t'ai (?) in 1092. During the period Joseon Dynasty, China and Japan had been kept the time system that one day is divided into 12 shin (?2?) or 100 gak (?). However detailed part of the system had a little difference among the three countries. Though the whole system of water clock in Joseon had manufactured on the basis of Chinese, it had been gradually developed by own method and idea. In this study we show the historical records of the standard time keeping system in East Asian history. And then we can inform materials on the structure and functional devises for the purpose of new restoration models about the automatic clock and time system.

  20. System and method for adaptively deskewing parallel data signals relative to a clock

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank N.

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of reducing skew between a plurality of signals transmitted with a transmit clock is described. Skew is detected between the received transmit clock and each of received data signals. Delay is added to the clock or to one or more of the plurality of data signals to compensate for the detected skew. Each of the plurality of delayed signals is compared to a reference signal to detect changes in the skew. The delay added to each of the plurality of delayed signals is updated to adapt to changes in the detected skew.

  1. Running on time: the role of circadian clocks in the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Michal; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The night and day cycle governs the circadian (24 hourly) rhythm of activity and rest in animals and humans. This is reflected in daily changes of the global gene expression pattern and metabolism, but also in the local physiology of various tissues. A central clock in the brain co-ordinates the rhythmic locomotion behaviour, as well as synchronizing various local oscillators, such as those found in the musculoskeletal system. It has become increasingly recognized that the internal molecular clocks in cells allow a tissue to anticipate the rhythmic changes in their local environment and the specific demands of that tissue. Consequently, the majority of the rhythmic clock controlled genes and pathways are tissue specific. The concept of the tissue-specific function of circadian clocks is further supported by the diverse musculoskeletal phenotypes in mice with deletions or mutations of various core clock components, ranging from increased bone mass, dwarfism, arthropathy, reduced muscle strength and tendon calcification. The present review summarizes the current understanding of the circadian clocks in muscle, bone, cartilage and tendon tissues, with particular focus on the evidence of circadian rhythms in tissue physiology, their entrainment mechanisms and disease links, and the tissue-specific clock target genes/pathways. Research in this area holds strong potential to advance our understanding of how circadian rhythms control the health and disease of the musculoskeletal tissues, which has major implications in diseases associated with advancing age. It could also have potential implications in sports performance and sports medicine. PMID:25195734

  2. Running on time: the role of circadian clocks in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Michal; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-10-01

    The night and day cycle governs the circadian (24 hourly) rhythm of activity and rest in animals and humans. This is reflected in daily changes of the global gene expression pattern and metabolism, but also in the local physiology of various tissues. A central clock in the brain co-ordinates the rhythmic locomotion behaviour, as well as synchronizing various local oscillators, such as those found in the musculoskeletal system. It has become increasingly recognized that the internal molecular clocks in cells allow a tissue to anticipate the rhythmic changes in their local environment and the specific demands of that tissue. Consequently, the majority of the rhythmic clock controlled genes and pathways are tissue specific. The concept of the tissue-specific function of circadian clocks is further supported by the diverse musculoskeletal phenotypes in mice with deletions or mutations of various core clock components, ranging from increased bone mass, dwarfism, arthropathy, reduced muscle strength and tendon calcification. The present review summarizes the current understanding of the circadian clocks in muscle, bone, cartilage and tendon tissues, with particular focus on the evidence of circadian rhythms in tissue physiology, their entrainment mechanisms and disease links, and the tissue-specific clock target genes/pathways. Research in this area holds strong potential to advance our understanding of how circadian rhythms control the health and disease of the musculoskeletal tissues, which has major implications in diseases associated with advancing age. It could also have potential implications in sports performance and sports medicine. PMID:25195734

  3. Mammalian circadian clock system: Molecular mechanisms for pharmaceutical and medical sciences.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hitoshi; Doi, Masao; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Matsuo, Masahiro

    2010-07-31

    An internal circadian (from the Latin "circa" meaning "about" and "dien" meaning "day") clock has been found across kingdoms of life, a testimony that circadian rhythms are a basic feature of life on earth. Physiologically relevant circadian time is generated at the level of transcription-(post)translation feedback loop of clock genes, which machinery can be found in most cells throughout the body. Lesions of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) abolish clock oscillations in the body, indicating thereby that rhythm generation is a hierarchial system with the SCN at the top. Disrupting this exquisitely harmonious system causes abnormal expression of cell-type specific clock-controlled genes, as revealed by the etiology of life-style related diseases such as hypertension. PMID:20620185

  4. Verge and Foliot Clock Escapement: A Simple Dynamical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2010-09-01

    The earliest mechanical clocks appeared in Europe in the 13th century. From about 1250 CE to 1670 CE, these simple clocks consisted of a weight suspended from a rope or chain that was wrapped around a horizontal axle. To tell time, the weight must fall with a slow uniform speed, but, under the action of gravity alone, such a suspended weight would accelerate. To prevent this acceleration, an escapement mechanism was required. The best such escapement mechanism was called the verge and foliot escapement, and it was so successful that it lasted until about 1800 CE. These simple weight-driven clocks with verge and foliot escapements were accurate enough to mark the hours but not minutes or seconds. From 1670, significant improvements were made (principally by introducing pendulums and the newly invented anchor escapement) that justified the introduction of hands to mark minutes, and then seconds. By the end of the era of mechanical clocks, in the first half of the 20th century, these much-studied and much-refined machines were accurate to a millisecond a day.

  5. A Byzantine-Fault Tolerant Self-Stabilizing Protocol for Distributed Clock Synchronization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2006-01-01

    Embedded distributed systems have become an integral part of safety-critical computing applications, necessitating system designs that incorporate fault tolerant clock synchronization in order to achieve ultra-reliable assurance levels. Many efficient clock synchronization protocols do not, however, address Byzantine failures, and most protocols that do tolerate Byzantine failures do not self-stabilize. Of the Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization algorithms that exist in the literature, they are based on either unjustifiably strong assumptions about initial synchrony of the nodes or on the existence of a common pulse at the nodes. The Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol presented here does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the clocks. Furthermore, there is neither a central clock nor an externally generated pulse system. The proposed protocol converges deterministically, is scalable, and self-stabilizes in a short amount of time. The convergence time is linear with respect to the self-stabilization period. Proofs of the correctness of the protocol as well as the results of formal verification efforts are reported.

  6. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system i...

  7. Defining the robust behaviour of the plant clock gene circuit with absolute RNA timeseries and open infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Flis, Anna; Fernández, Aurora Piñas; Zielinski, Tomasz; Mengin, Virginie; Sulpice, Ronan; Stratford, Kevin; Hume, Alastair; Pokhilko, Alexandra; Southern, Megan M.; Seaton, Daniel D.; McWatters, Harriet G.; Stitt, Mark; Halliday, Karen J.; Millar, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the complex, transcriptional feedback loops in the circadian clock mechanism has depended upon quantitative, timeseries data from disparate sources. We measure clock gene RNA profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown with or without exogenous sucrose, or in soil-grown plants and in wild-type and mutant backgrounds. The RNA profiles were strikingly robust across the experimental conditions, so current mathematical models are likely to be broadly applicable in leaf tissue. In addition to providing reference data, unexpected behaviours included co-expression of PRR9 and ELF4, and regulation of PRR5 by GI. Absolute RNA quantification revealed low levels of PRR9 transcripts (peak approx. 50 copies cell−1) compared with other clock genes, and threefold higher levels of LHY RNA (more than 1500 copies cell−1) than of its close relative CCA1. The data are disseminated from BioDare, an online repository for focused timeseries data, which is expected to benefit mechanistic modelling. One data subset successfully constrained clock gene expression in a complex model, using publicly available software on parallel computers, without expert tuning or programming. We outline the empirical and mathematical justification for data aggregation in understanding highly interconnected, dynamic networks such as the clock, and the observed design constraints on the resources required to make this approach widely accessible. PMID:26468131

  8. Model selection reveals control of cold signalling by evening-phased components of the plant circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Keily, Jack; MacGregor, Dana R; Smith, Robert W; Millar, Andrew J; Halliday, Karen J; Penfield, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks confer advantages by restricting biological processes to certain times of day through the control of specific phased outputs. Control of temperature signalling is an important function of the plant oscillator, but the architecture of the gene network controlling cold signalling by the clock is not well understood. Here we use a model ensemble fitted to time-series data and a corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) analysis to extend a dynamic model to include the control of the key cold-regulated transcription factors C-REPEAT BINDING FACTORs 1–3 (CBF1, CBF2, CBF3). AICc was combined with in silico analysis of genetic perturbations in the model ensemble, and selected a model that predicted mutant phenotypes and connections between evening-phased circadian clock components and CBF3 transcriptional control, but these connections were not shared by CBF1 and CBF2. In addition, our model predicted the correct gating of CBF transcription by cold only when the cold signal originated from the clock mechanism itself, suggesting that the clock has an important role in temperature signal transduction. Our data shows that model selection could be a useful method for the expansion of gene network models. PMID:23909712

  9. Defining the robust behaviour of the plant clock gene circuit with absolute RNA timeseries and open infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Flis, Anna; Fernández, Aurora Piñas; Zielinski, Tomasz; Mengin, Virginie; Sulpice, Ronan; Stratford, Kevin; Hume, Alastair; Pokhilko, Alexandra; Southern, Megan M; Seaton, Daniel D; McWatters, Harriet G; Stitt, Mark; Halliday, Karen J; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the complex, transcriptional feedback loops in the circadian clock mechanism has depended upon quantitative, timeseries data from disparate sources. We measure clock gene RNA profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown with or without exogenous sucrose, or in soil-grown plants and in wild-type and mutant backgrounds. The RNA profiles were strikingly robust across the experimental conditions, so current mathematical models are likely to be broadly applicable in leaf tissue. In addition to providing reference data, unexpected behaviours included co-expression of PRR9 and ELF4, and regulation of PRR5 by GI. Absolute RNA quantification revealed low levels of PRR9 transcripts (peak approx. 50 copies cell(-1)) compared with other clock genes, and threefold higher levels of LHY RNA (more than 1500 copies cell(-1)) than of its close relative CCA1. The data are disseminated from BioDare, an online repository for focused timeseries data, which is expected to benefit mechanistic modelling. One data subset successfully constrained clock gene expression in a complex model, using publicly available software on parallel computers, without expert tuning or programming. We outline the empirical and mathematical justification for data aggregation in understanding highly interconnected, dynamic networks such as the clock, and the observed design constraints on the resources required to make this approach widely accessible. PMID:26468131

  10. RighTime: A real time clock correcting program for MS-DOS-based computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, G. Thomas

    1993-01-01

    A computer program is described which effectively eliminates the misgivings of the DOS system clock in PC/AT-class computers. RighTime is a small, sophisticated memory-resident program that automatically corrects both the DOS system clock and the hardware 'CMOS' real time clock (RTC) in real time. RighTime learns what corrections are required without operator interaction beyond the occasional accurate time set. Both warm (power on) and cool (power off) errors are corrected, usually yielding better than one part per million accuracy in the typical desktop computer with no additional hardware, and RighTime increases the system clock resolution from approximately 0.0549 second to 0.01 second. Program tools are also available which allow visualization of RighTime's actions, verification of its performance, display of its history log, and which provide data for graphing of the system clock behavior. The program has found application in a wide variety of industries, including astronomy, satellite tracking, communications, broadcasting, transportation, public utilities, manufacturing, medicine, and the military.

  11. System-level identification of transcriptional circuits underlying mammalian circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hiroki R; Hayashi, Satoko; Chen, Wenbin; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Iino, Masamitsu; Hashimoto, Seiichi

    2005-02-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks consist of complexly integrated regulatory loops, making it difficult to elucidate them without both the accurate measurement of system dynamics and the comprehensive identification of network circuits. Toward a system-level understanding of this transcriptional circuitry, we identified clock-controlled elements on 16 clock and clock-controlled genes in a comprehensive surveillance of evolutionarily conserved cis elements and measurement of their transcriptional dynamics. Here we report the roles of E/E' boxes, DBP/E4BP4 binding elements and RevErbA/ROR binding elements in nine, seven and six genes, respectively. Our results indicate that circadian transcriptional circuits are governed by two design principles: regulation of E/E' boxes and RevErbA/ROR binding elements follows a repressor-precedes-activator pattern, resulting in delayed transcriptional activity, whereas regulation of DBP/E4BP4 binding elements follows a repressor-antiphasic-to-activator mechanism, which generates high-amplitude transcriptional activity. Our analysis further suggests that regulation of E/E' boxes is a topological vulnerability in mammalian circadian clocks, a concept that has been functionally verified using in vitro phenotype assay systems. PMID:15665827

  12. Tissue-specific clocks in Arabidopsis show asymmetric coupling

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Motomu; Shimizu, Hanako; Nohales, Maria A.; Araki, Takashi; Kay, Steve A.

    2014-01-01

    Many organisms rely on a circadian clock system to adapt to daily and seasonal environmental changes. The mammalian circadian clock consists of a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus that is tightly coupled and synchronizes other clocks in peripheral tissues1, 2. Plants also have a circadian clock, but plant circadian clock function has long been assumed to be uncoupled3. Only a few studies have been able to show a weak, local coupling among cells4, 5, 6, 7. Here, by implementing two novel techniques, we have performed a comprehensive tissue-specific analysis of leaf tissues, and we have discovered that the vasculature and mesophyll clocks asymmetrically regulate each other in Arabidopsis. The circadian clock in the vasculature has characteristics distinct from other tissues, cycles robustly without environmental cues, and affects circadian clock regulation in other tissues. Furthermore, we found that vasculature-enriched genes that are rhythmic are preferentially expressed in the evening, whereas rhythmic mesophyll-enriched genes tend to be expressed in the morning. Our results set the stage for a deeper understanding of how the vasculature circadian clock in plants regulates key physiological responses such as flowering time. PMID:25363766

  13. Cycling of clock genes entrained to the solar rhythm enables plants to tell time: data from arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yeang, Hoong-Yeet

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims An endogenous rhythm synchronized to dawn cannot time photosynthesis-linked genes to peak consistently at noon since the interval between sunrise and noon changes seasonally. In this study, a solar clock model that circumvents this limitation is proposed using two daily timing references synchronized to noon and midnight. Other rhythmic genes that are not directly linked to photosynthesis, and which peak at other times, also find an adaptive advantage in entrainment to the solar rhythm. Methods Fourteen datasets extracted from three published papers were used in a meta-analysis to examine the cyclic behaviour of the Arabidopsis thaliana photosynthesis-related gene CAB2 and the clock oscillator genes TOC1 and LHY in T cycles and N–H cycles. Key Results Changes in the rhythms of CAB2, TOC1 and LHY in plants subjected to non-24-h light:dark cycles matched the hypothesized changes in their behaviour as predicted by the solar clock model, thus validating it. The analysis further showed that TOC1 expression peaked ∼5·5 h after mid-day, CAB2 peaked close to noon, while LHY peaked ∼7·5 h after midnight, regardless of the cycle period, the photoperiod or the light:dark period ratio. The solar clock model correctly predicted the zeitgeber timing of these genes under 11 different lighting regimes comprising combinations of seven light periods, nine dark periods, four cycle periods and four light:dark period ratios. In short cycles that terminated before LHY could be expressed, the solar clock correctly predicted zeitgeber timing of its expression in the following cycle. Conclusions Regulation of gene phases by the solar clock enables the plant to tell the time, by which means a large number of genes are regulated. This facilitates the initiation of gene expression even before the arrival of sunrise, sunset or noon, thus allowing the plant to ‘anticipate’ dawn, dusk or mid-day respectively, independently of the photoperiod. PMID:26070640

  14. Hepatic circadian-clock system altered by insulin resistance, diabetes and insulin sensitizer in mice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Huey-Ling; Yang, Shu-Chuan; Yang, Shih-Hsien; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are intrinsic rhythms that are coordinated with the rotation of the Earth and are also generated by a set of circadian-clock genes at the intracellular level. Growing evidence suggests a strong link between circadian rhythms and energy metabolism; however, the fundamental mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, neonatal streptozotocin (STZ)-treated mice were used to model the molecular and physiological progress from insulin resistance to diabetes. Two-day-old male C57BL/6 mice received a single injection of STZ and were tested for non-obese, hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic conditions in the early stage, insulin resistance in the middle stage, and diabetes in the late stage. Gene expression levels of the hepatic circadian-clock system were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Most of the components of the hepatic circadian-clock gene expression system, such as the mRNAs of Bmal1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1), Per2 (period 2) and Cry1 (cryptochrome 1), were elevated, and circadian patterns were retained in the early and middle stages of insulin-resistant conditions. The insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, returns the physiological and molecular changes associated with the diabetic phenotype to normal levels through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) rather than PPARα. Early and chronic treatment with rosiglitazone has been shown to be effective to counter the diabetic condition. Over time, this effect acts to attenuate the increased gene expression levels of the hepatic circadian-clock system and delay the severity of diabetic conditions. Together, these results support an essential role for the hepatic circadian-clock system in the coordinated regulation and/or response of metabolic pathways. PMID:25799429

  15. Hepatic Circadian-Clock System Altered by Insulin Resistance, Diabetes and Insulin Sensitizer in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hsien; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are intrinsic rhythms that are coordinated with the rotation of the Earth and are also generated by a set of circadian-clock genes at the intracellular level. Growing evidence suggests a strong link between circadian rhythms and energy metabolism; however, the fundamental mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, neonatal streptozotocin (STZ)-treated mice were used to model the molecular and physiological progress from insulin resistance to diabetes. Two-day-old male C57BL/6 mice received a single injection of STZ and were tested for non-obese, hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic conditions in the early stage, insulin resistance in the middle stage, and diabetes in the late stage. Gene expression levels of the hepatic circadian-clock system were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Most of the components of the hepatic circadian-clock gene expression system, such as the mRNAs of Bmal1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1), Per2 (period 2) and Cry1 (cryptochrome 1), were elevated, and circadian patterns were retained in the early and middle stages of insulin-resistant conditions. The insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, returns the physiological and molecular changes associated with the diabetic phenotype to normal levels through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) rather than PPARα. Early and chronic treatment with rosiglitazone has been shown to be effective to counter the diabetic condition. Over time, this effect acts to attenuate the increased gene expression levels of the hepatic circadian-clock system and delay the severity of diabetic conditions. Together, these results support an essential role for the hepatic circadian-clock system in the coordinated regulation and/or response of metabolic pathways. PMID:25799429

  16. Evaluating the Effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) Satellite Clock Error via GPS Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, Dinesh; Shafii, Shalini; Amin, Zainal Fitry M.; Jusoh, Asmariah; Zainun Ali, Siti

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock error using GPS simulation. Two conditions of tests are used; Case 1: All the GPS satellites have clock errors within the normal range of 0 to 7 ns, corresponding to pseudorange error range of 0 to 2.1 m; Case 2: One GPS satellite suffers from critical failure, resulting in clock error in the pseudorange of up to 1 km. It is found that increase of GPS satellite clock error causes increase of average positional error due to increase of pseudorange error in the GPS satellite signals, which results in increasing error in the coordinates computed by the GPS receiver. Varying average positional error patterns are observed for the each of the readings. This is due to the GPS satellite constellation being dynamic, causing varying GPS satellite geometry over location and time, resulting in GPS accuracy being location / time dependent. For Case 1, in general, the highest average positional error values are observed for readings with the highest PDOP values, while the lowest average positional error values are observed for readings with the lowest PDOP values. For Case 2, no correlation is observed between the average positional error values and PDOP, indicating that the error generated is random.

  17. Measurement and simulation of clock errors from resource-constrained embedded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, M. A.; Matthews, C. E.; Esward, T. J.; Whibberley, P. B.

    2010-07-01

    Resource-constrained embedded systems such as wireless sensor networks are becoming increasingly sought-after in a range of critical sensing applications. Hardware for such systems is typically developed as a general tool, intended for research and flexibility. These systems often have unexpected limitations and sources of error when being implemented for specific applications. We investigate via measurement and simulation the output of the onboard clock of a Crossbow MICAz testbed, comprising a quartz oscillator accessed via a combination of hardware and software. We show that the clock output available to the user suffers a number of instabilities and errors. Using a simple software simulation of the system based on a series of nested loops, we identify the source of each component of the error, finding that there is a 7.5 × 10-6 probability that a given oscillation from the governing crystal will be miscounted, resulting in frequency jitter over a 60 µHz range.

  18. An Empirical Clock to Measure the Dynamical Age of Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalessandro, E.

    2014-08-01

    Blue Straggler Stars (BSS) are among the brightest and more massive stars in globular clusters (GCs). For this reason they represent an ideal tool to probe the dynamical evolution of these stellar systems. Here I show, following the results by Ferraro et al. (2012), that the BSS radial distribution can be used as a powerful indicator of the cluster dynamical age. In fact on the basis of their BSS radial distribution shape, GCs can be efficiently grouped in different families corresponding to the different dynamical stages reached by the stellar systems. This allows one to define a first empirical clock, the dynamical clock, able to measure the dynamical age of a stellar system from pure observational quantities.

  19. Slot clock recovery in optical PPM communication systems with avalanche photodiode photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli

    1989-01-01

    Slot timing recovery in a direct-detection optical PPM communication system can be achieved by processing the photodetector output waveform with a nonlinear device whose output forms the input to a phase-locked loop. The choice of a simple transition detector as the nonlinearity is shown to give satisfactory synchronization performance. The rms phase error of the recovered slot clock and the effect of slot timing jitter on the bit error probability were directly measured. The experimental system consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (wavelength = 834 nm) and a silicon avalanche photodiode photodetector. The system used Q = 4 PPM signaling and operated at a source data rate of 25 Mbits/s. The mathematical model developed to compute the rms phase error of the recovered clock is shown to be in good agreement with results of actual measurements of phase errors. The use of the recovered slot clock in the receiver resulted in no significant degradation in receiver sensitivity compared to a system with perfect slot timing. The system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the -6th at a received optical signal energy of 55 detected photons per information bit.

  20. A quantum many-body spin system in an optical lattice clock.

    PubMed

    Martin, M J; Bishof, M; Swallows, M D; Zhang, X; Benko, C; von-Stecher, J; Gorshkov, A V; Rey, A M; Ye, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Strongly interacting quantum many-body systems arise in many areas of physics, but their complexity generally precludes exact solutions to their dynamics. We explored a strongly interacting two-level system formed by the clock states in (87)Sr as a laboratory for the study of quantum many-body effects. Our collective spin measurements reveal signatures of the development of many-body correlations during the dynamical evolution. We derived a many-body Hamiltonian that describes the experimental observation of atomic spin coherence decay, density-dependent frequency shifts, severely distorted lineshapes, and correlated spin noise. These investigations open the door to further explorations of quantum many-body effects and entanglement through use of highly coherent and precisely controlled optical lattice clocks. PMID:23929976

  1. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cappellini, G.; Lombardi, P.; Mancini, M.; Pagano, G.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fallani, L.; Catani, J.

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic {sup 173}Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  2. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellini, G.; Lombardi, P.; Mancini, M.; Pagano, G.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fallani, L.; Catani, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic 173Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  3. Resetting Biological Clocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfree, Arthur T.

    1975-01-01

    Reports on experiments conducted on two biological clocks, in organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms, which indicate that biological oscillation can be arrested by a single stimulus of a definite strength delivered at the proper time. (GS)

  4. Clock performance as a critical parameter in navigation satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderle, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The high performance of available oscillators has permitted the development of invaluable navigation and geodetic satellite systems. However, still higher performance oscillators would further improve the accuracy or flexibility of the systems.

  5. THE mPER2 CLOCK GENE MODULATES COCAINE ACTIONS IN THE MOUSE CIRCADIAN SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Stowie, Adam C.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is a potent disruptor of photic and non-photic pathways for circadian entrainment of the master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These actions of cocaine likely involve its modulation of molecular (clock gene) components for SCN clock timekeeping. At present, however, the physiological basis of such an interaction is unclear. To address this question, we compared photic and non-photic phase-resetting responses between wild-type (WT) and Per2 mutant mice expressing nonfunctional PER2 protein to systemic and intra-SCN cocaine administrations. In the systemic trials, cocaine was administered i.p. (20 mg/kg) either at midday or prior to a light pulse in the early night to assess its non-photic and photic behavioral phase-resetting actions, respectively. In the intra-SCN trial, cocaine was administered by reverse microdialysis at midday to determine if the SCN is a direct target for its non-photic phase-resetting action. Non-photic phase-advancing responses to i.p. cocaine at midday were significantly (~3.5-fold) greater in Per2 mutants than WTs. However, the phase-advancing action of intra-SCN cocaine perfusion at midday did not differ between genotypes. In the light pulse trial, Per2 mutants exhibited larger photic phase-delays than did WTs, and the attenuating action of cocaine on this response was proportionately larger than in WTs. These data indicate that the Per2 clock gene is a potent modulator of cocaine’s actions in the circadian system. With regard to non-photic phase-resetting, the SCN is confirmed as a direct target of cocaine action; however, Per2 modulation of this effect likely occurs outside of the SCN. PMID:23333842

  6. Verification of fault-tolerant clock synchronization systems. M.S. Thesis - College of William and Mary, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Paul S.

    1993-01-01

    A critical function in a fault-tolerant computer architecture is the synchronization of the redundant computing elements. The synchronization algorithm must include safeguards to ensure that failed components do not corrupt the behavior of good clocks. Reasoning about fault-tolerant clock synchronization is difficult because of the possibility of subtle interactions involving failed components. Therefore, mechanical proof systems are used to ensure that the verification of the synchronization system is correct. In 1987, Schneider presented a general proof of correctness for several fault-tolerant clock synchronization algorithms. Subsequently, Shankar verified Schneider's proof by using the mechanical proof system EHDM. This proof ensures that any system satisfying its underlying assumptions will provide Byzantine fault-tolerant clock synchronization. The utility of Shankar's mechanization of Schneider's theory for the verification of clock synchronization systems is explored. Some limitations of Shankar's mechanically verified theory were encountered. With minor modifications to the theory, a mechanically checked proof is provided that removes these limitations. The revised theory also allows for proven recovery from transient faults. Use of the revised theory is illustrated with the verification of an abstract design of a clock synchronization system.

  7. A meeting of two chronobiological systems: circadian proteins Period1 and BMAL1 modulate the human hair cycle clock.

    PubMed

    Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Hardman, Jonathan A; Bíró, Tamás; Haslam, Iain S; Philpott, Michael P; Tóth, Balázs I; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Baier, Gerold; Watson, Rachel E B; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Paus, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    The hair follicle (HF) is a continuously remodeled mini organ that cycles between growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative quiescence (telogen). As the anagen-to-catagen transformation of microdissected human scalp HFs can be observed in organ culture, it permits the study of the unknown controls of autonomous, rhythmic tissue remodeling of the HF, which intersects developmental, chronobiological, and growth-regulatory mechanisms. The hypothesis that the peripheral clock system is involved in hair cycle control, i.e., the anagen-to-catagen transformation, was tested. Here we show that in the absence of central clock influences, isolated, organ-cultured human HFs show circadian changes in the gene and protein expression of core clock genes (CLOCK, BMAL1, and Period1) and clock-controlled genes (c-Myc, NR1D1, and CDKN1A), with Period1 expression being hair cycle dependent. Knockdown of either BMAL1 or Period1 in human anagen HFs significantly prolonged anagen. This provides evidence that peripheral core clock genes modulate human HF cycling and are an integral component of the human hair cycle clock. Specifically, our study identifies BMAL1 and Period1 as potential therapeutic targets for modulating human hair growth. PMID:24005054

  8. Molecular clocks and the early evolution of metazoan nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Wray, Gregory A

    2015-12-19

    The timing of early animal evolution remains poorly resolved, yet remains critical for understanding nervous system evolution. Methods for estimating divergence times from sequence data have improved considerably, providing a more refined understanding of key divergences. The best molecular estimates point to the origin of metazoans and bilaterians tens to hundreds of millions of years earlier than their first appearances in the fossil record. Both the molecular and fossil records are compatible, however, with the possibility of tiny, unskeletonized, low energy budget animals during the Proterozoic that had planktonic, benthic, or meiofaunal lifestyles. Such animals would likely have had relatively simple nervous systems equipped primarily to detect food, avoid inhospitable environments and locate mates. The appearance of the first macropredators during the Cambrian would have changed the selective landscape dramatically, likely driving the evolution of complex sense organs, sophisticated sensory processing systems, and diverse effector systems involved in capturing prey and avoiding predation. PMID:26554040

  9. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Havaux, Michel; Riefler, Michael; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. PMID:27354555

  10. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Havaux, Michel; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. PMID:27354555

  11. The development of the hardware for studying biological clock systems under microgravity conditions, using scorpions as animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, L.; Viganò, W.; Donati, A.; Porciani, M.; Zolesi, V.; Schulze-Varnholt, D.; Manieri, P.; El-Din Sallam, A.; Schmäh, M.; Horn, E. R.

    2007-02-01

    The study of internal clock systems of scorpions in weightless conditions is the goal of the SCORPI experiment. SCORPI was selected for flight on the International Space Station (ISS) and will be mounted in the European facility BIOLAB, the European Space Agency (ESA) laboratory designed to support biological experiments on micro-organisms, cells, tissue, cultures, small plants and small invertebrates. This paper outlines the main features of a breadboard designed and developed in order to allow the analysis of critical aspects of the experiment. It is a complete tool to simulate the experiment mission on ground and it can be customised, adapted and tuned to the scientific requirements. The paper introduces the SCORPI-T experiment which represents an important precursor for the success of the SCORPI on BIOLAB. The capabilities of the hardware developed show its potential use for future similar experiments in space.

  12. MIMO equalization optimized for baud rate clock recovery in coherent 112 Gbit/sec DP-QPSK metro systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshtein, Albert; Sadot, Dan; Dorman, Guy

    2015-03-01

    A novel MIMO equalization architecture optimized for baud rate clock recovery (BCR-MIMO) in coherent 112 Gbit/sec dual polarization quadrature phase shift keying (DP-QPSK) metro systems is proposed. This architecture is designed to decouple between multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) equalization and clock recovery (CR) loops, avoiding the interaction between them. The decoupling between the two loops is achieved, while maintaining similar MIMO equalizer performance, as compared to the butterfly-structured equalizer.

  13. GCFR plant control system

    SciTech Connect

    Estrine, E.A.; Greiner, H.G.

    1980-05-01

    A plant control system is being designed for a gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant. Control analysis is being performed as an integral part of the plant design process to ensure that control requirements are satisfied as the plant design evolves. The load control portion of the plant control system provides stable automatic (closed-loop) control of the plant over the 25% to 100% load range. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate load control system performance. The results show that the plant is controllable at full load with the control system structure selected, but gain scheduling is required to achieve desired performance over the load range.

  14. Plant uptake-assisted round-the-clock photocatalysis for complete purification of aquaculture wastewater using sunlight.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhenfeng; Cao, Fenglei; Zhu, Jian; Li, Hexing

    2015-02-17

    A novel reactor equipped with solar batteries, Bi2O3/TiO2 film photocatalyst, and celery plant was designed and used for purification of aquaculture wastewater. The Bi2O3/TiO2 film photocatalyst started photocatalytic degradation of organonitrogen compounds under irradiation of sunlight. Meanwhile, the solar batteries absorbed and converted excess sunlight into electric energy and then started UV lamps at night, leading to round-the-clock photocatalysis. Subsequently, the inorganic nitrogen species including NH4(+), NO2(-), and NO3(-) resulting from photocatalytic degradation of the organonitrogen compounds could subsequently be uptaken by the celery plant as the fertilizer to reduce the secondary pollution. It was found that, after 24 h circulation, both organonitrogen compounds and NO2(-) species were completely removed, while NH4(+) and NO3(-) contents also decreased by 30% and 50%, respectively. The reactor could be used repetitively, showing a good potential in practical application. PMID:25625860

  15. Early results from a prototype VLBI clock monitoring system. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Madrid, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    Four sets of experiments were conducted to measure the relative epoch offsets between atomic clocks in California, Australia, and Spain by means of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). The experiments were conducted using an incomplete R & D VLBI system with a number of inherent limitations. The results indicate that the measurement objective of epoch offset to 10 nanoseconds will be met. Tables show the measured offset, the residual to fit, and the square root Allan variance. Graphs show the rate change and the rate reset.

  16. Stop and restart of granular clock in a vibrated compartmentalized bidisperse granular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi-Yi; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jiang, Rui; Wu, Yong-Hong

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies a bidisperse granular mixture consisting of two species of stainless steel spheres in a vertically vibrated compartmentalized container. The experiments show that with proper vibration acceleration, the granular clock stops when horizontal segregation of the large spheres residing in the far end from the barrier wall occurs. When the segregation is broken, the granular clock restarts. We present the phase diagrams of vibration acceleration versus container width and small particle number, which exhibits three different regions, namely, clustering state, stop-restart of the granular clock, and the granular clock. A generalized flux model is proposed to reproduce the phenomenon of stop and restart of the granular clock.

  17. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  18. Circadian Clocks and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Peek, Clara B.; Affinati, Alison; Maury, Eleonore; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks maintain periodicity in internal cycles of behavior, physiology, and metabolism, enabling organisms to anticipate the 24-h rotation of the Earth. In mammals, circadian integration of metabolic systems optimizes energy harvesting and utilization across the light/dark cycle. Disruption of clock genes has recently been linked to sleep disorders and to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Conversely, aberrant nutrient signaling affects circadian rhythms of behavior. This chapter reviews the emerging relationship between the molecular clock and metabolic systems and examines evidence that circadian disruption exerts deleterious consequences on human health. PMID:23604478

  19. Highly reliable optical system for a rubidium space cold atom clock.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Sun, Yanguang; Wang, Bin; Xia, Wenbing; Qu, Qiuzhi; Xiang, Jingfeng; Dong, Zuoren; Lü, Desheng; Liu, Liang

    2016-05-01

    We describe a highly reliable optical system designed for a rubidium space cold atom clock (SCAC), presenting its design, key technologies, and optical components. All of the optical and electronic components are integrated onto an optimized two-sided 300  mm×290  mm×30  mm optical bench. The compact optical structure and special thermal design ensure that the optical system can pass all of the space environmental qualification tests including both thermal vacuum and mechanical tests. To verify its performance, the optical system is carefully checked before and after each test. The results indicate that this optical system is suitably robust for the space applications for which the rubidium SCAC was built. PMID:27140378

  20. Power Plant Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.; Yang, Y. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Three basic thermodynamic cycles of advanced nuclear MHD power plant systems are studied. The effect of reactor exit temperature and space radiator temperature on the overall thermal efficiency of a regenerative turbine compressor power plant system is shown. The effect of MHD pressure ratio on plant efficiency is also described, along with the dependence of MHD power output, compressor power requirement, turbine power output, mass flow rate of H2, and overall plant efficiency on the reactor exit temperature for a specific configuration.

  1. The JPL near-real-time VLBI system and its application to clock synchronization and earth orientation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. S.; Eubanks, T. M.; Roth, M. G.; Steppe, J. A.; Esposito, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    The JPL near-real-time VLBI system called Block I is discussed. The hardware and software of the system are described, and the Time and Earth Motion Precision Observations (TEMPO) which utilize Block I are discussed. These observations are designed to provide interstation clock synchronization to 10 nsec and to determine earth orientation (UT1 and polar motion - UTPM) to 30 cm or better in each component. TEMPO results for clock synchronization and UTPM are presented with data from the July 1980-August 1981 analyzed using the most recent JPL solution software and source catalog. Future plans for TEMPO and Block I are discussed.

  2. Osmotic stress at the barley root affects expression of circadian clock genes in the shoot.

    PubMed

    Habte, Ermias; Müller, Lukas M; Shtaya, Munqez; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2014-06-01

    The circadian clock is an important timing system that controls physiological responses to abiotic stresses in plants. However, there is little information on the effects of the clock on stress adaptation in important crops, like barley. In addition, we do not know how osmotic stress perceived at the roots affect the shoot circadian clock. Barley genotypes, carrying natural variation at the photoperiod response and clock genes Ppd-H1 and HvELF3, were grown under control and osmotic stress conditions to record changes in the diurnal expression of clock and stress-response genes and in physiological traits. Variation at HvELF3 affected the expression phase and shape of clock and stress-response genes, while variation at Ppd-H1 only affected the expression levels of stress genes. Osmotic stress up-regulated expression of clock and stress-response genes and advanced their expression peaks. Clock genes controlled the expression of stress-response genes, but had minor effects on gas exchange and leaf transpiration. This study demonstrated that osmotic stress at the barley root altered clock gene expression in the shoot and acted as a spatial input signal into the clock. Unlike in Arabidopsis, barley primary assimilation was less controlled by the clock and more responsive to environmental perturbations, such as osmotic stress. PMID:24895755

  3. Circadian Clocks in Fuel Harvesting and Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    RAMSEY, K.M.; BASS, J.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian systems have evolved in plants, eubacteria, neurospora, and the metazoa as a mechanism to optimize energy acquisition and storage in synchrony with the rotation of the Earth on its axis. In plants, circadian clocks drive the expression of genes involved in oxygenic photosynthesis during the light and nitrogen fixation during the dark, repeating this cycle each day. In mammals, the core clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) functions to entrain extra-SCN and peripheral clocks to the light cycle, including regions central to energy homeostasis and sleep, as well as peripheral tissues involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. Tissue-specific gene targeting has shown a primary role of clock genes in endocrine pancreas insulin secretion, indicating that local clocks play a cell-autonomous role in organismal homeostasis. A present focus is to dissect the consequences of clock disruption on modulation of nuclear hormone receptor signaling and on posttranscriptional regulation of intermediary metabolism. Experimental genetic studies have pointed toward extensive interplay between circadian and metabolic systems and offer a means to dissect the impact of local tissue molecular clocks on fuel utilization across the sleep–wake cycle. PMID:21890641

  4. Plant Systems Biology (editorial)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2003, Plant Physiology published an Arabidopsis special issue devoted to plant systems biology. The intention of Natasha Raikhel and Gloria Coruzzi, the two editors of this first-of-its-kind issue, was ‘‘to help nucleate this new effort within the plant community’’ as they considered that ‘‘...

  5. Autonomous Rubidium Clock Weak Frequency Jump Detector for Onboard Navigation Satellite System.

    PubMed

    Khare, Akshay; Arora, Rajat; Banik, Alak; Mehta, Sanjay D

    2016-02-01

    Frequency jumps are common in rubidium frequency sources. They affect the estimation of user position in navigational satellite systems. These jumps must be detected and corrected immediately as they have direct impact on the navigation system integrity. A novel weak frequency jump detector is proposed based on a Kalman filter with a multi-interval approach. This detector can be applied for both "sudden" and "slow" frequency transitions. In this detection method, noises of clock data are reduced by Kalman filtering, for accurate estimation of jump size with less latency. Analysis on in-orbit rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS) phase telemetry data shows that the detector can be used for fast detection and correction of weak frequency jumps. Furthermore, performance comparison of different existing frequency jump detection techniques with the proposed detector is discussed. A multialgorithm-based strategy is proposed depending on the jump size and latency for onboard navigation satellites having RAFS as the primary frequency source. PMID:26685233

  6. Flies, clocks and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, E; Kyriacou, C P

    2001-01-01

    The negative feedback model for gene regulation of the circadian mechanism is described for the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster. The conservation of function of clock molecules is illustrated by comparison with the mammalian circadian system, and the apparent swapping of roles between various canonical clock gene components is highlighted. The role of clock gene duplications and divergence of function is introduced via the timeless gene. The impressive similarities in clock gene regulation between flies and mammals could suggest that variation between more closely related species within insects might be minimal. However, this is not borne out because the expression of clock molecules in the brain of the giant silk moth, Antheraea pernyi, is not easy to reconcile with the negative feedback roles of the period and timeless genes. Variation in clock gene sequences between and within fly species is examined and the role of co-evolution between and within clock molecules is described, particularly with reference to adaptive functions of the circadian phenotype. PMID:11710984

  7. Interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian clock system: Importance for metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Ribas-Latre, Aleix; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Background While additional research is needed, a number of large epidemiological studies show an association between circadian disruption and metabolic disorders. Specifically, obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and other signs of metabolic syndrome all have been linked to circadian disruption in humans. Studies in other species support this association and generally reveal that feeding that is not in phase with the external light/dark cycle, as often occurs with night or rotating shift workers, is disadvantageous in terms of energy balance. As food is a strong driver of circadian rhythms in the periphery, understanding how nutrient metabolism drives clocks across the body is important for dissecting out why circadian misalignment may produce such metabolic effects. A number of circadian clock proteins as well as their accessory proteins (such as nuclear receptors) are highly sensitive to nutrient metabolism. Macronutrients and micronutrients can function as zeitgebers for the clock in a tissue-specific way and can thus impair synchrony between clocks across the body, or potentially restore synchrony in the case of circadian misalignment. Circadian nuclear receptors are particularly sensitive to nutrient metabolism and can alter tissue-specific rhythms in response to changes in the diet. Finally, SNPs in human clock genes appear to be correlated with diet-specific responses and along with chronotype eventually may provide valuable information from a clinical perspective on how to use diet and nutrition to treat metabolic disorders. Scope of review This article presents a background of the circadian clock components and their interrelated metabolic and transcriptional feedback loops, followed by a review of some recent studies in humans and rodents that address the effects of nutrient metabolism on the circadian clock and vice versa. We focus on studies in which results suggest that nutrients provide an opportunity to restore or, alternatively

  8. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity, respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous - whose rates are related by a non-constant function beta sub a - is demonstrated. The cosmological character of beta sub a is also discussed.

  9. Circadian Clock, Cancer, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a global regulatory system that interfaces with most other regulatory systems and pathways in mammalian organisms. Investigations of the circadian clock–DNA damage response connections have revealed that nucleotide excision repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis are appreciably influenced by the clock. Although several epidemiological studies in humans and a limited number of genetic studies in mouse model systems have indicated that clock disruption may predispose mammals to cancer, well-controlled genetic studies in mice have not supported the commonly held view that circadian clock disruption is a cancer risk factor. In fact, in the appropriate genetic background, clock disruption may instead aid in cancer regression by promoting intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the clock may affect the efficacy of cancer treatment (chronochemotherapy) by modulating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as the activity of the DNA repair enzymes that repair the DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs. PMID:25302769

  10. Constitutive, light-responsive and circadian clock-responsive factors compete for the different l box elements in plant light-regulated promoters.

    PubMed

    Borello, U; Ceccarelli, E; Giuliano, G

    1993-10-01

    The l box is a conserved regulatory motif which is found upstream of plant genes (rbcS, cab and nia) whose transcription is regulated by light and the circadian clock. Gel retardation and UV cross-linking assays were used to resolve two different groups of I box binding factors (IBFs) in tomato nuclear extracts. Active components of the first group (IBF-1) recognize the l box of the light-responsive rbcS promoter; one factor within this group, IBF-1a, also recognizes the adjacent G box, which has been shown previously to bind a different class of plant transcription factors, the G box binding factors (GBFs). To the limit of experimental resolution, IBF-1a and GBF compete for the same nucleotides on the G box. Nevertheless, these two activities are biochemically and immunologically distinct. The relative abundance of IBF-1a shows a vast decrease in dark-adapted plants. Factors in the second group (IBF-2), recognize the l box of the nia promoter, which is regulated both by light and the circadian clock; one factor within this group, IBF-2a, also binds the l box of a second promoter showing similar regulation, the cab promoter. The IBF-2a binding sites on the cab and nia promoters show extensive homology to a circadian clock-responsive promoter element from wheat. The abundance of IBF-2a is diurnally regulated and shows a dramatic induction around the onset of the light period. Transfer of the plants in continuous darkness demonstrates that this induction is under the control of a circadian clock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8252065

  11. Model Checking a Byzantine-Fault-Tolerant Self-Stabilizing Protocol for Distributed Clock Synchronization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the mechanical verification of a simplified model of a rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing protocol for distributed clock synchronization systems. This protocol does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the system. This protocol tolerates bursts of transient failures, and deterministically converges within a time bound that is a linear function of the self-stabilization period. A simplified model of the protocol is verified using the Symbolic Model Verifier (SMV) [SMV]. The system under study consists of 4 nodes, where at most one of the nodes is assumed to be Byzantine faulty. The model checking effort is focused on verifying correctness of the simplified model of the protocol in the presence of a permanent Byzantine fault as well as confirmation of claims of determinism and linear convergence with respect to the self-stabilization period. Although model checking results of the simplified model of the protocol confirm the theoretical predictions, these results do not necessarily confirm that the protocol solves the general case of this problem. Modeling challenges of the protocol and the system are addressed. A number of abstractions are utilized in order to reduce the state space. Also, additional innovative state space reduction techniques are introduced that can be used in future verification efforts applied to this and other protocols.

  12. Time-related dynamics of variation in core clock gene expression levels in tissues relevant to the immune system.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Sothern, R B; Greco, A; Pazienza, V; Vinciguerra, M; Liu, S; Cai, Y

    2011-01-01

    Immune parameters show rhythmic changes with a 24-h periodicity driven by an internal circadian timing system that relies on clock genes (CGs). CGs form interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops to generate and maintain 24-h mRNA and protein oscillations. In this study we evaluate and compare the profiles and the dynamics of variation of CG expression in peripheral blood, and two lymphoid tissues of mice. Expression levels of seven recognized key CGs (mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1, mCry2, and Rev-erbalpha) were evaluated by quantitative RT- PCR in spleen, thymus and peripheral blood of C57BL/6 male mice housed on a 12-h light (L)-dark (D) cycle and sacrificed every 4 h for 24 h (3-4 mice/time point). We found a statistically significant time-effect in spleen (S), thymus (T) and blood (B) for the original values of expression level of mBmal1 (S), mClock (T, B), mPer1 (S, B), mPer2 (S), mCry1 (S), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S, T, B) and for the fractional variation calculated between single time-point expression value of mBmal1 (B), mPer2 (T), mCry2 (B) and mRev-Erbalpha (S). A significant 24-h rhythm was validated for five CGs in blood (mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry2, mRev-Erbalpha), for four CGs in the spleen (mBmal1, mPer1, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha), and for three CGs in the thymus (mClock, mPer2, mRev-Erbalpha). The original values of acrophases for mBmal1, mClock, mPer1, mPer2, mCry1 and mCry2 were very similar for spleen and thymus and advanced by several hours for peripheral blood compared to the lymphoid tissues, whereas the phases of mRev-Erbalpha were coincident for all three tissues. In conclusion, central and peripheral lymphoid tissues in the mouse show different sequences of activation of clock gene expression compared to peripheral blood. These differences may underlie the compartmental pattern of web functioning in the immune system. PMID:22230394

  13. A circadian clock in Antarctic krill: an endogenous timing system governs metabolic output rhythms in the euphausid species Euphausia superba.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Mathias; Wendt, Sabrina; Kawaguchi, So; Kramer, Achim; Meyer, Bettina

    2011-01-01

    Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, shapes the structure of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Its central position in the food web, the ongoing environmental changes due to climatic warming, and increasing commercial interest on this species emphasize the urgency of understanding the adaptability of krill to its environment. Krill has evolved rhythmic physiological and behavioral functions which are synchronized with the daily and seasonal cycles of the complex Southern Ocean ecosystem. The mechanisms, however, leading to these rhythms are essentially unknown. Here, we show that krill possesses an endogenous circadian clock that governs metabolic and physiological output rhythms. We found that expression of the canonical clock gene cry2 was highly rhythmic both in a light-dark cycle and in constant darkness. We detected a remarkable short circadian period, which we interpret as a special feature of the krill's circadian clock that helps to entrain the circadian system to the extreme range of photoperiods krill is exposed to throughout the year. Furthermore, we found that important key metabolic enzymes of krill showed bimodal circadian oscillations (∼9-12 h period) in transcript abundance and enzymatic activity. Oxygen consumption of krill showed ∼9-12 h oscillations that correlated with the temporal activity profile of key enzymes of aerobic energy metabolism. Our results demonstrate the first report of an endogenous circadian timing system in Antarctic krill and its likely link to metabolic key processes. Krill's circadian clock may not only be critical for synchronization to the solar day but also for the control of seasonal events. This study provides a powerful basis for the investigation into the mechanisms of temporal synchronization in this marine key species and will also lead to the first comprehensive analyses of the circadian clock of a polar marine organism through the entire photoperiodic cycle. PMID:22022521

  14. Endogenous circannual clock and HP complex in a hibernation control system.

    PubMed

    Kondo, N

    2007-01-01

    Hibernation in mammals is a mysterious biological phenomenon that appears on a seasonal basis for surviving a potentially lethal low body temperature (Tb) near 0 degrees C and protecting organisms from various diseases and harmful events during hibernation. The exact mechanism by which such a unique ability is seasonally developed is still unknown. On the basis of our previous finding that the source of calcium ions for excitation-contraction coupling in myocardium of chipmunks, a rodent hibernator, is seasonally modulated for hibernation, the liver-derived hibernation-specific protein (HP) complex was discovered. Recently, the HP complex was identified as a promising candidate hormone that carries a hibernation signal to the brain independently of Tb and environmental changes for developing a capacity for tolerating low Tb. This finding will promote new approaches to understanding biological hibernation systems, including a circannual clock and its signaling pathway between the brain and the periphery. A new definition of hibernation and a possible model of a hibernation control system are proposed. PMID:18419320

  15. An uncorrelated relaxed-clock analysis suggests an earlier origin for flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen A.; Beaulieu, Jeremy M.; Donoghue, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dating analyses for land plants that incorporate 33 fossil calibrations, permit rates of molecular evolution to be uncorrelated across the tree, and take into account uncertainties in phylogenetic relationships and the fossil record. We attached a prior probability to each fossil-based minimum age, and explored the effects of relying on the first appearance of tricolpate pollen grains as a lower bound for the age of eudicots. Many of our divergence-time estimates for major clades coincide well with both the known fossil record and with previous estimates. However, our estimates for the origin of crown-clade angiosperms, which center on the Late Triassic, are considerably older than the unequivocal fossil record of flowering plants or than the molecular dates presented in recent studies. Nevertheless, we argue that our older estimates should be taken into account in studying the causes and consequences of the angiosperm radiation in relation to other major events, including the diversification of holometabolous insects. Although the methods used here do help to correct for lineage-specific heterogeneity in rates of molecular evolution (associated, for example, with evolutionary shifts in life history), we remain concerned that some such effects (e.g., the early radiation of herbaceous clades within angiosperms) may still be biasing our inferences. PMID:20304790

  16. Can an 18-point clock-drawing scoring system predict dementia in elderly individuals with mild cognitive impairment?

    PubMed

    Babins, Lennie; Slater, Marie-Eve; Whitehead, Victor; Chertkow, Howard

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a clock-drawing scoring system better suited to detecting possible early markers of dementia in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We modified the scoring system of Freedman et al. (1994), in which the major components are integrity of the circle, placement and size of the hands, and placement and sequence of the numbers. We rescored the clock-drawing test using a novel 18-point scoring system, which emphasizes hand elements-number of hands, direction indicated, and size differences. We retrospectively assessed 123 individuals (ages 58-88 years) selected from the Memory Clinic at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal. These consisted of 21 normal elderly individuals (NORM group), 41 participants with mild cognitive impairment who did not develop dementia on follow-up visits (MCI-NP), 41 participants with mild cognitive impairment who became demented after a 48-month follow-up (MCI-D), and 20 participants diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the 18-point system, the MCI-NP and the MCI-D did not show any difference on overall total score (p = .166), However, using Pearson chi-squares to examine the within-categories effects comparing the mildly cognitively impaired groups (MCI-NP and MCI-D), there were three significant hand items that appear to be possible early markers of progression to dementia. The clock has two hands (p = .043), hour hand is towards correct number (p = .023), and size difference of the hands is respected (p = .004), all showed significant differences between progressors and nonprogressors. The 18-point clock-drawing scoring system may have advantages in better indicating MCI individuals more likely to progress to dementia. PMID:18938669

  17. A gallium-arsenide digital phase shifter for clock and control signal distribution in high-speed digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouts, Douglas J.

    1992-01-01

    The design, implementation, testing, and applications of a gallium-arsenide digital phase shifter and fan-out buffer are described. The integrated circuit provides a method for adjusting the phase of high-speed clock and control signals in digital systems, without the need for pruning cables, multiplexing between cables of different lengths, delay lines, or similar techniques. The phase of signals distributed with the described chip can be dynamically adjusted in eight different steps of approximately 60 ps per step. The IC also serves as a fan-out buffer and provides 12 in-phase outputs. The chip is useful for distributing high-speed clock and control signals in synchronous digital systems, especially if components are distributed over a large physical area or if there is a large number of components.

  18. Biochemical Frequency Control by Synchronisation of Coupled Repressilators: An In Silico Study of Modules for Circadian Clock Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hinze, Thomas; Schumann, Mathias; Bodenstein, Christian; Heiland, Ines; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Exploration of chronobiological systems emerges as a growing research field within bioinformatics focusing on various applications in medicine, agriculture, and material sciences. From a systems biological perspective, the question arises whether biological control systems for regulation of oscillatory signals and their technical counterparts utilise similar mechanisms. If so, modelling approaches and parameterisation adopted from building blocks can help to identify general components for frequency control in circadian clocks along with gaining insight into mechanisms of clock synchronisation to external stimuli like the daily rhythm of sunlight and darkness. Phase-locked loops could be an interesting candidate in this context. Both, biology and engineering, can benefit from a unified view resulting from systems modularisation. In a first experimental study, we analyse a model of coupled repressilators. We demonstrate its ability to synchronise clock signals in a monofrequential manner. Several oscillators initially deviate in phase difference and frequency with respect to explicit reaction and diffusion rates. Accordingly, the duration of the synchronisation process depends on dedicated reaction and diffusion parameters whose settings still lack to be sufficiently captured analytically. PMID:22046179

  19. Clock drift-tolerant optical bit pattern monitoring technique in asynchronous undersampling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huixing; Zhao, Wei

    2011-10-01

    Based on an asynchronously undersampling system, we present a novel bit pattern monitoring technique in terms of its performance analysis and the implementation aspects. Relying upon an finite impulse response (FIR) filter assisted fine synchronization of the acquired samples, the technique can significantly reduce the random walk clock drift between data signal and sampling source compared to a conventional fine synchronization using a fixed time step. For the performance analysis of this technique, we first present an intuitive understanding of the principle of the FIR filter method under consideration of the filter frequency response. We find that the frequency response of the FIR filter simply serves to extract the spectral component at the aliasing frequency found in the periodogram and diminish all other frequency components. Then we test the tracking limit and discuss the optimized filter length choice of the new bit pattern monitoring technique through numerical examples. It turns out that the optimal filter length is chosen as the one which minimized the measured jitter and can be found iteratively. Finally, we present an experimental verification of this FIR bit pattern synchronization method by measuring and reconstructing bit patterns of 40 Gb/s nonreturn-to-zero and 160 Gb/s return-to-zero data signals, respectively.

  20. Long-term effect of systemic RNA interference on circadian clock genes in hemimetabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Uryu, Outa; Kamae, Yuichi; Tomioka, Kenji; Yoshii, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) strategy, which enables gene-specific knock-down of transcripts, has been spread across a wide area of insect studies for investigating gene function without regard to model and non-model insects. This technique is of particular benefit to promote molecular studies on non-model insects. However, the optimal conditions for RNAi are still not well understood because of its variable efficiency depending on the species, target genes, and experimental conditions. To apply RNAi technique to long-running experiments such as chronobiological studies, the effects of RNAi have to persist throughout the experiment. In this study, we attempted to determine the optimal concentration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for systemic RNAi and its effective period in two different insect species, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the firebrat Thermobia domestica. In both species, higher concentrations of dsRNA principally yielded a more efficient knock-down of mRNA levels of tested clock genes, although the effect depended on the gene and the species. Surprisingly, the effect of the RNAi reached its maximum effect 1-2 weeks and 1 month after the injection of dsRNA in the crickets and the firebrats, respectively, suggesting a slow but long-term effect of RNAi. Our study provides fundamental information for utilizing RNAi technique in any long-running experiment. PMID:23458340

  1. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  2. Design and implementation of fast bipolar clock drivers for CCD imaging systems in space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarajan, Jayesh; Kumar, Nishant; Verma, Amarnath; Thaker, Ramkrishna

    2016-05-01

    Drive electronics for generating fast, bipolar clocks, which can drive capacitive loads of the order of 5-10nF are indispensable for present day Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs). Design of these high speed bipolar clocks is challenging because of the capacitive loads that have to be driven and a strict constraint on the rise and fall times. Designing drive electronics circuits for space applications becomes even more challenging due to limited number of available discrete devices, which can survive in the harsh radiation prone space environment. This paper presents the design, simulations and test results of a set of such high speed, bipolar clock drivers. The design has been tested under a thermal cycle of -15 deg C to +55 deg C under vacuum conditions and has been designed using radiation hardened components. The test results show that the design meets the stringent rise/fall time requirements of 50+/-10ns for Multiple Vertical CCD (VCCD) clocks and 20+/-5ns for Horizontal CCD (HCCD) clocks with sufficient design margins across full temperature range, with a pixel readout rate of 6.6MHz. The full design has been realized in flexi-rigid PCB with package volume of 140x160x50 mm3.

  3. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-06-01

    In this study we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancelation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits respectively two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 {m^2/s^2} based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s/s) level. Since optical-atomic clocks with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimeter level accuracy in the near future.

  4. Quasars as very-accurate clock synchronizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Quasars can be employed to synchronize global data communications, geophysical measurements, and atomic clocks. It is potentially two to three orders of magnitude better than presently-used Moon-bounce system. Comparisons between quasar and clock pulses are used to develop correction or synchronization factors for station clocks.

  5. Clock and clock-controlled genes are differently expressed in the retina, lamina and in selected cells of the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Damulewicz, Milena; Loboda, Agnieszka; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Pyza, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The retina and the first optic neuropil (lamina) of Drosophila show circadian rhythms in various processes. To learn about the regulation of circadian rhythms in the retina and lamina and in two cell types, glial and the lamina L2 interneurons, we examined expression of the following clock genes; per, tim, clk, and cry and clock-controlled genes (ccgs); Atpα, nrv2, brp, Pdfr. We found that the expression of gene studied is specific for the retina and lamina. The rhythms of per and tim expression in the retina and glial cells are similar to that observed in the whole head and in clock neurons, while they differ in the lamina and L2 cells. In both the retina and lamina, CRY seems to be a repressor of clk expression. In L2 interneurons per expression is not cyclic indicating the other function of PER in those cells than in the circadian molecular clock. In contrast to per and tim, the pattern of clk and cry expression is similar in both the retina and lamina. The retina holds the autonomous oscillators but the expression of cry and ccgs, Atpα and nrv2, is also regulated by inputs from the pacemaker transmitted by PDF and ITP neuropeptides. PMID:26441524

  6. Initial results of precise orbit and clock determination for COMPASS navigation satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Li, Min; Qu, Lizhong; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2013-05-01

    The development of the COMPASS satellite system is introduced, and the regional tracking network and data availability are described. The precise orbit determination strategy of COMPASS satellites is presented. Data of June 2012 are processed. The obtained orbits are evaluated by analysis of post-fit residuals, orbit overlap comparison and SLR (satellite laser ranging) validation. The RMS (root mean square) values of post-fit residuals for one month's data are smaller than 2.0 cm for ionosphere-free phase measurements and 2.6 m for ionosphere-free code observations. The 48-h orbit overlap comparison shows that the RMS values of differences in the radial component are much smaller than 10 cm and those of the cross-track component are smaller than 20 cm. The SLR validation shows that the overall RMS of observed minus computed residuals is 68.5 cm for G01 and 10.8 cm for I03. The static and kinematic PPP solutions are produced to further evaluate the accuracy of COMPASS orbit and clock products. The static daily COMPASS PPP solutions achieve an accuracy of better than 1 cm in horizontal and 3 cm in vertical. The accuracy of the COMPASS kinematic PPP solutions is within 1-2 cm in the horizontal and 4-7 cm in the vertical. In addition, we find that the COMPASS kinematic solutions are generally better than the GPS ones for the selected location. Furthermore, the COMPASS/GPS combinations significantly improve the accuracy of GPS only PPP solutions. The RMS values are basically smaller than 1 cm in the horizontal components and 3-4 cm in the vertical component.

  7. Hypothesis: Role for the circadian Clock system and sleep in the pathogenesis of adhesions and chronic pelvic pain?

    PubMed

    Sadek, Khaled; Macklon, Nick; Bruce, Kim; Cagampang, Felino; Cheong, Ying

    2011-03-01

    Intra-peritoneal adhesions ensuing from surgery or infection may lead to chronic pelvic pain, bowel obstruction, infertility and additional invasive surgery to resolve adhesion-related complications. As a result adhesions are a major clinical, social and economic concern. The cumulative year-on-year direct costs of adhesion-related readmissions for a 10-year period are more than £ 569 million. The degree of intra-abdominal adhesion formation in an individual patient after a surgical or infective insult remains difficult to predict. This reflects a lack of understanding as to the underlying aetiologies. Several different mechanisms leading to adhesion formation and re-formation have been proposed. These include abnormal modulations in inflammatory status, fibrinolytic pathways and matrix remodelling. A number of preventative strategies have been designed accordingly. However, although each individual model offers specific insights into the aetiology of adhesion formation, none have been shown to provide the basis for a highly effective clinical intervention. A unifying fundamental mechanism remains elusive. In this article we propose that such a mechanism can be found within the molecular control of circadian rhythms and "Clock" gene biology. A number of physiological processes demonstrating circadian variation have been shown to involve 'Clock genes' in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which then entrains a similar set of Clock genes in peripheral tissues such as the heart, brain, spleen, lung, liver, skeletal muscle and kidney. The intrinsic time-keeping system influences activity, such as sleep, temperature regulation, rates of metabolism, immune responses, blood pressure and hormone secretion. The function and availability of mediators involved in the inflammatory response, fibrinolytic and anti-coagulation pathways are all under the tight control of the molecular Clock system. These include IL-6, PAI-1, fibrinogen, fibroblasts and TNF-α. We hypothesise that

  8. Circadian clocks: lessons from fish.

    PubMed

    Idda, M Laura; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Vallone, Daniela; Gothilf, Yoav; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and cellular organization of the circadian timing system in vertebrates has increased enormously over the past decade. In large part, progress has been based on genetic studies in the mouse as well as on fundamental similarities between vertebrate and Drosophila clocks. The zebrafish was initially considered as a potentially attractive genetic model for identifying vertebrate clock genes. However, instead, fish have ultimately proven to be valuable complementary models for studying various aspects of clock biology. For example, many fish can shift from diurnal to nocturnal activity implying specific flexibility in their clock function. We have learned much about the function of light input pathways, and the ontogeny and function of the pineal organ, the fish central pacemaker. Finally, blind cavefish have also provided new insight into the evolution of the circadian clock under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:22877658

  9. Circadian Tick-Talking Across the Neuroendocrine System and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei Circuits: The Enigmatic Communication Between the Molecular and Electrical Membrane Clocks.

    PubMed

    Belle, M D C

    2015-07-01

    As with many processes in nature, appropriate timing in biological systems is of paramount importance. In the neuroendocrine system, the efficacy of hormonal influence on major bodily functions, such as reproduction, metabolism and growth, relies on timely communication within and across many of the brain's homeostatic systems. The activity of these circuits is tightly orchestrated with the animal's internal physiological demands and external solar cycle by a master circadian clock. In mammals, this master clock is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where the ensemble activity of thousands of clock neurones generates and communicates circadian time cues to the rest of the brain and body. Many regions of the brain, including areas with neuroendocrine function, also contain local daily clocks that can provide feedback signals to the SCN. Although much is known about the molecular processes underpinning endogenous circadian rhythm generation in SCN neurones and, to a lesser extent, extra-SCN cells, the electrical membrane clock that acts in partnership with the molecular clockwork to communicate circadian timing across the brain is poorly understood. The present review focuses on some circadian aspects of reproductive neuroendocrinology and processes involved in circadian rhythm communication in the SCN, aiming to identify key gaps in our knowledge of cross-talk between our daily master clock and neuroendocrine function. The intention is to highlight our surprisingly limited understanding of their interaction in the hope that this will stimulate future work in these areas. PMID:25845396

  10. A Hertz-Linewidth Ultrastable Diode Laser System for Clock Transition Detection of Strontium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Lin, Yi-Ge; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Shao-Kai; Zhao, Yang; Meng, Fei; Lin, Bai-Ke; Cao, Jian-Ping; Li, Tian-Chu; Fang, Zhan-Jun; Zang, Er-Jun

    2014-02-01

    The frequencies of two 698 nm external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) are locked separately to two independently located ultrahigh finesse optical resonant cavities with the Pound—Drever—Hall technique. The linewidth of each ECDL is measured to be ~4.6 Hz by their beating and the fractional frequency stability below 5 × 10-15 between 1 s to 10 s averaging time. Another 698 nm laser diode is injection locked to one of the cavity-stabilized ECDLs with a fixed frequency offset for power amplification while maintaining its linewidth and frequency characteristics. The frequency drift is ~1 Hz/s measured by a femtosecond optical frequency comb based on erbium fiber. The output of the injection slave laser is delivered to the magneto-optical trap of a Sr optical clock through a 10-m-long single mode polarization maintaining fiber with an active fiber noise cancelation technique to detect the clock transition of Sr atoms.

  11. Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynands, Robert

    Time is a strange thing. On the one hand it is arguably the most inaccessible physical phenomenon of all: both in that it is impossible to manipulate or modify—for all we know—and in that even after thousands of years mankind's philosophers still have not found a fully satisfying way to understand it. On the other hand, no other quantity can be measured with greater precision. Today's atomic clocks allow us to reproduce the length of the second as the SI unit of time with an uncertainty of a few parts in 1016—orders of magnitude better than any other quantity. In a sense, one can say [1

  12. Molecular clocks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y; Ho, Simon Y W

    2016-05-23

    In the 1960s, several groups of scientists, including Emile Zuckerkandl and Linus Pauling, had noted that proteins experience amino acid replacements at a surprisingly consistent rate across very different species. This presumed single, uniform rate of genetic evolution was subsequently described using the term 'molecular clock'. Biologists quickly realised that such a universal pacemaker could be used as a yardstick for measuring the timescale of evolutionary divergences: estimating the rate of amino acid exchanges per unit of time and applying it to protein differences across a range of organisms would allow deduction of the divergence times of their respective lineages (Figure 1). PMID:27218841

  13. Special Relativistic Clock Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Tom

    2007-03-01

    Time mappings of a stationary clock's time points onto a moving clock's time line heuristically resolve certain temporal asymmetries in time dilation. Time mapping postulates are identified and transforms are derived. `Clock Re-phasing' vs. `Time Leap' is discussed.

  14. RNA around the clock – regulation at the RNA level in biological timing

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Christine; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    The circadian timing system in plants synchronizes their physiological functions with the environment. This is achieved by a global control of gene expression programs with a considerable part of the transcriptome undergoing 24-h oscillations in steady-state abundance. These circadian oscillations are driven by a set of core clock proteins that generate their own 24-h rhythm through periodic feedback on their own transcription. Additionally, post-transcriptional events are instrumental for oscillations of core clock genes and genes in clock output. Here we provide an update on molecular events at the RNA level that contribute to the 24-h rhythm of the core clock proteins and shape the circadian transcriptome. We focus on the circadian system of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana but also discuss selected regulatory principles in other organisms. PMID:25999975

  15. Circadian Clocks, Stress, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dumbell, Rebecca; Matveeva, Olga; Oster, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions. PMID:27199894

  16. Simulating Future GPS Clock Scenarios with Two Composite Clock Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Matthias; Matsakis, Demetrios; Greenhall, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Using the GPS Toolkit, the GPS constellation is simulated using 31 satellites (SV) and a ground network of 17 monitor stations (MS). At every 15-minutes measurement epoch, the monitor stations measure the time signals of all satellites above a parameterized elevation angle. Once a day, the satellite clock estimates the station and satellite clocks. The first composite clock (B) is based on the Brown algorithm, and is now used by GPS. The second one (G) is based on the Greenhall algorithm. The composite clock of G and B performance are investigated using three ground-clock models. Model C simulates the current GPS configuration, in which all stations are equipped with cesium clocks, except for masers at USNO and Alternate Master Clock (AMC) sites. Model M is an improved situation in which every station is equipped with active hydrogen masers. Finally, Models F and O are future scenarios in which the USNO and AMC stations are equipped with fountain clocks instead of masers. Model F is a rubidium fountain, while Model O is more precise but futuristic Optical Fountain. Each model is evaluated using three performance metrics. The timing-related user range error having all satellites available is the first performance index (PI1). The second performance index (PI2) relates to the stability of the broadcast GPS system time itself. The third performance index (PI3) evaluates the stability of the time scales computed by the two composite clocks. A distinction is made between the "Signal-in-Space" accuracy and that available through a GNSS receiver.

  17. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  18. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancellation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks (OACs) and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits, respectively, two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 m2 s- 2 based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s s-1) level. Since OACs with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimetre level accuracy in the near future.

  19. 25 MHz clock continuous-variable quantum key distribution system over 50 km fiber channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Duan; Huang, Peng; Lin, Dakai; Peng, Jinye; Zeng, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a practical continuous-variable quantum key distribution system is developed and it runs in the real-world conditions with 25 MHz clock rate. To reach high-rate, we have employed a homodyne detector with maximal bandwidth to 300 MHz and an optimal high-efficiency error reconciliation algorithm with processing speed up to 25 Mbps. To optimize the stability of the system, several key techniques are developed, which include a novel phase compensation algorithm, a polarization feedback algorithm, and related stability method on the modulators. Practically, our system is tested for more than 12 hours with a final secret key rate of 52 kbps over 50 km transmission distance, which is the highest rate so far in such distance. Our system may pave the road for practical broadband secure quantum communication with continuous variables in the commercial conditions. PMID:26419413

  20. 25 MHz clock continuous-variable quantum key distribution system over 50 km fiber channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Duan; Huang, Peng; Lin, Dakai; Peng, Jinye; Zeng, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a practical continuous-variable quantum key distribution system is developed and it runs in the real-world conditions with 25 MHz clock rate. To reach high-rate, we have employed a homodyne detector with maximal bandwidth to 300 MHz and an optimal high-efficiency error reconciliation algorithm with processing speed up to 25 Mbps. To optimize the stability of the system, several key techniques are developed, which include a novel phase compensation algorithm, a polarization feedback algorithm, and related stability method on the modulators. Practically, our system is tested for more than 12 hours with a final secret key rate of 52 kbps over 50 km transmission distance, which is the highest rate so far in such distance. Our system may pave the road for practical broadband secure quantum communication with continuous variables in the commercial conditions. PMID:26419413

  1. Coordination of the maize transcriptome by a conserved circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The plant circadian clock orchestrates 24-hour rhythms in internal physiological processes to coordinate these activities with daily and seasonal changes in the environment. The circadian clock has a profound impact on many aspects of plant growth and development, including biomass accumulation and flowering time. Despite recent advances in understanding the circadian system of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the contribution of the circadian oscillator to important agronomic traits in Zea mays and other cereals remains poorly defined. To address this deficit, this study investigated the transcriptional landscape of the maize circadian system. Results Since transcriptional regulation is a fundamental aspect of circadian systems, genes exhibiting circadian expression were identified in the sequenced maize inbred B73. Of the over 13,000 transcripts examined, approximately 10 percent displayed circadian expression patterns. The majority of cycling genes had peak expression at subjective dawn and dusk, similar to other plant circadian systems. The maize circadian clock organized co-regulation of genes participating in fundamental physiological processes, including photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall biogenesis, and phytohormone biosynthesis pathways. Conclusions Circadian regulation of the maize genome was widespread and key genes in several major metabolic pathways had circadian expression waveforms. The maize circadian clock coordinated transcription to be coincident with oncoming day or night, which was consistent with the circadian oscillator acting to prepare the plant for these major recurring environmental changes. These findings highlighted the multiple processes in maize plants under circadian regulation and, as a result, provided insight into the important contribution this regulatory system makes to agronomic traits in maize and potentially other C4 plant species. PMID:20576144

  2. Expression of clock genes period and timeless in the central nervous system of the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella.

    PubMed

    Kobelková, Alena; Závodská, Radka; Sauman, Ivo; Bazalová, Olga; Dolezel, David

    2015-04-01

    Homologous circadian genes are found in all insect clocks, but their contribution to species-specific circadian timing systems differs. The aim of this study was to extend research within Lepidoptera to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying circadian clock plasticity and evolution. The Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella (Pyralidae), represents a phylogenetically ancestral lepidopteran species. We have identified circadian rhythms in egg hatching, adult emergence, and adult locomotor activity. Cloning full-length complementary DNAs and further characterization confirmed one copy of period and timeless genes in both sexes. Both per and tim transcripts oscillate in their abundance in E. kuehniella heads under light-dark conditions. PER-like immunoreactivity (PER-lir) was observed in nuclei and cytoplasm of most neurons in the central brain, the ventral part of subesophageal complex, the neurohemal organs, the optic lobes, and eyes. PER-lir in photoreceptor nuclei oscillated during the day with maximal intensity in the light phase of the photoperiodic regime and lack of a signal in the middle of the dark phase. Expression patterns of per and tim messenger RNAs (mRNAs) were revealed in the identical location as the PER-lir was detected. In the photoreceptors, a daily rhythm in the intensity of expression of both per mRNA and tim mRNA was found. These findings suggest E. kuehniella as a potential lepidopteran model for circadian studies. PMID:25637625

  3. The Cyanobacterial Clock and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal; Rust, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the simplest known circadian clock, which presents a unique opportunity to study how rhythms are generated and how input signals from the environment reset the clock time. The kaiABC locus forms the core of the oscillator, and the remarkable ability to reconstitute oscillations using purified KaiABC proteins has allowed researchers to study mechanism using the tools of quantitative biochemistry. Autotrophic cyanobacteria experience major shifts in metabolism following a light-dark transition, and recent work suggests that input mechanisms that couple the day-night cycle to the clock involve energy and redox metabolites acting directly on clock proteins. We offer a summary of the current state of knowledge in this system and present a perspective for future lines of investigation. PMID:24667330

  4. Mechanism of the circadian clock in physiology

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    It has been well established that the circadian clock plays a crucial role in the regulation of almost every physiological process. It also plays a critical role in pathophysiological states including those of obesity and diabetes. Recent evidence has highlighted the potential for targeting the circadian clock as a potential drug target. New studies have also demonstrated the existence of “clock-independent effects” of the circadian proteins, leading to exciting new avenues of research in the circadian clock field in physiology. The goal of this review is to provide an introduction to and overview of the circadian clock in physiology, including mechanisms, targets, and role in disease states. The role of the circadian clocks in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, renal function, metabolism, the endocrine system, immune, and reproductive systems will be discussed. PMID:23576606

  5. Precise time dissemination via portable atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1982-01-01

    The most precise operational method of time dissemination over long distances presently available to the Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) community of users is by means of portable atomic clocks. The Global Positioning System (GPS), the latest system showing promise of replacing portable clocks for global PTTI dissemination, was evaluated. Although GPS has the technical capability of providing superior world-wide dissemination, the question of present cost and future accessibility may require a continued reliance on portable clocks for a number of years. For these reasons a study of portable clock operations as they are carried out today was made. The portable clock system that was utilized by the U.S. Naval Observatory (NAVOBSY) in the global synchronization of clocks over the past 17 years is described and the concepts on which it is based are explained. Some of its capabilities and limitations are also discussed.

  6. Clocks in algae.

    PubMed

    Noordally, Zeenat B; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-01-20

    As major contributors to global oxygen levels and producers of fatty acids, carotenoids, sterols, and phycocolloids, algae have significant ecological and commercial roles. Early algal models have contributed much to our understanding of circadian clocks at physiological and biochemical levels. The genetic and molecular approaches that identified clock components in other taxa have not been as widely applied to algae. We review results from seven species: the chlorophytes Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Ostreococcus tauri, and Acetabularia spp.; the dinoflagellates Lingulodinium polyedrum and Symbiodinium spp.; the euglenozoa Euglena gracilis; and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The relative simplicity, experimental tractability, and ecological and evolutionary diversity of algal systems may now make them particularly useful in integrating quantitative data from "omic" technologies (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics) with computational and mathematical methods. PMID:25379817

  7. An ultra-stable referenced interrogation system in the deep ultraviolet for a mercury optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawkins, S. T.; Chicireanu, R.; Petersen, M.; Millo, J.; Magalhães, D. V.; Mandache, C.; Le Coq, Y.; Bize, S.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed an ultra-stable source in the deep ultraviolet, suitable to fulfil the interrogation requirements of a future fully-operational lattice clock based on neutral mercury. At the core of the system is a Fabry-Pérot cavity which is highly impervious to temperature and vibrational perturbations. The mirror substrate is made of fused silica in order to exploit the comparatively low thermal noise limits associated with this material. By stabilizing the frequency of a 1062.6 nm Yb-doped fiber laser to the cavity, and including an additional link to LNE-SYRTE’s fountain primary frequency standards via an optical frequency comb, we produce a signal which is both stable at the 10-15 level in fractional terms and referenced to primary frequency standards. The signal is subsequently amplified and frequency-doubled twice to produce several milliwatts of interrogation signal at 265.6 nm in the deep ultraviolet.

  8. Synchronization of Biological Clock Neurons by Light and Peripheral Feedback Systems Promotes Circadian Rhythms and Health

    PubMed Central

    Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-h rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase-synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm, and these changes play a major role in the ability to adapt to seasonal changes. Both aging and sleep deprivation negatively affect the circadian amplitude of the SCN, whereas behavioral activity (i.e., exercise) has a positive effect on amplitude. Given that the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm is essential for achieving robust rhythmicity in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms that underlie neuronal synchronization warrant further study. A growing body of evidence suggests that the functional integrity of the SCN contributes to health, well-being, cognitive performance, and alertness; in contrast, deterioration of the 24-h rhythm is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease, cancer, depression, and sleep disorders. PMID:26097465

  9. Synchronization of Biological Clock Neurons by Light and Peripheral Feedback Systems Promotes Circadian Rhythms and Health.

    PubMed

    Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-h rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase-synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude of the SCN's electrical activity rhythm, and these changes play a major role in the ability to adapt to seasonal changes. Both aging and sleep deprivation negatively affect the circadian amplitude of the SCN, whereas behavioral activity (i.e., exercise) has a positive effect on amplitude. Given that the amplitude of the SCN's electrical activity rhythm is essential for achieving robust rhythmicity in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms that underlie neuronal synchronization warrant further study. A growing body of evidence suggests that the functional integrity of the SCN contributes to health, well-being, cognitive performance, and alertness; in contrast, deterioration of the 24-h rhythm is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease, cancer, depression, and sleep disorders. PMID:26097465

  10. A high-speed photonic clock and carrier regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Lutes, G.

    1995-01-01

    As data communications rates climb toward 10 Gbits/s, clock recovery and synchronization become more difficult, if not impossible, using conventional electronic circuits. The high-speed photonic clock regenerator described in this article may be more suitable for such use. This photonic regenerator is based on a previously reported photonic oscillator capable of fast acquisition and synchronization. With both electrical and optical clock inputs and outputs, the device is easily interfaced with fiber-optic systems. The recovered electrical clock can be used locally and the optical clock can be used anywhere within a several kilometer radius of the clock/carrier regenerator.

  11. VLBI clock synchronization. [for atomic clock rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential accuracy of VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) for clock epoch and rate comparisons was demonstrated by results from long- and short-baseline experiments. It was found that atomic clocks at widely separated sites (several thousand kilometers apart) can be synchronized to within several nanoseconds from a few minutes of VLBI observations and to within one nanosecond from several hours of observations.

  12. [Signal systems of plant immunity].

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, A P

    2002-01-01

    Plants can recognise the penetrating pathogen and respond to the attack with an array of defense reactions. Signal transduction from receptor in plasma membrane to genome is necessary to activate these reactions. Plant cell signaling systems which take part in signal transduction were discovered and identified recently. The obtained results suggest that plant cells have complex and well coordinated signal network which regulates their immune potential. PMID:12187855

  13. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  14. Peripheral circadian clocks--a conserved phenotype?

    PubMed

    Weigl, Yuval; Harbour, Valerie L; Robinson, Barry; Dufresne, Line; Amir, Shimon

    2013-05-01

    The circadian system of mammals regulates the timing of occurrence of behavioral and physiological events, thereby optimizing adaptation to their surroundings. This system is composed of a single master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and a population of peripheral clocks. The SCN integrates time information from exogenous sources and, in turn, synchronizes the downstream peripheral clocks. It is assumed that under normal conditions, the circadian phenotype of different peripheral clocks would be conserved with respect to its period and robustness. To study this idea, we measured the daily wheel-running activity (WRA; a marker of the SCN output) in 84 male inbred LEW/Crl rats housed under a 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle. In addition, we assessed the mRNA expression of two clock genes, rPer2 and rBmal1, and one clock-controlled gene, rDbp, in four tissues that have the access to time cues other than those emanating from the SCN: olfactory bulbs (OBs), liver, tail skin, and white blood cells (WBCs). In contrast with the assumption stated above, we found that circadian clocks in peripheral tissues differ in the temporal pattern of the expression of circadian clock genes, in the robustness of the rhythms, and possibly in the number of functional ~24-h-clock cells. Based on the tissue diversity in the robustness of the clock output, the hepatic clock is likely to house the highest number of functional ~24-h-clock cells, and the OBs, the fewest number. Thus, the phenotype of the circadian clock in the periphery is tissue specific and may depend not only on the SCN but also on the sensitivity of the tissue to non-SCN-derived time cues. In the OBs and liver, the circadian clock phenotypes seem to be dominantly shaped by the SCN output. However, in the tail skin and WBC, other time cues participate in the phenotype design. Finally, our study suggests that the basic phenotype of the circadian clock is constructed at the transcript level of the core clock

  15. Song I-Yeong's Armillary Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Yong Sam

    In 1669 (the 10th year of the reign of King Hyeonjong), Song I-Yeong (宋以穎, 1619-1692), who was a professor of astronomy at Gwansanggam (Bureau of Astronomy), developed the armillary clock which uses the weight power system of an alarm clock. The armillary clock is a unique astronomical clock that combines the traditional armillary sphere of Joseon and the principle of a Western alarm clock. Song I-Yeong's armillary clock was repaired in 1687-1688 according to the records, and since then not much is known about the history of the armillary clock. After many years, in the early 1930s which was the Japanese colonial era, Inchon (仁村) Kim Seong-Su (金性洙, 1891-1955) purchased the armillary clock at the Insa-dong antique street and donated to the Korea University Museum of the present time (designated as National Treasure No. 230 in 1985). Currently, the armillary clock is not in operation because some of the parts are damaged or lost.

  16. Experimental validation of clock synchronization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Graham, R. Lynn

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to validate mathematically derived clock synchronization theories and their associated algorithms through experiment. Two theories are considered, the Interactive Convergence Clock Synchronization Algorithm and the Midpoint Algorithm. Special clock circuitry was designed and built so that several operating conditions and failure modes (including malicious failures) could be tested. Both theories are shown to predict conservative upper bounds (i.e., measured values of clock skew were always less than the theory prediction). Insight gained during experimentation led to alternative derivations of the theories. These new theories accurately predict the behavior of the clock system. It is found that a 100 percent penalty is paid to tolerate worst-case failures. It is also shown that under optimal conditions (with minimum error and no failures) the clock skew can be as much as three clock ticks. Clock skew grows to six clock ticks when failures are present. Finally, it is concluded that one cannot rely solely on test procedures or theoretical analysis to predict worst-case conditions.

  17. Methodologies for steering clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadsey, Harold

    1995-01-01

    One of the concerns of the PTTI community is the coordination of one time scale with another. This is accomplished through steering one clock system to another, with a goal of a zero or constant offset in time and frequency. In order to attain this goal, rate differences are calculated and allowed for by the steering algorithm. This paper will present several of these different methods of determining rate differences. Ideally, any change in rate should not cause the offset to change sign (overshoot) by any amount, but certainly not by as much as its previous absolute value. The advantages and disadvantages of each depend on the user's situation.

  18. Circadian clocks and cell division

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has selected a system of two intertwined cell cycles: the cell division cycle (CDC) and the daily (circadian) biological clock. The circadian clock keeps track of solar time and programs biological processes to occur at environmentally appropriate times. One of these processes is the CDC, which is often gated by the circadian clock. The intermeshing of these two cell cycles is probably responsible for the observation that disruption of the circadian system enhances susceptibility to some kinds of cancer. The core mechanism underlying the circadian clockwork has been thought to be a transcription and translation feedback loop (TTFL), but recent evidence from studies with cyanobacteria, synthetic oscillators and immortalized cell lines suggests that the core circadian pacemaking mechanism that gates cell division in mammalian cells could be a post-translational oscillator (PTO). PMID:20890114

  19. Gigabit Ethernet Asynchronous Clock Compensation FIFO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duhachek, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Clock compensation for Gigabit Ethernet is necessary because the clock recovered from the 1.25 Gb/s serial data stream has the potential to be 200 ppm slower or faster than the system clock. The serial data is converted to 10-bit parallel data at a 125 MHz rate on a clock recovered from the serial data stream. This recovered data needs to be processed by a system clock that is also running at a nominal rate of 125 MHz, but not synchronous to the recovered clock. To cross clock domains, an asynchronous FIFO (first-in-first-out) is used, with the write pointer (wprt) in the recovered clock domain and the read pointer (rptr) in the system clock domain. Because the clocks are generated from separate sources, there is potential for FIFO overflow or underflow. Clock compensation in Gigabit Ethernet is possible by taking advantage of the protocol data stream features. There are two distinct data streams that occur in Gigabit Ethernet where identical data is transmitted for a period of time. The first is configuration, which happens during auto-negotiation. The second is idle, which occurs at the end of auto-negotiation and between every packet. The identical data in the FIFO can be repeated by decrementing the read pointer, thus compensating for a FIFO that is draining too fast. The identical data in the FIFO can also be skipped by incrementing the read pointer, which compensates for a FIFO draining too slowly. The unique and novel features of this FIFO are that it works in both the idle stream and the configuration streams. The increment or decrement of the read pointer is different in the idle and compensation streams to preserve disparity. Another unique feature is that the read pointer to write pointer difference range changes between compensation and idle to minimize FIFO latency during packet transmission.

  20. A colorful model of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Steven M

    2006-01-27

    The migration of the colorful monarch butterfly provides biologists with a unique model system with which to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying a sophisticated circadian clock. The monarch circadian clock is involved in the induction of the migratory state and navigation over long distances, using the sun as a compass. PMID:16439193

  1. Priming in Systemic Plant Immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wang, Lin; Glazebrook, Jane; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2009-01-01

    Upon local infection, plants possess inducible systemic defense responses against their natural enemies. Bacterial infection results in the accumulation to high levels of the mobile metabolite C9-dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid in the vascular sap of Arabidopsis. Azelaic acid confers local and systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae. The compound primes plants to strongly accumulate salicylic acid (SA), a known defense signal, upon infection. Mutation of a gene induced by azelaic acid (AZI1) results in the specific loss in plants of systemic immunity triggered by pathogen or azelaic acid and of the priming of SA induction. AZI1, a predicted secreted protein, is also important for generating vascular sap that confers disease resistance. Thus, azelaic acid and AZI1 comprise novel components of plant systemic immunity involved in priming defenses.

  2. Clocks in the Green Lineage: Comparative Functional Analysis of the Circadian Architecture of the Picoeukaryote Ostreococcus[W

    PubMed Central

    Corellou, Florence; Schwartz, Christian; Motta, Jean-Paul; Djouani-Tahri, El Batoul; Sanchez, Frédéric; Bouget, François-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Biological rhythms that allow organisms to adapt to the solar cycle are generated by endogenous circadian clocks. In higher plants, many clock components have been identified and cellular rhythmicity is thought to be driven by a complex transcriptional feedback circuitry. In the small genome of the green unicellular alga Ostreococcus tauri, two of the master clock genes Timing of Cab expression1 (TOC1) and Circadian Clock-Associated1 (CCA1) appear to be conserved, but others like Gigantea or Early-Flowering4 are lacking. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines and tools for gene functional analysis were therefore developed to characterize clock gene function in this simple eukaryotic system. This approach revealed several features that are comparable to those in higher plants, including the circadian regulation of TOC1, CCA1, and the output gene Chlorophyll a/b Binding under constant light, the relative phases of TOC1/CCA1 expression under light/dark cycles, arrhythmic overexpression phenotypes under constant light, the binding of CCA1 to a conserved evening element in the TOC1 promoter, as well as the requirement of the evening element for circadian regulation of TOC1 promoter activity. Functional analysis supports TOC1 playing a central role in the clock, but repression of CCA1 had no effect on clock function in constant light, arguing against a simple TOC1 /CCA1 one-loop clock in Ostreococcus. The emergence of functional genomics in a simple green cell with a small genome may facilitate increased understanding of how complex cellular processes such as the circadian clock have evolved in plants. PMID:19948792

  3. Fossil power plant systems description

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This single-volume, looseleaf text presents the functions and relationships between each major component and its auxiliaries within a system. The text also describes the relationships between systems. All major components are addressed, and system boundaries are defined for a generic fossil power plant.

  4. Nutrient Sensing and the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Clara B.; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system synchronizes behavioral and physiologic processes with daily changes in the external light-dark cycle, optimizing energetic cycles with the rising and setting of the sun. Molecular clocks are organized hierarchically, with neural clocks orchestrating the daily switch between periods of feeding and fasting, and peripheral clocks generating 24hr oscillations of energy storage and utilization. Recent studies indicate that clocks respond to nutrient signals, and that high-fat diet influences the period of locomotor activity under free-running conditions, a core property of the clock. A major goal is to identify the molecular basis for the reciprocal relationship between metabolic and circadian pathways. Here, we highlight the role of peptidergic hormones and macromolecules as nutrient signals integrating circadian and metabolic systems. PMID:22424658

  5. The Ozone-Iodine-Chlorate Clock Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T. P.; Monteiro, Emily V.; Pereira, Juliano R. T.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions. PMID:24386257

  6. Rigorously modeling self-stabilizing fault-tolerant circuits: An ultra-robust clocking scheme for systems-on-chip☆

    PubMed Central

    Dolev, Danny; Függer, Matthias; Posch, Markus; Schmid, Ulrich; Steininger, Andreas; Lenzen, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We present the first implementation of a distributed clock generation scheme for Systems-on-Chip that recovers from an unbounded number of arbitrary transient faults despite a large number of arbitrary permanent faults. We devise self-stabilizing hardware building blocks and a hybrid synchronous/asynchronous state machine enabling metastability-free transitions of the algorithm's states. We provide a comprehensive modeling approach that permits to prove, given correctness of the constructed low-level building blocks, the high-level properties of the synchronization algorithm (which have been established in a more abstract model). We believe this approach to be of interest in its own right, since this is the first technique permitting to mathematically verify, at manageable complexity, high-level properties of a fault-prone system in terms of its very basic components. We evaluate a prototype implementation, which has been designed in VHDL, using the Petrify tool in conjunction with some extensions, and synthesized for an Altera Cyclone FPGA. PMID:26516290

  7. Circadian clock genes universally control key agricultural traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers that enable plants to synchronize biological processes with daily and seasonal environmental conditions in order to allocate resources during the most beneficial times of day and year. The circadian clock regulates a number of central plant activities, includin...

  8. The Circadian Clock-Controlled Transcriptome of Developing Soybean Seeds.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of metabolic and physiological processes in plants are controlled by the circadian clock, which enables the plant to anticipate daily changes in the environment. Microarray expression profiling was used to identify circadian clock controlled genes expressed in developing soybean seeds. 1.8...

  9. Deciphering the Duality of Clock and Growth Metabolism in a Cell Autonomous System Using NMR Profiling of the Secretome.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Arjun; Krishnaiah, Saikumari Y; Rhoades, Seth; Growe, Jacqueline; Slaff, Barry; Venkataraman, Anand; Olarerin-George, Anthony O; Van Dang, Chi; Hogenesch, John B; Weljie, Aalim M

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations in circadian metabolism are crucial to the well being of organism. Our understanding of metabolic rhythms has been greatly enhanced by recent advances in high-throughput systems biology experimental techniques and data analysis. In an in vitro setting, metabolite rhythms can be measured by time-dependent sampling over an experimental period spanning one or more days at sufficent resolution to elucidate rhythms. We hypothesized that cellular metabolic effects over such a time course would be influenced by both oscillatory and circadian-independent cell metabolic effects. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling of mammalian cell culture media of synchronized U2 OS cells containing an intact transcriptional clock. The experiment was conducted over 48 h, typical for circadian biology studies, and samples collected at 2 h resolution to unravel such non-oscillatory effects. Our data suggest specific metabolic activities exist that change continuously over time in this settting and we demonstrate that the non-oscillatory effects are generally monotonic and possible to model with multivariate regression. Deconvolution of such non-circadian persistent changes are of paramount importance to consider while studying circadian metabolic oscillations. PMID:27472375

  10. Double-modulation CPT cesium compact clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Peter; Mejri, Sinda; Tricot, Francois; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Boudot, Rodolphe; de Clercq, Emeric; Guérandel, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Double-modulation coherent population trapping (CPT) is based on a synchronous modulation of Raman phase and laser polarization, which allows the atomic population to accumulate in a common dark state. The high contrast signal obtained on the clock transition with a relative compact and robust laser system is interesting as basis of a high performance microwave clock. Here we study the parameters of a double-modulation CPT Cs clock working in cw mode. The optimal polarization modulation frequency and cell temperature for maximum contrast of clock transition are investigated. The parameters of the detection are also studied. With the optimal parameters, we observe a CPT signal with contrast of 10% and linewidth of 492 Hz, which is well suited for implementing a cw atomic clock.

  11. Design and Evaluation of a Clock Multiplexing Circuit for the SSRL Booster Accelerator Timing System - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, Million

    2015-08-21

    SPEAR3 is a 234 m circular storage ring at SLAC’s synchrotron radiation facility (SSRL) in which a 3 GeV electron beam is stored for user access. Typically the electron beam decays with a time constant of approximately 10hr due to electron lose. In order to replenish the lost electrons, a booster synchrotron is used to accelerate fresh electrons up to 3GeV for injection into SPEAR3. In order to maintain a constant electron beam current of 500mA, the injection process occurs at 5 minute intervals. At these times the booster synchrotron accelerates electrons for injection at a 10Hz rate. A 10Hz 'injection ready' clock pulse train is generated when the booster synchrotron is operating. Between injection intervals-where the booster is not running and hence the 10 Hz ‘injection ready’ signal is not present-a 10Hz clock is derived from the power line supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) to keep track of the injection timing. For this project I constructed a multiplexing circuit to 'switch' between the booster synchrotron 'injection ready' clock signal and PG&E based clock signal. The circuit uses digital IC components and is capable of making glitch-free transitions between the two clocks. This report details construction of a prototype multiplexing circuit including test results and suggests improvement opportunities for the final design.

  12. Design and Evaluation of a Clock Multiplexing Circuit for the SSRL Booster Accelerator Timing System - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, Million

    2015-08-25

    SPEAR3 is a 234 m circular storage ring at SLAC’s synchrotron radiation facility (SSRL) in which a 3 GeV electron beam is stored for user access. Typically the electron beam decays with a time constant of approximately 10hr due to electron lose. In order to replenish the lost electrons, a booster synchrotron is used to accelerate fresh electrons up to 3GeV for injection into SPEAR3. In order to maintain a constant electron beam current of 500mA, the injection process occurs at 5 minute intervals. At these times the booster synchrotron accelerates electrons for injection at a 10Hz rate. A 10Hz 'injection ready' clock pulse train is generated when the booster synchrotron is operating. Between injection intervalswhere the booster is not running and hence the 10 Hz ‘injection ready’ signal is not present-a 10Hz clock is derived from the power line supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) to keep track of the injection timing. For this project I constructed a multiplexing circuit to 'switch' between the booster synchrotron 'injection ready' clock signal and PG&E based clock signal. The circuit uses digital IC components and is capable of making glitch-free transitions between the two clocks. This report details construction of a prototype multiplexing circuit including test results and suggests improvement opportunities for the final design.

  13. The performance of primary Cs beam clocks using quadrupole and hexapole deflection systems. Consequences for time keeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, G.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1978 the time-and-frequency standard CS1 of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has operated continuously as a 'primary clock'. Its uncertainty (7.1 to the negative 15th power) is considerably smaller than that of the other existing primary standards. The CS1 is equipped with a combination of quadrupole and hexapole magnets and uses a longitudinal C-field. Consequences of utilizing primary clocks of this quality for the generation of the International Atomic Time Scale TAI are discussed.

  14. Impact of clock-associated Arabidopsis pseudo-response regulators in metabolic coordination

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako; Nakamichi, Norihito; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Takeshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2009-01-01

    In higher plants, the circadian clock controls a wide range of cellular processes such as photosynthesis and stress responses. Understanding metabolic changes in arrhythmic plants and determining output-related function of clock genes would help in elucidating circadian-clock mechanisms underlying plant growth and development. In this work, we investigated physiological relevance of PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORS (PRR 9, 7, and 5) in Arabidopsis thaliana by transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses. Metabolite profiling using gas chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry demonstrated well-differentiated metabolite phenotypes of seven mutants, including two arrhythmic plants with similar morphology, a PRR 9, 7, and 5 triple mutant and a CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1)-overexpressor line. Despite different light and time conditions, the triple mutant exhibited a dramatic increase in intermediates in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This suggests that proteins PRR 9, 7, and 5 are involved in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. Integrated analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics revealed that PRR 9, 7, and 5 negatively regulate the biosynthetic pathways of chlorophyll, carotenoid and abscisic acid, and α-tocopherol, highlighting them as additional outputs of pseudo-response regulators. These findings indicated that mitochondrial functions are coupled with the circadian system in plants. PMID:19359492

  15. Short-scale atomic clock based on the quantum magnetometers system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The experimental results of dependence of Allan variance as averaging time for system of two quantum magnetometers with laser pumping of the alkaline atoms are presented. Also the role of different components of luminous frequency shift of a radio optical resonance in case of an optimum operation mode of quantum magnetometers in such system is noted. It is shown that the effect of compensation of luminous shift components allows to reduce Allan variance in times of averaging more, than hundreds of seconds in comparison with the quantum standard of frequency on 0-0 transition.

  16. Parasites, proteomes and systems: has Descartes’ clock run out of time?

    PubMed Central

    WASTLING, J. M.; ARMSTRONG, S. D.; KRISHNA, R.; XIA, D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Systems biology aims to integrate multiple biological data types such as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics across different levels of structure and scale; it represents an emerging paradigm in the scientific process which challenges the reductionism that has dominated biomedical research for hundreds of years. Systems biology will nevertheless only be successful if the technologies on which it is based are able to deliver the required type and quality of data. In this review we discuss how well positioned is proteomics to deliver the data necessary to support meaningful systems modelling in parasite biology. We summarise the current state of identification proteomics in parasites, but argue that a new generation of quantitative proteomics data is now needed to underpin effective systems modelling. We discuss the challenges faced to acquire more complete knowledge of protein post-translational modifications, protein turnover and protein-protein interactions in parasites. Finally we highlight the central role of proteome-informatics in ensuring that proteomics data is readily accessible to the user-community and can be translated and integrated with other relevant data types. PMID:22828391

  17. A quantum network of clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, Peter; Kessler, Eric; Bishof, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Sorensen, Anders; Ye, Jun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Shared timing information constitutes a key resource for positioning and navigation with a direct correspondence between timing accuracy and precision in applications such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). By combining precision metrology and quantum networks, we propose here a quantum, cooperative protocol for the operation of a network consisting of geographically remote optical atomic clocks. Using non-local entangled states, we demonstrate an optimal utilization of the global network resources, and show that such a network can be operated near the fundamental limit set by quantum theory yielding an ultra-precise clock signal. Furthermore, the internal structure of the network, combined with basic techniques from quantum communication, guarantees security both from internal and external threats. Realization of such a global quantum network of clocks may allow construction of a real-time single international time scale (world clock) with unprecedented stability and accuracy. See also: Komar et al. arXiv:1310.6045 (2013) and Kessler et al. arXiv:1310.6043 (2013).

  18. A microbial clock provides an accurate estimate of the postmortem interval in a mouse model system

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Wegener Parfrey, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonio; Lauber, Christian L; Knights, Dan; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Gregory C; Gebert, Matthew J; Van Treuren, Will; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Keepers, Kyle; Guo, Yan; Bullard, James; Fierer, Noah; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Establishing the time since death is critical in every death investigation, yet existing techniques are susceptible to a range of errors and biases. For example, forensic entomology is widely used to assess the postmortem interval (PMI), but errors can range from days to months. Microbes may provide a novel method for estimating PMI that avoids many of these limitations. Here we show that postmortem microbial community changes are dramatic, measurable, and repeatable in a mouse model system, allowing PMI to be estimated within approximately 3 days over 48 days. Our results provide a detailed understanding of bacterial and microbial eukaryotic ecology within a decomposing corpse system and suggest that microbial community data can be developed into a forensic tool for estimating PMI. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01104.001 PMID:24137541

  19. First nuclear clock?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    A nuclear clock that is more precise than any atomic clock available today could soon be a reality after physicists in Germany detected a crucial low-energy transition in the thorium-229 nucleus, which could be used to create a new frequency standard.

  20. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  1. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  2. Robustness of Circadian Clocks to Daylight Fluctuations: Hints from the Picoeucaryote Ostreococcus tauri

    PubMed Central

    Thommen, Quentin; Pfeuty, Benjamin; Morant, Pierre-Emmanuel; Corellou, Florence; Bouget, François-Yves; Lefranc, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The development of systemic approaches in biology has put emphasis on identifying genetic modules whose behavior can be modeled accurately so as to gain insight into their structure and function. However, most gene circuits in a cell are under control of external signals and thus, quantitative agreement between experimental data and a mathematical model is difficult. Circadian biology has been one notable exception: quantitative models of the internal clock that orchestrates biological processes over the 24-hour diurnal cycle have been constructed for a few organisms, from cyanobacteria to plants and mammals. In most cases, a complex architecture with interlocked feedback loops has been evidenced. Here we present the first modeling results for the circadian clock of the green unicellular alga Ostreococcus tauri. Two plant-like clock genes have been shown to play a central role in the Ostreococcus clock. We find that their expression time profiles can be accurately reproduced by a minimal model of a two-gene transcriptional feedback loop. Remarkably, best adjustment of data recorded under light/dark alternation is obtained when assuming that the oscillator is not coupled to the diurnal cycle. This suggests that coupling to light is confined to specific time intervals and has no dynamical effect when the oscillator is entrained by the diurnal cycle. This intringuing property may reflect a strategy to minimize the impact of fluctuations in daylight intensity on the core circadian oscillator, a type of perturbation that has been rarely considered when assessing the robustness of circadian clocks. PMID:21085637

  3. Cesium clocks keep the world on time

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, H.

    1985-09-01

    The development of timekeeping systems based on the natural resonance of cesium atoms is reviewed. The design of a typical cesium clock using a frequency lock servo is described. Some common applications of cesium beam frequency and time reference systems are discussed, including Navstar GPS navigation referencing; military satellite communications; and measurements of relative gravitational effects. The possibility of increasing timekeeping accuracies using improved cesium clock designs is evaluated.

  4. Biological clocks and the practice of psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous biological clocks enable living species to acquire some independence in relation to time. They improve the efficiency of biological systems, by allowing them to anticipate future constraints on major physyological systems and cell energy metabolism. The temporal organization of a giwen biological function can be impaired in its coordination with astronomical time or with other biological function. There are also external conditions that influence biological clocks. This temporal organization is complex, and it is possible that a series of psychiatric disorders and syndromes involve primary or secondary changes in biological clocks: seasonal and other mood disorders, premenstrual syndromes, social jet lag, free-running rhythms, and several sleep disorders are among them. In this review, we describe the main concepts relevant to chronobiology and explore the relevance of knowledge about biological clocks to the clinical practice of psychiatry PMID:17969862

  5. Optical clocks and relativity.

    PubMed

    Chou, C W; Hume, D B; Rosenband, T; Wineland, D J

    2010-09-24

    Observers in relative motion or at different gravitational potentials measure disparate clock rates. These predictions of relativity have previously been observed with atomic clocks at high velocities and with large changes in elevation. We observed time dilation from relative speeds of less than 10 meters per second by comparing two optical atomic clocks connected by a 75-meter length of optical fiber. We can now also detect time dilation due to a change in height near Earth's surface of less than 1 meter. This technique may be extended to the field of geodesy, with applications in geophysics and hydrology as well as in space-based tests of fundamental physics. PMID:20929843

  6. LED Systems Target Plant Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To help develop technologies for growing edible biomass (food crops) in space, Kennedy Space Center partnered with Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC), of Madison, Wisconsin, through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. One result of this research was the High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC) system, components of which have been incorporated into a variety of agricultural greenhouse and consumer aquarium lighting features. The new lighting systems can be adapted to a specific plant species during a specific growth stage, allowing maximum efficiency in light absorption by all available photosynthetic tissues.

  7. Circadian clocks and the regulation of virulence in fungi: Getting up to speed.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Montserrat A; Canessa, Paulo; Larrondo, Luis F

    2016-09-01

    You cannot escape time. Therefore, it seems wise to learn how to keep track of it and use it to your advantage. Circadian clocks are molecular circuits that allow organisms to temporally coordinate a plethora of processes, including gene expression, with a close to 24h rhythm, optimizing cellular function in synchrony with daily environmental cycles. The molecular bases of these clocks have been extensively studied in the fungus Neurospora crassa, providing a detailed molecular description. Surprisingly, there is scarce molecular information of clocks in fungi other than Neurospora, despite the existence of rhythmic phenomena in many fungal species, including pathogenic ones. This review will comment on the overall importance of clocks, what is known in Neurospora and what has been described in other fungi including new insights on the evolution of fungal clock components. The molecular description of the circadian system of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea will be revisited, as well as time-of-the-day variation in host-pathogen interaction dynamics, utilizing an Arabidopsis-Botrytis system, including also what is known regarding circadian regulation of defense mechanisms in the Arabidopsis thaliana plant model. Finally, this review will mention how little is known about circadian regulation of human pathogenic fungi, commenting on potential future directions and the overall perspective of fungal circadian studies. PMID:27039027

  8. A low cost concept for data acquisition systems applied to decentralized renewable energy plants.

    PubMed

    Jucá, Sandro C S; Carvalho, Paulo C M; Brito, Fábio T

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes experiences of the use of monitoring and data acquisition systems (DAS) and proposes a new concept of a low cost DAS applied to decentralized renewable energy (RE) plants with an USB interface. The use of such systems contributes to disseminate these plants, recognizing in real time local energy resources, monitoring energy conversion efficiency and sending information concerning failures. These aspects are important, mainly for developing countries, where decentralized power plants based on renewable sources are in some cases the best option for supplying electricity to rural areas. Nevertheless, the cost of commercial DAS is still a barrier for a greater dissemination of such systems in developing countries. The proposed USB based DAS presents a new dual clock operation philosophy, in which the acquisition system contains two clock sources for parallel information processing from different communication protocols. To ensure the low cost of the DAS and to promote the dissemination of this technology in developing countries, the proposed data acquisition firmware and the software for USB microcontrollers programming is a free and open source software, executable in the Linux and Windows® operating systems. PMID:22346600

  9. A Low Cost Concept for Data Acquisition Systems Applied to Decentralized Renewable Energy Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jucá, Sandro C. S.; Carvalho, Paulo C. M.; Brito, Fábio T.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes experiences of the use of monitoring and data acquisition systems (DAS) and proposes a new concept of a low cost DAS applied to decentralized renewable energy (RE) plants with an USB interface. The use of such systems contributes to disseminate these plants, recognizing in real time local energy resources, monitoring energy conversion efficiency and sending information concerning failures. These aspects are important, mainly for developing countries, where decentralized power plants based on renewable sources are in some cases the best option for supplying electricity to rural areas. Nevertheless, the cost of commercial DAS is still a barrier for a greater dissemination of such systems in developing countries. The proposed USB based DAS presents a new dual clock operation philosophy, in which the acquisition system contains two clock sources for parallel information processing from different communication protocols. To ensure the low cost of the DAS and to promote the dissemination of this technology in developing countries, the proposed data acquisition firmware and the software for USB microcontrollers programming is a free and open source software, executable in the Linux and Windows® operating systems. PMID:22346600

  10. A tunable artificial circadian clock in clock-defective mice

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Matthew; Beesley, Stephen; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Chen, Rongmin; Abich, Estela; Cheng, Wayne; Yi, Paul; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Lee, Choogon

    2015-01-01

    Self-sustaining oscillations are essential for diverse physiological functions such as the cell cycle, insulin secretion and circadian rhythms. Synthetic oscillators using biochemical feedback circuits have been generated in cell culture. These synthetic systems provide important insight into design principles for biological oscillators, but have limited similarity to physiological pathways. Here we report the generation of an artificial, mammalian circadian clock in vivo, capable of generating robust, tunable circadian rhythms. In mice deficient in Per1 and Per2 genes (thus lacking circadian rhythms), we artificially generate PER2 rhythms and restore circadian sleep/wake cycles with an inducible Per2 transgene. Our artificial clock is tunable as the period and phase of the rhythms can be modulated predictably. This feature, and other design principles of our work, might enhance the study and treatment of circadian dysfunction and broader aspects of physiology involving biological oscillators. PMID:26617050

  11. Chitosan Effects on Plant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a natural, safe, and cheap product of chitin deacetylation, widely used by several industries because of its interesting features. The availability of industrial quantities of CHT in the late 1980s enabled it to be tested in agriculture. CHT has been proven to stimulate plant growth, to protect the safety of edible products, and to induce abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in various horticultural commodities. The stimulating effect of different enzyme activities to detoxify reactive oxygen species suggests the involvement of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in CHT signaling. CHT could also interact with chromatin and directly affect gene expression. Recent innovative uses of CHT include synthesis of CHT nanoparticles as a valuable delivery system for fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides, and micronutrients for crop growth promotion by a balanced and sustained nutrition. In addition, CHT nanoparticles can safely deliver genetic material for plant transformation. This review presents an overview on the status of the use of CHT in plant systems. Attention was given to the research that suggested the use of CHT for sustainable crop productivity. PMID:27347928

  12. Chitosan Effects on Plant Systems.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a natural, safe, and cheap product of chitin deacetylation, widely used by several industries because of its interesting features. The availability of industrial quantities of CHT in the late 1980s enabled it to be tested in agriculture. CHT has been proven to stimulate plant growth, to protect the safety of edible products, and to induce abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in various horticultural commodities. The stimulating effect of different enzyme activities to detoxify reactive oxygen species suggests the involvement of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in CHT signaling. CHT could also interact with chromatin and directly affect gene expression. Recent innovative uses of CHT include synthesis of CHT nanoparticles as a valuable delivery system for fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides, and micronutrients for crop growth promotion by a balanced and sustained nutrition. In addition, CHT nanoparticles can safely deliver genetic material for plant transformation. This review presents an overview on the status of the use of CHT in plant systems. Attention was given to the research that suggested the use of CHT for sustainable crop productivity. PMID:27347928

  13. Frequency Metrology with Optical Lattice Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Feng-Lei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2010-08-01

    The precision measurement of time and frequency is of great interest for a wide range of applications, including fundamental science and technologies that support broadband communication networks and the navigation with global positioning systems (GPSs). The development of optical frequency measurement based on frequency combs has revolutionized the field of frequency metrology, especially research on optical frequency standards. The proposal and realization of the optical lattice clock have further stimulated studies in the field of optical frequency metrology. Optical carrier transfer using optical fibers has been used to disseminate optical frequencies or compare two optical clocks without degrading their stability and accuracy. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art development of optical frequency combs, standards, and transfer techniques with emphasis on optical lattice clocks. We address recent results achieved at the University of Tokyo and the National Metrology Institute of Japan in respect of frequency metrology with Sr and Yb optical lattice clocks.

  14. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  15. Quantum time-of-flight measurements: Kicked clock versus continuous clock

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Daniel; Sala Mayato, R.; Muga, J.G.

    2003-03-01

    The measurement of time durations or instants of occurrence of events has been frequently modeled 'operationally' by coupling the system of interest to a ''clock.'' According to several of these models, the operational approach is limited at low energies because the perturbation of the clock does not allow to reproduce accurately the corresponding ideal time quantity, defined for the system in isolation. We show that, for a time-of-flight measurement model that can be set to measure dwell or arrival times, these limitations may be overcome by extending the range of energies where the clock works properly using pulsed couplings rather than continuous ones.

  16. Atomic clocks for astrophysical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Mattison, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that recently developed atomic hydrogen masers have achieved stability well into the 10 to the -16th domain for averaging time intervals beyond 1000 sec and that further improvements are in prospect. These devices are highly adaptable for space use in very high precision measurements of angle through Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and of range and range-rate through Doppler techniques. Space missions that will use these clocks for measuring the sun's gravity field distribution and for testing gravitation and relativity (a project that will include a search for pulsed low-frequency gravitational waves) are discussed. Estimates are made of system performance capability, and the accuracy capability of relativistic measurements is evaluated in terms of the results from the 1976 NASA/SAO spaceborne clock test of the Einstein Equivalence Principle.

  17. Short-term GNSS satellite clock stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griggs, E.; Kursinski, E. R.; Akos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) clock stability is characterized via the modified Allan deviation using active hydrogen masers as the receiver frequency reference. The high stability of the maser reference allows the GNSS clock contribution to the GNSS carrier phase variance to be determined quite accurately. Satellite clock stability for four different GNSS constellations are presented, highlighting the similarities and differences between the constellations as well as satellite blocks and clock types. Impact on high-rate applications, such as GNSS radio occultation (RO), is assessed through the calculation of the maximum carrier phase error due to clock instability. White phase noise appears to dominate at subsecond time scales. However, while we derived the theoretical contribution of white phase modulation to the modified Allan deviation, our analysis of the GNSS satellite clocks was limited to 1-200 s time scales because of inconsistencies between the subsecond results from the commercial and software-defined receivers. The rubidium frequency standards on board the Global Positioning System (GPS) Block IIF, BeiDou, and Galileo satellites show improved stability results in comparison to previous GPS blocks for time scales relevant to RO. The Globalnaya Navigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) satellites are the least stable of the GNSS constellations in the short term and will need high-rate corrections to produce RO results comparable to those from the other GNSS constellations.

  18. Coupling governs entrainment range of circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrián E; Westermark, Pål O; Heine, Markus; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Synchronization of these timers to environmental light–dark cycles (‘entrainment') is crucial for an organism's fitness. Little is known about which oscillator qualities determine entrainment, i.e., entrainment range, phase and amplitude. In a systematic theoretical and experimental study, we uncovered these qualities for circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN—the master clock in mammals) and the lung (a peripheral clock): (i) the ratio between stimulus (zeitgeber) strength and oscillator amplitude and (ii) the rigidity of the oscillatory system (relaxation rate upon perturbation) determine entrainment properties. Coupling among oscillators affects both qualities resulting in increased amplitude and rigidity. These principles explain our experimental findings that lung clocks entrain to extreme zeitgeber cycles, whereas SCN clocks do not. We confirmed our theoretical predictions by showing that pharmacological inhibition of coupling in the SCN leads to larger ranges of entrainment. These differences between master and the peripheral clocks suggest that coupling-induced rigidity in the SCN filters environmental noise to create a robust circadian system. PMID:21119632

  19. Collecting in Central Asia: National Plant Germplasm System Plant Explorations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System is charged with the preservation of economically important crop plants and their wild relatives. Curators in the System strive to develop collections capturing the genetic diversity of each species. One mechanism for filling gaps in collections is through...

  20. Network balance via CRY signalling controls the Arabidopsis circadian clock over ambient temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Peter D; Ugarte, Nicolas; Domijan, Mirela; Costa, Maria; Foreman, Julia; MacGregor, Dana; Rose, Ken; Griffiths, Jayne; Millar, Andrew J; Finkenstädt, Bärbel; Penfield, Steven; Rand, David A; Halliday, Karen J; Hall, Anthony J W

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks exhibit ‘temperature compensation', meaning that they show only small changes in period over a broad temperature range. Several clock genes have been implicated in the temperature-dependent control of period in Arabidopsis. We show that blue light is essential for this, suggesting that the effects of light and temperature interact or converge upon common targets in the circadian clock. Our data demonstrate that two cryptochrome photoreceptors differentially control circadian period and sustain rhythmicity across the physiological temperature range. In order to test the hypothesis that the targets of light regulation are sufficient to mediate temperature compensation, we constructed a temperature-compensated clock model by adding passive temperature effects into only the light-sensitive processes in the model. Remarkably, this model was not only capable of full temperature compensation and consistent with mRNA profiles across a temperature range, but also predicted the temperature-dependent change in the level of LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL, a key clock protein. Our analysis provides a systems-level understanding of period control in the plant circadian oscillator. PMID:23511208

  1. The regulation of central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Boivin, D B

    2009-11-01

    Many circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as clocks located in other brain regions and most peripheral tissues. These central and peripheral clocks are based on clock genes and their protein products. In recent years, the expression of clock genes has started to be investigated in human samples, primarily white blood cells, but also skin, oral mucosa, colon cells, adipose tissue as well as post-mortem brain tissue. The expression of clock genes in those peripheral tissues offers a way to monitor human peripheral clocks and to compare their function and regulation with those of the central clock, which is followed by markers such as melatonin, cortisol and core body temperature. We have recently used such an approach to compare central and peripheral rhythms in subjects under different lighting conditions. In particular, we have monitored the entrainment of the clock of blood cells in subjects undergoing a simulated night shift protocol with bright light treatment, known to efficiently reset the central clock. This line of research will be helpful for learning more about the human circadian system and to find ways to alleviate health problems of shift workers, and other populations experiencing altered circadian rhythms. PMID:19849799

  2. Skeletal muscle functions around the clock.

    PubMed

    Mayeuf-Louchart, A; Staels, B; Duez, H

    2015-09-01

    In mammals, the central clock localized in the central nervous system imposes a circadian rhythmicity to all organs. This is achieved thanks to a well-conserved molecular clockwork, involving interactions between several transcription factors, whose pace is conveyed to peripheral tissues through neuronal and humoral signals. The molecular clock plays a key role in the control of numerous physiological processes and takes part in the regulation of metabolism and energy balance. Skeletal muscle is one of the peripheral organs whose function is under the control of the molecular clock. However, although skeletal muscle metabolism and performances display circadian rhythmicity, the role of the molecular clock in the skeletal muscle has remained unappreciated for years. Peripheral organs such as skeletal muscle, and the liver, among others, can be desynchronized from the central clock by external stimuli, such as feeding or exercise, which impose a new rhythm at the organism level. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the clock in skeletal muscle circadian physiology, focusing on the control of myogenesis and skeletal muscle metabolism. PMID:26332967

  3. Towards Self-Clocked Gated OCDMA Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, S.; Osadola, T.; Glesk, I.

    2013-02-01

    A novel incoherent OCDMA receiver with incorporated all-optical clock recovery for self-synchronization of a time gate for the multi access interferences (MAI) suppression and minimizing the effect of data time jitter in incoherent OCDMA system was successfully developed and demonstrated. The solution was implemented and tested in a multiuser environment in an out of the laboratory OCDMA testbed with two-dimensional wavelength-hopping time-spreading coding scheme and OC-48 (2.5 Gbp/s) data rate. The self-clocked all-optical time gate uses SOA-based fibre ring laser optical clock, recovered all-optically from the received OCDMA traffic to control its switching window for cleaning the autocorrelation peak from the surrounding MAI. A wider eye opening was achieved when the all-optically recovered clock from received data was used for synchronization if compared to a static approach with the RF clock being generated by a RF synthesizer. Clean eye diagram was also achieved when recovered clock is used to drive time gating.

  4. Deterministic and Stochastic Receiver Clock Modeling in Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orliac, E.; Dach, R.; Wang, K.; Rothacher, M.; Voithenleitner, D.; Hugentobler, U.; Heinze, M.; Svehla, D.

    2012-04-01

    The traditional GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) data analysis assumes an independent set of clock corrections for each epoch. This introduces a huge number of parameters that are highly correlated with station height and troposphere parameters. If the number of clock parameters can be reduced, the GNSS processing procedure may be stabilized. Experiments with kinematic solutions for stations equipped with H-Maser clocks have confirmed this. On the other hand, static coordinates do not significantly benefit from changing the strategy in handling the clock parameter. In the current GNSS constellation only GIOVE-B and the GPS Block IIF satellite clocks seem to be good enough to be modeled instead of freely estimated for each epoch without losing accuracy at the level of phase measurements. With the Galileo constellation this will change in future. In this context, ESA (European Space Agency) funded a project on "Satellite and Station Clock Modelling for GNSS". In the frame of this project, various deterministic and stochastic clock models have been evaluated, implemented and assessed for both, station and satellite clocks. In this paper we focus on the impact of modeling the receiver clock in the processing of GNSS data in static and kinematic precise point positioning (PPP) modes. Initial results show that for stations connected to an H-Maser clock the stability of the vertical position for kinematic PPP could be improved by up to 60%. The impact of clock modeling on the estimation of troposphere parameters is also investigated, along with the role of the tropospheric modeling itself, by testing various sampling rates and relative constraints for the troposphere parameters. Finally, we investigate the convergence time of PPP when deterministic or stochastic clock modeling is applied to the receiver clock.

  5. Body weight, metabolism and clock genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biological rhythms are present in the lives of almost all organisms ranging from plants to more evolved creatures. These oscillations allow the anticipation of many physiological and behavioral mechanisms thus enabling coordination of rhythms in a timely manner, adaption to environmental changes and more efficient organization of the cellular processes responsible for survival of both the individual and the species. Many components of energy homeostasis exhibit circadian rhythms, which are regulated by central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) and peripheral (located in other tissues) circadian clocks. Adipocyte plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the signaling of satiety and cellular differentiation and proliferation. Also, the adipocyte circadian clock is probably involved in the control of many of these functions. Thus, circadian clocks are implicated in the control of energy balance, feeding behavior and consequently in the regulation of body weight. In this regard, alterations in clock genes and rhythms can interfere with the complex mechanism of metabolic and hormonal anticipation, contributing to multifactorial diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The aim of this review was to define circadian clocks by describing their functioning and role in the whole body and in adipocyte metabolism, as well as their influence on body weight control and the development of obesity. PMID:20712885

  6. Body weight, metabolism and clock genes.

    PubMed

    Zanquetta, Melissa M; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Monteiro, Maria Beatriz; Villares, Sandra Mf

    2010-01-01

    Biological rhythms are present in the lives of almost all organisms ranging from plants to more evolved creatures. These oscillations allow the anticipation of many physiological and behavioral mechanisms thus enabling coordination of rhythms in a timely manner, adaption to environmental changes and more efficient organization of the cellular processes responsible for survival of both the individual and the species. Many components of energy homeostasis exhibit circadian rhythms, which are regulated by central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) and peripheral (located in other tissues) circadian clocks. Adipocyte plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the signaling of satiety and cellular differentiation and proliferation. Also, the adipocyte circadian clock is probably involved in the control of many of these functions. Thus, circadian clocks are implicated in the control of energy balance, feeding behavior and consequently in the regulation of body weight. In this regard, alterations in clock genes and rhythms can interfere with the complex mechanism of metabolic and hormonal anticipation, contributing to multifactorial diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The aim of this review was to define circadian clocks by describing their functioning and role in the whole body and in adipocyte metabolism, as well as their influence on body weight control and the development of obesity. PMID:20712885

  7. VCSELs for atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkland, Darwin K.; Peake, Gregory M.; Geib, Kent M.; Lutwak, Robert; Garvey, R. Michael; Varghese, Mathew; Mescher, Mark

    2006-02-01

    The spectroscopic technique of coherent population trapping (CPT) enables an all-optical interrogation of the groundstate hyperfine splitting of cesium (or rubidium), compared to the optical-microwave double resonance technique conventionally employed in atomic frequency standards. All-optical interrogation enables the reduction of the size and power consumption of an atomic clock by two orders of magnitude, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are preferred optical sources due to their low power consumption and circular output beam. Several research teams are currently using VCSELs for DARPA's chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) program with the goal of producing an atomic clock having a volume < 1 cm^3, a power consumption < 30 mW, and an instability (Allan deviation) < 1x10^-11 during a 1-hour averaging interval. This paper describes the VCSEL requirements for CPT-based atomic clocks, which include single mode operation, single polarization operation, modulation bandwidth > 4 GHz, low power consumption (for the CSAC), narrow linewidth, and low relative intensity noise (RIN). A significant manufacturing challenge is to reproducibly obtain the required wavelength at the specified VCSEL operating temperature and drive current. Data are presented that show the advantage of operating at the D1 (rather than D2) resonance of the alkali atoms. Measurements of VCSEL linewidth will be discussed in particular, since atomic clock performance is especially sensitive to this parameter.

  8. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock.

    PubMed

    Wall, Michael L; Koller, Andrew P; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-22

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s-wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p- and s-wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures. PMID:26849600

  9. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael L.; Koller, Andrew P.; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R.; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s -wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p - and s -wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures.

  10. Room 103, transom woodwork and original clock. All clocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Room 103, transom woodwork and original clock. All clocks are driven by a common signal. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. The circadian clock-associated gene zea mays gigantea1 affects maize developmental transitions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The circadian clock is the internal timing mechanism that allows plants to make developmental decisions in accordance with environmental conditions. The genes of the maize circadian clock are not well defined. Gigantea (gi) genes are conserved across flowering plants, including maize. In model plant...

  12. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  13. Plant health sensing system for determining nitrogen status in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomasson, J. A.; Sui, Ruixiu; Read, John J.; Reddy, K. R.

    2004-03-01

    A plant health sensing system was developed for determining nitrogen status in plants. The system consists of a multi-spectral optical sensor and a data-acquisition and processing unit. The optical sensor"s light source provides modulated panchromatic illumination of a plant canopy with light-emitting diodes, and the sensor measures spectral reflectance through optical filters that partition the energy into blue, green, red, and near-infrared wavebands. Spectral reflectance of plants is detected in situ, at the four wavebands, in real time. The data-acquisition and processing unit is based on a single board computer that collects data from the multi-spectral sensor and spatial information from a global positioning system receiver. Spectral reflectance at the selected wavebands is analyzed, with algorithms developed during preliminary work, to determine nitrogen status in plants. The plant health sensing system has been tested primarily in the laboratory and field so far, and promising results have been obtained. This article describes the development, theory of operation, and test results of the plant health sensing system.

  14. Orbit and clock determination of BDS regional navigation satellite system based on IGS M-GEX and WHU BETS tracking network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GENG, T.; Zhao, Q.; Shi, C.; Shum, C.; Guo, J.; Su, X.

    2013-12-01

    BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) began to provide the regional open service on December 27th 2012 and will provide the global open service by the end of 2020. Compared to GPS, the space segment of BDS Regional System consists of 5 Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), 5 Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit satellites (IGSO) and 4 Medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites. Since 2011, IGS Multiple-GNSS Experiment (M-GEX) focuses on tracking the newly available GNSS signals. This includes all signals from the modernized satellites of the GPS and GLONASS systems, as well as signals of the BDS, Galileo and QZSS systems. Up to now, BDS satellites are tracked by around 25 stations with a variety of different antennas and receivers from different GNSS manufacture communities in M-GEX network. Meanwhile, there are 17 stations with Unicore Communications Incorporation's GPS/BDS receivers in BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) network by Wuhan University. In addition, 5 BDS satellites have been tracking by the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS). BDS performance is expected to be further studied by the GNSS communities. Following an introduction of the BDS system and above different tracking network, this paper discusses the achieved BDS characterization and performance assessment. Firstly, the BDS signal and measurement quality are analyzed with different antennas and receivers in detail compared to GPS. This includes depth of coverage for satellite observation, carrier-to-noise-density ratios, code noise and multipath, carrier phase errors. Secondly, BDS Precise Orbit Determination (POD) is processed. Different arc lengths and sets of orbit parameters are tested using Position And Navigation Data Analysis software (PANDA) which is developed at the Wuhan University. GEO, IGSO and MEO satellites orbit quality will be assessed using overlap comparison, 2-day orbit fit and external validations with Satellite Laser Range (SLR). Then BDS satellites are equipped

  15. A fault-tolerant clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daley, W. P.; Mckenna, J. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Computers must operate correctly even though one or more of components have failed. Electronic clock has been designed to be insensitive to occurrence of faults; it is substantial advance over any known clock.

  16. Central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system of mammals is composed of a hierarchy of oscillators that function at the cellular, tissue, and systems levels. A common molecular mechanism underlies the cell-autonomous circadian oscillator throughout the body, yet this clock system is adapted to different functional contexts. In the central suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, a coupled population of neuronal circadian oscillators acts as a master pacemaker for the organism to drive rhythms in activity and rest, feeding, body temperature, and hormones. Coupling within the SCN network confers robustness to the SCN pacemaker, which in turn provides stability to the overall temporal architecture of the organism. Throughout the majority of the cells in the body, cell-autonomous circadian clocks are intimately enmeshed within metabolic pathways. Thus, an emerging view for the adaptive significance of circadian clocks is their fundamental role in orchestrating metabolism. PMID:22483041

  17. Estimating the instability of a composite clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    A composite clock created from a local clock ensemble is known by its time offsets from the ensemble clocks. By a geometrical argument, estimate for the instability of the composite clock are calculated from the instabilities of the ensemble clocks, individually and against the composite clock. The method is illustrated by examples using simulated and real ensembles.

  18. A Novel Photonic Clock and Carrier Recovery Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve; Lutes, George; Maleki, Lute

    1996-01-01

    As data communication rates climb toward ten Gb/s, clock recovery and synchronization become more difficult, if not impossible, using conventional electronic circuits. We present in this article experimental results of a high speed clock and carrier recovery using a novel device called a photonic oscillator that we recently developed in our laboratory. This device is capable of recovering clock signals up to 70 GHz. To recover the clock, the incoming data is injected into the photonic oscillator either through the optical injection port or the electrical injection port. The free running photonic oscillator is tuned to oscillate at a nominal frequency equal to the clock frequency of the incoming data. With the injection of the data, the photonic oscillator will be quickly locked to clock frequency of the data stream while rejecting other frequency components associated with the data. Consequently, the output of the locked photonic oscillator is a continuous periodical wave synchronized with the incoming data or simply the recovered clock. We have demonstrated a clock to spur ratio of more than 60 dB of the recovered clock using this technique. Similar to the clock recovery, the photonic oscillator can be used to recover a high frequency carrier degraded by noise and an improvement of about 50 dB in signal-to-noise ratio was demonstrated. The photonic oscillator has both electrical and optical inputs and outputs and can be directly interfaced with a photonic system without signal conversion. In addition to clock and carrier recovery, the photonic oscillator can also be used for (1) stable high frequency clock signal generation, (2) frequency multiplication, (3) square wave and comb frequency generation, and (4) photonic phase locked loop.

  19. Derivation and experimental verification of clock synchronization theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this work is to validate mathematically derived clock synchronization theories and their associated algorithms through experiment. Two theories are considered, the Interactive Convergence Clock Synchronization Algorithm and the Mid-Point Algorithm. Special clock circuitry was designed and built so that several operating conditions and failure modes (including malicious failures) could be tested. Both theories are shown to predict conservative upper bounds (i.e., measured values of clock skew were always less than the theory prediction). Insight gained during experimentation led to alternative derivations of the theories. These new theories accurately predict the clock system's behavior. It is found that a 100% penalty is paid to tolerate worst case failures. It is also shown that under optimal conditions (with minimum error and no failures) the clock skew can be as much as 3 clock ticks. Clock skew grows to 6 clock ticks when failures are present. Finally, it is concluded that one cannot rely solely on test procedures or theoretical analysis to predict worst case conditions. conditions.

  20. Derivation and experimental verification of clock synchronization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this work is to validate mathematically derived clock synchronization theories and their associated algorithms through experiment. Two theories are considered, the Interactive Convergence Clock Synchronization Algorithm and the Mid-Point Algorithm. Special clock circuitry was designed and built so that several operating conditions and failure modes (including malicious failures) could be tested. Both theories are shown to predict conservative upper bounds (i.e., measured values of clock skew were always less than the theory prediction). Insight gained during experimentation led to alternative derivations of the theories. These new theories accurately predict the clock system's behavior. It is found that a 100% penalty is paid to tolerate worst case failures. It is also shown that under optimal conditions (with minimum error and no failures) the clock skew can be as much as 3 clock ticks. Clock skew grows to 6 clock ticks when failures are present. Finally, it is concluded that one cannot rely solely on test procedures or theoretical analysis to predict worst case conditions. conditions.

  1. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  2. Narrative Clock Sculptures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Art teacher Linda Popp and artist H. Ed Smith team up to teach about creating sculptural clocks. This lesson shows how a portrait can be created using various media. Students based projects on someone in their lives they have known for a long time. This sculptural problem was part of a series of portrait and self-portrait lessons with a high…

  3. Quantum Clock Synchronization with a Single Qudit

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Armin; Cabello, Adán; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to Byzantine agreement (BA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm, based on a quantum solution of the detectable BA, which achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system. PMID:25613754

  4. Reciprocal interactions between circadian clocks and aging.

    PubMed

    Banks, Gareth; Nolan, Patrick M; Peirson, Stuart N

    2016-08-01

    Virtually, all biological processes in the body are modulated by an internal circadian clock which optimizes physiological and behavioral performance according to the changing demands of the external 24-h world. This circadian clock undergoes a number of age-related changes, at both the physiological and molecular levels. While these changes have been considered to be part of the normal aging process, there is increasing evidence that disruptions to the circadian system can substantially impact upon aging and these impacts will have clear health implications. Here we review the current data of how both the physiological and core molecular clocks change with age and how feedback from external cues may modulate the aging of the circadian system. PMID:27137838

  5. Clock shifts in the Unitary Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Richard; Man, Jay; Lopes, Raphael; Navon, Nir; Smith, Robert; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    Clock shifts are interaction-induced changes in the transition frequency between atomic spin states. So-called because of their importance as systematic errors in atomic clocks, they reveal details of both the interaction energy within a gas and the particle correlations. In this work, we employ a RF-injection technique to rapidly project a thermal Bose gas into the unitary regime on a timescale much shorter than three-body losses. Working with a two-state system, one of which exhibits strong intrastate interactions, we carry out Ramsey spectroscopy to extract the variation in the clock shift across a Feshbach resonance. Thanks to the relationship between these shifts and particle correlations, we use our measurements to infer the contact as a function of both interaction strength and degeneracy. This quantity plays a central role in the many-body physics of strongly correlated systems, offering a link between few-body and thermodynamic behaviour.

  6. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal "clock" gene expression.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, M; Yildiz, S; Dirim Arslan, A; Sharma, R; Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-23

    Using a transgenic mice model (i.e. "clock" knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulates the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e. D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2 (neuronal PAS domain protein 2), and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e. D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e. rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the dopamine receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e. intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance implementation of a quantum clock synchronization algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jingfu; Long, G.C; Liu Wenzhang; Deng Zhiwei; Lu Zhiheng

    2004-12-01

    The quantum clock synchronization (QCS) algorithm proposed by Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2006 (2000)] has been implemented in a three qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum system. The time difference between two separated clocks can be determined by measuring the output states. The experimental realization of the QCS algorithm also demonstrates an application of the quantum phase estimation.

  8. Pulsed Optically Pumped Rb clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micalizio, S.; Levi, F.; Godone, A.; Calosso, C. E.; François, B.; Boudot, R.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Gharavipour, M.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    INRIM demonstrated a Rb vapour cell clock based on pulsed optical pumping (POP) with unprecedented frequency stability performances, both in the short and in the medium-long term period. In the frame of a EMRP project, we are developing a new clock based on the same POP principle but adopting solutions aimed at reducing the noise sources affecting the INRIM clock. At the same time, concerning possible technological applications, particular care are devoted in the project to reduce the size and the weight of the clock, still keeping the excellent stability of the INRIM clock. The paper resumes the main results of this activity.

  9. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26657326

  10. A precise clock distribution network for MRPC-based experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Cao, P.; Shang, L.; An, Q.

    2016-06-01

    In high energy physics experiments, the MRPC (Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors are widely used recently which can provide higher-resolution measurement for particle identification. However, the application of MRPC detectors leads to a series of challenges in electronics design with large number of front-end electronic channels, especially for distributing clock precisely. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a universal scheme of clock transmission network for MRPC-based experiments with advantages of both precise clock distribution and global command synchronization. For precise clock distributing, the clock network is designed into a tree architecture with two stages: the first one has a point-to-multipoint long range bidirectional distribution with optical channels and the second one has a fan-out structure with copper link inside readout crates. To guarantee the precision of clock frequency or phase, the r-PTP (reduced Precision Time Protocol) and the DDMTD (digital Dual Mixer Time Difference) methods are used for frequency synthesis, phase measurement and adjustment, which is implemented by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in real-time. In addition, to synchronize global command execution, based upon this clock distribution network, synchronous signals are coded with clock for transmission. With technique of encoding/decoding and clock data recovery, signals such as global triggers or system control commands, can be distributed to all front-end channels synchronously, which greatly simplifies the system design. The experimental results show that both the clock jitter (RMS) and the clock skew can be less than 100 ps.

  11. In vitro and in vivo Phase Changes of the Mouse Circadian Clock by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Yu; Yokota, Aya; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yamada, Shunya; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shinozaki, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are governed by an endogenous circadian clock system, including the molecular clock works in each cell and tissue. Adaptation of the circadian clock to different environmental stimuli such as light, food, and stress is essential for homeostasis maintenance. However, the influence of oxidative stress on the circadian clock phase is not fully understood in vitro and in vivo. Here, we examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress on the PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE bioluminescence rhythm in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in mouse peripheral tissues in vivo. The circadian clock phase changed with the dose of H2O2 and time of day in vitro; similar phase changes were observed in vivo in the circadian clocks of the peripheral tissues. In addition, mice treated with hemin-induced oxidative stress also showed phase changes of peripheral clocks, similarly as H2O2 treatment. Thus, oxidative stress can entrain circadian clock systems.

  12. Synergism of coupled subsarcolemmal Ca2+ clocks and sarcolemmal voltage clocks confers robust and flexible pacemaker function in a novel pacemaker cell model

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that sinoatrial node cells (SANC) generate spontaneous, rhythmic, local subsarcolemmal Ca2+ releases (Ca2+ clock), which occur during late diastolic depolarization (DD) and interact with the classic sarcolemmal voltage oscillator (membrane clock) by activating Na+-Ca2+ exchanger current (INCX). This and other interactions between clocks, however, are not captured by existing essentially membrane-delimited cardiac pacemaker cell numerical models. Using wide-scale parametric analysis of classic formulations of membrane clock and Ca2+ cycling, we have constructed and initially explored a prototype rabbit SANC model featuring both clocks. Our coupled oscillator system exhibits greater robustness and flexibility than membrane clock operating alone. Rhythmic spontaneous Ca2+ releases of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)-based Ca2+ clock ignite rhythmic action potentials via late DD INCX over much broader ranges of membrane clock parameters [e.g., L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) and/or hyperpolarization-activated (“funny”) current (If) conductances]. The system Ca2+ clock includes SR and sarcolemmal Ca2+ fluxes, which optimize cell Ca2+ balance to increase amplitudes of both SR Ca2+ release and late DD INCX as SR Ca2+ pumping rate increases, resulting in a broad pacemaker rate modulation (1.8–4.6 Hz). In contrast, the rate modulation range via membrane clock parameters is substantially smaller when Ca2+ clock is unchanged or lacking. When Ca2+ clock is disabled, the system parametric space for fail-safe SANC operation considerably shrinks: without rhythmic late DD INCX ignition signals membrane clock substantially slows, becomes dysrhythmic, or halts. In conclusion, the Ca2+ clock is a new critical dimension in SANC function. A synergism of the coupled function of Ca2+ and membrane clocks confers fail-safe SANC operation at greatly varying rates. PMID:19136600

  13. Parcs:. a Laser-Cooled Atomic Clock in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavner, T. P.; Hollberg, L. W.; Jefferts, S. R.; Robinson, H. G.; Sullivan, D. B.; Walls, F. L.; Ashby, N.; Klipstein, W. M.; Maleki, L.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Wu, S.; Young, L.; Mattison, E. M.; Vessot, R. F. C.; Demarchi, A.

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes progress toward the development of a Primary Atomic Reference Clock in Space (PARCS) and reviews the scientific and technical objectives of the PARCS mission. PARCS is a collaborative effort involving the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the University of Colorado, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (SAO) and the Politecnico di Torino. Space systems for this experiment include a laser-cooled cesium atomic clock and a GPS frequency-comparison and orbit determination system, along with a hydrogen maser that serves as both a local oscillator for the cesium clock and a reference against which certain tests of gravitational theory can be made. In the microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS), cesium atoms can be launched more slowly through the clock's microwave cavity, thus significantly reducing a number of troubling effects (including several critical systematic effects), so clock performance can be substantially improved beyond that achieved on earth.

  14. A relativistic analysis of clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The relativistic conversion between coordinate time and atomic time is reformulated to allow simpler time calculations relating analysis in solar-system barycentric coordinates (using coordinate time) with earth-fixed observations (measuring earth-bound proper time or atomic time.) After an interpretation of terms, this simplified formulation, which has a rate accuracy of about 10 to the minus 15th power, is used to explain the conventions required in the synchronization of a world wide clock network and to analyze two synchronization techniques-portable clocks and radio interferometry. Finally, pertinent experiment tests of relativity are briefly discussed in terms of the reformulated time conversion.

  15. Real clocks and the Zeno effect

    SciTech Connect

    Egusquiza, Inigo L.; Garay, Luis J.

    2003-08-01

    Real clocks are not perfect. This must have an effect in our predictions for the behavior of a quantum system, an effect for which we present a unified description, encompassing several previous proposals. We study the relevance of clock errors in the Zeno effect and find that generically no Zeno effect can be present (in such a way that there is no contradiction with currently available experimental data). We further observe that, within the class of stochasticities in time addressed here, there is no modification in emission line shapes.

  16. Biochemical basis for the biological clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Pletcher, Jake; Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Lian-Ying; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    NADH oxidases at the external surface of plant and animal cells (ECTO-NOX proteins) exhibit stable and recurring patterns of oscillations with potentially clock-related, entrainable, and temperature-compensated period lengths of 24 min. To determine if ECTO-NOX proteins might represent the ultradian time keepers (pacemakers) of the biological clock, COS cells were transfected with cDNAs encoding tNOX proteins having a period length of 22 min or with C575A or C558A cysteine to alanine replacements having period lengths of 36 or 42 min. Here we demonstrate that such transfectants exhibited 22, 36, or 40 to 42 h circadian patterns in the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a common clock-regulated protein, in addition to the endogenous 24 h circadian period length. The fact that the expression of a single oscillatory ECTO-NOX protein determines the period length of a circadian biochemical marker (60 X the ECTO-NOX period length) provides compelling evidence that ECTO-NOX proteins are the biochemical ultradian drivers of the cellular biological clock.

  17. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  18. Rockets, clocks, and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    Uses of atomic clocks, telemetry, and spacecraft to test predictions of the General Theory of Relativity are described. The number of cycles of a signal being generated by an atomic clock on board a satellite and directed toward earth stations allows precise determination of movements away or toward the receiving station, with an accuracy of 1/9,192,631,770 when using the outer shell electron to nucleus magnetic interaction of a cesium 133 isotope. Doppler radar serves the same purpose when reflected off the surface of a spacecraft, and radio transmitters landed on Mars have provided a source of signals which are deflected by the sun when orbital positions of earth and Mars are in favorable positions. Goals of the NASA Starprobe mission to measure the gravitational flattening and time/space warping occurring around the sun are outlined.

  19. Generating clock signals for a cycle accurate, cycle reproducible FPGA based hardware accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameth W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for generating clock signals for a cycle accurate FPGA based hardware accelerator used to simulate operations of a device-under-test (DUT). In one embodiment, the DUT includes multiple device clocks generating multiple device clock signals at multiple frequencies and at a defined frequency ratio; and the FPG hardware accelerator includes multiple accelerator clocks generating multiple accelerator clock signals to operate the FPGA hardware accelerator to simulate the operations of the DUT. In one embodiment, operations of the DUT are mapped to the FPGA hardware accelerator, and the accelerator clock signals are generated at multiple frequencies and at the defined frequency ratio of the frequencies of the multiple device clocks, to maintain cycle accuracy between the DUT and the FPGA hardware accelerator. In an embodiment, the FPGA hardware accelerator may be used to control the frequencies of the multiple device clocks.

  20. Seismic monitoring system replacement at Temelin plant

    SciTech Connect

    Baltus, R.; Palusamy, S.S.

    1996-12-01

    The VVER-1000 plants under construction at Temelin (Czech Republic) were designed with an automatic reactor trip system triggered on seismic peak accelerations. Within the plant I and C upgrade, Westinghouse designed a digital Seismic Monitoring System to be integrated in an Artificial Intelligence based Diagnostic and Monitoring System. The system meets the requirements of the emerging standards prepared by the US NRC on the basis of EPRI studies, which recommend a detailed data evaluation and a pre-shutdown plant inspection before orderly shutdown, if required, rather than immediate emergency shutdown. The paper presents the arguments about automatic trip, as discussed in an IAEA meeting attended by expert consultants from Japan, Russia, US and Eastern and Western Europe. It describes the system installed at Temelin, including the plant specific criteria for OBE exceedance. Finally it presents the capabilities and limitations of the integration into an overall Diagnostic and Monitoring System.

  1. Clock Synchronization for Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis Robles, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks, more so generally than in other types of distributed systems, clock synchronization is crucial since by having this service available, several applications such as media access protocols, object tracking, or data fusion, would improve their performance. In this dissertation, we propose a set of algorithms to achieve…

  2. The circadian clock and cell cycle: Interconnected biological circuits

    PubMed Central

    Masri, Selma; Cervantes, Marlene; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock governs biological timekeeping on a systemic level, helping to regulate and maintain physiological processes, including endocrine and metabolic pathways with a periodicity of 24-hours. Disruption within the circadian clock machinery has been linked to numerous pathological conditions, including cancer, suggesting that clock-dependent regulation of the cell cycle is an essential control mechanism. This review will highlight recent advances on the ‘gating’ controls of the circadian clock at various checkpoints of the cell cycle and also how the cell cycle can influence biological rhythms. The reciprocal influence that the circadian clock and cell cycle exert on each other suggests that these intertwined biological circuits are essential and multiple regulatory/control steps have been instated to ensure proper timekeeping. PMID:23969329

  3. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  4. Hunting for topological dark matter with atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevianko, A.; Pospelov, M.

    2014-12-01

    The cosmological applications of atomic clocks so far have been limited to searches for the uniform-in-time drift of fundamental constants. We point out that a transient-in-time change of fundamental constants can be induced by dark-matter objects that have large spatial extent, such as stable topological defects built from light non-Standard Model fields. Networks of correlated atomic clocks, some of them already in existence, such as the Global Positioning System, can be used as a powerful tool to search for topological defect dark matter, thus providing another important fundamental physics application for the ever-improving accuracy of atomic clocks. During the encounter with an extended dark-matter object, as it sweeps through the network, initially synchronized clocks will become desynchronized. Time discrepancies between spatially separated clocks are expected to exhibit a distinct signature, encoding the defect's space structure and its interaction strength with atoms.

  5. Clock Synchronization in Wireless Sensor Networks: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Ill-Keun; Lee, Jaehan; Kim, Jangsub; Serpedin, Erchin; Wu, Yik-Chung

    2009-01-01

    The development of tiny, low-cost, low-power and multifunctional sensor nodes equipped with sensing, data processing, and communicating components, have been made possible by the recent advances in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) assume a collection of such tiny sensing devices connected wirelessly and which are used to observe and monitor a variety of phenomena in the real physical world. Many applications based on these WSNs assume local clocks at each sensor node that need to be synchronized to a common notion of time. This paper reviews the existing clock synchronization protocols for WSNs and the methods of estimating clock offset and clock skew in the most representative clock synchronization protocols for WSNs. PMID:22389588

  6. Velocity response curves demonstrate the complexity of modeling entrainable clocks.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephanie R; Cheever, Allyson; Harmon, Sarah M

    2014-12-21

    Circadian clocks are biological oscillators that regulate daily behaviors in organisms across the kingdoms of life. Their rhythms are generated by complex systems, generally involving interlocked regulatory feedback loops. These rhythms are entrained by the daily light/dark cycle, ensuring that the internal clock time is coordinated with the environment. Mathematical models play an important role in understanding how the components work together to function as a clock which can be entrained by light. For a clock to entrain, it must be possible for it to be sped up or slowed down at appropriate times. To understand how biophysical processes affect the speed of the clock, one can compute velocity response curves (VRCs). Here, in a case study involving the fruit fly clock, we demonstrate that VRC analysis provides insight into a clock׳s response to light. We also show that biochemical mechanisms and parameters together determine a model׳s ability to respond realistically to light. The implication is that, if one is developing a model and its current form has an unrealistic response to light, then one must reexamine one׳s model structure, because searching for better parameter values is unlikely to lead to a realistic response to light. PMID:25193284

  7. Clocking in the face of unpredictability beyond quantum uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2015-05-01

    In earlier papers we showed unpredictability beyond quantum uncertainty in atomic clocks, ensuing from a proven gap between given evidence and explanations of that evidence. Here we reconceive a clock, not as an isolated entity, but as enmeshed in a self-adjusting communications network adapted to one or another particular investigation, in contact with an unpredictable environment. From the practical uses of clocks, we abstract a clock enlivened with the computational capacity of a Turing machine, modified to transmit and to receive numerical communications. Such "live clocks" phase the steps of their computations to mesh with the arrival of transmitted numbers. We lift this phasing, known in digital communications, to a principle of logical synchronization, distinct from the synchronization defined by Einstein in special relativity. Logical synchronization elevates digital communication to a topic in physics, including applications to biology. One explores how feedback loops in clocking affect numerical signaling among entities functioning in the face of unpredictable influences, making the influences themselves into subjects of investigation. The formulation of communications networks in terms of live clocks extends information theory by expressing the need to actively maintain communications channels, and potentially, to create or drop them. We show how networks of live clocks are presupposed by the concept of coordinates in a spacetime. A network serves as an organizing principle, even when the concept of the rigid body that anchors a special-relativistic coordinate system is inapplicable, as is the case, for example, in a generic curved spacetime.

  8. Redox rhythm reinforces the circadian clock to gate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mian; Wang, Wei; Karapetyan, Sargis; Mwimba, Musoki; Marqués, Jorge; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to the transcriptional circadian clock, many organisms, including Arabidopsis, have a circadian redox rhythm driven by the organism’s metabolic activities1–3. It has been hypothesized that the redox rhythm is linked to the circadian clock, but the mechanism and the biological significance of this link have only begun to be investigated4–7. Here we report that the master immune regulator NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1) of Arabidopsis is a sensor of the plant’s redox state and regulates transcription of core circadian clock genes even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Surprisingly, acute perturbation in the redox status triggered by the immune signal salicylic acid (SA) does not compromise the circadian clock but rather leads to its reinforcement. Mathematical modelling and subsequent experiments show that NPR1 reinforces the circadian clock without changing the period by regulating both the morning and the evening clock genes. This balanced network architecture helps plants gate their immune responses towards the morning and minimize costs on growth at night. Our study demonstrates how a sensitive redox rhythm interacts with a robust circadian clock to ensure proper responsiveness to environmental stimuli without compromising fitness of the organism. PMID:26098366

  9. Circadian Clocks as Modulators of Metabolic Comorbidity in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Barandas, Rita; Landgraf, Dominic; McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder are often accompanied by metabolic dysfunction symptoms, including obesity and diabetes. Since the circadian system controls important brain systems that regulate affective, cognitive, and metabolic functions, and neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases are often correlated with disturbances of circadian rhythms, we hypothesize that dysregulation of circadian clocks plays a central role in metabolic comorbidity in psychiatric disorders. In this review paper, we highlight the role of circadian clocks in glucocorticoid, dopamine, and orexin/melanin-concentrating hormone systems and describe how a dysfunction of these clocks may contribute to the simultaneous development of psychiatric and metabolic symptoms. PMID:26483181

  10. Disruption of the circadian clock due to the Clock mutation has discrete effects on aging and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Antoch, Marina P.; Gorbacheva, Victoria Y.; Vykhovanets, Olena; Toshkov, Illia A.; Kondratov, Roman V.; Kondratova, Anna A.; Lee, Choogon; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system has been implicated in the regulation of various biological processes including those involved in genotoxic stress responses and tumor suppression. Here we report that mice with the functional deficiency in circadian transcription factor CLOCK (Clock/Clock mutant mice) do not display predisposition to tumor formation both during their normal lifespan or when challenged by γ-radiation. This phenotype is consistent with high apoptotic and low proliferation rate in lymphoid tissues of Clock mutant mice and is supported by the gene expression profiling of a number of apoptosis and cell cycle-related genes, as well as by growth inhibition of cells with CLOCK downregulation. At the same time, Clock mutant mice respond to low-dose irradiation by accelerating their aging program, and develop phenotypes that are reminiscent of those in Bmal1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the dichotomy in biological consequences of the disruption of the circadian clock with respect to ageing and cancer. They also highlight the existence of a complex interconnection between ageing, carcinogenesis and individual components of the circadian clock machinery. PMID:18418054