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Sample records for plant genome horizons

  1. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  2. Plant functional genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtorf, Hauke; Guitton, Marie-Christine; Reski, Ralf

    2002-04-01

    Functional genome analysis of plants has entered the high-throughput stage. The complete genome information from key species such as Arabidopsis thaliana and rice is now available and will further boost the application of a range of new technologies to functional plant gene analysis. To broadly assign functions to unknown genes, different fast and multiparallel approaches are currently used and developed. These new technologies are based on known methods but are adapted and improved to accommodate for comprehensive, large-scale gene analysis, i.e. such techniques are novel in the sense that their design allows researchers to analyse many genes at the same time and at an unprecedented pace. Such methods allow analysis of the different constituents of the cell that help to deduce gene function, namely the transcripts, proteins and metabolites. Similarly the phenotypic variations of entire mutant collections can now be analysed in a much faster and more efficient way than before. The different methodologies have developed to form their own fields within the functional genomics technological platform and are termed transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics. Gene function, however, cannot solely be inferred by using only one such approach. Rather, it is only by bringing together all the information collected by different functional genomic tools that one will be able to unequivocally assign functions to unknown plant genes. This review focuses on current technical developments and their impact on the field of plant functional genomics. The lower plant Physcomitrella is introduced as a new model system for gene function analysis, owing to its high rate of homologous recombination.

  3. Evolution of plant genome architecture.

    PubMed

    Wendel, Jonathan F; Jackson, Scott A; Meyers, Blake C; Wing, Rod A

    2016-01-01

    We have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of the evolution and structure of plant genomes in recent years. Here, we highlight three important emergent realizations: (1) that the evolutionary history of all plant genomes contains multiple, cyclical episodes of whole-genome doubling that were followed by myriad fractionation processes; (2) that the vast majority of the variation in genome size reflects the dynamics of proliferation and loss of lineage-specific transposable elements; and (3) that various classes of small RNAs help shape genomic architecture and function. We illustrate ways in which understanding these organism-level and molecular genetic processes can be used for crop plant improvement. PMID:26926526

  4. Advances in plant chromosome genomics.

    PubMed

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Kubaláková, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Simková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is revolutionizing genomics and is providing novel insights into genome organization, evolution and function. The number of plant genomes targeted for sequencing is rising. For the moment, however, the acquisition of full genome sequences in large genome species remains difficult, largely because the short reads produced by NGS platforms are inadequate to cope with repeat-rich DNA, which forms a large part of these genomes. The problem of sequence redundancy is compounded in polyploids, which dominate the plant kingdom. An approach to overcoming some of these difficulties is to reduce the full nuclear genome to its individual chromosomes using flow-sorting. The DNA acquired in this way has proven to be suitable for many applications, including PCR-based physical mapping, in situ hybridization, forming DNA arrays, the development of DNA markers, the construction of BAC libraries and positional cloning. Coupling chromosome sorting with NGS offers opportunities for the study of genome organization at the single chromosomal level, for comparative analyses between related species and for the validation of whole genome assemblies. Apart from the primary aim of reducing the complexity of the template, taking a chromosome-based approach enables independent teams to work in parallel, each tasked with the analysis of a different chromosome(s). Given that the number of plant species tractable for chromosome sorting is increasing, the likelihood is that chromosome genomics - the marriage of cytology and genomics - will make a significant contribution to the field of plant genetics. PMID:24406816

  5. Structural variations in plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, David; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Differences between plant genomes range from single nucleotide polymorphisms to large-scale duplications, deletions and rearrangements. The large polymorphisms are termed structural variants (SVs). SVs have received significant attention in human genetics and were found to be responsible for various chronic diseases. However, little effort has been directed towards understanding the role of SVs in plants. Many recent advances in plant genetics have resulted from improvements in high-resolution technologies for measuring SVs, including microarray-based techniques, and more recently, high-throughput DNA sequencing. In this review we describe recent reports of SV in plants and describe the genomic technologies currently used to measure these SVs. PMID:24907366

  6. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2011-01-01

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  7. Translational genomics for plant breeding with the genome sequence explosion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jae; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Jeong, Haneul; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2016-04-01

    The use of next-generation sequencers and advanced genotyping technologies has propelled the field of plant genomics in model crops and plants and enhanced the discovery of hidden bridges between genotypes and phenotypes. The newly generated reference sequences of unstudied minor plants can be annotated by the knowledge of model plants via translational genomics approaches. Here, we reviewed the strategies of translational genomics and suggested perspectives on the current databases of genomic resources and the database structures of translated information on the new genome. As a draft picture of phenotypic annotation, translational genomics on newly sequenced plants will provide valuable assistance for breeders and researchers who are interested in genetic studies. PMID:26269219

  8. PlantGDB: A Resource for Comparative Plant Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PlantGDB (http://www.plantgdb.org/) is a genomics database encompassing sequence data for green plants (Viridiplantae). PlantGDB provides annotated transcript assemblies for >100 plant species, with transcripts mapped to their cognate genomic context where available, integrated with a variety of seq...

  9. Bioinformatics Approach in Plant Genomic Research.

    PubMed

    Ong, Quang; Nguyen, Phuc; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Le, Ly

    2016-08-01

    The advance in genomics technology leads to the dramatic change in plant biology research. Plant biologists now easily access to enormous genomic data to deeply study plant high-density genetic variation at molecular level. Therefore, fully understanding and well manipulating bioinformatics tools to manage and analyze these data are essential in current plant genome research. Many plant genome databases have been established and continued expanding recently. Meanwhile, analytical methods based on bioinformatics are also well developed in many aspects of plant genomic research including comparative genomic analysis, phylogenomics and evolutionary analysis, and genome-wide association study. However, constantly upgrading in computational infrastructures, such as high capacity data storage and high performing analysis software, is the real challenge for plant genome research. This review paper focuses on challenges and opportunities which knowledge and skills in bioinformatics can bring to plant scientists in present plant genomics era as well as future aspects in critical need for effective tools to facilitate the translation of knowledge from new sequencing data to enhancement of plant productivity. PMID:27499685

  10. Psychrotolerant actinomycetes of plants and organic horizons in tundra and taiga soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrova, M. S.; Zenova, G. M.; Yakushev, A. V.; Manucharova, N. A.; Makarova, E. P.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Chernov, I. Yu.

    2013-08-01

    It has been revealed that in organic horizons and plants of the tundra and taiga ecosystems under low temperatures, actinomycetal complexes form. The population density of psychrotolerant actinomycetes in organic horizons and plants reaches tens and hundreds of thousands CFU/g of substrate or soil, and decreases in the sequence litters > plants > soils > undecomposed plant remains > moss growths. The mycelium length of psychrotolerant actinomycetes reaches 220 m/g of substrate. Application of the FISH method has demonstrated that metabolically active psychrotolerant bacteria of the phylum Actinobacteria constitute 30% of all metabolically active psychrotolerant representatives of the Bacterià domain of the prokaryotic microbial community of soils and plants. Psychrotolerant actinomycetes in tundra and taiga ecosystems possess antimicrobial properties.

  11. Importance of anchor genomes for any plant genome project

    PubMed Central

    Messing, Joachim; Llaca, Victor

    1998-01-01

    Progress in agricultural and environmental technologies is hampered by a slower rate of gene discovery in plants than animals. The vast pool of genes in plants, however, will be an important resource for insertion of genes, via biotechnological procedures, into an array of plants, generating unique germ plasms not achievable by conventional breeding. It just became clear that genomes of grasses have evolved in a manner analogous to Lego blocks. Large chromosome segments have been reshuffled and stuffer pieces added between genes. Although some genomes have become very large, the genome with the fewest stuffer pieces, the rice genome, is the Rosetta Stone of all the bigger grass genomes. This means that sequencing the rice genome as anchor genome of the grasses will provide instantaneous access to the same genes in the same relative physical position in other grasses (e.g., corn and wheat), without the need to sequence each of these genomes independently. (i) The sequencing of the entire genome of rice as anchor genome for the grasses will accelerate plant gene discovery in many important crops (e.g., corn, wheat, and rice) by several orders of magnitudes and reduce research and development costs for government and industry at a faster pace. (ii) Costs for sequencing entire genomes have come down significantly. Because of its size, rice is only 12% of the human or the corn genome, and technology improvements by the human genome project are completely transferable, translating in another 50% reduction of the costs. (iii) The physical mapping of the rice genome by a group of Japanese researchers provides a jump start for sequencing the genome and forming an international consortium. Otherwise, other countries would do it alone and own proprietary positions. PMID:9482827

  12. Cyberinfrastructure for (Comparative) Plant Genome Research Through PlantGDB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate and comprehensive gene structure annotation in emerging and assembled genomes is fundamental to comparative, functional, and translational genomics. We plan to build the cyberinfrastructure necessary for defining and accessing the plant gene space. Our Plant Genetic Data Base (PlantGDB) r...

  13. The functional role of carbonate-cemented soil horizons in desert ecosystems: Spatial and temporal dynamics of plant water availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In water limited ecosystems, soil profile characteristics can control plant community composition and production through their effects on spatial and temporal patterns of plant available water. Little is known, however, about water availability in soil horizons cemented with carbonates (petrocalcic ...

  14. Andrographolide: A New Plant-Derived Antineoplastic Entity on Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Astha; Padh, Harish; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2011-01-01

    Plant-derived natural products occupy an important position in the area of cancer chemotherapy. Molecules such as vincristine, vinblastine, paclitaxel, camptothecin derivatives, epipodophyllotoxin, and so forth, are invaluable contributions of nature to modern medicine. However, the quest to find out novel therapeutic compounds for cancer treatment and management is a never-ending venture; and diverse plant species are persistently being studied for identification of prospective anticancer agents. In this regard, Andrographis paniculata Nees, a well-known plant of Indian and Chinese traditional system of medicines, has drawn attention of researchers in recent times. Andrographolide, the principal bioactive chemical constituent of the plant has shown credible anticancer potential in various investigations around the globe. In vitro studies demonstrate the capability of the compound of inducing cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells at different concentrations. Andrographolide also shows potent immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic activities in tumorous tissues. Synthetic analogues of the compound have also been created and analyzed, which have also shown similar activities. Although it is too early to predict its future in cancer chemotherapy, the prologue strongly recommends further research on this molecule to assess its potential as a prospective anticancer agent. PMID:19752167

  15. Genomic selection in plant breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection (GS) is a method to predict the genetic value of selection candidates based on the genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) predicted from high-density markers positioned throughout the genome. Unlike marker-assisted selection, the GEBV is based on all markers including both minor ...

  16. PGP repository: a plant phenomics and genomics data publication infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Arend, Daniel; Junker, Astrid; Scholz, Uwe; Schüler, Danuta; Wylie, Juliane; Lange, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomics and phenomics represents the most promising tools for accelerating yield gains and overcoming emerging crop productivity bottlenecks. However, accessing this wealth of plant diversity requires the characterization of this material using state-of-the-art genomic, phenomic and molecular technologies and the release of subsequent research data via a long-term stable, open-access portal. Although several international consortia and public resource centres offer services for plant research data management, valuable digital assets remains unpublished and thus inaccessible to the scientific community. Recently, the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research and the German Plant Phenotyping Network have jointly initiated the Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository (PGP) as infrastructure to comprehensively publish plant research data. This covers in particular cross-domain datasets that are not being published in central repositories because of its volume or unsupported data scope, like image collections from plant phenotyping and microscopy, unfinished genomes, genotyping data, visualizations of morphological plant models, data from mass spectrometry as well as software and documents.The repository is hosted at Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research using e!DAL as software infrastructure and a Hierarchical Storage Management System as data archival backend. A novel developed data submission tool was made available for the consortium that features a high level of automation to lower the barriers of data publication. After an internal review process, data are published as citable digital object identifiers and a core set of technical metadata is registered at DataCite. The used e!DAL-embedded Web frontend generates for each dataset a landing page and supports an interactive exploration. PGP is registered as research data repository at BioSharing.org, re3data.org and OpenAIRE as valid EU Horizon 2020 open

  17. PGP repository: a plant phenomics and genomics data publication infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Arend, Daniel; Junker, Astrid; Scholz, Uwe; Schüler, Danuta; Wylie, Juliane; Lange, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomics and phenomics represents the most promising tools for accelerating yield gains and overcoming emerging crop productivity bottlenecks. However, accessing this wealth of plant diversity requires the characterization of this material using state-of-the-art genomic, phenomic and molecular technologies and the release of subsequent research data via a long-term stable, open-access portal. Although several international consortia and public resource centres offer services for plant research data management, valuable digital assets remains unpublished and thus inaccessible to the scientific community. Recently, the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research and the German Plant Phenotyping Network have jointly initiated the Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository (PGP) as infrastructure to comprehensively publish plant research data. This covers in particular cross-domain datasets that are not being published in central repositories because of its volume or unsupported data scope, like image collections from plant phenotyping and microscopy, unfinished genomes, genotyping data, visualizations of morphological plant models, data from mass spectrometry as well as software and documents. The repository is hosted at Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research using e!DAL as software infrastructure and a Hierarchical Storage Management System as data archival backend. A novel developed data submission tool was made available for the consortium that features a high level of automation to lower the barriers of data publication. After an internal review process, data are published as citable digital object identifiers and a core set of technical metadata is registered at DataCite. The used e!DAL-embedded Web frontend generates for each dataset a landing page and supports an interactive exploration. PGP is registered as research data repository at BioSharing.org, re3data.org and OpenAIRE as valid EU Horizon 2020 open

  18. Gramene 2013: Comparative plant genomics resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is a curated online resource for comparative functional genomics in crops and model plant species, currently hosting 27 fully and 10 partially sequenced reference genomes in its build number 38. Its strength derives from the application of a phylogenetic framework fo...

  19. Gramene: a growing plant comparative genomics resource

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gramene (www.gramene.org) is a curated genetic, genomic and comparative genome analysis resource for the major crop species, such as rice, maize, wheat and many other plant (mainly grass) species. Gramene is an open-source project, with all data and software freely downloadable through the ftp site ...

  20. A Plant-Associated Microbe Genome Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Jan E. Leach; Scott Gold; Sue Tolin; Kellye Eversole

    2003-03-06

    Plant-associated microorganisms are critical to agricultural and food security and are key components in maintaining the balance of our ecosystems. Some of these diverse microbes, which include viruses, bacteria, oomycetes, fungi, and nematodes, cause plant diseases, whereas others prevent diseases or enhance plant growth. Despite their importance, we know little about them on a genomic level. To intervene in disease and understand the basis of biological control or symbiotic relationships, a concerted and coordinated genomic analysis of these microbes is essential. Genome analysis, in this context, refers to the structural and functional analysis of the microbe DNA including the genes, the proteins encoded by those genes, as well as noncoding sequences involved in genome dynamics and function. The ultimate emphasis is on understanding genomic functions involved in plant associations. Members of The American Phytopathological Society (APS) developed a prioritized list of plant-associated microbes for genome analysis. With this list as a foundation for discussions, a Workshop on Genomic Analysis of Plant-Associated Microorganisms was held in Washington, D.C., on 9 to 11 April 2002. The workshop was organized by the Public Policy Board of APS, and was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), and USDA-National Research Initiatives (USDA-NRI). The workshop included academic, industrial, and governmental experts from the genomics and microbial research communities and observers from the federal funding agencies. After reviewing current and near-term technologies, workshop participants proposed a comprehensive, international initiative to obtain the genomic information needed to understand these important microbes and their interactions with host plants and the environment. Specifically, the recommendations call for a 5-year, $500 million international public

  1. A plant-associated microbe genome initiative.

    PubMed

    Leach, Jan E; Gold, Scott; Tolin, Sue; Eversole, Kellye

    2003-05-01

    ABSTRACT Plant-associated microorganisms are critical to agricultural and food security and are key components in maintaining the balance of our ecosystems. Some of these diverse microbes, which include viruses, bacteria, oomycetes, fungi, and nematodes, cause plant diseases, whereas others prevent diseases or enhance plant growth. Despite their importance, we know little about them on a genomic level. To intervene in disease and understand the basis of biological control or symbiotic relationships, a concerted and coordinated genomic analysis of these microbes is essential. Genome analysis, in this context, refers to the structural and functional analysis of the microbe DNA including the genes, the proteins encoded by those genes, as well as noncoding sequences involved in genome dynamics and function. The ultimate emphasis is on understanding genomic functions involved in plant associations. Members of The American Phytopathological Society (APS) developed a prioritized list of plant-associated microbes for genome analysis. With this list as a foundation for discussions, a Workshop on Genomic Analysis of Plant-Associated Microorganisms was held in Washington, D.C., on 9 to 11 April 2002. The workshop was organized by the Public Policy Board of APS, and was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), and USDA-National Research Initiatives (USDA-NRI). The workshop included academic, industrial, and governmental experts from the genomics and microbial research communities and observers from the federal funding agencies. After reviewing current and near-term technologies, workshop participants proposed a comprehensive, international initiative to obtain the genomic information needed to understand these important microbes and their interactions with host plants and the environment. Specifically, the recommendations call for a 5-year, $500 million

  2. Plant cytogenetics in genome databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytogenetic maps provide an integrated representation of genetic and cytological information that can be used to enhance genome and chromosome research. As genome analysis technologies become more affordable, the density of markers on cytogenetic maps increases, making these resources more useful a...

  3. Why Assembling Plant Genome Sequences Is So Challenging

    PubMed Central

    Claros, Manuel Gonzalo; Bautista, Rocío; Guerrero-Fernández, Darío; Benzerki, Hicham; Seoane, Pedro; Fernández-Pozo, Noé

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the biological and economic importance of plants, relatively few plant species have been sequenced. Only the genome sequence of plants with relatively small genomes, most of them angiosperms, in particular eudicots, has been determined. The arrival of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed the rapid and efficient development of new genomic resources for non-model or orphan plant species. But the sequencing pace of plants is far from that of animals and microorganisms. This review focuses on the typical challenges of plant genomes that can explain why plant genomics is less developed than animal genomics. Explanations about the impact of some confounding factors emerging from the nature of plant genomes are given. As a result of these challenges and confounding factors, the correct assembly and annotation of plant genomes is hindered, genome drafts are produced, and advances in plant genomics are delayed. PMID:24832233

  4. Plantagora: Modeling Whole Genome Sequencing and Assembly of Plant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barthelson, Roger; McFarlin, Adam J.; Rounsley, Steven D.; Young, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Genomics studies are being revolutionized by the next generation sequencing technologies, which have made whole genome sequencing much more accessible to the average researcher. Whole genome sequencing with the new technologies is a developing art that, despite the large volumes of data that can be produced, may still fail to provide a clear and thorough map of a genome. The Plantagora project was conceived to address specifically the gap between having the technical tools for genome sequencing and knowing precisely the best way to use them. Methodology/Principal Findings For Plantagora, a platform was created for generating simulated reads from several different plant genomes of different sizes. The resulting read files mimicked either 454 or Illumina reads, with varying paired end spacing. Thousands of datasets of reads were created, most derived from our primary model genome, rice chromosome one. All reads were assembled with different software assemblers, including Newbler, Abyss, and SOAPdenovo, and the resulting assemblies were evaluated by an extensive battery of metrics chosen for these studies. The metrics included both statistics of the assembly sequences and fidelity-related measures derived by alignment of the assemblies to the original genome source for the reads. The results were presented in a website, which includes a data graphing tool, all created to help the user compare rapidly the feasibility and effectiveness of different sequencing and assembly strategies prior to testing an approach in the lab. Some of our own conclusions regarding the different strategies were also recorded on the website. Conclusions/Significance Plantagora provides a substantial body of information for comparing different approaches to sequencing a plant genome, and some conclusions regarding some of the specific approaches. Plantagora also provides a platform of metrics and tools for studying the process of sequencing and assembly further. PMID:22174807

  5. Dynamics of chloroplast genomes in green plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Qiuxiang; Hu, Wangxiong; Wang, Tingzhang; Xue, Qingzhong; Messing, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles, in which genes have widely been used in the phylogenetic analysis of green plants. Here, we took advantage of the breadth of plastid genomes (cpDNAs) sequenced species to investigate their dynamic changes. Our study showed that gene rearrangements occurred more frequently in the cpDNAs of green algae than in land plants. Phylogenetic trees were generated using 55 conserved protein-coding genes including 33 genes for photosynthesis, 16 ribosomal protein genes and 6 other genes, which supported the monophyletic evolution of vascular plants, land plants, seed plants, and angiosperms. Moreover, we could show that seed plants were more closely related to bryophytes rather than pteridophytes. Furthermore, the substitution rate for cpDNA genes was calculated to be 3.3×10(-10), which was almost 10 times lower than genes of nuclear genomes, probably because of the plastid homologous recombination machinery. PMID:26206079

  6. JGI Plant Genomics Gene Annotation Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Shengqiang; Rokhsar, Dan; Goodstein, David; Hayes, David; Mitros, Therese

    2014-07-14

    Plant genomes vary in size and are highly complex with a high amount of repeats, genome duplication and tandem duplication. Gene encodes a wealth of information useful in studying organism and it is critical to have high quality and stable gene annotation. Thanks to advancement of sequencing technology, many plant species genomes have been sequenced and transcriptomes are also sequenced. To use these vastly large amounts of sequence data to make gene annotation or re-annotation in a timely fashion, an automatic pipeline is needed. JGI plant genomics gene annotation pipeline, called integrated gene call (IGC), is our effort toward this aim with aid of a RNA-seq transcriptome assembly pipeline. It utilizes several gene predictors based on homolog peptides and transcript ORFs. See Methods for detail. Here we present genome annotation of JGI flagship green plants produced by this pipeline plus Arabidopsis and rice except for chlamy which is done by a third party. The genome annotations of these species and others are used in our gene family build pipeline and accessible via JGI Phytozome portal whose URL and front page snapshot are shown below.

  7. Meiotic recombination and genome evolution in plants.

    PubMed

    Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Shilo, Shay; Levy, Avraham A

    2016-04-01

    Homologous recombination affects genome evolution through crossover, gene conversion and point mutations. Whole genome sequencing together with a detailed epigenome analysis have shed new light on our understanding of how meiotic recombination shapes plant genes and genome structure. Crossover events are associated with DNA sequence motifs, together with an open chromatin signature (hypomethylated CpGs, low nucleosome occupancy or specific histone modifications). The crossover landscape may differ between male and female meiocytes and between species. At the gene level, crossovers occur preferentially in promoter regions in Arabidopsis. In recent years, there is rising support suggesting that biased mismatch repair during meiotic recombination may increase GC content genome-wide and may be responsible for the GC content gradient found in many plant genes. PMID:26939088

  8. Phytozome System for Comparative Plant Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-27

    Phytozome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the UC Berkeley Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst green plants. Families of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These families allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of release 7.0, Phytozome provides access to twenty-five sequenced and annotated green plant genomes which have been clustered into gene families at eleven evolutionarily significant nodes., Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, TAIR, JGI are lyper-linked and searchable.

  9. Phytozome System for Comparative Plant Genomics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-09-27

    Phytozome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the UC Berkeley Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst green plants. Families of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These families allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of release 7.0, Phytozome providesmore » access to twenty-five sequenced and annotated green plant genomes which have been clustered into gene families at eleven evolutionarily significant nodes., Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, TAIR, JGI are lyper-linked and searchable.« less

  10. Application of Genomic Tools in Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-de-Castro, A.M.; Vilanova, S.; Cañizares, J.; Pascual, L.; Blanca, J.M.; Díez, M.J.; Prohens, J.; Picó, B.

    2012-01-01

    Plant breeding has been very successful in developing improved varieties using conventional tools and methodologies. Nowadays, the availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are allowing the mass sequencing of genomes and transcriptomes, which is producing a vast array of genomic information. The analysis of NGS data by means of bioinformatics developments allows discovering new genes and regulatory sequences and their positions, and makes available large collections of molecular markers. Genome-wide expression studies provide breeders with an understanding of the molecular basis of complex traits. Genomic approaches include TILLING and EcoTILLING, which make possible to screen mutant and germplasm collections for allelic variants in target genes. Re-sequencing of genomes is very useful for the genome-wide discovery of markers amenable for high-throughput genotyping platforms, like SSRs and SNPs, or the construction of high density genetic maps. All these tools and resources facilitate studying the genetic diversity, which is important for germplasm management, enhancement and use. Also, they allow the identification of markers linked to genes and QTLs, using a diversity of techniques like bulked segregant analysis (BSA), fine genetic mapping, or association mapping. These new markers are used for marker assisted selection, including marker assisted backcross selection, ‘breeding by design’, or new strategies, like genomic selection. In conclusion, advances in genomics are providing breeders with new tools and methodologies that allow a great leap forward in plant breeding, including the ‘superdomestication’ of crops and the genetic dissection and breeding for complex traits. PMID:23115520

  11. Widespread mitovirus sequences in plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Benjamin E.; Yerramsetty, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    The exploration of the evolution of RNA viruses has been aided recently by the discovery of copies of fragments or complete genomes of non-retroviral RNA viruses (Non-retroviral Endogenous RNA Viral Elements, or NERVEs) in many eukaryotic nuclear genomes. Among the most prominent NERVEs are partial copies of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) of the mitoviruses in plant mitochondrial genomes. Mitoviruses are in the family Narnaviridae, which are the simplest viruses, encoding only a single protein (the RdRP) in their unencapsidated viral plus strand. Narnaviruses are known only in fungi, and the origin of plant mitochondrial mitovirus NERVEs appears to be horizontal transfer from plant pathogenic fungi. At least one mitochondrial mitovirus NERVE, but not its nuclear copy, is expressed. PMID:25870770

  12. CRISPR/Cas9 for plant genome editing: accomplishments, problems and prospects.

    PubMed

    Paul, Joseph W; Qi, Yiping

    2016-07-01

    The increasing burden of the world population on agriculture requires the development of more robust crops. Dissecting the basic biology that underlies plant development and stress responses will inform the design of better crops. One powerful tool for studying plants at the molecular level is the RNA-programmed genome editing system composed of a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-encoded guide RNA and the nuclease Cas9. Here, some of the recent advances in CRISPR/Cas9 technology that have profound implications for improving the study of plant biology are described. These tools are also paving the way towards new horizons for biotechnologies and crop development. PMID:27114166

  13. A transgenic perspective on plant functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic crops are very much in the news due to the increasing public debate on their acceptance. In the scientific community though, transgenic plants are proving to be powerful tools to study various aspects of plant sciences. The emerging scientific revolution sparked by genomics based technologies is producing enormous amounts of DNA sequence information that, together with plant transformation methodology, is opening up new experimental opportunities for functional genomics analysis. An overview is provided here on the use of transgenic technology for the functional analysis of plant genes in model plants and a link made to their utilization in transgenic crops. In transgenic plants, insertional mutagenesis using heterologous maize transposons or Agrobacterium mediated T-DNA insertions, have been valuable tools for the identification and isolation of genes that display a mutant phenotype. To discover functions of genes that do not display phenotypes when mutated, insertion sequences have been engineered to monitor or change the expression pattern of adjacent genes. These gene detector insertions can detect adjacent promoters, enhancers or gene exons and precisely reflect the expression pattern of the tagged gene. Activation tag insertions can mis-express the adjacent gene and confer dominant phenotypes that help bridge the phenotype gap. Employment of various forms of gene silencing technology broadens the scope of recovering knockout phenotypes for genes with redundant function. All these transgenic strategies describing gene-phenotype relationships can be addressed by high throughput reverse genetics methods that will help provide functions to the genes discovered by genome sequencing. The gene functions discovered by insertional mutagenesis and silencing strategies along with expression pattern analysis will provide an integrated functional genomics perspective and offer unique applications in transgenic crops. PMID:11131004

  14. 77 FR 75425 - Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomics (IWGPG): The National Plant Genome Initiative-What's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomics (IWGPG): The National Plant Genome Initiative--What's Next? AGENCY: Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION... Group on Plant Genomics (IWGPG). DATES: Saturday, January 12, 2013, 1:30 p.m. to 3:40 p.m....

  15. Plant metabolic clusters - from genetics to genomics.

    PubMed

    Nützmann, Hans-Wilhelm; Huang, Ancheng; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Contents 771 I. 771 II. 772 III. 780 IV. 781 V. 786 786 References 786 SUMMARY: Plant natural products are of great value for agriculture, medicine and a wide range of other industrial applications. The discovery of new plant natural product pathways is currently being revolutionized by two key developments. First, breakthroughs in sequencing technology and reduced cost of sequencing are accelerating the ability to find enzymes and pathways for the biosynthesis of new natural products by identifying the underlying genes. Second, there are now multiple examples in which the genes encoding certain natural product pathways have been found to be grouped together in biosynthetic gene clusters within plant genomes. These advances are now making it possible to develop strategies for systematically mining multiple plant genomes for the discovery of new enzymes, pathways and chemistries. Increased knowledge of the features of plant metabolic gene clusters - architecture, regulation and assembly - will be instrumental in expediting natural product discovery. This review summarizes progress in this area. PMID:27112429

  16. Impact and insights from ancient repetitive elements in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Maumus, Florian; Quesneville, Hadi

    2016-04-01

    Transposable elements and other repeated sequences are predominant contributors to most plant genomes. The vast majority of repeated elements accumulate mutations to the extent of becoming anonymous sequences, also known as 'genomic dark matter' which is also thought to contribute significantly to the composition of plant genomes. This review aims to highlight recent methods and analyses suggesting that ancient repeats have profound effects on plant genome biology. PMID:26874965

  17. Plant genome size variation: bloating and purging DNA.

    PubMed

    Michael, Todd P

    2014-07-01

    Plant genome size variation is a dynamic process of bloating and purging DNA. While it was thought plants were on a path to obesity through continual DNA bloating, recent research supports that most plants activity purge DNA. Plant genome size research has greatly benefited from the cataloguing of genome size estimates at the Kew Plant DNA C-values Database, and the recent availability of over 50 fully sequenced and published plant genomes. The emerging trend is that plant genomes bloat due to the copy-and-paste proliferation of a few long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTRs) and aggressively purge these proliferating LTRs through several mechanisms including illegitimate and incomplete recombination, and double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. However, ultra-small genomes such as Utricularia gibba (Bladderwort), which is 82 megabases (Mb), purge excess DNA through genome fractionation and neofunctionalization during multiple rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD). In contrast, the largest published genome, Picea abies (Norway Spruce) at 19 800 Mb, has no detectable WGD but has bloated with diverse and diverged LTRs that either have evaded purging mechanisms or these purging mechanism are absent in gymnosperms. Finally, advances in DNA methylation studies suggest that smaller genomes have a more aggressive epigenomic surveillance system to purge young LTR retrotransposons, which is less active or missing in larger genomes like the bloated gymnosperms. While genome size may not reflect genome complexity, evidence is mounting that genome size may reflect evolutionary status. PMID:24651721

  18. The Plant Ontology: A Tool for Plant Genomics.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Laurel; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    The use of controlled, structured vocabularies (ontologies) has become a critical tool for scientists in the post-genomic era of massive datasets. Adoption and integration of common vocabularies and annotation practices enables cross-species comparative analyses and increases data sharing and reusability. The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/ ) describes plant anatomy, morphology, and the stages of plant development, and offers a database of plant genomics annotations associated to the PO terms. The scope of the PO has grown from its original design covering only rice, maize, and Arabidopsis, and now includes terms to describe all green plants from angiosperms to green algae.This chapter introduces how the PO and other related ontologies are constructed and organized, including languages and software used for ontology development, and provides an overview of the key features. Detailed instructions illustrate how to search and browse the PO database and access the associated annotation data. Users are encouraged to provide input on the ontology through the online term request form and contribute datasets for integration in the PO database. PMID:26519402

  19. Offsets in radiocarbon ages between plants and shells from same horizons of coastal sediments in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Toshimichi; Hong, Wan; Sung, Ki Suk; Sung, Kil Ho; Nakashima, Rei

    2015-10-01

    To measure the spatial and chronological changes of the reservoir effect around the Korean Peninsula, the radiocarbon ages of 38 marine shell and terrestrial plant pairs from the same horizons of six cores of Holocene sediments collected from the southern coast and western coast sites of the peninsula were measured. These reservoir ages (R) were distributed in the range of 430 ± 190 yrs within 60 ± 60 to 1000 ± 60 yrs starting in 9000 cal BP. The average R values of the cores obtained from large rivers, such as the S13 and YAR-4 cores (340 and 190 yrs), were clearly smaller than the R values of the sites far from a large river, such as the S15 and W09 cores (470 and 650 yrs). This is thought to be associated with the mixing process of old brine and young freshwater. On the other hand, the R values of the S13, W17, and YAR-4 cores gradually increased during the time span from 6700 to 8200 cal BP. The R values for the S15 core also increased in the period from 2800 to 3800 cal BP. Such tendencies result from the mixing ratio increase of brine due to the rising sea level.

  20. Current challenges in de novo plant genome sequencing and assembly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequencing is now affordable, but assembling plant genomes de novo remains challenging. We assess the state of the art of assembly and review the best practices for the community. PMID:22546054

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Klebsiella variicola Plant Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Barrios, Humberto; Rodríguez-Medina, Nadia; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa Elena

    2015-01-01

    Three endophytic Klebsiella variicola isolates—T29A, 3, and 6A2, obtained from sugar cane stem, maize shoots, and banana leaves, respectively—were used for whole-genome sequencing. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of circular chromosomes and plasmids. The genomes contain plant colonization and cellulases genes. This study will help toward understanding the genomic basis of K. variicola interaction with plant hosts. PMID:26358599

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Klebsiella variicola Plant Isolates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Barrios, Humberto; Rodríguez-Medina, Nadia; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa Elena; Garza-Ramos, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    Three endophytic Klebsiella variicola isolates-T29A, 3, and 6A2, obtained from sugar cane stem, maize shoots, and banana leaves, respectively-were used for whole-genome sequencing. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of circular chromosomes and plasmids. The genomes contain plant colonization and cellulases genes. This study will help toward understanding the genomic basis of K. variicola interaction with plant hosts. PMID:26358599

  3. Gramene 2016: comparative plant genomics and pathway resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online resource for comparative functional genomics in crops and model plant species. Its two main frameworks are genomes (collaboration with Ensembl Plants) and pathways (The Plant Reactome and archival BioCyc databases). Since our last NAR update, the data...

  4. Preparation of genomic DNA from plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Richards, E; Reichardt, M; Rogers, S

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes two methods for preparing genomic DNA from plant tissue. In the first method, plant cells are lysed with ionic detergent, treated with protease, and subsequently purified by cesium chloride (CsCl) density gradient centrifugation. The second method is based upon a series of treatments with the nonionic detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to lyse cells and purify nucleic acid. Nucleic acid is recovered from the final CTAB solution by isopropanol or ethanol precipitation. The first method, although somewhat more lengthy, results in highly purified nucleic acid. The second method requires fewer manipulations, results in very high yields (approximately 10-fold higher per gram fresh tissue depending on species and condition of starting material), and produces DNA that is less pure but nonetheless suitable in quality for use in many molecular biology manipulations. PMID:18265183

  5. Evolution and function of genomic imprinting in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jessica A.; Zilberman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, an inherently epigenetic phenomenon defined by parent of origin-dependent gene expression, is observed in mammals and flowering plants. Genome-scale surveys of imprinted expression and the underlying differential epigenetic marks have led to the discovery of hundreds of imprinted plant genes and confirmed DNA and histone methylation as key regulators of plant imprinting. However, the biological roles of the vast majority of imprinted plant genes are unknown, and the evolutionary forces shaping plant imprinting remain rather opaque. Here, we review the mechanisms of plant genomic imprinting and discuss theories of imprinting evolution and biological significance in light of recent findings. PMID:26680300

  6. Genomes of Planktonic Acidimicrobiales: Widening Horizons for Marine Actinobacteria by Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Ghai, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomes of four novel marine Actinobacteria have been assembled from large metagenomic data sets derived from the Mediterranean deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). These are the first marine representatives belonging to the order Acidimicrobiales and only the second group of planktonic marine Actinobacteria to be described. Their streamlined genomes and photoheterotrophic lifestyle suggest that they are planktonic, free-living microbes. A novel rhodopsin clade, acidirhodopsins, related to freshwater actinorhodopsins, was found in these organisms. Their genomes suggest a capacity to assimilate C2 compounds, some using the glyoxylate bypass and others with the ethylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pathway. They are also able to derive energy from dimethylsulfopropionate (DMSP), sulfonate, and carbon monoxide oxidation, all commonly available in the marine habitat. These organisms appear to be prevalent in the deep photic zone at or around the DCM. The presence of sister clades to the marine Acidimicrobiales in freshwater aquatic habitats provides a new example of marine-freshwater transitions with potential evolutionary insights. PMID:25670777

  7. Finding and Characterizing Repeats in Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jacques; Peterlongo, Pierre; Tempel, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a particularly high proportion of repeated structures of various types. This chapter proposes a guided tour of available software that can help biologists to look for these repeats and check some hypothetical models intended to characterize their structures. Since transposable elements are a major source of repeats in plants, many methods have been used or developed for this large class of sequences. They are representative of the range of tools available for other classes of repeats and we have provided a whole section on this topic as well as a selection of the main existing software. In order to better understand how they work and how repeats may be efficiently found in genomes, it is necessary to look at the technical issues involved in the large-scale search of these structures. Indeed, it may be hard to keep up with the profusion of proposals in this dynamic field and the rest of the chapter is devoted to the foundations of the search for repeats and more complex patterns. The second section introduces the key concepts that are useful for understanding the current state of the art in playing with words, applied to genomic sequences. This can be seen as the first stage of a very general approach called linguistic analysis that is interested in the analysis of natural or artificial texts. Words, the lexical level, correspond to simple repeated entities in texts or strings. In fact, biologists need to represent more complex entities where a repeat family is built on more abstract structures, including direct or inverted small repeats, motifs, composition constraints as well as ordering and distance constraints between these elementary blocks. In terms of linguistics, this corresponds to the syntactic level of a language. The last section introduces concepts and practical tools that can be used to reach this syntactic level in biological sequence analysis. PMID:26519414

  8. Gene duplication and transfer events in plant mitochondria genome

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Aisheng Peng Rihe; Zhuang Jing; Gao Feng; Zhu Bo; Fu Xiaoyan; Xue Yong; Jin Xiaofen; Tian Yongsheng; Zhao Wei; Yao Quanhong

    2008-11-07

    Gene or genome duplication events increase the amount of genetic material available to increase the genomic, and thereby phenotypic, complexity of organisms during evolution. Gene duplication and transfer events have been important to molecular evolution in all three domains of life, and may be the first step in the emergence of new gene functions. Gene transfer events have been proposed as another accelerator of evolution. The duplicated gene or genome, mainly nuclear, has been the subject of several recent reviews. In addition to the nuclear genome, organisms have organelle genomes, including mitochondrial genome. In this review, we briefly summarize gene duplication and transfer events in the plant mitochondrial genome.

  9. Architecture and evolution of a minute plant genome

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Lyons, Eric; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; Pérez-Torres, Claudia Anahí; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Chang, Tien-Hao; Lan, Tianying; Welch, Andreanna J.; Juárez, María Jazmín Abraham; Simpson, June; Fernández-Cortés, Araceli; Arteaga-Vázquez, Mario; Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Acevedo-Hernández, Gustavo; Schuster, Stephan C.; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Minoche, André E.; Xu, Sen; Lynch, Michael; Oropeza-Aburto, Araceli; Cervantes-Pérez, Sergio Alan; de Jesús Ortega-Estrada, María; Cervantes-Luevano, Jacob Israel; Michael, Todd P.; Mockler, Todd; Bryant, Douglas; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Albert, Victor A.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that the evolution of plant genome size is principally unidirectional and increasing owing to the varied action of whole-genome duplications (WGDs) and mobile element proliferation1. However, extreme genome size reductions have been reported in the angiosperm family tree. Here we report the sequence of the 82-megabase genome of the carnivorous bladderwort plant Utricularia gibba. Despite its tiny size, the U. gibba genome accommodates a typical number of genes for a plant, with the main difference from other plant genomes arising from a drastic reduction in non-genic DNA. Unexpectedly, we identified at least three rounds of WGD in U. gibba since common ancestry with tomato (Solanum) and grape (Vitis). The compressed architecture of the U. gibba genome indicates that a small fraction of intergenic DNA, with few or no active retrotransposons, is sufficient to regulate and integrate all the processes required for the development and reproduction of a complex organism. PMID:23665961

  10. Architecture and evolution of a minute plant genome.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Lyons, Eric; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; Pérez-Torres, Claudia Anahí; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Chang, Tien-Hao; Lan, Tianying; Welch, Andreanna J; Juárez, María Jazmín Abraham; Simpson, June; Fernández-Cortés, Araceli; Arteaga-Vázquez, Mario; Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Acevedo-Hernández, Gustavo; Schuster, Stephan C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Minoche, André E; Xu, Sen; Lynch, Michael; Oropeza-Aburto, Araceli; Cervantes-Pérez, Sergio Alan; de Jesús Ortega-Estrada, María; Cervantes-Luevano, Jacob Israel; Michael, Todd P; Mockler, Todd; Bryant, Douglas; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Albert, Victor A; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2013-06-01

    It has been argued that the evolution of plant genome size is principally unidirectional and increasing owing to the varied action of whole-genome duplications (WGDs) and mobile element proliferation. However, extreme genome size reductions have been reported in the angiosperm family tree. Here we report the sequence of the 82-megabase genome of the carnivorous bladderwort plant Utricularia gibba. Despite its tiny size, the U. gibba genome accommodates a typical number of genes for a plant, with the main difference from other plant genomes arising from a drastic reduction in non-genic DNA. Unexpectedly, we identified at least three rounds of WGD in U. gibba since common ancestry with tomato (Solanum) and grape (Vitis). The compressed architecture of the U. gibba genome indicates that a small fraction of intergenic DNA, with few or no active retrotransposons, is sufficient to regulate and integrate all the processes required for the development and reproduction of a complex organism. PMID:23665961

  11. The genomics of plant sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Vyskot, Boris; Hobza, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Around six percent of flowering species are dioecious, with separate female and male individuals. Sex determination is mostly based on genetics, but morphologically distinct sex chromosomes have only evolved in a few species. Of these, heteromorphic sex chromosomes have been most clearly described in the two model species - Silene latifolia and Rumex acetosa. In both species, the sex chromosomes are the largest chromosomes in the genome. They are hence easily distinguished, can be physically separated and analyzed. This review discusses some recent experimental data on selected model dioecious species, with a focus on S. latifolia. Phylogenetic analyses show that dioecy in plants originated independently and repeatedly even within individual genera. A cogent question is whether there is genetic degeneration of the non-recombining part of the plant Y chromosome, as in mammals, and, if so, whether reduced levels of gene expression in the heterogametic sex are equalized by dosage compensation. Current data provide no clear conclusion. We speculate that although some transcriptome analyses indicate the first signs of degeneration, especially in S. latifolia, the evolutionary processes forming plant sex chromosomes in plants may, to some extent, differ from those in animals. PMID:26025526

  12. Transposable Elements and Genome Size Variations in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Il

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of protein-coding genes is not highly variable between plant taxa, the DNA content in their genomes is highly variable, by as much as 2,056-fold from a 1C amount of 0.0648 pg to 132.5 pg. The mean 1C-value in plants is 2.4 pg, and genome size expansion/contraction is lineage-specific in plant taxonomy. Transposable element fractions in plant genomes are also variable, as low as ~3% in small genomes and as high as ~85% in large genomes, indicating that genome size is a linear function of transposable element content. Of the 2 classes of transposable elements, the dynamics of class 1 long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons is a major contributor to the 1C value differences among plants. The activity of LTR retrotransposons is under the control of epigenetic suppressing mechanisms. Also, genome-purging mechanisms have been adopted to counter-balance the genome size amplification. With a wealth of information on whole-genome sequences in plant genomes, it was revealed that several genome-purging mechanisms have been employed, depending on plant taxa. Two genera, Lilium and Fritillaria, are known to have large genomes in angiosperms. There were twice times of concerted genome size evolutions in the family Liliaceae during the divergence of the current genera in Liliaceae. In addition to the LTR retrotransposons, non-LTR retrotransposons and satellite DNAs contributed to the huge genomes in the two genera by possible failure of genome counter-balancing mechanisms. PMID:25317107

  13. PGSB/MIPS Plant Genome Information Resources and Concepts for the Analysis of Complex Grass Genomes.

    PubMed

    Spannagl, Manuel; Bader, Kai; Pfeifer, Matthias; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology; formerly MIPS-Munich Institute for Protein Sequences) has been involved in developing, implementing and maintaining plant genome databases for more than a decade. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable datasets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, e.g., from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and analyzed. In addition, genomes from both model and crop plants form a scaffold for comparative genomics, assisted by specialized tools such as the CrowsNest viewer to explore conserved gene order (synteny) between related species on macro- and micro-levels.The genomes of many economically important Triticeae plants such as wheat, barley, and rye present a great challenge for sequence assembly and bioinformatic analysis due to their enormous complexity and large genome size. Novel concepts and strategies have been developed to deal with these difficulties and have been applied to the genomes of wheat, barley, rye, and other cereals. This includes the GenomeZipper concept, reference-guided exome assembly, and "chromosome genomics" based on flow cytometry sorted chromosomes. PMID:26519405

  14. Sputnik: a database platform for comparative plant genomics.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Stephen; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2003-01-01

    Two million plant ESTs, from 20 different plant species, and totalling more than one 1000 Mbp of DNA sequence, represents a formidable transcriptomic resource. Sputnik uses the potential of this sequence resource to fill some of the information gap in the un-sequenced plant genomes and to serve as the foundation for in silicio comparative plant genomics. The complexity of the individual EST collections has been reduced using optimised EST clustering techniques. Annotation of cluster sequences is performed by exploiting and transferring information from the comprehensive knowledgebase already produced for the completed model plant genome (Arabidopsis thaliana) and by performing additional state of-the-art sequence analyses relevant to today's plant biologist. Functional predictions, comparative analyses and associative annotations for 500 000 plant EST derived peptides make Sputnik (http://mips.gsf.de/proj/sputnik/) a valid platform for contemporary plant genomics. PMID:12519965

  15. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  16. An introduction to the medicinal plant genome project.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shilin; Xiang, Li; Guo, Xu; Li, Qiushi

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, genomics has developed rapidly with the application of next-generation sequencing technology. However, very few studies have been carried out on genomics for medicinal plants. This paper introduces the genome research of medicinal plants, including genome sequencing, assembly, annotation, and functional genomics, to set up the foundation for the development of natural medicines and the selection of cultivars with good agricultural traits. This study places the study on traditional Chinese medicine into the frontier field of life science. PMID:21695623

  17. Metabolite-based genome-wide association studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The plant metabolome is the readout of plant physiological status and is regarded as the bridge between the genome and the phenome of plants. Unraveling the natural variation and the underlying genetic basis of plant metabolism has received increasing interest from plant biologists. Enabled by the recent advances in high-throughput profiling and genotyping technologies, metabolite-based genome-wide association study (mGWAS) has emerged as a powerful alternative forward genetics strategy to dissect the genetic and biochemical bases of metabolism in model and crop plants. In this review, recent progress and applications of mGWAS in understanding the genetic control of plant metabolism and in interactive functional genomics and metabolomics are presented. Further directions and perspectives of mGWAS in plants are also discussed. PMID:25637954

  18. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1–3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution. PMID:26630570

  19. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research.

    PubMed

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C; Martis, Mihaela M; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyword search options and a new BLAST sequence search functionality. Actively involved in corresponding sequencing consortia, PlantsDB has dedicated special efforts to the integration and visualization of complex triticeae genome data, especially for barley, wheat and rye. We enhanced CrowsNest, a tool to visualize syntenic relationships between genomes, with data from the wheat sub-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii and added functionality to the PGSB RNASeqExpressionBrowser. GenomeZipper results were integrated for the genomes of barley, rye, wheat and perennial ryegrass and interactive access is granted through PlantsDB interfaces. Data exchange and cross-linking between PlantsDB and other plant genome databases is stimulated by the transPLANT project (http://transplantdb.eu/). PMID:26527721

  20. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research

    PubMed Central

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C.; Martis, Mihaela M.; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G.; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F.X.

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyword search options and a new BLAST sequence search functionality. Actively involved in corresponding sequencing consortia, PlantsDB has dedicated special efforts to the integration and visualization of complex triticeae genome data, especially for barley, wheat and rye. We enhanced CrowsNest, a tool to visualize syntenic relationships between genomes, with data from the wheat sub-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii and added functionality to the PGSB RNASeqExpressionBrowser. GenomeZipper results were integrated for the genomes of barley, rye, wheat and perennial ryegrass and interactive access is granted through PlantsDB interfaces. Data exchange and cross-linking between PlantsDB and other plant genome databases is stimulated by the transPLANT project (http://transplantdb.eu/). PMID:26527721

  1. Klebsormidium flaccidum genome reveals primary factors for plant terrestrial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Koichi; Maruyama, Fumito; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Togashi, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Seo, Mitsunori; Sato, Syusei; Yamada, Takuji; Mori, Hiroshi; Tajima, Naoyuki; Moriyama, Takashi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Watanabe, Mai; Wada, Hajime; Kobayashi, Koichi; Saito, Masakazu; Masuda, Tatsuru; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Awai, Koichiro; Shimojima, Mie; Masuda, Shinji; Iwai, Masako; Nobusawa, Takashi; Narise, Takafumi; Kondo, Satoshi; Saito, Hikaru; Sato, Ryoichi; Murakawa, Masato; Ihara, Yuta; Oshima-Yamada, Yui; Ohtaka, Kinuka; Satoh, Masanori; Sonobe, Kohei; Ishii, Midori; Ohtani, Ryosuke; Kanamori-Sato, Miyu; Honoki, Rina; Miyazaki, Daichi; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Umetsu, Jumpei; Higashi, Kouichi; Shibata, Daisuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Sato, Naoki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Ida, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Ken; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The colonization of land by plants was a key event in the evolution of life. Here we report the draft genome sequence of the filamentous terrestrial alga Klebsormidium flaccidum (Division Charophyta, Order Klebsormidiales) to elucidate the early transition step from aquatic algae to land plants. Comparison of the genome sequence with that of other algae and land plants demonstrate that K. flaccidum acquired many genes specific to land plants. We demonstrate that K. flaccidum indeed produces several plant hormones and homologues of some of the signalling intermediates required for hormone actions in higher plants. The K. flaccidum genome also encodes a primitive system to protect against the harmful effects of high-intensity light. The presence of these plant-related systems in K. flaccidum suggests that, during evolution, this alga acquired the fundamental machinery required for adaptation to terrestrial environments. PMID:24865297

  2. Klebsormidium flaccidum genome reveals primary factors for plant terrestrial adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Koichi; Maruyama, Fumito; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Togashi, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Seo, Mitsunori; Sato, Syusei; Yamada, Takuji; Mori, Hiroshi; Tajima, Naoyuki; Moriyama, Takashi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Watanabe, Mai; Wada, Hajime; Kobayashi, Koichi; Saito, Masakazu; Masuda, Tatsuru; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Awai, Koichiro; Shimojima, Mie; Masuda, Shinji; Iwai, Masako; Nobusawa, Takashi; Narise, Takafumi; Kondo, Satoshi; Saito, Hikaru; Sato, Ryoichi; Murakawa, Masato; Ihara, Yuta; Oshima-Yamada, Yui; Ohtaka, Kinuka; Satoh, Masanori; Sonobe, Kohei; Ishii, Midori; Ohtani, Ryosuke; Kanamori-Sato, Miyu; Honoki, Rina; Miyazaki, Daichi; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Umetsu, Jumpei; Higashi, Kouichi; Shibata, Daisuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Sato, Naoki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Ida, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Ken; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The colonization of land by plants was a key event in the evolution of life. Here we report the draft genome sequence of the filamentous terrestrial alga Klebsormidium flaccidum (Division Charophyta, Order Klebsormidiales) to elucidate the early transition step from aquatic algae to land plants. Comparison of the genome sequence with that of other algae and land plants demonstrate that K. flaccidum acquired many genes specific to land plants. We demonstrate that K. flaccidum indeed produces several plant hormones and homologues of some of the signalling intermediates required for hormone actions in higher plants. The K. flaccidum genome also encodes a primitive system to protect against the harmful effects of high-intensity light. The presence of these plant-related systems in K. flaccidum suggests that, during evolution, this alga acquired the fundamental machinery required for adaptation to terrestrial environments. PMID:24865297

  3. Genomic resources in fruit plants: an assessment of current status.

    PubMed

    Rai, Manoj K; Shekhawat, N S

    2015-01-01

    The availability of many genomic resources such as genome sequences, functional genomics resources including microarrays and RNA-seq, sufficient numbers of molecular markers, express sequence tags (ESTs) and high-density genetic maps is causing a rapid acceleration of genetics and genomic research of many fruit plants. This is leading to an increase in our knowledge of the genes that are linked to many horticultural and agronomically important traits. Recently, some progress has also been made on the identification and functional analysis of miRNAs in some fruit plants. This is one of the most active research fields in plant sciences. The last decade has witnessed development of genomic resources in many fruit plants such as apple, banana, citrus, grapes, papaya, pears, strawberry etc.; however, many of them are still not being exploited. Furthermore, owing to lack of resources, infrastructure and research facilities in many lesser-developed countries, development of genomic resources in many underutilized or less-studied fruit crops, which grow in these countries, is limited. Thus, research emphasis should be given to those fruit crops for which genomic resources are relatively scarce. The development of genomic databases of these less-studied fruit crops will enable biotechnologists to identify target genes that underlie key horticultural and agronomical traits. This review presents an overview of the current status of the development of genomic resources in fruit plants with the main emphasis being on genome sequencing, EST resources, functional genomics resources including microarray and RNA-seq, identification of quantitative trait loci and construction of genetic maps as well as efforts made on the identification and functional analysis of miRNAs in fruit plants. PMID:24649925

  4. GenomicusPlants: A Web Resource to Study Genome Evolution in Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Alexandra; Murat, Florent; Salse, Jérôme; Roest Crollius, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics combined with phylogenetic reconstructions are powerful approaches to study the evolution of genes and genomes. However, the current rapid expansion of the volume of genomic information makes it increasingly difficult to interrogate, integrate and synthesize comparative genome data while taking into account the maximum breadth of information available. GenomicusPlants (http://www.genomicus.biologie.ens.fr/genomicus-plants) is an extension of the Genomicus webserver that addresses this issue by allowing users to explore flowering plant genomes in an intuitive way, across the broadest evolutionary scales. Extant genomes of 26 flowering plants can be analyzed, as well as 23 ancestral reconstructed genomes. Ancestral gene order provides a long-term chronological view of gene order evolution, greatly facilitating comparative genomics and evolutionary studies. Four main interfaces (‘views’) are available where: (i) PhyloView combines phylogenetic trees with comparisons of genomic loci across any number of genomes; (ii) AlignView projects loci of interest against all other genomes to visualize its topological conservation; (iii) MatrixView compares two genomes in a classical dotplot representation; and (iv) Karyoview visualizes chromosome karyotypes ‘painted’ with colours of another genome of interest. All four views are interconnected and benefit from many customizable features. PMID:25432975

  5. Gramene 2016: comparative plant genomics and pathway resources

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Ruiz, Marcela K.; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Preece, Justin; Olson, Andrew; Naithani, Sushma; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Dharmawardhana, Palitha; Jiao, Yinping; Mulvaney, Joseph; Kumari, Sunita; Chougule, Kapeel; Elser, Justin; Wang, Bo; Thomason, James; Bolser, Daniel M.; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Walts, Brandon; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Huerta, Laura; Keays, Maria; Tang, Y. Amy; Parkinson, Helen; Fabregat, Antonio; McKay, Sheldon; Weiser, Joel; D'Eustachio, Peter; Stein, Lincoln; Petryszak, Robert; Kersey, Paul J.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Ware, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online resource for comparative functional genomics in crops and model plant species. Its two main frameworks are genomes (collaboration with Ensembl Plants) and pathways (The Plant Reactome and archival BioCyc databases). Since our last NAR update, the database website adopted a new Drupal management platform. The genomes section features 39 fully assembled reference genomes that are integrated using ontology-based annotation and comparative analyses, and accessed through both visual and programmatic interfaces. Additional community data, such as genetic variation, expression and methylation, are also mapped for a subset of genomes. The Plant Reactome pathway portal (http://plantreactome.gramene.org) provides a reference resource for analyzing plant metabolic and regulatory pathways. In addition to ∼200 curated rice reference pathways, the portal hosts gene homology-based pathway projections for 33 plant species. Both the genome and pathway browsers interface with the EMBL-EBI's Expression Atlas to enable the projection of baseline and differential expression data from curated expression studies in plants. Gramene's archive website (http://archive.gramene.org) continues to provide previously reported resources on comparative maps, markers and QTL. To further aid our users, we have also introduced a live monthly educational webinar series and a Gramene YouTube channel carrying video tutorials. PMID:26553803

  6. Gramene 2016: comparative plant genomics and pathway resources.

    PubMed

    Tello-Ruiz, Marcela K; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Preece, Justin; Olson, Andrew; Naithani, Sushma; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Dharmawardhana, Palitha; Jiao, Yinping; Mulvaney, Joseph; Kumari, Sunita; Chougule, Kapeel; Elser, Justin; Wang, Bo; Thomason, James; Bolser, Daniel M; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Walts, Brandon; Fonseca, Nuno A; Huerta, Laura; Keays, Maria; Tang, Y Amy; Parkinson, Helen; Fabregat, Antonio; McKay, Sheldon; Weiser, Joel; D'Eustachio, Peter; Stein, Lincoln; Petryszak, Robert; Kersey, Paul J; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Ware, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online resource for comparative functional genomics in crops and model plant species. Its two main frameworks are genomes (collaboration with Ensembl Plants) and pathways (The Plant Reactome and archival BioCyc databases). Since our last NAR update, the database website adopted a new Drupal management platform. The genomes section features 39 fully assembled reference genomes that are integrated using ontology-based annotation and comparative analyses, and accessed through both visual and programmatic interfaces. Additional community data, such as genetic variation, expression and methylation, are also mapped for a subset of genomes. The Plant Reactome pathway portal (http://plantreactome.gramene.org) provides a reference resource for analyzing plant metabolic and regulatory pathways. In addition to ∼ 200 curated rice reference pathways, the portal hosts gene homology-based pathway projections for 33 plant species. Both the genome and pathway browsers interface with the EMBL-EBI's Expression Atlas to enable the projection of baseline and differential expression data from curated expression studies in plants. Gramene's archive website (http://archive.gramene.org) continues to provide previously reported resources on comparative maps, markers and QTL. To further aid our users, we have also introduced a live monthly educational webinar series and a Gramene YouTube channel carrying video tutorials. PMID:26553803

  7. Perspectives for genomic selection applications and research in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection (GS) has created a lot of excitement and expectations in the animal and plant breeding research communities. In this review, we briefly describe how genomic prediction can be integrated into breeding efforts and point out achievements and areas where more research is needed. GS pro...

  8. PGDD: a database of gene and genome duplication in plants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Tang, Haibao; Wang, Xiyin; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    Genome duplication (GD) has permanently shaped the architecture and function of many higher eukaryotic genomes. The angiosperms (flowering plants) are outstanding models in which to elucidate consequences of GD for higher eukaryotes, owing to their propensity for chromosomal duplication or even triplication in a few cases. Duplicated genome structures often require both intra- and inter-genome alignments to unravel their evolutionary history, also providing the means to deduce both obvious and otherwise-cryptic orthology, paralogy and other relationships among genes. The burgeoning sets of angiosperm genome sequences provide the foundation for a host of investigations into the functional and evolutionary consequences of gene and GD. To provide genome alignments from a single resource based on uniform standards that have been validated by empirical studies, we built the Plant Genome Duplication Database (PGDD; freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/), a web service providing synteny information in terms of colinearity between chromosomes. At present, PGDD contains data for 26 plants including bryophytes and chlorophyta, as well as angiosperms with draft genome sequences. In addition to the inclusion of new genomes as they become available, we are preparing new functions to enhance PGDD. PMID:23180799

  9. Polyploidy-associated genome modifications during land plant evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuannian; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of polyploidy in land plant evolution has led to an acceleration of genome modifications relative to other crown eukaryotes and is correlated with key innovations in plant evolution. Extensive genome resources provide for relating genomic changes to the origins of novel morphological and physiological features of plants. Ancestral gene contents for key nodes of the plant family tree are inferred. Pervasive polyploidy in angiosperms appears likely to be the major factor generating novel angiosperm genes and expanding some gene families. However, most gene families lose most duplicated copies in a quasi-neutral process, and a few families are actively selected for single-copy status. One of the great challenges of evolutionary genomics is to link genome modifications to speciation, diversification and the morphological and/or physiological innovations that collectively compose biodiversity. Rapid accumulation of genomic data and its ongoing investigation may greatly improve the resolution at which evolutionary approaches can contribute to the identification of specific genes responsible for particular innovations. The resulting, more ‘particulate’ understanding of plant evolution, may elevate to a new level fundamental knowledge of botanical diversity, including economically important traits in the crop plants that sustain humanity. PMID:24958928

  10. Progress of targeted genome modification approaches in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Cardi, Teodoro; Neal Stewart, C

    2016-07-01

    Transgene integration in plants is based on illegitimate recombination between non-homologous sequences. The low control of integration site and number of (trans/cis)gene copies might have negative consequences on the expression of transferred genes and their insertion within endogenous coding sequences. The first experiments conducted to use precise homologous recombination for gene integration commenced soon after the first demonstration that transgenic plants could be produced. Modern transgene targeting categories used in plant biology are: (a) homologous recombination-dependent gene targeting; (b) recombinase-mediated site-specific gene integration; (c) oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis; (d) nuclease-mediated site-specific genome modifications. New tools enable precise gene replacement or stacking with exogenous sequences and targeted mutagenesis of endogeneous sequences. The possibility to engineer chimeric designer nucleases, which are able to target virtually any genomic site, and use them for inducing double-strand breaks in host DNA create new opportunities for both applied plant breeding and functional genomics. CRISPR is the most recent technology available for precise genome editing. Its rapid adoption in biological research is based on its inherent simplicity and efficacy. Its utilization, however, depends on available sequence information, especially for genome-wide analysis. We will review the approaches used for genome modification, specifically those for affecting gene integration and modification in higher plants. For each approach, the advantages and limitations will be noted. We also will speculate on how their actual commercial development and implementation in plant breeding will be affected by governmental regulations. PMID:27025856

  11. Signatures of adaptation to plant parasitism in nematode genomes.

    PubMed

    Bird, David McK; Jones, John T; Opperman, Charles H; Kikuchi, Taisei; Danchin, Etienne G J

    2015-02-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause considerable damage to global agriculture. The ability to parasitize plants is a derived character that appears to have independently emerged several times in the phylum Nematoda. Morphological convergence to feeding style has been observed, but whether this is emergent from molecular convergence is less obvious. To address this, we assess whether genomic signatures can be associated with plant parasitism by nematodes. In this review, we report genomic features and characteristics that appear to be common in plant-parasitic nematodes while absent or rare in animal parasites, predators or free-living species. Candidate horizontal acquisitions of parasitism genes have systematically been found in all plant-parasitic species investigated at the sequence level. Presence of peptides that mimic plant hormones also appears to be a trait of plant-parasitic species. Annotations of the few genomes of plant-parasitic nematodes available to date have revealed a set of apparently species-specific genes on every occasion. Effector genes, important for parasitism are frequently found among those species-specific genes, indicating poor overlap. Overall, nematodes appear to have developed convergent genomic solutions to adapt to plant parasitism. PMID:25656361

  12. The plant ontology as a tool for comparative plant anatomy and genomic analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant science is now a major player in the fields of genomics, gene expression analysis, phenomics and metabolomics. Recent advances in sequencing technologies have led to a windfall of data, with new species being added rapidly to the list of species whose genomes have been decoded. The Plant Ontol...

  13. Recombination and the maintenance of plant organelle genome stability.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Alexandre; Brisson, Normand

    2010-04-01

    Like their nuclear counterpart, the plastid and mitochondrial genomes of plants have to be faithfully replicated and repaired to ensure the normal functioning of the plant. Inability to maintain organelle genome stability results in plastid and/or mitochondrial defects, which can lead to potentially detrimental phenotypes. Fortunately, plant organelles have developed multiple strategies to maintain the integrity of their genetic material. Of particular importance among these processes is the extensive use of DNA recombination. In fact, recombination has been implicated in both the replication and the repair of organelle genomes. Revealingly, deregulation of recombination in organelles results in genomic instability, often accompanied by adverse consequences for plant fitness. The recent identification of four families of proteins that prevent aberrant recombination of organelle DNA sheds much needed mechanistic light on this important process. What comes out of these investigations is a partial portrait of the recombination surveillance machinery in which plants have co-opted some proteins of prokaryotic origin but have also evolved whole new factors to keep their organelle genomes intact. These new features presumably optimized the protection of plastid and mitochondrial genomes against the particular genotoxic stresses they face. PMID:20180912

  14. Catastrophic chromosomal restructuring during genome elimination in plants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ek Han; Henry, Isabelle M; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Bradnam, Keith R; Mandakova, Terezie; Marimuthu, Mohan Pa; Korf, Ian; Lysak, Martin A; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon Wl

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is associated with mitotic errors and cancer. This phenomenon can lead to deleterious rearrangements, but also genetic novelty, and many questions regarding its genesis, fate and evolutionary role remain unanswered. Here, we describe extreme chromosomal restructuring during genome elimination, a process resulting from hybridization of Arabidopsis plants expressing different centromere histones H3. Shattered chromosomes are formed from the genome of the haploid inducer, consistent with genomic catastrophes affecting a single, laggard chromosome compartmentalized within a micronucleus. Analysis of breakpoint junctions implicates breaks followed by repair through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or stalled fork repair. Furthermore, mutation of required NHEJ factor DNA Ligase 4 results in enhanced haploid recovery. Lastly, heritability and stability of a rearranged chromosome suggest a potential for enduring genomic novelty. These findings provide a tractable, natural system towards investigating the causes and mechanisms of complex genomic rearrangements similar to those associated with several human disorders. PMID:25977984

  15. Applied plant genomics: the secret is integration.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, Mark T; Paterson, Andrew H

    2002-04-01

    Although concerted efforts to understand selected botanical models have been made, the resulting basic knowledge varies in its applicability to other diverse species including the major crops. Recent advances in high-throughput genomics are offering new avenues through which to exploit model systems for the study of botanical diversity, providing prospects for crop improvement. In particular, whole-genome sequencing has provided opportunities for the broader application of reverse genetics, expression profiling, and molecular mapping in diverse species. PMID:11856610

  16. Mineralogy in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility stratigraphic horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.L.

    1985-09-01

    Forty-six samples were selected for this study from two cores, one extending 50 ft up through the roof of the WIPP facility and the other penetrating 50 ft below the facility floor. These samples, selected from approximately every other foot of core length, represent the major lithologies present in the immediate vicinity of the WIPP facility horizon: ''clean'' halite, polyhalitic halite, argillaceous halite, and mixed polyhalitic-argillaceous halite. Samples were analyzed for non-NaCl mineralogy by determining weight percents of water- and EDTA-insoluble residues, which were then identified by x-ray diffraction. In general, WIPP halite contains at most 5 wt % non-NaCl residue. The major mineral constituents are quartz, magnesite, anhydrite, gypsum, polyhalite, and clays. Results of this study confirm that, in previous descriptions of WIPP core, trace mineral quantities have been visually overestimated by approximately an order of magnitude. 9 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Genomics of adaptation to host-plants in herbivorous insects.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jean-Christophe; d'Alençon, Emmanuelle; Guy, Endrick; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Jaquiéry, Julie; Nouhaud, Pierre; Peccoud, Jean; Sugio, Akiko; Streiff, Réjane

    2015-11-01

    Herbivorous insects represent the most species-rich lineages of metazoans. The high rate of diversification in herbivorous insects is thought to result from their specialization to distinct host-plants, which creates conditions favorable for the build-up of reproductive isolation and speciation. These conditions rely on constraints against the optimal use of a wide range of plant species, as each must constitute a viable food resource, oviposition site and mating site for an insect. Utilization of plants involves many essential traits of herbivorous insects, as they locate and select their hosts, overcome their defenses and acquire nutrients while avoiding intoxication. Although advances in understanding insect-plant molecular interactions have been limited by the complexity of insect traits involved in host use and the lack of genomic resources and functional tools, recent studies at the molecular level, combined with large-scale genomics studies at population and species levels, are revealing the genetic underpinning of plant specialization and adaptive divergence in non-model insect herbivores. Here, we review the recent advances in the genomics of plant adaptation in hemipterans and lepidopterans, two major insect orders, each of which includes a large number of crop pests. We focus on how genomics and post-genomics have improved our understanding of the mechanisms involved in insect-plant interactions by reviewing recent molecular discoveries in sensing, feeding, digesting and detoxifying strategies. We also present the outcomes of large-scale genomics approaches aimed at identifying loci potentially involved in plant adaptation in these insects. PMID:25846754

  18. BRAD, the genetics and genomics database for Brassica plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brassica species include both vegetable and oilseed crops, which are very important to the daily life of common human beings. Meanwhile, the Brassica species represent an excellent system for studying numerous aspects of plant biology, specifically for the analysis of genome evolution following polyploidy, so it is also very important for scientific research. Now, the genome of Brassica rapa has already been assembled, it is the time to do deep mining of the genome data. Description BRAD, the Brassica database, is a web-based resource focusing on genome scale genetic and genomic data for important Brassica crops. BRAD was built based on the first whole genome sequence and on further data analysis of the Brassica A genome species, Brassica rapa (Chiifu-401-42). It provides datasets, such as the complete genome sequence of B. rapa, which was de novo assembled from Illumina GA II short reads and from BAC clone sequences, predicted genes and associated annotations, non coding RNAs, transposable elements (TE), B. rapa genes' orthologous to those in A. thaliana, as well as genetic markers and linkage maps. BRAD offers useful searching and data mining tools, including search across annotation datasets, search for syntenic or non-syntenic orthologs, and to search the flanking regions of a certain target, as well as the tools of BLAST and Gbrowse. BRAD allows users to enter almost any kind of information, such as a B. rapa or A. thaliana gene ID, physical position or genetic marker. Conclusion BRAD, a new database which focuses on the genetics and genomics of the Brassica plants has been developed, it aims at helping scientists and breeders to fully and efficiently use the information of genome data of Brassica plants. BRAD will be continuously updated and can be accessed through http://brassicadb.org. PMID:21995777

  19. MIPS PlantsDB: a database framework for comparative plant genome research.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, Thomas; Martis, Mihaela M; Roessner, Stephan K; Pfeifer, Matthias; Bader, Kai C; Sharma, Sapna; Gundlach, Heidrun; Spannagl, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of plant genome (sequence) data enables powerful comparative analyses and integrative approaches and also requires structured and comprehensive information resources. Databases are needed for both model and crop plant organisms and both intuitive search/browse views and comparative genomics tools should communicate the data to researchers and help them interpret it. MIPS PlantsDB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/genomes.jsp) was initially described in NAR in 2007 [Spannagl,M., Noubibou,O., Haase,D., Yang,L., Gundlach,H., Hindemitt, T., Klee,K., Haberer,G., Schoof,H. and Mayer,K.F. (2007) MIPSPlantsDB-plant database resource for integrative and comparative plant genome research. Nucleic Acids Res., 35, D834-D840] and was set up from the start to provide data and information resources for individual plant species as well as a framework for integrative and comparative plant genome research. PlantsDB comprises database instances for tomato, Medicago, Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, Sorghum, maize, rice, barley and wheat. Building up on that, state-of-the-art comparative genomics tools such as CrowsNest are integrated to visualize and investigate syntenic relationships between monocot genomes. Results from novel genome analysis strategies targeting the complex and repetitive genomes of triticeae species (wheat and barley) are provided and cross-linked with model species. The MIPS Repeat Element Database (mips-REdat) and Catalog (mips-REcat) as well as tight connections to other databases, e.g. via web services, are further important components of PlantsDB. PMID:23203886

  20. Retrotransposon evolution in diverse plant genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, T; Seago, C; Mende, M; Leggett, M; Thomas, H; Forster, J W; Jones, R N; Jenkins, G

    2000-01-01

    Retrotransposon or retrotransposon-like sequences have been reported to be conserved components of cereal centromeres. Here we show that the published sequences are derived from a single conventional Ty3-gypsy family or a nonautonomous derivative. Both autonomous and nonautonomous elements are likely to have colonized Poaceae centromeres at the time of a common ancestor but have been maintained since by active retrotransposition. The retrotransposon family is also present at a lower copy number in the Arabidopsis genome, where it shows less pronounced localization. The history of the family in the two types of genome provides an interesting contrast between "boom and bust" and persistent evolutionary patterns. PMID:10978295

  1. Plant genomics: More than food for thought

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Steven P.

    1998-01-01

    In all but the poorest countries of South Asia and Africa, the supply and quality of food will rise to meet the demand. Biotechnology, accelerated by genomics, will create wealth for both producers and consumers by reducing the cost and increasing the quality of food. Famine and malnutrition in the poorest countries may be alleviated by applying genomics or other tools of biotechnology to improving subsistence crops. The role of the public sector and the impact of patent law both could be great, but government policies on these issues are still unclear. PMID:9482820

  2. Population Genomics for Understanding Adaptation in Wild Plant Species.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Detlef; Nordborg, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is the foundation of modern biology. However, it has proven remarkably difficult to demonstrate at the genetic, genomic, and population level exactly how wild species adapt to their natural environments. We discuss how one can use large sets of multiple genome sequences from wild populations to understand adaptation, with an emphasis on the small herbaceous plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We present motivation for such studies; summarize progress in describing whole-genome, species-wide sequence variation; and then discuss what insights have emerged from these resources, either based on sequence information alone or in combination with phenotypic data. We conclude with thoughts on opportunities with other plant species and the impact of expected progress in sequencing technology and genome engineering for studying adaptation in nature. PMID:26436459

  3. Towards social acceptance of plant breeding by genome editing.

    PubMed

    Araki, Motoko; Ishii, Tetsuya

    2015-03-01

    Although genome-editing technologies facilitate efficient plant breeding without introducing a transgene, it is creating indistinct boundaries in the regulation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Rapid advances in plant breeding by genome-editing require the establishment of a new global policy for the new biotechnology, while filling the gap between process-based and product-based GMO regulations. In this Opinion article we review recent developments in producing major crops using genome-editing, and we propose a regulatory model that takes into account the various methodologies to achieve genetic modifications as well as the resulting types of mutation. Moreover, we discuss the future integration of genome-editing crops into society, specifically a possible response to the 'Right to Know' movement which demands labeling of food that contains genetically engineered ingredients. PMID:25726138

  4. Phytozome: a Tool for Green Plant Comparative Genomics

    DOE Data Explorer

    Phytozome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst green plants. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of release v4.0, Phytozome provides access to nine sequenced and annotated green plant genomes, eight of which have been clustered into gene families at six evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, TAIR, JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. [Copied from the Overview at http://www.phytozome.net/Phytozome_info.php

  5. Ancient signals: comparative genomics of green plant CDPKs

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Louis-Philippe; Sheen, Jen; Séguin, Armand

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are multifunctional proteins combining calcium-binding and signaling capabilities within a single gene product. This unique versatility enables multiple plant biological processes to be controlled, including developmental programs and stress responses. The genome of flowering plants typically encodes around 30 CDPK homologs that cluster in four conserved clades. In this Review, we take advantage of the recent availability of genome sequences from green algae and early land plants to examine how well the previously described CDPK family from angiosperms compares to the broader evolutionary states associated with early diverging green plant lineages. Our analysis suggests that the current architecture of the CDPK family was shaped during the colonization of the land by plants, whereas CDPKs from ancestor green algae have continued to evolve independently. PMID:24342084

  6. Widespread Endogenization of Genome Sequences of Non-Retroviral RNA Viruses into Plant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Saisho, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Wataru; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Non-retroviral RNA virus sequences (NRVSs) have been found in the chromosomes of vertebrates and fungi, but not plants. Here we report similarly endogenized NRVSs derived from plus-, negative-, and double-stranded RNA viruses in plant chromosomes. These sequences were found by searching public genomic sequence databases, and, importantly, most NRVSs were subsequently detected by direct molecular analyses of plant DNAs. The most widespread NRVSs were related to the coat protein (CP) genes of the family Partitiviridae which have bisegmented dsRNA genomes, and included plant- and fungus-infecting members. The CP of a novel fungal virus (Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 2, RnPV2) had the greatest sequence similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana ILR2, which is thought to regulate the activities of the phytohormone auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Furthermore, partitivirus CP-like sequences much more closely related to plant partitiviruses than to RnPV2 were identified in a wide range of plant species. In addition, the nucleocapsid protein genes of cytorhabdoviruses and varicosaviruses were found in species of over 9 plant families, including Brassicaceae and Solanaceae. A replicase-like sequence of a betaflexivirus was identified in the cucumber genome. The pattern of occurrence of NRVSs and the phylogenetic analyses of NRVSs and related viruses indicate that multiple independent integrations into many plant lineages may have occurred. For example, one of the NRVSs was retained in Ar. thaliana but not in Ar. lyrata or other related Camelina species, whereas another NRVS displayed the reverse pattern. Our study has shown that single- and double-stranded RNA viral sequences are widespread in plant genomes, and shows the potential of genome integrated NRVSs to contribute to resolve unclear phylogenetic relationships of plant species. PMID:21779172

  7. Tc1-like transposable elements in plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Tc1/mariner superfamily of transposable elements (TEs) is widespread in animal genomes. Mariner-like elements, which bear a DDD triad catalytic motif, have been identified in a wide range of flowering plant species. However, as the founding member of the superfamily, Tc1-like elements that bear a DD34E triad catalytic motif are only known to unikonts (animals, fungi, and Entamoeba). Results Here we report the identification of Tc1-like elements (TLEs) in plant genomes. These elements bear the four terminal nucleotides and the characteristic DD34E triad motif of Tc1 element. The two TLE families (PpTc1, PpTc2) identified in the moss (Physcomitrella patens) genome contain highly similar copies. Multiple copies of PpTc1 are actively transcribed and the transcripts encode intact full length transposase coding sequences. TLEs are also found in angiosperm genome sequence databases of rice (Oryza sativa), dwarf birch (Betula nana), cabbage (Brassica rapa), hemp (Cannabis sativa), barley (Hordium valgare), lettuce (Lactuta sativa), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), pear (Pyrus x bretschneideri), and wheat (Triticum urartu). Conclusions This study extends the occurrence of TLEs to the plant phylum. The elements in the moss genome have amplified recently and may still be capable of transposition. The TLEs are also present in angiosperm genomes, but apparently much less abundant than in moss. PMID:24926322

  8. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E.; Sessa, Emily B.; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Barker, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity. PMID:26702445

  9. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E; Sessa, Emily B; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W; Rieseberg, Loren H; Barker, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity. PMID:26702445

  10. RNAi and functional genomics in plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Rosso, M N; Jones, J T; Abad, P

    2009-01-01

    Plant nematology is currently undergoing a revolution with the availability of the first genome sequences as well as comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries from a range of nematode species. Several strategies are being used to exploit this wealth of information. Comparative genomics is being used to explore the acquisition of novel genes associated with parasitic lifestyles. Functional analyses of nematode genes are moving toward larger scale studies including global transcriptome profiling. RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to reduce expression of a range of plant parasitic nematode genes and is a powerful tool for functional analysis of nematode genes. RNAi-mediated suppression of genes essential for nematode development, survival, or parasitism is revealing new targets for nematode control. Plant nematology in the genomics era is now facing the challenge to develop RNAi screens adequate for high-throughput functional analyses. PMID:19400649

  11. Genomics Approaches For Improving Salinity Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants.

    PubMed

    Nongpiur, Ramsong Chantre; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata; Pareek, Ashwani

    2016-08-01

    Salinity is one of the major factors which reduces crop production worldwide. Plant responses to salinity are highly complex and involve a plethora of genes. Due to its multigenicity, it has been difficult to attain a complete understanding of how plants respond to salinity. Genomics has progressed tremendously over the past decade and has played a crucial role towards providing necessary knowledge for crop improvement. Through genomics, we have been able to identify and characterize the genes involved in salinity stress response, map out signaling pathways and ultimately utilize this information for improving the salinity tolerance of existing crops. The use of new tools, such as gene pyramiding, in genetic engineering and marker assisted breeding has tremendously enhanced our ability to generate stress tolerant crops. Genome editing technologies such as Zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 also provide newer and faster avenues for plant biologists to generate precisely engineered crops. PMID:27499683

  12. Widespread genome duplications throughout the history of flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liying; Wall, P. Kerr; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Lindsay, Bruce G.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Doyle, Jeff J.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Carlson, John E.; Arumuganathan, Kathiravetpilla; Barakat, Abdelali; Albert, Victor A.; Ma, Hong; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic comparisons provide evidence for ancient genome-wide duplications in a diverse array of animals and plants. We developed a birth–death model to identify evidence for genome duplication in EST data, and applied a mixture model to estimate the age distribution of paralogous pairs identified in EST sets for species representing the basal-most extant flowering plant lineages. We found evidence for episodes of ancient genome-wide duplications in the basal angiosperm lineages including Nuphar advena (yellow water lily: Nymphaeaceae) and the magnoliids Persea americana (avocado: Lauraceae), Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip poplar: Magnoliaceae), and Saruma henryi (Aristolochiaceae). In addition, we detected independent genome duplications in the basal eudicot Eschscholzia californica (California poppy: Papaveraceae) and the basal monocot Acorus americanus (Acoraceae), both of which were distinct from duplications documented for ancestral grass (Poaceae) and core eudicot lineages. Among gymnosperms, we found equivocal evidence for ancient polyploidy in Welwitschia mirabilis (Gnetales) and no evidence for polyploidy in pine, although gymnosperms generally have much larger genomes than the angiosperms investigated. Cross-species sequence divergence estimates suggest that synonymous substitution rates in the basal angiosperms are less than half those previously reported for core eudicots and members of Poaceae. These lower substitution rates permit inference of older duplication events. We hypothesize that evidence of an ancient duplication observed in the Nuphar data may represent a genome duplication in the common ancestor of all or most extant angiosperms, except Amborella. PMID:16702410

  13. PhytoPath: an integrative resource for plant pathogen genomics.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Helder; Maheswari, Uma; Urban, Martin; Irvine, Alistair George; Cuzick, Alayne; McDowall, Mark D; Staines, Daniel M; Kulesha, Eugene; Hammond-Kosack, Kim Elizabeth; Kersey, Paul Julian

    2016-01-01

    PhytoPath (www.phytopathdb.org) is a resource for genomic and phenotypic data from plant pathogen species, that integrates phenotypic data for genes from PHI-base, an expertly curated catalog of genes with experimentally verified pathogenicity, with the Ensembl tools for data visualization and analysis. The resource is focused on fungi, protists (oomycetes) and bacterial plant pathogens that have genomes that have been sequenced and annotated. Genes with associated PHI-base data can be easily identified across all plant pathogen species using a BioMart-based query tool and visualized in their genomic context on the Ensembl genome browser. The PhytoPath resource contains data for 135 genomic sequences from 87 plant pathogen species, and 1364 genes curated for their role in pathogenicity and as targets for chemical intervention. Support for community annotation of gene models is provided using the WebApollo online gene editor, and we are working with interested communities to improve reference annotation for selected species. PMID:26476449

  14. Exploring laccase genes from plant pathogen genomes: a bioinformatic approach.

    PubMed

    Feng, B Z; Li, P Q; Fu, L; Yu, X M

    2015-01-01

    To date, research on laccases has mostly been focused on plant and fungal laccases and their current use in biotechnological applications. In contrast, little is known about laccases from plant pathogens, although recent rapid progress in whole genome sequencing of an increasing number of organisms has facilitated their identification and ascertainment of their origins. In this study, a comparative analysis was performed to elucidate the distribution of laccases among bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes, and, through comparison of their amino acids, to determine the relationships between them. We retrieved the laccase genes for the 20 publicly available plant pathogen genomes. From these, 125 laccase genes were identified in total, including seven in bacterial genomes, 101 in fungal genomes, and 17 in oomycete genomes. Most of the predicted protein models of these genes shared typical fungal laccase characteristics, possessing four conserved domains with one cysteine and ten histidine residues at these domains. Phylogenetic analysis illustrated that laccases from bacteria and oomycetes were grouped into two distinct clades, whereas fungal laccases clustered in three main clades. These results provide the theoretical groundwork regarding the role of laccases in plant pathogens and might be used to guide future research into these enzymes. PMID:26535716

  15. PhytoPath: an integrative resource for plant pathogen genomics

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Helder; Maheswari, Uma; Urban, Martin; Irvine, Alistair George; Cuzick, Alayne; McDowall, Mark D.; Staines, Daniel M.; Kulesha, Eugene; Hammond-Kosack, Kim Elizabeth; Kersey, Paul Julian

    2016-01-01

    PhytoPath (www.phytopathdb.org) is a resource for genomic and phenotypic data from plant pathogen species, that integrates phenotypic data for genes from PHI-base, an expertly curated catalog of genes with experimentally verified pathogenicity, with the Ensembl tools for data visualization and analysis. The resource is focused on fungi, protists (oomycetes) and bacterial plant pathogens that have genomes that have been sequenced and annotated. Genes with associated PHI-base data can be easily identified across all plant pathogen species using a BioMart-based query tool and visualized in their genomic context on the Ensembl genome browser. The PhytoPath resource contains data for 135 genomic sequences from 87 plant pathogen species, and 1364 genes curated for their role in pathogenicity and as targets for chemical intervention. Support for community annotation of gene models is provided using the WebApollo online gene editor, and we are working with interested communities to improve reference annotation for selected species. PMID:26476449

  16. Endogenous RNA viruses of plants in insect genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from RNA viruses with no DNA stage are rare, especially those where the parental viruses possess single-strand positive-sense (ssRNA+) genomes. Here we provide evidence that EVEs that share a sequence similarity to ssRNA+viruses of plants are integrated into the genomes of a number of insects, including mosquito, fruit flies, bees, ant, silkworm, pea aphid, Monarch butterfly, and wasps. A preliminary phylogenetic analysis places these EVEs as divergent relatives of the Virgaviridae and three currently unclassified plant viral species. PMID:22410578

  17. The Mitochondrial Genome of an Aquatic Plant, Spirodela polyrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqin; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Background Spirodela polyrhiza is a species of the order Alismatales, which represent the basal lineage of monocots with more ancestral features than the Poales. Its complete sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome could provide clues for the understanding of the evolution of mt genomes in plant. Methods Spirodela polyrhiza mt genome was sequenced from total genomic DNA without physical separation of chloroplast and nuclear DNA using the SOLiD platform. Using a genome copy number sensitive assembly algorithm, the mt genome was successfully assembled. Gap closure and accuracy was determined with PCR products sequenced with the dideoxy method. Conclusions This is the most compact monocot mitochondrial genome with 228,493 bp. A total of 57 genes encode 35 known proteins, 3 ribosomal RNAs, and 19 tRNAs that recognize 15 amino acids. There are about 600 RNA editing sites predicted and three lineage specific protein-coding-gene losses. The mitochondrial genes, pseudogenes, and other hypothetical genes (ORFs) cover 71,783 bp (31.0%) of the genome. Imported plastid DNA accounts for an additional 9,295 bp (4.1%) of the mitochondrial DNA. Absence of transposable element sequences suggests that very few nuclear sequences have migrated into Spirodela mtDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved protein-coding genes suggests that Spirodela shares the common ancestor with other monocots, but there is no obvious synteny between Spirodela and rice mtDNAs. After eliminating genes, introns, ORFs, and plastid-derived DNA, nearly four-fifths of the Spirodela mitochondrial genome is of unknown origin and function. Although it contains a similar chloroplast DNA content and range of RNA editing as other monocots, it is void of nuclear insertions, active gene loss, and comprises large regions of sequences of unknown origin in non-coding regions. Moreover, the lack of synteny with known mitochondrial genomic sequences shed new light on the early evolution of monocot mitochondrial genomes

  18. Geospatial estimation of the impact of Deepwater Horizon oil spill on plant oiling along the Louisiana shorelines.

    PubMed

    Goovaerts, Pierre; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russell; Rissing, Matthew

    2016-09-15

    Stranded oil covering soil and plant stems in fragile Louisiana marshes was one of the most visible impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. As part of the assessment of marsh injury after the DWH spill, plant stem oiling was broken into five categories (0%, 0-10%, 10-50%, 50-90%, 90-100%) and used as the independent variable for estimating death of vegetation, accelerated erosion, and other metrics of injury. The length of shoreline falling into each of these stem oiling categories was therefore a key measure of the total extent of marsh injury, and its accurate estimation is the focus of this paper. First, we used geographically-weighted logistic regression (GWR) to explore and model spatially varying relationships between stem oiling field data and secondary information (oiling exposure category) collected during shoreline surveys. We then combined GWR probability estimates with field data using indicator cokriging to predict the probability of exceeding four stem oiling thresholds (0, 10, 50, and 90%) at 50 m intervals along the Louisiana shoreline. Cross-validation using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves demonstrate the greater prediction accuracy of the multivariate geostatistical approach relative to either aspatial regression or indicator kriging that ignores secondary information. PMID:27240202

  19. Ensembl Plants: Integrating Tools for Visualizing, Mining, and Analyzing Plant Genomics Data.

    PubMed

    Bolser, Dan; Staines, Daniel M; Pritchard, Emily; Kersey, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Ensembl Plants ( http://plants.ensembl.org ) is an integrative resource presenting genome-scale information for a growing number of sequenced plant species (currently 33). Data provided includes genome sequence, gene models, functional annotation, and polymorphic loci. Various additional information are provided for variation data, including population structure, individual genotypes, linkage, and phenotype data. In each release, comparative analyses are performed on whole genome and protein sequences, and genome alignments and gene trees are made available that show the implied evolutionary history of each gene family. Access to the data is provided through a genome browser incorporating many specialist interfaces for different data types, and through a variety of additional methods for programmatic access and data mining. These access routes are consistent with those offered through the Ensembl interface for the genomes of non-plant species, including those of plant pathogens, pests, and pollinators.Ensembl Plants is updated 4-5 times a year and is developed in collaboration with our international partners in the Gramene ( http://www.gramene.org ) and transPLANT projects ( http://www.transplantdb.org ). PMID:26519403

  20. Analyses of Charophyte Chloroplast Genomes Help Characterize the Ancestral Chloroplast Genome of Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Civáň, Peter; Foster, Peter G.; Embley, Martin T.; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  1. Analyses of charophyte chloroplast genomes help characterize the ancestral chloroplast genome of land plants.

    PubMed

    Civaň, Peter; Foster, Peter G; Embley, Martin T; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J

    2014-04-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  2. Application of plant genomics for improved symbiotic nitrogen fixation in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because genome sequencing, transcript profiling, proteome analysis, metabolite profiling, mutant analysis, and comparative genomics have progressed at a logarithmic pace, we know more about the plant genes involved in symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) than could have been imagined a decade ago. Howe...

  3. The Reference Genome of the Halophytic Plant Eutrema salsugineum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruolin; Jarvis, David E.; Chen, Hao; Beilstein, Mark A.; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Shu, ShengQiang; Prochnik, Simon; Xin, Mingming; Ma, Chuang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Wing, Rod A.; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Schumaker, Karen S.; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Halophytes are plants that can naturally tolerate high concentrations of salt in the soil, and their tolerance to salt stress may occur through various evolutionary and molecular mechanisms. Eutrema salsugineum is a halophytic species in the Brassicaceae that can naturally tolerate multiple types of abiotic stresses that typically limit crop productivity, including extreme salinity and cold. It has been widely used as a laboratorial model for stress biology research in plants. Here, we present the reference genome sequence (241 Mb) of E. salsugineum at 8× coverage sequenced using the traditional Sanger sequencing-based approach with comparison to its close relative Arabidopsis thaliana. The E. salsugineum genome contains 26,531 protein-coding genes and 51.4% of its genome is composed of repetitive sequences that mostly reside in pericentromeric regions. Comparative analyses of the genome structures, protein-coding genes, microRNAs, stress-related pathways, and estimated translation efficiency of proteins between E. salsugineum and A. thaliana suggest that halophyte adaptation to environmental stresses may occur via a global network adjustment of multiple regulatory mechanisms. The E. salsugineum genome provides a resource to identify naturally occurring genetic alterations contributing to the adaptation of halophytic plants to salinity and that might be bioengineered in related crop species. PMID:23518688

  4. The Reference Genome of the Halophytic Plant Eutrema salsugineum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruolin; Jarvis, David E; Chen, Hao; Beilstein, Mark A; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Shu, Shengqiang; Prochnik, Simon; Xin, Mingming; Ma, Chuang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Wing, Rod A; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Schumaker, Karen S; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Halophytes are plants that can naturally tolerate high concentrations of salt in the soil, and their tolerance to salt stress may occur through various evolutionary and molecular mechanisms. Eutrema salsugineum is a halophytic species in the Brassicaceae that can naturally tolerate multiple types of abiotic stresses that typically limit crop productivity, including extreme salinity and cold. It has been widely used as a laboratorial model for stress biology research in plants. Here, we present the reference genome sequence (241 Mb) of E. salsugineum at 8× coverage sequenced using the traditional Sanger sequencing-based approach with comparison to its close relative Arabidopsis thaliana. The E. salsugineum genome contains 26,531 protein-coding genes and 51.4% of its genome is composed of repetitive sequences that mostly reside in pericentromeric regions. Comparative analyses of the genome structures, protein-coding genes, microRNAs, stress-related pathways, and estimated translation efficiency of proteins between E. salsugineum and A. thaliana suggest that halophyte adaptation to environmental stresses may occur via a global network adjustment of multiple regulatory mechanisms. The E. salsugineum genome provides a resource to identify naturally occurring genetic alterations contributing to the adaptation of halophytic plants to salinity and that might be bioengineered in related crop species. PMID:23518688

  5. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21-24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae) by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus); beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus); and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus). The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus) and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae) by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology. PMID:27617007

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    PubMed Central

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21–24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae) by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus); beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus); and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus). The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus) and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae) by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology. PMID:27617007

  7. Patterns of tandem repetition in plant whole genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Paterson, Andrew H

    2009-06-01

    Tandem repeats often confound large genome assemblies. A survey of tandemly arrayed repetitive sequences was carried out in whole genome sequences of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the moss Physcomitrella patens, the monocots rice and sorghum, and the dicots Arabidopsis thaliana, poplar, grapevine, and papaya, in order to test how these assemblies deal with this fraction of DNA. Our results suggest that plant genome assemblies preferentially include tandem repeats composed of shorter monomeric units (especially dinucleotide and 9-30-bp repeats), while higher repetitive units pose more difficulties to assemble. Nevertheless, notwithstanding that currently available sequencing technologies struggle with higher arrays of repeated DNA, major well-known repetitive elements including centromeric and telomeric repeats as well as high copy-number genes, were found to be reasonably well represented. A database including all tandem repeat sequences characterized here was created to benefit future comparative genomic analyses. PMID:19242726

  8. Integrating genomics and plant breeding: whither the breeders?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant breeding has been practiced >5,000 years as an art and >100 years as a science. Selection provides the means where populations are improved for product, such as yield or composition, or for crop protection, such as pest and stress resistance. Such activities have not required use of genomic te...

  9. Molecular Tools for Exploring Polyploid Genomes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Aversano, Riccardo; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella; Caruso, Immacolata; Fasano, Carlo; Rosellini, Daniele; Carputo, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Polyploidy is a very common phenomenon in the plant kingdom, where even diploid species are often described as paleopolyploids. The polyploid condition may bring about several advantages compared to the diploid state. Polyploids often show phenotypes that are not present in their diploid progenitors or exceed the range of the contributing species. Some of these traits may play a role in heterosis or could favor adaptation to new ecological niches. Advances in genomics and sequencing technology may create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring the molecular effects of polyploidization. Through this review, we provide an overview of technologies and strategies that may allow an in-depth analysis of polyploid genomes. After introducing some basic aspects on the origin and genetics of polyploids, we highlight the main tools available for genome and gene expression analysis and summarize major findings. In the last part of this review, the implications of next generation sequencing are briefly discussed. The accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists to understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement. PMID:22949863

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Plant Probiotic Bacillus Strains.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Park, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Soo-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of four Bacillus strains that exhibit plant probiotic activities. Three of them are the type strains of Bacillus endophyticus, "Bacillus gaemokensis," and Bacillus trypoxylicola, and the other, Bacillus sp. strain KCTC 13219, should be reclassified into a species belonging to the genus Lysinibacillus. PMID:27174273

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Plant Probiotic Bacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of four Bacillus strains that exhibit plant probiotic activities. Three of them are the type strains of Bacillus endophyticus, “Bacillus gaemokensis,” and Bacillus trypoxylicola, and the other, Bacillus sp. strain KCTC 13219, should be reclassified into a species belonging to the genus Lysinibacillus. PMID:27174273

  12. Genome-guided investigation of plant natural product biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Franziska; Kim, Jeongwoon; Clavijo, Bernardo J; Hamilton, John P; Childs, Kevin L; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Cepela, Jason; Habermann, Marc; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Clissold, Leah; McLay, Kirsten; Buell, Carol Robin; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-05-01

    The medicinal plant Madagascar periwinkle, Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don, produces hundreds of biologically active monoterpene-derived indole alkaloid (MIA) metabolites and is the sole source of the potent, expensive anti-cancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Access to a genome sequence would enable insights into the biochemistry, control, and evolution of genes responsible for MIA biosynthesis. However, generation of a near-complete, scaffolded genome is prohibitive to small research communities due to the expense, time, and expertise required. In this study, we generated a genome assembly for C. roseus that provides a near-comprehensive representation of the genic space that revealed the genomic context of key points within the MIA biosynthetic pathway including physically clustered genes, tandem gene duplication, expression sub-functionalization, and putative neo-functionalization. The genome sequence also facilitated high resolution co-expression analyses that revealed three distinct clusters of co-expression within the components of the MIA pathway. Coordinated biosynthesis of precursors and intermediates throughout the pathway appear to be a feature of vinblastine/vincristine biosynthesis. The C. roseus genome also revealed localization of enzyme-rich genic regions and transporters near known biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting how even a draft genome sequence can empower the study of high-value specialized metabolites. PMID:25759247

  13. Genomics of cold hardiness in woody plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term cold hardiness or freezing tolerance is used to represent in a general sense the ability of plants to adapt to and withstand freezing temperatures. It is a complex, multigenic trait that is too often viewed as a single entity when in fact is composed of many aspects, all of which can be to...

  14. The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Banks, Jo Ann; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Bowman, John L.; Gribskov, Michael; dePamphilis, Claude; Albert, Victor A.; Aono, Naoki; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Ambrose, Barbara A.; Ashton, Neil W.; Axtell, Michael J.; Barker, Elizabeth; Barker, Michael S.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Chapple, Clint; Cheng, Chaoyang; Correa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Dacre, Michael; DeBarry, Jeremy; Dreyer, Ingo; Elias, Marek; Engstrom, Eric M.; Estelle, Mark; Feng, Liang; Finet, Cedric; Floyd, Sandra K.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Fujita, Tomomichi; Gramzow, Lydia; Gutensohn, Michael; Harholt, Jesper; Hattori, Mitsuru; Heyl, Alexander; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Iwata, Mineko; Karol, Kenneth G.; Koehler, Barbara; Kolukisaoglu, Uener; Kubo, Minoru; Kurata, Tetsuya; Lalonde, Sylvie; Li, Kejie; Li, Ying; Litt, Amy; Lyons, Eric; Manning, Gerard; Maruyama, Takeshi; Michael, Todd P.; Mikami, Koji; Miyazaki, Saori; Morinaga, Shin-ichi; Murata, Takashi; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Nelson, David R.; Obara, Mari; Oguri, Yasuko; Olmstead, Richard G.; Onodera, Naoko; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Pils, Birgit; Prigge, Michael; Rensing, Stefan A.; Riano-Pachon, Diego Mauricio; Roberts, Alison W.; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Schulz, Burkhard; Schulz, Christian; Shakirov, Eugene V.; Shibagaki, Nakako; Shinohara, Naoki; Shippen, Dorothy E.; Sorensen, Iben; Sotooka, Ryo; Sugimoto, Nagisa; Sugita, Mamoru; Sumikawa, Naomi; Tanurdzic, Milos; Theilsen, Gunter; Ulvskov, Peter; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Weng, Jing-Ke; Willats, William W.G.T.; Wipf, Daniel; Wolf, Paul G.; Yang, Lixing; Zimmer, Andreas D.; Zhu, Qihui; Mitros, Therese; Hellsten, Uffe; Loque, Dominique; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shapiro, Harris; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution

  15. Multitissue molecular, genomic, and developmental effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on resident Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis).

    PubMed

    Dubansky, Benjamin; Whitehead, Andrew; Miller, Jeffrey T; Rice, Charles D; Galvez, Fernando

    2013-05-21

    The Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster resulted in crude oil contamination along the Gulf coast in sensitive estuaries. Toxicity from exposure to crude oil can affect populations of fish that live or breed in oiled habitats as seen following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. In an ongoing study of the effects of Deepwater Horizon crude oil on fish, Gulf killifish ( Fundulus grandis ) were collected from an oiled site (Grande Terre, LA) and two reference locations (coastal MS and AL) and monitored for measures of exposure to crude oil. Killifish collected from Grande Terre had divergent gene expression in the liver and gill tissue coincident with the arrival of contaminating oil and up-regulation of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein in gill, liver, intestine, and head kidney for over one year following peak landfall of oil (August 2011) compared to fish collected from reference sites. Furthermore, laboratory exposures of Gulf killifish embryos to field-collected sediments from Grande Terre and Barataria Bay, LA, also resulted in increased CYP1A and developmental abnormalities when exposed to sediments collected from oiled sites compared to exposure to sediments collected from a reference site. These data are predictive of population-level impacts in fish exposed to sediments from oiled locations along the Gulf of Mexico coast. PMID:23659337

  16. HORIZON SENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk, Sc.D.

    2002-07-31

    Real-time horizon sensing (HS) on continuous mining (CM) machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade HS systems has been ongoing this quarter at Oxbow Mining Company, Monterey Coal Company (EXXON), FMC Trona, Twentymile Coal Company (RAG America), and SASOL Coal. Detailed monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (United States) and IEC (International) certification.

  17. Genome-wide Comparative Analysis of Annexin Superfamily in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jami, Sravan Kumar; Clark, Greg B.; Ayele, Belay T.; Ashe, Paula; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2012-01-01

    Most annexins are calcium-dependent, phospholipid-binding proteins with suggested functions in response to environmental stresses and signaling during plant growth and development. They have previously been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis and rice, and constitute a multigene family in plants. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of annexin gene families in the sequenced genomes of Viridiplantae ranging from unicellular green algae to multicellular plants, and identified 149 genes. Phylogenetic studies of these deduced annexins classified them into nine different arbitrary groups. The occurrence and distribution of bona fide type II calcium binding sites within the four annexin domains were found to be different in each of these groups. Analysis of chromosomal distribution of annexin genes in rice, Arabidopsis and poplar revealed their localization on various chromosomes with some members also found on duplicated chromosomal segments leading to gene family expansion. Analysis of gene structure suggests sequential or differential loss of introns during the evolution of land plant annexin genes. Intron positions and phases are well conserved in annexin genes from representative genomes ranging from Physcomitrella to higher plants. The occurrence of alternative motifs such as K/R/HGD was found to be overlapping or at the mutated regions of the type II calcium binding sites indicating potential functional divergence in certain plant annexins. This study provides a basis for further functional analysis and characterization of annexin multigene families in the plant lineage. PMID:23133603

  18. Research progress of genome editing and derivative technologies in plants.

    PubMed

    Qiwei, Shan; Caixia, Gao

    2015-10-01

    Genome editing technologies using engineered nucleases have been widely used in many model organisms. Genome editing with sequence-specific nuclease (SSN) creates DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genomic target sites that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways, which can be employed to achieve targeted genome modifications such as gene mutations, insertions, replacements or chromosome rearrangements. There are three major SSNs─zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. In contrast to ZFN and TALEN, which require substantial protein engineering to each DNA target, the CRISPR/Cas9 system requires only a change in the guide RNA. For this reason, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple, inexpensive and versatile tool for genome engineering. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression, such as activation, depression and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we summarize the development and applications of genome editing technologies for basic research and biotechnology, as well as highlight challenges and future directions, with particular emphasis on plants. PMID:26496748

  19. Catastrophic chromosomal restructuring during genome elimination in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ek Han; Henry, Isabelle M; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Bradnam, Keith R; Mandakova, Terezie; Marimuthu, Mohan PA; Korf, Ian; Lysak, Martin A; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon WL

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is associated with mitotic errors and cancer. This phenomenon can lead to deleterious rearrangements, but also genetic novelty, and many questions regarding its genesis, fate and evolutionary role remain unanswered. Here, we describe extreme chromosomal restructuring during genome elimination, a process resulting from hybridization of Arabidopsis plants expressing different centromere histones H3. Shattered chromosomes are formed from the genome of the haploid inducer, consistent with genomic catastrophes affecting a single, laggard chromosome compartmentalized within a micronucleus. Analysis of breakpoint junctions implicates breaks followed by repair through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or stalled fork repair. Furthermore, mutation of required NHEJ factor DNA Ligase 4 results in enhanced haploid recovery. Lastly, heritability and stability of a rearranged chromosome suggest a potential for enduring genomic novelty. These findings provide a tractable, natural system towards investigating the causes and mechanisms of complex genomic rearrangements similar to those associated with several human disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06516.001 PMID:25977984

  20. Genomic insights into Xylella fastidiosa interactions with plant and insect hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilization of genomic data and widespread availability of genomics tools are still incipient in plant pathology. The first genome of a plant pathogen, the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, was only completed in 2000. Since then, a large number of bacterial plant pathogens have been sequenced, but much ...

  1. The plant glycosyltransferase clone collection for functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Lao, Jeemeng; Oikawa, Ai; Bromley, Jennifer R; McInerney, Peter; Suttangkakul, Anongpat; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Plahar, Hector; Chiu, Tsan-Yu; González Fernández-Niño, Susana M; Ebert, Berit; Yang, Fan; Christiansen, Katy M; Hansen, Sara F; Stonebloom, Solomon; Adams, Paul D; Ronald, Pamela C; Hillson, Nathan J; Hadi, Masood Z; Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E; Loqué, Dominique; Scheller, Henrik V; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2014-08-01

    The glycosyltransferases (GTs) are an important and functionally diverse family of enzymes involved in glycan and glycoside biosynthesis. Plants have evolved large families of GTs which undertake the array of glycosylation reactions that occur during plant development and growth. Based on the Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy) database, the genome of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana codes for over 450 GTs, while the rice genome (Oryza sativa) contains over 600 members. Collectively, GTs from these reference plants can be classified into over 40 distinct GT families. Although these enzymes are involved in many important plant specific processes such as cell-wall and secondary metabolite biosynthesis, few have been functionally characterized. We have sought to develop a plant GTs clone resource that will enable functional genomic approaches to be undertaken by the plant research community. In total, 403 (88%) of CAZy defined Arabidopsis GTs have been cloned, while 96 (15%) of the GTs coded by rice have been cloned. The collection resulted in the update of a number of Arabidopsis GT gene models. The clones represent full-length coding sequences without termination codons and are Gateway® compatible. To demonstrate the utility of this JBEI GT Collection, a set of efficient particle bombardment plasmids (pBullet) was also constructed with markers for the endomembrane. The utility of the pBullet collection was demonstrated by localizing all members of the Arabidopsis GT14 family to the Golgi apparatus or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Updates to these resources are available at the JBEI GT Collection website http://www.addgene.org/. PMID:24905498

  2. Plant Genome DataBase Japan (PGDBj): A Portal Website for the Integration of Plant Genome-Related Databases

    PubMed Central

    Asamizu, Erika; Ichihara, Hisako; Nakaya, Akihiro; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Hirakawa, Hideki; Ishii, Takahiro; Tamura, Takuro; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakajima, Yukari; Tabata, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The Plant Genome DataBase Japan (PGDBj, http://pgdbj.jp/?ln=en) is a portal website that aims to integrate plant genome-related information from databases (DBs) and the literature. The PGDBj is comprised of three component DBs and a cross-search engine, which provides a seamless search over the contents of the DBs. The three DBs are as follows. (i) The Ortholog DB, providing gene cluster information based on the amino acid sequence similarity. Over 500,000 amino acid sequences of 20 Viridiplantae species were subjected to reciprocal BLAST searches and clustered. Sequences from plant genome DBs (e.g. TAIR10 and RAP-DB) were also included in the cluster with a direct link to the original DB. (ii) The Plant Resource DB, integrating the SABRE DB, which provides cDNA and genome sequence resources accumulated and maintained in the RIKEN BioResource Center and National BioResource Projects. (iii) The DNA Marker DB, providing manually or automatically curated information of DNA markers, quantitative trait loci and related linkage maps, from the literature and external DBs. As the PGDBj targets various plant species, including model plants, algae, and crops important as food, fodder and biofuel, researchers in the field of basic biology as well as a wide range of agronomic fields are encouraged to perform searches using DNA sequences, gene names, traits and phenotypes of interest. The PGDBj will return the search results from the component DBs and various types of linked external DBs. PMID:24363285

  3. Fungal and oomycete genes galore: highlights from the Fungal Genomics Workshop at the 2007 Plant and Animal Genome Conference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the new Fungal Genomics Workshop at the Plant and Animal Genome meetings is to go beyond generating sequences to discuss what can be done next, particularly in comparative genomics and global functional analyses. The new workshop is timely and hopefully will provide a broad forum f...

  4. The complete chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences of Boea hygrometrica: insights into the evolution of plant organellar genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tongwu; Fang, Yongjun; Wang, Xumin; Deng, Xin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) genomes of resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica (Bh, Gesneriaceae) have been determined with the lengths of 153,493 bp and 510,519 bp, respectively. The smaller chloroplast genome contains more genes (147) with a 72% coding sequence, and the larger mitochondrial genome have less genes (65) with a coding faction of 12%. Similar to other seed plants, the Bh cp genome has a typical quadripartite organization with a conserved gene in each region. The Bh mt genome has three recombinant sequence repeats of 222 bp, 843 bp, and 1474 bp in length, which divide the genome into a single master circle (MC) and four isomeric molecules. Compared to other angiosperms, one remarkable feature of the Bh mt genome is the frequent transfer of genetic material from the cp genome during recent Bh evolution. We also analyzed organellar genome evolution in general regarding genome features as well as compositional dynamics of sequence and gene structure/organization, providing clues for the understanding of the evolution of organellar genomes in plants. The cp-derived sequences including tRNAs found in angiosperm mt genomes support the conclusion that frequent gene transfer events may have begun early in the land plant lineage. PMID:22291979

  5. Impact of recurrent gene duplication on adaptation of plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent gene duplication and retention played an important role in angiosperm genome evolution. It has been hypothesized that these processes contribute significantly to plant adaptation but so far this hypothesis has not been tested at the genome scale. Results We studied available sequenced angiosperm genomes to assess the frequency of positive selection footprints in lineage specific expanded (LSE) gene families compared to single-copy genes using a dN/dS-based test in a phylogenetic framework. We found 5.38% of alignments in LSE genes with codons under positive selection. In contrast, we found no evidence for codons under positive selection in the single-copy reference set. An analysis at the branch level shows that purifying selection acted more strongly on single-copy genes than on LSE gene clusters. Moreover we detect significantly more branches indicating evolution under positive selection and/or relaxed constraint in LSE genes than in single-copy genes. Conclusions In this – to our knowledge –first genome-scale study we provide strong empirical support for the hypothesis that LSE genes fuel adaptation in angiosperms. Our conservative approach for detecting selection footprints as well as our results can be of interest for further studies on (plant) gene family evolution. PMID:24884640

  6. Plant genome values: How much do we know?

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    Plants are the basis of life on earth. We cannot overemphasize their importance. The value of plant genome initiatives is self-evident. The need is to identify priorities for action. The angiosperm genome is highly variable, but the extent of this variability is unknown. Uncertainties remain about the number of genes and the number of species living. Many plants will become extinct before they are discovered. We risk losing both genes and vital information about plant uses. There are also major gaps in our karyotypic knowledge. No chromosome count exists for >70% of angiosperm species. DNA C values are known for only ≈1% of angiosperms, a sample unrepresentative of the global flora. Researchers reported new relationships between genome size and characters of major interest for plant breeding and the environment and the need for more data. In 1997, a Royal Botanic Gardens Kew workshop identified gaps and planned international collaboration to fill them. An electronic version of the Angiosperm DNA C value database also was published. Another initiative, which will make a very significant contribution to the conservation of plant genetic diversity on a global scale is Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank, partly funded by the U.K. Millennium Commission, celebrating the year 2000. Costing up to £80 million (£1 = $1.62), its main aims are to collect and conserve the seed of almost all of the U.K. spermatophyte flora by the year 2000, to collect and conserve a further 10% of the world spermatophyte flora principally from the drylands by 2009, and to provide a world class building as the focus of this activity by 2000. PMID:9482826

  7. Nontransgenic Genome Modification in Plant Cells1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Ira; Zuker, Amir; Shklarman, Elena; Zeevi, Vardit; Tovkach, Andrey; Roffe, Suzy; Ovadis, Marianna; Tzfira, Tzvi; Vainstein, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a powerful tool for genome editing in eukaryotic cells. ZFNs have been used for targeted mutagenesis in model and crop species. In animal and human cells, transient ZFN expression is often achieved by direct gene transfer into the target cells. Stable transformation, however, is the preferred method for gene expression in plant species, and ZFN-expressing transgenic plants have been used for recovery of mutants that are likely to be classified as transgenic due to the use of direct gene-transfer methods into the target cells. Here we present an alternative, nontransgenic approach for ZFN delivery and production of mutant plants using a novel Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based expression system for indirect transient delivery of ZFNs into a variety of tissues and cells of intact plants. TRV systemically infected its hosts and virus ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis could be clearly observed in newly developed infected tissues as measured by activation of a mutated reporter transgene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and petunia (Petunia hybrida) plants. The ability of TRV to move to developing buds and regenerating tissues enabled recovery of mutated tobacco and petunia plants. Sequence analysis and transmission of the mutations to the next generation confirmed the stability of the ZFN-induced genetic changes. Because TRV is an RNA virus that can infect a wide range of plant species, it provides a viable alternative to the production of ZFN-mediated mutants while avoiding the use of direct plant-transformation methods. PMID:20876340

  8. The Comprehensive Phytopathogen Genomics Resource: a web-based resource for data-mining plant pathogen genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, John P.; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric C.; Adhikari, Bishwo N.; Perna, Nicole T.; Tisserat, Ned; Leach, Jan E.; Lévesque, C. André; Buell, C. Robin

    2011-01-01

    The Comprehensive Phytopathogen Genomics Resource (CPGR) provides a web-based portal for plant pathologists and diagnosticians to view the genome and trancriptome sequence status of 806 bacterial, fungal, oomycete, nematode, viral and viroid plant pathogens. Tools are available to search and analyze annotated genome sequences of 74 bacterial, fungal and oomycete pathogens. Oomycete and fungal genomes are obtained directly from GenBank, whereas bacterial genome sequences are downloaded from the A Systematic Annotation Package (ASAP) database that provides curation of genomes using comparative approaches. Curated lists of bacterial genes relevant to pathogenicity and avirulence are also provided. The Plant Pathogen Transcript Assemblies Database provides annotated assemblies of the transcribed regions of 82 eukaryotic genomes from publicly available single pass Expressed Sequence Tags. Data-mining tools are provided along with tools to create candidate diagnostic markers, an emerging use for genomic sequence data in plant pathology. The Plant Pathogen Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) database is a resource for pathogens that lack genome or transcriptome data sets and contains 131 755 rDNA sequences from GenBank for 17 613 species identified as plant pathogens and related genera. Database URL: http://cpgr.plantbiology.msu.edu. PMID:22120664

  9. Investigation of terpene diversification across multiple sequenced plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Boutanaev, Alexander M; Moses, Tessa; Zi, Jiachen; Nelson, David R; Mugford, Sam T; Peters, Reuben J; Osbourn, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce an array of specialized metabolites, including chemicals that are important as medicines, flavors, fragrances, pigments and insecticides. The vast majority of this metabolic diversity is untapped. Here we take a systematic approach toward dissecting genetic components of plant specialized metabolism. Focusing on the terpenes, the largest class of plant natural products, we investigate the basis of terpene diversity through analysis of multiple sequenced plant genomes. The primary drivers of terpene diversification are terpenoid synthase (TS) "signature" enzymes (which generate scaffold diversity), and cytochromes P450 (CYPs), which modify and further diversify these scaffolds, so paving the way for further downstream modifications. Our systematic search of sequenced plant genomes for all TS and CYP genes reveals that distinct TS/CYP gene pairs are found together far more commonly than would be expected by chance, and that certain TS/CYP pairings predominate, providing signals for key events that are likely to have shaped terpene diversity. We recover TS/CYP gene pairs for previously characterized terpene metabolic gene clusters and demonstrate new functional pairing of TSs and CYPs within previously uncharacterized clusters. Unexpectedly, we find evidence for different mechanisms of pathway assembly in eudicots and monocots; in the former, microsyntenic blocks of TS/CYP gene pairs duplicate and provide templates for the evolution of new pathways, whereas in the latter, new pathways arise by mixing and matching of individual TS and CYP genes through dynamic genome rearrangements. This is, to our knowledge, the first documented observation of the unique pattern of TS and CYP assembly in eudicots and monocots. PMID:25502595

  10. Investigation of terpene diversification across multiple sequenced plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    Boutanaev, Alexander M.; Moses, Tessa; Zi, Jiachen; Nelson, David R.; Mugford, Sam T.; Peters, Reuben J.; Osbourn, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce an array of specialized metabolites, including chemicals that are important as medicines, flavors, fragrances, pigments and insecticides. The vast majority of this metabolic diversity is untapped. Here we take a systematic approach toward dissecting genetic components of plant specialized metabolism. Focusing on the terpenes, the largest class of plant natural products, we investigate the basis of terpene diversity through analysis of multiple sequenced plant genomes. The primary drivers of terpene diversification are terpenoid synthase (TS) “signature” enzymes (which generate scaffold diversity), and cytochromes P450 (CYPs), which modify and further diversify these scaffolds, so paving the way for further downstream modifications. Our systematic search of sequenced plant genomes for all TS and CYP genes reveals that distinct TS/CYP gene pairs are found together far more commonly than would be expected by chance, and that certain TS/CYP pairings predominate, providing signals for key events that are likely to have shaped terpene diversity. We recover TS/CYP gene pairs for previously characterized terpene metabolic gene clusters and demonstrate new functional pairing of TSs and CYPs within previously uncharacterized clusters. Unexpectedly, we find evidence for different mechanisms of pathway assembly in eudicots and monocots; in the former, microsyntenic blocks of TS/CYP gene pairs duplicate and provide templates for the evolution of new pathways, whereas in the latter, new pathways arise by mixing and matching of individual TS and CYP genes through dynamic genome rearrangements. This is, to our knowledge, the first documented observation of the unique pattern of TS and CYP assembly in eudicots and monocots. PMID:25502595

  11. HORIZON SENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    With the aid of a DOE grant (No. DE-FC26-01NT41050), Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) developed the Horizon Sensor (HS) to distinguish between the different layers of a coal seam. Mounted on mining machine cutter drums, HS units can detect or sense the horizon between the coal seam and the roof and floor rock, providing the opportunity to accurately mine the section of the seam most desired. HS also enables accurate cutting of minimum height if that is the operator's objective. Often when cutting is done out-of-seam, the head-positioning function facilitates a fixed mining height to minimize dilution. With this technology, miners can still be at a remote location, yet cut only the clean coal, resulting in a much more efficient overall process. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate the feasibility of horizon sensing on mining machines and demonstrate that Horizon Sensing can allow coal to be cut cleaner and more efficiently. Stolar's primary goal was to develop the Horizon Sensor (HS) into an enabling technology for full or partial automation or ''agile mining''. This technical innovation (R&D 100 Award Winner) is quickly demonstrating improvements in productivity and miner safety at several prominent coal mines in the United States. In addition, the HS system can enable the cutting of cleaner coal. Stolar has driven the HS program on the philosophy that cutting cleaner coal means burning cleaner coal. The sensor, located inches from the cutting bits, is based upon the physics principles of a Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA). When it is in proximity of the rock-coal interface, the RMPA impedance varies depending on the thickness of uncut coal. The impedance is measured by the computer-controlled electronics and then sent by radio waves to the mining machine. The worker at the machine can read the data via a Graphical User Interface, displaying a color-coded image of the coal being cut, and direct the machine appropriately. The Horizon Sensor

  12. Crop Improvement through Modification of the Plant's Own Genome

    PubMed Central

    Rommens, Caius M.; Humara, Jaime M.; Ye, Jingsong; Yan, Hua; Richael, Craig; Zhang, Lynda; Perry, Rachel; Swords, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering has, until now, relied on the incorporation of foreign DNA into plant genomes. Public concern about the extent to which transgenic crops differ from their traditionally bred counterparts has resulted in molecular strategies and gene choices that limit, but not eliminate, the introduction of foreign DNA. Here, we demonstrate that a plant-derived (P-) DNA fragment can be used to replace the universally employed Agrobacterium transfer (T-) DNA. Marker-free P-DNAs are transferred to plant cell nuclei together with conventional T-DNAs carrying a selectable marker gene. By subsequently linking a positive selection for temporary marker gene expression to a negative selection against marker gene integration, 29% of derived regeneration events contain P-DNA insertions but lack any copies of the T-DNA. Further refinements are accomplished by employing Ω-mutated virD2 and isopentenyl transferase cytokinin genes to impair T-DNA integration and select against backbone integration, respectively. The presented methods are used to produce hundreds of marker-free and backbone-free potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants displaying reduced expression of a tuber-specific polyphenol oxidase gene in potato. The modified plants represent the first example of genetically engineered plants that only contain native DNA. PMID:15133156

  13. Killing Horizons Kill Horizon Degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamin, L.; Grumiller, D.

    Frequently, it is argued that the microstates responsible for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy should arise from some physical degrees of freedom located near or on the black hole horizon. In this essay, we elucidate that instead entropy may emerge from the conversion of physical degrees of freedom, attached to a generic boundary, into unobservable gauge degrees of freedom attached to the horizon. By constructing the reduced phase space, it can be demonstrated that such a transmutation indeed takes place for a large class of black holes, including Schwarzschild.

  14. Telling plant species apart with DNA: from barcodes to genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Zhu; van der Bank, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Land plants underpin a multitude of ecosystem functions, support human livelihoods and represent a critically important component of terrestrial biodiversity—yet many tens of thousands of species await discovery, and plant identification remains a substantial challenge, especially where material is juvenile, fragmented or processed. In this opinion article, we tackle two main topics. Firstly, we provide a short summary of the strengths and limitations of plant DNA barcoding for addressing these issues. Secondly, we discuss options for enhancing current plant barcodes, focusing on increasing discriminatory power via either gene capture of nuclear markers or genome skimming. The former has the advantage of establishing a defined set of target loci maximizing efficiency of sequencing effort, data storage and analysis. The challenge is developing a probe set for large numbers of nuclear markers that works over sufficient phylogenetic breadth. Genome skimming has the advantage of using existing protocols and being backward compatible with existing barcodes; and the depth of sequence coverage can be increased as sequencing costs fall. Its non-targeted nature does, however, present a major informatics challenge for upscaling to large sample sets. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481790

  15. Enhancement of Plant Productivity in the Post-Genomics Era.

    PubMed

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Tran, Vietnam Lam-Son Phan

    2016-08-01

    and larger scale. In their article, Onda and Mochida detailed how to use these technologies in fully characterizing the genetic diversity or multigenecity within a particular plant species. The authors discussed the constant innovation of sequencing platforms which has made sequencing technologies become more superior and more powerful than ever before. Additionally, the efforts result in not only further cut down of the sequencing cost and increase in the sequencing speed, but also improvement in sequencing accuracy and extended sequencing application to studies at both DNA and RNA levels. Such knowledge will help the scientists interpret, at least partially, how plants can adapt to various environmental conditions, or how different cultivars can respond differently to the same stress. Another article by Ong et al. also laid emphasis on the importance of various high-throughput sequencing platforms, thanks to which a large number of genomic databases supplied with detailed annotation and useful bioinformatics tools have been established to assist geneticists. Readers can find in this review the summary of available plant-specific genomic databases up-to-date and popular web-based resources that are relevant for comparative genomics, plant evolution and phylogenomics studies. These, along with other approaches, such as quantitative trait locus and genome-wide association study, will lay foundation for prediction and identification of genes or alleles responsible for valuable agronomic traits, contributing to the enhancement of plant productivity by genetic engineering approach. In this thematic issue, specific examples for crop improvement are also demonstrated. The first showcase is given by Nongpiur et al. who provided evidence that synergistic employment of genomics approaches and high-throughput gene expression methods have aided in dissecting the salinity-responsive signaling pathway, identifying genes involved in the stress response and selecting candidate genes

  16. Telling plant species apart with DNA: from barcodes to genomes.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Peter M; Li, De-Zhu; van der Bank, Michelle; Twyford, Alex D

    2016-09-01

    Land plants underpin a multitude of ecosystem functions, support human livelihoods and represent a critically important component of terrestrial biodiversity-yet many tens of thousands of species await discovery, and plant identification remains a substantial challenge, especially where material is juvenile, fragmented or processed. In this opinion article, we tackle two main topics. Firstly, we provide a short summary of the strengths and limitations of plant DNA barcoding for addressing these issues. Secondly, we discuss options for enhancing current plant barcodes, focusing on increasing discriminatory power via either gene capture of nuclear markers or genome skimming. The former has the advantage of establishing a defined set of target loci maximizing efficiency of sequencing effort, data storage and analysis. The challenge is developing a probe set for large numbers of nuclear markers that works over sufficient phylogenetic breadth. Genome skimming has the advantage of using existing protocols and being backward compatible with existing barcodes; and the depth of sequence coverage can be increased as sequencing costs fall. Its non-targeted nature does, however, present a major informatics challenge for upscaling to large sample sets.This article is part of the themed issue 'From DNA barcodes to biomes'. PMID:27481790

  17. The PlantsP and PlantsT Functional Genomics Databases.

    PubMed

    Tchieu, Jason H; Fana, Fariba; Fink, J Lynn; Harper, Jeffrey; Nair, T Murlidharan; Niedner, R Hannes; Smith, Douglas W; Steube, Kenneth; Tam, Tobey M; Veretnik, Stella; Wang, Degeng; Gribskov, Michael

    2003-01-01

    PlantsP and PlantsT allow users to quickly gain a global understanding of plant phosphoproteins and plant membrane transporters, respectively, from evolutionary relationships to biochemical function as well as a deep understanding of the molecular biology of individual genes and their products. As one database with two functionally different web interfaces, PlantsP and PlantsT are curated plant-specific databases that combine sequence-derived information with experimental functional-genomics data. PlantsP focuses on proteins involved in the phosphorylation process (i.e., kinases and phosphatases), whereas PlantsT focuses on membrane transport proteins. Experimentally, PlantsP provides a resource for information on a collection of T-DNA insertion mutants (knockouts) in each kinase and phosphatase, primarily in Arabidopsis thaliana, and PlantsT uniquely combines experimental data regarding mineral composition (derived from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy) of mutant and wild-type strains. Both databases provide extensive information on motifs and domains, detailed information contributed by individual experts in their respective fields, and descriptive information drawn directly from the literature. The databases incorporate a unique user annotation and review feature aimed at acquiring expert annotation directly from the plant biology community. PlantsP is available at http://plantsp.sdsc.edu and PlantsT is available at http://plantst.sdsc.edu. PMID:12520018

  18. De novo prediction of the genomic components and capabilities for microbial plant biomass degradation from (meta-)genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the biological mechanisms used by microorganisms for plant biomass degradation is of considerable biotechnological interest. Despite of the growing number of sequenced (meta)genomes of plant biomass-degrading microbes, there is currently no technique for the systematic determination of the genomic components of this process from these data. Results We describe a computational method for the discovery of the protein domains and CAZy families involved in microbial plant biomass degradation. Our method furthermore accurately predicts the capability to degrade plant biomass for microbial species from their genome sequences. Application to a large, manually curated data set of microbial degraders and non-degraders identified gene families of enzymes known by physiological and biochemical tests to be implicated in cellulose degradation, such as GH5 and GH6. Additionally, genes of enzymes that degrade other plant polysaccharides, such as hemicellulose, pectins and oligosaccharides, were found, as well as gene families which have not previously been related to the process. For draft genomes reconstructed from a cow rumen metagenome our method predicted Bacteroidetes-affiliated species and a relative to a known plant biomass degrader to be plant biomass degraders. This was supported by the presence of genes encoding enzymatically active glycoside hydrolases in these genomes. Conclusions Our results show the potential of the method for generating novel insights into microbial plant biomass degradation from (meta-)genome data, where there is an increasing production of genome assemblages for uncultured microbes. PMID:23414703

  19. Genomic organization of plant terpene synthases and molecular evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, S C; Croteau, R B

    2001-01-01

    Terpenoids are the largest, most diverse class of plant natural products and they play numerous functional roles in primary metabolism and in ecological interactions. The first committed step in the formation of the various terpenoid classes is the transformation of the prenyl diphosphate precursors, geranyl diphosphate, farnesyl diphosphate, and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, to the parent structures of each type catalyzed by the respective monoterpene (C(10)), sesquiterpene (C(15)), and diterpene synthases (C(20)). Over 30 cDNAs encoding plant terpenoid synthases involved in primary and secondary metabolism have been cloned and characterized. Here we describe the isolation and analysis of six genomic clones encoding terpene synthases of conifers, [(-)-pinene (C(10)), (-)-limonene (C(10)), (E)-alpha-bisabolene (C(15)), delta-selinene (C(15)), and abietadiene synthase (C(20)) from Abies grandis and taxadiene synthase (C(20)) from Taxus brevifolia], all of which are involved in natural products biosynthesis. Genome organization (intron number, size, placement and phase, and exon size) of these gymnosperm terpene synthases was compared to eight previously characterized angiosperm terpene synthase genes and to six putative terpene synthase genomic sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana. Three distinct classes of terpene synthase genes were discerned, from which assumed patterns of sequential intron loss and the loss of an unusual internal sequence element suggest that the ancestral terpenoid synthase gene resembled a contemporary conifer diterpene synthase gene in containing at least 12 introns and 13 exons of conserved size. A model presented for the evolutionary history of plant terpene synthases suggests that this superfamily of genes responsible for natural products biosynthesis derived from terpene synthase genes involved in primary metabolism by duplication and divergence in structural and functional specialization. This novel molecular evolutionary approach focused

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata.

    PubMed

    Han, Limin; Chen, Chen; Wang, Bin; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Pinellia ternata is an important medicinal plant used in the treatment of cough, to dispel phlegm, to calm vomiting and to terminate early pregnancy, as an anti-ulcer and anti-tumor medicine. In this study, we found that the complete chloroplast genome of Pinellia ternata was 164 013 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 625 bp separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 89 783 bp and 22 980 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 132 predicted functional genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes. The chloroplast DNA is GC-rich (36.7%). The phylogenetic analysis showed a strong sister relationship with Colocasia esculenta, which also strongly supports the position of Pinellia ternata. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pinellia ternata reported here has the potential to advance population and phylogenetic studies of this medicinal plant. PMID:26153849

  1. The Plant Genome Integrative Explorer Resource: PlantGenIE.org.

    PubMed

    Sundell, David; Mannapperuma, Chanaka; Netotea, Sergiu; Delhomme, Nicolas; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Sjödin, Andreas; Van de Peer, Yves; Jansson, Stefan; Hvidsten, Torgeir R; Street, Nathaniel R

    2015-12-01

    Accessing and exploring large-scale genomics data sets remains a significant challenge to researchers without specialist bioinformatics training. We present the integrated PlantGenIE.org platform for exploration of Populus, conifer and Arabidopsis genomics data, which includes expression networks and associated visualization tools. Standard features of a model organism database are provided, including genome browsers, gene list annotation, Blast homology searches and gene information pages. Community annotation updating is supported via integration of WebApollo. We have produced an RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) expression atlas for Populus tremula and have integrated these data within the expression tools. An updated version of the ComPlEx resource for performing comparative plant expression analyses of gene coexpression network conservation between species has also been integrated. The PlantGenIE.org platform provides intuitive access to large-scale and genome-wide genomics data from model forest tree species, facilitating both community contributions to annotation improvement and tools supporting use of the included data resources to inform biological insight. PMID:26192091

  2. Plant Ion Channels: Gene Families, Physiology, and Functional Genomics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John M.; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Distinct potassium, anion, and calcium channels in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane of plant cells have been identified and characterized by patch clamping. Primarily owing to advances in Arabidopsis genetics and genomics, and yeast functional complementation, many of the corresponding genes have been identified. Recent advances in our understanding of ion channel genes that mediate signal transduction and ion transport are discussed here. Some plant ion channels, for example, ALMT and SLAC anion channel subunits, are unique. The majority of plant ion channel families exhibit homology to animal genes; such families include both hyperpolarization-and depolarization-activated Shaker-type potassium channels, CLC chloride transporters/channels, cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptor homologs. These plant ion channels offer unique opportunities to analyze the structural mechanisms and functions of ion channels. Here we review gene families of selected plant ion channel classes and discuss unique structure-function aspects and their physiological roles in plant cell signaling and transport. PMID:18842100

  3. Applications of CPPs in Genome Modulation of Plants.

    PubMed

    Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Pepper, Jordan; Eudes, François

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a class of short peptides that are known to translocate inside living cells through the cell membrane. Many CPPs show an ability to bind and deliver macromolecular cargoes such as DNA, RNA and protein into living cells, making them excellent transfection and transduction agents with low cytotoxicity. While their use is well established in mammalian cell systems, they have also been explored in the last decade as transfection agents in plant cells. Their efficacy has been demonstrated in both monocot and dicot clades as well as a variety of tissues and cell cultures, from leaves to protoplasts. Factors affecting CPP and CPP-cargo uptake have been addressed with specific attention to the plant cell wall and classes of CPPs utilized in plant cell systems. It has been shown that internalization of most free peptides in plant cells has been dominated by direct translocation across the cell membrane, while CPP-macromolecular cargo complexes and conjugates were translocated via macropinocytosis. Moreover, functionalization of CPPs resulted in generation of peptides with specialized cargo delivery attributes, e.g., for specific subcellular targeting. Thus, the use of CPPs in plants presents a promising method for plant transgenesis as well as genome regulation and modification. PMID:26202286

  4. Genomic and genotoxic responses to controlled weathered-oil exposures confirm and extend field studies on impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on native killifish.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Whitney; Miles, Scott; Tang, Song; Mayer, Greg; Whitehead, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    To understand the ecotoxicological impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, field studies provide a context for ecological realism but laboratory-based studies offer power for connecting biological effects with specific causes. As a complement to field studies, we characterized genome-wide gene expression responses of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) to oil-contaminated waters in controlled laboratory exposures. Transcriptional responses to the highest concentrations of oiled water in the laboratory were predictive of field-observed responses that coincided with the timing and location of major oiling. The transcriptional response to the low concentration (∼ 10-fold lower than the high concentration) was distinct from the high concentration and was not predictive of major oiling in the field. The high concentration response was characterized by activation of the molecular signaling pathway that facilitates oil metabolism and oil toxicity. The high concentration also induced DNA damage. The low concentration invoked expression of genes that may support a compensatory response, including genes associated with regulation of transcription, cell cycle progression, RNA processing, DNA damage, and apoptosis. We conclude that the gene expression response detected in the field was a robust indicator of exposure to the toxic components of contaminating oil, that animals in the field were exposed to relatively high concentrations that are especially damaging to early life stages, and that such exposures can damage DNA. PMID:25208076

  5. Genomic and Genotoxic Responses to Controlled Weathered-Oil Exposures Confirm and Extend Field Studies on Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Native Killifish

    PubMed Central

    Pilcher, Whitney; Miles, Scott; Tang, Song; Mayer, Greg; Whitehead, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    To understand the ecotoxicological impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, field studies provide a context for ecological realism but laboratory-based studies offer power for connecting biological effects with specific causes. As a complement to field studies, we characterized genome-wide gene expression responses of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) to oil-contaminated waters in controlled laboratory exposures. Transcriptional responses to the highest concentrations of oiled water in the laboratory were predictive of field-observed responses that coincided with the timing and location of major oiling. The transcriptional response to the low concentration (∼10-fold lower than the high concentration) was distinct from the high concentration and was not predictive of major oiling in the field. The high concentration response was characterized by activation of the molecular signaling pathway that facilitates oil metabolism and oil toxicity. The high concentration also induced DNA damage. The low concentration invoked expression of genes that may support a compensatory response, including genes associated with regulation of transcription, cell cycle progression, RNA processing, DNA damage, and apoptosis. We conclude that the gene expression response detected in the field was a robust indicator of exposure to the toxic components of contaminating oil, that animals in the field were exposed to relatively high concentrations that are especially damaging to early life stages, and that such exposures can damage DNA. PMID:25208076

  6. RSAT::Plants: Motif Discovery Within Clusters of Upstream Sequences in Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Castro-Mondragon, Jaime A; Rioualen, Claire; Cantalapiedra, Carlos P; van Helden, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The plant-dedicated mirror of the Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools (RSAT, http://plants.rsat.eu ) offers specialized options for researchers dealing with plant transcriptional regulation. The website contains whole-sequenced genomes from species regularly updated from Ensembl Plants and other sources (currently 40), and supports an array of tasks frequently required for the analysis of regulatory sequences, such as retrieving upstream sequences, motif discovery, motif comparison, and pattern matching. RSAT::Plants also integrates the footprintDB collection of DNA motifs. This protocol explains step-by-step how to discover DNA motifs in regulatory regions of clusters of co-expressed genes in plants. It also explains how to empirically control the significance of the result, and how to associate the discovered motifs with putative binding factors. PMID:27557774

  7. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    PubMed

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  8. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS006.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Bernal, Johan F; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:26607897

  9. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS006

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Bernal, Johan F.; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:26607897

  10. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  11. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  12. Genomics and Evolution in Traditional Medicinal Plants: Road to a Healthier Life

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Da-Cheng; Xiao, Pei-Gen

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants have long been utilized in traditional medicine and ethnomedicine worldwide. This review presents a glimpse of the current status of and future trends in medicinal plant genomics, evolution, and phylogeny. These dynamic fields are at the intersection of phytochemistry and plant biology and are concerned with the evolution mechanisms and systematics of medicinal plant genomes, origin and evolution of the plant genotype and metabolic phenotype, interaction between medicinal plant genomes and their environment, the correlation between genomic diversity and metabolite diversity, and so on. Use of the emerging high-end genomic technologies can be expanded from crop plants to traditional medicinal plants, in order to expedite medicinal plant breeding and transform them into living factories of medicinal compounds. The utility of molecular phylogeny and phylogenomics in predicting chemodiversity and bioprospecting is also highlighted within the context of natural-product-based drug discovery and development. Representative case studies of medicinal plant genome, phylogeny, and evolution are summarized to exemplify the expansion of knowledge pedigree and the paradigm shift to the omics-based approaches, which update our awareness about plant genome evolution and enable the molecular breeding of medicinal plants and the sustainable utilization of plant pharmaceutical resources. PMID:26461812

  13. The Plant Ontology as a Tool for Comparative Plant Anatomy and Genomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Laurel; Walls, Ramona L.; Elser, Justin; Gandolfo, Maria A.; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Smith, Barry; Preece, Justin; Athreya, Balaji; Mungall, Christopher J.; Rensing, Stefan; Hiss, Manuel; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Li, Donghui; Huala, Eva; Schaeffer, Mary; Menda, Naama; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Shrestha, Rosemary; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary (‘ontology’) of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of the PO has been expanded to include all green plants. The PO was the first multispecies anatomy ontology developed for the annotation of genes and phenotypes. Also, to our knowledge, it was one of the first biological ontologies that provides translations (via synonyms) in non-English languages such as Japanese and Spanish. As of Release #18 (July 2012), there are about 2.2 million annotations linking PO terms to >110,000 unique data objects representing genes or gene models, proteins, RNAs, germplasm and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from 22 plant species. In this paper, we focus on the plant anatomical entity branch of the PO, describing the organizing principles, resources available to users and examples of how the PO is integrated into other plant genomics databases and web portals. We also provide two examples of comparative analyses, demonstrating how the ontology structure and PO-annotated data can be used to discover the patterns of expression of the LEAFY (LFY) and terpene synthase (TPS) gene homologs. PMID:23220694

  14. Ecological genetics and genomics of plant defenses: Evidence and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jill T.; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Summary Herbivores exert significant selection on plants, and plants have evolved a variety of constitutive and inducible defenses to resist and tolerate herbivory. Assessing the genetic mechanisms that influence defenses against herbivores will deepen our understanding of the evolution of essential phenotypic traits. Ecogenomics is a powerful interdisciplinary approach that can address fundamental questions about the ecology and evolutionary biology of species, such as: which evolutionary forces maintain variation within a population? and What is the genetic architecture of adaptation? This field seeks to identify gene regions that influence ecologically-important traits, assess the fitness consequences under natural conditions of alleles at key quantitative trait loci (QTLs), and test how the abiotic and biotic environment affects gene expression. Here, we review ecogenomics techniques and emphasize how this framework can address long-standing and emerging questions relating to anti-herbivore defenses in plants. For example, ecogenomics tools can be used to investigate: inducible vs. constitutive defenses; tradeoffs between resistance and tolerance; adaptation to the local herbivore community; selection on alleles that confer resistance and tolerance in natural populations; and whether different genes are activated in response to specialist vs. generalist herbivores and to different types of damage. Ecogenomic studies can be conducted with model species, such as Arabidopsis, or their relatives, in which case myriad molecular tools are already available. Burgeoning sequence data will also facilitate ecogenomic studies of non-model species. Throughout this paper, we highlight approaches that are particularly suitable for ecological studies of non-model organisms, discuss the benefits and disadvantages of specific techniques, and review bioinformatic tools for analyzing data. We focus on established and promising techniques, such as QTL mapping with pedigreed

  15. High-throughput comparison, functional annotation, and metabolic modeling of plant genomes using the PlantSEED resource.

    PubMed

    Seaver, Samuel M D; Gerdes, Svetlana; Frelin, Océane; Lerma-Ortiz, Claudia; Bradbury, Louis M T; Zallot, Rémi; Hasnain, Ghulam; Niehaus, Thomas D; El Yacoubi, Basma; Pasternak, Shiran; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon; Overbeek, Ross; Stevens, Rick; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Ware, Doreen; Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S

    2014-07-01

    The increasing number of sequenced plant genomes is placing new demands on the methods applied to analyze, annotate, and model these genomes. Today's annotation pipelines result in inconsistent gene assignments that complicate comparative analyses and prevent efficient construction of metabolic models. To overcome these problems, we have developed the PlantSEED, an integrated, metabolism-centric database to support subsystems-based annotation and metabolic model reconstruction for plant genomes. PlantSEED combines SEED subsystems technology, first developed for microbial genomes, with refined protein families and biochemical data to assign fully consistent functional annotations to orthologous genes, particularly those encoding primary metabolic pathways. Seamless integration with its parent, the prokaryotic SEED database, makes PlantSEED a unique environment for cross-kingdom comparative analysis of plant and bacterial genomes. The consistent annotations imposed by PlantSEED permit rapid reconstruction and modeling of primary metabolism for all plant genomes in the database. This feature opens the unique possibility of model-based assessment of the completeness and accuracy of gene annotation and thus allows computational identification of genes and pathways that are restricted to certain genomes or need better curation. We demonstrate the PlantSEED system by producing consistent annotations for 10 reference genomes. We also produce a functioning metabolic model for each genome, gapfilling to identify missing annotations and proposing gene candidates for missing annotations. Models are built around an extended biomass composition representing the most comprehensive published to date. To our knowledge, our models are the first to be published for seven of the genomes analyzed. PMID:24927599

  16. Genomic resources for valuable woody ornamental landscape plants such as hydrangea macrophylla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New and improved ornamental landscape plants are typically produced by conventional breeding. Unfortunately, long generation times for woody plants can significantly slow progress. Incorporating genomic and biotechnology resources provides more information when designing breeding strategies and ac...

  17. Lifestyles of the effector-rich: genome-enabled characterization of bacterial plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome sequencing of bacterial plant pathogens is providing transformative insights into the complex network of molecular plant-microbe interactions mediated by extracellular effectors during pathogenesis. Bacterial pathogens sequenced to completion are phylogenetically diverse and vary significant...

  18. The methylation status of plant genomic DNA influences PCR efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, K V; Dubrovina, A S; Tyunin, A P

    2015-03-01

    During the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is a versatile and widely used method, certain DNA sequences are rapidly amplified through thermocycling. Although there are numerous protocols of PCR optimization for different applications, little is known about the effect of DNA modifications, such as DNA methylation, on PCR efficiency. Recent studies show that cytosine methylation alters DNA mechanical properties and suggest that DNA methylation may directly or indirectly influence the effectiveness of DNA amplification during PCR. In the present study, using plant DNA, we found that highly methylated plant DNA genomic regions were amplified with lower efficiencies compared to that for the regions methylated at a lower level. The correlation was observed when amplifying stilbene synthase (STS1, STS10) genes of Vitis amurensis, the Actin2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana, the internal transcribed spacer (AtITS), and tRNAPro of A. thaliana. The level of DNA methylation within the analyzed DNA regions has been analyzed with bisulfite sequencing. The obtained data show that efficient PCRs of highly methylated plant DNA regions can be hampered. Proteinase K treatment of the plant DNA prior to PCR and using HotTaq DNA polymerase improved amplification of the highly methylated plant DNA regions. We suggest that increased DNA denaturation temperatures of the highly methylated DNA and contamination with DNA-binding proteins contribute to the hampered PCR amplification of highly methylated DNA. The data show that it is necessary to use current DNA purification protocols and commercial kits with caution to ensure appropriate PCR product yield and prevent bias toward unmethylated DNA amplification in PCRs. PMID:25506767

  19. Research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yunsheng, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Population genomics, a new paradigm for population genetics, combine the concepts and techniques of genomics with the theoretical system of population genetics and improve our understanding of microevolution through identification of site-specific effect and genome-wide effects using genome-wide polymorphic sites genotypeing. With the appearance and improvement of the next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, the numbers of plant species with complete genome sequences increased rapidly and large scale resequencing has also been carried out in recent years. Parallel sequencing has also been done in some plant species without complete genome sequences. These studies have greatly promoted the development of population genomics and deepened our understanding of the genetic diversity, level of linking disequilibium, selection effect, demographical history and molecular mechanism of complex traits of relevant plant population at a genomic level. In this review, I briely introduced the concept and research methods of population genomics and summarized the research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing. I also discussed the prospect as well as existing problems of plant population genomics in order to provide references for related studies. PMID:27531607

  20. Genome sequences of Phytophthora enable translational plant disease management and accelerate research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole and partial genome sequences are becoming available at an ever-increasing pace. For many plant pathogen systems, we are moving into the era of genome resequencing. The first Phytophthora genomes, P. ramorum and P. sojae, became available in 2004, followed shortly by P. infestans in 2006. Ava...

  1. Genome-scale computational analysis of DNA curvature and repeats in Arabidopsis and rice uncovers plant-specific genomic properties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to its overarching role in genome function, sequence-dependent DNA curvature continues to attract great attention. The DNA double helix is not a rigid cylinder, but presents both curvature and flexibility in different regions, depending on the sequence. More in depth knowledge of the various orders of complexity of genomic DNA structure has allowed the design of sophisticated bioinformatics tools for its analysis and manipulation, which, in turn, have yielded a better understanding of the genome itself. Curved DNA is involved in many biologically important processes, such as transcription initiation and termination, recombination, DNA replication, and nucleosome positioning. CpG islands and tandem repeats also play significant roles in the dynamics and evolution of genomes. Results In this study, we analyzed the relationship between these three structural features within rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genomes. A genome-scale prediction of curvature distribution in rice and Arabidopsis indicated that most of the chromosomes of both genomes have maximal chromosomal DNA curvature adjacent to the centromeric region. By analyzing tandem repeats across the genome, we found that frequencies of repeats are higher in regions adjacent to those with high curvature value. Further analysis of CpG islands shows a clear interdependence between curvature value, repeat frequencies and CpG islands. Each CpG island appears in a local minimal curvature region, and CpG islands usually do not appear in the centromere or regions with high repeat frequency. A statistical evaluation demonstrates the significance and non-randomness of these features. Conclusions This study represents the first systematic genome-scale analysis of DNA curvature, CpG islands and tandem repeats at the DNA sequence level in plant genomes, and finds that not all of the chromosomes in plants follow the same rules common to other eukaryote organisms, suggesting that some

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ying-Ning; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia. PMID:26564046

  3. Genome Sequence of Amycolatopsis sp Strain ATCC 39116, a Plant Biomass-Degrading Actinomycete

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K.

    2012-01-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals.

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. celebensis Isolated from Banana Plants

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, James; Grant, Murray R.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the annotated draft genome sequences of strains Xanthomonas arboricola pv. celebensis NCPPB 1832 and NCPPB 1630 (NCPPB, National Collection of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria), both isolated from Musa species in New Zealand. This will allow the comparison of genomes between phylogenetically distant xanthomonads that have independently converged with the ability to colonize banana plants. PMID:26868395

  5. Genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain ATCC 39116, a plant biomass-degrading actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer R; Goodwin, Lynne A; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K

    2012-05-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals. PMID:22493203

  6. SUMMER RESEARCH INTERNSHIPS IN PLANT GENOME RESEARCH FOR AMERICAN INDIANS AT IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The involvement of American Indian students and researchers in plant genome research is minimal. In an effort to increase their representation in the research community, we are offering a summer program to mentor seven American Indian undergraduates in plant genomics research. Students selected to...

  7. The NSF Plant Genome Research Outreach Program for American Indians at Iowa State University

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The involvement of Native American students and researchers in plant genome research is minimal. In an effort to increase their representation in the research community, a summer program to mentor Native American/American Indian undergraduates in plant genomics research has begun on the Iowa State U...

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. celebensis Isolated from Banana Plants.

    PubMed

    Harrison, James; Grant, Murray R; Studholme, David J

    2016-01-01

    We report here the annotated draft genome sequences of strains Xanthomonas arboricola pv. celebensis NCPPB 1832 and NCPPB 1630 (NCPPB, National Collection of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria), both isolated from Musa species in New Zealand. This will allow the comparison of genomes between phylogenetically distant xanthomonads that have independently converged with the ability to colonize banana plants. PMID:26868395

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ying-Ning

    2015-01-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia. PMID:26564046

  10. The two-speed genomes of filamentous pathogens: waltz with plants.

    PubMed

    Dong, Suomeng; Raffaele, Sylvain; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-12-01

    Fungi and oomycetes include deep and diverse lineages of eukaryotic plant pathogens. The last 10 years have seen the sequencing of the genomes of a multitude of species of these so-called filamentous plant pathogens. Already, fundamental concepts have emerged. Filamentous plant pathogen genomes tend to harbor large repertoires of genes encoding virulence effectors that modulate host plant processes. Effector genes are not randomly distributed across the genomes but tend to be associated with compartments enriched in repetitive sequences and transposable elements. These findings have led to the 'two-speed genome' model in which filamentous pathogen genomes have a bipartite architecture with gene sparse, repeat rich compartments serving as a cradle for adaptive evolution. Here, we review this concept and discuss how plant pathogens are great model systems to study evolutionary adaptations at multiple time scales. We will also introduce the next phase of research on this topic. PMID:26451981

  11. Complete genome sequence of the plant-associated Serratia plymuthica strain AS13

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Roger D.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Goodwin, Lynne; Alström, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Held, Brittany; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Tapia, Roxanne; Hauser, Loren; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Högberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica AS13 is a plant-associated Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of special interest because of its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The complete genome of S. plymuthica AS13 consists of a 5,442,549 bp circular chromosome. The chromosome contains 4,951 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced as part of the project entitled “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010). PMID:23450001

  12. Complete genome sequence of the plant-associated Serratia plymuthica strain AS13

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Finlay, Roger D.; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Alstrom, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam L; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Held, Brittany; Han, Cliff; Detter, J C; Tapia, Roxanne; Hauser, Loren John; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hogberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica AS13 is a plant-associated Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of special interest because of its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The complete genome of S. plymuthica AS13 consists of a 5,442,549 bp circular chromosome. The chromosome contains 4,951 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced as part of the project enti- tled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

  13. High-throughput comparison, functional annotation, and metabolic modeling of plant genomes using the PlantSEED resource

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing number of sequenced plant genomes is placing new demands on the methods applied to analyze, annotate, and model these genomes. Today's annotation pipelines result in inconsistent gene assignments that complicate comparative analyses and prevent efficient construction of metabolic mode...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pantoea sp. Strain AS-PWVM4

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Indu; Kaur, Sukhvir; Devi, Usha; Kumar, Navinder; Sharma, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Nonpathogenic Pantoea spp. have been shown to confer biofertilizer and biocontrol activities, indicating their potential for increasing crop yield. Herein, we provide the high-quality genome sequence of Pantoea sp. strain AS-PWVM4, a Gram-negative motile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium isolated from a pomegranate plant. The 4.9-Mb genome contains genes related to plant growth promotion and the synthesis of siderophores. PMID:24309733

  15. The Genome of Selaginella: A Remnant of an Ancient Vascular Plant Lineage (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting, 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Banks, Jody [Purdue University

    2013-01-22

    Jody Banks from Purdue University on "The Genome of Selaginella, a Remnant of an Ancient Vascular Plant Lineage" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  16. The Challenges and Opportunities for Extending Plant Genomics to Climate (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, David

    2013-03-01

    David Weston of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "The challenges and opportunities for extending plant genomics to climate" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. The Genome of Selaginella: A Remnant of an Ancient Vascular Plant Lineage (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting, 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Jody

    2012-03-21

    Jody Banks from Purdue University on "The Genome of Selaginella, a Remnant of an Ancient Vascular Plant Lineage" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  18. New Approaches and Technologies to Sequence de novo Plant reference Genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Jeremy Schmutz of the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology on "New approaches and technologies to sequence de novo plant reference genomes" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  19. Response of salt marshes to oiling from the Deepwater Horizon spill: Implications for plant growth, soil surface-erosion, and shoreline stability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qianxin; Mendelssohn, Irving A; Graham, Sean A; Hou, Aixin; Fleeger, John W; Deis, Donald R

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the initial impacts and post spill recovery of salt marshes over a 3.5-year period along northern Barataria Bay, LA, USA exposed to varying degrees of Deepwater Horizon oiling to determine the effects on shoreline-stabilizing vegetation and soil processes. In moderately oiled marshes, surface soil total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations were ~70mgg(-1) nine months after the spill. Though initial impacts of moderate oiling were evident, Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus aboveground biomass and total live belowground biomass were equivalent to reference marshes within 24-30months post spill. In contrast, heavily oiled marsh plants did not fully recover from oiling with surface soil total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations that exceeded 500mgg(-1) nine months after oiling. Initially, heavy oiling resulted in near complete plant mortality, and subsequent recovery of live aboveground biomass was only 50% of reference marshes 42months after the spill. Heavy oiling also changed the vegetation structure of shoreline marshes from a mixed Spartina-Juncus community to predominantly Spartina; live Spartina aboveground biomass recovered within 2-3years, however, Juncus showed no recovery. In addition, live belowground biomass (0-12cm) in heavily oiled marshes was reduced by 76% three and a half years after the spill. Detrimental effects of heavy oiling on marsh plants also corresponded with significantly lower soil shear strength, lower sedimentation rates, and higher vertical soil-surface erosion rates, thus potentially affecting shoreline salt marsh stability. PMID:27016685

  20. Genomic diversity of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from aerial or root surfaces of plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among the diverse strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas chlororaphis inhabiting plant surfaces are those that protect plants from infection by pathogens. To explore the diversity of these bacteria, we derived genomic sequences of seven strains that suppress plant disease. Along with t...

  1. What can patterns of differentiation across plant genomes tell us about adaptation and speciation?

    PubMed Central

    Strasburg, Jared L.; Sherman, Natasha A.; Wright, Kevin M.; Moyle, Leonie C.; Willis, John H.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2012-01-01

    Genome scans have become a common approach to identify genomic signatures of natural selection and reproductive isolation, as well as the genomic bases of ecologically relevant phenotypes, based on patterns of polymorphism and differentiation among populations or species. Here, we review the results of studies taking genome scan approaches in plants, consider the patterns of genomic differentiation documented and their possible causes, discuss the results in light of recent models of genomic differentiation during divergent adaptation and speciation, and consider assumptions and caveats in their interpretation. We find that genomic regions of high divergence generally appear quite small in comparisons of both closely and more distantly related populations, and for the most part, these differentiated regions are spread throughout the genome rather than strongly clustered. Thus, the genome scan approach appears well-suited for identifying genomic regions or even candidate genes that underlie adaptive divergence and/or reproductive barriers. We consider other methodologies that may be used in conjunction with genome scan approaches, and suggest further developments that would be valuable. These include broader use of sequence-based markers of known genomic location, greater attention to sampling strategies to make use of parallel environmental or phenotypic transitions, more integration with approaches such as quantitative trait loci mapping and measures of gene flow across the genome, and additional theoretical and simulation work on processes related to divergent adaptation and speciation. PMID:22201166

  2. The hidden side of plant invasions: the role of genome size.

    PubMed

    Suda, Jan; Meyerson, Laura A; Leitch, Ilia J; Pyšek, Petr

    2015-02-01

    The ecological role of genome size in plant biology, biogeography, and morphology has garnered increasing attention as the methods and technology associated with measuring cytological characteristics have become more reliable and accessible. However, how plant genome size influences plant invasions and at what stage in the invasion this influence occurs have been little explored. Several large-scale analyses of published data have yielded valuable interspecific comparisons, but experimental studies that manipulate environmental factors are needed, particularly below the species level, to fully understand the role that genome size plays in plant invasion. In this review, we summarize the available knowledge, discuss the integration of genome size data into invasion research, and suggest how it can be applied to detect and manage invasive species. We also explore how global climate change could exert selective pressures on plant populations with varying genome sizes, thereby increasing the distribution range and invasiveness of some populations while decreasing others. Finally, we outline avenues for future research, including considerations of large-scale studies of intraspecific variation in genome size of invasive populations, testing the interaction of genome size with other factors in macroecological analyses of invasions, as well as the role this trait may play in plant-enemy interactions. PMID:25323486

  3. The contribution of genetic and genomic approaches to plant domestication studies.

    PubMed

    Gepts, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The application of genomic approaches to the phenomenon of plant domestication promises a better understanding of the origins of agriculture, but also of the way plant genomes in general are organized and expressed. Building on earlier genetic research, more detailed information has become available on the organization of genetic diversity at the genome level and the effects of gene flow on diversity in different regions of the genome. In addition, putative domestication genes have been identified through population genomics approaches (selective sweeps or divergence scanning). Further information has been obtained on the origin of domestication syndrome mutations and the dispersal and adaptation of crops after domestication. For the future, increasingly multidisciplinary approaches using combinations of genomics and other approaches will prevail. PMID:24631844

  4. Variation block-based genomics method for crop plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In contrast with wild species, cultivated crop genomes consist of reshuffled recombination blocks, which occurred by crossing and selection processes. Accordingly, recombination block-based genomics analysis can be an effective approach for the screening of target loci for agricultural traits. Results We propose the variation block method, which is a three-step process for recombination block detection and comparison. The first step is to detect variations by comparing the short-read DNA sequences of the cultivar to the reference genome of the target crop. Next, sequence blocks with variation patterns are examined and defined. The boundaries between the variation-containing sequence blocks are regarded as recombination sites. All the assumed recombination sites in the cultivar set are used to split the genomes, and the resulting sequence regions are termed variation blocks. Finally, the genomes are compared using the variation blocks. The variation block method identified recurring recombination blocks accurately and successfully represented block-level diversities in the publicly available genomes of 31 soybean and 23 rice accessions. The practicality of this approach was demonstrated by the identification of a putative locus determining soybean hilum color. Conclusions We suggest that the variation block method is an efficient genomics method for the recombination block-level comparison of crop genomes. We expect that this method will facilitate the development of crop genomics by bringing genomics technologies to the field of crop breeding. PMID:24929792

  5. Plant genome editing made easy: targeted mutagenesis in model and crop plants using the CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Khaoula; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Kamoun, Sophien; Nekrasov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering (also known as genome editing) has emerged as an alternative to classical plant breeding and transgenic (GMO) methods to improve crop plants. Until recently, available tools for introducing site-specific double strand DNA breaks were restricted to zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and TAL effector nucleases (TALENs). However, these technologies have not been widely adopted by the plant research community due to complicated design and laborious assembly of specific DNA binding proteins for each target gene. Recently, an easier method has emerged based on the bacterial type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas (CRISPR-associated) immune system. The CRISPR/Cas system allows targeted cleavage of genomic DNA guided by a customizable small noncoding RNA, resulting in gene modifications by both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homology-directed repair (HDR) mechanisms. In this review we summarize and discuss recent applications of the CRISPR/Cas technology in plants. PMID:24112467

  6. Plant genome editing made easy: targeted mutagenesis in model and crop plants using the CRISPR/Cas system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering (also known as genome editing) has emerged as an alternative to classical plant breeding and transgenic (GMO) methods to improve crop plants. Until recently, available tools for introducing site-specific double strand DNA breaks were restricted to zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and TAL effector nucleases (TALENs). However, these technologies have not been widely adopted by the plant research community due to complicated design and laborious assembly of specific DNA binding proteins for each target gene. Recently, an easier method has emerged based on the bacterial type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas (CRISPR-associated) immune system. The CRISPR/Cas system allows targeted cleavage of genomic DNA guided by a customizable small noncoding RNA, resulting in gene modifications by both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homology-directed repair (HDR) mechanisms. In this review we summarize and discuss recent applications of the CRISPR/Cas technology in plants. PMID:24112467

  7. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequences of Two Xanthomonas Pathotype Strains Infecting Aroid Plants.

    PubMed

    Robène, I; Bolot, S; Pruvost, O; Arlat, M; Noël, L D; Carrère, S; Jacques, M-A; Koebnik, R; Gagnevin, L

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences of bacterial pathogens of the Araceae family, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae LMG 695 and Xanthomonas campestris pv. syngonii LMG 9055, differing in host range. A comparison between genome sequences will help understand the mechanisms involved in tissue specificity and adaptation to host plants. PMID:27587819

  8. An Innovative Plant Genomics and Gene Annotation Program for High School, Community College, and University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacisalihoglu, Gokhan; Hilgert, Uwe; Nash, E. Bruce; Micklos, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Today's biology educators face the challenge of training their students in modern molecular biology techniques including genomics and bioinformatics. The Dolan DNA Learning Center (DNALC) of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has developed and disseminated a bench- and computer-based plant genomics curriculum for biology faculty. In 2007, a five-day…

  9. Diverse lifestyles and strategies of plant pathogenesis encoded in the genomes of eighteen Dothideomycetes fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The class Dothideomycetes is one of the largest groups of fungi with a high level of ecological diversity including many plant pathogens infecting a broad range of hosts. Here for the first time we compare the sequenced genomes of 18 Dothideomycetes to analyze their evolution, genome organization, a...

  10. Genome-wide computational prediction and analysis of core promoter elements across plant monocots and dicots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription initiation, essential to gene expression regulation, involves recruitment of basal transcription factors to the core promoter elements (CPEs). The distribution of currently known CPEs across plant genomes is largely unknown. This is the first large scale genome-wide report on the compu...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Dactylonectria macrodidyma, a Plant-Pathogenic Fungus in the Nectriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Demers, Jill; Veltri, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Dactylonectria macrodidyma is part of the Nectriaceae, a family containing important plant pathogens. This species possesses the ability to induce disease on grapevine, avocado, and olive. Here, we report the first draft genome of D. macrodidyma isolate JAC15-245. The assembled genome was 58 Mbp and contained an estimated 16,454 genes. PMID:25883288

  12. Draft genome sequence of Dactylonectria macrodydima, a plant pathogenic fungus in the Nectriaceae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dactylonectria macrodidyma is part of the Nectriaceae, a family containing important plant pathogens. This species possesses the ability to induce disease on grapevine, avocado and olive. Here, we report the first draft genome of D. macrodidyma isolate JAC15-08. The assembled genome was 58 Mbp and c...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Dactylonectria macrodidyma, a Plant-Pathogenic Fungus in the Nectriaceae.

    PubMed

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Demers, Jill; Veltri, Daniel; Crouch, Jo Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dactylonectria macrodidyma is part of the Nectriaceae, a family containing important plant pathogens. This species possesses the ability to induce disease on grapevine, avocado, and olive. Here, we report the first draft genome of D. macrodidyma isolate JAC15-245. The assembled genome was 58 Mbp and contained an estimated 16,454 genes. PMID:25883288

  14. The complete Mitochondrial genome of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Heteroptera: Miridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris, comprises 17027 bp. The genome contains 13 protein coding regions, 22 tRNA genes, and two ribosomal RNA genes. The gene arrangement corresponds to the common order found among insect mtDNAs which is considered to be the ...

  15. Genomic selection for quantitative adult plant stem rust resistance in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative adult plant resistance (APR) to stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) is an important breeding target in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and a potential target for genomic selection (GS). To evaluate the relative importance of known APR loci in applying genomic selection, we charact...

  16. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequences of Two Xanthomonas Pathotype Strains Infecting Aroid Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bolot, S.; Pruvost, O.; Arlat, M.; Noël, L. D.; Carrère, S.; Jacques, M.-A.

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences of bacterial pathogens of the Araceae family, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae LMG 695 and Xanthomonas campestris pv. syngonii LMG 9055, differing in host range. A comparison between genome sequences will help understand the mechanisms involved in tissue specificity and adaptation to host plants. PMID:27587819

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Isolated from a Milk Powder Manufacturing Plant.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Sara A; Cox, Murray P; Flint, Steve H; Lindsay, Denise; Biggs, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Three strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus (designated A1, P3, and D1) were isolated from a New Zealand milk powder manufacturing plant. Here, we describe their draft genome sequences. This information provided the first genomic insights into the nature of G. stearothermophilus strains present in the milk powder manufacturing environment. PMID:26472822

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Hop Latent Virus Infecting Hop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong

    2015-01-01

    The hop latent virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that mainly infects hop plants. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a hop latent virus, which was de novo assembled by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Our study indicates that transcriptome data are useful for identifying a complete viral genome. PMID:25908127

  19. Plum pox virus (PPV) genome expression in genetically engineered RNAi plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important approach to controlling sharka disease caused by Plum pox virus (PPV) is the development of PPV resistant plants using small interfering RNAs (siRNA) technology. In order to evaluate siRNA induced gene silencing, we studied, based on knowledge of the PPV genome sequence, virus genome t...

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Isolated from a Milk Powder Manufacturing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Sara A.; Cox, Murray P.; Flint, Steve H.; Lindsay, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Three strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus (designated A1, P3, and D1) were isolated from a New Zealand milk powder manufacturing plant. Here, we describe their draft genome sequences. This information provided the first genomic insights into the nature of G. stearothermophilus strains present in the milk powder manufacturing environment. PMID:26472822

  1. Polyploidization as a Retraction Force in Plant Genome Evolution: Sequence Rearrangements in Triticale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyploidization is a major evolutionary process in plants where hybridization and chromosome doubling induce enormous genomic stress and restructuring. Here, we show that PCR-based molecular marker techniques involving retrotransposons and microsatellites are extremely powerful tools to uncover pol...

  2. Advances and perspectives on the use of CRISPR/Cas9 systems in plant genomics research.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degao; Hu, Rongbin; Palla, Kaitlin J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan

    2016-04-01

    Genome editing with site-specific nucleases has become a powerful tool for functional characterization of plant genes and genetic improvement of agricultural crops. Among the various site-specific nuclease-based technologies available for genome editing, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems have shown the greatest potential for rapid and efficient editing of genomes in plant species. This article reviews the current status of application of CRISPR/Cas9 to plant genomics research, with a focus on loss-of-function and gain-of-function analysis of individual genes in the context of perennial plants and the potential application of CRISPR/Cas9 to perturbation of gene expression, and identification and analysis of gene modules as part of an accelerated domestication and synthetic biology effort. PMID:26896588

  3. Life-style transitions in plant pathogenic Colletotrichum fungi deciphered by genome and transcriptome analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colletotrichum species are devastating fungal pathogens of major crop plants worldwide. Infection involves differentiation of specialized cell-types associated with host surface penetration, growth inside living host cells (biotrophy) and tissue destruction (necrotrophy). Here we report genome and t...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Lysobacter capsici AZ78, a Bacterium Antagonistic to Plant-Pathogenic Oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Puopolo, Gerardo; Sonego, Paolo; Engelen, Kristof; Pertot, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    Lysobacter capsici AZ78, isolated from tobacco rhizosphere, effectively controls Phytophthora infestans and Plasmopara viticola on tomato and grapevine plants, respectively. We report the first draft genome sequence of the L. capsici species. PMID:24762937

  5. From Agrobacterium to viral vectors: genome modification of plant cells by rare cutting restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Marton, Ira; Honig, Arik; Omid, Ayelet; De Costa, Noam; Marhevka, Elena; Cohen, Barry; Zuker, Amir; Vainstein, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and biotechnologists require methods to accurately modify the genome of higher eukaryotic cells. Such modifications include, but are not limited to, site-specific mutagenesis, site-specific insertion of foreign DNA, and replacement and deletion of native sequences. Accurate genome modifications in plant species have been rather limited, with only a handful of plant species and genes being modified through the use of early genome-editing techniques. The development of rare-cutting restriction enzymes as a tool for the induction of site-specific genomic double-strand breaks and their introduction as a reliable tool for genome modification in animals, animal cells and human cell lines have paved the way for the adaptation of rare-cutting restriction enzymes to genome editing in plant cells. Indeed, the number of plant species and genes which have been successfully edited using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and engineered homing endonucleases is on the rise. In our review, we discuss the basics of rare-cutting restriction enzyme-mediated genome-editing technology with an emphasis on its application in plant species. PMID:24166446

  6. PLAZA 3.0: an access point for plant comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Proost, Sebastian; Van Bel, Michiel; Vaneechoutte, Dries; Van de Peer, Yves; Inzé, Dirk; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Vandepoele, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis has significantly altered our view on the complexity of genome organization and gene functions in different kingdoms. PLAZA 3.0 is designed to make comparative genomics data for plants available through a user-friendly web interface. Structural and functional annotation, gene families, protein domains, phylogenetic trees and detailed information about genome organization can easily be queried and visualized. Compared with the first version released in 2009, which featured nine organisms, the number of integrated genomes is more than four times higher, and now covers 37 plant species. The new species provide a wider phylogenetic range as well as a more in-depth sampling of specific clades, and genomes of additional crop species are present. The functional annotation has been expanded and now comprises data from Gene Ontology, MapMan, UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, PlnTFDB and PlantTFDB. Furthermore, we improved the algorithms to transfer functional annotation from well-characterized plant genomes to other species. The additional data and new features make PLAZA 3.0 (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/plaza/) a versatile and comprehensible resource for users wanting to explore genome information to study different aspects of plant biology, both in model and non-model organisms. PMID:25324309

  7. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Doethideomycetes Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabien; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-03-13

    The class of Dothideomycetes is one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related species can have very diverse host plants. Eighteen genomes of Dothideomycetes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. Here we describe the results of comparative analyses of the fungi in this group.

  8. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Dothideomycetes

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabian; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-05

    The class of Dothideomycetes is one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops that are grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host plant, and related species can have very diverse hosts. Eighteen genomes of Dothideomycetes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. Here we describe the results of comparative analyses of the fungi in this group.

  9. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces acidiscabies 84-104, an emergent plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Huguet-Tapia, José C; Loria, Rosemary

    2012-04-01

    A draft genome sequence of the plant pathogen Streptomyces acidiscabies 84-104, an emergent plant pathogen, is presented here. The genome is among the largest of streptomycetes, at more than 11 Mb, and encodes a 100-kb pathogenicity island (PAI) shared with other plant-pathogenic streptomycetes. The presence of this conserved PAI, and the remnants of a conserved integrase/recombinase at its 3' end, supports the hypothesis that S. acidiscabies emerged as a plant pathogen as a result of this acquisition. PMID:22408247

  10. Genomic Basis of Plant Pathogen Suppression by Biocontrol Pseudomonas Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various plant commensal bacterial species, which naturally colonize the plant rhizosphere, are able to suppress fungal, bacterial, viral and even insect plant pathogens. These biocontrol activities are elicited primarily through the production of secreted exoenzymes and secondary metabolites that ma...

  11. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    SciTech Connect

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Schmutz, Jeremy; Wang, Hao; Percifield, Ryan; Hawkins, Jennifer; Pontaroli, Ana C.; Estep, Matt; Feng, Liang; Vaughn, Justin N; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Barry, Kerrie; Lindquist, Erika; Hellsten, Uffe; Deshpande, Shweta; Wang, Xuewen; Wu, Xiaomei; Mitros, Therese; Triplett, Jimmy; Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Mauro-Herrera, Margarita; Wang, Lin; Li, Pinghua; Sharma, Manoj; Sharma, Rita; Ronald, Pamela; Panaud, Olivier; Kellogg, Elizabeth A.; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Doust, Andrew N.; Tuskan, Gerald A; Rokhsar, Daniel; Devos, Katrien M

    2012-01-01

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The ~400-Mb assembly covers ~80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  12. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    SciTech Connect

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The {approx}400-Mb assembly covers {approx}80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  13. Genome editing: intellectual property and product development in plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Helga; Schillberg, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Genome editing is a revolutionary technology in molecular biology. While scientists are fascinated with the unlimited possibilities provided by directed and controlled changes in DNA in eukaryotes and have eagerly adopted such tools for their own experiments, an understanding of the intellectual property (IP) implications involved in bringing genome editing-derived products to market is often lacking. Due to the ingenuity of genome editing, the time between new product conception and its actual existence can be relatively short; therefore knowledge about IP of the various genome editing methods is relevant. This point must be regarded in a national framework as patents are instituted nationally. Therefore, when designing scientific work that could lead to a product, it is worthwhile to consider the different methods used for genome editing not only for their scientific merits but also for their compatibility with a speedy and reliable launch into the desired market. PMID:27146974

  14. [CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing systems and the analysis of targeted genome mutations in plants].

    PubMed

    Xingliang, Ma; Yaoguang, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genomic editing technologies use programmable DNA nucleases to cleave genomic target sites, thus inducing targeted mutations in the genomes. The newly prevailed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system that consists of the Cas9 nuclease and single guide RNA (sgRNA) has the advantages of simplicity and high efficiency as compared to other programmable DNA nuclease systems such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs). Currently, a number of cases have been reported on the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing technology in plants. In this review, we summarize the strategies for preparing the Cas9 and sgRNA expression constructs, the transformation method for obtaining targeted mutations, the efficiency and features of the resulting mutations and the methods for detecting or genotyping of the mutation sites. We also discuss the existing problems and perspectives of CRISPR/Cas9-based genomic editing in plants. PMID:26907775

  15. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Hogberg, Nils; Alstrom, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

  16. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    PubMed Central

    Högberg, Nils; Alström, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010). PMID:22675598

  17. Shrinkage of Genome Size in a Plant RNA Virus upon Transfer of an Essential Viral Gene into the Host Genome

    PubMed Central

    Tromas, Nicolas; Zwart, Mark P.; Forment, Javier; Elena, Santiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Nonretroviral integrated RNA viruses (NIRVs) are genes of nonretroviral RNA viruses found in the genomes of many eukaryotic organisms. NIRVs are thought to sometimes confer virus resistance, meaning that they could impact spread of the virus in the host population. However, a NIRV that is expressed may also impact the evolution of virus populations within host organisms. Here, we experimentally addressed the evolution of a virus in a host expressing a NIRV using Tobacco etch virus (TEV), a plant RNA virus, and transgenic tobacco plants expressing its replicase, NIb. We found that a virus missing the NIb gene, TEV-ΔNIb, which is incapable of autonomous replication in wild-type plants, had a higher fitness than the full-length TEV in the transgenic plants. Moreover, when the full-length TEV was evolved by serial passages in transgenic plants, we observed genomic deletions within NIb—and in some cases the adjacent cistrons—starting from the first passage. When we passaged TEV and TEV-ΔNIb in transgenic plants, we found mutations in proteolytic sites, but these only occurred in TEV-ΔNIb lineages, suggesting the adaptation of polyprotein processing to altered NIb expression. These results raise the possibility that NIRV expression can indeed induce the deletion of the corresponding genes in the viral genome, resulting in the formation of viruses that are replication defective in hosts that do not express the same NIRV. Moreover, virus genome evolution was contingent upon the deletion of the viral replicase, suggesting NIRV expression could also alter patterns of virus evolution. PMID:24558257

  18. Analysis of 41 plant genomes supports a wave of successful genome duplications in association with the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Kevin; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Ancient whole-genome duplications (WGDs), also referred to as paleopolyploidizations, have been reported in most evolutionary lineages. Their attributed role remains a major topic of discussion, ranging from an evolutionary dead end to a road toward evolutionary success, with evidence supporting both fates. Previously, based on dating WGDs in a limited number of plant species, we found a clustering of angiosperm paleopolyploidizations around the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) extinction event about 66 million years ago. Here we revisit this finding, which has proven controversial, by combining genome sequence information for many more plant lineages and using more sophisticated analyses. We include 38 full genome sequences and three transcriptome assemblies in a Bayesian evolutionary analysis framework that incorporates uncorrelated relaxed clock methods and fossil uncertainty. In accordance with earlier findings, we demonstrate a strongly nonrandom pattern of genome duplications over time with many WGDs clustering around the K–Pg boundary. We interpret these results in the context of recent studies on invasive polyploid plant species, and suggest that polyploid establishment is promoted during times of environmental stress. We argue that considering the evolutionary potential of polyploids in light of the environmental and ecological conditions present around the time of polyploidization could mitigate the stark contrast in the proposed evolutionary fates of polyploids. PMID:24835588

  19. Genome of Plant Maca (Lepidium meyenii) Illuminates Genomic Basis for High-Altitude Adaptation in the Central Andes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tian, Yang; Yan, Liang; Zhang, Guanghui; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Jiajin; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yuntao; Long, Ni; Wang, Yangzi; Ma, Yujin; He, Yuqi; Xue, Yu; Hao, Shumei; Yang, Shengchao; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Liangsheng; Dong, Yang; Chen, Wei; Sheng, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp, 2n = 8x = 64), belonging to the Brassicaceae family, is an economic plant cultivated in the central Andes sierra in Peru (4000-4500 m). Considering that the rapid uplift of the central Andes occurred 5-10 million years ago (Ma), an evolutionary question arises regarding how plants such as maca acquire high-altitude adaptation within a short geological period. Here, we report the high-quality genome assembly of maca, in which two closely spaced maca-specific whole-genome duplications (WGDs; ∼6.7 Ma) were identified. Comparative genomic analysis between maca and closely related Brassicaceae species revealed expansions of maca genes and gene families involved in abiotic stress response, hormone signaling pathway, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis via WGDs. The retention and subsequent functional divergence of many duplicated genes may account for the morphological and physiological changes (i.e., small leaf shape and self-fertility) in maca in a high-altitude environment. In addition, some duplicated maca genes were identified with functions in morphological adaptation (i.e., LEAF CURLING RESPONSIVENESS) and abiotic stress response (i.e., GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEINS and DNA-DAMAGE-REPAIR/TOLERATION 2) under positive selection. Collectively, the maca genome provides useful information to understand the important roles of WGDs in the high-altitude adaptation of plants in the Andes. PMID:27174404

  20. Megacycles of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration correlate with fossil plant genome size

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Peter J.; Freckleton, Rob P.; Beaulieu, Jeremy M.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Beerling, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Tectonic processes drive megacycles of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, ca, that force large fluctuations in global climate. With a period of several hundred million years, these megacycles have been linked to the evolution of vascular plants, but adaptation at the subcellular scale has been difficult to determine because fossils typically do not preserve this information. Here we show, after accounting for evolutionary relatedness using phylogenetic comparative methods, that plant nuclear genome size (measured as the haploid DNA amount) and the size of stomatal guard cells are correlated across a broad taxonomic range of extant species. This phylogenetic regression was used to estimate the mean genome size of fossil plants from the size of fossil stomata. For the last 400 Myr, spanning almost the full evolutionary history of vascular plants, we found a significant correlation between fossil plant genome size and ca, modelled independently using geochemical data. The correlation is consistent with selection for stomatal size and genome size by ca as plants adapted towards optimal leaf gas exchange under a changing CO2 regime. Our findings point to the possibility that major episodes of change in ca throughout Earth history might have selected for changes in genome size, influencing plant diversification. PMID:22232767

  1. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation. PMID:26109237

  2. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation. PMID:26109237

  3. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-06-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation.

  4. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of plant-growth promoting Serratia proteamaculans S4.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Goodwin, Lynne A; Högberg, Nils; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Alström, Sadhna; Bruce, David; Quintana, Beverly; Munk, Christine; Daligault, Hajnalka; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Reitenga, Krista; Green, Lance; Chain, Patrick; Erkkila, Tracy; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Xu, Yan; Kunde, Yulia; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Szeto, Ernest; Mavromatis, Kostas; Huntemann, Marcel; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Markowitz, Victor; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D

    2013-07-30

    Serratia proteamaculans S4 (previously Serratia sp. S4), isolated from the rhizosphere of wild Equisetum sp., has the ability to stimulate plant growth and to suppress the growth of several soil-borne fungal pathogens of economically important crops. Here we present the non-contiguous, finished genome sequence of S. proteamaculans S4, which consists of a 5,324,944 bp circular chromosome and a 129,797 bp circular plasmid. The chromosome contains 5,008 predicted genes while the plasmid comprises 134 predicted genes. In total, 4,993 genes are assigned as protein-coding genes. The genome consists of 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes and 58 pseudogenes. This genome is a part of the project "Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth-promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens" awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI's Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24501629

  5. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of plant-growth promoting Serratia proteamaculans S4

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Högberg, Nils; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Alström, Sadhna; Bruce, David; Quintana, Beverly; Munk, Christine; Daligault, Hajnalka; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Reitenga, Krista; Green, Lance; Chain, Patrick; Erkkila, Tracy; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Xu, Yan; Kunde, Yulia; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Szeto, Ernest; Mavromatis, Kostas; Huntemann, Marcel; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Markowitz, Victor; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans S4 (previously Serratia sp. S4), isolated from the rhizosphere of wild Equisetum sp., has the ability to stimulate plant growth and to suppress the growth of several soil-borne fungal pathogens of economically important crops. Here we present the non-contiguous, finished genome sequence of S. proteamaculans S4, which consists of a 5,324,944 bp circular chromosome and a 129,797 bp circular plasmid. The chromosome contains 5,008 predicted genes while the plasmid comprises 134 predicted genes. In total, 4,993 genes are assigned as protein-coding genes. The genome consists of 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes and 58 pseudogenes. This genome is a part of the project “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth-promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI’s Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24501629

  6. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P.; Guerra, Miguel P.

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ∼130 genes in a 100–220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field. PMID:26284102

  7. The promise of genomics in the study of plant-pollinator interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Flowers exist in exceedingly complex fitness landscapes, in which subtle variation in each trait can affect the pollinators, herbivores and pleiotropically linked traits in other plant tissues. A whole-genome approach to flower evolution will help our understanding of plant-pollinator interactions. PMID:23796166

  8. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

    2011-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  9. De novo reconstruction of plant RNA and DNA virus genomes from viral siRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In antiviral defense, plants produce massive quantities of 21-24 nucleotide siRNAs. Here we demonstrate that the complete genomes of DNA and RNA viruses and viroids can be reconstructed by deep sequencing and de novo assembly of viral/viroid siRNAs from experimentally- and naturally-infected plants....

  10. Are We There Yet? Reliably Estimating the Completeness of Plant Genome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Veeckman, Elisabeth; Ruttink, Tom; Vandepoele, Klaas

    2016-08-01

    Genome sequencing is becoming cheaper and faster thanks to the introduction of next-generation sequencing techniques. Dozens of new plant genome sequences have been released in recent years, ranging from small to gigantic repeat-rich or polyploid genomes. Most genome projects have a dual purpose: delivering a contiguous, complete genome assembly and creating a full catalog of correctly predicted genes. Frequently, the completeness of a species' gene catalog is measured using a set of marker genes that are expected to be present. This expectation can be defined along an evolutionary gradient, ranging from highly conserved genes to species-specific genes. Large-scale population resequencing studies have revealed that gene space is fairly variable even between closely related individuals, which limits the definition of the expected gene space, and, consequently, the accuracy of estimates used to assess genome and gene space completeness. We argue that, based on the desired applications of a genome sequencing project, different completeness scores for the genome assembly and/or gene space should be determined. Using examples from several dicot and monocot genomes, we outline some pitfalls and recommendations regarding methods to estimate completeness during different steps of genome assembly and annotation. PMID:27512012

  11. Are We There Yet? Reliably Estimating the Completeness of Plant Genome Sequences[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing is becoming cheaper and faster thanks to the introduction of next-generation sequencing techniques. Dozens of new plant genome sequences have been released in recent years, ranging from small to gigantic repeat-rich or polyploid genomes. Most genome projects have a dual purpose: delivering a contiguous, complete genome assembly and creating a full catalog of correctly predicted genes. Frequently, the completeness of a species’ gene catalog is measured using a set of marker genes that are expected to be present. This expectation can be defined along an evolutionary gradient, ranging from highly conserved genes to species-specific genes. Large-scale population resequencing studies have revealed that gene space is fairly variable even between closely related individuals, which limits the definition of the expected gene space, and, consequently, the accuracy of estimates used to assess genome and gene space completeness. We argue that, based on the desired applications of a genome sequencing project, different completeness scores for the genome assembly and/or gene space should be determined. Using examples from several dicot and monocot genomes, we outline some pitfalls and recommendations regarding methods to estimate completeness during different steps of genome assembly and annotation. PMID:27512012

  12. Physical mapping resources for large plant genomes: radiation hybrids for wheat D-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of a high quality reference sequence is a daunting task in crops like wheat with large (~17Gb), highly repetitive (>80%) and polyploid genome. To achieve complete sequence assembly of such genomes, development of a high quality physical map is a necessary first step. However, due to the lack of recombination in certain regions of the chromosomes, genetic mapping, which uses recombination frequency to map marker loci, alone is not sufficient to develop high quality marker scaffolds for a sequence ready physical map. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping, which uses radiation induced chromosomal breaks, has proven to be a successful approach for developing marker scaffolds for sequence assembly in animal systems. Here, the development and characterization of a RH panel for the mapping of D-genome of wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii is reported. Results Radiation dosages of 350 and 450 Gy were optimized for seed irradiation of a synthetic hexaploid (AABBDD) wheat with the D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. The surviving plants after irradiation were crossed to durum wheat (AABB), to produce pentaploid RH1s (AABBD), which allows the simultaneous mapping of the whole D-genome. A panel of 1,510 RH1 plants was obtained, of which 592 plants were generated from the mature RH1 seeds, and 918 plants were rescued through embryo culture due to poor germination (<3%) of mature RH1 seeds. This panel showed a homogenous marker loss (2.1%) after screening with SSR markers uniformly covering all the D-genome chromosomes. Different marker systems mostly detected different lines with deletions. Using markers covering known distances, the mapping resolution of this RH panel was estimated to be <140kb. Analysis of only 16 RH lines carrying deletions on chromosome 2D resulted in a physical map with cM/cR ratio of 1:5.2 and 15 distinct bins. Additionally, with this small set of lines, almost all the tested ESTs could be mapped. A set of 399 most informative RH

  13. Analysis of the Complete Chloroplast Genome of a Medicinal Plant, Dianthus superbus var. longicalyncinus, from a Comparative Genomics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Gurusamy; Park, SeonJoo

    2015-01-01

    Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicinal plant that is also used for ornamental purposes. In this study, D. superbus was compared to its closely related family of Caryophyllaceae chloroplast (cp) genomes such as Lychnis chalcedonica and Spinacia oleracea. D. superbus had the longest large single copy (LSC) region (82,805 bp), with some variations in the inverted repeat region A (IRA)/LSC regions. The IRs underwent both expansion and constriction during evolution of the Caryophyllaceae family; however, intense variations were not identified. The pseudogene ribosomal protein subunit S19 (rps19) was identified at the IRA/LSC junction, but was not present in the cp genome of other Caryophyllaceae family members. The translation initiation factor IF-1 (infA) and ribosomal protein subunit L23 (rpl23) genes were absent from the Dianthus cp genome. When the cp genome of Dianthus was compared with 31 other angiosperm lineages, the infA gene was found to have been lost in most members of rosids, solanales of asterids and Lychnis of Caryophyllales, whereas rpl23 gene loss or pseudogization had occurred exclusively in Caryophyllales. Nevertheless, the cp genome of Dianthus and Spinacia has two introns in the proteolytic subunit of ATP-dependent protease (clpP) gene, but Lychnis has lost introns from the clpP gene. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of individual protein-coding genes infA and rpl23 revealed that gene loss or pseudogenization occurred independently in the cp genome of Dianthus. Molecular phylogenetic analysis also demonstrated a sister relationship between Dianthus and Lychnis based on 78 protein-coding sequences. The results presented herein will contribute to studies of the evolution, molecular biology and genetic engineering of the medicinal and ornamental plant, D. superbus var. longicalycinus. PMID:26513163

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain P23, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed

    PubMed Central

    Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium, which was isolated from the surface of duckweed. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain P23. The genome data will serve as a valuable reference for understanding the molecular mechanism of plant growth promotion in aquatic plants. PMID:25720680

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain P23, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Masayuki; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium, which was isolated from the surface of duckweed. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain P23. The genome data will serve as a valuable reference for understanding the molecular mechanism of plant growth promotion in aquatic plants. PMID:25720680

  16. Cytogenetic characterization and genome size of the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Guilherme; Cardoso, Luísa; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Duarte, Patrícia; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Catharanthus roseus is a highly valuable medicinal plant producing several terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) with pharmaceutical applications, including the anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine. Due to the interest in its TIAs, C. roseus is one of the most extensively studied medicinal plants and has become a model species for the study of plant secondary metabolism. However, very little is known about the cytogenetics and genome size of this species, in spite of their importance for breeding programmes, TIA genetics and emerging genomic research. Therefore, the present paper provides a karyotype description and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data for C. roseus, as well as a rigorous characterization of its genome size. Methodology The organization of C. roseus chromosomes was characterized using several DNA/chromatin staining techniques and FISH of rDNA. Genome size was investigated by flow cytometry using an optimized methodology. Principal results The C. roseus full chromosome complement of 2n = 16 includes two metacentric, four subtelocentric and two telocentric chromosome pairs, with the presence of a single nucleolus organizer region in chromosome 6. An easy and reliable flow cytometry protocol for nuclear genome analysis of C. roseus was optimized, and the C-value of this species was estimated to be 1C = 0.76 pg, corresponding to 738 Mbp. Conclusions The organization and size of the C. roseus genome were characterized, providing an important basis for future studies of this important medicinal species, including further cytogenetic mapping, genomics, TIA genetics and breeding programmes. PMID:22479673

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the relict woody plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinhui; Hao, Zhaodong; Xu, Haibin; Yang, Liming; Liu, Guangxin; Sheng, Yu; Zheng, Chen; Zheng, Weiwei; Cheng, Tielong; Shi, Jisen

    2015-01-01

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng is the only species in the genus Metasequoia Miki ex Hu et Cheng, which belongs to the Cupressaceae family. There were around 10 species in the Metasequoia genus, which were widely spread across the Northern Hemisphere during the Cretaceous of the Mesozoic and in the Cenozoic. M. glyptostroboides is the only remaining representative of this genus. Here, we report the complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence and the cp genomic features of M. glyptostroboides. The M. glyptostroboides cp genome is 131,887 bp in length, with a total of 117 genes comprised of 82 protein-coding genes, 31 tRNA genes and four rRNA genes. In this genome, 11 forward repeats, nine palindromic repeats, and 15 tandem repeats were detected. A total of 188 perfect microsatellites were detected through simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis and these were distributed unevenly within the cp genome. Comparison of the cp genome structure and gene order to those of several other land plants indicated that a copy of the inverted repeat (IR) region, which was found to be IR region A (IRA), was lost in the M. glyptostroboides cp genome. The five most divergent and five most conserved genes were determined and further phylogenetic analysis was performed among plant species, especially for related species in conifers. Finally, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that M. glyptostroboides is a sister species to Cryptomeria japonica (L. F.) D. Don and to Taiwania cryptomerioides Hayata. The complete cp genome sequence information of M. glyptostroboides will be great helpful for further investigations of this endemic relict woody plant and for in-depth understanding of the evolutionary history of the coniferous cp genomes, especially for the position of M. glyptostroboides in plant systematics and evolution. PMID:26136762

  18. Detecting and Characterizing the Highly Divergent Plastid Genome of the Nonphotosynthetic Parasitic Plant Hydnora visseri (Hydnoraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Julia; Der, Joshua P.; Wafula, Eric K.; Jones, Samuel S.; Wagner, Sarah T.; Honaas, Loren A.; Ralph, Paula E.; Bolin, Jay F.; Maass, Erika; Neinhuis, Christoph; Wanke, Stefan; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2016-01-01

    Plastid genomes of photosynthetic flowering plants are usually highly conserved in both structure and gene content. However, the plastomes of parasitic and mycoheterotrophic plants may be released from selective constraint due to the reduction or loss of photosynthetic ability. Here we present the greatly reduced and highly divergent, yet functional, plastome of the nonphotosynthetic holoparasite Hydnora visseri (Hydnoraceae, Piperales). The plastome is 27 kb in length, with 24 genes encoding ribosomal proteins, ribosomal RNAs, tRNAs, and a few nonbioenergetic genes, but no genes related to photosynthesis. The inverted repeat and the small single copy region are only approximately 1.5 kb, and intergenic regions have been drastically reduced. Despite extreme reduction, gene order and orientation are highly similar to the plastome of Piper cenocladum, a related photosynthetic plant in Piperales. Gene sequences in Hydnora are highly divergent and several complementary approaches using the highest possible sensitivity were required for identification and annotation of this plastome. Active transcription is detected for all of the protein-coding genes in the plastid genome, and one of two introns is appropriately spliced out of rps12 transcripts. The whole-genome shotgun read depth is 1,400× coverage for the plastome, whereas the mitochondrial genome is covered at 40× and the nuclear genome at 2×. Despite the extreme reduction of the genome and high sequence divergence, the presence of syntenic, long transcriptionally active open-reading frames with distant similarity to other plastid genomes and a high plastome stoichiometry relative to the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes suggests that the plastome remains functional in H. visseri. A four-stage model of gene reduction, including the potential for complete plastome loss, is proposed to account for the range of plastid genomes in nonphotosynthetic plants. PMID:26739167

  19. Genomics applications to plant defense research and crop pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-insect interaction is a complex and dynamic process, leading to a variety of beneficial and deleterious outcome. Mechanisms of plant defense against insect attack, including constitutive and induced defenses, have been evolving for millions of years and are therefore shared across many plant ...

  20. RNA-guided genome editing in plants using a CRISPR-Cas system.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kabin; Yang, Yinong

    2013-11-01

    Precise and straightforward methods to edit the plant genome are much needed for functional genomics and crop improvement. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using bacterial Type II cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated nuclease (Cas) is emerging as an efficient tool for genome editing in microbial and animal systems. Here, we report the genome editing and targeted gene mutation in plants via the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Three guide RNAs (gRNAs) with a 20-22-nt seed region were designed to pair with distinct rice genomic sites which are followed by the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM). The engineered gRNAs were shown to direct the Cas9 nuclease for precise cleavage at the desired sites and introduce mutation (insertion or deletion) by error-prone non-homologous end joining DNA repairing. By analyzing the RNA-guided genome-editing events, the mutation efficiency at these target sites was estimated to be 3-8%. In addition, the off-target effect of an engineered gRNA-Cas9 was found on an imperfectly paired genomic site, but it had lower genome-editing efficiency than the perfectly matched site. Further analysis suggests that mismatch position between gRNA seed and target DNA is an important determinant of the gRNA-Cas9 targeting specificity, and specific gRNAs could be designed to target more than 90% of rice genes. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas system can be exploited as a powerful tool for gene targeting and precise genome editing in plants. PMID:23956122

  1. A CRISPR/Cas9 Toolbox for Multiplexed Plant Genome Editing and Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lowder, Levi G; Zhang, Dengwei; Baltes, Nicholas J; Paul, Joseph W; Tang, Xu; Zheng, Xuelian; Voytas, Daniel F; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Zhang, Yong; Qi, Yiping

    2015-10-01

    The relative ease, speed, and biological scope of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated Protein9 (Cas9)-based reagents for genomic manipulations are revolutionizing virtually all areas of molecular biosciences, including functional genomics, genetics, applied biomedical research, and agricultural biotechnology. In plant systems, however, a number of hurdles currently exist that limit this technology from reaching its full potential. For example, significant plant molecular biology expertise and effort is still required to generate functional expression constructs that allow simultaneous editing, and especially transcriptional regulation, of multiple different genomic loci or multiplexing, which is a significant advantage of CRISPR/Cas9 versus other genome-editing systems. To streamline and facilitate rapid and wide-scale use of CRISPR/Cas9-based technologies for plant research, we developed and implemented a comprehensive molecular toolbox for multifaceted CRISPR/Cas9 applications in plants. This toolbox provides researchers with a protocol and reagents to quickly and efficiently assemble functional CRISPR/Cas9 transfer DNA constructs for monocots and dicots using Golden Gate and Gateway cloning methods. It comes with a full suite of capabilities, including multiplexed gene editing and transcriptional activation or repression of plant endogenous genes. We report the functionality and effectiveness of this toolbox in model plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice (Oryza sativa), demonstrating its utility for basic and applied plant research. PMID:26297141

  2. A CRISPR/Cas9 Toolbox for Multiplexed Plant Genome Editing and Transcriptional Regulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lowder, Levi G.; Zhang, Dengwei; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Paul, Joseph W.; Tang, Xu; Zheng, Xuelian; Voytas, Daniel F.; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Zhang, Yong; Qi, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    The relative ease, speed, and biological scope of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated Protein9 (Cas9)-based reagents for genomic manipulations are revolutionizing virtually all areas of molecular biosciences, including functional genomics, genetics, applied biomedical research, and agricultural biotechnology. In plant systems, however, a number of hurdles currently exist that limit this technology from reaching its full potential. For example, significant plant molecular biology expertise and effort is still required to generate functional expression constructs that allow simultaneous editing, and especially transcriptional regulation, of multiple different genomic loci or multiplexing, which is a significant advantage of CRISPR/Cas9 versus other genome-editing systems. To streamline and facilitate rapid and wide-scale use of CRISPR/Cas9-based technologies for plant research, we developed and implemented a comprehensive molecular toolbox for multifaceted CRISPR/Cas9 applications in plants. This toolbox provides researchers with a protocol and reagents to quickly and efficiently assemble functional CRISPR/Cas9 transfer DNA constructs for monocots and dicots using Golden Gate and Gateway cloning methods. It comes with a full suite of capabilities, including multiplexed gene editing and transcriptional activation or repression of plant endogenous genes. We report the functionality and effectiveness of this toolbox in model plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice (Oryza sativa), demonstrating its utility for basic and applied plant research. PMID:26297141

  3. Oligonucleotide-Mediated Genome Editing Provides Precision and Function to Engineered Nucleases and Antibiotics in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Woodward, Melody J; Mihiret, Yohannes A; Lincoln, Tracey A; Segami, Rosa E; Sanders, Steven L; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report a form of oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision genome editing in plants that uses single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODNs) to precisely and efficiently generate genome edits at DNA strand lesions made by DNA double strand break reagents. Employing a transgene model in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we obtained a high frequency of precise targeted genome edits when ssODNs were introduced into protoplasts that were pretreated with the glycopeptide antibiotic phleomycin, a nonspecific DNA double strand breaker. Simultaneous delivery of ssODN and a site-specific DNA double strand breaker, either transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9), resulted in a much greater targeted genome-editing frequency compared with treatment with DNA double strand-breaking reagents alone. Using this site-specific approach, we applied the combination of ssODN and CRISPR/Cas9 to develop an herbicide tolerance trait in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by precisely editing the 5'-ENOLPYRUVYLSHIKIMATE-3-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (EPSPS) genes. EPSPS edits occurred at sufficient frequency that we could regenerate whole plants from edited protoplasts without employing selection. These plants were subsequently determined to be tolerant to the herbicide glyphosate in greenhouse spray tests. Progeny (C1) of these plants showed the expected Mendelian segregation of EPSPS edits. Our findings show the enormous potential of using a genome-editing platform for precise, reliable trait development in crop plants. PMID:26864017

  4. Complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN.

    PubMed

    Weilharter, Alexandra; Mitter, Birgit; Shin, Maria V; Chain, Patrick S G; Nowak, Jerzy; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-07-01

    Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN(T) is able to efficiently colonize the rhizosphere, root, and above-ground plant tissues of a wide variety of genetically unrelated plants, such as potatoes, canola, maize, and grapevines. Strain PsJN shows strong plant growth-promoting effects and was reported to enhance plant vigor and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the genome sequence of this strain, which indicates the presence of multiple traits relevant for endophytic colonization and plant growth promotion. PMID:21551308

  5. Genome-wide analysis suggests divergent evolution of lipid phosphotases/phosphotransferase genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhenxi; Kasimu, Rena; Chen, Yinhua; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Gai, Jiangtao

    2016-08-01

    Genes of the LPPT (lipid phosphatase/phosphotransferase) family play important roles in lipid phosphorous transfer and triacylglycerol accumulation in plants. To provide overviews of the plant LPPT family and their overall relationships, here we carried out genome-wide identifications and analyses of plant LPPT family members. A total of 643 putative LPPT genes were identified from 48 sequenced plant genomes, among which 205 genes from 14 plants were chosen for further analyses. Plant LPPT genes belonged to three distinctive groups, namely the LPT (lipid phosphotransfease), LPP (lipid phosphatase), and pLPP (plastidic lipid phosphotransfease) groups. Genes of the LPT group could be further partitioned into three groups, two of which were only identified in terrestrial plants. Genes in the LPP and pLPP groups experienced duplications in early stages of plant evolution. Among 17 Zea mays LPPT genes, divergence of temporal-spatial expression patterns was revealed based on microarray data analysis. Peptide sequences of plant LPPT genes harbored different conserved motifs. A test of Branch Model versus One-ratio Model did not support significant selective pressures acting on different groups of LPPT genes, although quite different nonsynonymous evolutionary rates and selective pressures were observed. The complete picture of the plant LPPT family provided here should facilitate further investigations of plant LPPT genes and offer a better understanding of lipid biosynthesis in plants. PMID:27501416

  6. Endogenous florendoviruses are major components of plant genomes and hallmarks of virus evolution

    PubMed Central

    Geering, Andrew D. W.; Maumus, Florian; Copetti, Dario; Choisne, Nathalie; Zwickl, Derrick J.; Zytnicki, Matthias; McTaggart, Alistair R.; Scalabrin, Simone; Vezzulli, Silvia; Wing, Rod A.; Quesneville, Hadi; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been extensively described in animals but are much less well understood in plants. Here we describe a new genus of Caulimoviridae called ‘Florendovirus’, members of which have colonized the genomes of a large diversity of flowering plants, sometimes at very high copy numbers (>0.5% total genome content). The genome invasion of Oryza is dated to over 1.8 million years ago (MYA) but phylogeographic evidence points to an even older age of 20–34 MYA for this virus group. Some appear to have had a bipartite genome organization, a unique characteristic among viral retroelements. In Vitis vinifera, 9% of the endogenous florendovirus loci are located within introns and therefore may influence host gene expression. The frequent colocation of endogenous florendovirus loci with TA simple sequence repeats, which are associated with chromosome fragility, suggests sequence capture during repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. PMID:25381880

  7. Endogenous florendoviruses are major components of plant genomes and hallmarks of virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Geering, Andrew D W; Maumus, Florian; Copetti, Dario; Choisne, Nathalie; Zwickl, Derrick J; Zytnicki, Matthias; McTaggart, Alistair R; Scalabrin, Simone; Vezzulli, Silvia; Wing, Rod A; Quesneville, Hadi; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been extensively described in animals but are much less well understood in plants. Here we describe a new genus of Caulimoviridae called 'Florendovirus', members of which have colonized the genomes of a large diversity of flowering plants, sometimes at very high copy numbers (>0.5% total genome content). The genome invasion of Oryza is dated to over 1.8 million years ago (MYA) but phylogeographic evidence points to an even older age of 20-34 MYA for this virus group. Some appear to have had a bipartite genome organization, a unique characteristic among viral retroelements. In Vitis vinifera, 9% of the endogenous florendovirus loci are located within introns and therefore may influence host gene expression. The frequent colocation of endogenous florendovirus loci with TA simple sequence repeats, which are associated with chromosome fragility, suggests sequence capture during repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. PMID:25381880

  8. Emerging psyllid genomics: Applications to reduce plant disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, and the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, both transmit bacterial pathogens that destroy important food crops, potato, tomato, citrus, and others. The International psyllid genome consortium (being led by the authors) has developed a research team to...

  9. Genomic selection in plant breeding: knowledge and prospects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection,” the ability to select for even complex, quantitative traits based on marker data alone, has arisen from the conjunction of new high throughput marker technologies and new statistical methods needed to analyze the data. This review surveys what is known about these technologies, ...

  10. Evidence-based gene predictions in plant genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated evidence-based gene building is a rapid and cost-effective way to provide reliable gene annotations on newly sequenced genomes. One of the limitations of evidence-based gene builders, however, is their requirement for gene expression evidence—known proteins, full-length cDNAs, or expressed...

  11. Comparative genomics reveals convergent rates of evolution in ant-plant mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Moreau, Corrie S

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis-the close and often long-term interaction of species-is predicted to drive genome evolution in a variety of ways. For example, parasitic interactions have been shown to increase rates of molecular evolution, a trend generally attributed to the Red Queen Hypothesis. However, it is much less clear how mutualisms impact the genome, as both increased and reduced rates of change have been predicted. Here we sequence the genomes of seven species of ants, three that have convergently evolved obligate plant-ant mutualism and four closely related species of non-mutualists. Comparing these sequences, we investigate how genome evolution is shaped by mutualistic behaviour. We find that rates of molecular evolution are higher in the mutualists genome wide, a characteristic apparently not the result of demography. Our results suggest that the intimate relationships of obligate mutualists may lead to selective pressures similar to those seen in parasites, thereby increasing rates of evolution. PMID:27557866

  12. Mechanisms of genomic rearrangements and gene expression changes in plant polyploids

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey Chen, Z.; Ni, Zhongfu

    2007-01-01

    Summary Polyploidy is produced by multiplication of a single genome (autopolyploid) or combination of two or more divergent genomes (allopolyploid). The available data obtained from the study of synthetic (newly created or human-made) plant allopolyploids have documented dynamic and stochastic changes in genomic organization and gene expression, including sequence elimination, inter-chromosomal exchanges, cytosine methylation, gene repression, novel activation, genetic dominance, subfunctionalization and transposon activation. The underlying mechanisms for these alterations are poorly understood. To promote a better understanding of genomic and gene expression changes in polyploidy, we briefly review origins and forms of polyploidy and summarize what has been learned from genome-wide gene expression analyses in newly synthesized auto- and allopolyploids. We show transcriptome divergence between the progenitors and in the newly formed allopolyploids. We propose models for transcriptional regulation, chromatin modification and RNA-mediated pathways in establishing locus-specific expression of orthologous and homoeologous genes during allopolyploid formation and evolution. PMID:16479580

  13. Creating Order from Chaos: Epigenome Dynamics in Plants with Complex Genomes.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan M; Lisch, Damon; Li, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Flowering plants have strikingly distinct genomes, although they contain a similar suite of expressed genes. The diversity of genome structures and organization is largely due to variation in transposable elements (TEs) and whole-genome duplication (WGD) events. We review evidence that chromatin modifications and epigenetic regulation are intimately associated with TEs and likely play a role in mediating the effects of WGDs. We hypothesize that the current structure of a genome is the result of various TE bursts and WGDs and it is likely that the silencing mechanisms and the chromatin structure of a genome have been shaped by these events. This suggests that the specific mechanisms targeting chromatin modifications and epigenomic patterns may vary among different species. Many crop species have likely evolved chromatin-based mechanisms to tolerate silenced TEs near actively expressed genes. These interactions of heterochromatin and euchromatin are likely to have important roles in modulating gene expression and variability within species. PMID:26869701

  14. Genome characteristics of facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strains reflect host range and host plant biogeography.

    PubMed

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A; Berry, Alison M; Bickhart, Derek M; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, Maria Pilar; Goltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga R; Labarre, Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez, Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E; Mullin, Beth C; Niemann, James; Pujic, Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt, Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P; Vallenet, David; Valverde, Claudio; Wall, Luis G; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R

    2007-01-01

    Soil bacteria that also form mutualistic symbioses in plants encounter two major levels of selection. One occurs during adaptation to and survival in soil, and the other occurs in concert with host plant speciation and adaptation. Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia are facultative symbionts that form N(2)-fixing root nodules on diverse and globally distributed angiosperms in the "actinorhizal" symbioses. Three closely related clades of Frankia sp. strains are recognized; members of each clade infect a subset of plants from among eight angiosperm families. We sequenced the genomes from three strains; their sizes varied from 5.43 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (Frankia sp. strain HFPCcI3) to 7.50 Mbp for a medium host range strain (Frankia alni strain ACN14a) to 9.04 Mbp for a broad host range strain (Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported for such closely related soil bacteria (97.8%-98.9% identity of 16S rRNA genes). The extent of gene deletion, duplication, and acquisition is in concert with the biogeographic history of the symbioses and host plant speciation. Host plant isolation favored genome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genome expansion. The results support the idea that major genome expansions as well as reductions can occur in facultative symbiotic soil bacteria as they respond to new environments in the context of their symbioses. PMID:17151343

  15. Evaluating and Characterizing Ancient Whole-Genome Duplications in Plants with Gene Count Data.

    PubMed

    Tiley, George P; Ané, Cécile; Burleigh, J Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) have helped shape the genomes of land plants, and recent evidence suggests that the genomes of all angiosperms have experienced at least two ancient WGDs. In plants, WGDs often are followed by rapid fractionation, in which many homeologous gene copies are lost. Thus, it can be extremely difficult to identify, let alone characterize, ancient WGDs. In this study, we use a new maximum likelihood estimator to test for evidence of ancient WGDs in land plants and estimate the fraction of new genes copies that are retained following a WGD using gene count data, the number of gene copies in gene families. We identified evidence of many putative ancient WGDs in land plants and found that the genome fractionation rates vary tremendously among ancient WGDs. Analyses of WGDs within Brassicales also indicate that background gene duplication and loss rates vary across land plants, and different gene families have different probabilities of being retained following a WGD. Although our analyses are largely robust to errors in duplication and loss rates and the choice of priors, simulations indicate that this method can have trouble detecting multiple WGDs that occur on the same branch, especially when the gene retention rates for ancient WGDs are very low. They also suggest that we should carefully evaluate evidence for some ancient plant WGD hypotheses. PMID:26988251

  16. Evaluating and Characterizing Ancient Whole-Genome Duplications in Plants with Gene Count Data

    PubMed Central

    Tiley, George P.; Ané, Cécile; Burleigh, J. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) have helped shape the genomes of land plants, and recent evidence suggests that the genomes of all angiosperms have experienced at least two ancient WGDs. In plants, WGDs often are followed by rapid fractionation, in which many homeologous gene copies are lost. Thus, it can be extremely difficult to identify, let alone characterize, ancient WGDs. In this study, we use a new maximum likelihood estimator to test for evidence of ancient WGDs in land plants and estimate the fraction of new genes copies that are retained following a WGD using gene count data, the number of gene copies in gene families. We identified evidence of many putative ancient WGDs in land plants and found that the genome fractionation rates vary tremendously among ancient WGDs. Analyses of WGDs within Brassicales also indicate that background gene duplication and loss rates vary across land plants, and different gene families have different probabilities of being retained following a WGD. Although our analyses are largely robust to errors in duplication and loss rates and the choice of priors, simulations indicate that this method can have trouble detecting multiple WGDs that occur on the same branch, especially when the gene retention rates for ancient WGDs are very low. They also suggest that we should carefully evaluate evidence for some ancient plant WGD hypotheses. PMID:26988251

  17. Genomes of three facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strainsreflect host plant biogeography

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, J.Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry,Alison; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, M. Pilar; Ggoltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga; Labarre,Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez,Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth; Niemann, James; Pujic,Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt,Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde,Claudio; Wall, Luis; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2006-02-01

    Filamentous actinobacteria from the genus Frankia anddiverse woody trees and shrubs together form N2-fixing actinorhizal rootnodule symbioses that are a major source of new soil nitrogen in widelydiverse biomes 1. Three major clades of Frankia sp. strains are defined;each clade is associated with a defined subset of plants from among theeight actinorhizal plant families 2,3. The evolution arytrajectoriesfollowed by the ancestors of both symbionts leading to current patternsof symbiont compatibility are unknown. Here we show that the competingprocesses of genome expansion and contraction have operated in differentgroups of Frankia strains in a manner that can be related to thespeciation of the plant hosts and their geographic distribution. Wesequenced and compared the genomes from three Frankia sp. strains havingdifferent host plant specificities. The sizes of their genomes variedfrom 5.38 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (HFPCcI3) to 7.50Mbp for amedium host range strain (ACN14a) to 9.08 Mbp for a broad host rangestrain (EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported forsuch closely related bacteria. Since the order of divergence of thestrains is known, the extent of gene deletion, duplication andacquisition could be estimated and was found to be inconcert with thebiogeographic history of the symbioses. Host plant isolation favoredgenome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genomeexpansion. The results support the idea that major genome reductions aswell as expansions can occur in facultatively symbiotic soil bacteria asthey respond to new environments in the context of theirsymbioses.

  18. Maintenance of genome stability in plants: repairing DNA double strand breaks and chromatin structure stability.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells are subject to high levels of DNA damage resulting from plant's obligatory dependence on sunlight and the associated exposure to environmental stresses like solar UV radiation, high soil salinity, drought, chilling injury, and other air and soil pollutants including heavy metals and metabolic by-products from endogenous processes. The irreversible DNA damages, generated by the environmental and genotoxic stresses affect plant growth and development, reproduction, and crop productivity. Thus, for maintaining genome stability, plants have developed an extensive array of mechanisms for the detection and repair of DNA damages. This review will focus recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms regulating plant genome stability in the context of repairing of double stand breaks and chromatin structure maintenance. PMID:25295048

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the hornwort Megaceros aenigmaticus shows a mixed mode of conservative yet dynamic evolution in early land plant mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Wang, Bin; Liu, Yang; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2009-06-01

    Land plants possess some of the most unusual mitochondrial genomes among eukaryotes. However, in early land plants these genomes resemble those of green and red algae or early eukaryotes. The question of when during land plant evolution the dramatic change in mtDNAs occurred remains unanswered. Here we report the first completely sequenced mitochondrial genome of the hornwort, Megaceros aenigmaticus, a member of the sister group of vascular plants. It is a circular molecule of 184,908 base pairs, with 32 protein genes, 3 rRNA genes, 17 tRNA genes, and 30 group II introns. The genome contains many genes arranged in the same order as in those of a liverwort, a moss, several green and red algae, and Reclinomonas americana, an early-branching eukaryote with the most ancestral form of mtDNA. In particular, the gene order between mtDNAs of the hornwort and Physcomitrella patens (moss) differs by only 8 inversions and translocations. However, the hornwort mtDNA possesses 4 derived features relative to green alga mtDNAs--increased genome size, RNA editing, intron gains, and gene losses--which were all likely acquired during the origin and early evolution of land plants. Overall, this genome and those of other 2 bryophytes show that mitochondrial genomes in early land plants, unlike their seed plant counterparts, exhibit a mixed mode of conservative yet dynamic evolution. PMID:19475442

  20. The Ditylenchus destructor genome provides new insights into the evolution of plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinshui; Peng, Donghai; Chen, Ling; Liu, Hualin; Chen, Feng; Xu, Mengci; Ju, Shouyong; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-07-27

    Plant-parasitic nematodes were found in 4 of the 12 clades of phylum Nematoda. These nematodes in different clades may have originated independently from their free-living fungivorous ancestors. However, the exact evolutionary process of these parasites is unclear. Here, we sequenced the genome sequence of a migratory plant nematode, Ditylenchus destructor We performed comparative genomics among the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans and all the plant nematodes with genome sequences available. We found that, compared with C. elegans, the core developmental control processes underwent heavy reduction, though most signal transduction pathways were conserved. We also found D. destructor contained more homologies of the key genes in the above processes than the other plant nematodes. We suggest that Ditylenchus spp. may be an intermediate evolutionary history stage from free-living nematodes that feed on fungi to obligate plant-parasitic nematodes. Based on the facts that D. destructor can feed on fungi and has a relatively short life cycle, and that it has similar features to both C. elegans and sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes from clade 12, we propose it as a new model to study the biology, biocontrol of plant nematodes and the interaction between nematodes and plants. PMID:27466450

  1. Plants from Chernobyl zone could shed light on genome stability in radioactive environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Galina; Talalaiev, Oleksandr; Doonan, John

    2016-07-01

    For nearly 30 years, despite of chronic radiation, flora in Chernobyl zone continue to flourish, evidencing the adaptation of plants to such an environment. Keeping in mind interplanetary missions, this phenomenon is a challenge for plant space research since it highlights the possible mechanisms of genome protection and stabilization in harmful environment. Plants are sessile organisms and, contrary to animals, could not escape the external impact. Therefore, plants should evolve the robust system allowing DNA-protection against damage, which is of special interest. Our investigations show that Arabidopsis thaliana from Chernobyl zone tolerate radiomimetics and heavy metals better than control plants from non-polluted areas. Besides, its genome is less affected by such mutagens. qPCR investigations have revealed up-regulation of some genes involved in DNA damage response. In particular, expression of ATR is increased slightly and downstream expression of CycB1:1 gene is increased significantly after bleomycin treatment suggesting role of ATR-dependent pathway in genome stabilization. Several DNA repair pathways are known to exist in plants. We continue investigations on gene expression from different DNA repair pathways as well as cell cycle regulation and investigation of PCD hallmarks in order to reveal the mechanism of plant tolerance to radiation environment. Our investigations provide unique information for space researchers working on biotechnology of radiation tolerant plants.

  2. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  3. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  4. Co-evolution of plant LTR-retrotransposons and their host genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meixia; Ma, Jianxin

    2013-07-01

    Transposable elements (TEs), particularly, long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs), are the most abundant DNA components in all plant species that have been investigated, and are largely responsible for plant genome size variation. Although plant genomes have experienced periodic proliferation and/or recent burst of LTR-retrotransposons, the majority of LTR-RTs are inactivated by DNA methylation and small RNA-mediated silencing mechanisms, and/or were deleted/truncated by unequal homologous recombination and illegitimate recombination, as suppression mechanisms that counteract genome expansion caused by LTR-RT amplification. LTR-RT DNA is generally enriched in pericentromeric regions of the host genomes, which appears to be the outcomes of preferential insertions of LTR-RTs in these regions and low effectiveness of selection that purges LTR-RT DNA from these regions relative to chromosomal arms. Potential functions of various TEs in their host genomes remain blurry; nevertheless, LTR-RTs have been recognized to play important roles in maintaining chromatin structures and centromere functions and regulation of gene expressions in their host genomes. PMID:23794032

  5. The CRISPR/Cas9 system for plant genome editing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Bortesi, Luisa; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome editing using artificial nucleases has the potential to accelerate basic research as well as plant breeding by providing the means to modify genomes rapidly in a precise and predictable manner. Here we describe the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, a recently developed tool for the introduction of site-specific double-stranded DNA breaks. We highlight the strengths and weaknesses of this technology compared with two well-established genome editing platforms: zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We summarize recent results obtained in plants using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, discuss possible applications in plant breeding and consider potential future developments. PMID:25536441

  6. The Physcomitrella genome reveals evolutionary insights into the conquest of land by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rensing, Stefan A.; Lang, Daniel; Zimmer, Andreas D.; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Nishiyama, Tomaoki; Perroud, Pierre-Francois; Lindquist, Erika A.; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Tanahashi, Takako; Sakakibara, Keiko; Fujita, Tomomichi; Oishi, Kazuko; Shin, Tadasu; Kuroki, Yoko; Toyoda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Sugano, Sumio; Kohara, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Anterola, Aldwin; Aoki, Setsuyuki; Ashton, Neil; Barbazuk, W. Brad; Barker, Elizabeth; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Blankenship, Robert; Cho, Sung Hyun; Dutcher, Susan K.; Estelle, Mark; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Gundlach, Heidrum; Hanada, Kousuke; Melkozernov, Alexander; Murata, Takashi; Nelson, David R.; Pils, Birgit; Prigge, Michael; Reiss, Bernd; Renner, Tanya; Rombauts, Stephane; Rushton, Paul J.; Sanderfoot, Anton; Schween, Gabriele; Shiu, Shin-Han; Stueber, Kurt; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Tu, Hank; Van de Peer, Yves; Verrier, Paul J.; Waters, Elizabeth; Wood, Andrew; Yang, Lixing; Cove, David; Cuming, Andrew C.; Hasebe, Mitsayasu; Lucas, Susan; Mishler, Brent D.; Reski, Ralf; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Quatrano, Rakph S.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2007-09-18

    We report the draft genome sequence of the model moss Physcomitrella patens and compare its features with those of flowering plants, from which it is separated by more than 400 million years, and unicellular aquatic algae. This comparison reveals genomic changes concomitant with the evolutionary movement to land, including a general increase in gene family complexity; loss of genes associated with aquatic environments (e.g., flagellar arms); acquisition of genes for tolerating terrestrial stresses (e.g., variation in temperature and water availability); and the development of the auxin and abscisic acid signaling pathways for coordinating multicellular growth and dehydration response. The Physcomitrella genome provides a resource for phylogenetic inferences about gene function and for experimental analysis of plant processes through this plant's unique facility for reverse genetics.

  7. The genome of the recently domesticated crop plant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dohm, Juliane C; Minoche, André E; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Zakrzewski, Falk; Tafer, Hakim; Rupp, Oliver; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Stracke, Ralf; Reinhardt, Richard; Goesmann, Alexander; Kraft, Thomas; Schulz, Britta; Stadler, Peter F; Schmidt, Thomas; Gabaldón, Toni; Lehrach, Hans; Weisshaar, Bernd; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2014-01-23

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) is an important crop of temperate climates which provides nearly 30% of the world's annual sugar production and is a source for bioethanol and animal feed. The species belongs to the order of Caryophylalles, is diploid with 2n = 18 chromosomes, has an estimated genome size of 714-758 megabases and shares an ancient genome triplication with other eudicot plants. Leafy beets have been cultivated since Roman times, but sugar beet is one of the most recently domesticated crops. It arose in the late eighteenth century when lines accumulating sugar in the storage root were selected from crosses made with chard and fodder beet. Here we present a reference genome sequence for sugar beet as the first non-rosid, non-asterid eudicot genome, advancing comparative genomics and phylogenetic reconstructions. The genome sequence comprises 567 megabases, of which 85% could be assigned to chromosomes. The assembly covers a large proportion of the repetitive sequence content that was estimated to be 63%. We predicted 27,421 protein-coding genes supported by transcript data and annotated them on the basis of sequence homology. Phylogenetic analyses provided evidence for the separation of Caryophyllales before the split of asterids and rosids, and revealed lineage-specific gene family expansions and losses. We sequenced spinach (Spinacia oleracea), another Caryophyllales species, and validated features that separate this clade from rosids and asterids. Intraspecific genomic variation was analysed based on the genome sequences of sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima; progenitor of all beet crops) and four additional sugar beet accessions. We identified seven million variant positions in the reference genome, and also large regions of low variability, indicating artificial selection. The sugar beet genome sequence enables the identification of genes affecting agronomically relevant traits, supports molecular breeding and maximizes the plant

  8. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Mongolia Medicine Artemisia frigida and Phylogenetic Relationships with Other Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue; Huo, Naxin; Dong, Lingli; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Shuixian; Young, Hugh A.; Feng, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Artemisia frigida Willd. is an important Mongolian traditional medicinal plant with pharmacological functions of stanch and detumescence. However, there is little sequence and genomic information available for Artemisia frigida, which makes phylogenetic identification, evolutionary studies, and genetic improvement of its value very difficult. We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida based on 454 pyrosequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings The complete chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida is 151,076 bp including a large single copy (LSC) region of 82,740 bp, a small single copy (SSC) region of 18,394 bp and a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 24,971 bp. The genome contains 114 unique genes and 18 duplicated genes. The chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida contains a small 3.4 kb inversion within a large 23 kb inversion in the LSC region, a unique feature in Asteraceae. The gene order in the SSC region of Artemisia frigida is inverted compared with the other 6 Asteraceae species with the chloroplast genomes sequenced. This inversion is likely caused by an intramolecular recombination event only occurred in Artemisia frigida. The existence of rich SSR loci in the Artemisia frigida chloroplast genome provides a rare opportunity to study population genetics of this Mongolian medicinal plant. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates a sister relationship between Artemisia frigida and four other species in Asteraceae, including Ageratina adenophora, Helianthus annuus, Guizotia abyssinica and Lactuca sativa, based on 61 protein-coding sequences. Furthermore, Artemisia frigida was placed in the tribe Anthemideae in the subfamily Asteroideae (Asteraceae) based on ndhF and trnL-F sequence comparisons. Conclusion The chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida was assembled and analyzed in this study, representing the first plastid genome sequenced in the Anthemideae tribe. This complete chloroplast genome sequence will be

  9. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Hoffman, Adam; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Walla, Michael D.; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Newman, Lee; Monchy, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. 638 is an endophytic plant growth promoting gamma-proteobacterium that was isolated from the stem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa×deltoides cv. H11-11), a potentially important biofuel feed stock plant. The Enterobacter sp. 638 genome sequence reveals the presence of a 4,518,712 bp chromosome and a 157,749 bp plasmid (pENT638-1). Genome annotation and comparative genomics allowed the identification of an extended set of genes specific to the plant niche adaptation of this bacterium. This includes genes that code for putative proteins involved in survival in the rhizosphere (to cope with oxidative stress or uptake of nutrients released by plant roots), root adhesion (pili, adhesion, hemagglutinin, cellulose biosynthesis), colonization/establishment inside the plant (chemiotaxis, flagella, cellobiose phosphorylase), plant protection against fungal and bacterial infections (siderophore production and synthesis of the antimicrobial compounds 4-hydroxybenzoate and 2-phenylethanol), and improved poplar growth and development through the production of the phytohormones indole acetic acid, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. Metabolite analysis confirmed by quantitative RT–PCR showed that, the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol is induced by the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. Interestingly, both the genetic determinants required for sucrose metabolism and the synthesis of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are clustered on a genomic island. These findings point to a close interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host, where the availability of sucrose, a major plant sugar, affects the synthesis of plant growth promoting phytohormones by the endophytic bacterium. The availability of the genome sequence, combined with metabolome and transcriptome analysis, will provide a better understanding of the synergistic interactions between poplar and its growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further exploited to

  10. Application of functional genomics and proteomics to plant cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cryobiology has primarily emerged from the classical fields of cryobiology and plant stress physiology. Cryopreservation tools are now available to geneticists for germplasm preservation and the field itself is advancing significantly through the use of molecular techniques. Long-term preser...

  11. Essential RNA-Based Technologies and Their Applications in Plant Functional Genomics.

    PubMed

    Teotia, Sachin; Singh, Deepali; Tang, Xiaoqing; Tang, Guiliang

    2016-02-01

    Genome sequencing has not only extended our understanding of the blueprints of many plant species but has also revealed the secrets of coding and non-coding genes. We present here a brief introduction to and personal account of key RNA-based technologies, as well as their development and applications for functional genomics of plant coding and non-coding genes, with a focus on short tandem target mimics (STTMs), artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs), and CRISPR/Cas9. In addition, their use in multiplex technologies for the functional dissection of gene networks is discussed. PMID:26774589

  12. Integrated genome sequence and linkage map of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingzhi; Zhou, Changpin; Cheng, Shifeng; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Yan; Ni, Peixiang; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xun; Huang, Ying; Song, Chi; Wang, Zhiwen; Shi, Nan; Zhang, Xudong; Fang, Xiaohua; Yang, Qing; Jiang, Huawu; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Wang, Ying; Chen, Fan; Wang, Jun; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-03-01

    The family Euphorbiaceae includes some of the most efficient biomass accumulators. Whole genome sequencing and the development of genetic maps of these species are important components in molecular breeding and genetic improvement. Here we report the draft genome of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant. The assembled genome has a total length of 320.5 Mbp and contains 27,172 putative protein-coding genes. We established a linkage map containing 1208 markers and anchored the genome assembly (81.7%) to this map to produce 11 pseudochromosomes. After gene family clustering, 15,268 families were identified, of which 13,887 existed in the castor bean genome. Analysis of the genome highlighted specific expansion and contraction of a number of gene families during the evolution of this species, including the ribosome-inactivating proteins and oil biosynthesis pathway enzymes. The genomic sequence and linkage map provide a valuable resource not only for fundamental and applied research on physic nut but also for evolutionary and comparative genomics analysis, particularly in the Euphorbiaceae. PMID:25603894

  13. Dynamics and Adaptive Benefits of Protein Domain Emergence and Arrangements during Plant Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kersting, Anna R.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Moore, Andrew D.; Grath, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Plant genomes are generally very large, mostly paleopolyploid, and have numerous gene duplicates and complex genomic features such as repeats and transposable elements. Many of these features have been hypothesized to enable plants, which cannot easily escape environmental challenges, to rapidly adapt. Another mechanism, which has recently been well described as a major facilitator of rapid adaptation in bacteria, animals, and fungi but not yet for plants, is modular rearrangement of protein-coding genes. Due to the high precision of profile-based methods, rearrangements can be well captured at the protein level by characterizing the emergence, loss, and rearrangements of protein domains, their structural, functional, and evolutionary building blocks. Here, we study the dynamics of domain rearrangements and explore their adaptive benefit in 27 plant and 3 algal genomes. We use a phylogenomic approach by which we can explain the formation of 88% of all arrangements by single-step events, such as fusion, fission, and terminal loss of domains. We find many domains are lost along every lineage, but at least 500 domains are novel, that is, they are unique to green plants and emerged more or less recently. These novel domains duplicate and rearrange more readily within their genomes than ancient domains and are overproportionally involved in stress response and developmental innovations. Novel domains more often affect regulatory proteins and show a higher degree of structural disorder than ancient domains. Whereas a relatively large and well-conserved core set of single-domain proteins exists, long multi-domain arrangements tend to be species-specific. We find that duplicated genes are more often involved in rearrangements. Although fission events typically impact metabolic proteins, fusion events often create new signaling proteins essential for environmental sensing. Taken together, the high volatility of single domains and complex arrangements in plant genomes

  14. Dynamics and adaptive benefits of protein domain emergence and arrangements during plant genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Kersting, Anna R; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Moore, Andrew D; Grath, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Plant genomes are generally very large, mostly paleopolyploid, and have numerous gene duplicates and complex genomic features such as repeats and transposable elements. Many of these features have been hypothesized to enable plants, which cannot easily escape environmental challenges, to rapidly adapt. Another mechanism, which has recently been well described as a major facilitator of rapid adaptation in bacteria, animals, and fungi but not yet for plants, is modular rearrangement of protein-coding genes. Due to the high precision of profile-based methods, rearrangements can be well captured at the protein level by characterizing the emergence, loss, and rearrangements of protein domains, their structural, functional, and evolutionary building blocks. Here, we study the dynamics of domain rearrangements and explore their adaptive benefit in 27 plant and 3 algal genomes. We use a phylogenomic approach by which we can explain the formation of 88% of all arrangements by single-step events, such as fusion, fission, and terminal loss of domains. We find many domains are lost along every lineage, but at least 500 domains are novel, that is, they are unique to green plants and emerged more or less recently. These novel domains duplicate and rearrange more readily within their genomes than ancient domains and are overproportionally involved in stress response and developmental innovations. Novel domains more often affect regulatory proteins and show a higher degree of structural disorder than ancient domains. Whereas a relatively large and well-conserved core set of single-domain proteins exists, long multi-domain arrangements tend to be species-specific. We find that duplicated genes are more often involved in rearrangements. Although fission events typically impact metabolic proteins, fusion events often create new signaling proteins essential for environmental sensing. Taken together, the high volatility of single domains and complex arrangements in plant genomes

  15. Genomic Insights into the Origin of Parasitism in the Emerging Plant Pathogen Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Taisei; Cotton, James A.; Dalzell, Jonathan J.; Hasegawa, Koichi; Kanzaki, Natsumi; McVeigh, Paul; Takanashi, Takuma; Tsai, Isheng J.; Assefa, Samuel A.; Cock, Peter J. A.; Otto, Thomas Dan; Hunt, Martin; Reid, Adam J.; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Tsuchihara, Kazuko; Yokoi, Toshiro; Larsson, Mattias C.; Miwa, Johji; Maule, Aaron G.; Sahashi, Norio; Jones, John T.; Berriman, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the nematode responsible for a devastating epidemic of pine wilt disease in Asia and Europe, and represents a recent, independent origin of plant parasitism in nematodes, ecologically and taxonomically distinct from other nematodes for which genomic data is available. As well as being an important pathogen, the B. xylophilus genome thus provides a unique opportunity to study the evolution and mechanism of plant parasitism. Here, we present a high-quality draft genome sequence from an inbred line of B. xylophilus, and use this to investigate the biological basis of its complex ecology which combines fungal feeding, plant parasitic and insect-associated stages. We focus particularly on putative parasitism genes as well as those linked to other key biological processes and demonstrate that B. xylophilus is well endowed with RNA interference effectors, peptidergic neurotransmitters (including the first description of ins genes in a parasite) stress response and developmental genes and has a contracted set of chemosensory receptors. B. xylophilus has the largest number of digestive proteases known for any nematode and displays expanded families of lysosome pathway genes, ABC transporters and cytochrome P450 pathway genes. This expansion in digestive and detoxification proteins may reflect the unusual diversity in foods it exploits and environments it encounters during its life cycle. In addition, B. xylophilus possesses a unique complement of plant cell wall modifying proteins acquired by horizontal gene transfer, underscoring the impact of this process on the evolution of plant parasitism by nematodes. Together with the lack of proteins homologous to effectors from other plant parasitic nematodes, this confirms the distinctive molecular basis of plant parasitism in the Bursaphelenchus lineage. The genome sequence of B. xylophilus adds to the diversity of genomic data for nematodes, and will be an important resource in understanding the

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Verticillium-wilt causing plant pathogen Verticillium nonalfalfae

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Vid; de Jonge, Ronnie; Van de Peer, Yves; Javornik, Branka; Jakše, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium nonalfalfae is a fungal plant pathogen that causes wilt disease by colonizing the vascular tissues of host plants. The disease induced by hop isolates of V. nonalfalfae manifests in two different forms, ranging from mild symptoms to complete plant dieback, caused by mild and lethal pathotypes, respectively. Pathogenicity variations between the causal strains have been attributed to differences in genomic sequences and perhaps also to differences in their mitochondrial genomes. We used data from our recent Illumina NGS-based project of genome sequencing V. nonalfalfae to study the mitochondrial genomes of its different strains. The aim of the research was to prepare a V. nonalfalfae reference mitochondrial genome and to determine its phylogenetic placement in the fungal kingdom. The resulting 26,139 bp circular DNA molecule contains a full complement of the 14 "standard" fungal mitochondrial protein-coding genes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase subunits, together with a small rRNA subunit, a large rRNA subunit, which contains ribosomal protein S3 encoded within a type IA-intron and 26 tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of this mitochondrial genome placed it in the Verticillium spp. lineage in the Glomerellales group, which is also supported by previous phylogenetic studies based on nuclear markers. The clustering with the closely related Verticillium dahliae mitochondrial genome showed a very conserved synteny and a high sequence similarity. Two distinguishing mitochondrial genome features were also found—a potential long non-coding RNA (orf414) contained only in the Verticillium spp. of the fungal kingdom, and a specific fragment length polymorphism observed only in V. dahliae and V. nubilum of all the Verticillium spp., thus showing potential as a species specific biomarker. PMID:26839950

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Verticillium-wilt causing plant pathogen Verticillium nonalfalfae.

    PubMed

    Jelen, Vid; de Jonge, Ronnie; Van de Peer, Yves; Javornik, Branka; Jakše, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium nonalfalfae is a fungal plant pathogen that causes wilt disease by colonizing the vascular tissues of host plants. The disease induced by hop isolates of V. nonalfalfae manifests in two different forms, ranging from mild symptoms to complete plant dieback, caused by mild and lethal pathotypes, respectively. Pathogenicity variations between the causal strains have been attributed to differences in genomic sequences and perhaps also to differences in their mitochondrial genomes. We used data from our recent Illumina NGS-based project of genome sequencing V. nonalfalfae to study the mitochondrial genomes of its different strains. The aim of the research was to prepare a V. nonalfalfae reference mitochondrial genome and to determine its phylogenetic placement in the fungal kingdom. The resulting 26,139 bp circular DNA molecule contains a full complement of the 14 "standard" fungal mitochondrial protein-coding genes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase subunits, together with a small rRNA subunit, a large rRNA subunit, which contains ribosomal protein S3 encoded within a type IA-intron and 26 tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of this mitochondrial genome placed it in the Verticillium spp. lineage in the Glomerellales group, which is also supported by previous phylogenetic studies based on nuclear markers. The clustering with the closely related Verticillium dahliae mitochondrial genome showed a very conserved synteny and a high sequence similarity. Two distinguishing mitochondrial genome features were also found-a potential long non-coding RNA (orf414) contained only in the Verticillium spp. of the fungal kingdom, and a specific fragment length polymorphism observed only in V. dahliae and V. nubilum of all the Verticillium spp., thus showing potential as a species specific biomarker. PMID:26839950

  18. Physiological and genomic basis of mechanical-functional trade-off in plant vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sonali; Majumder, Arun Lahiri

    2014-01-01

    Some areas in plant abiotic stress research are not frequently addressed by genomic and molecular tools. One such area is the cross reaction of gravitational force with upward capillary pull of water and the mechanical-functional trade-off in plant vasculature. Although frost, drought and flooding stress greatly impact these physiological processes and consequently plant performance, the genomic and molecular basis of such trade-off is only sporadically addressed and so is its adaptive value. Embolism resistance is an important multiple stress- opposition trait and do offer scopes for critical insight to unravel and modify the input of living cells in the process and their biotechnological intervention may be of great importance. Vascular plants employ different physiological strategies to cope with embolism and variation is observed across the kingdom. The genomic resources in this area have started to emerge and open up possibilities of synthesis, validation and utilization of the new knowledge-base. This review article assesses the research till date on this issue and discusses new possibilities for bridging physiology and genomics of a plant, and foresees its implementation in crop science. PMID:24904619

  19. Evolutionary divergence and limits of conserved non-coding sequence detection in plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Anna R.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Gu, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory motifs embedded in upstream regions of plants is a particularly challenging bioinformatics task. Previous studies have shown that motifs in plants are short compared with those found in vertebrates. Furthermore, plant genomes have undergone several diversification mechanisms such as genome duplication events which impact the evolution of regulatory motifs. In this article, a systematic phylogenomic comparison of upstream regions is conducted to further identify features of the plant regulatory genomes, the component of genomes regulating gene expression, to enable future de novo discoveries. The findings highlight differences in upstream region properties between major plant groups and the effects of divergence times and duplication events. First, clear differences in upstream region evolution can be detected between monocots and dicots, thus suggesting that a separation of these groups should be made when searching for novel regulatory motifs, particularly since universal motifs such as the TATA box are rare. Second, investigating the decay rate of significantly aligned regions suggests that a divergence time of ∼100 mya sets a limit for reliable conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) detection. Insights presented here will set a framework to help identify embedded motifs of functional relevance by understanding the limits of bioinformatics detection for CNSs. PMID:21470961

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3, a Strain of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium with Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Wang, Chengqiang; Guo, Haimeng; Xia, Zhilin; Ye, Jiangping; Liu, Kai; Yang, Yanan; Hou, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hu; Wang, Jun; Du, Binghai; Ding, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of D. tsuruhatensis MTQ3. Several functional genes related to antimicrobial activity and environment adaption have been found in the genome. This is the first genome sequence of D. tsuruhatensis related to PGPR. PMID:26251486

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of four representative plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some Pseudomonas strains function as predominant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Within this group, Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas fluorescens are non-pathogenic biocontrol agents, and some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains are PGPR. P. chlororaphis GP72 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with a fully sequenced genome. We conducted a genomic analysis comparing GP72 with three other pseudomonad PGPR: P. fluorescens Pf-5, P. aeruginosa M18, and the nitrogen-fixing strain P. stutzeri A1501. Our aim was to identify the similarities and differences among these strains using a comparative genomic approach to clarify the mechanisms of plant growth-promoting activity. Results The genome sizes of GP72, Pf-5, M18, and A1501 ranged from 4.6 to 7.1 M, and the number of protein-coding genes varied among the four species. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) analysis assigned functions to predicted proteins. The COGs distributions were similar among the four species. However, the percentage of genes encoding transposases and their inactivated derivatives (COG L) was 1.33% of the total genes with COGs classifications in A1501, 0.21% in GP72, 0.02% in Pf-5, and 0.11% in M18. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that GP72 and Pf-5 were the most closely related strains, consistent with the genome alignment results. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences (CDSs) between GP72 and Pf-5 revealed 3544 conserved genes. There were fewer conserved genes when GP72 CDSs were compared with those of A1501 and M18. Comparisons among the four Pseudomonas species revealed 603 conserved genes in GP72, illustrating common plant growth-promoting traits shared among these PGPR. Conserved genes were related to catabolism, transport of plant-derived compounds, stress resistance, and rhizosphere colonization. Some strain-specific CDSs were related to different kinds of biocontrol activities or plant growth promotion. The GP72 genome

  2. The plant growth-promoting bacteria Azospirillum amazonense: genomic versatility and phytohormone pathway.

    PubMed

    Cecagno, Ricardo; Fritsch, Tiago Ebert; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2015-01-01

    The rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum amazonense associates with plant roots to promote plant growth. Variation in replicon numbers and rearrangements is common among Azospirillum strains, and characterization of these naturally occurring differences can improve our understanding of genome evolution. We performed an in silico comparative genomic analysis to understand the genomic plasticity of A. amazonense. The number of A. amazonense-specific coding sequences was similar when compared with the six closely related bacteria regarding belonging or not to the Azospirillum genus. Our results suggest that the versatile gene repertoire found in A. amazonense genome could have been acquired from distantly related bacteria from horizontal transfer. Furthermore, the identification of coding sequence related to phytohormone production, such as flavin-monooxygenase and aldehyde oxidase, is likely to represent the tryptophan-dependent TAM pathway for auxin production in this bacterium. Moreover, the presence of the coding sequence for nitrilase indicates the presence of the alternative route that uses IAN as an intermediate for auxin synthesis, but it remains to be established whether the IAN pathway is the Trp-independent route. Future investigations are necessary to support the hypothesis that its genomic structure has evolved to meet the requirement for adaptation to the rhizosphere and interaction with host plants. PMID:25866821

  3. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activities against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9 Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain Co1-6, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties. PMID:26272562

  5. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain Co1-6, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Jansson, Janet K; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties. PMID:26272562

  7. Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter koreensis 5J12A, a Plant Growth-Promoting and Desiccation-Tolerant Strain

    PubMed Central

    Narváez-Reinaldo, Juan Jesús; García-Fontana, Cristina; Vílchez, Juan Ignacio; González-López, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobacter koreensis 5J12A is a desiccation-tolerant organism isolated from the Nerium oleander rhizosphere. Here, we report its genome sequence, which may shed light on its role in plant growth promotion. This is believed to be the first published genome of a desiccation-tolerant plant growth promoter from the genus Arthrobacter. PMID:26067978

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing and gene replacement in plants: Transitioning from lab to field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering system has ignited and swept through the scientific community like wildfire. Owing largely to its efficiency, specificity, and flexibility, the CRISPR/Cas9 system has quickly become the preferred genome-editing tool of plant scientists. In plants, much of the earl...

  9. Comparative genomics of plant-associated Pseudomonas spp.: Insights into diversity and inheritance of traits involved in multitrophic interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group, including seven new genomic sequences for plant-associated strains. These strains exhibit a diverse spectrum of traits involved in biological control and other multitrophic interactions with plants, microbes, and ins...

  10. Complete genome sequence of Kibdelosporangium phytohabitans KLBMP 1111(T), a plant growth promoting endophytic actinomycete isolated from oil-seed plant Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sheng; Feng, Wei-Wei; Xing, Ke; Bai, Juan-Luan; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Wei-Jie; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2015-12-20

    Kibdelosporangium phytohabitans KLBMP 1111(T) is a plant growth promoting endophytic actinomycete isolated from the oil-seed plant Jatropha curcas L. collected from dry-hot valley, in Sichuan, China. The complete genome sequence of this actinomycete consists of one chromosome (11,759,770bp) with no plasmid. From the genome, we identified gene clusters responsible for polyketide and nonribosomal peptide synthesis of natural products, and genes related to the plant growth promoting, such as zeatin, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD) and siderophore. The complete genome information may be useful to understand the beneficial interactions between K. phytohabitans KLBMP 1111(T) and host plants. PMID:26516119

  11. Space stress and genome shock in developing plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    In the present paper I review symptoms of stress at the level of the nucleus in cells of plants grown in space under nonoptimized conditions. It remains to be disclosed to what extent gravity "unloading" in the space environment directly contributes to the low mitotic index and the chromosomal anomalies and damage that is frequently, but not invariably, demonstrable in space-grown plants. Evaluation of the available facts indicates that indirect effects play a major role and that there is a significant biological component to the susceptibility to stress damage equation as well. Much remains to be learned on how to provide strictly controlled, optimal environments for plant growth in space. Only after optimized controls become possible will one be able to attribute any observed space effects to lowered gravity or to other significant but more indirect effects of the space environment.

  12. Delineation of metabolic gene clusters in plant genomes by chromatin signatures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nan; Nützmann, Hans-Wilhelm; MacDonald, James T; Moore, Ben; Field, Ben; Berriri, Souha; Trick, Martin; Rosser, Susan J; Kumar, S Vinod; Freemont, Paul S; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-03-18

    Plants are a tremendous source of diverse chemicals, including many natural product-derived drugs. It has recently become apparent that the genes for the biosynthesis of numerous different types of plant natural products are organized as metabolic gene clusters, thereby unveiling a highly unusual form of plant genome architecture and offering novel avenues for discovery and exploitation of plant specialized metabolism. Here we show that these clustered pathways are characterized by distinct chromatin signatures of histone 3 lysine trimethylation (H3K27me3) and histone 2 variant H2A.Z, associated with cluster repression and activation, respectively, and represent discrete windows of co-regulation in the genome. We further demonstrate that knowledge of these chromatin signatures along with chromatin mutants can be used to mine genomes for cluster discovery. The roles of H3K27me3 and H2A.Z in repression and activation of single genes in plants are well known. However, our discovery of highly localized operon-like co-regulated regions of chromatin modification is unprecedented in plants. Our findings raise intriguing parallels with groups of physically linked multi-gene complexes in animals and with clustered pathways for specialized metabolism in filamentous fungi. PMID:26895889

  13. Delineation of metabolic gene clusters in plant genomes by chromatin signatures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nan; Nützmann, Hans-Wilhelm; MacDonald, James T.; Moore, Ben; Field, Ben; Berriri, Souha; Trick, Martin; Rosser, Susan J.; Kumar, S. Vinod; Freemont, Paul S.; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a tremendous source of diverse chemicals, including many natural product-derived drugs. It has recently become apparent that the genes for the biosynthesis of numerous different types of plant natural products are organized as metabolic gene clusters, thereby unveiling a highly unusual form of plant genome architecture and offering novel avenues for discovery and exploitation of plant specialized metabolism. Here we show that these clustered pathways are characterized by distinct chromatin signatures of histone 3 lysine trimethylation (H3K27me3) and histone 2 variant H2A.Z, associated with cluster repression and activation, respectively, and represent discrete windows of co-regulation in the genome. We further demonstrate that knowledge of these chromatin signatures along with chromatin mutants can be used to mine genomes for cluster discovery. The roles of H3K27me3 and H2A.Z in repression and activation of single genes in plants are well known. However, our discovery of highly localized operon-like co-regulated regions of chromatin modification is unprecedented in plants. Our findings raise intriguing parallels with groups of physically linked multi-gene complexes in animals and with clustered pathways for specialized metabolism in filamentous fungi. PMID:26895889

  14. Lifestyle transitions in plant pathogenic Colletotrichum fungi deciphered by genome and transcriptome analyses.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Richard J; Thon, Michael R; Hacquard, Stéphane; Amyotte, Stefan G; Kleemann, Jochen; Torres, Maria F; Damm, Ulrike; Buiate, Ester A; Epstein, Lynn; Alkan, Noam; Altmüller, Janine; Alvarado-Balderrama, Lucia; Bauser, Christopher A; Becker, Christian; Birren, Bruce W; Chen, Zehua; Choi, Jaeyoung; Crouch, Jo Anne; Duvick, Jonathan P; Farman, Mark A; Gan, Pamela; Heiman, David; Henrissat, Bernard; Howard, Richard J; Kabbage, Mehdi; Koch, Christian; Kracher, Barbara; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Law, Audrey D; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Miyara, Itay; Moore, Neil; Neumann, Ulla; Nordström, Karl; Panaccione, Daniel G; Panstruga, Ralph; Place, Michael; Proctor, Robert H; Prusky, Dov; Rech, Gabriel; Reinhardt, Richard; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Rounsley, Steve; Schardl, Christopher L; Schwartz, David C; Shenoy, Narmada; Shirasu, Ken; Sikhakolli, Usha R; Stüber, Kurt; Sukno, Serenella A; Sweigard, James A; Takano, Yoshitaka; Takahara, Hiroyuki; Trail, Frances; van der Does, H Charlotte; Voll, Lars M; Will, Isa; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhang, Jingze; Zhou, Shiguo; Dickman, Martin B; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Ma, Li-Jun; Vaillancourt, Lisa J

    2012-09-01

    Colletotrichum species are fungal pathogens that devastate crop plants worldwide. Host infection involves the differentiation of specialized cell types that are associated with penetration, growth inside living host cells (biotrophy) and tissue destruction (necrotrophy). We report here genome and transcriptome analyses of Colletotrichum higginsianum infecting Arabidopsis thaliana and Colletotrichum graminicola infecting maize. Comparative genomics showed that both fungi have large sets of pathogenicity-related genes, but families of genes encoding secreted effectors, pectin-degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism enzymes, transporters and peptidases are expanded in C. higginsianum. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed that these genes are transcribed in successive waves that are linked to pathogenic transitions: effectors and secondary metabolism enzymes are induced before penetration and during biotrophy, whereas most hydrolases and transporters are upregulated later, at the switch to necrotrophy. Our findings show that preinvasion perception of plant-derived signals substantially reprograms fungal gene expression and indicate previously unknown functions for particular fungal cell types. PMID:22885923

  15. Extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from latex-containing plants.

    PubMed

    Michiels, An; Van den Ende, Wim; Tucker, Mark; Van Riet, Liesbet; Van Laere, André

    2003-04-01

    The isolation of intact, high-molecular-mass genomic DNA is essential for many molecular biology applications including long PCR, endonuclease restriction digestion, Southern blot analysis, and genomic library construction. Many protocols are available for the extraction of DNA from plant material. However, for latex-containing Asteraceae (Cichorioideae) species, standard protocols and commercially available kits do not produce efficient yields of high-quality amplifiable DNA. A cetyltrimethylammonium bromide protocol has been optimized for isolation of genomic DNA from latex-containing plants. Key steps in the modified protocol are the use of etiolated leaf tissue for extraction and an overnight 25 degrees C isopropanol precipitation step. The purified DNA has excellent spectral qualities, is efficiently digested by restriction endonucleases, and is suitable for long-fragment PCR amplification. PMID:12672415

  16. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae).

    PubMed

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xiao-Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Xu-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae) has been reconstructed from the whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The genome is 161 541 bp in length, and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 86 518 bp) and small (SSC, 13 111 bp) single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 30 956 bp each). The chloroplast genome contains 131 genes, including 84 protein-coding genes (78 PCG species), eight ribosomal RNA genes (four rRNA species) and 37 transfer RNA genes (28 tRNA species). Phylogenetic tree based on the maximum parsimony (MP) analysis of 65 chloroplast protein-coding genes for 13 taxa demonstrated a close relationship between R. palmatum and Fagopyrum esculentum subsp. ancestrale in Polygonaceae. PMID:26153751

  17. Genomic Diversity of Biocontrol Strains of Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Aerial or Root Surfaces of Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The striking ecological, metabolic, and biochemical diversity of Pseudomonas has intrigued microbiologists for many decades. To explore the genomic diversity of biocontrol strains of Pseudomonas spp., we derived high quality draft sequences of seven strains known to suppress plant disease. The str...

  18. A genome-wide association study platform built on iPlant cyber-infrastructure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We demonstrated a flexible Genome-Wide Association (GWA) Study (GWAS) platform built upon the iPlant Collaborative Cyber-infrastructure. The platform supports big data management, sharing, and large scale study of both genotype and phenotype data on clusters. End users can add their own analysis too...

  19. Comparative genomics of bacterial and plant folate synthesis and salvage: predictions and validations

    PubMed Central

    de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; El Yacoubi, Basma; de la Garza, Rocío Díaz; Noiriel, Alexandre; Hanson, Andrew D

    2007-01-01

    Background Folate synthesis and salvage pathways are relatively well known from classical biochemistry and genetics but they have not been subjected to comparative genomic analysis. The availability of genome sequences from hundreds of diverse bacteria, and from Arabidopsis thaliana, enabled such an analysis using the SEED database and its tools. This study reports the results of the analysis and integrates them with new and existing experimental data. Results Based on sequence similarity and the clustering, fusion, and phylogenetic distribution of genes, several functional predictions emerged from this analysis. For bacteria, these included the existence of novel GTP cyclohydrolase I and folylpolyglutamate synthase gene families, and of a trifunctional p-aminobenzoate synthesis gene. For plants and bacteria, the predictions comprised the identities of a 'missing' folate synthesis gene (folQ) and of a folate transporter, and the absence from plants of a folate salvage enzyme. Genetic and biochemical tests bore out these predictions. Conclusion For bacteria, these results demonstrate that much can be learnt from comparative genomics, even for well-explored primary metabolic pathways. For plants, the findings particularly illustrate the potential for rapid functional assignment of unknown genes that have prokaryotic homologs, by analyzing which genes are associated with the latter. More generally, our data indicate how combined genomic analysis of both plants and prokaryotes can be more powerful than isolated examination of either group alone. PMID:17645794

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni” Strain CX, a Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Shao, J.; Bottner-Parker, K. D.; Gundersen-Rindal, D. E.; Zhao, Y.; Davis, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    “Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni” strain CX, belonging to subgroup 16SrIII-A, is a plant-pathogenic bacterium causing economically important diseases in many fruit crops. Here, we report the draft genome sequence, which consists of 598,508 bases, with a G+C content of 27.21 mol%. PMID:26472824

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis YL-1, a Biocontrol Strain Suppressing Plant Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shi-En; Baird, Sonya M.; Qiao, Junqing; Du, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis YL-1 was isolated from soybean root tips and showed a broad range of antagonistic activities to microbial plant pathogens. Here, we report the high-quality draft genome sequence of YL-1, which consists of a chromosome with an estimated size of 6.8 Mb with a G+C value of 63.09%. PMID:24482513

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus methylotrophicus Strain B25, a Potential Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brutel, Aline; Lemainque, Arnaud; Mairey, Barbara; Médigue, Claudine; Vallenet, David; Lefort, Francois; Grizard, Damien

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Bacillus methylotrophicus strain B25, isolated in Switzerland, was sequenced. Its size is 3.85 Mb, and several genes that may contribute to plant growth-promoting activities were identified in silico. PMID:26966215

  3. Mycosphaerella graminicola sequencing heads towards the first finished genome of a filamentous plant pathogenic fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella is one of the largest genera of plant pathogenic fungi with more than 1,000 named species, a few of which cause disease in humans and other vertebrates. The genomes of M. graminicola and M. fijiensis, two of the most economically important pathogens of wheat and banana, respectively, ...

  4. Reovirus genomes from plant-feeding insects represent a newly discovered lineage within the family Reoviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A complex set of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) was isolated from threecornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus), a plant-feeding hemipteran pest. A subset of these dsRNAs constitute the genome of a new reovirus, provisionally designated Spissistilus festinus reovirus (SpFRV). SpFRV was prese...

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Carnation Mottle Virus Infecting Hop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong

    2015-01-01

    The Carnation mottle virus (CarMV) is a single positive-strand RNA virus belonging to the genus Carmovirus. The major natural host for CarMV is the carnation. In this study, using transcriptome data, we provide for the first time a nearly complete genome sequence of CarMV infecting hop plants. PMID:25977420

  6. Plant breeding with genomic selection: potential gain per unit time and cost

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advancements in genotyping are rapidly decreasing marker costs and increasing genome coverage. This is facilitating the use of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in plant breeding. Commonly employed MAS strategies, however, are not well suited for complex traits, requiring extra time for field-based ph...

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Trantas, Emmanouil A.; Licciardello, Grazia; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Witek, Kamil; Strano, Cinzia P.; Duxbury, Zane; Ververidis, Filippos; Goumas, Dimitrios E.; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Guttman, David S.; Catara, Vittoria; Sarris, Panagiotis F.

    2015-01-01

    The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor) and P. mediterranea (Pmed), are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for genes that encode proteins involved in commercially important chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of type III secretion system and known type III effector-encoding genes from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes. Genome-mining also revealed the presence of gene clusters for biosynthesis of siderophores, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and hydrogen cyanide. A highly conserved quorum sensing system was detected in all strains, although species specific differences were observed. Our study provides the basis for in-depth investigations regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence strategies in the battle between plants and microbes. PMID:26300874

  8. Genome plasticity in filamentous plant pathogens contributes to the emergence of novel effectors and their cellular processes in the host.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanhan; Li, Ying; Qi, Zhongqiang; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-02-01

    Plant diseases cause extensive yield loss of crops worldwide, and secretory 'warfare' occurs between plants and pathogenic organisms all the time. Filamentous plant pathogens have evolved the ability to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization through secreting effectors inside plant cells. The stresses from hosts and environment can drive the genome dynamics of plant pathogens. Remarkable advances in plant pathology have been made owing to these adaptable genome regions of several lineages of filamentous phytopathogens. Characterization new effectors and interaction analyses between pathogens and plants have provided molecular insights into the plant pathways perturbed during the infection process. In this mini-review, we highlight promising approaches of identifying novel effectors based on the genome plasticity. We also discuss the interaction mechanisms between plants and their filamentous pathogens and outline the possibilities of effector gene expression under epigenetic control that will be future directions for research. PMID:26228744

  9. Genome size reduction can trigger rapid phenotypic evolution in invasive plants

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Sébastien; Muenke, Nikolas J.; Molofsky, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The study of rapid evolution in invasive species has highlighted the fundamental role played by founder events, emergence of genetic novelties through recombination and rapid response to new selective pressures. However, whether rapid adaptation of introduced species can be driven by punctual changes in genome organization has received little attention. In plants, variation in genome size, i.e. variation in the amount of DNA per monoploid set of chromosomes through loss or gain of repeated DNA sequences, is known to influence a number of physiological, phenological and life-history features. The present study investigated whether change in genome size has contributed to the evolution of greater potential of vegetative growth in invasive populations of an introduced grass. Methods The study was based on the recent demonstration that invasive genotypes of reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) occurring in North America have emerged from recombination between introduced European strains. The genome sizes of more than 200 invasive and native genotypes were measured and their genome size was related to their phenotypic traits measured in a common glasshouse environment. Population genetics data were used to infer phylogeographical relationships between study populations, and the evolutionary history of genome size within the study species was inferred. Key Results Invasive genotypes had a smaller genome than European native genotypes from which they are derived. This smaller genome size had phenotypic effects that increased the species' invasive potential, including a higher early growth rate, due to a negative relationship between genome size and rate of stem elongation. Based on inferred phylogeographical relationships of invasive and native populations, evolutionary models were consistent with a scenario of genome reduction by natural selection during the invasion process, rather than a scenario of stochastic change. Conclusions Punctual

  10. The mitochondrial genome of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant bugs from the genus Lygus are important pests of a wide variety of cultivated crops throughout the northern temperate regions. Lygus lineolaris is the most widespread species in North America and the primary pest species in the eastern half of the continent. Mitochondrial DNA has been an imp...

  11. Application of Functional Genomics and Proteomics to Plant Cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Gayle M

    2010-01-01

    Plant cryobiology has primarily emerged from the classical fields of cryobiology and plant stress physiology. Cryopreservation tools are now available to geneticists for germplasm preservation and the field itself is advancing significantly through the use of molecular techniques. Long-term preservation of vegetatively propagated tissues can minimize the risks of long-term maintenance under tissue culture or field conditions. Cells can be successfully cryopreserved when the adverse affects of ice crystal formation are mitigated by the removal of water or procedures to limit ice formation and crystal growth. The addition of cryoprotectant solutions to hydrated cells may improve the survival of microdissected shoot tips or embryonic axes. Recent discoveries in the genetic pathways leading to cold acclimation and freezing tolerance suggest the involvement of key cold-regulated genes in the acquisition of cold tolerance in plant tissues. Model systems of banana and Arabidopsis have revealed the involvement of genes and proteins in the glycolytic and other metabolic pathways, particularly processes involved in dehydration tolerance, osmoprotection, and membrane transport. Furthermore, successful recovery appears to be dependent upon the presence of antioxidant protection from reactive oxygen species. Characterization of specific genes and proteins will lead to significant advances in plant cryobiology research. PMID:20808520

  12. Genomic Approaches to Understanding Allelochemical Effects on Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known concerning the mode of action of allelochemicals or plant defense responses mounted against them. Theoretically, changes in the expression of genes encoding the primary target or other proteins in the same pathway should occur soon after phytotoxin exposure. Defense responses, such ...

  13. Semiclassical ultraextremal horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Matyjasek, Jerzy; Zaslavskii, O.B.

    2005-04-15

    We examine backreaction of quantum massive fields on multiply-degenerate (ultraextremal) horizons. It is shown that, under influence of the quantum backreaction, the horizon of such a kind moves to a new position near which the metric does not change its asymptotics, so the ultraextremal black holes and cosmological spacetimes do exist as self-consistent solutions of the semiclassical field equations.

  14. The 2011 Horizon Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Smith, R.; Willis, H.; Levine, A.; Haywood, K.

    2011-01-01

    The internationally recognized series of "Horizon Reports" is part of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years on a variety of sectors around the globe. This volume, the "2011 Horizon…

  15. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  16. The 2010 Horizon Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Levine, A.; Smith, R.; Stone, S.

    2010-01-01

    The annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a qualitative research project established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry on college and university campuses within the next five years. The…

  17. Fuzziness at the horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, Davide; Nicolini, Piero

    2010-08-01

    We study the stability of the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole interior by analysing the propagation of a massless scalar field between the two horizons. We show that the spacetime fuzziness triggered by the field higher momenta can cure the classical exponential blue-shift divergence, suppressing the emergence of infinite energy density in a region nearby the Cauchy horizon.

  18. Living with genome instability: the adaptation of phytoplasmas todiverse environments of their insect and plant hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Ewing, Adam; Miller, Sally A.; Radek, Agnes; Shevchenko, Dimitriy; Tsukerman, Kiryl; Walunas, Theresa; Lapidus, Alla; Campbell, John W.; Hogenhout Saskia A.

    2006-02-17

    Phytoplasmas (Candidatus Phytoplasma, Class Mollicutes) cause disease in hundreds of economically important plants, and are obligately transmitted by sap-feeding insects of the order Hemiptera, mainly leafhoppers and psyllids. The 706,569-bp chromosome and four plasmids of aster yellows phytoplasma strain witches broom (AY-WB) were sequenced and compared to the onion yellows phytoplasma strain M (OY-M) genome. The phytoplasmas have small repeat-rich genomes. The repeated DNAs are organized into large clusters, potential mobile units (PMUs), which contain tra5 insertion sequences (ISs), and specialized sigma factors and membrane proteins. So far, PMUs are unique to phytoplasmas. Compared to mycoplasmas, phytoplasmas lack several recombination and DNA modification functions, and therefore phytoplasmas probably use different mechanisms of recombination, likely involving PMUs, for the creation of variability, allowing phytoplasmas to adjust to the diverse environments of plants and insects. The irregular GC skews and presence of ISs and large repeated sequences in the AY-WB and OY-M genomes are indicative of high genomic plasticity. Nevertheless, segments of {approx}250 kb, located between genes lplA and glnQ are syntenic between the two phytoplasmas, contain the majority of the metabolic genes and no ISs. AY-WB is further along in the reductive evolution process than OY-M. The AY-WB genome is {approx}154 kb smaller than the OY-M genome, primarily as a result of fewer multicopy sequences, including PMUs. Further, AY-WB lacks genes that are truncated and are part of incomplete pathways in OY-M. This is the first comparative phytoplasma genome analysis and report of the existence of PMUs in phytoplasma genomes.

  19. Comparative genomics reveals insight into virulence strategies of plant pathogenic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Bishwo N; Hamilton, John P; Zerillo, Marcelo M; Tisserat, Ned; Lévesque, C André; Buell, C Robin

    2013-01-01

    The kingdom Stramenopile includes diatoms, brown algae, and oomycetes. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, including Phytophthora, Pythium and downy mildew species, cause devastating diseases on a wide range of host species and have a significant impact on agriculture. Here, we report comparative analyses on the genomes of thirteen straminipilous species, including eleven plant pathogenic oomycetes, to explore common features linked to their pathogenic lifestyle. We report the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of six Pythium genomes and comparison with other stramenopiles including photosynthetic diatoms, and other plant pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora species, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, and Pythium ultimum var. ultimum. Novel features of the oomycete genomes include an expansion of genes encoding secreted effectors and plant cell wall degrading enzymes in Phytophthora species and an over-representation of genes involved in proteolytic degradation and signal transduction in Pythium species. A complete lack of classical RxLR effectors was observed in the seven surveyed Pythium genomes along with an overall reduction of pathogenesis-related gene families in H. arabidopsidis. Comparative analyses revealed fewer genes encoding enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism in Pythium species and H. arabidopsidis as compared to Phytophthora species, suggesting variation in virulence mechanisms within plant pathogenic oomycete species. Shared features between the oomycetes and diatoms revealed common mechanisms of intracellular signaling and transportation. Our analyses demonstrate the value of comparative genome analyses for exploring the evolution of pathogenesis and survival mechanisms in the oomycetes. The comparative analyses of seven Pythium species with the closely related oomycetes, Phytophthora species and H. arabidopsidis, and distantly related diatoms provide insight into genes that underlie virulence. PMID:24124466

  20. Comparative Genomics Reveals Insight into Virulence Strategies of Plant Pathogenic Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Bishwo N.; Hamilton, John P.; Zerillo, Marcelo M.; Tisserat, Ned; Lévesque, C. André; Buell, C. Robin

    2013-01-01

    The kingdom Stramenopile includes diatoms, brown algae, and oomycetes. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, including Phytophthora, Pythium and downy mildew species, cause devastating diseases on a wide range of host species and have a significant impact on agriculture. Here, we report comparative analyses on the genomes of thirteen straminipilous species, including eleven plant pathogenic oomycetes, to explore common features linked to their pathogenic lifestyle. We report the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of six Pythium genomes and comparison with other stramenopiles including photosynthetic diatoms, and other plant pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora species, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, and Pythium ultimum var. ultimum. Novel features of the oomycete genomes include an expansion of genes encoding secreted effectors and plant cell wall degrading enzymes in Phytophthora species and an over-representation of genes involved in proteolytic degradation and signal transduction in Pythium species. A complete lack of classical RxLR effectors was observed in the seven surveyed Pythium genomes along with an overall reduction of pathogenesis-related gene families in H. arabidopsidis. Comparative analyses revealed fewer genes encoding enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism in Pythium species and H. arabidopsidis as compared to Phytophthora species, suggesting variation in virulence mechanisms within plant pathogenic oomycete species. Shared features between the oomycetes and diatoms revealed common mechanisms of intracellular signaling and transportation. Our analyses demonstrate the value of comparative genome analyses for exploring the evolution of pathogenesis and survival mechanisms in the oomycetes. The comparative analyses of seven Pythium species with the closely related oomycetes, Phytophthora species and H. arabidopsidis, and distantly related diatoms provide insight into genes that underlie virulence. PMID:24124466

  1. Genome Information of Methylobacterium oryzae, a Plant-Probiotic Methylotroph in the Phyllosphere

    PubMed Central

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Lee, Yi; Sa, Tong-Min; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2014-01-01

    Pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs in the Rhizobiales are widespread in the environment, and many Methylobacterium species associated with plants produce plant growth-promoting substances. To gain insights into the life style at the phyllosphere and the genetic bases of plant growth promotion, we determined and analyzed the complete genome sequence of Methylobacterium oryzae CBMB20T, a strain isolated from rice stem. The genome consists of a 6.29-Mb chromosome and four plasmids, designated as pMOC1 to pMOC4. Among the 6,274 coding sequences in the chromosome, the bacterium has, besides most of the genes for the central metabolism, all of the essential genes for the assimilation and dissimilation of methanol that are either located in methylotrophy islands or dispersed. M. oryzae is equipped with several kinds of genes for adaptation to plant surfaces such as defense against UV radiation, oxidative stress, desiccation, or nutrient deficiency, as well as high proportion of genes related to motility and signaling. Moreover, it has an array of genes involved in metabolic pathways that may contribute to promotion of plant growth; they include auxin biosynthesis, cytokine biosynthesis, vitamin B12 biosynthesis, urea metabolism, biosorption of heavy metals or decrease of metal toxicity, pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deamination, phosphate solubilization, and thiosulfate oxidation. Through the genome analysis of M. oryzae, we provide information on the full gene complement of M. oryzae that resides in the aerial parts of plants and enhances plant growth. The plant-associated lifestyle of M. oryzae pertaining to methylotrophy and plant growth promotion, and its potential as a candidate for a bioinoculant targeted to the phyllosphere and focused on phytostimulation are illuminated. PMID:25211235

  2. Genome information of Methylobacterium oryzae, a plant-probiotic methylotroph in the phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Jeong, Haeyoung; Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Lee, Yi; Sa, Tong-Min; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F

    2014-01-01

    Pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs in the Rhizobiales are widespread in the environment, and many Methylobacterium species associated with plants produce plant growth-promoting substances. To gain insights into the life style at the phyllosphere and the genetic bases of plant growth promotion, we determined and analyzed the complete genome sequence of Methylobacterium oryzae CBMB20T, a strain isolated from rice stem. The genome consists of a 6.29-Mb chromosome and four plasmids, designated as pMOC1 to pMOC4. Among the 6,274 coding sequences in the chromosome, the bacterium has, besides most of the genes for the central metabolism, all of the essential genes for the assimilation and dissimilation of methanol that are either located in methylotrophy islands or dispersed. M. oryzae is equipped with several kinds of genes for adaptation to plant surfaces such as defense against UV radiation, oxidative stress, desiccation, or nutrient deficiency, as well as high proportion of genes related to motility and signaling. Moreover, it has an array of genes involved in metabolic pathways that may contribute to promotion of plant growth; they include auxin biosynthesis, cytokine biosynthesis, vitamin B12 biosynthesis, urea metabolism, biosorption of heavy metals or decrease of metal toxicity, pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deamination, phosphate solubilization, and thiosulfate oxidation. Through the genome analysis of M. oryzae, we provide information on the full gene complement of M. oryzae that resides in the aerial parts of plants and enhances plant growth. The plant-associated lifestyle of M. oryzae pertaining to methylotrophy and plant growth promotion, and its potential as a candidate for a bioinoculant targeted to the phyllosphere and focused on phytostimulation are illuminated. PMID:25211235

  3. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Mushegian, Arcady R.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  4. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to modify abiotic stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Watanabe, Takahito; Sugano, Shigeo S; Ueta, Risa; Ishihara, Ryosuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osakabe, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to modify plant genomes, however, improvements in specificity and applicability are still needed in order for the editing technique to be useful in various plant species. Here, using genome editing mediated by a truncated gRNA (tru-gRNA)/Cas9 combination, we generated new alleles for OST2, a proton pump in Arabidopsis, with no off-target effects. By following expression of Cas9 and the tru-gRNAs, newly generated mutations in CRIPSR/Cas9 transgenic plants were detected with high average mutation rates of up to 32.8% and no off-target effects using constitutive promoter. Reducing nuclear localization signals in Cas9 decreased the mutation rate. In contrast, tru-gRNA Cas9 cassettes driven by meristematic- and reproductive-tissue-specific promoters increased the heritable mutation rate in Arabidopsis, showing that high expression in the germ line can produce bi-allelic mutations. Finally, the new mutant alleles obtained for OST2 exhibited altered stomatal closing in response to environmental conditions. These results suggest further applications in molecular breeding to improve plant function using optimized plant CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:27226176

  5. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to modify abiotic stress responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Watanabe, Takahito; Sugano, Shigeo S; Ueta, Risa; Ishihara, Ryosuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osakabe, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to modify plant genomes, however, improvements in specificity and applicability are still needed in order for the editing technique to be useful in various plant species. Here, using genome editing mediated by a truncated gRNA (tru-gRNA)/Cas9 combination, we generated new alleles for OST2, a proton pump in Arabidopsis, with no off-target effects. By following expression of Cas9 and the tru-gRNAs, newly generated mutations in CRIPSR/Cas9 transgenic plants were detected with high average mutation rates of up to 32.8% and no off-target effects using constitutive promoter. Reducing nuclear localization signals in Cas9 decreased the mutation rate. In contrast, tru-gRNA Cas9 cassettes driven by meristematic- and reproductive-tissue-specific promoters increased the heritable mutation rate in Arabidopsis, showing that high expression in the germ line can produce bi-allelic mutations. Finally, the new mutant alleles obtained for OST2 exhibited altered stomatal closing in response to environmental conditions. These results suggest further applications in molecular breeding to improve plant function using optimized plant CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:27226176

  6. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  7. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Vallon, Olivier; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Witman, George B.; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Marshall, Wallace F.; Qu, Liang-Hu; Nelson, David R.; Sanderfoot, Anton A.; Spalding, Martin H.; Kapitonov, Vladimir V.; Ren, Qinghu; Ferris, Patrick; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan M.; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Cardol, Pierre; Cerutti, Heriberto; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Chen, Chun-Long; Cognat, Valérie; Croft, Martin T.; Dent, Rachel; Dutcher, Susan; Fernández, Emilio; Ferris, Patrick; Fukuzawa, Hideya; González-Ballester, David; González-Halphen, Diego; Hallmann, Armin; Hanikenne, Marc; Hippler, Michael; Inwood, William; Jabbari, Kamel; Kalanon, Ming; Kuras, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul A.; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Lobanov, Alexey V.; Lohr, Martin; Manuell, Andrea; Meier, Iris; Mets, Laurens; Mittag, Maria; Mittelmeier, Telsa; Moroney, James V.; Moseley, Jeffrey; Napoli, Carolyn; Nedelcu, Aurora M.; Niyogi, Krishna; Novoselov, Sergey V.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Pazour, Greg; Purton, Saul; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Riekhof, Wayne; Rymarquis, Linda; Schroda, Michael; Stern, David; Umen, James; Willows, Robert; Wilson, Nedra; Zimmer, Sara Lana; Allmer, Jens; Balk, Janneke; Bisova, Katerina; Chen, Chong-Jian; Elias, Marek; Gendler, Karla; Hauser, Charles; Lamb, Mary Rose; Ledford, Heidi; Long, Joanne C.; Minagawa, Jun; Page, M. Dudley; Pan, Junmin; Pootakham, Wirulda; Roje, Sanja; Rose, Annkatrin; Stahlberg, Eric; Terauchi, Aimee M.; Yang, Pinfen; Ball, Steven; Bowler, Chris; Dieckmann, Carol L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Green, Pamela; Jorgensen, Richard; Mayfield, Stephen; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T.; Brokstein, Peter; Dubchak, Inna; Goodstein, David; Hornick, Leila; Huang, Y. Wayne; Jhaveri, Jinal; Luo, Yigong; Martínez, Diego; Ngau, Wing Chi Abby; Otillar, Bobby; Poliakov, Alexander; Porter, Aaron; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Werner, Gregory; Zhou, Kemin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the ∼120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella. PMID:17932292

  8. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  9. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  10. Unlimited Thirst for Genome Sequencing, Data Interpretation, and Database Usage in Genomic Era: The Road towards Fast-Track Crop Plant Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, Mahalingam

    2015-01-01

    The number of sequenced crop genomes and associated genomic resources is growing rapidly with the advent of inexpensive next generation sequencing methods. Databases have become an integral part of all aspects of science research, including basic and applied plant and animal sciences. The importance of databases keeps increasing as the volume of datasets from direct and indirect genomics, as well as other omics approaches, keeps expanding in recent years. The databases and associated web portals provide at a minimum a uniform set of tools and automated analysis across a wide range of crop plant genomes. This paper reviews some basic terms and considerations in dealing with crop plant databases utilization in advancing genomic era. The utilization of databases for variation analysis with other comparative genomics tools, and data interpretation platforms are well described. The major focus of this review is to provide knowledge on platforms and databases for genome-based investigations of agriculturally important crop plants. The utilization of these databases in applied crop improvement program is still being achieved widely; otherwise, the end for sequencing is not far away. PMID:25874133

  11. Genome-Scale Phylogenetics: Inferring the Plant Tree of Life from 18,896 Gene Trees

    PubMed Central

    Burleigh, J. Gordon; Bansal, Mukul S.; Eulenstein, Oliver; Hartmann, Stefanie; Wehe, André; Vision, Todd J.

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses using genome-scale data sets must confront incongruence among gene trees, which in plants is exacerbated by frequent gene duplications and losses. Gene tree parsimony (GTP) is a phylogenetic optimization criterion in which a species tree that minimizes the number of gene duplications induced among a set of gene trees is selected. The run time performance of previous implementations has limited its use on large-scale data sets. We used new software that incorporates recent algorithmic advances to examine the performance of GTP on a plant data set consisting of 18,896 gene trees containing 510,922 protein sequences from 136 plant taxa (giving a combined alignment length of >2.9 million characters). The relationships inferred from the GTP analysis were largely consistent with previous large-scale studies of backbone plant phylogeny and resolved some controversial nodes. The placement of taxa that were present in few gene trees generally varied the most among GTP bootstrap replicates. Excluding these taxa either before or after the GTP analysis revealed high levels of phylogenetic support across plants. The analyses supported magnoliids sister to a eudicot + monocot clade and did not support the eurosid I and II clades. This study presents a nuclear genomic perspective on the broad-scale phylogenic relationships among plants, and it demonstrates that nuclear genes with a history of duplication and loss can be phylogenetically informative for resolving the plant tree of life. PMID:21186249

  12. CRISPR/Cas9-Based Multiplex Genome Editing in Monocot and Dicot Plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingliang; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated genome targeting system has been applied to a variety of organisms, including plants. Compared to other genome-targeting technologies such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas9 system is easier to use and has much higher editing efficiency. In addition, multiple "single guide RNAs" (sgRNAs) with different target sequences can be designed to direct the Cas9 protein to multiple genomic sites for simultaneous multiplex editing. Here, we present a procedure for highly efficient multiplex genome targeting in monocot and dicot plants using a versatile and robust CRISPR/Cas9 vector system, emphasizing the construction of binary constructs with multiple sgRNA expression cassettes in one round of cloning using Golden Gate ligation. We also describe the genotyping of targeted mutations in transgenic plants by direct Sanger sequencing followed by decoding of superimposed sequencing chromatograms containing biallelic or heterozygous mutations using the Web-based tool DSDecode. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27366892

  13. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    SciTech Connect

    Taghavi, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Hoffman, A.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Walla, M. D.; Vangronsveld, J.; Newman, L.; Monchy, S.

    2010-05-13

    Enterobacter sp. 638 is an endophytic plant growth promoting gamma-proteobacterium that was isolated from the stem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides cv. H11-11), a potentially important biofuel feed stock plant. The Enterobacter sp. 638 genome sequence reveals the presence of a 4,518,712 bp chromosome and a 157,749 bp plasmid (pENT638-1). Genome annotation and comparative genomics allowed the identification of an extended set of genes specific to the plant niche adaptation of this bacterium. This includes genes that code for putative proteins involved in survival in the rhizosphere (to cope with oxidative stress or uptake of nutrients released by plant roots), root adhesion (pili, adhesion, hemagglutinin, cellulose biosynthesis), colonization/establishment inside the plant (chemiotaxis, flagella, cellobiose phosphorylase), plant protection against fungal and bacterial infections (siderophore production and synthesis of the antimicrobial compounds 4-hydroxybenzoate and 2-phenylethanol), and improved poplar growth and development through the production of the phytohormones indole acetic acid, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. Metabolite analysis confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR showed that, the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol is induced by the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. Interestingly, both the genetic determinants required for sucrose metabolism and the synthesis of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are clustered on a genomic island. These findings point to a close interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host, where the availability of sucrose, a major plant sugar, affects the synthesis of plant growth promoting phytohormones by the endophytic bacterium. The availability of the genome sequence, combined with metabolome and transcriptome analysis, will provide a better understanding of the synergistic interactions between poplar and its growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further exploited to

  14. Whole Genome Duplication Affects Evolvability of Flowering Time in an Autotetraploid Plant

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sara L.; Husband, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome duplications have occurred recurrently throughout the evolutionary history of eukaryotes. The resulting genetic and phenotypic changes can influence physiological and ecological responses to the environment; however, the impact of genome copy number on evolvability has rarely been examined experimentally. Here, we evaluate the effect of genome duplication on the ability to respond to selection for early flowering time in lines drawn from naturally occurring diploid and autotetraploid populations of the plant Chamerion angustifolium (fireweed). We contrast this with the result of four generations of selection on synthesized neoautotetraploids, whose genic variability is similar to diploids but genome copy number is similar to autotetraploids. In addition, we examine correlated responses to selection in all three groups. Diploid and both extant tetraploid and neoautotetraploid lines responded to selection with significant reductions in time to flowering. Evolvability, measured as realized heritability, was significantly lower in extant tetraploids ( = 0.31) than diploids ( = 0.40). Neotetraploids exhibited the highest evolutionary response ( = 0.55). The rapid shift in flowering time in neotetraploids was associated with an increase in phenotypic variability across generations, but not with change in genome size or phenotypic correlations among traits. Our results suggest that whole genome duplications, without hybridization, may initially alter evolutionary rate, and that the dynamic nature of neoautopolyploids may contribute to the prevalence of polyploidy throughout eukaryotes. PMID:23028620

  15. Species-wide genome sequence and nucleotide polymorphisms from the model allopolyploid plant Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Schmutzer, Thomas; Samans, Birgit; Dyrszka, Emmanuelle; Ulpinnis, Chris; Weise, Stephan; Stengel, Doreen; Colmsee, Christian; Lespinasse, Denis; Micic, Zeljko; Abel, Stefan; Duchscherer, Peter; Breuer, Frank; Abbadi, Amine; Leckband, Gunhild; Snowdon, Rod; Scholz, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Brassica napus (oilseed rape, canola) is one of the world’s most important sources of vegetable oil for human nutrition and biofuel, and also a model species for studies investigating the evolutionary consequences of polyploidisation. Strong bottlenecks during its recent origin from interspecific hybridisation, and subsequently through intensive artificial selection, have severely depleted the genetic diversity available for breeding. On the other hand, high-throughput genome profiling technologies today provide unprecedented scope to identify, characterise and utilise genetic diversity in primary and secondary crop gene pools. Such methods also enable implementation of genomic selection strategies to accelerate breeding progress. The key prerequisite is availability of high-quality sequence data and identification of high-quality, genome-wide sequence polymorphisms representing relevant gene pools. We present comprehensive genome resequencing data from a panel of 52 highly diverse natural and synthetic B. napus accessions, along with a stringently selected panel of 4.3 million high-confidence, genome-wide SNPs. The data is of great interest for genomics-assisted breeding and for evolutionary studies on the origins and consequences in allopolyploidisation in plants. PMID:26647166

  16. Species-wide genome sequence and nucleotide polymorphisms from the model allopolyploid plant Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Schmutzer, Thomas; Samans, Birgit; Dyrszka, Emmanuelle; Ulpinnis, Chris; Weise, Stephan; Stengel, Doreen; Colmsee, Christian; Lespinasse, Denis; Micic, Zeljko; Abel, Stefan; Duchscherer, Peter; Breuer, Frank; Abbadi, Amine; Leckband, Gunhild; Snowdon, Rod; Scholz, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Brassica napus (oilseed rape, canola) is one of the world's most important sources of vegetable oil for human nutrition and biofuel, and also a model species for studies investigating the evolutionary consequences of polyploidisation. Strong bottlenecks during its recent origin from interspecific hybridisation, and subsequently through intensive artificial selection, have severely depleted the genetic diversity available for breeding. On the other hand, high-throughput genome profiling technologies today provide unprecedented scope to identify, characterise and utilise genetic diversity in primary and secondary crop gene pools. Such methods also enable implementation of genomic selection strategies to accelerate breeding progress. The key prerequisite is availability of high-quality sequence data and identification of high-quality, genome-wide sequence polymorphisms representing relevant gene pools. We present comprehensive genome resequencing data from a panel of 52 highly diverse natural and synthetic B. napus accessions, along with a stringently selected panel of 4.3 million high-confidence, genome-wide SNPs. The data is of great interest for genomics-assisted breeding and for evolutionary studies on the origins and consequences in allopolyploidisation in plants. PMID:26647166

  17. Cytosine methylation of plastid genome in higher plants. Fact or artefact?

    PubMed

    Fojtová, M; Kovarík, A; Matyásek, R

    2001-03-01

    DNA methylation of chloroplast genome has been studied in a large variety of angiosperm species using restriction enzyme analysis of three genomic loci (totally encompassing about 10% of chloroplast genome) and bisulfite genomic sequencing of tobacco ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (large subunit) gene (rbcL). Except for CCWGG (W=A or T) sites that were partially refractory to the cleavage with methylation sensitive EcoRII in all loci, no cytosine methylation was found at the CCGG (MspI/HpaII) and several other restriction sites tested. However, EcoRII was unable to completely digest an unmethylated CCWGG site in the cloned rbcL gene on plasmid. Further a bisulfite genomic sequencing performed on EcoRII-restricted DNA failed to show any 5-methylcytosine either within or outside inspected EcoRII sites along the 3' end of rbcL coding region. In conclusion our results do not support evidence for methylated cytosine residues in plant chloroplast genomes and we suggest that results obtained with EcoRII should be interpreted with great care especially when small differences in methylation levels are analysed. PMID:11448733

  18. Genome-wide analysis of adaptive molecular evolution in the carnivorous plant Utricularia gibba.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Chang, Tien-Hao; Librado, Pablo; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Rozas, Julio; Albert, Victor A

    2015-02-01

    The genome of the bladderwort Utricularia gibba provides an unparalleled opportunity to uncover the adaptive landscape of an aquatic carnivorous plant with unique phenotypic features such as absence of roots, development of water-filled suction bladders, and a highly ramified branching pattern. Despite its tiny size, the U. gibba genome accommodates approximately as many genes as other plant genomes. To examine the relationship between the compactness of its genome and gene turnover, we compared the U. gibba genome with that of four other eudicot species, defining a total of 17,324 gene families (orthogroups). These families were further classified as either 1) lineage-specific expanded/contracted or 2) stable in size. The U. gibba-expanded families are generically related to three main phenotypic features: 1) trap physiology, 2) key plant morphogenetic/developmental pathways, and 3) response to environmental stimuli, including adaptations to life in aquatic environments. Further scans for signatures of protein functional specialization permitted identification of seven candidate genes with amino acid changes putatively fixed by positive Darwinian selection in the U. gibba lineage. The Arabidopsis orthologs of these genes (AXR, UMAMIT41, IGS, TAR2, SOL1, DEG9, and DEG10) are involved in diverse plant biological functions potentially relevant for U. gibba phenotypic diversification, including 1) auxin metabolism and signal transduction, 2) flowering induction and floral meristem transition, 3) root development, and 4) peptidases. Taken together, our results suggest numerous candidate genes and gene families as interesting targets for further experimental confirmation of their functional and adaptive roles in the U. gibba's unique lifestyle and highly specialized body plan. PMID:25577200

  19. Comparative Genomics Yields Insights into Niche Adaptation of Plant Vascular Wilt Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Steven J.; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Kang, Seogchan; Veronese, Paola; Gold, Scott E.; Thomma, Bart P. H. J.; Chen, Zehua; Henrissat, Bernard; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Park, Jongsun; Garcia-Pedrajas, Maria D.; Barbara, Dez J.; Anchieta, Amy; de Jonge, Ronnie; Santhanam, Parthasarathy; Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Atallah, Zahi; Amyotte, Stefan G.; Paz, Zahi; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Hayes, Ryan J.; Heiman, David I.; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Engels, Reinhard; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Dobinson, Katherine F.; Ma, Li-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum infect over 200 plant species, causing billions of dollars in annual crop losses. The characteristic wilt symptoms are a result of colonization and proliferation of the pathogens in the xylem vessels, which undergo fluctuations in osmolarity. To gain insights into the mechanisms that confer the organisms' pathogenicity and enable them to proliferate in the unique ecological niche of the plant vascular system, we sequenced the genomes of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum and compared them to each other, and to the genome of Fusarium oxysporum, another fungal wilt pathogen. Our analyses identified a set of proteins that are shared among all three wilt pathogens, and present in few other fungal species. One of these is a homolog of a bacterial glucosyltransferase that synthesizes virulence-related osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria. Pathogenicity tests of the corresponding V. dahliae glucosyltransferase gene deletion mutants indicate that the gene is required for full virulence in the Australian tobacco species Nicotiana benthamiana. Compared to other fungi, the two sequenced Verticillium genomes encode more pectin-degrading enzymes and other carbohydrate-active enzymes, suggesting an extraordinary capacity to degrade plant pectin barricades. The high level of synteny between the two Verticillium assemblies highlighted four flexible genomic islands in V. dahliae that are enriched for transposable elements, and contain duplicated genes and genes that are important in signaling/transcriptional regulation and iron/lipid metabolism. Coupled with an enhanced capacity to degrade plant materials, these genomic islands may contribute to the expanded genetic diversity and virulence of V. dahliae, the primary causal agent of Verticillium wilts. Significantly, our study reveals insights into the genetic mechanisms of niche adaptation of fungal wilt pathogens, advances our understanding of the evolution and

  20. Whole genome duplication events in plant evolution reconstructed and predicted using myosin motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The evolution of land plants is characterized by whole genome duplications (WGD), which drove species diversification and evolutionary novelties. Detecting these events is especially difficult if they date back to the origin of the plant kingdom. Established methods for reconstructing WGDs include intra- and inter-genome comparisons, KS age distribution analyses, and phylogenetic tree constructions. Results By analysing 67 completely sequenced plant genomes 775 myosins were identified and manually assembled. Phylogenetic trees of the myosin motor domains revealed orthologous and paralogous relationships and were consistent with recent species trees. Based on the myosin inventories and the phylogenetic trees, we have identified duplications of the entire myosin motor protein family at timings consistent with 23 WGDs, that had been reported before. We also predict 6 WGDs based on further protein family duplications. Notably, the myosin data support the two recently reported WGDs in the common ancestor of all extant angiosperms. We predict single WGDs in the Manihot esculenta and Nicotiana benthamiana lineages, two WGDs for Linum usitatissimum and Phoenix dactylifera, and a triplication or two WGDs for Gossypium raimondii. Our data show another myosin duplication in the ancestor of the angiosperms that could be either the result of a single gene duplication or a remnant of a WGD. Conclusions We have shown that the myosin inventories in angiosperms retain evidence of numerous WGDs that happened throughout plant evolution. In contrast to other protein families, many myosins are still present in extant species. They are closely related and have similar domain architectures, and their phylogenetic grouping follows the genome duplications. Because of its broad taxonomic sampling the dataset provides the basis for reliable future identification of further whole genome duplications. PMID:24053117

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Adaptive Molecular Evolution in the Carnivorous Plant Utricularia gibba

    PubMed Central

    Librado, Pablo; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Rozas, Julio; Albert, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    The genome of the bladderwort Utricularia gibba provides an unparalleled opportunity to uncover the adaptive landscape of an aquatic carnivorous plant with unique phenotypic features such as absence of roots, development of water-filled suction bladders, and a highly ramified branching pattern. Despite its tiny size, the U. gibba genome accommodates approximately as many genes as other plant genomes. To examine the relationship between the compactness of its genome and gene turnover, we compared the U. gibba genome with that of four other eudicot species, defining a total of 17,324 gene families (orthogroups). These families were further classified as either 1) lineage-specific expanded/contracted or 2) stable in size. The U. gibba-expanded families are generically related to three main phenotypic features: 1) trap physiology, 2) key plant morphogenetic/developmental pathways, and 3) response to environmental stimuli, including adaptations to life in aquatic environments. Further scans for signatures of protein functional specialization permitted identification of seven candidate genes with amino acid changes putatively fixed by positive Darwinian selection in the U. gibba lineage. The Arabidopsis orthologs of these genes (AXR, UMAMIT41, IGS, TAR2, SOL1, DEG9, and DEG10) are involved in diverse plant biological functions potentially relevant for U. gibba phenotypic diversification, including 1) auxin metabolism and signal transduction, 2) flowering induction and floral meristem transition, 3) root development, and 4) peptidases. Taken together, our results suggest numerous candidate genes and gene families as interesting targets for further experimental confirmation of their functional and adaptive roles in the U. gibba’s unique lifestyle and highly specialized body plan. PMID:25577200

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Tandem Repeats in Plants and Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhixin; Guo, Cheng; Sutharzan, Sreeskandarajan; Li, Pei; Echt, Craig S.; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) extensively exist in the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Based on the sequenced genomes and gene annotations of 31 plant and algal species in Phytozome version 8.0 (http://www.phytozome.net/), we examined TRs in a genome-wide scale, characterized their distributions and motif features, and explored their putative biological functions. Among the 31 species, no significant correlation was detected between the TR density and genome size. Interestingly, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (42,059 bp/Mbp) and castor bean Ricinus communis (55,454 bp/Mbp) showed much higher TR densities than all other species (13,209 bp/Mbp on average). In the 29 land plants, including 22 dicots, 5 monocots, and 2 bryophytes, 5′-UTR and upstream intergenic 200-nt (UI200) regions had the first and second highest TR densities, whereas in the two green algae (C. reinhardtii and Volvox carteri) the first and second highest densities were found in intron and coding sequence (CDS) regions, respectively. In CDS regions, trinucleotide and hexanucleotide motifs were those most frequently represented in all species. In intron regions, especially in the two green algae, significantly more TRs were detected near the intron–exon junctions. Within intergenic regions in dicots and monocots, more TRs were found near both the 5′ and 3′ ends of genes. GO annotation in two green algae revealed that the genes with TRs in introns are significantly involved in transcriptional and translational processing. As the first systematic examination of TRs in plant and green algal genomes, our study showed that TRs displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation in plants and green algae. PMID:24192840

  3. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in plants and green algae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Guo, Cheng; Sutharzan, Sreeskandarajan; Li, Pei; Echt, Craig S; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) extensively exist in the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Based on the sequenced genomes and gene annotations of 31 plant and algal species in Phytozome version 8.0 (http://www.phytozome.net/), we examined TRs in a genome-wide scale, characterized their distributions and motif features, and explored their putative biological functions. Among the 31 species, no significant correlation was detected between the TR density and genome size. Interestingly, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (42,059 bp/Mbp) and castor bean Ricinus communis (55,454 bp/Mbp) showed much higher TR densities than all other species (13,209 bp/Mbp on average). In the 29 land plants, including 22 dicots, 5 monocots, and 2 bryophytes, 5'-UTR and upstream intergenic 200-nt (UI200) regions had the first and second highest TR densities, whereas in the two green algae (C. reinhardtii and Volvox carteri) the first and second highest densities were found in intron and coding sequence (CDS) regions, respectively. In CDS regions, trinucleotide and hexanucleotide motifs were those most frequently represented in all species. In intron regions, especially in the two green algae, significantly more TRs were detected near the intron-exon junctions. Within intergenic regions in dicots and monocots, more TRs were found near both the 5' and 3' ends of genes. GO annotation in two green algae revealed that the genes with TRs in introns are significantly involved in transcriptional and translational processing. As the first systematic examination of TRs in plant and green algal genomes, our study showed that TRs displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation in plants and green algae. PMID:24192840

  4. Genome analysis of medicinal Ganoderma spp. with plant-pathogenic and saprotrophic life-styles.

    PubMed

    Kües, Ursula; Nelson, David R; Liu, Chang; Yu, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Jianhui; Li, Jianqin; Wang, Xin-Cun; Sun, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a fungal genus belonging to the Ganodermataceae family and Polyporales order. Plant-pathogenic species in this genus can cause severe diseases (stem, butt, and root rot) in economically important trees and perennial crops, especially in tropical countries. Ganoderma species are white rot fungi and have ecological importance in the breakdown of woody plants for nutrient mobilization. They possess effective machineries of lignocellulose-decomposing enzymes useful for bioenergy production and bioremediation. In addition, the genus contains many important species that produce pharmacologically active compounds used in health food and medicine. With the rapid adoption of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, whole genome sequencing and systematic transcriptome analyses become affordable approaches to identify an organism's genes. In the last few years, numerous projects have been initiated to identify the genetic contents of several Ganoderma species, particularly in different strains of Ganoderma lucidum. In November 2013, eleven whole genome sequencing projects for Ganoderma species were registered in international databases, three of which were already completed with genomes being assembled to high quality. In addition to the nuclear genome, two mitochondrial genomes for Ganoderma species have also been reported. Complementing genome analysis, four transcriptome studies on various developmental stages of Ganoderma species have been performed. Information obtained from these studies has laid the foundation for the identification of genes involved in biological pathways that are critical for understanding the biology of Ganoderma, such as the mechanism of pathogenesis, the biosynthesis of active components, life cycle and cellular development, etc. With abundant genetic information becoming available, a few centralized resources have been established to disseminate the knowledge and integrate relevant data to support comparative genomic analyses of

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Cupriavidus gilardii Strain JZ4 Isolated from the Desert Plant Tribulus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Lafi, Feras F.; Bokhari, Ameerah; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2016-01-01

    We isolated the plant endophytic bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain JZ4 from the roots of the desert plant Tribulus terrestris, collected from the Jizan region, Saudi Arabia. We report here the draft genome sequence of JZ4, together with several enzymes related to plant growth-promoting activity, environmental adaption, and antifungal activity. PMID:27469951

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Cupriavidus gilardii Strain JZ4 Isolated from the Desert Plant Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Lafi, Feras F; Bokhari, Ameerah; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B; Hirt, Heribert; Saad, Maged M

    2016-01-01

    We isolated the plant endophytic bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain JZ4 from the roots of the desert plant Tribulus terrestris, collected from the Jizan region, Saudi Arabia. We report here the draft genome sequence of JZ4, together with several enzymes related to plant growth-promoting activity, environmental adaption, and antifungal activity. PMID:27469951

  7. From algae to angiosperms–inferring the phylogeny of green plants (Viridiplantae) from 360 plastid genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing has provided a wealth of plastid genome sequence data from an increasingly diverse set of green plants (Viridiplantae). Although these data have helped resolve the phylogeny of numerous clades (e.g., green algae, angiosperms, and gymnosperms), their utility for inferring relationships across all green plants is uncertain. Viridiplantae originated 700-1500 million years ago and may comprise as many as 500,000 species. This clade represents a major source of photosynthetic carbon and contains an immense diversity of life forms, including some of the smallest and largest eukaryotes. Here we explore the limits and challenges of inferring a comprehensive green plant phylogeny from available complete or nearly complete plastid genome sequence data. Results We assembled protein-coding sequence data for 78 genes from 360 diverse green plant taxa with complete or nearly complete plastid genome sequences available from GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses of the plastid data recovered well-supported backbone relationships and strong support for relationships that were not observed in previous analyses of major subclades within Viridiplantae. However, there also is evidence of systematic error in some analyses. In several instances we obtained strongly supported but conflicting topologies from analyses of nucleotides versus amino acid characters, and the considerable variation in GC content among lineages and within single genomes affected the phylogenetic placement of several taxa. Conclusions Analyses of the plastid sequence data recovered a strongly supported framework of relationships for green plants. This framework includes: i) the placement of Zygnematophyceace as sister to land plants (Embryophyta), ii) a clade of extant gymnosperms (Acrogymnospermae) with cycads + Ginkgo sister to remaining extant gymnosperms and with gnetophytes (Gnetophyta) sister to non-Pinaceae conifers (Gnecup trees), and iii) within the monilophyte clade

  8. Test plan: Sealing of the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ), including Marker Bed 139 (MB139) and the overlying halite, below the repository horizon, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Small-scale seal performance test-series F

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, E.H.

    1992-05-01

    This test plan describes activities intended to demonstrate equipment and techniques for producing, injecting, and evaluating microfine cementitious grout. The grout will be injected in fractured rock located below the repository horizon at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These data are intended to support the development of the Alcove Gas Barrier System (AGBS), the design of upcoming, large-scale seal tests, and ongoing laboratory evaluations of grouting efficacy. Degradation of the grout will be studied in experiments conducted in parallel with the underground grouting experiment.

  9. Test plan: Sealing of the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ), including Marker Bed 139 (MB139) and the overlying halite, below the repository horizon, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. [Cementitious grout into fractured WIPP rock

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, E.H.

    1992-05-01

    This test plan describes activities intended to demonstrate equipment and techniques for producing, injecting, and evaluating microfine cementitious grout. The grout will be injected in fractured rock located below the repository horizon at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These data are intended to support the development of the Alcove Gas Barrier System (AGBS), the design of upcoming, large-scale seal tests, and ongoing laboratory evaluations of grouting efficacy. Degradation of the grout will be studied in experiments conducted in parallel with the underground grouting experiment.

  10. PHYTOCHEMICALS IN PLANTS: GENOMICS-ASSISTED PLANT IMPROVEMENT FOR NUTRITIONAL AND HEALTH BENEFITS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are an important source of essential nutrients and health-beneficial components that are crucial for human life. Because the intake of these phytochemicals is not always adequate, the resources of plant biotechnology are being used to enhance the nutritional quality of our plant-based food s...

  11. openSputnik--a database to ESTablish comparative plant genomics using unsaturated sequence collections.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The public expressed sequence tag collections are continually being enriched with high-quality sequences that represent an ever-expanding range of taxonomically diverse plant species. While these sequence collections provide biased insight into the populations of expressed genes available within individual species and their associated tissues, the information is conceivably of wider relevance in a comparative context. When we consider the available expressed sequence tag (EST) collections of summer 2004, most of the major plant taxonomic clades are at least superficially represented. Investigation of the five million available plant ESTs provides a wealth of information that has applications in modelling the routes of plant genome evolution and the identification of lineage-specific genes and gene families. Over four million ESTs from over 50 distinct plant species have been collated within an EST analysis pipeline called openSputnik. The ESTs were resolved down into approximately one million unigene sequences. These have been annotated using orthology-based annotation transfer from reference plant genomes and using a variety of contemporary bioinformatics methods to assign peptide, structural and functional attributes. The openSputnik database is available at http://sputnik.btk.fi. PMID:15608275

  12. New Horizons at Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Paul; Nimmo, Francis

    2016-06-01

    The New Horizons mission has revealed Pluto and its moon Charon to be geologically active worlds. The familiar, yet exotic, landforms suggest that geologic processes operate similarly across the Solar System, even in its cold outer reaches.

  13. The mitochondrial genomes of the early land plants Treubia lacunosa and Anomodon rugelii: dynamic and conservative evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xue, Jia-Yu; Wang, Bin; Li, Libo; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2011-01-01

    Early land plant mitochondrial genomes captured important changes of mitochondrial genome evolution when plants colonized land. The chondromes of seed plants show several derived characteristics, e.g., large genome size variation, rapid intra-genomic rearrangement, abundant introns, and highly variable levels of RNA editing. On the other hand, the chondromes of charophytic algae are still largely ancestral in these aspects, resembling those of early eukaryotes. When the transition happened has been a long-standing question in studies of mitochondrial genome evolution. Here we report complete mitochondrial genome sequences from an early-diverging liverwort, Treubia lacunosa, and a late-evolving moss, Anomodon rugelii. The two genomes, 151,983 and 104,239 base pairs in size respectively, contain standard sets of protein coding genes for respiration and protein synthesis, as well as nearly full sets of rRNA and tRNA genes found in the chondromes of the liverworts Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea and the moss Physcomitrella patens. The gene orders of these two chondromes are identical to those of the other liverworts and moss. Their intron contents, with all cis-spliced group I or group II introns, are also similar to those in the previously sequenced liverwort and moss chondromes. These five chondromes plus the two from the hornworts Phaeoceros laevis and Megaceros aenigmaticus for the first time allowed comprehensive comparative analyses of structure and organization of mitochondrial genomes both within and across the three major lineages of bryophytes. These analyses led to the conclusion that the mitochondrial genome experienced dynamic evolution in genome size, gene content, intron acquisition, gene order, and RNA editing during the origins of land plants and their major clades. However, evolution of this organellar genome has remained rather conservative since the origin and initial radiation of early land plants, except within vascular plants. PMID

  14. The complete nucleotide sequence of the hornwort (Anthoceros formosae) chloroplast genome: insight into the earliest land plants.

    PubMed

    Kugita, Masanori; Kaneko, Akira; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Takeya, Yuko; Matsumoto, Tohoru; Yoshinaga, Koichi

    2003-01-15

    It is generally believed that bryophytes are the earliest land plants. However, the phylogenetic relationships among bryophytes, including mosses, liverworts and hornworts, are not clearly resolved. To obtain more information on the earliest land plants, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast genome from the hornwort Anthoceros formosae. The circular double-stranded DNA of 161 162 bp is the largest genome ever reported among land plant chloroplasts. It contains 76 protein, 32 tRNA and 4 rRNA genes and 10 open reading frames (ORFs), which are identical with the chloroplast genome of the other green plants analyzed. The major difference is a larger inverted repeat than that of the liverwort Marchantia, Anthoceros contains an excess of ndhB and rps7 genes and the 3' exon of rps12. The genes matK and rps15, commonly found in the chloroplast genomes of land plants, are pseudogenes. The intron of rrn23 is the first finding in the known chloroplast genomes of land plants. A striking feature of the hornwort chloroplast is that more than half of the protein-coding genes have nonsense codons, which are converted into sense codons by RNA editing. Maximum-likelihood (ML) analysis, based on 11 518 amino acid sites of 52 proteins encoded in the chloroplast genomes of the green plants, placed liverworts as the sister to all other land plants. PMID:12527781

  15. Post-conversion targeted capture of modified cytosines in mammalian and plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Suzuki, Masako; Wendt, Jennifer; Patterson, Nicole; Eichten, Steven R.; Hermanson, Peter J.; Green, Dawn; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey; Richmond, Todd; Rosenbaum, Heidi; Burgess, Daniel; Springer, Nathan M.; Greally, John M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a capture-based approach for bisulfite-converted DNA that allows interrogation of pre-defined genomic locations, allowing quantitative and qualitative assessments of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) at CG dinucleotides and in non-CG contexts (CHG, CHH) in mammalian and plant genomes. We show the technique works robustly and reproducibly using as little as 500 ng of starting DNA, with results correlating well with whole genome bisulfite sequencing data, and demonstrate that human DNA can be tested in samples contaminated with microbial DNA. This targeting approach will allow cell type-specific designs to maximize the value of 5mC and 5hmC sequencing. PMID:25813045

  16. Complete genome sequence of a new enamovirus from Argentina infecting alfalfa plants showing dwarfism symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Giolitti, Fabián; Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Lenardon, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Alfalfa dwarf disease, probably caused by synergistic interactions of mixed virus infections, is a major and emergent disease that threatens alfalfa production in Argentina. Deep sequencing of diseased alfalfa plant samples from the central region of Argentina resulted in the identification of a new virus genome resembling enamoviruses in sequence and genome structure. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that it is a new member of the genus Enamovirus, family Luteoviridae. The virus is tentatively named "alfalfa enamovirus 1" (AEV-1). The availability of the AEV-1 genome sequence will make it possible to assess the genetic variability of this virus and to construct an infectious clone to investigate its role in alfalfa dwarfism disease. PMID:27068164

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Andrographis paniculata.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ping; Shao, Yanhua; Li, Qian; Gao, Junli; Zhang, Runjing; Lai, Xiaoping; Wang, Deqin; Zhang, Huiye

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of Andrographis paniculata, an important medicinal plant with great economic value, has been studied in this article. The genome size is 150,249 bp in length, with 38.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25,300 bp) are separated by a large single copy region (LSC, 82,459 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 17,190 bp). The chloroplast genome contains 114 unique genes, 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. In these genes, 15 genes contained 1 intron and 3 genes comprised of 2 introns. PMID:25856518

  18. Infrared horizon locator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A precise method and apparatus for locating the earth's infrared horizon from space that is independent of season and latitude is described. First and second integrations of the earth's radiance profile are made from space to earth with the second delayed with respect to the first. The second integration is multiplied by a predetermined constant R and then compared with the first integration. When the two are equal the horizon is located.

  19. Evolution of genome size and chromosome number in the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea (Lentibulariaceae), with a new estimate of the minimum genome size in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Andreas; Michael, Todd P.; Rivadavia, Fernando; Sousa, Aretuza; Wang, Wenqin; Temsch, Eva M.; Greilhuber, Johann; Müller, Kai F.; Heubl, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Some species of Genlisea possess ultrasmall nuclear genomes, the smallest known among angiosperms, and some have been found to have chromosomes of diminutive size, which may explain why chromosome numbers and karyotypes are not known for the majority of species of the genus. However, other members of the genus do not possess ultrasmall genomes, nor do most taxa studied in related genera of the family or order. This study therefore examined the evolution of genome sizes and chromosome numbers in Genlisea in a phylogenetic context. The correlations of genome size with chromosome number and size, with the phylogeny of the group and with growth forms and habitats were also examined. Methods Nuclear genome sizes were measured from cultivated plant material for a comprehensive sampling of taxa, including nearly half of all species of Genlisea and representing all major lineages. Flow cytometric measurements were conducted in parallel in two laboratories in order to compare the consistency of different methods and controls. Chromosome counts were performed for the majority of taxa, comparing different staining techniques for the ultrasmall chromosomes. Key Results Genome sizes of 15 taxa of Genlisea are presented and interpreted in a phylogenetic context. A high degree of congruence was found between genome size distribution and the major phylogenetic lineages. Ultrasmall genomes with 1C values of <100 Mbp were almost exclusively found in a derived lineage of South American species. The ancestral haploid chromosome number was inferred to be n = 8. Chromosome numbers in Genlisea ranged from 2n = 2x = 16 to 2n = 4x = 32. Ascendant dysploid series (2n = 36, 38) are documented for three derived taxa. The different ploidy levels corresponded to the two subgenera, but were not directly correlated to differences in genome size; the three different karyotype ranges mirrored the different sections of the genus. The smallest known plant genomes were not found in

  20. WHOSE GENES ARE WE SEQUENCING? EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF MULTIPLE GENOMES IN NATIVE AND REGENERATED HIGH PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genome analysis has been traditionally based on an assumption that healthy plants are axenic organisms. With improved techniques for detecting microbial endophytes, evidence supporting the presence of microbial consortia associated with all major plant tissues is mounting. Herein, the isolat...

  1. Linear Plasmids and the Rate of Sequence Evolution in Plant Mitochondrial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jessica M; Simmons, Mark P; Wu, Zhiqiang; Sloan, Daniel B

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants experience frequent insertions of foreign sequences, including linear plasmids that also exist in standalone forms within mitochondria, but the history and phylogenetic distribution of plasmid insertions is not well known. Taking advantage of the increased availability of plant mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and plasmid-derived insertions. Mitochondrial genomes from multiple land plant lineages (including liverworts, lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) include fragmented remnants from ancient plasmid insertions. Such insertions are much more recent and widespread in angiosperms, in which approximately 75% of sequenced mitochondrial genomes contain identifiable plasmid insertions. Although conflicts between plasmid and angiosperm phylogenies provide clear evidence of repeated horizontal transfers, we were still able to detect significant phylogenetic concordance, indicating that mitochondrial plasmids have also experienced sustained periods of (effectively) vertical transmission in angiosperms. The observed levels of sequence divergence in plasmid-derived genes suggest that nucleotide substitution rates in these plasmids, which often encode their own viral-like DNA polymerases, are orders of magnitude higher than in mitochondrial chromosomes. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the periodic incorporation of mitochondrial genes into plasmids contributes to the remarkable heterogeneity in substitution rates among genes that has recently been discovered in some angiosperm mitochondrial genomes. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the recently acquired ψtrnP-trnW gene region in a maize linear plasmid is evolving significantly faster than homologous sequences that have been retained in the mitochondrial chromosome in closely related grasses. PMID:26759362

  2. Linear Plasmids and the Rate of Sequence Evolution in Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jessica M.; Simmons, Mark P.; Wu, Zhiqiang; Sloan, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants experience frequent insertions of foreign sequences, including linear plasmids that also exist in standalone forms within mitochondria, but the history and phylogenetic distribution of plasmid insertions is not well known. Taking advantage of the increased availability of plant mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and plasmid-derived insertions. Mitochondrial genomes from multiple land plant lineages (including liverworts, lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) include fragmented remnants from ancient plasmid insertions. Such insertions are much more recent and widespread in angiosperms, in which approximately 75% of sequenced mitochondrial genomes contain identifiable plasmid insertions. Although conflicts between plasmid and angiosperm phylogenies provide clear evidence of repeated horizontal transfers, we were still able to detect significant phylogenetic concordance, indicating that mitochondrial plasmids have also experienced sustained periods of (effectively) vertical transmission in angiosperms. The observed levels of sequence divergence in plasmid-derived genes suggest that nucleotide substitution rates in these plasmids, which often encode their own viral-like DNA polymerases, are orders of magnitude higher than in mitochondrial chromosomes. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the periodic incorporation of mitochondrial genes into plasmids contributes to the remarkable heterogeneity in substitution rates among genes that has recently been discovered in some angiosperm mitochondrial genomes. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the recently acquired ψtrnP-trnW gene region in a maize linear plasmid is evolving significantly faster than homologous sequences that have been retained in the mitochondrial chromosome in closely related grasses. PMID:26759362

  3. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Dothideomycetes Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabian; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-01-01

    The class Dothideomycetes is one of the largest groups of fungi with a high level of ecological diversity including many plant pathogens infecting a broad range of hosts. Here, we compare genome features of 18 members of this class, including 6 necrotrophs, 9 (hemi)biotrophs and 3 saprotrophs, to analyze genome structure, evolution, and the diverse strategies of pathogenesis. The Dothideomycetes most likely evolved from a common ancestor more than 280 million years ago. The 18 genome sequences differ dramatically in size due to variation in repetitive content, but show much less variation in number of (core) genes. Gene order appears to have been rearranged mostly within chromosomal boundaries by multiple inversions, in extant genomes frequently demarcated by adjacent simple repeats. Several Dothideomycetes contain one or more gene-poor, transposable element (TE)-rich putatively dispensable chromosomes of unknown function. The 18 Dothideomycetes offer an extensive catalogue of genes involved in cellulose degradation, proteolysis, secondary metabolism, and cysteine-rich small secreted proteins. Ancestors of the two major orders of plant pathogens in the Dothideomycetes, the Capnodiales and Pleosporales, may have had different modes of pathogenesis, with the former having fewer of these genes than the latter. Many of these genes are enriched in proximity to transposable elements, suggesting faster evolution because of the effects of repeat induced point (RIP) mutations. A syntenic block of genes, including oxidoreductases, is conserved in most Dothideomycetes and upregulated during infection in L. maculans, suggesting a possible function in response to oxidative stress. PMID:23236275

  4. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Dothideomycetes Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabian; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Wit, Pierre J. G. M. de; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-02-29

    The class Dothideomycetes is one of the largest groups of fungi with a high level of ecological diversity including many plant pathogens infecting a broad range of hosts. Here, we compare genome features of 18 members of this class, including 6 necrotrophs, 9 (hemi)biotrophs and 3 saprotrophs, to analyze genome structure, evolution, and the diverse strategies of pathogenesis. The Dothideomycetes most likely evolved from a common ancestor more than 280 million years ago. The 18 genome sequences differ dramatically in size due to variation in repetitive content, but show much less variation in number of (core) genes. Gene order appears to have been rearranged mostly within chromosomal boundaries by multiple inversions, in extant genomes frequently demarcated by adjacent simple repeats. Several Dothideomycetes contain one or more gene-poor, transposable element (TE)-rich putatively dispensable chromosomes of unknown function. The 18 Dothideomycetes offer an extensive catalogue of genes involved in cellulose degradation, proteolysis, secondary metabolism, and cysteine-rich small secreted proteins. Ancestors of the two major orders of plant pathogens in the Dothideomycetes, the Capnodiales and Pleosporales, may have had different modes of pathogenesis, with the former having fewer of these genes than the latter. Many of these genes are enriched in proximity to transposable elements, suggesting faster evolution because of the effects of repeat induced point (RIP) mutations. A syntenic block of genes, including oxidoreductases, is conserved in most Dothideomycetes and upregulated during infection in L. maculans, suggesting a possible function in response to oxidative stress.

  5. Multiplex sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes for assembling complex plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Beier, Sebastian; Himmelbach, Axel; Schmutzer, Thomas; Felder, Marius; Taudien, Stefan; Mayer, Klaus F X; Platzer, Matthias; Stein, Nils; Scholz, Uwe; Mascher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Hierarchical shotgun sequencing remains the method of choice for assembling high-quality reference sequences of complex plant genomes. The efficient exploitation of current high-throughput technologies and powerful computational facilities for large-insert clone sequencing necessitates the sequencing and assembly of a large number of clones in parallel. We developed a multiplexed pipeline for shotgun sequencing and assembling individual bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) using the Illumina sequencing platform. We illustrate our approach by sequencing 668 barley BACs (Hordeum vulgare L.) in a single Illumina HiSeq 2000 lane. Using a newly designed parallelized computational pipeline, we obtained sequence assemblies of individual BACs that consist, on average, of eight sequence scaffolds and represent >98% of the genomic inserts. Our BAC assemblies are clearly superior to a whole-genome shotgun assembly regarding contiguity, completeness and the representation of the gene space. Our methods may be employed to rapidly obtain high-quality assemblies of a large number of clones to assemble map-based reference sequences of plant and animal species with complex genomes by sequencing along a minimum tiling path. PMID:26801048

  6. Gramene: A Resource for Comparative Analysis of Plants Genomes and Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tello-Ruiz, Marcela Karey; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Youens-Clark, Ken; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Ware, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    Gramene is an integrated informatics resource for accessing, visualizing, and comparing plant genomes and biological pathways. Originally targeting grasses, Gramene has grown to host annotations for economically important and research model crops, including wheat, potato, tomato, banana, grape, poplar, and Chlamydomonas. Its strength derives from the application of a phylogenetic framework for genome comparison and the use of ontologies to integrate structural and functional annotation data. This chapter outlines system requirements for end users and database hosting, data types and basic navigation within Gramene, and provides examples of how to (1) view a phylogenetic tree for a family of transcription factors, (2) explore genetic variation in the orthologues of a gene with a known trait association, and (3) upload, visualize, and privately share end user data into a new genome browser track.Moreover, this is the first publication describing Gramene's new web interface-intended to provide a simplified portal to the most complete and up-to-date set of plant genome and pathway annotations. PMID:26519404

  7. Spatial separation of parental genomes in hybrids of somatic plant cells.

    PubMed

    Gleba, Y Y; Parokonny, A; Kotov, V; Negrutiu, I; Momot, V

    1987-06-01

    Chromosome spatial arrangements on metaphase plates of intergeneric intertribal cell hybrids of Nicotiana chinensis and Atropa belladonna as well as interspecific somatic hybrid plants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris were analyzed. In the metaphases of the first divisions of protoplast fusion products, chromosomes of the two parents were spatially separated (segmented metaphase). In long-term cultured somatic hybrids, the topology of genome separation pattern in both callus cells and plants showed changes in form from "segmental" to "radial." Growing the hybrid cells in the presence of colchicine resulted in random chromosome arrangement both in cells directly exposed to different colchicine concentrations and in colchicine-treated cells grown in colchicine-free media. The degree of genome separation calculated for different cell clones remained constant during in vitro propagation of cells but was significantly lower for subclones derived from colchicine-treated cells. Therefore, it is concluded that spatial chromosome arrangement in metaphase is epigenetically controlled. PMID:16593838

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol and Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain UM270.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salmerón, Julie E; Hernández-León, Rocio; Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma Del Carmen; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Santoyo, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens strain UM270 was isolated form the rhizosphere of wild Medicago spp. A previous work has shown that this pseudomonad isolate was able to produce diverse diffusible and volatile compounds involved in plant protection and growth promotion. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the rhizobacterium P. fluorescens strain UM270. The sequence covers 6,047,974 bp of a single chromosome, with 62.66 % G + C content and no plasmids. Genome annotations predicted 5,509 genes, 5,396 coding genes, 59 RNA genes and 110 pseudogenes. Genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of genes involved in biological control and plant-growth promoting activities. We anticipate that the P. fluorescens strain UM270 genome will contribute insights about bacterial plant protection and beneficial properties through genomic comparisons among fluorescent pseudomonads. PMID:26767092

  9. Genome Sequence of Phytophthora fragariae var. fragariae, a Quarantine Plant-Pathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ruifang; Cheng, Yinghui; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying; Guo, Liyun

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora fragariae var. fragariae is a serious plant-pathogenic fungus causing red core disease in strawberries, resulting in a larger number of fruit produced, and the fungus has been regulated as a quarantine pest of many countries and regions. Here, we announce the genome sequence of P. fragariae var. fragariae, and this information might provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenicity and host specificity of this pathogen, as well as help us further identify targets for fungicides. PMID:25814589

  10. Next Generation Sequencing Technologies: The Doorway to the Unexplored Genomics of Non-Model Plants

    PubMed Central

    Unamba, Chibuikem I. N.; Nag, Akshay; Sharma, Ram K.

    2015-01-01

    Non-model plants i.e., the species which have one or all of the characters such as long life cycle, difficulty to grow in the laboratory or poor fecundity, have been schemed out of sequencing projects earlier, due to high running cost of Sanger sequencing. Consequently, the information about their genomics and key biological processes are inadequate. However, the advent of fast and cost effective next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms in the recent past has enabled the unearthing of certain characteristic gene structures unique to these species. It has also aided in gaining insight about mechanisms underlying processes of gene expression and secondary metabolism as well as facilitated development of genomic resources for diversity characterization, evolutionary analysis and marker assisted breeding even without prior availability of genomic sequence information. In this review we explore how different Next Gen Sequencing platforms, as well as recent advances in NGS based high throughput genotyping technologies are rewarding efforts on de-novo whole genome/transcriptome sequencing, development of genome wide sequence based markers resources for improvement of non-model crops that are less costly than phenotyping. PMID:26734016

  11. Threshold models for genome-enabled prediction of ordinal categorical traits in plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-López, Osval A; Montesinos-López, Abelardo; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Eskridge, Kent; Crossa, José

    2015-02-01

    Categorical scores for disease susceptibility or resistance often are recorded in plant breeding. The aim of this study was to introduce genomic models for analyzing ordinal characters and to assess the predictive ability of genomic predictions for ordered categorical phenotypes using a threshold model counterpart of the Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Predictor (i.e., TGBLUP). The threshold model was used to relate a hypothetical underlying scale to the outward categorical response. We present an empirical application where a total of nine models, five without interaction and four with genomic × environment interaction (G×E) and genomic additive × additive × environment interaction (G×G×E), were used. We assessed the proposed models using data consisting of 278 maize lines genotyped with 46,347 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and evaluated for disease resistance [with ordinal scores from 1 (no disease) to 5 (complete infection)] in three environments (Colombia, Zimbabwe, and Mexico). Models with G×E captured a sizeable proportion of the total variability, which indicates the importance of introducing interaction to improve prediction accuracy. Relative to models based on main effects only, the models that included G×E achieved 9-14% gains in prediction accuracy; adding additive × additive interactions did not increase prediction accuracy consistently across locations. PMID:25538102

  12. The chloroplast genome sequence of an important medicinal plant Dioscorea nipponica.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan; Wang, Bo; Yang, Jun; Song, Chi; Wang, Ping; Chen, Shilin; Sun, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Dioscorea nipponica is an important medicinal plant belonging to Dioscoreaceae, a family which is vital for the evolution of monocotyledon. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the D. nipponica chloroplast genome was determined. It was an AT-rich (63.3%) chloroplast genome with 152,946 bp in length, containing a pair of 23,113 bp inverted repeats, which were separated by a large and a small single copy region of 83,557 bp and 23,064 bp in length, respectively. It encodes 120 unique genes, including 89 protein-coding genes, 27 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. The predicted gene-coding regions covered 58.7% of the genome sequences. Ten genes contained one intron, while two genes had two introns. Phylogenetic analyses showed the present chloroplast genome can be used as a potential supper barcode to distinguish D. nipponica from its closely related species. Furthermore, the chloroplast genome provides a molecular base for the next investigation on this important medicinal species. PMID:26017048

  13. Genome Sequencing of a Mung Bean Plant Growth Promoting Strain of P. aeruginosa with Biocontrol Ability

    PubMed Central

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Shankar, Manoharan; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 is a mung bean rhizosphere strain that produces secondary metabolites and hydrolytic enzymes contributing to excellent antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina, one of the prevalent fungal pathogens of mung bean. Genome sequencing was performed using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine generating 1,354,732 reads (6,772,433 sequenced bases) achieving ~25-fold coverage of the genome. Reference genome assembly using MIRA 3.4.0 yielded 198 contigs. The draft genome of PGPR2 encoded 6803 open reading frames, of which 5314 were genes with predicted functions, 1489 were genes of known functions, and 80 were RNA-coding genes. Strain specific and core genes of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 that are relevant to rhizospheric habitat were identified by pangenome analysis. Genes involved in plant growth promoting function such as synthesis of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid, trehalose, mineral scavenging siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, chitinases, acyl homoserine lactones, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and phytases were identified. In addition, niche-specific genes such as phosphate solubilising 3-phytase, adhesins, pathway-specific transcriptional regulators, a diguanylate cyclase involved in cellulose synthesis, a receptor for ferrienterochelin, a DEAD/DEAH-box helicase involved in stress tolerance, chemotaxis/motility determinants, an HtpX protease, and enzymes involved in the production of a chromanone derivative with potent antifungal activity were identified. PMID:25184130

  14. Threshold Models for Genome-Enabled Prediction of Ordinal Categorical Traits in Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos-López, Osval A.; Montesinos-López, Abelardo; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; de los Campos, Gustavo; Eskridge, Kent; Crossa, José

    2014-01-01

    Categorical scores for disease susceptibility or resistance often are recorded in plant breeding. The aim of this study was to introduce genomic models for analyzing ordinal characters and to assess the predictive ability of genomic predictions for ordered categorical phenotypes using a threshold model counterpart of the Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Predictor (i.e., TGBLUP). The threshold model was used to relate a hypothetical underlying scale to the outward categorical response. We present an empirical application where a total of nine models, five without interaction and four with genomic × environment interaction (G×E) and genomic additive × additive × environment interaction (G×G×E), were used. We assessed the proposed models using data consisting of 278 maize lines genotyped with 46,347 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and evaluated for disease resistance [with ordinal scores from 1 (no disease) to 5 (complete infection)] in three environments (Colombia, Zimbabwe, and Mexico). Models with G×E captured a sizeable proportion of the total variability, which indicates the importance of introducing interaction to improve prediction accuracy. Relative to models based on main effects only, the models that included G×E achieved 9–14% gains in prediction accuracy; adding additive × additive interactions did not increase prediction accuracy consistently across locations. PMID:25538102

  15. Parasitic plants have increased rates of molecular evolution across all three genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Theoretical models and experimental evidence suggest that rates of molecular evolution could be raised in parasitic organisms compared to non-parasitic taxa. Parasitic plants provide an ideal test for these predictions, as there are at least a dozen independent origins of the parasitic lifestyle in angiosperms. Studies of a number of parasitic plant lineages have suggested faster rates of molecular evolution, but the results of some studies have been mixed. Comparative analysis of all parasitic plant lineages, including sequences from all three genomes, is needed to examine the generality of the relationship between rates of molecular evolution and parasitism in plants. Results We analysed DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial, nuclear and chloroplast genomes for 12 independent evolutionary origins of parasitism in angiosperms. We demonstrated that parasitic lineages have a faster rate of molecular evolution than their non-parasitic relatives in sequences for all three genomes, for both synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. Conclusions Our results prove that raised rates of molecular evolution are a general feature of parasitic plants, not confined to a few taxa or specific genes. We discuss possible causes for this relationship, including increased positive selection associated with host-parasite arms races, relaxed selection, reduced population size or repeated bottlenecks, increased mutation rates, and indirect causal links with generation time and body size. We find no evidence that faster rates are due to smaller effective populations sizes or changes in selection pressure. Instead, our results suggest that parasitic plants have a higher mutation rate than their close non-parasitic relatives. This may be due to a direct connection, where some aspect of the parasitic lifestyle drives the evolution of raised mutation rates. Alternatively, this pattern may be driven by an indirect connection between rates and parasitism: for example, parasitic

  16. A Genomic Analysis of Factors Driving lincRNA Diversification: Lessons from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew D. L.; Forsythe, Evan S.; Devisetty, Upendra K.; Clausen, David S.; Haug-Batzell, Asher K.; Meldrum, Ari M. R.; Frank, Michael R.; Lyons, Eric; Beilstein, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptomic analyses from across eukaryotes indicate that most of the genome is transcribed at some point in the developmental trajectory of an organism. One class of these transcripts is termed long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Recently, attention has focused on understanding the evolutionary dynamics of lincRNAs, particularly their conservation within genomes. Here, we take a comparative genomic and phylogenetic approach to uncover factors influencing lincRNA emergence and persistence in the plant family Brassicaceae, to which Arabidopsis thaliana belongs. We searched 10 genomes across the family for evidence of > 5000 lincRNA loci from A. thaliana. From loci conserved in the genomes of multiple species, we built alignments and inferred phylogeny. We then used gene tree/species tree reconciliation to examine the duplication history and timing of emergence of these loci. Emergence of lincRNA loci appears to be linked to local duplication events, but, surprisingly, not whole genome duplication events (WGD), or transposable elements. Interestingly, WGD events are associated with the loss of loci for species having undergone relatively recent polyploidy. Lastly, we identify 1180 loci of the 6480 previously annotated A. thaliana lincRNAs (18%) with elevated levels of conservation. These conserved lincRNAs show higher expression, and are enriched for stress-responsiveness and cis-regulatory motifs known as conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs). These data highlight potential functional pathways and suggest that CNSs may regulate neighboring genes at both the genomic and transcriptomic level. In sum, we provide insight into processes that may influence lincRNA diversification by providing an evolutionary context for previously annotated lincRNAs. PMID:27440919

  17. Computational genomic identification and functional reconstitution of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Medema, Marnix H; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-08-27

    Covering: 2003 to 2016The last decade has seen the first major discoveries regarding the genomic basis of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. Four key computationally driven strategies have been developed to identify such pathways, which make use of physical clustering, co-expression, evolutionary co-occurrence and epigenomic co-regulation of the genes involved in producing a plant natural product. Here, we discuss how these approaches can be used for the discovery of plant biosynthetic pathways encoded by both chromosomally clustered and non-clustered genes. Additionally, we will discuss opportunities to prioritize plant gene clusters for experimental characterization, and end with a forward-looking perspective on how synthetic biology technologies will allow effective functional reconstitution of candidate pathways using a variety of genetic systems. PMID:27321668

  18. Correction: Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The version of this article published in BMC Genomics 2013, 14: 274, contains 9 unpublished genomes (Botryobasidium botryosum, Gymnopus luxurians, Hypholoma sublateritium, Jaapia argillacea, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Conidiobolus coronatus, Laccaria amethystina, Paxillus involutus, and P. rubicundulus) downloaded from JGI website. In this correction, we removed these genomes after discussion with editors and data producers whom we should have contacted before downloading these genomes. Removing these data did not alter the principle results and conclusions of our original work. The relevant Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6; and Table 1 have been revised. Additional files 1, 3, 4, and 5 were also revised. We would like to apologize for any confusion or inconvenience this may have caused. Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 94 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed

  19. Genome-wide variation of the somatic mutation frequency in transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga; Hohn, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    In order to analyse the frequency of point mutations in whole plants, several constructs containing single nonsense mutations in the β-glucuronidase (uidA) gene were used to generate transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Upon histochemical staining of transgenic plants, sectors indicative of transgene reactivation appeared. Reversion frequencies were in the range of 10–7–10–8 events per base pair, exceeding the previous estimates for other eukaryotes at least 100-fold. The frequency was dependent on the position of the mutation substrate within the transgene and the position of the transgene within the Arabidopsis genome. An inverse relationship between the level of transgene transcription and mutation frequency was observed in single-copy lines. DNA-damaging factors induced the mutation frequency by a factor of up to 56 for UV-C, a factor of 3 for X-rays and a factor of 2 for methyl methanesulfonate. This novel plant mutation-monitoring system allowed us to measure the frequencies of point mutation in whole plants and may be used as an alternative or complement to study the mutagenicity of different environmental factors on the higher eukaryote’s genome. PMID:10970837

  20. Genome-wide discovery of G-quadruplex forming sequences and their functional relevance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rohini; Aggarwal, Jyoti; Thakkar, Bijal

    2016-01-01

    DNA, in addition to the canonical B-form, can acquire a variety of alternate structures, such as G-quadruplexes. These structures have been implicated in several cellular processes in animals. In this study, we identified different types of G-quadruplex forming sequences (GQSes) in 15 sequenced plants and analyzed their distribution in various genomic features, including gene body, coding, intergenic and promoter regions. G2-type GQSes were most abundant in all the plant species analyzed. A strong association of G3-type GQSes with intergenic, promoter and intronic regions was found. However, G2-type GQSes were enriched in genic, CDS, exonic and untranslated regions. Further, we identified GQSes present in the conserved genes among monocots and dicots. The genes involved in development, cell growth and size, transmembrane transporter, and regulation of gene expression were found to be significantly enriched. In the promoter region, we detected strong co-occurrence of Telobox, ERF, MYB, RAV1B and E2F motifs with GQSes. Further, we validated the structure formation of several plant GQSes, demonstrated their effect on stalling in-vitro replication and revealed their interaction with plant nuclear proteins. Our data provide insights into the prevalence of GQSes in plants, establish their association with different genomic features and functional relevance. PMID:27324275

  1. Centromere and telomere sequence alterations reflect the rapid genome evolution within the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trung D; Cao, Hieu X; Jovtchev, Gabriele; Neumann, Pavel; Novák, Petr; Fojtová, Miloslava; Vu, Giang T H; Macas, Jiří; Fajkus, Jiří; Schubert, Ingo; Fuchs, Joerg

    2015-12-01

    Linear chromosomes of eukaryotic organisms invariably possess centromeres and telomeres to ensure proper chromosome segregation during nuclear divisions and to protect the chromosome ends from deterioration and fusion, respectively. While centromeric sequences may differ between species, with arrays of tandemly repeated sequences and retrotransposons being the most abundant sequence types in plant centromeres, telomeric sequences are usually highly conserved among plants and other organisms. The genome size of the carnivorous genus Genlisea (Lentibulariaceae) is highly variable. Here we study evolutionary sequence plasticity of these chromosomal domains at an intrageneric level. We show that Genlisea nigrocaulis (1C = 86 Mbp; 2n = 40) and G. hispidula (1C = 1550 Mbp; 2n = 40) differ as to their DNA composition at centromeres and telomeres. G. nigrocaulis and its close relative G. pygmaea revealed mainly 161 bp tandem repeats, while G. hispidula and its close relative G. subglabra displayed a combination of four retroelements at centromeric positions. G. nigrocaulis and G. pygmaea chromosome ends are characterized by the Arabidopsis-type telomeric repeats (TTTAGGG); G. hispidula and G. subglabra instead revealed two intermingled sequence variants (TTCAGG and TTTCAGG). These differences in centromeric and, surprisingly, also in telomeric DNA sequences, uncovered between groups with on average a > 9-fold genome size difference, emphasize the fast genome evolution within this genus. Such intrageneric evolutionary alteration of telomeric repeats with cytosine in the guanine-rich strand, not yet known for plants, might impact the epigenetic telomere chromatin modification. PMID:26485466

  2. Towards personalized agriculture: what chemical genomics can bring to plant biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Michael E.; McCourt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the dominant drug paradigm in which compounds were developed to “fit all,” new models focused around personalized medicine are appearing in which treatments are developed and customized for individual patients. The agricultural biotechnology industry (Ag-biotech) should also think about these new personalized models. For example, most common herbicides are generic in action, which led to the development of genetically modified crops to add specificity. The ease and accessibility of modern genomic analysis, when wedded to accessible large chemical space, should facilitate the discovery of chemicals that are more selective in their utility. Is it possible to develop species-selective herbicides and growth regulators? More generally put, is plant research at a stage where chemicals can be developed that streamline plant development and growth to various environments? We believe the advent of chemical genomics now opens up these and other opportunities to “personalize” agriculture. Furthermore, chemical genomics does not necessarily require genetically tractable plant models, which in principle should allow quick translation to practical applications. For this to happen, however, will require collaboration between the Ag-biotech industry and academic labs for early stage research and development, a situation that has proven very fruitful for Big Pharma. PMID:25183965

  3. Antibiotics induce genome-wide hypermethylation in cultured Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, F; Oakeley, E J; Jost, J P

    1997-01-17

    Plant genomic DNA methylation was analyzed by an improved SssI methyltransferase assay and by genomic sequencing with sodium bisulfite. Kanamycin, hygromycin, and cefotaxime (also called Claforan) are commonly used as selective agents for the production of transgenic plants. These antibiotics caused DNA hypermethylation in tobacco plants grown in vitro, which was both time- and dose-dependent. An exposure of the plantlets to 500 mg/liter cefotaxime for 1 month caused the de novo methylation of 3 x 10(7) CpG sites/haploid genome of 3.5 x 10(9) base pairs. It occurred in high, moderate, and low repetitive DNA and was not reversible upon the removal of the antibiotics. Reversion was only observed in progeny grown in the absence of drugs. Analysis of the promoter regions of two single-copy genes, an auxin-binding protein gene and the class I chitinase gene, showed the hypermethylation to be heterogeneous but biased toward CpGs. The hypermethylation of the class I chitinase and the auxin-binding protein promoters was not a consequence of a drug-induced gene amplification. PMID:8999825

  4. The Plant Short-Chain Dehydrogenase (SDR) superfamily: genome-wide inventory and diversification patterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) form one of the largest and oldest NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductase families. Despite a conserved ‘Rossmann-fold’ structure, members of the SDR superfamily exhibit low sequence similarities, which constituted a bottleneck in terms of identification. Recent classification methods, relying on hidden-Markov models (HMMs), improved identification and enabled the construction of a nomenclature. However, functional annotations of plant SDRs remain scarce. Results Wide-scale analyses were performed on ten plant genomes. The combination of hidden Markov model (HMM) based analyses and similarity searches led to the construction of an exhaustive inventory of plant SDR. With 68 to 315 members found in each analysed genome, the inventory confirmed the over-representation of SDRs in plants compared to animals, fungi and prokaryotes. The plant SDRs were first classified into three major types — ‘classical’, ‘extended’ and ‘divergent’ — but a minority (10% of the predicted SDRs) could not be classified into these general types (‘unknown’ or ‘atypical’ types). In a second step, we could categorize the vast majority of land plant SDRs into a set of 49 families. Out of these 49 families, 35 appeared early during evolution since they are commonly found through all the Green Lineage. Yet, some SDR families — tropinone reductase-like proteins (SDR65C), ‘ABA2-like’-NAD dehydrogenase (SDR110C), ‘salutaridine/menthone-reductase-like’ proteins (SDR114C), ‘dihydroflavonol 4-reductase’-like proteins (SDR108E) and ‘isoflavone-reductase-like’ (SDR460A) proteins — have undergone significant functional diversification within vascular plants since they diverged from Bryophytes. Interestingly, these diversified families are either involved in the secondary metabolism routes (terpenoids, alkaloids, phenolics) or participate in developmental processes (hormone biosynthesis or catabolism, flower

  5. Big Data in Plant Science: Resources and Data Mining Tools for Plant Genomics and Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Popescu, George V; Noutsos, Christos; Popescu, Sorina C

    2016-01-01

    In modern plant biology, progress is increasingly defined by the scientists' ability to gather and analyze data sets of high volume and complexity, otherwise known as "big data". Arguably, the largest increase in the volume of plant data sets over the last decade is a consequence of the application of the next-generation sequencing and mass-spectrometry technologies to the study of experimental model and crop plants. The increase in quantity and complexity of biological data brings challenges, mostly associated with data acquisition, processing, and sharing within the scientific community. Nonetheless, big data in plant science create unique opportunities in advancing our understanding of complex biological processes at a level of accuracy without precedence, and establish a base for the plant systems biology. In this chapter, we summarize the major drivers of big data in plant science and big data initiatives in life sciences with a focus on the scope and impact of iPlant, a representative cyberinfrastructure platform for plant science. PMID:27115651

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa Strain Sb3-1, a Soilborne Bacterium with Antagonistic Activity toward Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wetzlinger, Ute; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Paenibacillus polymyxa Sb3-1, a strain that shows antagonistic activities against pathogenic fungi and bacteria, consists of one 5.6-Mb circular chromosome and two plasmids of 223 kb and 8 kb. The genome reveals several genes that potentially contribute to its antagonistic and plant growth promotion activity. PMID:25767224

  7. MAKER-P: a tool-kit for the creation, management, and quality control of plant genome annotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have optimized and extended the widely used annotation-engine MAKER for use on plant genomes. We have benchmarked the resulting software, MAKER-P, using the A. thaliana genome and the TAIR10 gene models. Here we demonstrate the ability of the MAKER-P toolkit to generate de novo repeat databases, ...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacillus brevis DZQ7, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Wang, Chengqiang; Hou, Xiaoyang; Xia, Zhilin; Ye, Jiangping; Liu, Kai; Liu, Hu; Wang, Jun; Guo, Haimeng; Yu, Xiaoning; Yang, Yanan; Du, Binghai; Ding, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacillus brevis DZQ7 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. brevis DZQ7. Several functional genes related to antimicrobial activity were identified in the genome. PMID:26294619

  9. An eriophyid mite-transmitted plant virus contains eight genomic RNA segments with unusual heterogeneity in the nucleocapsid protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eriophyid mite-transmitted, multipartite, negative-sense plant RNA viruses with membrane-bound spherical virions are classified in the genus Emaravirus. The relatively dissimilar emaraviruses evolved with 4 to 6 genomic RNAs with one open reading frame (ORF) in each genomic RNA segment. We report he...

  10. PMI: Plant-Microbe Interfaces (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Schadt, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Christopher Schadt of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Plant-Microbe Interactions" in the context of poplar trees at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 held in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  11. Did RNA editing in plant organellar genomes originate under natural selection or through genetic drift?

    PubMed Central

    Jobson, Richard W; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2008-01-01

    Background The C↔U substitution types of RNA editing have been observed frequently in organellar genomes of land plants. Although various attempts have been made to explain why such a seemingly inefficient genetic mechanism would have evolved, no satisfactory explanation exists in our view. In this study, we examined editing patterns in chloroplast genomes of the hornwort Anthoceros formosae and the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and in mitochondrial genomes of the angiosperms Arabidopsis thaliana, Beta vulgaris and Oryza sativa, to gain an understanding of the question of how RNA editing originated. Results We found that 1) most editing sites were distributed at the 2nd and 1st codon positions, 2) editing affected codons that resulted in larger hydrophobicity and molecular size changes much more frequently than those with little change involved, 3) editing uniformly increased protein hydrophobicity, 4) editing occurred more frequently in ancestrally T-rich sequences, which were more abundant in genes encoding membrane-bound proteins with many hydrophobic amino acids than in genes encoding soluble proteins, and 5) editing occurred most often in genes found to be under strong selective constraint. Conclusion These analyses show that editing mostly affects functionally important and evolutionarily conserved codon positions, codons and genes encoding membrane-bound proteins. In particular, abundance of RNA editing in plant organellar genomes may be associated with disproportionately large percentages of genes in these two genomes that encode membrane-bound proteins, which are rich in hydrophobic amino acids and selectively constrained. These data support a hypothesis that natural selection imposed by protein functional constraints has contributed to selective fixation of certain editing sites and maintenance of the editing activity in plant organelles over a period of more than four hundred millions years. The retention of genes encoding RNA editing activity may be

  12. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae

    PubMed Central

    Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Pellicer, Jaume; Čížková, Jana; Koblížková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel; Fuková, Iva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kelly, Laura J.; Leitch, Ilia J.

    2015-01-01

    The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55–83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57%) of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%). Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes. PMID:26606051

  13. Highly efficient heritable plant genome engineering using Cas9 orthologues from Streptococcus thermophilus and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Jeannette; Schiml, Simon; Fauser, Friedrich; Puchta, Holger

    2015-12-01

    The application of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system of Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) is currently revolutionizing genome engineering in plants. However, synthetic plant biology will require more complex manipulations of genomes and transcriptomes. The simultaneous addressing of different specific genomic sites with independent enzyme activities within the same cell is a key to this issue. Such approaches can be achieved by the adaptation of additional bacterial orthologues of the CRISPR/Cas system for use in plant cells. Here, we show that codon-optimised Cas9 orthologues from Streptococcus thermophilus (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9) can both be used to induce error-prone non-homologous end-joining-mediated targeted mutagenesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at frequencies at least comparable to those that have previously been reported for the S. pyogenes CRISPR/Cas system. Stable inheritance of the induced targeted mutations of the ADH1 gene was demonstrated for both St1Cas9- and SaCas9-based systems at high frequencies. We were also able to demonstrate that the SaCas9 and SpCas9 proteins enhance homologous recombination via the induction of double-strand breaks only in the presence of their species-specific single guide (sg) RNAs. These proteins are not prone to inter-species interference with heterologous sgRNA expression constructs. Thus, the CRISPR/Cas systems of S. pyogenes and S. aureus should be appropriate for simultaneously addressing different sequence motifs with different enzyme activities in the same plant cell. PMID:26576927

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Wood, Andrew J; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as 'aldehyde scavengers' by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried out genome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species-including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  15. Genome sequence of Ensifer adhaerens OV14 provides insights into its ability as a novel vector for the genetic transformation of plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently it has been shown that Ensifer adhaerens can be used as a plant transformation technology, transferring genes into several plant genomes when equipped with a Ti plasmid. For this study, we have sequenced the genome of Ensifer adhaerens OV14 (OV14) and compared it with those of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 (C58) and Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 (1021); the latter of which has also demonstrated a capacity to genetically transform crop genomes, albeit at significantly reduced frequencies. Results The 7.7 Mb OV14 genome comprises two chromosomes and two plasmids. All protein coding regions in the OV14 genome were functionally grouped based on an eggNOG database. No genes homologous to the A. tumefaciens Ti plasmid vir genes appeared to be present in the OV14 genome. Unexpectedly, OV14 and 1021 were found to possess homologs to chromosomal based genes cited as essential to A. tumefaciens T-DNA transfer. Of significance, genes that are non-essential but exert a positive influence on virulence and the ability to genetically transform host genomes were identified in OV14 but were absent from the 1021 genome. Conclusions This study reveals the presence of homologs to chromosomally based Agrobacterium genes that support T-DNA transfer within the genome of OV14 and other alphaproteobacteria. The sequencing and analysis of the OV14 genome increases our understanding of T-DNA transfer by non-Agrobacterium species and creates a platform for the continued improvement of Ensifer-mediated transformation (EMT). PMID:24708309

  16. Genome sequence of the necrotrophic plant pathogen Pythium ultimum reveals original pathogenicity mechanisms and effector repertoire

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pythium ultimum is a ubiquitous oomycete plant pathogen responsible for a variety of diseases on a broad range of crop and ornamental species. Results The P. ultimum genome (42.8 Mb) encodes 15,290 genes and has extensive sequence similarity and synteny with related Phytophthora species, including the potato blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Whole transcriptome sequencing revealed expression of 86% of genes, with detectable differential expression of suites of genes under abiotic stress and in the presence of a host. The predicted proteome includes a large repertoire of proteins involved in plant pathogen interactions, although, surprisingly, the P. ultimum genome does not encode any classical RXLR effectors and relatively few Crinkler genes in comparison to related phytopathogenic oomycetes. A lower number of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism were present compared to Phytophthora species, with the notable absence of cutinases, suggesting a significant difference in virulence mechanisms between P. ultimum and more host-specific oomycete species. Although we observed a high degree of orthology with Phytophthora genomes, there were novel features of the P. ultimum proteome, including an expansion of genes involved in proteolysis and genes unique to Pythium. We identified a small gene family of cadherins, proteins involved in cell adhesion, the first report of these in a genome outside the metazoans. Conclusions Access to the P. ultimum genome has revealed not only core pathogenic mechanisms within the oomycetes but also lineage-specific genes associated with the alternative virulence and lifestyles found within the pythiaceous lineages compared to the Peronosporaceae. PMID:20626842

  17. Mining the genome of Rhodococcus fascians, a plant growth-promoting bacterium gone astray.

    PubMed

    Francis, Isolde M; Stes, Elisabeth; Zhang, Yucheng; Rangel, Diana; Audenaert, Kris; Vereecke, Danny

    2016-09-25

    Rhodococcus fascians is a phytopathogenic Gram-positive Actinomycete with a very broad host range encompassing especially dicotyledonous herbaceous perennials, but also some monocots, such as the Liliaceae and, recently, the woody crop pistachio. The pathogenicity of R. fascians strain D188 is known to be encoded by the linear plasmid pFiD188 and to be dictated by its capacity to produce a mixture of cytokinins. Here, we show that D188-5, the nonpathogenic plasmid-free derivative of the wild-type strain D188 actually has a plant growth-promoting effect. With the availability of the genome sequence of R. fascians, the chromosome of strain D188 was mined for putative plant growth-promoting functions and the functionality of some of these activities was tested. This analysis together with previous results suggests that the plant growth-promoting activity of R. fascians is due to production of plant growth modulators, such as auxin and cytokinin, combined with degradation of ethylene through 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. Moreover, R. fascians has several functions that could contribute to efficient colonization and competitiveness, but there is little evidence for a strong impact on plant nutrition. Possibly, the plant growth promotion encoded by the D188 chromosome is imperative for the epiphytic phase of the life cycle of R. fascians and prepares the plant to host the bacteria, thus ensuring proper continuation into the pathogenic phase. PMID:26877150

  18. Discovery of novel plant interaction determinants from the genomes of 163 root nodule bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne G.; Ardley, Julie K.; Tennessen, Kristin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2015-11-20

    Root nodule bacteria (RNB) or “rhizobia” are a type of plant growth promoting bacteria, typified by their ability to fix nitrogen for their plant host, fixing nearly 65% of the nitrogen currently utilized in sustainable agricultural production of legume crops and pastures. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 110 RNB from diverse hosts and biogeographical regions, and undertook a global exploration of all available RNB genera with the aim of identifying novel genetic determinants of symbiotic association and plant growth promotion. Specifically, we performed a subtractive comparative analysis with non-RNB genomes, employed relevant transcriptomic data, and leveraged phylogeneticmore » distribution patterns and sequence signatures based on known precepts of symbioticand host-microbe interactions. A total of 184 protein families were delineated, including known factors for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and candidates with previously unexplored functions, for which a role in host-interaction, -regulation, biocontrol, and more, could be posited. Lastly, these analyses expand our knowledge of the RNB purview and provide novel targets for strain improvement in the ultimate quest to enhance plant productivity and agricultural sustainability.« less

  19. Discovery of novel plant interaction determinants from the genomes of 163 root nodule bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne G.; Ardley, Julie K.; Tennessen, Kristin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2015-11-20

    Root nodule bacteria (RNB) or “rhizobia” are a type of plant growth promoting bacteria, typified by their ability to fix nitrogen for their plant host, fixing nearly 65% of the nitrogen currently utilized in sustainable agricultural production of legume crops and pastures. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 110 RNB from diverse hosts and biogeographical regions, and undertook a global exploration of all available RNB genera with the aim of identifying novel genetic determinants of symbiotic association and plant growth promotion. Specifically, we performed a subtractive comparative analysis with non-RNB genomes, employed relevant transcriptomic data, and leveraged phylogenetic distribution patterns and sequence signatures based on known precepts of symbioticand host-microbe interactions. A total of 184 protein families were delineated, including known factors for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and candidates with previously unexplored functions, for which a role in host-interaction, -regulation, biocontrol, and more, could be posited. Lastly, these analyses expand our knowledge of the RNB purview and provide novel targets for strain improvement in the ultimate quest to enhance plant productivity and agricultural sustainability.

  20. Selection of highly efficient sgRNAs for CRISPR/Cas9-based plant genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Gang; Zhang, Huimin; Lou, Dengji; Yu, Diqiu

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA system has been developed to mediate genome editing and become a powerful tool for biological research. Employing the CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA system for genome editing and manipulation has accelerated research and expanded researchers’ ability to generate genetic models. However, the method evaluating the efficiency of sgRNAs is lacking in plants. Based on the nucleotide compositions and secondary structures of sgRNAs which have been experimentally validated in plants, we instituted criteria to design efficient sgRNAs. To facilitate the assembly of multiple sgRNA cassettes, we also developed a new strategy to rapidly construct CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA system for multiplex editing in plants. In theory, up to ten single guide RNA (sgRNA) cassettes can be simultaneously assembled into the final binary vectors. As a proof of concept, 21 sgRNAs complying with the criteria were designed and the corresponding Cas9/sgRNAs expression vectors were constructed. Sequencing analysis of transgenic rice plants suggested that 82% of the desired target sites were edited with deletion, insertion, substitution, and inversion, displaying high editing efficiency. This work provides a convenient approach to select efficient sgRNAs for target editing. PMID:26891616

  1. Discovery of Novel Plant Interaction Determinants from the Genomes of 163 Root Nodule Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne G.; Ardley, Julie K.; Tennessen, Kristin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2015-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria (RNB) or “rhizobia” are a type of plant growth promoting bacteria, typified by their ability to fix nitrogen for their plant host, fixing nearly 65% of the nitrogen currently utilized in sustainable agricultural production of legume crops and pastures. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 110 RNB from diverse hosts and biogeographical regions, and undertook a global exploration of all available RNB genera with the aim of identifying novel genetic determinants of symbiotic association and plant growth promotion. Specifically, we performed a subtractive comparative analysis with non-RNB genomes, employed relevant transcriptomic data, and leveraged phylogenetic distribution patterns and sequence signatures based on known precepts of symbiotic- and host-microbe interactions. A total of 184 protein families were delineated, including known factors for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and candidates with previously unexplored functions, for which a role in host-interaction, -regulation, biocontrol, and more, could be posited. These analyses expand our knowledge of the RNB purview and provide novel targets for strain improvement in the ultimate quest to enhance plant productivity and agricultural sustainability. PMID:26584898

  2. Firewall or smooth horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ori, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Almheiri, Marolf, Polchinski, and Sully pointed out that for a sufficiently old black hole (BH), the set of assumptions known as the complementarity postulates appears to be inconsistent with the assumption of local regularity at the horizon. They concluded that the horizon of an old BH is likely to be the locus of local irregularity, a "firewall". Here I point out that if one adopts a different assumption, namely that semiclassical physics holds throughout its anticipated domain of validity, then the inconsistency is avoided, and the horizon retains its regularity. In this alternative view-point, the vast portion of the original BH information remains trapped inside the BH throughout the semiclassical domain of evaporation, and possibly leaks out later on. This appears to be an inevitable outcome of semiclassical gravity (if assumed to apply throughout its anticipated domain of validity).

  3. Genomic analyses of metal resistance genes in three plant growth promoting bacteria of legume plants in Northwest mine tailings, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin; Hao, Xiuli; Herzberg, Martin; Luo, Yantao; Nies, Dietrich H; Wei, Gehong

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the diversity of metal resistance genetic determinant from microbes that survived at metal tailings in northwest of China, a highly elevated level of heavy metal containing region, genomic analyses was conducted using genome sequence of three native metal-resistant plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB). It shows that: Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 contains metal transporters from P-type ATPase, CDF (Cation Diffusion Facilitator), HupE/UreJ and CHR (chromate ion transporter) family involved in copper, zinc, nickel as well as chromate resistance and homeostasis. Meanwhile, the putative CopA/CueO system is expected to mediate copper resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 while ZntA transporter, assisted with putative CzcD, determines zinc tolerance in Agrobacterium tumefaciens CCNWGS0286. The greenhouse experiment provides the consistent evidence of the plant growth promoting effects of these microbes on their hosts by nitrogen fixation and/or indoleacetic acid (IAA) secretion, indicating a potential in-site phytoremediation usage in the mining tailing regions of China. PMID:25597676

  4. Precise plant breeding using new genome editing techniques: opportunities, safety and regulation in the EU.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Frank; Schiemann, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Several new plant breeding techniques (NPBTs) have been developed during the last decade, and make it possible to precisely perform genome modifications in plants. The major problem, other than technical aspects, is the vagueness of regulation concerning these new techniques. Since the definition of eight NPBTs by a European expert group in 2007, there has been an ongoing debate on whether the resulting plants and their products are covered by GMO legislation. Obviously, cover by GMO legislation would severely hamper the use of NPBT, because genetically modified plants must pass a costly and time-consuming GMO approval procedure in the EU. In this review, we compare some of the NPBTs defined by the EU expert group with classical breeding techniques and conventional transgenic plants. The list of NPBTs may be shortened (or extended) during the international discussion process initiated by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. From the scientific point of view, it may be argued that plants developed by NPBTs are often indistinguishable from classically bred plants and are not expected to possess higher risks for health and the environment. In light of the debate on the future regulation of NPBTs and the accumulated evidence on the biosafety of genetically modified plants that have been commercialized and risk-assessed worldwide, it may be suggested that plants modified by crop genetic improvement technologies, including genetic modification, NPBTs or other future techniques, should be evaluated according to the new trait and the resulting end product rather than the technique used to create the new plant variety. PMID:24330272

  5. Expression of Active Subunit of Nitrogenase via Integration into Plant Organelle Genome

    PubMed Central

    Groat, Jeanna; Staub, Jeffrey M.; Stephens, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability is crucial for crop yield with nitrogen fertilizer accounting for a large percentage of farmers’ expenses. However, an untimely or excessive application of fertilizer can increase risks of negative environmental effects. These factors, along with the environmental and energy costs of synthesizing nitrogen fertilizer, led us to seek out novel biotechnology-driven approaches to supply nitrogen to plants. The strategy we focused on involves transgenic expression of nitrogenase, a bacterial multi-subunit enzyme that can capture atmospheric nitrogen. Here we report expression of the active Fe subunit of nitrogenase via integration into the tobacco plastid genome of bacterial gene sequences modified for expression in plastid. Our study suggests that it will be possible to engineer plants that are able to produce their own nitrogen fertilizer by expressing nitrogenase genes in plant plastids. PMID:27529475

  6. Expression of Active Subunit of Nitrogenase via Integration into Plant Organelle Genome.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Natalia B; Groat, Jeanna; Staub, Jeffrey M; Stephens, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability is crucial for crop yield with nitrogen fertilizer accounting for a large percentage of farmers' expenses. However, an untimely or excessive application of fertilizer can increase risks of negative environmental effects. These factors, along with the environmental and energy costs of synthesizing nitrogen fertilizer, led us to seek out novel biotechnology-driven approaches to supply nitrogen to plants. The strategy we focused on involves transgenic expression of nitrogenase, a bacterial multi-subunit enzyme that can capture atmospheric nitrogen. Here we report expression of the active Fe subunit of nitrogenase via integration into the tobacco plastid genome of bacterial gene sequences modified for expression in plastid. Our study suggests that it will be possible to engineer plants that are able to produce their own nitrogen fertilizer by expressing nitrogenase genes in plant plastids. PMID:27529475

  7. Applications of flow cytometry in plant pathology for genome size determination, detection and physiological status.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Liesbet; Höfte, Monica; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Leus, Leen

    2011-10-01

    Flow cytometers are probably the most multipurpose laboratory devices available. They can analyse a vast and very diverse range of cell parameters. This technique has left its mark on cancer, human immunodeficiency virus and immunology research, and is indispensable in routine clinical diagnostics. Flow cytometry (FCM) is also a well-known tool for the detection and physiological status assessment of microorganisms in drinking water, marine environments, food and fermentation processes. However, flow cytometers are seldom used in plant pathology, despite FCM's major advantages as both a detection method and a research tool. Potential uses of FCM include the characterization of genome sizes of fungal and oomycete populations, multiplexed pathogen detection and the monitoring of the viability, culturability and gene expression of plant pathogens, and many others. This review provides an overview of the history, advantages and disadvantages of FCM, and focuses on the current applications and future possibilities of FCM in plant pathology. PMID:21726378

  8. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; et al

    2015-06-02

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of our present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer.more » These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. Lastly, these characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.« less

  9. Influence of outliers on accuracy estimation in genomic prediction in plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Estaghvirou, Sidi Boubacar Ould; Ogutu, Joseph O; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2014-12-01

    Outliers often pose problems in analyses of data in plant breeding, but their influence on the performance of methods for estimating predictive accuracy in genomic prediction studies has not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluate the influence of outliers on the performance of methods for accuracy estimation in genomic prediction studies using simulation. We simulated 1000 datasets for each of 10 scenarios to evaluate the influence of outliers on the performance of seven methods for estimating accuracy. These scenarios are defined by the number of genotypes, marker effect variance, and magnitude of outliers. To mimic outliers, we added to one observation in each simulated dataset, in turn, 5-, 8-, and 10-times the error SD used to simulate small and large phenotypic datasets. The effect of outliers on accuracy estimation was evaluated by comparing deviations in the estimated and true accuracies for datasets with and without outliers. Outliers adversely influenced accuracy estimation, more so at small values of genetic variance or number of genotypes. A method for estimating heritability and predictive accuracy in plant breeding and another used to estimate accuracy in animal breeding were the most accurate and resistant to outliers across all scenarios and are therefore preferable for accuracy estimation in genomic prediction studies. The performances of the other five methods that use cross-validation were less consistent and varied widely across scenarios. The computing time for the methods increased as the size of outliers and sample size increased and the genetic variance decreased. PMID:25273862

  10. A series of TA-based and zero-background vectors for plant functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuntao; Yin, Xianlun; Kong, Xiangxiang; Li, Wansha; Ma, Lan; Sun, Xudong; Guan, Yanlong; Todd, Christopher D; Yang, Yongping; Hu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    With the sequencing of genomes from many organisms now complete and the development of high-throughput sequencing, life science research has entered the functional post-genome era. Therefore, deciphering the function of genes and how they interact is in greater demand. To study an unknown gene, the basic methods are either overexpression or gene knockout by creating transgenic plants, and gene construction is usually the first step. Although traditional cloning techniques using restriction enzymes or a site-specific recombination system (Gateway or Clontech cloning technology) are highly useful for efficiently transferring DNA fragments into destination plasmids, the process is time consuming and expensive. To facilitate the procedure of gene construction, we designed a TA-based cloning system in which only one step was needed to subclone a DNA fragment into vectors. Such a cloning system was developed from the pGreen binary vector, which has a minimal size and facilitates construction manipulation, combined with the negative selection marker gene ccdB, which has the advantages of eliminating the self-ligation background and directly enabling high-efficiency TA cloning technology. We previously developed a set of transient and stable transformation vectors for constitutive gene expression, gene silencing, protein tagging, subcellular localization analysis and promoter activity detection. Our results show that such a system is highly efficient and serves as a high-throughput platform for transient or stable transformation in plants for functional genome research. PMID:23555713

  11. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J.; Church, George M.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-06-02

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of our present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. Lastly, these characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.

  12. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J.; Church, George M.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels. PMID:26035711

  13. A simple Gateway-assisted construction system of TALEN genes for plant genome editing.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Hiroaki; Onodera, Hitomi; Kihira, Miho; Aoki, Hiromi; Matsuzaki, Hikaru; Shimada, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    TALEN is an artificial nuclease being applied for sequence-specific genome editing. For the plant genome editing, a pair of TALEN genes is expressed in the cells, and a binary plasmid for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation should be assembled. We developed a novel procedure using the Gateway-assisted plasmids, named Emerald-Gateway TALEN system. We constructed entry vectors, pPlat plasmids, for construction of a desired TALEN gene using Platinum Gate TALEN kit. We also created destination plasmid, pDual35SGw1301, which allowed two TALEN genes to both DNA strands to recruit using Gateway technology. Resultant TALEN genes were evaluated by the single-strand annealing (SSA) assay in E. coli cells. By this assay, the TALENs recognized the corresponding targets in the divided luciferase gene, and induced a specific recombination to generate an active luciferase gene. Using the TALEN genes constructed, we created a transformant potato cells in which a site-specific mutation occurred at the target site of the GBSS gene. This suggested that our system worked effectively and was applicable as a convenient tool for the plant genome editing. PMID:27452606

  14. A simple Gateway-assisted construction system of TALEN genes for plant genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Hiroaki; Onodera, Hitomi; Kihira, Miho; Aoki, Hiromi; Matsuzaki, Hikaru; Shimada, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    TALEN is an artificial nuclease being applied for sequence-specific genome editing. For the plant genome editing, a pair of TALEN genes is expressed in the cells, and a binary plasmid for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation should be assembled. We developed a novel procedure using the Gateway-assisted plasmids, named Emerald–Gateway TALEN system. We constructed entry vectors, pPlat plasmids, for construction of a desired TALEN gene using Platinum Gate TALEN kit. We also created destination plasmid, pDual35SGw1301, which allowed two TALEN genes to both DNA strands to recruit using Gateway technology. Resultant TALEN genes were evaluated by the single-strand annealing (SSA) assay in E. coli cells. By this assay, the TALENs recognized the corresponding targets in the divided luciferase gene, and induced a specific recombination to generate an active luciferase gene. Using the TALEN genes constructed, we created a transformant potato cells in which a site-specific mutation occurred at the target site of the GBSS gene. This suggested that our system worked effectively and was applicable as a convenient tool for the plant genome editing. PMID:27452606

  15. Unusual RNA plant virus integration in the soybean genome leads to the production of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Guilherme Cordenonsi; de Oliveira, Luiz Felipe Valter; de Morais, Guilherme Loss; Abdelnor, Ricardo Vilela; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Waterhouse, Peter M; Farinelli, Laurent; Margis, Rogerio

    2016-05-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is known to be a major force in genome evolution. The acquisition of genes from viruses by eukaryotic genomes is a well-studied example of HGT, including rare cases of non-retroviral RNA virus integration. The present study describes the integration of cucumber mosaic virus RNA-1 into soybean genome. After an initial metatranscriptomic analysis of small RNAs derived from soybean, the de novo assembly resulted a 3029-nt contig homologous to RNA-1. The integration of this sequence in the soybean genome was confirmed by DNA deep sequencing. The locus where the integration occurred harbors the full RNA-1 sequence followed by the partial sequence of an endogenous mRNA and another sequence of RNA-1 as an inverted repeat and allowing the formation of a hairpin structure. This region recombined into a retrotransposon located inside an exon of a soybean gene. The nucleotide similarity of the integrated sequence compared to other Cucumber mosaic virus sequences indicates that the integration event occurred recently. We described a rare event of non-retroviral RNA virus integration in soybean that leads to the production of a double-stranded RNA in a similar fashion to virus resistance RNAi plants. PMID:26993236

  16. Localized Retroprocessing as a Model of Intron Loss in the Plant Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Argelia; Ross, T Gregory; Graham, Sean W; Barrett, Craig F; Davis, Jerrold I; Seberg, Ole; Petersen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Loss of introns in plant mitochondrial genes is commonly explained by retroprocessing. Under this model, an mRNA is reverse transcribed and integrated back into the genome, simultaneously affecting the contents of introns and edited sites. To evaluate the extent to which retroprocessing explains intron loss, we analyzed patterns of intron content and predicted RNA editing for whole mitochondrial genomes of 30 species in the monocot order Alismatales. In this group, we found an unusually high degree of variation in the intron content, even expanding the hitherto known variation among angiosperms. Some species have lost some two-third of the cis-spliced introns. We found a strong correlation between intron content and editing frequency, and detected 27 events in which intron loss is consistent with the presence of nucleotides in an edited state, supporting retroprocessing. However, we also detected seven cases of intron loss not readily being explained by retroprocession. Our analyses are also not consistent with the entire length of a fully processed cDNA copy being integrated into the genome, but instead indicate that retroprocessing usually occurs for only part of the gene. In some cases, several rounds of retroprocessing may explain intron loss in genes completely devoid of introns. A number of taxa retroprocessing seem to be very common and a possibly ongoing process. It affects the entire mitochondrial genome. PMID:27435795

  17. A little bit of sex matters for genome evolution in asexual plants.

    PubMed

    Hojsgaard, Diego; Hörandl, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Genome evolution in asexual organisms is theoretically expected to be shaped by various factors: first, hybrid origin, and polyploidy confer a genomic constitution of highly heterozygous genotypes with multiple copies of genes; second, asexuality confers a lack of recombination and variation in populations, which reduces the efficiency of selection against deleterious mutations; hence, the accumulation of mutations and a gradual increase in mutational load (Muller's ratchet) would lead to rapid extinction of asexual lineages; third, allelic sequence divergence is expected to result in rapid divergence of lineages (Meselson effect). Recent transcriptome studies on the asexual polyploid complex Ranunculus auricomus using single-nucleotide polymorphisms confirmed neutral allelic sequence divergence within a short time frame, but rejected a hypothesis of a genome-wide accumulation of mutations in asexuals compared to sexuals, except for a few genes related to reproductive development. We discuss a general model that the observed incidence of facultative sexuality in plants may unmask deleterious mutations with partial dominance and expose them efficiently to purging selection. A little bit of sex may help to avoid genomic decay and extinction. PMID:25750646

  18. A little bit of sex matters for genome evolution in asexual plants

    PubMed Central

    Hojsgaard, Diego; Hörandl, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Genome evolution in asexual organisms is theoretically expected to be shaped by various factors: first, hybrid origin, and polyploidy confer a genomic constitution of highly heterozygous genotypes with multiple copies of genes; second, asexuality confers a lack of recombination and variation in populations, which reduces the efficiency of selection against deleterious mutations; hence, the accumulation of mutations and a gradual increase in mutational load (Muller’s ratchet) would lead to rapid extinction of asexual lineages; third, allelic sequence divergence is expected to result in rapid divergence of lineages (Meselson effect). Recent transcriptome studies on the asexual polyploid complex Ranunculus auricomus using single-nucleotide polymorphisms confirmed neutral allelic sequence divergence within a short time frame, but rejected a hypothesis of a genome-wide accumulation of mutations in asexuals compared to sexuals, except for a few genes related to reproductive development. We discuss a general model that the observed incidence of facultative sexuality in plants may unmask deleterious mutations with partial dominance and expose them efficiently to purging selection. A little bit of sex may help to avoid genomic decay and extinction. PMID:25750646

  19. GreenPhylDB v2.0: comparative and functional genomics in plants.

    PubMed

    Rouard, Mathieu; Guignon, Valentin; Aluome, Christelle; Laporte, Marie-Angélique; Droc, Gaëtan; Walde, Christian; Zmasek, Christian M; Périn, Christophe; Conte, Matthieu G

    2011-01-01

    GreenPhylDB is a database designed for comparative and functional genomics based on complete genomes. Version 2 now contains sixteen full genomes of members of the plantae kingdom, ranging from algae to angiosperms, automatically clustered into gene families. Gene families are manually annotated and then analyzed phylogenetically in order to elucidate orthologous and paralogous relationships. The database offers various lists of gene families including plant, phylum and species specific gene families. For each gene cluster or gene family, easy access to gene composition, protein domains, publications, external links and orthologous gene predictions is provided. Web interfaces have been further developed to improve the navigation through information related to gene families. New analysis tools are also available, such as a gene family ontology browser that facilitates exploration. GreenPhylDB is a component of the South Green Bioinformatics Platform (http://southgreen.cirad.fr/) and is accessible at http://greenphyl.cirad.fr. It enables comparative genomics in a broad taxonomy context to enhance the understanding of evolutionary processes and thus tends to speed up gene discovery. PMID:20864446

  20. Localized Retroprocessing as a Model of Intron Loss in the Plant Mitochondrial Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, Argelia; Ross, T. Gregory; Graham, Sean W.; Barrett, Craig F.; Davis, Jerrold I.; Seberg, Ole; Petersen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Loss of introns in plant mitochondrial genes is commonly explained by retroprocessing. Under this model, an mRNA is reverse transcribed and integrated back into the genome, simultaneously affecting the contents of introns and edited sites. To evaluate the extent to which retroprocessing explains intron loss, we analyzed patterns of intron content and predicted RNA editing for whole mitochondrial genomes of 30 species in the monocot order Alismatales. In this group, we found an unusually high degree of variation in the intron content, even expanding the hitherto known variation among angiosperms. Some species have lost some two-third of the cis-spliced introns. We found a strong correlation between intron content and editing frequency, and detected 27 events in which intron loss is consistent with the presence of nucleotides in an edited state, supporting retroprocessing. However, we also detected seven cases of intron loss not readily being explained by retroprocession. Our analyses are also not consistent with the entire length of a fully processed cDNA copy being integrated into the genome, but instead indicate that retroprocessing usually occurs for only part of the gene. In some cases, several rounds of retroprocessing may explain intron loss in genes completely devoid of introns. A number of taxa retroprocessing seem to be very common and a possibly ongoing process. It affects the entire mitochondrial genome. PMID:27435795

  1. The streamlined genome of Phytomonas spp. relative to human pathogenic kinetoplastids reveals a parasite tailored for plants.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Betina M; Denoeud, France; Opperdoes, Fred; Noel, Benjamin; Madoui, Mohammed-Amine; Hammarton, Tansy C; Field, Mark C; Da Silva, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Poulain, Julie; Katinka, Michael; Jabbari, Kamel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Campbell, David A; Cintron, Roxana; Dickens, Nicholas J; Docampo, Roberto; Sturm, Nancy R; Koumandou, V Lila; Fabre, Sandrine; Flegontov, Pavel; Lukeš, Julius; Michaeli, Shulamit; Mottram, Jeremy C; Szöőr, Balázs; Zilberstein, Dan; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wincker, Patrick; Dollet, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Members of the family Trypanosomatidae infect many organisms, including animals, plants and humans. Plant-infecting trypanosomes are grouped under the single genus Phytomonas, failing to reflect the wide biological and pathological diversity of these protists. While some Phytomonas spp. multiply in the latex of plants, or in fruit or seeds without apparent pathogenicity, others colonize the phloem sap and afflict plants of substantial economic value, including the coffee tree, coconut and oil palms. Plant trypanosomes have not been studied extensively at the genome level, a major gap in understanding and controlling pathogenesis. We describe the genome sequences of two plant trypanosomatids, one pathogenic isolate from a Guianan coconut and one non-symptomatic isolate from Euphorbia collected in France. Although these parasites have extremely distinct pathogenic impacts, very few genes are unique to either, with the vast majority of genes shared by both isolates. Significantly, both Phytomonas spp. genomes consist essentially of single copy genes for the bulk of their metabolic enzymes, whereas other trypanosomatids e.g. Leishmania and Trypanosoma possess multiple paralogous genes or families. Indeed, comparison with other trypanosomatid genomes revealed a highly streamlined genome, encoding for a minimized metabolic system while conserving the major pathways, and with retention of a full complement of endomembrane organelles, but with no evidence for functional complexity. Identification of the metabolic genes of Phytomonas provides opportunities for establishing in vitro culturing of these fastidious parasites and new tools for the control of agricultural plant disease. PMID:24516393

  2. The Streamlined Genome of Phytomonas spp. Relative to Human Pathogenic Kinetoplastids Reveals a Parasite Tailored for Plants

    PubMed Central

    Porcel, Betina M.; Denoeud, France; Opperdoes, Fred; Noel, Benjamin; Madoui, Mohammed-Amine; Hammarton, Tansy C.; Field, Mark C.; Da Silva, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Poulain, Julie; Katinka, Michael; Jabbari, Kamel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Campbell, David A.; Cintron, Roxana; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Docampo, Roberto; Sturm, Nancy R.; Koumandou, V. Lila; Fabre, Sandrine; Flegontov, Pavel; Lukeš, Julius; Michaeli, Shulamit; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Szöőr, Balázs; Zilberstein, Dan; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wincker, Patrick; Dollet, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Members of the family Trypanosomatidae infect many organisms, including animals, plants and humans. Plant-infecting trypanosomes are grouped under the single genus Phytomonas, failing to reflect the wide biological and pathological diversity of these protists. While some Phytomonas spp. multiply in the latex of plants, or in fruit or seeds without apparent pathogenicity, others colonize the phloem sap and afflict plants of substantial economic value, including the coffee tree, coconut and oil palms. Plant trypanosomes have not been studied extensively at the genome level, a major gap in understanding and controlling pathogenesis. We describe the genome sequences of two plant trypanosomatids, one pathogenic isolate from a Guianan coconut and one non-symptomatic isolate from Euphorbia collected in France. Although these parasites have extremely distinct pathogenic impacts, very few genes are unique to either, with the vast majority of genes shared by both isolates. Significantly, both Phytomonas spp. genomes consist essentially of single copy genes for the bulk of their metabolic enzymes, whereas other trypanosomatids e.g. Leishmania and Trypanosoma possess multiple paralogous genes or families. Indeed, comparison with other trypanosomatid genomes revealed a highly streamlined genome, encoding for a minimized metabolic system while conserving the major pathways, and with retention of a full complement of endomembrane organelles, but with no evidence for functional complexity. Identification of the metabolic genes of Phytomonas provides opportunities for establishing in vitro culturing of these fastidious parasites and new tools for the control of agricultural plant disease. PMID:24516393

  3. Maize plants prime anti-herbivore responses by the memorizing and recalling of airborne information in their genome

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Koichi; Arimura, Gen-Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Intact maize plants prime for defensive action against herbivory in response to herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) emitted from caterpillar-infested conspecific plants. The recent research showed that the primed defense in receiver plants that had been exposed to HIPVs was maintained for at least 5 d after exposure. Herbivory triggered the receiver plants to enhance the expression of a defense gene for trypsin inhibitor (TI). At the upstream sequence of a TI gene, non-methylated cytosine residues were observed in the genome of HIPV-exposed plants more frequently than in that of healthy plant volatile-exposed plants. These findings provide an innovative mechanism for the memory of HIPV-mediated habituation for plant defense. This mechanism and further innovations for priming of defenses via plant communications will contribute to the development of plant volatile-based pest management methods in agriculture and horticulture. PMID:23887489

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Pantoea ananatis GB1, a Plant-Growth-Promoting Hydrocarbonoclastic Root Endophyte, Isolated at a Diesel Fuel Phytoremediation Site Planted with Populus.

    PubMed

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan D; Bottos, Eric M; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    We report the 4.76-Mb draft genome of Pantoea ananatis GB1, a Gram-negative bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae, isolated from the roots of poplars planted for phytoremediation of a diesel-contaminated plume at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB1 promotes plant growth in various hosts and metabolizes hydrocarbons. PMID:26950324

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Pantoea ananatis GB1, a Plant-Growth-Promoting Hydrocarbonoclastic Root Endophyte, Isolated at a Diesel Fuel Phytoremediation Site Planted with Populus

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Bottos, Eric M.; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele

    2016-01-01

    We report the 4.76-Mb draft genome of Pantoea ananatis GB1, a Gram-negative bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae, isolated from the roots of poplars planted for phytoremediation of a diesel-contaminated plume at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB1 promotes plant growth in various hosts and metabolizes hydrocarbons. PMID:26950324

  6. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-H15, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from cucumber seedling substrate.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuxuan; Han, Yuzhu; Shang, QingMao; Li, Pinglan

    2015-04-20

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-H15 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from the cucumber seedling substrate collected in Beijing, China. The complete genome of B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 consists of one single circular chromosome (3,864,316 bp) without any plasmid. From the genome, we identified clusters responsible for non-ribosomal synthesis of secondary metabolites, and genes related to the plant growth promotion hormone such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and acetoin secretion. In addition, genes that contribute to biofilm formation were also found on the genome of L-H15. Complete genome information enables further study on the beneficial interactions between B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 and host plants, and the future application of B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 as biofertilizer and biocide. PMID:25725457

  7. Complete genome sequence of a new bipartite begomovirus infecting fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) plants in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Leke, Walter N; Khatabi, Behnam; Fondong, Vincent N; Brown, Judith K

    2016-08-01

    The complete genome sequence was determined and characterized for a previously unreported bipartite begomovirus from fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis, family Cucurbitaceae) plants displaying mosaic symptoms in Cameroon. The DNA-A and DNA-B components were ~2.7 kb and ~2.6 kb in size, and the arrangement of viral coding regions on the genomic components was like those characteristic of other known bipartite begomoviruses originating in the Old World. While the DNA-A component was more closely related to that of chayote yellow mosaic virus (ChaYMV), at 78 %, the DNA-B component was more closely related to that of soybean chlorotic blotch virus (SbCBV), at 64 %. This newly discovered bipartite Old World virus is herein named telfairia mosaic virus (TelMV). PMID:27262944

  8. The butterfly plant arms-race escalated by gene and genome duplications

    PubMed Central

    Edger, Patrick P.; Heidel-Fischer, Hanna M.; Bekaert, Michaël; Rota, Jadranka; Glöckner, Gernot; Platts, Adrian E.; Heckel, David G.; Der, Joshua P.; Wafula, Eric K.; Tang, Michelle; Hofberger, Johannes A.; Smithson, Ann; Hall, Jocelyn C.; Blanchette, Matthieu; Bureau, Thomas E.; Wright, Stephen I.; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Eric Schranz, M.; Barker, Michael S.; Conant, Gavin C.; Wahlberg, Niklas; Vogel, Heiko; Pires, J. Chris; Wheat, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Coevolutionary interactions are thought to have spurred the evolution of key innovations and driven the diversification of much of life on Earth. However, the genetic and evolutionary basis of the innovations that facilitate such interactions remains poorly understood. We examined the coevolutionary interactions between plants (Brassicales) and butterflies (Pieridae), and uncovered evidence for an escalating evolutionary arms-race. Although gradual changes in trait complexity appear to have been facilitated by allelic turnover, key innovations are associated with gene and genome duplications. Furthermore, we show that the origins of both chemical defenses and of molecular counter adaptations were associated with shifts in diversification rates during the arms-race. These findings provide an important connection between the origins of biodiversity, coevolution, and the role of gene and genome duplications as a substrate for novel traits. PMID:26100883

  9. Stable predictive control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Raúl; Favela, Antonio; Raimondi, Angelo; Nevado, Antonio; Requena, Ricardo; Beltrán-Carbajal, Francisco

    2012-04-01

    The stability theory of predictive and adaptive predictive control for processes of linear and stable nature is based on the hypothesis of a physically realisable driving desired trajectory (DDT). The formal theoretical verification of this hypothesis is trivial for processes with a stable inverse, but it is not for processes with an unstable inverse. The extended strategy of predictive control was developed with the purpose of overcoming methodologically this stability problem and it has delivered excellent performance and stability in its industrial applications given a suitable choice of the prediction horizon. From a theoretical point of view, the existence of a prediction horizon capable of ensuring stability for processes with an unstable inverse was proven in the literature. However, no analytical solution has been found for the determination of the prediction horizon values which guarantee stability, in spite of the theoretical and practical interest of this matter. This article presents a new method able to determine the set of prediction horizon values which ensure stability under the extended predictive control strategy formulation and a particular performance criterion for the design of the DDT generically used in many industrial applications. The practical application of this method is illustrated by means of simulation examples.

  10. TriAnnot: A Versatile and High Performance Pipeline for the Automated Annotation of Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Philippe; Guilhot, Nicolas; Sakai, Hiroaki; Bernard, Aurélien; Choulet, Frédéric; Theil, Sébastien; Reboux, Sébastien; Amano, Naoki; Flutre, Timothée; Pelegrin, Céline; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Seidel, Michael; Giacomoni, Franck; Reichstadt, Mathieu; Alaux, Michael; Gicquello, Emmanuelle; Legeai, Fabrice; Cerutti, Lorenzo; Numa, Hisataka; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Mayer, Klaus; Itoh, Takeshi; Quesneville, Hadi; Feuillet, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In support of the international effort to obtain a reference sequence of the bread wheat genome and to provide plant communities dealing with large and complex genomes with a versatile, easy-to-use online automated tool for annotation, we have developed the TriAnnot pipeline. Its modular architecture allows for the annotation and masking of transposable elements, the structural, and functional annotation of protein-coding genes with an evidence-based quality indexing, and the identification of conserved non-coding sequences and molecular markers. The TriAnnot pipeline is parallelized on a 712 CPU computing cluster that can run a 1-Gb sequence annotation in less than 5 days. It is accessible through a web interface for small scale analyses or through a server for large scale annotations. The performance of TriAnnot was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and general fitness using curated reference sequence sets from rice and wheat. In less than 8 h, TriAnnot was able to predict more than 83% of the 3,748 CDS from rice chromosome 1 with a fitness of 67.4%. On a set of 12 reference Mb-sized contigs from wheat chromosome 3B, TriAnnot predicted and annotated 93.3% of the genes among which 54% were perfectly identified in accordance with the reference annotation. It also allowed the curation of 12 genes based on new biological evidences, increasing the percentage of perfect gene prediction to 63%. TriAnnot systematically showed a higher fitness than other annotation pipelines that are not improved for wheat. As it is easily adaptable to the annotation of other plant genomes, TriAnnot should become a useful resource for the annotation of large and complex genomes in the future. PMID:22645565

  11. A tiling microarray for global analysis of chloroplast genome expression in cucumber and other plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are small organelles equipped with their own genomes (plastomes). Although these organelles are involved in numerous plant metabolic pathways, current knowledge about the transcriptional activity of plastomes is limited. To solve this problem, we constructed a plastid tiling microarray (PlasTi-microarray) consisting of 1629 oligonucleotide probes. The oligonucleotides were designed based on the cucumber chloroplast genomic sequence and targeted both strands of the plastome in a non-contiguous arrangement. Up to 4 specific probes were designed for each gene/exon, and the intergenic regions were covered regularly, with 70-nt intervals. We also developed a protocol for direct chemical labeling and hybridization of as little as 2 micrograms of chloroplast RNA. We used this protocol for profiling the expression of the cucumber chloroplast plastome on the PlasTi-microarray. Owing to the high sequence similarity of plant plastomes, the newly constructed microarray can be used to study plants other than cucumber. Comparative hybridization of chloroplast transcriptomes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato and spinach showed that the PlasTi-microarray is highly versatile. PMID:21952044

  12. Boosted apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp

    Boosted black holes play an important role in General Relativity (GR), especially in relation to the binary black hole problem. Solving Einstein vac- uum equations in the strong field regime had long been the holy grail of numerical relativity until the significant breakthroughs made in 2005 and 2006. Numerical relativity plays a crucial role in gravitational wave detection by providing numerically generated gravitational waveforms that help search for actual signatures of gravitational radiation exciting laser interferometric de- tectors such as LIGO, VIRGO and GEO600 here on Earth. Binary black holes orbit each other in an ever tightening adiabatic inspiral caused by energy loss due to gravitational radiation emission. As the orbits shrinks, the holes speed up and eventually move at relativistic speeds in the vicinity of each other (separated by ~ 10M or so where 2M is the Schwarzschild radius). As such, one must abandon the Newtonian notion of a point mass on a circular orbit with tangential velocity and replace it with the concept of black holes, cloaked behind spheroidal event horizons that become distorted due to strong gravity, and further appear distorted because of Lorentz effects from the high orbital velocity. Apparent horizons (AHs) are 2-dimensional boundaries that are trapped surfaces. Conceptually, one can think of them as 'quasi-local' definitions for a black hole horizon. This will be explained in more detail in chapter 2. Apparent horizons are especially important in numerical relativity as they provide a computationally efficient way of describing and locating a black hole horizon. For a stationary spacetime, apparent horizons are 2-dimensional cross-sections of the event horizon, which is itself a 3-dimensional null surface in spacetime. Because an AH is a 2-dimensional cross-section of an event horizon, its area remains invariant under distortions due to Lorentz boosts although its shape changes. This fascinating property of the AH can be

  13. De novo reconstruction of consensus master genomes of plant RNA and DNA viruses from siRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In antiviral defense, plants produce massive quantities of 21-24 nucleotide siRNAs. Here we demonstrate that the complete genomes of DNA and RNA viruses and viroids can be reconstructed by deep sequencing and de novo assembly of viral/viroid siRNAs from experimentally- and naturally-infected plants....

  14. Whole-Genome Sequence of Ralstonia solanacearum P673, a Strain Capable of Infecting Tomato Plants at Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Huguet-Tapia, Jose C.

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of bacterial wilt, one of the most destructive bacterial plant diseases. We present the whole-genome sequence of the strain P673 (phylotype IIB, sequevar 4). This strain is capable of producing disease in tomato plants at low temperatures. P673 has 311 unique genes. PMID:24558246

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XK-4-1, a Plant Growth-Promoting Endophyte with Antifungal Activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhengxiang; Hsiang, Tom; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Jinglong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a bacterial plant-growth-promoting endophyte, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XK-4-1, which consists of one circular chromosome of 3,941,805 bp with 3,702 coding sequences (CDSs). The data presented highlight multiple sets of functional genes associated with its plant-beneficial characteristics. PMID:26564038

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XK-4-1, a Plant Growth-Promoting Endophyte with Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsiang, Tom; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Jinglong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a bacterial plant-growth-promoting endophyte, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XK-4-1, which consists of one circular chromosome of 3,941,805 bp with 3,702 coding sequences (CDSs). The data presented highlight multiple sets of functional genes associated with its plant-beneficial characteristics. PMID:26564038

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain SPG23, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bottos, Eric M.; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Thijs, Sofie; Rineau, Francois; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4.7-Mb draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. SPG23, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium belonging to the Actinobacteria, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain SPG23 is a potent plant growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. PMID:26701084

  18. Insights from the genome of the biotrophic fungal plant pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Kämper, Jörg; Kahmann, Regine; Bölker, Michael; Ma, Li-Jun; Brefort, Thomas; Saville, Barry J; Banuett, Flora; Kronstad, James W; Gold, Scott E; Müller, Olaf; Perlin, Michael H; Wösten, Han A B; de Vries, Ronald; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Reynaga-Peña, Cristina G; Snetselaar, Karen; McCann, Michael; Pérez-Martín, José; Feldbrügge, Michael; Basse, Christoph W; Steinberg, Gero; Ibeas, Jose I; Holloman, William; Guzman, Plinio; Farman, Mark; Stajich, Jason E; Sentandreu, Rafael; González-Prieto, Juan M; Kennell, John C; Molina, Lazaro; Schirawski, Jan; Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio; Greilinger, Doris; Münch, Karin; Rössel, Nicole; Scherer, Mario; Vranes, Miroslav; Ladendorf, Oliver; Vincon, Volker; Fuchs, Uta; Sandrock, Björn; Meng, Shaowu; Ho, Eric C H; Cahill, Matt J; Boyce, Kylie J; Klose, Jana; Klosterman, Steven J; Deelstra, Heine J; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Li, Weixi; Sanchez-Alonso, Patricia; Schreier, Peter H; Häuser-Hahn, Isolde; Vaupel, Martin; Koopmann, Edda; Friedrich, Gabi; Voss, Hartmut; Schlüter, Thomas; Margolis, Jonathan; Platt, Darren; Swimmer, Candace; Gnirke, Andreas; Chen, Feng; Vysotskaia, Valentina; Mannhaupt, Gertrud; Güldener, Ulrich; Münsterkötter, Martin; Haase, Dirk; Oesterheld, Matthias; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Mauceli, Evan W; DeCaprio, David; Wade, Claire M; Butler, Jonathan; Young, Sarah; Jaffe, David B; Calvo, Sarah; Nusbaum, Chad; Galagan, James; Birren, Bruce W

    2006-11-01

    Ustilago maydis is a ubiquitous pathogen of maize and a well-established model organism for the study of plant-microbe interactions. This basidiomycete fungus does not use aggressive virulence strategies to kill its host. U. maydis belongs to the group of biotrophic parasites (the smuts) that depend on living tissue for proliferation and development. Here we report the genome sequence for a member of this economically important group of biotrophic fungi. The 20.5-million-base U. maydis genome assembly contains 6,902 predicted protein-encoding genes and lacks pathogenicity signatures found in the genomes of aggressive pathogenic fungi, for example a battery of cell-wall-degrading enzymes. However, we detected unexpected genomic features responsible for the pathogenicity of this organism. Specifically, we found 12 clusters of genes encoding small secreted proteins with unknown function. A significant fraction of these genes exists in small gene families. Expression analysis showed that most of the genes contained in these clusters are regulated together and induced in infected tissue. Deletion of individual clusters altered the virulence of U. maydis in five cases, ranging from a complete lack of symptoms to hypervirulence. Despite years of research into the mechanism of pathogenicity in U. maydis, no 'true' virulence factors had been previously identified. Thus, the discovery of the secreted protein gene clusters and the functional demonstration of their decisive role in the infection process illuminate previously unknown mechanisms of pathogenicity operating in biotrophic fungi. Genomic analysis is, similarly, likely to open up new avenues for the discovery of virulence determinants in other pathogens. PMID:17080091

  19. Fungal plant cell wall-degrading enzyme database: a platform for comparative and evolutionary genomics in fungi and Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) play significant roles throughout the fungal life including acquisition of nutrients and decomposition of plant cell walls. In addition, many of PCWDEs are also utilized by biofuel and pulp industries. In order to develop a comparative genomics platform focused in fungal PCWDEs and provide a resource for evolutionary studies, Fungal PCWDE Database (FPDB) is constructed (http://pcwde.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/). Results In order to archive fungal PCWDEs, 22 sequence profiles were constructed and searched on 328 genomes of fungi, Oomycetes, plants and animals. A total of 6,682 putative genes encoding PCWDEs were predicted, showing differential distribution by their life styles, host ranges and taxonomy. Genes known to be involved in fungal pathogenicity, including polygalacturonase (PG) and pectin lyase, were enriched in plant pathogens. Furthermore, crop pathogens had more PCWDEs than those of rot fungi, implying that the PCWDEs analysed in this study are more needed for invading plant hosts than wood-decaying processes. Evolutionary analysis of PGs in 34 selected genomes revealed that gene duplication and loss events were mainly driven by taxonomic divergence and partly contributed by those events in species-level, especially in plant pathogens. Conclusions The FPDB would provide a fungi-specialized genomics platform, a resource for evolutionary studies of PCWDE gene families and extended analysis option by implementing Favorite, which is a data exchange and analysis hub built in Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP 2.0; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr/). PMID:24564786

  20. A geminivirus-based guide RNA delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 mediated plant genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kangquan; Han, Ting; Liu, Guang; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Ying; Yu, Alice Yunzi L.; Liu, Yule

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas has emerged as potent genome editing technology and has successfully been applied in many organisms, including several plant species. However, delivery of genome editing reagents remains a challenge in plants. Here, we report a virus-based guide RNA (gRNA) delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 mediated plant genome editing (VIGE) that can be used to precisely target genome locations and cause mutations. VIGE is performed by using a modified Cabbage Leaf Curl virus (CaLCuV) vector to express gRNAs in stable transgenic plants expressing Cas9. DNA sequencing confirmed VIGE of endogenous NbPDS3 and NbIspH genes in non-inoculated leaves because CaLCuV can infect plants systemically. Moreover, VIGE of NbPDS3 and NbIspH in newly developed leaves caused photo-bleached phenotype. These results demonstrate that geminivirus-based VIGE could be a powerful tool in plant genome editing. PMID:26450012

  1. A geminivirus-based guide RNA delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 mediated plant genome editing.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kangquan; Han, Ting; Liu, Guang; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Ying; Yu, Alice Yunzi L; Liu, Yule

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas has emerged as potent genome editing technology and has successfully been applied in many organisms, including several plant species. However, delivery of genome editing reagents remains a challenge in plants. Here, we report a virus-based guide RNA (gRNA) delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 mediated plant genome editing (VIGE) that can be used to precisely target genome locations and cause mutations. VIGE is performed by using a modified Cabbage Leaf Curl virus (CaLCuV) vector to express gRNAs in stable transgenic plants expressing Cas9. DNA sequencing confirmed VIGE of endogenous NbPDS3 and NbIspH genes in non-inoculated leaves because CaLCuV can infect plants systemically. Moreover, VIGE of NbPDS3 and NbIspH in newly developed leaves caused photo-bleached phenotype. These results demonstrate that geminivirus-based VIGE could be a powerful tool in plant genome editing. PMID:26450012

  2. Instability of enclosed horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  3. Determination of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences reveals that the largest reported mitochondrial genome in plants contains a significant amount of DNA having a nuclear origin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The melon belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family, whose economic importance among vegetable crops is second only to Solanaceae. The melon has a small genome size (454 Mb), which makes it suitable for molecular and genetic studies. Despite similar nuclear and chloroplast genome sizes, cucurbits show great variation when their mitochondrial genomes are compared. The melon possesses the largest plant mitochondrial genome, as much as eight times larger than that of other cucurbits. Results The nucleotide sequences of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes were determined. The chloroplast genome (156,017 bp) included 132 genes, with 98 single-copy genes dispersed between the small (SSC) and large (LSC) single-copy regions and 17 duplicated genes in the inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb). A comparison of the cucumber and melon chloroplast genomes showed differences in only approximately 5% of nucleotides, mainly due to short indels and SNPs. Additionally, 2.74 Mb of mitochondrial sequence, accounting for 95% of the estimated mitochondrial genome size, were assembled into five scaffolds and four additional unscaffolded contigs. An 84% of the mitochondrial genome is contained in a single scaffold. The gene-coding region accounted for 1.7% (45,926 bp) of the total sequence, including 51 protein-coding genes, 4 conserved ORFs, 3 rRNA genes and 24 tRNA genes. Despite the differences observed in the mitochondrial genome sizes of cucurbit species, Citrullus lanatus (379 kb), Cucurbita pepo (983 kb) and Cucumis melo (2,740 kb) share 120 kb of sequence, including the predicted protein-coding regions. Nevertheless, melon contained a high number of repetitive sequences and a high content of DNA of nuclear origin, which represented 42% and 47% of the total sequence, respectively. Conclusions Whereas the size and gene organisation of chloroplast genomes are similar among the cucurbit species, mitochondrial genomes show a wide variety of sizes, with a non

  4. Draft genome sequence of Pantoea ananatis B1-9, a nonpathogenic plant growth-promoting bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jin Hee; Kang, Beom Ryong; Rong, Xiaoqing; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B; Ji, Hyung Jin; Park, Chang-Seuk; Kim, Young Cheol

    2012-02-01

    Pantoea ananatis B1-9 is an endophytic Gram-negative rhizobacterium that was isolated for its ability to promote plant growth and improve crop yield in the field. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. ananatis B1-9. Comparison of this sequence to the sequenced genome of a plant-pathogenic P. ananatis strain, LMG20103, indicated that the pathogenesis-related genes were absent, but a subset of gene functions that may be related to its plant growth promotion were present. PMID:22247529

  5. Heterologous virus-induced gene silencing as a promising approach in plant functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Tafreshi, Seied Ali; Shariati, Mansour; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Khayam Nekui, Mojtaba; Esmaeili, Abolghasem

    2012-03-01

    VIGS (virus induced gene silencing) is considered as a powerful genomics tool for characterizing the function of genes in a few closely related plant species. The investigations have been carried out mainly in order to test if a pre-existing VIGS vector can serve as an efficient tool for gene silencing in a diverse array of plant species. Another route of investigation has been the constructing of new viral vectors to act in their hosts. Our approach was the creation of a heterologous system in which silencing of endogenous genes was achieved by sequences isolated from evolutionary remote species. In this study, we showed that a TRV-based vector cloned with sequences from a gymnosperm, Taxus baccata L. silenced the endogenous phytoene desaturase in an angiosperm, N. benthamiana. Our results showed that inserts of between 390 and 724 bp isolated from a conserved fragment of the Taxus PDS led to silencing of its homolog in tobacco. The real time analysis indicated that the expression of PDS was reduced 2.1- to 4.0-fold in pTRV-TbPDS infected plants compared with buffer treated plants. Once the best insert is identified and the conditions are optimized for heterologous silencing by pTRV-TbPDS in tobacco, then we can test if TRV can serve as an efficient silencing vector in Taxus. This strategy could also be used to silence a diverse array of genes from a wide range of species which have no VIGS protocol. The results also showed that plants silenced heterologously by the VIGS system a minimally affected with respect to plant growth which may be ideal for studying the genes that their complete loss of function may lead to decrease of plant growth or plant death. PMID:21655951

  6. CRISPR/Cas9 Platforms for Genome Editing in Plants: Developments and Applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingliang; Zhu, Qinlong; Chen, Yuanling; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2016-07-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein9 (Cas9) genome editing system (CRISPR/Cas9) is adapted from the prokaryotic type II adaptive immunity system. The CRISPR/Cas9 tool surpasses other programmable nucleases, such as ZFNs and TALENs, for its simplicity and high efficiency. Various plant-specific CRISPR/Cas9 vector systems have been established for adaption of this technology to many plant species. In this review, we present an overview of current advances on applications of this technology in plants, emphasizing general considerations for establishment of CRISPR/Cas9 vector platforms, strategies for multiplex editing, methods for analyzing the induced mutations, factors affecting editing efficiency and specificity, and features of the induced mutations and applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in plants. In addition, we provide a perspective on the challenges of CRISPR/Cas9 technology and its significance for basic plant research and crop genetic improvement. PMID:27108381

  7. Replicational release of geminivirus genomes from tandemly repeated copies: evidence for rolling-circle replication of a plant viral DNA.

    PubMed

    Stenger, D C; Revington, G N; Stevenson, M C; Bisaro, D M

    1991-09-15

    Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of Nicotiana benthamiana plants with Ti plasmids containing tandem genome repeats derived from different strains of the gemini-virus beet curly top virus (BCTV) resulted in the production of unit-length recombinant progeny genomes in systemically infected plants. When two putative plus-strand origins of replication were present in constructs used as inocula, a replicational escape mechanism was favored that resulted in progeny genomes of a single predominant genotype. The genotype was dependent upon the arrangement of repeated parental genomes in the inocula. Sequencing across the junction between parental BCTV strains in the recombinant progeny allowed mapping of the plus-strand origin of replication to a 20-base-pair sequence within the conserved hairpin found in all geminivirus genomes. In contrast, when inocula contained tandemly repeated BCTV genome sequences but only a single conserved hairpin, a number of different progeny genotypes were simultaneously replicated in infected plants, a result expected if unit-length viral genomes were generated by random intramolecular recombination events. These results and other considerations indicate that geminivirus DNA replication occurs by a rolling-circle mechanism. PMID:1896448

  8. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad J; Ran, Chao; Liu, Ke; Ryu, Choong-Min; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R; Williams, Malachi A; Hassan, Mohammad K; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Newman, Molli; Kloepper, Joseph W; Liles, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group) are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32 to 90%, with 2839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in a B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization. PMID:26347755

  9. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Ran, Chao; Liu, Ke; Ryu, Choong-Min; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R.; Williams, Malachi A.; Hassan, Mohammad K.; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Newman, Molli; Kloepper, Joseph W.; Liles, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group) are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32 to 90%, with 2839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in a B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization. PMID:26347755

  10. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-08-15

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes.

  11. Reannotation and extended community resources for the genome of the non-seed plant Physcomitrella patens provide insights into the evolution of plant gene structures and functions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The moss Physcomitrella patens as a model species provides an important reference for early-diverging lineages of plants and the release of the genome in 2008 opened the doors to genome-wide studies. The usability of a reference genome greatly depends on the quality of the annotation and the availability of centralized community resources. Therefore, in the light of accumulating evidence for missing genes, fragmentary gene structures, false annotations and a low rate of functional annotations on the original release, we decided to improve the moss genome annotation. Results Here, we report the complete moss genome re-annotation (designated V1.6) incorporating the increased transcript availability from a multitude of developmental stages and tissue types. We demonstrate the utility of the improved P. patens genome annotation for comparative genomics and new extensions to the cosmoss.org resource as a central repository for this plant “flagship” genome. The structural annotation of 32,275 protein-coding genes results in 8387 additional loci including 1456 loci with known protein domains or homologs in Plantae. This is the first release to include information on transcript isoforms, suggesting alternative splicing events for at least 10.8% of the loci. Furthermore, this release now also provides information on non-protein-coding loci. Functional annotations were improved regarding quality and coverage, resulting in 58% annotated loci (previously: 41%) that comprise also 7200 additional loci with GO annotations. Access and manual curation of the functional and structural genome annotation is provided via the http://www.cosmoss.org model organism database. Conclusions Comparative analysis of gene structure evolution along the green plant lineage provides novel insights, such as a comparatively high number of loci with 5’-UTR introns in the moss. Comparative analysis of functional annotations reveals expansions of moss house-keeping and metabolic genes

  12. Phylogenetic and Genomic Analyses Resolve the Origin of Important Plant Genes Derived from Transposable Elements

    PubMed Central

    Joly-Lopez, Zoé; Hoen, Douglas R.; Blanchette, Mathieu; Bureau, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Once perceived as merely selfish, transposable elements (TEs) are now recognized as potent agents of adaptation. One way TEs contribute to evolution is through TE exaptation, a process whereby TEs, which persist by replicating in the genome, transform into novel host genes, which persist by conferring phenotypic benefits. Known exapted TEs (ETEs) contribute diverse and vital functions, and may facilitate punctuated equilibrium, yet little is known about this process. To better understand TE exaptation, we designed an approach to resolve the phylogenetic context and timing of exaptation events and subsequent patterns of ETE diversification. Starting with known ETEs, we search in diverse genomes for basal ETEs and closely related TEs, carefully curate the numerous candidate sequences, and infer detailed phylogenies. To distinguish TEs from ETEs, we also weigh several key genomic characteristics including repetitiveness, terminal repeats, pseudogenic features, and conserved domains. Applying this approach to the well-characterized plant ETEs MUG and FHY3, we show that each group is paraphyletic and we argue that this pattern demonstrates that each originated in not one but multiple exaptation events. These exaptations and subsequent ETE diversification occurred throughout angiosperm evolution including the crown group expansion, the angiosperm radiation, and the primitive evolution of angiosperms. In addition, we detect evidence of several putative novel ETE families. Our findings support the hypothesis that TE exaptation generates novel genes more frequently than is currently thought, often coinciding with key periods of evolution. PMID:27189548

  13. A host plant genome (Zizania latifolia) after a century-long endophyte infection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Longbiao; Qiu, Jie; Han, Zujing; Ye, Zihong; Chen, Chao; Liu, Chuanjun; Xin, Xiufang; Ye, Chu-Yu; Wang, Ying-Ying; Xie, Hongqing; Wang, Yu; Bao, Jiandong; Tang, She; Xu, Jie; Gui, Yijie; Fu, Fei; Wang, Weidi; Zhang, Xingchen; Zhu, Qianhua; Guang, Xuanmin; Wang, Chongzhi; Cui, Haifeng; Cai, Daguang; Ge, Song; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan; Qian, Qian; He, Sheng Yang; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Fan, Longjiang

    2015-08-01

    Despite the importance of host-microbe interactions in natural ecosystems, agriculture and medicine, the impact of long-term (especially decades or longer) microbial colonization on the dynamics of host genomes is not well understood. The vegetable crop 'Jiaobai' with enlarged edible stems was domesticated from wild Zizania latifolia (Oryzeae) approximately 2000 years ago as a result of persistent infection by a fungal endophyte, Ustilago esculenta. Asexual propagation via infected rhizomes is the only means of Jiaobai production, and the Z. latifolia-endophyte complex has been maintained continuously for two centuries. Here, genomic analysis revealed that cultivated Z. latifolia has a significantly smaller repertoire of immune receptors compared with wild Z. latifolia. There are widespread gene losses/mutations and expression changes in the plant-pathogen interaction pathway in Jiaobai. These results show that continuous long-standing endophyte association can have a major effect on the evolution of the structural and transcriptomic components of the host genome. PMID:26072920

  14. Phylogenetic and Genomic Analyses Resolve the Origin of Important Plant Genes Derived from Transposable Elements.

    PubMed

    Joly-Lopez, Zoé; Hoen, Douglas R; Blanchette, Mathieu; Bureau, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Once perceived as merely selfish, transposable elements (TEs) are now recognized as potent agents of adaptation. One way TEs contribute to evolution is through TE exaptation, a process whereby TEs, which persist by replicating in the genome, transform into novel host genes, which persist by conferring phenotypic benefits. Known exapted TEs (ETEs) contribute diverse and vital functions, and may facilitate punctuated equilibrium, yet little is known about this process. To better understand TE exaptation, we designed an approach to resolve the phylogenetic context and timing of exaptation events and subsequent patterns of ETE diversification. Starting with known ETEs, we search in diverse genomes for basal ETEs and closely related TEs, carefully curate the numerous candidate sequences, and infer detailed phylogenies. To distinguish TEs from ETEs, we also weigh several key genomic characteristics including repetitiveness, terminal repeats, pseudogenic features, and conserved domains. Applying this approach to the well-characterized plant ETEs MUG and FHY3, we show that each group is paraphyletic and we argue that this pattern demonstrates that each originated in not one but multiple exaptation events. These exaptations and subsequent ETE diversification occurred throughout angiosperm evolution including the crown group expansion, the angiosperm radiation, and the primitive evolution of angiosperms. In addition, we detect evidence of several putative novel ETE families. Our findings support the hypothesis that TE exaptation generates novel genes more frequently than is currently thought, often coinciding with key periods of evolution. PMID:27189548

  15. A novel ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from wastewater treatment plant: Its enrichment, physiological and genomic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyang; Ding, Kun; Wen, Xianghua; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Bo; Yang, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are recently found to participate in the ammonia removal processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), similar to their bacterial counterparts. However, due to lack of cultivated AOA strains from WWTPs, their functions and contributions in these systems remain unclear. Here we report a novel AOA strain SAT1 enriched from activated sludge, with its physiological and genomic characteristics investigated. The maximal 16S rRNA gene similarity between SAT1 and other reported AOA strain is 96% (with "Ca. Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis"), and it is affiliated with Wastewater Cluster B (WWC-B) based on amoA gene phylogeny, a cluster within group I.1a and specific for activated sludge. Our strain is autotrophic, mesophilic (25 °C-33 °C) and neutrophilic (pH 5.0-7.0). Its genome size is 1.62 Mb, with a large fragment inversion (accounted for 68% genomic size) inside. The strain could not utilize urea due to truncation of the urea transporter gene. The lack of the pathways to synthesize usual compatible solutes makes it intolerant to high salinity (>0.03%), but could adapt to low salinity (0.005%) environments. This adaptation, together with possibly enhanced cell-biofilm attachment ability, makes it suitable for WWTPs environment. We propose the name "Candidatus Nitrosotenuis cloacae" for the strain SAT1. PMID:27030530

  16. A novel ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from wastewater treatment plant: Its enrichment, physiological and genomic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuyang; Ding, Kun; Wen, Xianghua; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Bo; Yang, Yunfeng

    2016-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are recently found to participate in the ammonia removal processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), similar to their bacterial counterparts. However, due to lack of cultivated AOA strains from WWTPs, their functions and contributions in these systems remain unclear. Here we report a novel AOA strain SAT1 enriched from activated sludge, with its physiological and genomic characteristics investigated. The maximal 16S rRNA gene similarity between SAT1 and other reported AOA strain is 96% (with “Ca. Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis”), and it is affiliated with Wastewater Cluster B (WWC-B) based on amoA gene phylogeny, a cluster within group I.1a and specific for activated sludge. Our strain is autotrophic, mesophilic (25 °C–33 °C) and neutrophilic (pH 5.0–7.0). Its genome size is 1.62 Mb, with a large fragment inversion (accounted for 68% genomic size) inside. The strain could not utilize urea due to truncation of the urea transporter gene. The lack of the pathways to synthesize usual compatible solutes makes it intolerant to high salinity (>0.03%), but could adapt to low salinity (0.005%) environments. This adaptation, together with possibly enhanced cell-biofilm attachment ability, makes it suitable for WWTPs environment. We propose the name “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis cloacae” for the strain SAT1.

  17. Allele Identification for Transcriptome-Based Population Genomics in the Invasive Plant Centaurea solstitialis

    PubMed Central

    Dlugosch, Katrina M.; Lai, Zhao; Bonin, Aurélie; Hierro, José; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptome sequences are becoming more broadly available for multiple individuals of the same species, providing opportunities to derive population genomic information from these datasets. Using the 454 Life Science Genome Sequencer FLX and FLX-Titanium next-generation platforms, we generated 11−430 Mbp of sequence for normalized cDNA for 40 wild genotypes of the invasive plant Centaurea solstitialis, yellow starthistle, from across its worldwide distribution. We examined the impact of sequencing effort on transcriptome recovery and overlap among individuals. To do this, we developed two novel publicly available software pipelines: SnoWhite for read cleaning before assembly, and AllelePipe for clustering of loci and allele identification in assembled datasets with or without a reference genome. AllelePipe is designed specifically for cases in which read depth information is not appropriate or available to assist with disentangling closely related paralogs from allelic variation, as in transcriptome or previously assembled libraries. We find that modest applications of sequencing effort recover most of the novel sequences present in the transcriptome of this species, including single-copy loci and a representative distribution of functional groups. In contrast, the coverage of variable sites, observation of heterozygosity, and overlap among different libraries are all highly dependent on sequencing effort. Nevertheless, the information gained from overlapping regions was informative regarding coarse population structure and variation across our small number of population samples, providing the first genetic evidence in support of hypothesized invasion scenarios. PMID:23390612

  18. A novel ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from wastewater treatment plant: Its enrichment, physiological and genomic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuyang; Ding, Kun; Wen, Xianghua; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Bo; Yang, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are recently found to participate in the ammonia removal processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), similar to their bacterial counterparts. However, due to lack of cultivated AOA strains from WWTPs, their functions and contributions in these systems remain unclear. Here we report a novel AOA strain SAT1 enriched from activated sludge, with its physiological and genomic characteristics investigated. The maximal 16S rRNA gene similarity between SAT1 and other reported AOA strain is 96% (with “Ca. Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis”), and it is affiliated with Wastewater Cluster B (WWC-B) based on amoA gene phylogeny, a cluster within group I.1a and specific for activated sludge. Our strain is autotrophic, mesophilic (25 °C–33 °C) and neutrophilic (pH 5.0–7.0). Its genome size is 1.62 Mb, with a large fragment inversion (accounted for 68% genomic size) inside. The strain could not utilize urea due to truncation of the urea transporter gene. The lack of the pathways to synthesize usual compatible solutes makes it intolerant to high salinity (>0.03%), but could adapt to low salinity (0.005%) environments. This adaptation, together with possibly enhanced cell-biofilm attachment ability, makes it suitable for WWTPs environment. We propose the name “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis cloacae” for the strain SAT1. PMID:27030530

  19. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome library from the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii: a new resource for plant comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenming; Tanurdzic, Milos; Luo, Meizhong; Sisneros, Nicholas; Kim, Hye Ran; Weng, Jing-Ke; Kudrna, Dave; Mueller, Christopher; Arumuganathan, K; Carlson, John; Chapple, Clint; de Pamphilis, Claude; Mandoli, Dina; Tomkins, Jeff; Wing, Rod A; Banks, Jo Ann

    2005-01-01

    Background The lycophytes are an ancient lineage of vascular plants that diverged from the seed plant lineage about 400 Myr ago. Although the lycophytes occupy an important phylogenetic position for understanding the evolution of plants and their genomes, no genomic resources exist for this group of plants. Results Here we describe the construction of a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Based on cell flow cytometry, this species has the smallest genome size among the different lycophytes tested, including Huperzia lucidula, Diphaiastrum digita, Isoetes engelmanii and S. kraussiana. The arrayed BAC library consists of 9126 clones; the average insert size is estimated to be 122 kb. Inserts of chloroplast origin account for 2.3% of the clones. The BAC library contains an estimated ten genome-equivalents based on DNA hybridizations using five single-copy and two duplicated S. moellendorffii genes as probes. Conclusion The S. moellenforffii BAC library, the first to be constructed from a lycophyte, will be useful to the scientific community as a resource for comparative plant genomics and evolution. PMID:15955246

  20. Oligonucleotide-Mediated Genome Editing Provides Precision and Function to Engineered Nucleases and Antibiotics in Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Noel J.; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B.; Warburg, Zachary J.; Woodward, Melody J.; Mihiret, Yohannes A.; Lincoln, Tracey A.; Segami, Rosa E.; Sanders, Steven L.; Walker, Keith A.; Beetham, Peter R.; Schöpke, Christian R.; Gocal, Greg F.W.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a form of oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision genome editing in plants that uses single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODNs) to precisely and efficiently generate genome edits at DNA strand lesions made by DNA double strand break reagents. Employing a transgene model in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we obtained a high frequency of precise targeted genome edits when ssODNs were introduced into protoplasts that were pretreated with the glycopeptide antibiotic phleomycin, a nonspecific DNA double strand breaker. Simultaneous delivery of ssODN and a site-specific DNA double strand breaker, either transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9), resulted in a much greater targeted genome-editing frequency compared with treatment with DNA double strand-breaking reagents alone. Using this site-specific approach, we applied the combination of ssODN and CRISPR/Cas9 to develop an herbicide tolerance trait in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by precisely editing the 5′-ENOLPYRUVYLSHIKIMATE-3-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (EPSPS) genes. EPSPS edits occurred at sufficient frequency that we could regenerate whole plants from edited protoplasts without employing selection. These plants were subsequently determined to be tolerant to the herbicide glyphosate in greenhouse spray tests. Progeny (C1) of these plants showed the expected Mendelian segregation of EPSPS edits. Our findings show the enormous potential of using a genome-editing platform for precise, reliable trait development in crop plants. PMID:26864017

  1. 2008 Co2 Assimilation in Plants: Genome to Biome Gordon Research Conference - August 17-22

    SciTech Connect

    James V. Maroney

    2009-08-12

    Formerly entitled 'CO2 Fixation and Metabolism in Green Plants', this long-standing Gordon Research Conference has been held on a triennial basis since 1976. In 1990 the participants decided to alternate between sites in the U.S. and outside the U.S. The 2005 conference was held in Europe at the Centre Paul Langevin in Aussois, France, so the 2008 conference returns to a U.S. site - the University of New England in Biddeford, Maine. The 2008 conference covers basic plant research related to photosynthesis and the subsequent regulation and engineering of carbon assimilation. Approaches that range from post-genomic technologies and systems biology, through to fundamental biochemistry, physiology and molecular biology are integrated within ecological and agronomic contexts. As such, the meeting provides the rare opportunity of a single venue for discussing all aspects of the 'carbon-side' of photosynthesis - from genome to biome. The 2008 conference will include an emphasis on the central role of carbon assimilation by plants for developing new sources of bioenergy and for achieving a carbon-neutral planet. A special characteristic of this conference is its 'intimacy' with approximately 110 conferees, ranging from beginning graduate students and postdoctoral associates to leading senior plant scientists, engaged in open and forward-thinking discussions in an informal, friendly setting. With extended time devoted to discussion, and the encouragement to challenge dogma, it is unlike other meetings in the U.S. or abroad. Another novel feature of the conference is a session devoted to the latest 'hot off the press' findings by both established and early career scientists, picked from the abstracts. Together with an expanded poster discussion in the evening sessions, this session provides an opportunity for early career scientists to present interesting new data and to 'test drive' hypotheses in a collegial atmosphere.

  2. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  3. Genome-wide identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants in plants.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinteng; Zhang, Zhanlu; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Kezhong; Leng, Pingsheng; Liang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR) genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development. PMID:25815311

  4. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary, and Expression Analyses of Histone H3 Variants in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jinteng; Zhang, Zhanlu; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Kezhong; Leng, Pingsheng; Liang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR) genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development. PMID:25815311

  5. Challenges of flow-cytometric estimation of nuclear genome size in orchids, a plant group with both whole-genome and progressively partial endoreplication.

    PubMed

    Trávníček, Pavel; Ponert, Jan; Urfus, Tomáš; Jersáková, Jana; Vrána, Jan; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Suda, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear genome size is an inherited quantitative trait of eukaryotic organisms with both practical and biological consequences. A detailed analysis of major families is a promising approach to fully understand the biological meaning of the extensive variation in genome size in plants. Although Orchidaceae accounts for ∼10% of the angiosperm diversity, the knowledge of patterns and dynamics of their genome size is limited, in part due to difficulties in flow cytometric analyses. Cells in various somatic tissues of orchids undergo extensive endoreplication, either whole-genome or partial, and the G1-phase nuclei with 2C DNA amounts may be lacking, resulting in overestimated genome size values. Interpretation of DNA content histograms is particularly challenging in species with progressively partial endoreplication, in which the ratios between the positions of two neighboring DNA peaks are lower than two. In order to assess distributions of nuclear DNA amounts and identify tissue suitable for reliable estimation of nuclear DNA content, we analyzed six different tissue types in 48 orchid species belonging to all recognized subfamilies. Although traditionally used leaves may provide incorrect C-values, particularly in species with progressively partial endoreplication, young ovaries and pollinaria consistently yield 2C and 1C peaks of their G1-phase nuclei, respectively, and are, therefore, the most suitable parts for genome size studies in orchids. We also provide new DNA C-values for 22 orchid genera and 42 species. Adhering to the proposed methodology would allow for reliable genome size estimates in this largest plant family. Although our research was limited to orchids, the need to find a suitable tissue with dominant 2C peak of G1-phase nuclei applies to all endopolyploid species. PMID:25929591

  6. Genome size as a key to evolutionary complex aquatic plants: polyploidy and hybridization in Callitriche (Plantaginaceae).

    PubMed

    Prančl, Jan; Kaplan, Zdeněk; Trávníček, Pavel; Jarolímová, Vlasta

    2014-01-01

    Despite their complex evolutionary histories, aquatic plants are highly underrepresented in contemporary biosystematic studies. Of them, the genus Callitriche is particularly interesting because of such evolutionary features as wide variation in chromosome numbers and pollination systems. However, taxonomic difficulties have prevented broader investigation of this genus. In this study we applied flow cytometry to Callitriche for the first time in order to gain an insight into evolutionary processes and genome size differentiation in the genus. Flow cytometry complemented by confirmation of chromosome counts was applied to an extensive dataset of 1077 Callitriche individuals from 495 localities in 11 European countries and the USA. Genome size was determined for 12 taxa. The results suggest that many important processes have interacted in the evolution of the genus, including polyploidization and hybridization. Incongruence between genome size and ploidy level, intraspecific variation in genome size, formation of autotriploid and hybridization between species with different pollination systems were also detected. Hybridization takes place particularly in the diploid-tetraploid complex C. cophocarpa-C. platycarpa, for which the triploid hybrids were frequently recorded in the area of co-occurrence of its parents. A hitherto unknown hybrid (probably C. hamulata × C. cophocarpa) with a unique chromosome number was discovered in the Czech Republic. However, hybridization occurs very rarely among most of the studied species. The main ecological preferences were also compared among the taxa collected. Although Callitriche taxa often grow in mixed populations, the ecological preferences of individual species are distinctly different in some cases. Anyway, flow cytometry is a very efficient method for taxonomic delimitation, determination and investigation of Callitriche species, and is even able to distinguish homoploid taxa and identify introduced species. PMID:25211149

  7. Genome Size as a Key to Evolutionary Complex Aquatic Plants: Polyploidy and Hybridization in Callitriche (Plantaginaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Prančl, Jan; Kaplan, Zdeněk; Trávníček, Pavel; Jarolímová, Vlasta

    2014-01-01

    Despite their complex evolutionary histories, aquatic plants are highly underrepresented in contemporary biosystematic studies. Of them, the genus Callitriche is particularly interesting because of such evolutionary features as wide variation in chromosome numbers and pollination systems. However, taxonomic difficulties have prevented broader investigation of this genus. In this study we applied flow cytometry to Callitriche for the first time in order to gain an insight into evolutionary processes and genome size differentiation in the genus. Flow cytometry complemented by confirmation of chromosome counts was applied to an extensive dataset of 1077 Callitriche individuals from 495 localities in 11 European countries and the USA. Genome size was determined for 12 taxa. The results suggest that many important processes have interacted in the evolution of the genus, including polyploidization and hybridization. Incongruence between genome size and ploidy level, intraspecific variation in genome size, formation of autotriploid and hybridization between species with different pollination systems were also detected. Hybridization takes place particularly in the diploid – tetraploid complex C. cophocarpa – C. platycarpa, for which the triploid hybrids were frequently recorded in the area of co-occurrence of its parents. A hitherto unknown hybrid (probably C. hamulata × C. cophocarpa) with a unique chromosome number was discovered in the Czech Republic. However, hybridization occurs very rarely among most of the studied species. The main ecological preferences were also compared among the taxa collected. Although Callitriche taxa often grow in mixed populations, the ecological preferences of individual species are distinctly different in some cases. Anyway, flow cytometry is a very efficient method for taxonomic delimitation, determination and investigation of Callitriche species, and is even able to distinguish homoploid taxa and identify introduced species. PMID

  8. Lineage-Specific Conserved Noncoding Sequences of Plant Genomes: Their Possible Role in Nucleosome Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Kryukov, Kirill; Sumiyama, Kenta; Saitou, Naruya

    2014-01-01

    Many studies on conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) have found that CNSs are enriched significantly in regulatory sequence elements. We conducted whole-genome analysis on plant CNSs to identify lineage-specific CNSs in eudicots, monocots, angiosperms, and vascular plants based on the premise that lineage-specific CNSs define lineage-specific characters and functions in groups of organisms. We identified 27 eudicot, 204 monocot, 6,536 grass, 19 angiosperm, and 2 vascular plant lineage-specific CNSs (lengths range from 16 to 1,517 bp) that presumably originated in their respective common ancestors. A stronger constraint on the CNSs located in the untranslated regions was observed. The CNSs were often flanked by genes involved in transcription regulation. A drop of A+T content near the border of CNSs was observed and CNS regions showed a higher nucleosome occupancy probability. These CNSs are candidate regulatory elements, which are expected to define lineage-specific features of various plant groups. PMID:25364802

  9. Comparative analysis of contextual bias around the translation initiation sites in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Paras; Rangan, Latha; Ramesh, T Venkata; Gupta, Mudit

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide distribution around translation initiation site (TIS) is thought to play an important role in determining translation efficiency. Kozak in vertebrates and later Joshi et al. in plants identified context sequence having a key role in translation efficiency, but a great variation regarding this context sequence has been observed among different taxa. The present study aims to refine the context sequence around initiation codon in plants and addresses the sampling error problem by using complete genomes of 7 monocots and 7 dicots separately. Besides positions -3 and +4, significant conservation at -2 and +5 positions was also found and nucleotide bias at the latter two positions was shown to directly influence translation efficiency in the taxon studied. About 1.8% (monocots) and 2.4% (dicots) of the total sequences fit the context sequence from positions -3 to +5, which might be indicative of lower number of housekeeping genes in the transcriptome. A three base periodicity was observed in 5' UTR and CDS of monocots and only in CDS of dicots as confirmed against random occurrence and annotation errors. Deterministic enrichment of GCNAUGGC in monocots, AANAUGGC in dicots and GCNAUGGC in plants around TIS was also established (where AUG denotes the start codon), which can serve as an arbiter of putative TIS with efficient translation in plants. PMID:27316311

  10. Functional cybrid plants possessing a Nicotiana genome and an Atropa plastome.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, S G; Shlumukov, L R; Pogrebnyak, N J; Berger, S; Gleba, Y

    1987-08-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts of plastome chlorophyll-deficient, streptomycin-resistant Nicotiana tabacum were fused with those of wild type Atropa belladonna using the polyethylene-glycol/high Ca++/dimethylsulfoxide method. Protoplasts were cultured in nutrient media suitable for regeneration of tobacco but not Atropa cells. In two experiments, a total of 41 cell lines have been selected as green colonies. Cytogenetic (chromosomal number and morphology) and biochemical (isozyme analyses of esterase, amylase and peroxidase) studies were used to evaluate the nuclear genetic constitution of regenerated plants. To study plastid genetic constitution, restriction endonuclease analysis of chloroplast DNA was performed. Three groups of regenerants have been identified: (a) nuclear hybrids (4 cell lines); (b) Atropa plants, most probably arising from rare surviving parental protoplasts (4 lines) and (c) Nicotiana/Atropa cybrids possessing a tobacco genome and an Atropa plastome (33 lines). Most of cybrids obtained were diploid, morphogenetically normal plants phenotypically similar to tobacco. Some plants flowered and yielded viable seeds. Part of cybrid regenerants were variegated, variegation being transmitted to sexual progeny. Electron microscopic analysis of the mesophyll cells of variegated leaves revealed the presence of heteroplastidic cells. Analysis of thylakoid membrane polypeptides shows that in the cybrids the content of at least one of the major polypeptides, presumably a chlorophyll a/b binding protein is drastically reduced. PMID:17186622

  11. Precision genome editing in plants via gene targeting and piggyBac-mediated marker excision

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Ohtsuki, Namie; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Precise genome engineering via homologous recombination (HR)-mediated gene targeting (GT) has become an essential tool in molecular breeding as well as in basic plant science. As HR-mediated GT is an extremely rare event, positive–negative selection has been used extensively in flowering plants to isolate cells in which GT has occurred. In order to utilize GT as a methodology for precision mutagenesis, the positive selectable marker gene should be completely eliminated from the GT locus. Here, we introduce targeted point mutations conferring resistance to herbicide into the rice acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene via GT with subsequent marker excision by piggyBac transposition. Almost all regenerated plants expressing piggyBac transposase contained exclusively targeted point mutations without concomitant re-integration of the transposon, resulting in these progeny showing a herbicide bispyribac sodium (BS)-tolerant phenotype. This approach was also applied successfully to the editing of a microRNA targeting site in the rice cleistogamy 1 gene. Therefore, our approach provides a general strategy for the targeted modification of endogenous genes in plants. PMID:25284193

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant-Pathogenic Soil Fungus Rhizoctonia solani Anastomosis Group 3 Strain Rhs1AP

    PubMed Central

    Cubeta, Marc A.; Dean, Ralph A.; Jabaji, Suha; Neate, Stephen M.; Tavantzis, Stellos; Toda, Takeshi; Vilgalys, Rytas; Bharathan, Narayanaswamy; Fedorova-Abrams, Natalie; Pakala, Suman B.; Pakala, Suchitra M.; Zafar, Nikhat; Joardar, Vinita; Losada, Liliana; Nierman, William C.

    2014-01-01

    The soil fungus Rhizoctonia solani is a pathogen of agricultural crops. Here, we report on the 51,705,945 bp draft consensus genome sequence of R. solani strain Rhs1AP. A comprehensive understanding of the heterokaryotic genome complexity and organization of R. solani may provide insight into the plant disease ecology and adaptive behavior of the fungus. PMID:25359908

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant-Pathogenic Soil Fungus Rhizoctonia solani Anastomosis Group 3 Strain Rhs1AP.

    PubMed

    Cubeta, Marc A; Thomas, Elizabeth; Dean, Ralph A; Jabaji, Suha; Neate, Stephen M; Tavantzis, Stellos; Toda, Takeshi; Vilgalys, Rytas; Bharathan, Narayanaswamy; Fedorova-Abrams, Natalie; Pakala, Suman B; Pakala, Suchitra M; Zafar, Nikhat; Joardar, Vinita; Losada, Liliana; Nierman, William C

    2014-01-01

    The soil fungus Rhizoctonia solani is a pathogen of agricultural crops. Here, we report on the 51,705,945 bp draft consensus genome sequence of R. solani strain Rhs1AP. A comprehensive understanding of the heterokaryotic genome complexity and organization of R. solani may provide insight into the plant disease ecology and adaptive behavior of the fungus. PMID:25359908

  14. The complete genome sequence of a new polerovirus in strawberry plants from eastern Canada showing strawberry decline symptoms.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Bernardy, Mike; Bhagwat, Basdeo; Wiersma, Paul A; DeYoung, Robyn; Bouthillier, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Strawberry decline disease, probably caused by synergistic reactions of mixed virus infections, threatens the North American strawberry industry. Deep sequencing of strawberry plant samples from eastern Canada resulted in the identification of a new virus genome resembling poleroviruses in sequence and genome structure. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that it is a new member of the genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae. The virus is tentatively named "strawberry polerovirus 1" (SPV1). PMID:25362546

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium radiotolerans, a DDE-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Strain Isolated from Cucurbita pepo

    PubMed Central

    Eevers, Nele; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Bottos, Eric M.; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We announce the draft genome of Methylobacterium radiotolerans, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from Cucurbita pepo roots. This strain shows 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE)-degrading potential and plant growth-promoting capacities. Analyses of its 6.8-Mb genome will improve our understanding of DDE-degradation pathways and aid in the deployment of phytoremediation technologies to remediate DDE-contaminated soils. PMID:25977414

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes, a DDE-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Strain Isolated from Cucurbita pepo

    PubMed Central

    Eevers, Nele; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Bottos, Eric M.; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Enterobacter aerogenes, a Gram-negative bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae isolated from Cucurbita pepo root tissue. This bacterium shows 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE)-degrading potential and plant growth-promoting capacity. An analysis of its 4.5-Mb draft genome will enhance the understanding of DDE degradation pathways and phytoremediation applications for DDE-contaminated soils. PMID:25883299

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Glehnia littoralis F.Schmidt ex Miq. (Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Choon; Oh Lee, Hyun; Kim, Kyunghee; Kim, Soonok; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Glehnia littoralis F. Schmidt ex Miq is an oriental medicinal herb belonging to Apiaceae family, and its dried roots and rhizomes are known to show various pharmacological effects. The complete chlorplast genome of G. littoralis was generated by de novo assembly using whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of G. littoralis was 147 467 bp in length and divided into four distinct regions: large single copy region (93 493 bp), small single copy region (17 546 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (18 214 bp). A total of 114 genes including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes were predicted and accounted for 57.1% of the chloroplast genome. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that G. littoralis is an herbal species closely related to Ledebouriella seseloides, an herbal medicinal plant. PMID:26367483

  18. Whole-genome sequencing of Bacillus subtilis XF-1 reveals mechanisms for biological control and multiple beneficial properties in plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shengye; Li, Xingyu; He, Pengfei; Ho, Honhing; Wu, Yixin; He, Yueqiu

    2015-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis XF-1 is a gram-positive, plant-associated bacterium that stimulates plant growth and produces secondary metabolites that suppress soil-borne plant pathogens. In particular, it is especially highly efficient at controlling the clubroot disease of cruciferous crops. Its 4,061,186-bp genome contains an estimated 3853 protein-coding sequences and the 1155 genes of XF-1 are present in most genome-sequenced Bacillus strains: 3757 genes in B. subtilis 168, and 1164 in B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42. Analysis using the Cluster of Orthologous Groups database of proteins shows that 60 genes control bacterial mobility, 221 genes are related to cell wall and membrane biosynthesis, and more than 112 are genes associated with secondary metabolites. In addition, the genes contributed to the strain's plant colonization, bio-control and stimulation of plant growth. Sequencing of the genome is a fundamental step for developing a desired strain to serve as an efficient biological control agent and plant growth stimulator. Similar to other members of the taxon, XF-1 has a genome that contains giant gene clusters for the non-ribosomal synthesis of antifungal lipopeptides (surfactin and fengycin), the polyketides (macrolactin and bacillaene), the siderophore bacillibactin, and the dipeptide bacilysin. There are two synthesis pathways for volatile growth-promoting compounds. The expression of biosynthesized antibiotic peptides in XF-1 was revealed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:25860123

  19. BioNano genome mapping of individual chromosomes supports physical mapping and sequence assembly in complex plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Staňková, Helena; Hastie, Alex R; Chan, Saki; Vrána, Jan; Tulpová, Zuzana; Kubaláková, Marie; Visendi, Paul; Hayashi, Satomi; Luo, Mingcheng; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Doležel, Jaroslav; Šimková, Hana

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of a reference genome sequence of bread wheat is challenging due to its specific features such as the genome size of 17 Gbp, polyploid nature and prevalence of repetitive sequences. BAC-by-BAC sequencing based on chromosomal physical maps, adopted by the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium as the key strategy, reduces problems caused by the genome complexity and polyploidy, but the repeat content still hampers the sequence assembly. Availability of a high-resolution genomic map to guide sequence scaffolding and validate physical map and sequence assemblies would be highly beneficial to obtaining an accurate and complete genome sequence. Here, we chose the short arm of chromosome 7D (7DS) as a model to demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to couple chromosome flow sorting with genome mapping in nanochannel arrays and create a de novo genome map of a wheat chromosome. We constructed a high-resolution chromosome map composed of 371 contigs with an N50 of 1.3 Mb. Long DNA molecules achieved by our approach facilitated chromosome-scale analysis of repetitive sequences and revealed a ~800-kb array of tandem repeats intractable to current DNA sequencing technologies. Anchoring 7DS sequence assemblies obtained by clone-by-clone sequencing to the 7DS genome map provided a valuable tool to improve the BAC-contig physical map and validate sequence assembly on a chromosome-arm scale. Our results indicate that creating genome maps for the whole wheat genome in a chromosome-by-chromosome manner is feasible and that they will be an affordable tool to support the production of improved pseudomolecules. PMID:26801360

  20. Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 103 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed. Importantly, cellulases of some GH families are present in fungi that are not known to have cellulose-degrading ability. In addition, our results also showed that in general, plant pathogenic fungi have the highest number of CAZymes. Biotrophic fungi tend to have fewer CAZymes than necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi. Pathogens of dicots often contain more pectinases than fungi infecting monocots. Interestingly, besides yeasts, many saprophytic fungi that are highly active in degrading plant biomass contain fewer CAZymes than plant pathogenic fungi. Furthermore, analysis of the gene expression profile of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum revealed that most of the CAZyme genes related to cell wall degradation were up-regulated during plant infection. Phylogenetic analysis also

  1. Sexual and apomictic plant reproduction in the genomics era: exploring the mechanisms potentially useful in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sangam L; Perotti, Enrico; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Ortiz, Rodomiro

    2010-12-01

    Arabidopsis, Mimulus and tomato have emerged as model plants in researching genetic and molecular basis of differences in mating systems. Variations in floral traits and loss of self-incompatibility have been associated with mating system differences in crops. Genomics research has advanced considerably, both in model and crop plants, which may provide opportunities to modify breeding systems as evidenced in Arabidopsis and tomato. Mating system, however, not recombination per se, has greater effect on the level of polymorphism. Generating targeted recombination remains one of the most important factors for crop genetic enhancement. Asexual reproduction through seeds or apomixis, by producing maternal clones, presents a tremendous potential for agriculture. Although believed to be under simple genetic control, recent research has revealed that apomixis results as a consequence of the deregulation of the timing of sexual events rather than being the product of specific apomixis genes. Further, forward genetic studies in Arabidopsis have permitted the isolation of novel genes reported to control meiosis I and II entry. Mutations in these genes trigger the production of unreduced or apomeiotic megagametes and are an important step toward understanding and engineering apomixis. PMID:20509033

  2. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-S60, a plant growth-promoting and antifungal bacterium.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuxuan; Han, Yuzhu; Yu, Yaqiong; Shang, Qingmao; Zhang, Bao; Li, Pinglan

    2015-10-20

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-S60, a gram-positive plant-associated bacterium, which could stimulate plant growth and shows strong antifungal function, was isolated from the turfy soil in Beijing, China. The genome of B. amyloliquefaciens L-S60 comprises a 3903,017bp long circular chromosome that consists of 3909 protein-coding genes and 117 RNA genes. Based on genomic analysis, we identified gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of numerous bioactive metabolites with well-established in-vitro activity such as surfactin, iturin and fengycins. Additionally, we also found functionally related genes in the genome of L-S60, which play key roles in the process of plant growth promotion hormone secretion, biofilm formation and volatile compounds production. PMID:26297906

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of a Natural Root Isolate, Bacillus subtilis UD1022, a Potential Plant Growth-Promoting Biocontrol Agent.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Usha; Polson, Shawn W; Sherrier, D Janine; Bais, Harsh P

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis, which belongs to the phylum Firmicutes, is the most widely studied Gram-positive model organism. It is found in a wide variety of environments and is particularly abundant in soils and in the gastrointestinal tracts of ruminants and humans. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the newly described B. subtilis strain UD1022. The UD1022 genome consists of a 4.025-Mbp chromosome, and other major findings from our analysis will provide insights into the genomic basis of it being a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with biocontrol potential. PMID:26159522

  4. Comparative genome analysis of lignin biosynthesis gene families across the plant kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background As a major component of plant cell wall, lignin plays important roles in mechanical support, water transport, and stress responses. As the main cause for the recalcitrance of plant cell wall, lignin modification has been a major task for bioenergy feedstock improvement. The study of the evolution and function of lignin biosynthesis genes thus has two-fold implications. First, the lignin biosynthesis pathway provides an excellent model to study the coordinative evolution of a biochemical pathway in plants. Second, understanding the function and evolution of lignin biosynthesis genes will guide us to develop better strategies for bioenergy feedstock improvement. Results We analyzed lignin biosynthesis genes from fourteen plant species and one symbiotic fungal species. Comprehensive comparative genome analysis was carried out to study the distribution, relatedness, and family expansion of the lignin biosynthesis genes across the plant kingdom. In addition, we also analyzed the comparative synteny map between rice and sorghum to study the evolution of lignin biosynthesis genes within the Poaceae family and the chromosome evolution between the two species. Comprehensive lignin biosynthesis gene expression analysis was performed in rice, poplar and Arabidopsis. The representative data from rice indicates that different fates of gene duplications exist for lignin biosynthesis genes. In addition, we also carried out the biomass composition analysis of nine Arabidopsis mutants with both MBMS analysis and traditional wet chemistry methods. The results were analyzed together with the genomics analysis. Conclusion The research revealed that, among the species analyzed, the complete lignin biosynthesis pathway first appeared in moss; the pathway is absent in green algae. The expansion of lignin biosynthesis gene families correlates with substrate diversity. In addition, we found that the expansion of the gene families mostly occurred after the divergence of monocots

  5. Consequences of Normalizing Transcriptomic and Genomic Libraries of Plant Genomes Using a Duplex-Specific Nuclease and Tetramethylammonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Froenicke, Lutz; Lavelle, Dean; Martineau, Belinda; Perroud, Bertrand; Michelmore, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Several applications of high throughput genome and transcriptome sequencing would benefit from a reduction of the high-copy-number sequences in the libraries being sequenced and analyzed, particularly when applied to species with large genomes. We adapted and analyzed the consequences of a method that utilizes a thermostable duplex-specific nuclease for reducing the high-copy components in transcriptomic and genomic libraries prior to sequencing. This reduces the time, cost, and computational effort of obtaining informative transcriptomic and genomic sequence data for both fully sequenced and non-sequenced genomes. It also reduces contamination from organellar DNA in preparations of nuclear DNA. Hybridization in the presence of 3 M tetramethylammonium chloride (TMAC), which equalizes the rates of hybridization of GC and AT nucleotide pairs, reduced the bias against sequences with high GC content. Consequences of this method on the reduction of high-copy and enrichment of low-copy sequences are reported for Arabidopsis and lettuce. PMID:23409088

  6. Whole genome sequence and genome annotation of Colletotrichum acutatum, causal agent of anthracnose in pepper plants in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joon-Hee; Chon, Jae-Kyung; Ahn, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Ik-Young; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum acutatum is a destructive fungal pathogen which causes anthracnose in a wide range of crops. Here we report the whole genome sequence and annotation of C. acutatum strain KC05, isolated from an infected pepper in Kangwon, South Korea. Genomic DNA from the KC05 strain was used for the whole genome sequencing using a PacBio sequencer and the MiSeq system. The KC05 genome was determined to be 52,190,760 bp in size with a G + C content of 51.73% in 27 scaffolds and to contain 13,559 genes with an average length of 1516 bp. Gene prediction and annotation were performed by incorporating RNA-Seq data. The genome sequence of the KC05 was deposited at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession number LUXP00000000. PMID:27114908

  7. Whole genome sequence and genome annotation of Colletotrichum acutatum, causal agent of anthracnose in pepper plants in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Joon-Hee; Chon, Jae-Kyung; Ahn, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Ik-Young; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2016-06-01

    Colletotrichum acutatum is a destructive fungal pathogen which causes anthracnose in a wide range of crops. Here we report the whole genome sequence and annotation of C. acutatum strain KC05, isolated from an infected pepper in Kangwon, South Korea. Genomic DNA from the KC05 strain was used for the whole genome sequencing using a PacBio sequencer and the MiSeq system. The KC05 genome was determined to be 52,190,760 bp in size with a G + C content of 51.73% in 27 scaffolds and to contain 13,559 genes with an average length of 1516 bp. Gene prediction and annotation were performed by incorporating RNA-Seq data. The genome sequence of the KC05 was deposited at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession number LUXP00000000. PMID:27114908

  8. Discovery of MicroRNA169 Gene Copies in Genomes of Flowering Plants through Positional Information

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Martín; Messing, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Expansion and contraction of microRNA (miRNA) families can be studied in sequenced plant genomes through sequence alignments. Here, we focused on miR169 in sorghum because of its implications in drought tolerance and stem-sugar content. We were able to discover many miR169 copies that have escaped standard genome annotation methods. A new miR169 cluster was found on sorghum chromosome 1. This cluster is composed of the previously annotated sbi-MIR169o together with two newly found MIR169 copies, named sbi-MIR169t and sbi-MIR169u. We also found that a miR169 cluster on sorghum chr7 consisting of sbi-MIR169l, sbi-MIR169m, and sbi-MIR169n is contained within a chromosomal inversion of at least 500 kb that occurred in sorghum relative to Brachypodium, rice, foxtail millet, and maize. Surprisingly, synteny of chromosomal segments containing MIR169 copies with linked bHLH and CONSTANS-LIKE genes extended from Brachypodium to dictotyledonous species such as grapevine, soybean, and cassava, indicating a strong conservation of linkages of certain flowering and/or plant height genes and microRNAs, which may explain linkage drag of drought and flowering traits and would have consequences for breeding new varieties. Furthermore, alignment of rice and sorghum orthologous regions revealed the presence of two additional miR169 gene copies (miR169r and miR169s) on sorghum chr7 that formed an antisense miRNA gene pair. Both copies are expressed and target different set of genes. Synteny-based analysis of microRNAs among different plant species should lead to the discovery of new microRNAs in general and contribute to our understanding of their evolution. PMID:23348041

  9. Discovery of MicroRNA169 gene copies in genomes of flowering plants through positional information.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Martín; Messing, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Expansion and contraction of microRNA (miRNA) families can be studied in sequenced plant genomes through sequence alignments. Here, we focused on miR169 in sorghum because of its implications in drought tolerance and stem-sugar content. We were able to discover many miR169 copies that have escaped standard genome annotation methods. A new miR169 cluster was found on sorghum chromosome 1. This cluster is composed of the previously annotated sbi-MIR169o together with two newly found MIR169 copies, named sbi-MIR169t and sbi-MIR169u. We also found that a miR169 cluster on sorghum chr7 consisting of sbi-MIR169l, sbi-MIR169m, and sbi-MIR169n is contained within a chromosomal inversion of at least 500 kb that occurred in sorghum relative to Brachypodium, rice, foxtail millet, and maize. Surprisingly, synteny of chromosomal segments containing MIR169 copies with linked bHLH and CONSTANS-LIKE genes extended from Brachypodium to dictotyledonous species such as grapevine, soybean, and cassava, indicating a strong conservation of linkages of certain flowering and/or plant height genes and microRNAs, which may explain linkage drag of drought and flowering traits and would have consequences for breeding new varieties. Furthermore, alignment of rice and sorghum orthologous regions revealed the presence of two additional miR169 gene copies (miR169r and miR169s) on sorghum chr7 that formed an antisense miRNA gene pair. Both copies are expressed and target different set of genes. Synteny-based analysis of microRNAs among different plant species should lead to the discovery of new microRNAs in general and contribute to our understanding of their evolution. PMID:23348041

  10. Comparative analysis of predicted plastid-targeted proteomes of sequenced higher plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Scott; Harper, Artemus; Raja, Rajani; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Dhingra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Plastids are actively involved in numerous plant processes critical to growth, development and adaptation. They play a primary role in photosynthesis, pigment and monoterpene synthesis, gravity sensing, starch and fatty acid synthesis, as well as oil, and protein storage. We applied two complementary methods to analyze the recently published apple genome (Malus × domestica) to identify putative plastid-targeted proteins, the first using TargetP and the second using a custom workflow utilizing a set of predictive programs. Apple shares roughly 40% of its 10,492 putative plastid-targeted proteins with that of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastid-targeted proteome as identified by the Chloroplast 2010 project and ∼57% of its entire proteome with Arabidopsis. This suggests that the plastid-targeted proteomes between apple and Arabidopsis are different, and interestingly alludes to the presence of differential targeting of homologs between the two species. Co-expression analysis of 2,224 genes encoding putative plastid-targeted apple proteins suggests that they play a role in plant developmental and intermediary metabolism. Further, an inter-specific comparison of Arabidopsis, Prunus persica (Peach), Malus × domestica (Apple), Populus trichocarpa (Black cottonwood), Fragaria vesca (Woodland Strawberry), Solanum lycopersicum (Tomato) and Vitis vinifera (Grapevine) also identified a large number of novel species-specific plastid-targeted proteins. This analysis also revealed the presence of alternatively targeted homologs across species. Two separate analyses revealed that a small subset of proteins, one representing 289 protein clusters and the other 737 unique protein sequences, are conserved between seven plastid-targeted angiosperm proteomes. Majority of the novel proteins were annotated to play roles in stress response, transport, catabolic processes, and cellular component organization. Our results suggest that the current state of knowledge regarding

  11. High-Throughput Cryopreservation of Plant Cell Cultures for Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yoichi; Sakurai, Nozomu; Oikawa, Akira; Kai, Kosuke; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Mori, Kumiko; Moriya, Kanami; Fujii, Fumiko; Aoki, Koh; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Ohta, Daisaku; Saito, Kazuki; Shibata, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Suspension-cultured cell lines from plant species are useful for genetic engineering. However, maintenance of these lines is laborious, involves routine subculturing and hampers wider use of transgenic lines, especially when many lines are required for a high-throughput functional genomics application. Cryopreservation of these lines may reduce the need for subculturing. Here, we established a simple protocol for cryopreservation of cell lines from five commonly used plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, Daucus carota, Lotus japonicus, Nicotiana tabacum and Oryza sativa. The LSP solution (2 M glycerol, 0.4 M sucrose and 86.9 mM proline) protected cells from damage during freezing and was only mildly toxic to cells kept at room temperature for at least 2 h. More than 100 samples were processed for freezing simultaneously. Initially, we determined the conditions for cryopreservation using a programmable freezer; we then developed a modified simple protocol that did not require a programmable freezer. In the simple protocol, a thick expanded polystyrene (EPS) container containing the vials with the cell–LSP solution mixtures was kept at −30°C for 6 h to cool the cells slowly (pre-freezing); samples from the EPS containers were then plunged into liquid nitrogen before long-term storage. Transgenic Arabidopsis cells were subjected to cryopreservation, thawed and then re-grown in culture; transcriptome and metabolome analyses indicated that there was no significant difference in gene expression or metabolism between cryopreserved cells and control cells. The simplicity of the protocol will accelerate the pace of research in functional plant genomics. PMID:22437846

  12. [Mechanisms for miniature dwarf characteristics of Mi-cro-Tom tomato and its application in plant functional genomics studies.].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Lan-Lan; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Chen, Kun-Song; Xu, Chang-Jie

    2008-10-01

    Micro-Tom is a miniature dwarf tomato, which can grow at a high density, has a short life cycle, and can be transformed efficiently. As a result, it became a new model plant for functional genomics study. The origin and biological characteristics of Micro-Tom were summarized. Recent advances in the mechanisms involved in the miniature dwarf trait, as well as the application of Micro-Tom in plant functional genomics study and the improved genetic transformation systems were reviewed. PMID:18930884

  13. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of the NADK Gene Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Yan; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ri; Li, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background NAD(H) kinase (NADK) is the key enzyme that catalyzes de novo synthesis of NADP(H) from NAD(H) for NADP(H)-based metabolic pathways. In plants, NADKs form functional subfamilies. Studies of these families in Arabidopsis thaliana indicate that they have undergone considerable evolutionary selection; however, the detailed evolutionary history and functions of the various NADKs in plants are not clearly understood. Principal Findings We performed a comparative genomic analysis that identified 74 NADK gene homologs from 24 species representing the eight major plant lineages within the supergroup Plantae: glaucophytes, rhodophytes, chlorophytes, bryophytes, lycophytes, gymnosperms, monocots and eudicots. Phylogenetic and structural analysis classified these NADK genes into four well-conserved subfamilies with considerable variety in the domain organization and gene structure among subfamily members. In addition to the typical NAD_kinase domain, additional domains, such as adenylate kinase, dual-specificity phosphatase, and protein tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domains, were found in subfamily II. Interestingly, NADKs in subfamily III exhibited low sequence similarity (∼30%) in the kinase domain within the subfamily and with the other subfamilies. These observations suggest that gene fusion and exon shuffling may have occurred after gene duplication, leading to specific domain organization seen in subfamilies II and III, respectively. Further analysis of the exon/intron structures showed that single intron loss and gain had occurred, yielding the diversified gene structures, during the process of structural evolution of NADK family genes. Finally, both available global microarray data analysis and qRT-RCR experiments revealed that the NADK genes in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa show different expression patterns in different developmental stages and under several different abiotic/biotic stresses and hormone treatments, underscoring the functional diversity

  15. Genome-Scale Genotype-Phenotype Matching of Two Lactococcus lactis Isolates from Plants Identifies Mechanisms of Adaptation to the Plant Niche▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, Roland J.; Starrenburg, Marjo J. C.; Boekhorst, Jos; Renckens, Bernadet; Molenaar, Douwe; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a primary constituent of many starter cultures used for the manufacturing of fermented dairy products, but the species also occurs in various nondairy niches such as (fermented) plant material. Three genome sequences of L. lactis dairy strains (IL-1403, SK11, and MG1363) are publicly available. An extensive molecular and phenotypic diversity analysis was now performed on two L. lactis plant isolates. Diagnostic sequencing of their genomes resulted in over 2.5 Mb of sequence for each strain. A high synteny was found with the genome of L. lactis IL-1403, which was used as a template for contig mapping and locating deletions and insertions in the plant L. lactis genomes. Numerous genes were identified that do not have homologs in the published genome sequences of dairy L. lactis strains. Adaptation to growth on substrates derived from plant cell walls is evident from the presence of gene sets for the degradation of complex plant polymers such as xylan, arabinan, glucans, and fructans but also for the uptake and conversion of typical plant cell wall degradation products such as α-galactosides, β-glucosides, arabinose, xylose, galacturonate, glucuronate, and gluconate. Further niche-specific differences are found in genes for defense (nisin biosynthesis), stress response (nonribosomal peptide synthesis and various transporters), and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, as well as the expected differences in various mobile elements such as prophages, plasmids, restriction-modification systems, and insertion sequence elements. Many of these genes were identified for the first time in Lactococcus lactis. In most cases good correspondence was found with the phenotypic characteristics of these two strains. PMID:18039825

  16. DNA-binding protein prediction using plant specific support vector machines: validation and application of a new genome annotation tool

    PubMed Central

    Motion, Graham B.; Howden, Andrew J. M.; Huitema, Edgar; Jones, Susan

    2015-01-01

    There are currently 151 plants with draft genomes available but levels of functional annotation for putative protein products are low. Therefore, accurate computational predictions are essential to annotate genomes in the first instance, and to provide focus for the more costly and time consuming functional assays that follow. DNA-binding proteins are an important class of proteins that require annotation, but current computational methods are not applicable for genome wide predictions in plant species. Here, we explore the use of species and lineage specific models for the prediction of DNA-binding proteins in plants. We show that a species specific support vector machine model based on Arabidopsis sequence data is more accurate (accuracy 81%) than a generic model (74%), and based on this we develop a plant specific model for predicting DNA-binding proteins. We apply this model to the tomato proteome and demonstrate its ability to perform accurate high-throughput prediction of DNA-binding proteins. In doing so, we have annotated 36 currently uncharacterised proteins by assigning a putative DNA-binding function. Our model is publically available and we propose it be used in combination with existing tools to help increase annotation levels of DNA-binding proteins encoded in plant genomes. PMID:26304539

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. EpS/L25, Isolated from the Medicinal Plant Echinacea purpurea and Able To Synthesize Antimicrobial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Presta, Luana; Bosi, Emanuele; Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Miceli, Elisangela; Maggini, Valentina; Bogani, Patrizia; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    We announce here the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain EpS/L25, isolated from the stem/leaves of the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea. This genome will allow for comparative genomics in order to identify genes associated with the production of bioactive compounds and antibiotic resistance. PMID:27151804

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. EpS/L25, Isolated from the Medicinal Plant Echinacea purpurea and Able To Synthesize Antimicrobial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Presta, Luana; Bosi, Emanuele; Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Miceli, Elisangela; Maggini, Valentina; Bogani, Patrizia; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Mengoni, Alessio; Fani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We announce here the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain EpS/L25, isolated from the stem/leaves of the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea This genome will allow for comparative genomics in order to identify genes associated with the production of bioactive compounds and antibiotic resistance. PMID:27151804

  19. Gravitational Horizon(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao Yuan

    2012-05-01

    Anomalous decelerations of spacecraft Pioneer-10,11,etc could be interpreted as signal delay effect between speed of gravity and that of light as reflected in virtual scale, similar to covarying virtual scale effect in relative motion (http://arxiv.org/html/math-ph/0001019v5).A finite speed of gravity faster than light could be inferred (http://arXiv.org/html/physics/0001034v2). Measurements of gravitational variations by paraconical pendulum during a total solar eclipse infer the same(http://arXiv.org/html/physics/0001034v9). A finite Superluminal speed of gravity is the necessary condition to imply that there exists gravitational horizon (GH). Such "GH" of our Universe would stretch far beyond the cosmic event horizon of light. Dark energy may be owing to mutually interactive gravitational horizons of cousin universes. Sufficient condition for the conjecture is that the dark energy would be increasing with age of our Universe since accelerated expansion started about 5 Gyr ago, since more and more arrivals of "GH" of distant cousin universes would interact with "GH" of our Universe. The history of dark energy variations between then and now would be desirable(http://arXiv.org/html/physics/0001034). In "GH" conjecture, the neighborhood of cousin universes would be likely boundless in 4D-space-time without begining or end. The dark energy would keep all universes in continually accelerated expansion to eventual fragmentation. Fragments would crash and merge into bangs, big or small, to form another generation of cousin universes. These scenarios might offer a clue to what was before the big bang.

  20. Genome-Wide Identification of Evolutionarily Conserved Alternative Splicing Events in Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chamala, Srikar; Feng, Guanqiao; Chavarro, Carolina; Barbazuk, W. Brad

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) plays important roles in many plant functions, but its conservation across the plant kingdom is not known. We describe a methodology to identify AS events and identify conserved AS events across large phylogenetic distances using RNA-Seq datasets. We applied this methodology to transcriptome data from nine angiosperms including Amborella, the single sister species to all other extant flowering plants. AS events within 40–70% of the expressed multi-exonic genes per species were found, 27,120 of which are conserved among two or more of the taxa studied. While many events are species specific, many others are shared across long evolutionary distances suggesting they have functional significance. Conservation of AS event data provides an estimate of the number of ancestral AS events present at each node of the tree representing the nine species studied. Furthermore, the presence or absence of AS isoforms between species with different whole genome duplication (WGD) histories provides the opportunity to examine the impact of WDG on AS potential. Examining AS in gene families identifies those with high rates of AS, and conservation can distinguish ancient events vs. recent or species specific adaptations. The MADS-box and SR protein families are found to represent families with low and high occurrences of AS, respectively, yet their AS events were likely present in the MRCA of angiosperms. PMID:25859541