Sample records for plant pathogen fusarium

  1. Monitoring of pathogenic and non?pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strains during tomato plant infection

    PubMed Central

    Validov, Shamil Z.; Kamilova, Faina D.; Lugtenberg, Ben J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Monitoring of pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum (Fox), which cause wilt and rots on agricultural and ornamental plants, is important for predicting disease outbreaks. Since both pathogenic and non?pathogenic strains of Fox are ubiquitous and are able to colonize plant roots, detection of Fox DNA in plant material is not the ultimate proof of an ongoing infection which would cause damage to the plant. We followed the colonization of tomato plants by strains Fox f. sp. radicis?lycopersici ZUM2407 (a tomato foot and root rot pathogen), Fox f. sp. radicis?cucumerinum V03?2g (a cucumber root rot pathogen) and Fox Fo47 (a well?known non?pathogenic biocontrol strain). We determined fungal DNA concentrations in tomato plantlets by quantitative PCR (qPCR) with primers complementary to the intergenic spacer region (IGS) of these three Fox strains. Two weeks after inoculation of tomato seedlings with these Fox strains, the DNA concentration of Forl ZUM2407 was five times higher than that of the non?compatible pathogen Forc V03?2g and 10 times higher than that of Fo47. In 3?week?old plantlets the concentration of Forl ZUM2407 DNA was at least 10 times higher than those of the other strains. The fungal DNA concentration, as determined by qPCR, appeared to be in good agreement with data of the score of visible symptoms of tomato foot and root rot obtained 3 weeks after inoculation of tomato with Forl ZUM2407. Our results show that targeting of the multicopy ribosomal operon results in a highly sensitive qPCR reaction for the detection of Fox DNA. Since formae speciales of Fox cannot be distinguished by comparison of ribosomal operons, detection of Fox DNA is not evidence of plant infection by a compatible pathogen. Nevertheless, the observed difference in levels of plant colonization between pathogenic and non?pathogenic strains strongly suggests that a concentration of Fox DNA in plant material above the threshold level of 0.005% is due to proliferation of pathogenic Fox. PMID:21255375

  2. Monitoring of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strains during tomato plant infection.

    PubMed

    Validov, Shamil Z; Kamilova, Faina D; Lugtenberg, Ben J J

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum (Fox), which cause wilt and rots on agricultural and ornamental plants, is important for predicting disease outbreaks. Since both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Fox are ubiquitous and are able to colonize plant roots, detection of Fox DNA in plant material is not the ultimate proof of an ongoing infection which would cause damage to the plant. We followed the colonization of tomato plants by strains Fox f. sp. radicis-lycopersici ZUM2407 (a tomato foot and root rot pathogen), Fox f. sp. radiciscucumerinum V03-2g (a cucumber root rot pathogen) and Fox Fo47 (a well-known non-pathogenic biocontrol strain). We determined fungal DNA concentrations in tomato plantlets by quantitative PCR (qPCR) with primers complementary to the intergenic spacer region (IGS) of these three Fox strains. Two weeks after inoculation of tomato seedlings with these Fox strains, the DNA concentration of Forl ZUM2407 was five times higher than that of the non-compatible pathogen Forc V03-2g and 10 times higher than that of Fo47. In 3-week-old plantlets the concentration of Forl ZUM2407 DNA was at least 10 times higher than those of the other strains. The fungal DNA concentration, as determined by qPCR, appeared to be in good agreement with data of the score of visible symptoms of tomato foot and root rot obtained 3 weeks after inoculation of tomato with Forl ZUM2407. Our results show that targeting of the multicopy ribosomal operon results in a highly sensitive qPCR reaction for the detection of Fox DNA. Since formae speciales of Fox cannot be distinguished by comparison of ribosomal operons, detection of Fox DNA is not evidence of plant infection by a compatible pathogen. Nevertheless, the observed difference in levels of plant colonization between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains strongly suggests that a concentration of Fox DNA in plant material above the threshold level of 0.005% is due to proliferation of pathogenic Fox. PMID:21255375

  3. A fungal symbiont of plant-roots modulates mycotoxin gene expression in the pathogen Fusarium sambucinum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium trichothecenes are fungal toxins that cause disease on infected plants and, more importantly, health problems for humans and animals that consume infected fruits or vegetables. Unfortunately, there are few methods for controlling the growth of mycotoxin production pathogens. In this study, ...

  4. Antifungal activity of a synthetic cationic peptide against the plant pathogens Colletotrichum graminicola and three Fusarium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A small cationic peptide (JH8944) was tested for activity against a number of pathogens of agricultural crops. JH8944 inhibited conidium growth in most of the tested plant pathogens with a dose of 50 µg ml 1, although one isolate of Fusarium oxysporum was inhibited at 5 µg ml 1. Most conidia of Fusa...

  5. Fusion proteins comprising a Fusarium-specific antibody linked to antifungal peptides protect plants against a fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Peschen, Dieter; Li, He-Ping; Fischer, Rainer; Kreuzaler, Fritz; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2004-06-01

    In planta expression of recombinant antibodies recognizing pathogen-specific antigens has been proposed as a strategy for crop protection. We report the expression of fusion proteins comprising a Fusarium-specific recombinant antibody linked to one of three antifungal peptides (AFPs) as a method for protecting plants against fungal diseases. A chicken-derived single-chain antibody specific to antigens displayed on the Fusarium cell surface was isolated from a pooled immunocompetent phage display library. This recombinant antibody inhibited fungal growth in vitro when fused to any of the three AFPs. Expression of the fusion proteins in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants conferred high levels of protection against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. matthiolae, whereas plants expressing either the fungus-specific antibody or AFPs alone exhibited only moderate resistance. Our results demonstrate that antibody fusion proteins may be used as effective and versatile tools for the protection of crop plants against fungal infection. PMID:15146196

  6. Molecular characterization of a novel hypovirus from the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Hailong; Chen, Xiaoguang; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2015-07-01

    A novel mycovirus, termed Fusarium graminearum Hypovirus 2 (FgHV2/JS16), isolated from a plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium graminearum strain JS16, was molecularly and biologically characterized. The genome of FgHV2/JS16 is 12,800 nucleotides (nts) long, excluding the poly (A) tail. This genome has only one large putative open reading frame, which encodes a polyprotein containing three normal functional domains, papain-like protease, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RNA helicase, and a novel domain with homologous bacterial SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) chromosome segregation proteins. A defective RNA segment that is 4553-nts long, excluding the poly (A) tail, was also detected in strain JS16. The polyprotein shared significant aa identities with Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV1) (16.8%) and CHV2 (16.2%). Phylogenetic analyses based on multiple alignments of the polyprotein clearly divided the members of Hypoviridae into two major groups, suggesting that FgHV2/JS16 was a novel hypovirus of a newly proposed genus-Alphahypovirus-composed of the members of Group 1, including CHV1, CHV2, FgHV1 and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirus 2. FgHV2/JS16 was shown to be associated with hypovirulence phenotypes according to comparisons of the biological properties shared between FgHV2/JS16-infected and FgHV2/JS16-free isogenic strains. Furthermore, we demonstrated that FgHV2/JS16 infection activated the RNA interference pathway in Fusarium graminearum by relative quantitative real time RT-PCR. PMID:25781585

  7. Can an Isolate of Talaromyces Reduce the Pathogenicity of the Plant Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Race 4 of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) is an emerging problem for cotton production in the U.S. because it is significantly more pathogenic than races 1 and 2 which are endemic to the U.S. Race 4 is a prodigious producer of the phytotoxin fusaric acid compared to races 1 and 2. When...

  8. A study on the susceptibility of the model legume plant Medicago truncatula to the soil-borne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Montserrat Ramírez-Suero; Anas Khanshour; Yves Martinez; Martina Rickauer

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium wilt is a soil-borne disease caused by formae specialis of Fusarium oxysporum on a large number of cultivated and wild plants. The susceptibility of the model legume plant Medicago truncatula to Fusarium oxysporum was studied by root-inoculating young plants in a miniaturised hydroponic culture. Among eight tested M. truncatula lines, all were susceptible to F. oxysporum f.sp. medicaginis, the

  9. Pathogen profile update: Fusarium oxysporum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CAROLINE B. MICHIELSE; MARTIJN REP

    2009-01-01

    Taxonomy: Kingdom Fungi; Phylum Ascomycota; Class Sordariomycetes; Order Hypocreales; Family Nectriaceae; genus Fusarium. Host range: Very broad at the species level. More than 120 different formae speciales have been identified based on specificity to host species belonging to a wide range of plant families. Disease symptoms: Initial symptoms of vascular wilt include vein clearing and leaf epinasty, followed by stunting,

  10. THE ROLE OF FUSARIUM BIODIVERSITY IN PLANT PATHOGENICITY AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fusarium disease complexes of maize, wheat, and other cereal grains are biologically highly diverse. This biodiversity is believed to have a major impact on the types and levels of mycotoxins in food grains. The first dimension of complexity is at the Fusarium species level. Identification an...

  11. Polyamine metabolism in flax in response to treatment with pathogenic and non–pathogenic Fusarium strains

    PubMed Central

    Wojtasik, Wioleta; Kulma, Anna; Namys?, Katarzyna; Preisner, Marta; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flax crop yield is limited by various environmental stress factors, but the largest crop losses worldwide are caused by Fusarium infection. Polyamines are one of the many plant metabolites possibly involved in the plant response to infection. However, in flax plants the polyamine composition, genes involved in polyamine synthesis, and in particular their regulation, were previously unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the polyamine synthesis pathway in flax and its involvement in response to pathogen infection. It is well established that polyamines are essential for the growth and development of both plants and fungi, but their role in pathogen infection still remains unknown. In our study we correlated the expression of genes involved in polyamine metabolism with the polyamine levels in plant tissues and compared the results for flax seedlings treated with two pathogenic and one non-pathogenic strains of Fusarium. We observed an increase in the expression of genes participating in polyamine synthesis after fungal infection, and it was reflected in an increase of polyamine content in the plant tissues. The highest level of mRNA was characteristic for ornithine decarboxylase during infection with all tested, pathogenic and non-pathogenic, Fusarium strains and the arginine decarboxylase gene during infection with the pathogenic strain of Fusarium culmorum. The main polyamine identified in the flax seedlings was putrescine, and its level changed the most during infection. Moreover, the considerable increase in the contents of cell wall-bound polyamines compared to the levels of free and conjugated polyamines may indicate that their main role during pathogen infection lies in strengthening of the cell wall. In vitro experiments showed that the polyamines inhibit Fusarium growth, which suggests that they play an important role in plant defense mechanisms. Furthermore, changes in metabolism and content of polyamines indicate different defense mechanisms activated in flax in response to infection by pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium strains. PMID:25972886

  12. Evaluation of the pathogenicity of Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium pseudograminearum on soybean seedlings under controlled conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Xue; E. Cober; H. D. Voldeng; C. Babcock; R. M. Clear

    2007-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the cause of fusarium head blight of small-grain cereals and of gibberella ear rot of corn, has recently been reported to attack soybean, causing root rot and pod blight. A morphologically similar species, Fusarium pseudograminearum, is also an important pathogen of the roots and crown of cereals, but its pathogenicity against soybean has not been tested yet. Pathogenicity

  13. Fusarium avenaceum, a pathogen of stored broccoli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julien Mercier; Joseph Makhlouf; Richard A. Martin

    Fusarium avenaceum was identified as a new pathogen of broccoli kept in long-term storage at low temperature and controlled atmosphere. The first sign of the disease was growth of a white fluffy mycelium partly covering the inflorescence. Although disease development was very slow at 5OC, breaking the cold chain did cause outbreaks of infection in apparently healthy broccoli. Broccoli stored

  14. Plant Disease Lesson: Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David G. Schmale III (Cornell University; )

    2003-06-12

    This plant disease lesson on Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab (caused by the fungus Fusarium graminearum (anamorph) Gibberella zeae (teleomorph)) includes information on symptoms and signs, pathogen biology, disease cycle and epidemiology, disease management, and the significance of the disease. Selected references are listed and a glossary is also available for use with this resource.

  15. Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Li Jun; van der Does, H. C.; Borkovich, Katherine A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Daboussi, Marie-Jose; Di Pietro, Antonio; Dufresne, Marie; Freitag, Michael; Grabherr, Manfred; Henrissat, Bernard; Houterman, Petra M.; Kang, Seogchan; Shim, Won-Bo; Wolochuk, Charles; Xie, Xiaohui; Xu, Jin Rong; Antoniw, John; Baker, Scott E.; Bluhm, Burton H.; Breakspear, Andrew; Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Chapman, Sinead; Coulson, Richard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Danchin, Etienne G.; Diener, Andrew; Gale, Liane R.; Gardiner, Donald; Goff, Steven; Hammond-Kossack, Kim; Hilburn, Karen; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Jonkers, Wilfried; Kazan, Kemal; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Koehrsen, Michael; Kumar, Lokesh; Lee, Yong Hwan; Li, Liande; Manners, John M.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Mukherjee, Mala; Park, Gyungsoon; Park, Jongsun; Park, Sook Young; Proctor, Robert H.; Regev, Aviv; Ruiz-Roldan, M. C.; Sain, Divya; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Sykes, Sean; Schwartz, David C.; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Wapinski, Ilan; Yoder, Olen; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhou, Shiguo; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kistler, H. Corby; Rep, Martijn

    2010-03-18

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, having significant impact on crop production and animal health. Distinctively, members of the F. oxysporum species complex exhibit wide host range but discontinuously distributed host specificity, reflecting remarkable genetic adaptability. To understand the molecular underpinnings of diverse phenotypic traits and their evolution in Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three economically important and phylogenetically related, yet phenotypically diverse plant-pathogenic species, F. graminearum, F. verticillioides and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed greatly expanded lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes, accounting for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity. Experimentally, we demonstrate for the first time the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, resulting in the conversion of a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in the F. oxysporum species complex, putting the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.

  16. Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Jun; van der Does, H. Charlotte; Borkovich, Katherine A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Daboussi, Marie-Josée; Di Pietro, Antonio; Dufresne, Marie; Freitag, Michael; Grabherr, Manfred; Henrissat, Bernard; Houterman, Petra M.; Kang, Seogchan; Shim, Won-Bo; Woloshuk, Charles; Xie, Xiaohui; Xu, Jin-Rong; Antoniw, John; Baker, Scott E.; Bluhm, Burton H.; Breakspear, Andrew; Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A. E.; Chapman, Sinead; Coulson, Richard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Danchin, Etienne G. J.; Diener, Andrew; Gale, Liane R.; Gardiner, Donald M.; Goff, Stephen; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Hilburn, Karen; Hua-Van, Aurélie; Jonkers, Wilfried; Kazan, Kemal; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Koehrsen, Michael; Kumar, Lokesh; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Li, Liande; Manners, John M.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Mukherjee, Mala; Park, Gyungsoon; Park, Jongsun; Park, Sook-Young; Proctor, Robert H.; Regev, Aviv; Ruiz-Roldan, M. Carmen; Sain, Divya; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Sykes, Sean; Schwartz, David C.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Wapinski, Ilan; Yoder, Olen; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhou, Shiguo; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kistler, H. Corby; Rep, Martijn

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. To understand the molecular underpinnings of pathogenicity in the genus Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three phenotypically diverse species: Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes and account for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity, indicative of horizontal acquisition. Experimentally, we demonstrate the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, converting a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in F. oxysporum. These findings put the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective. PMID:20237561

  17. The Genome of the Generalist Plant Pathogen Fusarium avenaceum Is Enriched with Genes Involved in Redox, Signaling and Secondary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lysře, Erik; Harris, Linda J.; Walkowiak, Sean; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Divon, Hege H.; Riiser, Even S.; Llorens, Carlos; Gabaldón, Toni; Kistler, H. Corby; Jonkers, Wilfried; Kolseth, Anna-Karin; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Thrane, Ulf; Frandsen, Rasmus J. N.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium avenaceum is a fungus commonly isolated from soil and associated with a wide range of host plants. We present here three genome sequences of F. avenaceum, one isolated from barley in Finland and two from spring and winter wheat in Canada. The sizes of the three genomes range from 41.6–43.1 MB, with 13217–13445 predicted protein-coding genes. Whole-genome analysis showed that the three genomes are highly syntenic, and share>95% gene orthologs. Comparative analysis to other sequenced Fusaria shows that F. avenaceum has a very large potential for producing secondary metabolites, with between 75 and 80 key enzymes belonging to the polyketide, non-ribosomal peptide, terpene, alkaloid and indole-diterpene synthase classes. In addition to known metabolites from F. avenaceum, fuscofusarin and JM-47 were detected for the first time in this species. Many protein families are expanded in F. avenaceum, such as transcription factors, and proteins involved in redox reactions and signal transduction, suggesting evolutionary adaptation to a diverse and cosmopolitan ecology. We found that 20% of all predicted proteins were considered to be secreted, supporting a life in the extracellular space during interaction with plant hosts. PMID:25409087

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M.; Thatcher, Louise F.; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B.; Manners, John M.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host–pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host–pathogen interactions for experimental verification. PMID:25994930

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Thatcher, Louise F; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host-pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host-pathogen interactions for experimental verification. PMID:25994930

  20. Ultrastructural and cell wall modifications during infection of Eucalyptus viminalis roots by a pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria-Isabel Salerno; Silvio Gianinazzi; Christine Arnould; Vivienne Gianinazzi-Pearson

    2004-01-01

    Fusarium species are soil-borne fungal pathogens that produce a variety of disease symptoms when attacking crop plants. The mode of root colonization of Eucalyptus viminalis seedlings by a pathogenic F. oxyporum strain (Foeu1) at the ultrastructural level and changes in cell wall pectin during host pathogen interactions are described. Root systems of E. viminalis plants were inoculated with F. oxysporum

  1. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTION BETWEEN FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM AND WHEAT DURING EARLY STAGES OF DISEASE DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminearum strains responsible for causing the plant disease Fusarium head blight vary greatly in their ability to cause disease and produce mycotoxins on wheat. With the goal of understanding fungal gene expression related to pathogenicity, three cDNA libraries were created by suppression...

  2. 504 Plant Disease / Vol. 98 No. 4 Monitoring the Long-Distance Transport of Fusarium graminearum

    E-print Network

    Ross, Shane

    incidence and severity were highest when wheat followed a susceptible host (corn) and least when wheat Fusarium graminearum causes Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat. Little is known about dispersal graminis f. sp. tritici, causal agent of wheat stem rust (40). The atmospheric transport of plant pathogens

  3. Cross Pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae on Sugar Beet and Common Bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium wilt, also known as Fusarium yellows, is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Fusarium oxysporum is a vascular pathogen with a broad host range including common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) with formae speciales (f. sp.) defined by the ability to cause ...

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF A FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES SEEDLING PATHOGENICITY FACTOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a larger research program focusing on the capacity of Fusarium verticillioides to infect and endophytically colonize corn, we have examined an apparent seedling pathogenicity factor produced by the fungus. Genetic analysis of field isolates indicated a single locus segregates for ability...

  5. The photolyase gene from the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is induced by visible light and ?-tomatine from tomato plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Encarna Alejandre-Durán; Teresa Roldán-Arjona; Rafael R Ariza; Manuel Ruiz-Rubio

    2003-01-01

    Survival of irradiated spores from Fusarium oxysporum with ultraviolet radiation (UV) was increased following exposition to visible light, indicating that this phytopathogenic fungus has a mechanism of photoreactivation able to counteract the lethal effects of UV. A genomic sequence containing the complete photolyase gene (phr1) from F. oxysporum was isolated by heterologous hybridisation with the Neurospora crassa photolyase gene. The

  6. Molecular Characterization of MADS-BOX Transcription Factors and Analysis of Field Population Diversity in the Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides 

    E-print Network

    Ortiz, Carlos S

    2013-04-10

    . verticillioides ETS collection against genomic sequences of F. graminearum and two non-pathogenic fungi (Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa) in order to identify Fusarium genes critical for plant disease. Their analysis identified 39 unique Fusarium... by the binding of external stimuli to G-protein receptors located in the plasma membrane. Such binding leads to the dissociation of a protein complex known as the heterotrimeric G protein and leads to the subsequent activation of MAP kinase and cAMP pathways...

  7. Fusarium graminearum: an pathogen of maize in Nepal, pathogenic variability and mycotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminearum is an important pathogen of maize in hills of Nepal. It predominantly occurs on maize grown in cool and humid environment of high hills. The pathogen is also known to infect other cereal crops including wheat and rice causing important diseases. The incidence of ear rot is hi...

  8. The photolyase gene from the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is induced by visible light and alpha-tomatine from tomato plant.

    PubMed

    Alejandre-Durán, Encarna; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R; Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel

    2003-11-01

    Survival of irradiated spores from Fusarium oxysporum with ultraviolet radiation (UV) was increased following exposition to visible light, indicating that this phytopathogenic fungus has a mechanism of photoreactivation able to counteract the lethal effects of UV. A genomic sequence containing the complete photolyase gene (phr1) from F. oxysporum was isolated by heterologous hybridisation with the Neurospora crassa photolyase gene. The F. oxysporum phr1 cDNA was isolated and expressed in a photolyase deficient Escherichia coli strain. The complementation of the photoreactivation deficiency of this E. coli mutant by phr1 cDNA demonstrated that the photolyase gene from F. oxysporum encodes a functional protein. The F. oxysporum PHR1 protein has a domain characteristic of photolyases from fungi (Trichoderma harziaium, N. crassa, Magnaporthe grisea, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to bacteria (E. coli), and clusters in the photolyases phylogenetic tree with fungal photolyases. The F. oxysporum phr1 gene was inducible by visible light. The phr1 expression was also detected in presence of alpha-tomatine, a glycoalkaloid from tomato damaging cell membranes, suggesting that phr1 is induced by this cellular stress. PMID:14516768

  9. Variation in sensitivity to tomatine and rishitin among isolates of Fusarium oxysporumf.sp. lycopersici, and strains not pathogenic on tomato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Suleman; A. M. Tohamy; A. A. Saleh; M. A. Madkour; David C. Straney

    1996-01-01

    Studies of several fungal plant pathogens have found an association between greater virulence and increased tolerance of the host 's defense compounds among different isolates of that pathogen species. This study examined 17Fusarium oxysporumisolates to determine if tolerance of either of two fungitoxic compounds produced by tomato, rishitin and tomatine, would correlate with virulence or pathogenicity on tomato. Among the

  10. Surfactin A production and isoforms characterizations in strains of Bacillus mojavensis for control of a maize pathogen, Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endophytic bacterium, Bacillus mojavensis, RRC 101 controls fungal diseases in maize and other plants. The bacterium and its cultural extracts have been shown to be antagonistic to the pathogenic and mycotoxic fungus, Fusarium verticillioides. An antifungal cyclic lipopeptide produced by B. moj...

  11. Phylogeny and pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. isolated from greenhouse melon soil in Liaoning Province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baixia; Yan, Jianfang; Zhang, Shuo; Liu, Xian; Gao, Zenggui

    2014-09-01

    Fungi of the Fusarium oxysporum are widely distributed around the world in all types of soils, and they are all anamorphic species. In order to investigate the relationships and differences among Fusarium spp., 25 Fusarium spp. were isolated from greenhouse melon soils in Liaoning Province, China. With these 25 strains, three positive control Fusarium strains were analyzed using universally primed PCR (UP-PCR). Seventy-three bands appeared after amplification using 6 primers, and 66 of these bands (90.4%) were polymorphic. All strains were clustered into eight groups, though 14 strains of F. oxysporum were clustered into a single group. We concluded that UP-PCR could reveal the genetic relationships and differences among Fusarium strains. Moreover, the UP-PCR results suggested that F. oxysporum is distinguishable from other Fusarium spp. Thus, UP-PCR is a useful method for Fusarium classification. The pathogenicity of 13 strains of F. oxysporum to muskmelon, cucumber and watermelon seedlings was studied by infecting the seedlings with a spore suspension after cutting the root. The results showed that the F. oxysporum strains were pathogenic to all three melon types, although the pathogenicity differed significantly among the 13 strains. In addition, all strains had the greatest pathogenicity toward watermelon. Since the factors affecting pathogenicity vary widely, they should be considered in future studies on Fusarium spp. The results of such studies may then yield an accurate description of the pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. PMID:25183948

  12. Phylogeny and pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. isolated from greenhouse melon soil in Liaoning Province

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baixia; Yan, Jianfang; Zhang, Shuo; Liu, Xian; Gao, Zenggui

    2013-01-01

    Fungi of the Fusarium oxysporum are widely distributed around the world in all types of soils, and they are all anamorphic species. In order to investigate the relationships and differences among Fusarium spp., 25 Fusarium spp. were isolated from greenhouse melon soils in Liaoning Province, China. With these 25 strains, three positive control Fusarium strains were analyzed using universally primed PCR (UP-PCR). Seventy-three bands appeared after amplification using 6 primers, and 66 of these bands (90.4%) were polymorphic. All strains were clustered into eight groups, though 14 strains of F. oxysporum were clustered into a single group. We concluded that UP-PCR could reveal the genetic relationships and differences among Fusarium strains. Moreover, the UP-PCR results suggested that F. oxysporum is distinguishable from other Fusarium spp. Thus, UP-PCR is a useful method for Fusarium classification. The pathogenicity of 13 strains of F. oxysporum to muskmelon, cucumber and watermelon seedlings was studied by infecting the seedlings with a spore suspension after cutting the root. The results showed that the F. oxysporum strains were pathogenic to all three melon types, although the pathogenicity differed significantly among the 13 strains. In addition, all strains had the greatest pathogenicity toward watermelon. Since the factors affecting pathogenicity vary widely, they should be considered in future studies on Fusarium spp. The results of such studies may then yield an accurate description of the pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. PMID:25183948

  13. Plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monica Höfte; PAUL DE VOS

    In the current taxonomy, plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species are restricted to rRNA group I organisms belonging to the Gamma subclass of Proteobacteria. Currently, about 21 validly described plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species are known. The most important species is P. syringae with more than 50 described pathovars. The pathovar concept is confusing and the taxonomy of P. syringae needs revision. P.

  14. Prussin et. al. 1 Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Experimental Validation of a Long-Distance Transport Model for Plant Pathogens:1

    E-print Network

    Ross, Shane

    -Distance Transport Model for Plant Pathogens:1 Application to Fusarium graminearum2 Aaron J. Prussin, II1* , Linsey C, causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat and barley,24 is a devastating plant pathogen developed to predict the long distance26 transport of plant pathogens, but this model has not yet been

  15. [Biodegradation of agricultural plant residues by Fusarium oxysporum strains].

    PubMed

    Chepchak, T P; Kurchenko, I N; Iur'eva, E M

    2014-01-01

    The cellulolytic and endoglucanase activity of Fusarium oxysporum strains isolated from soil and plants in the media with plant waste as carbon source has been studied. It was established that the majority of studied strains were able to hydrolyze the filter paper, husk of sunflower seeds, wheat straw and corn stalks. Cellulolytic activity depended on the strain of microscopic fungi, type of substrate and duration of cultivation. The maximum cellulase activity 1 U/ml and the concentration of reducing sugars -0.875 mg/ml were found in soil strain F. oxysporum 420 in the medium with corn stalks. Endoglucanase activity of plant pathogenic strains was higher than that of soil ones. PMID:25199344

  16. The Sfp-Type 4?-Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Ppt1 of Fusarium fujikuroi Controls Development, Secondary Metabolism and Pathogenicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philipp Wiemann; Sabine Albermann; Eva-Maria Niehaus; Lena Studt; Katharina W. von Bargen; Nelson L. Brock; Hans-Ulrich Humpf; Jeroen S. Dickschat; Bettina Tudzynski

    2012-01-01

    The heterothallic ascomycete Fusarium fujikuroi is a notorious rice pathogen causing super-elongation of plants due to the production of terpene-derived gibberellic acids (GAs) that function as natural plant hormones. Additionally, F. fujikuroi is able to produce a variety of polyketide- and non-ribosomal peptide-derived metabolites such as bikaverins, fusarubins and fusarins as well as metabolites from yet unidentified biosynthetic pathways, e.g.

  17. Cross pathogenicity and vegetative compatibility of Fusarium oxysporum isolated from sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, which causes Fusarium yellows in sugar beet, can be highly variable in virulence and morphology, with further diversity derived due to the wide geographic distribution of sugar beet production. Little is known about factors that determine pathogenicity to sugar beet...

  18. Influence of Climatic Factors on Fusarium Species Pathogenic to Cereals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. M. Doohan; J. Brennan; B. M. Cooke

    2003-01-01

    Fusarium head blight of small-grain cereals, ear rot of maize, seedling blight and foot rot of cereals are important diseases throughout the world. Fusarium graminearum, F. culmorum, F. poae, F. avenaceum and Microdochium nivale (formerly known as F. nivale) predominantly cause Fusarium diseases of small-grain cereals. Maize is predominantly attacked by F. graminearum, F. moniliforme, F. proliferatum and F. subglutinans.

  19. Slow sand filters effectively reduce Phytophthora after a pathogen switch from Fusarium and a simulated pump failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric; Oki, Lorence R

    2013-09-15

    Slow sand filtration has been shown to effectively reduce Phytophthora zoospores in irrigation water. This experiment tested the reduction of Phytophthora colony forming units (CFUs) by slow sand filtration systems after switching the pathogen contaminating plant leachate from Fusarium to Phytophthora and the resilience of the system to a short period without water, as might be caused by a pump failure. The slow sand filtration system greatly reduced Phytophthora CFUs and transmission after switching the pathogens. In addition, Phytophthora reduction by the slow sand filter was equally effective before and after the simulated pump failure. Reduction of Fusarium was not seen by the SSFs, before or after the simulated pump failure. The results suggest that slow sand filters are effective at reducing larger organisms, such as Phytophthora zoospores, even after a pump failure or a change in pathogens. PMID:23866129

  20. Molecular characterization of genes regulating fumonisin biosynthesis and development in maize pathogen fusarium verticilliodes 

    E-print Network

    Sagaram, Uma Shankar

    2009-05-15

    Fusarium verticillioides (Sacc.) Nirenberg (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis Wineland) is a fungal pathogen of maize that causes ear rots and stalk rots worldwide. In addition, it produces a group of mycotoxins called fumonisins when the fungus...

  1. Molecular characterization of genes regulating fumonisin biosynthesis and development in maize pathogen fusarium verticilliodes

    E-print Network

    Sagaram, Uma Shankar

    2009-05-15

    Fusarium verticillioides (Sacc.) Nirenberg (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis Wineland) is a fungal pathogen of maize that causes ear rots and stalk rots worldwide. In addition, it produces a group of mycotoxins called fumonisins when the fungus...

  2. THE PATHOGENICITY AND DNA POLYMORPHISM OF FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM ORIGINATING FROM DIANTHUS CARYOPHYLLUS, GYPSOPHILA SPP. AND SOIL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Werner; L. Irzykowska

    A number of Fusarium oxysporum pathogenic isolates originating from Dianthus caryophyllus, Gypsophila paniculata, G. repens and non-pathogenic strains obtained from soil was screened for pathogenicity and genetic variation. RAPD analysis con- ducted with arbitrary 10-mer primers gave 23 RAPD markers resulted from the DNA polymorphism. Clustering analysis based on RAPD fingerprint data revealed several distinct groups within F. oxysporum which

  3. Tissue-specific and pathogen-inducible expression of a fusion protein containing a Fusarium-specific antibody and a fungal chitinase protects wheat against Fusarium pathogens and mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Du, Hong-Jie; Wei, Qi-Yong; Huang, Tao; Yang, Peng; Kong, Xian-Wei; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-06-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat and other small grain cereals is a globally devastating disease caused by toxigenic Fusarium pathogens. Controlling FHB is a challenge because germplasm that is naturally resistant against these pathogens is inadequate. Current control measures rely on fungicides. Here, an antibody fusion comprised of the Fusarium spp.-specific recombinant antibody gene CWP2 derived from chicken, and the endochitinase gene Ech42 from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride was introduced into the elite wheat cultivar Zhengmai9023 by particle bombardment. Expression of this fusion gene was regulated by the lemma/palea-specific promoter Lem2 derived from barley; its expression was confirmed as lemma/palea-specific in transgenic wheat. Single-floret inoculation of independent transgenic wheat lines of the T3 to T6 generations revealed significant resistance (type II) to fungal spreading, and natural infection assays in the field showed significant resistance (type I) to initial infection. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed marked reduction of mycotoxins in the grains of the transgenic wheat lines. Progenies of crosses between the transgenic lines and the FHB-susceptible cultivar Huamai13 also showed significantly enhanced FHB resistance. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the tissue-specific expression of the antibody fusion was induced by salicylic acid drenching and induced to a greater extent by F. graminearum infection. Histochemical analysis showed substantial restriction of mycelial growth in the lemma tissues of the transgenic plants. Thus, the combined tissue-specific and pathogen-inducible expression of this Fusarium-specific antibody fusion can effectively protect wheat against Fusarium pathogens and reduce mycotoxin content in grain. PMID:25418882

  4. Moths that Vector a Plant Pathogen also Transport Endophytic Fungi and Mycoparasitic Antagonists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy S. Feldman; Heath E. O’Brien; A. Elizabeth Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Claviceps paspali, a common fungal pathogen of Paspalum grasses, attracts moth vectors by producing sugary exudates in the grass florets it infects. These exudates also support\\u000a mycoparasitic Fusarium species that may negatively influence C. paspali fitness. We examined the potential for moths on which C. paspali depends to also transmit mycoparasitic Fusarium and fungal endophytes, which inhabit asymptomatic plant tissue

  5. Actinomycetes as plant pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romano Locci

    1994-01-01

    Biology, taxonomy, pathogenicity and control of plant disease inducing actinomycetes are reviewed. Recent progress in the study of potato, sweet potato, blueberry and fruit and forest tree diseases is illustrated. The role in potato scab pathogenesis of the newly discovered phytotoxins, thaxtomins, is discussed.

  6. Genotype Response of Soybean (Glycine max) Whole Plants and Hairy Roots to Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium solani f. sp. Glycines, a soilborne fungus, infects soybean roots and causes sudden death syndrome. The response of 13 soybean genotypes to the pathogen infection was tested with potted greenhouse grown plants and with cultured hairy roots. The taproots of all genotypes grown plants measure...

  7. Fusarium azukicola sp. nov., an exotic azuki bean root-rot pathogen in Hokkaido, Japan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the phenotypic, molecular phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of a novel azuki bean (Vigna angularis) root-rot (BRR) pathogen from Hokkaido, Japan, which is formally described herein as Fusarium azukicola. This species can be distinguished phenotypically from the other Phaseolu...

  8. Identification of the Infection Route of a Fusarium Seed Pathogen into Nondormant Bromus tectorum Seeds.

    PubMed

    Franke, JanaLynn; Geary, Brad; Meyer, Susan E

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Fusarium has a wide host range and causes many different forms of plant disease. These include seed rot and seedling blight diseases of cultivated plants. The diseases caused by Fusarium on wild plants are less well-known. In this study, we examined disease development caused by Fusarium sp. n on nondormant seeds of the important rangeland weed Bromus tectorum as part of broader studies of the phenomenon of stand failure or "die-off" in this annual grass. We previously isolated an undescribed species in the F. tricinctum species complex from die-off soils and showed that it is pathogenic on seeds. It can cause high mortality of nondormant B. tectorum seeds, especially under conditions of water stress, but rarely attacks dormant seeds. In this study, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the mode of attack used by this pathogen. Nondormant B. tectorum seeds (i.e., florets containing caryopses) were inoculated with isolate Skull C1 macroconidia. Seeds were then exposed to water stress conditions (-1.5 MPa) for 7 days and then transferred to free water. Time lapse SEM photographs of healthy versus infected seeds revealed that hyphae under water stress conditions grew toward and culminated their attack at the abscission layer of the floret attachment scar. A prominent infection cushion, apparent macroscopically as a white tuft of mycelium at the radicle end of the seed, developed within 48 h after inoculation. Seeds that lacked an infection cushion completed germination upon transfer to free water, whereas seeds with an infection cushion were almost always killed. In addition, hyphae on seeds that did not initiate germination lacked directional growth and did not develop the infection cushion. This strongly suggests that the fungal attack is triggered by seed exudates released through the floret attachment scar at the initiation of germination. Images of cross sections of infected seeds showed that the fungal hyphae first penetrated the caryposis wall, then entered the embryo, and later ramified throughout the endosperm, completely destroying the seed. PMID:25389704

  9. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical investigation of pathogen development and host responses in resistant and susceptible wheat spikes infected by Fusarium culmorum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Kang; H. Buchenauer

    2000-01-01

    Pathogen development and host responses in wheat spikes of resistant and susceptible cultivars infected by Fusarium culmorum causing Fusarium head blight (FHB), were investigated by means of electron microscopy as well as immunogold labelling techniques. The studies revealed similarities in the infection process and the initial spreading of the pathogen in wheat spikes between resistant and susceptible cultivars. However, the

  10. Transgenic expression of polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins in Arabidopsis and wheat increases resistance to the flower pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, S; Sella, L; Janni, M; De Lorenzo, G; Favaron, F; D'Ovidio, R

    2012-03-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide, resulting in yield losses and mycotoxin contamination. The molecular mechanisms regulating Fusarium penetration and infection are poorly understood. Beside mycotoxin production, cell wall degradation may play a role in the development of FHB. Many fungal pathogens secrete polygalacturonases (PGs) during the early stages of infection, and plants have evolved polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) to restrict pectin degradation during fungal infection. To investigate the role of plant PGIPs in restricting the development of FHB symptoms, we first used Arabidopsis thaliana, whose genome encodes two PGIPs (AtPGIP1 and AtPGIP2). Arabidopsis transgenic plants expressing either of these PGIPs under control of the CaMV 35S promoter accumulate inhibitory activity against F. graminearum PG in their inflorescences, and show increased resistance to FHB. Second, transgenic wheat plants expressing the bean PvPGIP2 in their flowers also had a significant reduction of symptoms when infected with F. graminearum. Our data suggest that PGs likely play a role in F. graminearum infection of floral tissues, and that PGIPs incorporated into wheat may be important for increased resistance to FHB. PMID:21974721

  11. Fusaric acid is a crucial factor in the disturbance of leaf water imbalance in Fusarium-infected banana plants.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xian; Ling, Ning; Wang, Min; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2012-11-01

    Fusarium wilt of banana is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense infection. The initial chlorosis symptoms occur progressively from lower to upper leaves, with wilt symptoms subsequently occurring in the whole plant. To determine the effect of the pathogen infection on the gas exchange characteristics and water content in banana leaves, hydroponic experiments with pathogen inoculation were conducted in a greenhouse. Compared with control plants, infected banana seedlings showed a higher leaf temperature as determined by thermal imaging. Reduced stomatal conductance (g(s)) and transpiration rate (E) in infected plants resulted in lower levels of water loss than in control plants. Water potential in heavily diseased plants (II) was significantly reduced and the E/g(s) ratio was higher than in noninfected plants, indicating the occurrence of uncontrolled water loss not regulated by stomata in diseased plants. As no pathogen colonies were detected from the infected plant leaves, the crude toxin was extracted from the pathogen culture and evaluated about the effect on banana plant to further investigate the probable reason of these physiological changes in Fusarium-infected banana leaf. The phytotoxin fusaric acid (FA) was found in the crude toxin, and both crude toxin and pure FA had similar effects as the pathogen infection on the physiological changes in banana leaf. Additionally, FA was present at all positions in diseased plants and its concentration was positively correlated with the incidence of disease symptoms. Taken together, these observations indicated that FA secreted by the pathogen is an important factor involved in the disturbance of leaf temperature, resulting in uncontrolled leaf water loss and electrolyte leakage due to damaging the cell membrane. In conclusion, FA plays a critical role in accelerating the development of Fusarium wilt in banana plants by acting as a phytotoxin. PMID:22964424

  12. Phylogeny and pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum isolates from cottonseed imported from Australia into California for dairy cattle feed.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinggao; Bell, Alois A; Wheeler, Michael H; Stipanovic, Robert D; Puckhaber, Lorraine S

    2011-11-01

    A unique biotype of the Fusarium wilt pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. f.sp. vasinfectum (Atk) Sny. & Hans., found in Australia in 1993 is favored by neutral or alkaline heavy soils and does not require plant parasitic nematodes to cause disease. This makes it a threat to 4-6 million acres of USA Upland cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) that is grown on heavy alkaline soil and currently is not affected by Fusarium wilt. In 2001-2002, several shiploads of live cottonseed were imported into California for dairy cattle feed. Thirteen F. oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum isolates and four isolates of a Fusarium spp. that resembled F. oxysporum were isolated from the imported cottonseed. The isolates, designated by an AuSeed prefix, formed four vegetative compatibility groups (VCG) all of which were incompatible with tester isolates for 18 VCGs found in the USA. Isolate AuSeed14 was vegetatively compatible with the four reference isolates of Australian biotype VCG01111. Phylogenetic analyses based on EF-1?, PHO, BT, Mat1-1, and Mat1-2 gene sequences separated the 17 seed isolates into three lineages (race A, race 3, and Fusarium spp.) with AuSeed14 clustering into race 3 lineage or race A lineage depending on the genes analyzed. Indel analysis of the EF-1? gene sequences revealed a close evolutionary relationship among AuSeed14, Australian biotype reference isolates, and the four Fusarium spp. isolates. The Australian seed isolates and the four Australian biotype reference isolates caused disease with root-dip inoculation, but not with stem-puncture inoculation. Thus, they were a vascular incompetent pathotype. In contrast, USA race A lineage isolates readily colonized vascular tissue and formed a vascular competent pathotype when introduced directly into xylem vessels. The AuSeed14 isolate was as pathogenic as the Australian biotype, and it or related isolates could cause a severe Fusarium wilt problem in USA cotton fields if they become established. PMID:22004096

  13. Functional genomic studies of pathogenicity in Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Head blight or scab caused by Fusarium graminearum is a disease of wheat and barley that occurs worldwide and that has great impact on U.S. agriculture and society. Infested cereals are often contaminated with trichothecene and estrogenic mycotoxins. To better understand fungal pathogenesis and deve...

  14. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOGENIC, AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF FUSARIUM SOLANI F. SP. GLYCINES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) is caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG). Over the last 5 years an internationsl collection of FSG isolates has been established and maintained at the National Soybean Pathogen Collection Center. FSG isolates grew slowly and appeared reddish light blue t...

  15. FUMONISIN PRODUCTION IN THE CORN PATHOGEN FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES: THE GENETIC BASIS OF NATURALLY OCCURRING CHEMICAL VARIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are polyketide-derived mycotoxins produced by the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides. Previous analyses identified naturally occurring variants of the fungus that are deficient in fumonisin C-10 hydroxylation or that do not produce any fumonisins. In the current study, gene deletio...

  16. The Fusarium graminearum genome reveals a link between localized polymorphism and pathogen specialization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum is a major destructive pathogen of cultivated cereals. We have sequenced and annotated the F. graminearum genome, and found it includes very few repetitive sequences. We experimentally demonstrate that repeats are mutated by the process of repeat-induced p...

  17. Fusarium verticillioides chitin synthases CHS5 and CHS7 are required for normal growth and pathogenicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Troy M. LarsonDavid; David F. Kendra; Mark Busman; Daren W. Brown

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is both an endophyte and a pathogen of maize and is a health threat in many areas of the world because it can contaminate\\u000a maize with fumonisins, a toxic secondary metabolite. We identified eight putative chitin synthase (CHS) genes in F. verticillioides genomic sequence, and phylogenetic evidence shows that they group into seven established CHS gene classes. We

  18. Characterization of a population of Fusarium oxysporum, from sugar beet, using the population structure of putative pathogenicity genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WEBB, KIMBERLY M.*, PAUL COVEY, BRETT KUWITZKY, AND MIA HANSON, USDA-ARS, Sugar Beet Research Unit, 1701 Centre Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80526. Characterization of a population of Fusarium oxysporum, from sugar beet, using the population structure of putative pathogenicity genes. Fusarium oxysp...

  19. Molecular Inversion Probe: A New Tool for Highly Specific Detection of Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Trau, Matt; Botella, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Highly specific detection methods, capable of reliably identifying plant pathogens are crucial in plant disease management strategies to reduce losses in agriculture by preventing the spread of diseases. We describe a novel molecular inversion probe (MIP) assay that can be potentially developed into a robust multiplex platform to detect and identify plant pathogens. A MIP has been designed for the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans and the proof of concept for the efficiency of this technology is provided. We demonstrate that this methodology can detect as little as 2.5 ng of pathogen DNA and is highly specific, being able to accurately differentiate Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans from other fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea and even pathogens of the same species such as Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici. The MIP assay was able to detect the presence of the pathogen in infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants as soon as the tissues contained minimal amounts of pathogen. MIP methods are intrinsically highly multiplexable and future development of specific MIPs could lead to the establishment of a diagnostic method that could potentially screen infected plants for hundreds of pathogens in a single assay. PMID:25343255

  20. Adaptive Potential of Maritime Pine (Pinus pinaster) Populations to the Emerging Pitch Canker Pathogen, Fusarium circinatum

    PubMed Central

    Elvira-Recuenco, Margarita; Iturritxa, Eugenia; Majada, Juan; Alia, Ricardo; Raposo, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    There is a concern on how emerging pests and diseases will affect the distribution range and adaptability of their host species, especially due to different conditions derived from climate change and growing globalization. Fusarium circinatum, which causes pitch canker disease in Pinus species, is an exotic pathogen of recent introduction in Spain that threatens its maritime pine (P. pinaster) stands. To predict the impact this disease will have on the species, we examine host resistance traits and their genetic architecture. Resistance phenotyping was done in a clonal provenance/progeny trial, using three-year-old cuttings artificially inoculated with the pathogen and maintained under controlled environmental conditions. A total number of 670 ramets were assessed, distributed in 10 populations, with a total of 47 families, 2 to 5 half-sibs per family, and 3–7 ramets per clone. High genetic variation was found at the three hierarchical levels studied: population, family and clone, being both additive and non-additive effects important. Narrow-sense and broad-sense heritability estimates were relatively high, with respective values of 0.43–0.58 and 0.51–0.8, depending on the resistance traits measured (lesion length, lesion length rate, time to wilting, and survival). These values suggest the species' high capacity of evolutionary response to the F. circinatum pathogen. A population originated in Northern Spain was the most resistant, while another from Morocco was the most susceptible. The total number of plants that did not show lesion development or presented a small lesion (length<30 mm) was 224 out of 670, indicating a high proportion of resistant trees in the offspring within the analyzed populations. We found large differences among populations and considerable genetic variation within populations, which should allow, through natural or artificial selection, the successful adaptation of maritime pine to pitch canker disease. PMID:25500822

  1. Rapid and efficient estimation of pea resistance to the soil-borne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum by infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Rispail, Nicolas; Rubiales, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilts are widespread diseases affecting most agricultural crops. In absence of efficient alternatives, sowing resistant cultivars is the preferred approach to control this disease. However, actual resistance sources are often overcome by new pathogenic races, forcing breeders to continuously search for novel resistance sources. Selection of resistant accessions, mainly based on the evaluation of symptoms at timely intervals, is highly time-consuming. Thus, we tested the potential of an infra-red imaging system in plant breeding to speed up this process. For this, we monitored the changes in surface leaf temperature upon infection by F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi in several pea accessions with contrasting response to Fusarium wilt under a controlled environment. Using a portable infra-red imaging system we detected a significant temperature increase of at least 0.5 °C after 10 days post-inoculation in the susceptible accessions, while the resistant accession temperature remained at control level. The increase in leaf temperature at 10 days post-inoculation was positively correlated with the AUDPC calculated over a 30 days period. Thus, this approach allowed the early discrimination between resistant and susceptible accessions. As such, applying infra-red imaging system in breeding for Fusarium wilt resistance would contribute to considerably shorten the process of selection of novel resistant sources. PMID:25671514

  2. FUBT, a putative MFS transporter, promotes secretion of fusaric acid in the cotton pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum.

    PubMed

    Crutcher, Frankie K; Liu, Jinggao; Puckhaber, Lorraine S; Stipanovic, Robert D; Bell, Alois A; Nichols, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    Fusaric acid (FA) is a key component in virulence and symptom development in cotton during infection by Fusarium oxysporum. A putative major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter gene was identified downstream of the polyketide synthase gene responsible for the biosynthesis of FA in a region previously believed to be unrelated to the known FA gene cluster. Disruption of the transporter gene, designated FUBT, resulted in loss of FA secretion, decrease in FA production and a decrease in resistance to high concentrations of FA. Uptake of exogenous FA was unaffected in the disruption transformants, suggesting that FA enters the cell in Fusarium by an independent mechanism. Thus, FUBT is involved both in the extracellular transport of FA and in resistance of F. oxysporum to this non-specific toxin. A potential secondary resistance mechanism, the production of FA derivatives, was observed in FUBT deletion mutants. Molecular analysis of key biochemical processes in the production of FA could lead to future host plant resistance to Fusarium pathogens. PMID:25627440

  3. Changing fitness of a necrotrophic plant pathogen under increasing temperature.

    PubMed

    Sabburg, Rosalie; Obanor, Friday; Aitken, Elizabeth; Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2015-08-01

    Warmer temperatures associated with climate change are expected to have a direct impact on plant pathogens, challenging crops and altering plant disease profiles in the future. In this study, we have investigated the effect of increasing temperature on the pathogenic fitness of Fusarium pseudograminearum, an important necrotrophic plant pathogen associated with crown rot disease of wheat in Australia. Eleven wheat lines with different levels of crown rot resistance were artificially inoculated with F. pseudograminearum and maintained at four diurnal temperatures 15/15°C, 20/15°C, 25/15°C and 28/15°C in a controlled glasshouse. To quantify the success of F. pseudograminearum three fitness measures, these being disease severity, pathogen biomass in stem base and flag leaf node, and deoxynivalenol (DON) in stem base and flag leaf node of mature plants were used. F. pseudograminearum showed superior overall fitness at 15/15°C, and this was reduced with increasing temperature. Pathogen fitness was significantly influenced by the level of crown rot resistance of wheat lines, but the influence of line declined with increasing temperature. Lines that exhibited superior crown rot resistance in the field were generally associated with reduced overall pathogen fitness. However, the relative performance of the wheat lines was dependent on the measure of pathogen fitness, and lines that were associated with one reduced measure of pathogen fitness did not always reduce another. There was a strong correlation between DON in stem base tissue and disease severity, but length of browning was not a good predictor of Fusarium biomass in the stem base. We report that a combination of host resistance and rising temperature will reduce pathogen fitness under increasing temperature, but further studies combining the effect of rising CO2 are essential for more realistic assessments. PMID:25767051

  4. Prussin et. al. 1 Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Experimental Validation of a Long-Distance Transport Model for Plant Pathogens:1

    E-print Network

    Ross, Shane

    -Distance Transport Model for Plant Pathogens:1 Application to Fusarium graminearum2 Aaron J. Prussin, II1 plant pathogen that may be transported through the atmosphere over long25 distances. A Gaussian dispersal model has been developed to predict the long distance26 transport of plant pathogens

  5. Recognition of pathogens by plants

    E-print Network

    Holt III, Ben F.

    and respond to specific pathogens? Unlike animals, plants do not have the luxury of a circulating immune and localized programmed cell death. The hypersensitive response serves to Magazine R5 Figure 1 The interaction

  6. Comparative study of the pathogenicity of seabed isolates of Fusarium equiseti and the effect of the composition of the mineral salt medium and temperature on mycelial growth

    PubMed Central

    Palmero, D.; de Cara, M.; Iglesias, C.; Gálvez, L.; Tello, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenicity of seven strains of Fusarium equiseti isolated from seabed soil was evaluated on different host plants showing pre and post emergence damage. Radial growth of 27 strains was measured on culture media previously adjusted to different osmotic potentials with either KCl or NaCl (-1.50 to -144.54 bars) at 15°, 25° and 35° C. Significant differences and interactive effects were observed in the response of mycelia to osmotic potential and temperature. PMID:24031710

  7. RFLP analysis of rDNA-ITS regions of native non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum isolates and their field evaluation for the suppression of Fusarium wilt disease of banana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Thangavelu; A. Jayanthi

    2009-01-01

    Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense is the most devastating disease of banana affecting commercial cultivars grown worldwide. An attempt has been made to identify\\u000a antagonistic, non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum (npFo) isolates from banana soil. A total of 200 rhizosphere soil samples were collected from different commercial cultivars, as\\u000a well as wild bananas. Forty Fusarium isolates were recovered,

  8. The rhizosphere microbial community in a multiple parallel mineralization system suppresses the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kazuki; Iida, Yuichiro; Iwai, Takashi; Aoyama, Chihiro; Inukai, Ryuya; Ando, Akinori; Ogawa, Jun; Ohnishi, Jun; Terami, Fumihiro; Takano, Masao; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-12-01

    The rhizosphere microbial community in a hydroponics system with multiple parallel mineralization (MPM) can potentially suppress root-borne diseases. This study focused on revealing the biological nature of the suppression against Fusarium wilt disease, which is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum, and describing the factors that may influence the fungal pathogen in the MPM system. We demonstrated that the rhizosphere microbiota that developed in the MPM system could suppress Fusarium wilt disease under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. The microbiological characteristics of the MPM system were able to control the population dynamics of F. oxysporum, but did not eradicate the fungal pathogen. The roles of the microbiological agents underlying the disease suppression and the magnitude of the disease suppression in the MPM system appear to depend on the microbial density. F. oxysporum that survived in the MPM system formed chlamydospores when exposed to the rhizosphere microbiota. These results suggest that the microbiota suppresses proliferation of F. oxysporum by controlling the pathogen's morphogenesis and by developing an ecosystem that permits coexistence with F. oxysporum. PMID:24311557

  9. The rhizosphere microbial community in a multiple parallel mineralization system suppresses the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kazuki; Iida, Yuichiro; Iwai, Takashi; Aoyama, Chihiro; Inukai, Ryuya; Ando, Akinori; Ogawa, Jun; Ohnishi, Jun; Terami, Fumihiro; Takano, Masao; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere microbial community in a hydroponics system with multiple parallel mineralization (MPM) can potentially suppress root-borne diseases. This study focused on revealing the biological nature of the suppression against Fusarium wilt disease, which is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum, and describing the factors that may influence the fungal pathogen in the MPM system. We demonstrated that the rhizosphere microbiota that developed in the MPM system could suppress Fusarium wilt disease under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. The microbiological characteristics of the MPM system were able to control the population dynamics of F. oxysporum, but did not eradicate the fungal pathogen. The roles of the microbiological agents underlying the disease suppression and the magnitude of the disease suppression in the MPM system appear to depend on the microbial density. F. oxysporum that survived in the MPM system formed chlamydospores when exposed to the rhizosphere microbiota. These results suggest that the microbiota suppresses proliferation of F. oxysporum by controlling the pathogen's morphogenesis and by developing an ecosystem that permits coexistence with F. oxysporum. PMID:24311557

  10. The Genome Sequence of the Fungal Pathogen Fusarium virguliforme That Causes Sudden Death Syndrome in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Subodh K.; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Brar, Hargeet K.; Fakhoury, Ahmad M.; Bluhm, Burton H.; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium virguliforme causes sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean, a disease of serious concern throughout most of the soybean producing regions of the world. Despite the global importance, little is known about the pathogenesis mechanisms of F. virguliforme. Thus, we applied Next-Generation DNA Sequencing to reveal the draft F. virguliforme genome sequence and identified putative pathogenicity genes to facilitate discovering the mechanisms used by the pathogen to cause this disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We have generated the draft genome sequence of F. virguliforme by conducting whole-genome shotgun sequencing on a 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencer. Initially, single-end reads of a 400-bp shotgun library were assembled using the PCAP program. Paired end sequences from 3 and 20 Kb DNA fragments and approximately 100 Kb inserts of 1,400 BAC clones were used to generate the assembled genome. The assembled genome sequence was 51 Mb. The N50 scaffold number was 11 with an N50 Scaffold length of 1,263 Kb. The AUGUSTUS gene prediction program predicted 14,845 putative genes, which were annotated with Pfam and GO databases. Gene distributions were uniform in all but one of the major scaffolds. Phylogenic analyses revealed that F. virguliforme was closely related to the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca. Of the 14,845 F. virguliforme genes, 11,043 were conserved among five Fusarium species: F. virguliforme, F. graminearum, F. verticillioides, F. oxysporum and N. haematococca; and 1,332 F. virguliforme-specific genes, which may include pathogenicity genes. Additionally, searches for candidate F. virguliforme pathogenicity genes using gene sequences of the pathogen-host interaction database identified 358 genes. Conclusions The F. virguliforme genome sequence and putative pathogenicity genes presented here will facilitate identification of pathogenicity mechanisms involved in SDS development. Together, these resources will expedite our efforts towards discovering pathogenicity mechanisms in F. virguliforme. This will ultimately lead to improvement of SDS resistance in soybean. PMID:24454689

  11. Pathogenicity and mycotoxin production by Fusarium proliferatum isolated from onion and garlic in Serbia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Stankovic; J. Levic; T. Petrovic; A. Logrieco; A. Moretti

    2007-01-01

    Fusarium proliferatum can occur on a wide range of economically important vegetable plants but its role in disease is not always well established.\\u000a In 2000 and 2001, from forty-one field samples of wilting onion and garlic plants in Serbia, F. proliferatum as the predominant fungal species was isolated from root and bulbs. Seventy isolates were firstly characterized for their\\u000a sexual

  12. Visualization of interactions between a pathogenic and a beneficial Fusarium strain during biocontrol of tomato foot and root rot.

    PubMed

    Bolwerk, Annouschka; Lagopodi, Anastasia L; Lugtenberg, Ben J J; Bloemberg, Guido V

    2005-07-01

    The soilborne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici causes tomato foot and root rot (TFRR), which can be controlled by the addition of the nonpathogenic fungus F. oxysporum Fo47 to the soil. To improve our understanding of the interactions between the two Fusarium strains on tomato roots during biocontrol, the fungi were labeled using different autofluorescent proteins as markers and subsequently visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results were as follows. i) An at least 50-fold excess of Fo47over F. oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici was required to obtain control of TFRR. ii) When seedlings were planted in sand infested with spores of a single fungus, Fo47 hyphae attached to the root earlier than those of F. oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici. iii) Subsequent root colonization by F. oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici was faster and to a larger extent than that by Fo47. iv) Under disease-controlling conditions, colonization of tomato roots by the pathogenic fungus was significantly reduced. v) When the inoculum concentration of Fo47 was increased, root colonization by the pathogen was arrested at the stage of initial attachment to the root. vi) The percentage of spores of Fo47 that germinates in tomato root exudate in vitro is higher than that of the pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici. Based on these results, the mechanisms by which Fo47 controls TFRR are discussed in terms of i) rate of spore germination and competition for nutrients before the two fungi reach the rhizoplane; ii) competition for initial sites of attachment, intercellular junctions, and nutrients on the tomato root surface; and iii) inducing systemic resistance. PMID:16042017

  13. Detection of Fusarium wilt pathogens of Psidium guajava L. in soil using culture independent PCR (ciPCR)

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rupesh K.; Pandey, Brajesh K.; Muthukumar, M.; Pathak, Neelam; Zeeshan, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Traditional culturing methods take a long time for identification of pathogenic isolates. A protocol has been developed for the detection of Fusarium from soil samples in the early stage of infection. Seventeen soil samples from different locations were collected before the onset of rains to find out the presence of Fusarium spp. population present in the soil of guava orchards and to correlate its presence with incidence of wilt. A PCR based method was developed for the molecular characterization of Fusarium using Fusarium spp. specific primer. DNA extracted by this method was free from protein and other contaminations and the yield was sufficient for PCR amplification. The primer developed in this study was amplifying ?230 bp in all infected samples while not in healthy soil. The specificity and sensitivity of primer were tested on several Fusarium spp. and found that this primer was amplifying 10?6 dilution of the fungal DNA. The present study facilitates the rapid detection of Fusarium spp. from infected soil samples of guava collected from different agroclimatic regions in India. A rapid detection method for pathogens and a diagnostic assay for disease would facilitate an early detection of pathogen and lead to more effective control strategies. PMID:23961219

  14. Fusarium verticillioides: A new cotton wilt pathogen in Uzbekistan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increase in wilt has been observed in cotton fields in Uzbekistan. This prompted us to conduct a survey of Uzbek cotton fields for wilt over a five year period beginning in 2007. Twenty-four regions with different soil types and ecologies were screened. In 9 regions, over 45% of the plants dem...

  15. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection. PMID:20589070

  16. A Putative Transcription Factor pcs1 Positively Regulates Both Conidiation and Sexual Reproduction in the Cereal Pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Jung, Boknam; Park, Jungwook; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Yin-Won; Seo, Young-Su; Lee, Jungkwan

    2014-09-01

    The plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum causes Fusarium head blight in cereal crops and produces mycotoxins that are harmful to animals and humans. For the initiation and spread of disease, asexual and sexual reproduction is required. Therefore, studies on fungal reproduction contribute to the development of new methods to control and maintain the fungal population. Screening a previously generated transcription factor mutant collection, we identified one putative C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor, pcs1, which is required for both sexual and asexual reproduction. Deleting pcs1 in F. graminearum resulted in a dramatic reduction in conidial production and a complete loss of sexual reproduction. The pathways and gene ontology of pcs1-dependent genes from microarray experiments showed that several G-protein related pathways, oxidase activity, ribosome biogenesis, and RNA binding and processing were highly enriched, suggesting that pcs1 is involved in several different biological processes. Further, overexpression of pcs1 increased conidial production and resulted in earlier maturation of ascospores compared to the wild-type strain. Additionally, the vegetative growth of the overexpression mutants was decreased in nutrient-rich conditions but was not different from the wild-type strain in nutrient-poor conditions. Overall, we discovered that the pcs1 transcription factor positively regulates both conidiation and sexual reproduction and confers nutrient condition-dependent vegetative growth. PMID:25289009

  17. A Putative Transcription Factor pcs1 Positively Regulates Both Conidiation and Sexual Reproduction in the Cereal Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Boknam; Park, Jungwook; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Yin-Won; Seo, Young-Su; Lee, Jungkwan

    2014-01-01

    The plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum causes Fusarium head blight in cereal crops and produces mycotoxins that are harmful to animals and humans. For the initiation and spread of disease, asexual and sexual reproduction is required. Therefore, studies on fungal reproduction contribute to the development of new methods to control and maintain the fungal population. Screening a previously generated transcription factor mutant collection, we identified one putative C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor, pcs1, which is required for both sexual and asexual reproduction. Deleting pcs1 in F. graminearum resulted in a dramatic reduction in conidial production and a complete loss of sexual reproduction. The pathways and gene ontology of pcs1-dependent genes from microarray experiments showed that several G-protein related pathways, oxidase activity, ribosome biogenesis, and RNA binding and processing were highly enriched, suggesting that pcs1 is involved in several different biological processes. Further, overexpression of pcs1 increased conidial production and resulted in earlier maturation of ascospores compared to the wild-type strain. Additionally, the vegetative growth of the overexpression mutants was decreased in nutrient-rich conditions but was not different from the wild-type strain in nutrient-poor conditions. Overall, we discovered that the pcs1 transcription factor positively regulates both conidiation and sexual reproduction and confers nutrient condition-dependent vegetative growth. PMID:25289009

  18. Influence of plant root exudates, germ tube orientation and passive conidia transport on biological control of fusarium wilt by strains of nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Mandeel, Qaher A

    2006-03-01

    In earlier studies, biological control of Fusarium wilt of cucumber induced by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum was demonstrated using nonpathogenic strains C5 and C14 of Fusarium oxysporum. Strain C14 induced resistance and competed for infection sites whether roots were wounded or intact, whereas strain C5 required wounds to achieve biocontrol. In the current work, additional attributes involved in enhanced resistance by nonpathogenic biocontrol agents strains to Fusarium wilt of cucumber and pea were further investigated. In pre-penetration assays, pathogenic formae specials exhibited a significantly higher percentage of spore germination in 4-day-old root exudates of cucumber and pea than nonpathogens. Also, strain C5 exhibited the lowest significant reduction in spore germination in contrast to strain C14 or control. One-day-old cucumber roots injected with strain C14 resulted in significant reduction in germ tube orientation towards the root surface, 48-96 h after inoculation with F. o. cucumerinum spores, whereas strain C5 induced significantly lower spore orientation of the pathogen and only at 72 and 96 h after inoculation. In post-penetration tests, passive transport of microconidia of pathogenic and nonpathogens in stems from base to apex were examined when severed plant roots were immersed in spore suspension. In repeated trials, strain C5, F. o. cucumerinum and F. o. pisi were consistently isolated from stem tissues of both cucumber and pea at increasing heights over a 17 days incubation period. Strain C14 however, was recovered at a maximum translocation distance of 4.6 cm at day 6 and later height of isolation significantly declined thereafter to 1.2 cm at day 17. In pea stem, the decline was even less. Significant induction of resistance to challenge inoculation by the pathogen in cucumber occurred 72 and 96 h after pre-inoculation with biocontrol agents. Nonetheless, strain C14 induced protection as early as 48 h and the maximum resistance was reached at 96 h. The presented data confirm the previous findings that attributes important for nonpathogenic fusaria to induce resistant are: rapid spore germination and orientation in response to root exudate; active root penetration and passive conidia transport in stem to initiate defence reaction without pathogenicity and enough lag period between induction and challenge inoculation. Strain C14 possesses all these qualifications and hence its ability to enhance host resistance is superior than strain C5. PMID:16482390

  19. EVOLUTION OF THE FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM SPECIES COMPLEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight or scab of cereals is one of the most devastating plant diseases worldwide. These pathogens cause significant reduction in seed quality and yields and often contaminate seeds with trichothecene and estrogenic mycotoxins. Genealogical concordance phylogenetic species recognitio...

  20. Colonization of Tomato Root by Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum Strains Inoculated Together and Separately into the Soil

    PubMed Central

    Olivain, Chantal; Humbert, Claude; Nahalkova, Jarmila; Fatehi, Jamshid; L'Haridon, Floriane; Alabouvette, Claude

    2006-01-01

    In soil, fungal colonization of plant roots has been traditionally studied by indirect methods such as microbial isolation that do not enable direct observation of infection sites or of interactions between fungal pathogens and their antagonists. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize the colonization of tomato roots in heat-treated soil and to observe the interactions between a nonpathogenic strain, Fo47, and a pathogenic strain, Fol8, inoculated onto tomato roots in soil. When inoculated separately, both fungi colonized the entire root surface, with the exception of the apical zone. When both strains were introduced together, they both colonized the root surface and were observed at the same locations. When Fo47 was introduced at a higher concentration than Fol8, it colonized much of the root surface, but hyphae of Fol8 could still be observed at the same location on the root. There was no exclusion of the pathogenic strain by the presence of the nonpathogenic strain. These results are not consistent with the hypothesis that specific infection sites exist on the root for Fusarium oxysporum and instead support the hypothesis that competition occurs for nutrients rather than for infection sites. PMID:16461707

  1. Plant innate immunity against human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Melotto, Maeli; Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana

    2014-01-01

    Certain human bacterial pathogens such as the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are not proven to be plant pathogens yet. Nonetheless, under certain conditions they can survive on, penetrate into, and colonize internal plant tissues causing serious food borne disease outbreaks. In this review, we highlight current understanding on the molecular mechanisms of plant responses against human bacterial pathogens and discuss salient common and contrasting themes of plant interactions with phytopathogens or human pathogens. PMID:25157245

  2. Plant Pathogens as Indicators of Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Karen A.

    Chapter 25 Plant Pathogens as Indicators of Climate Change K.A. Garrett, M. Nita, E.D. De Wolf, L [1]. While some animal hosts may provide their pathogens with a consistent range of body temperatures, plant pathogens are generally much more exposed to the elements. Plant disease will tend to respond

  3. Fusarium wilt of lentil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium wilt of lentil is caused by the soil borne fungus Fusaium oxysporum f. sp. lentis. The pathogen is widespread. The disease shows symptoms of wilting, and stunted plants. Other symptoms include wilting of top leaves resemble water deficiency, shrinking and curling of leaves from the lower...

  4. Tomatinase from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is required for full virulence on tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Roncero, M Isabel G; Ruiz-Roldán, M Carmen

    2008-06-01

    Saponin detoxification enzymes from pathogenic fungi are involved in the infection process of their host plants. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp lycopersici, a tomato pathogen, produces the tomatinase enzyme Tom1, which degrades alpha-tomatine to less toxic derivates. To study the role of the tom1 gene in the virulence of F. oxysporum, we performed targeted disruption and overexpression of the gene. The infection process of tomato plants inoculated with transformants constitutively producing Tom1 resulted in an increase of symptom development. By contrast, tomato plants infected with the knockout mutants showed a delay in the disease process, indicating that Tom1, although not essential for pathogenicity, is required for the full virulence of F. oxysporum. Total tomatinase activity in the disrupted strains was reduced only 25%, leading to beta(2)-tomatine as the main hydrolysis product of the saponin in vitro. In silico analysis of the F. oxysporum genome revealed the existence of four additional putative tomatinase genes with identities to tomatinases from family 3 of glycosyl hydrolases. These might be responsible for the remaining tomatinase activity in the Deltatom1 mutants. Our results indicate that detoxification of alpha-tomatine in F. oxysporum is carried out by several tomatinase activities, suggesting the importance of these enzymes during the infection process. PMID:18624637

  5. Genetics of plant—pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheng Ji; Smith-Becker Jennifer; Keen Noel T

    1998-01-01

    Progress has occurred in understanding the function of disease-resistance genes that govern the resistance of plants to pathogens, and pathogen-produced molecules, called elicitors, that resistance genes key on. Data support the elicitor—receptor model wherein resistant plants contain receptors for pathogen elicitors. This recognition may be complex, however, involving delivery of elicitors to plant cells by specialized pathogen secretion systems and

  6. Xylella Genomics and Bacterial Pathogenicity to Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dow, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a pathogen of citrus, is the first plant pathogenic bacterium for which the complete genome sequence has been published. Inspection of the sequence reveals high relatedness to many genes of other pathogens, notably Xanthomonas campestris. Based on this, we suggest that Xylella possesses certain easily testable properties that contribute to pathogenicity. We also present some general considerations for deriving information on pathogenicity from bacterial genomics. PMID:11119303

  7. Variation in the Trichothecene Mycotoxin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are produced by some plant pathogenic species of the fungus Fusarium and can contribute to its virulence on some plants. In Fusarium graminearum and F. sporotrichioides trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes are encoded at three loci: the single-gene TRI101 locus; the two-gene ...

  8. Characterization of Fusarium verticillioides strains isolated from maize in Italy: fumonisin production, pathogenicity and genetic variability.

    PubMed

    Covarelli, Lorenzo; Stifano, Simonetta; Beccari, Giovanni; Raggi, Lorenzo; Lattanzio, Veronica Maria Teresa; Albertini, Emidio

    2012-08-01

    Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) is the main fungal agent of ear and kernel rot of maize (Zea mays L.) worldwide, including Italy. F.verticillioides is a highly toxigenic species since it is able to produce the carcinogenic mycotoxins fumonisins. In this study, 25 F. verticillioides strains, isolated from maize in different regions of Italy were analyzed for their ability to produce fumonisins, their pathogenicity and their genetic variability. A further referenced strain of G. moniliformis isolated from maize in USA was also used as outgroup. The fumonisins B?, B?, and B? were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Pathogenicity tests were carried out by symptom observation and determination of growth parameters after inoculation of maize seeds, seedlings and wounded detached leaves. Total genomic DNA was used for Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. About 20% of the analyzed strains were unable to produce fumonisins in in vitro experiments on inoculated maize flour, while, among fumonisin producers, a great variability was observed, with values ranging from 1 to 115 mg kg?ą. The different analyzed strains showed a wide range of pathogenicity in terms of effect on seed germination, seedling development and of symptoms produced on detached leaves, which were not correlated with the different in vitro fumonisin production. AFLP analysis indicated the presence of genetic diversity not only between the Italian strains and the American reference but also among the Italian isolates. PMID:22475938

  9. Characterization of the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum and the Effect of Fungicides on Their Mycelial Growth and Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Han, Joon-Hee; Lee, Ju Kyong; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2014-01-01

    Maize is a socioeconomically important crop in many countries. Recently, a high incidence of stalk rot disease has been reported in several maize fields in Gangwon province. In this report, we show that maize stalk rot is associated with the fungal pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum. Since no fungicides are available to control these pathogens on maize plants, we selected six fungicides (tebuconazole, difenoconazole, fluquinconazole, azoxystrobin, prochloraz and kresoxim-methyl) and examined their effectiveness against the two pathogens. The in vitro antifungal effects of the six fungicides on mycelial growth and colony formation were investigated. Based on the inhibition of mycelial growth, the most toxic fungicide was tebuconazole with 50% effective concentrations (EC50) of <0.1 ?g/ml and EC90 values of 0.9 ?g/ml for both pathogens, while the least toxic fungicide was azoxystrobin with EC50 values of 0.7 and 0.5 ?g/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, and EC90 values of >3,000 ?g/ml for both pathogens. Based on the inhibition of colony formation by the two pathogens, kresoxim-methyl was the most toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.01 ?g/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, whereas azoxystrobin was the least toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations >3,000 ?g/ml for both pathogens. PMID:25506304

  10. LDS1-produced oxylipins are negative regulators of growth, conidiation and fumonisin synthesis in the fungal maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Valeria; Giorni, Paola; Cirlini, Martina; Ludovici, Matteo; Visentin, Ivan; Cardinale, Francesca; Fabbri, Anna A.; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo; Battilani, Paola; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Oxylipins are fatty acid-derived signaling compounds produced by all eukaryotes so far investigated; in mycotoxigenic fungi, they modulate toxin production and interactions with the host plants. Among the many enzymes responsible for oxylipin generation, Linoleate Diol Synthase 1 (LDS1) produces mainly 8-hydroperoxyoctadecenoic acid and subsequently different di-hydroxyoctadecenoic acids. In this study, we inactivated a copy of the putative LDS1 ortholog (acc. N. FVEG_09294.3) of Fusarium verticillioides, with the aim to investigate its influence on the oxylipin profile of the fungus, on its development, secondary metabolism and virulence. LC-MS/MS oxylipin profiling carried out on the selected mutant strain revealed significant quali-quantitative differences for several oxylipins when compared to the WT strain. The Fvlds1-deleted mutant grew better, produced more conidia, synthesized more fumonisins and infected maize cobs faster than the WT strain. We hypothesize that oxylipins may act as regulators of gene expression in the toxigenic plant pathogen F. verticillioides, in turn causing notable changes in its phenotype. These changes could relate to the ability of oxylipins to re-shape the transcriptional profile of F. verticillioides by inducing chromatin modifications and exerting a direct control on the transcription of secondary metabolism in fungi. PMID:25566199

  11. Plants versus pathogens: an evolutionary arms race

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Gleason, Cynthia A.; Foley, Rhonda C.; Thrall, Peter H.; Burdon, Jeremy B.; Singh, Karam B.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of plant–pathogen interactions is a rapidly moving research field and one that is very important for productive agricultural systems. The focus of this review is on the evolution of plant defence responses and the coevolution of their pathogens, primarily from a molecular-genetic perspective. It explores the evolution of the major types of plant defence responses including pathogen associated molecular patterns and effector triggered immunity as well as the forces driving pathogen evolution, such as the mechanisms by which pathogen lineages and species evolve. Advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling, stomatal regulation, R gene–effector interactions and host specific toxins are used to highlight recent insights into the coevolutionary arms race between pathogens and plants. Finally, the review considers the intriguing question of how plants have evolved the ability to distinguish friends such as rhizobia and mycorrhiza from their many foes. PMID:21743794

  12. Proteasomal degradation in plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vitaly Citovsky; Adi Zaltsman; Stanislav V. Kozlovsky; Yedidya Gafni; Alexander Krichevsky

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitin\\/26S proteasome pathway is a basic biological mechanism involved in the regulation of a multitude of cellular processes. Increasing evidence indicates that plants utilize the ubiquitin\\/26S proteasome pathway in their immune response to pathogen invasion, emphasizing the role of this pathway during plant–pathogen interactions. The specific functions of proteasomal degradation in plant–pathogen interactions are diverse, and do not always

  13. Petunia Floral Defensins with Unique Prodomains as Novel Candidates for Development of Fusarium Wilt Resistance in Transgenic Banana Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ghag, Siddhesh B.; Shekhawat, Upendra K. Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a potent group of defense active molecules that have been utilized in developing resistance against a multitude of plant pathogens. Floral defensins constitute a group of cysteine-rich peptides showing potent growth inhibition of pathogenic filamentous fungi especially Fusarium oxysporum in vitro. Full length genes coding for two Petunia floral defensins, PhDef1 and PhDef2 having unique C- terminal 31 and 27 amino acid long predicted prodomains, were overexpressed in transgenic banana plants using embryogenic cells as explants for Agrobacterium–mediated genetic transformation. High level constitutive expression of these defensins in elite banana cv. Rasthali led to significant resistance against infection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense as shown by in vitro and ex vivo bioassay studies. Transgenic banana lines expressing either of the two defensins were clearly less chlorotic and had significantly less infestation and discoloration in the vital corm region of the plant as compared to untransformed controls. Transgenic banana plants expressing high level of full-length PhDef1 and PhDef2 were phenotypically normal and no stunting was observed. In conclusion, our results suggest that high-level constitutive expression of floral defensins having distinctive prodomains is an efficient strategy for development of fungal resistance in economically important fruit crops like banana. PMID:22745785

  14. Pathogenic and Phylogenetic analysis of Fusarium oxysporum from Sugarbeet in Michigan and Minnesota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend:FR. f. sp. betae (Stewart) Snyd & Hans, can lead to significant reduction in root yield sucrose percentage, and juice purity. Fusarium yellows has become increasingly common in both Michigan and Minnesota sug...

  15. Chemosensitization of Plant Pathogenic Fungi to Agricultural Fungicides

    PubMed Central

    Dzhavakhiya, Vitaly; Shcherbakova, Larisa; Semina, Yulia; Zhemchuzhina, Natalia; Campbell, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or “chemosensitization.” Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin) combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole) applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole) combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of Alternaria alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of Fusarium sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend. PMID:22408641

  16. Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens in Plants

    E-print Network

    Innes, Roger

    Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens in Plants Jules Ade, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, pathogens must overcome three layers of defense: (1) preformed physical barriers; (2) a cell-surface-based surveillance system that detects conserved pathogen molecules and (3) an intracellular surveillance system

  17. Biological Efficacy of Streptomyces sp. Strain BN1 against the Cereal Head Blight Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Boknam; Park, Sook-Young; Lee, Yin-Won; Lee, Jungkwan

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum is one of the most severe diseases threatening the production of small grains. Infected grains are often contaminated with mycotoxins such as zearalenone and trichothecences. During survey of contamination by FHB in rice grains, we found a bacterial isolate, designated as BN1, antagonistic to F. graminearum. The strain BN1 had branching vegetative hyphae and spores, and its aerial hyphae often had long, straight filaments bearing spores. The 16S rRNA gene of BN1 had 100% sequence identity with those found in several Streptomyces species. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS regions showed that BN1 grouped with S. sampsonii with 77% bootstrap value, suggesting that BN1 was not a known Streptomyces species. In addition, the efficacy of the BN1 strain against F. graminearum strains was tested both in vitro and in vivo. Wheat seedling length was significantly decreased by F. graminearum infection. However, this effect was mitigated when wheat seeds were treated with BN1 spore suspension prior to F. graminearum infection. BN1 also significantly decreased FHB severity when it was sprayed onto wheat heads, whereas BN1 was not effective when wheat heads were point inoculated. These results suggest that spraying of BN1 spores onto wheat heads during the wheat flowering season can be efficient for plant protection. Mechanistic studies on the antagonistic effect of BN1 against F. graminearum remain to be analyzed. PMID:25288928

  18. Water balance altered in cucumber plants infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Sun, Yuming; Sun, Guomei; Liu, Xiaokang; Zhai, Luchong; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt is caused by the infection and growth of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum in the xylem of host plants. The physiological responses of cucumbers that are infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC) was studied in pot and hydroponic experiments in a greenhouse. The results showed that although water absorption and stem hydraulic conductance decreased markedly in infected plants, large amounts of red ink accumulated in the leaves of infected cucumber plants. The transpiration rate (E) and stomatal conductance (gs) of the infected plants were significantly reduced, but the E/gs was higher than healthy plants. We further found that there was a positive correlation between leaf membrane injury and E/gs, indicating that the leaf cell membrane injury increased the non-stomatal water loss from infected plants. The fusaric acid (FA), which was detected in the infected plant, resulted in damage to the leaf cell membranes and an increase in E/gs, suggesting that FA plays an important role in non-stomatal water loss. In conclusion, leaf cell membrane injury in the soil-borne Fusarium wilt of cucumber plants induced uncontrolled water loss from damaged cells. FA plays a critical role in accelerating the development of Fusarium wilt in cucumber plants. PMID:25579504

  19. Inhibitory Effect of Algal Extracts on Mycelial Growth of the Tomato-Wilt Pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the inhibitory effect of cyanobacterial extracts of Nostoc commune FA-103 against the tomato-wilt pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. In an optimal medium, cell growth, antifungal activity, and antifungal compound production could be increased 2.7-fold, 4.1-fold, and 13.4-fold, respectively. A crude algal extract had a similar effect as mancozeb at the recommended dose, both in laboratory and pot tests. In vitro and in vivo fungal growth, spore sporulation and fungal infection of wilt pathogen in tomato seeds were significantly inhibited by cyanobacterial extracts. Nostoc commune FA-103 extracts have potential for the suppression of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. PMID:23997634

  20. Biodiversity of Fusarium species in ears and stalks of maize plants in Belgium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Scauflaire; Olivier Mahieu; Julien Louvieaux; Guy Foucart; Fabien Renard; Françoise Munaut

    In order to investigate the pre-harvest contamination of maize plants by Fusarium species in Belgium, a three-year survey has been performed in five fields in which three hybrids differing in susceptibility\\u000a to maize stalk rot were sampled at four different physiological stages. An extensive collection of 5,659 Fusarium isolates characterized at the species level was established during the 2005, 2006,

  1. In vitro study of the growth, development and pathogenicity responses of Fusarium oxysporum to phthalic acid, an autotoxin from Lanzhou lily.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijiang; Yang, Liu; Wang, Ruoyu; Zhang, Yubao; Shang, Qianhan; Wang, Le; Ren, Qin; Xie, Zhongkui

    2015-08-01

    Continuous monoculture of Lanzhou lily (Lilium davidii var. unicolor Cotton) results in frequent incidence of fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum. Phthalic acid (PA), a principal autotoxin from root exudates of Lanzhou lily, is involved in soil sickness by inducing autotoxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the direct allelopathic effects of PA on the growth, development and pathogenicity of F. oxysporum in vitro based on an ecologically relevant soil concentration. The results showed that PA slightly but not significantly inhibited the colony growth (mycelial growth) and fungal biomass of F. oxysporum at low concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.5 mM, and significantly inhibited the colony growth at the highest concentration (1 mM). None of the PA concentrations tested significantly inhibited the conidial germination and sporulation of F. oxysporum in liquid medium. However, mycotoxin (fusaric acid) yield and pathogenesis-related hydrolytic enzyme (protease, pectinase, cellulase, and amylase) activities were significantly stimulated in liquid cultures of F. oxysporum containing PA at ?0.25 mM. We conclude that PA at a soil level (i.e. 0.25 mM) is involved in plant-pathogen allelopathy as a stimulator of mycotoxin production and hydrolytic enzyme activities in F. oxysporum, which is possibly one of the mechanisms responsible for promoting the wilt disease of lily. PMID:25994089

  2. Detoxification of nitric oxide by flavohemoglobin and the denitrification pathway in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ephemeral nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical, highly reactive, environmentally rare, and a potent signaling molecule in organisms across kingdoms of life. This gaseous small molecule can freely transverse membranes and has been implicated in aspects of pathogenicity both in animal and plant ho...

  3. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLANT PATHOGENIC Prepared by Gabrielle Carstensen

    E-print Network

    ', `Molecular Plant-Pathogen Interactions', `Epidemiology and Ecology' and `Control and Breeding93 13TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLANT PATHOGENIC BACTERIA Prepared by Gabrielle Carstensen The 13th International Conference on Plant Pathogenic Bacteria (ICPPB) was held during June 2014

  4. Genomic clustering and co-regulation of transcriptional networks in the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genes for the production of a broad range of fungal secondary metabolites are frequently colinear. The prevalence of such gene clusters was systematically examined across the genome of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. The topological structure of transcriptional networks was also examined to investigate control mechanisms for mycotoxin biosynthesis and other processes. Results The genes associated with transcriptional processes were identified, and the genomic location of transcription-associated proteins (TAPs) analyzed in conjunction with the locations of genes exhibiting similar expression patterns. Highly conserved TAPs reside in regions of chromosomes with very low or no recombination, contrasting with putative regulator genes. Co-expression group profiles were used to define positionally clustered genes and a number of members of these clusters encode proteins participating in secondary metabolism. Gene expression profiles suggest there is an abundance of condition-specific transcriptional regulation. Analysis of the promoter regions of co-expressed genes showed enrichment for conserved DNA-sequence motifs. Potential global transcription factors recognising these motifs contain distinct sets of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) from those present in local regulators. Conclusions Proteins associated with basal transcriptional functions are encoded by genes enriched in regions of the genome with low recombination. Systematic searches revealed dispersed and compact clusters of co-expressed genes, often containing a transcription factor, and typically containing genes involved in biosynthetic pathways. Transcriptional networks exhibit a layered structure in which the position in the hierarchy of a regulator is closely linked to the DBD structural class. PMID:23805903

  5. The Interaction of Human Enteric Pathogens with Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeong-A; Lee, Dong Hwan; Heu, Sunggi

    2014-01-01

    There are an increasing number of outbreaks of human pathogens related to fresh produce. Thus, the growth of human pathogens on plants should be explored. Human pathogens can survive under the harsh environments in plants, and can adhere and actively invade plants. Plant-associated microbiota or insects contribute to the survival and transmission of enteric pathogens in plants. Human enteric pathogens also trigger plant innate immunity, but some pathogens–such as Salmonella–can overcome this defense mechanism. PMID:25288993

  6. Field resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae in transgenic cotton expressing the plant defensin NaD1.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Yolanda M; McKenna, James A; McGinness, Bruce S; Hinch, Jillian; Poon, Simon; Connelly, Angela A; Anderson, Marilyn A; Heath, Robyn L

    2014-04-01

    The plant defensin NaD1, from Nicotiana alata, has potent antifungal activity against a range of filamentous fungi including the two important cotton pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) and Verticillium dahliae. Transgenic cotton plants expressing NaD1 were produced and plants from three events were selected for further characterization. Homozygous plants were assessed in greenhouse bioassays for resistance to Fov. One line (D1) was selected for field trial testing over three growing seasons in soils naturally infested with Fov and over two seasons in soils naturally infested with V. dahliae. In the field trials with Fov-infested soil, line D1 had 2-3-times the survival rate, a higher tolerance to Fov (higher disease rank), and a 2-4-fold increase in lint yield compared to the non-transgenic Coker control. When transgenic line D1 was planted in V. dahliae-infested soil, plants had a higher tolerance to Verticillium wilt and up to a 2-fold increase in lint yield compared to the non-transgenic Coker control. Line D1 did not exhibit any detrimental agronomic features compared to the parent Coker control when plants were grown in non-diseased soil. This study demonstrated that the expression of NaD1 in transgenic cotton plants can provide substantial resistance to two economically important fungal pathogens. PMID:24502957

  7. Field resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae in transgenic cotton expressing the plant defensin NaD1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    The plant defensin NaD1, from Nicotiana alata, has potent antifungal activity against a range of filamentous fungi including the two important cotton pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) and Verticillium dahliae. Transgenic cotton plants expressing NaD1 were produced and plants from three events were selected for further characterization. Homozygous plants were assessed in greenhouse bioassays for resistance to Fov. One line (D1) was selected for field trial testing over three growing seasons in soils naturally infested with Fov and over two seasons in soils naturally infested with V. dahliae. In the field trials with Fov-infested soil, line D1 had 2–3-times the survival rate, a higher tolerance to Fov (higher disease rank), and a 2–4-fold increase in lint yield compared to the non-transgenic Coker control. When transgenic line D1 was planted in V. dahliae-infested soil, plants had a higher tolerance to Verticillium wilt and up to a 2-fold increase in lint yield compared to the non-transgenic Coker control. Line D1 did not exhibit any detrimental agronomic features compared to the parent Coker control when plants were grown in non-diseased soil. This study demonstrated that the expression of NaD1 in transgenic cotton plants can provide substantial resistance to two economically important fungal pathogens. PMID:24502957

  8. Sharing a Host Plant (Wheat [Triticum aestivum]) Increases the Fitness of Fusarium graminearum and the Severity of Fusarium Head Blight but Reduces the Fitness of Grain Aphids (Sitobion avenae).

    PubMed

    Drakulic, Jassy; Caulfield, John; Woodcock, Christine; Jones, Stephen P T; Linforth, Robert; Bruce, Toby J A; Ray, Rumiana V

    2015-05-15

    We hypothesized that interactions between fusarium head blight-causing pathogens and herbivores are likely to occur because they share wheat as a host plant. Our aim was to investigate the interactions between the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, and Fusarium graminearum on wheat ears and the role that host volatile chemicals play in mediating interactions. Wheat ears were treated with aphids and F. graminearum inoculum, together or separately, and disease progress was monitored by visual assessment and by quantification of pathogen DNA and mycotoxins. Plants exposed to both aphids and F. graminearum inoculum showed accelerated disease progression, with a 2-fold increase in disease severity and 5-fold increase in mycotoxin accumulation over those of plants treated only with F. graminearum. Furthermore, the longer the period of aphid colonization of the host prior to inoculation with F. graminearum, the greater the amount of pathogen DNA that accumulated. Headspace samples of plant volatiles were collected for use in aphid olfactometer assays and were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-coupled electroantennography. Disease-induced plant volatiles were repellent to aphids, and 2-pentadecanone was the key semiochemical underpinning the repellent effect. We measured aphid survival and fecundity on infected wheat ears and found that both were markedly reduced on infected ears. Thus, interactions between F. graminearum and grain aphids on wheat ears benefit the pathogen at the expense of the pest. Our findings have important consequences for disease epidemiology, because we show increased spread and development of host disease, together with greater disease severity and greater accumulation of pathogen DNA and mycotoxin, when aphids are present. PMID:25769834

  9. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6-enriched bio-organic fertilizer suppressed Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Ruan, Yunze; Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Jian; Waseem, Raza; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2013-04-24

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain NJN-6 is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) which can produce secondary metabolites antagonistic to several soil-borne pathogens. In this study, the ability of a bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) containing NJN-6 strain to promote the growth and suppress Fusarium wilt of banana plants was evaluated in a pot experiment. The results showed that the application of BIO significantly decreased the incidence of Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants compared to that for the organic fertilizer (OF). To determine the beneficial mechanism of the strain, the colonization of NJN-6 strain on banana roots was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The plant growth-promoting hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), along with antifungal lipopeptides iturin A, were detected when the NJN-6 strain was incubated in both Landy medium with additional l-tryptophan and in root exudates of banana plants. In addition, some antifungal volatile organic compounds and iturin A were also detected in BIO. In summary, strain NJN-6 could colonize the roots of banana plants after the application of BIO and produced active compounds which were beneficial for the growth of banana plants. PMID:23541032

  10. Novel fusarium head blight pathogens from Nepal and Louisiana revealed by multilocus genealogical concordance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to assess evolutionary relationships, species diversity, and trichothecene toxin potential of five Fusarium graminearum complex (FGSC) isolates identified as genetically novel during prior Fusarium head blight (FHB) surveys in Nepal and Louisiana. Results of a multilocus gen...

  11. Fusaric acid production and pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, Fusarium wilt of cotton has gained increased importance with the emergence of extremely virulent strains of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum. The recent discovery of new pathotypes not previously found in the U.S. is of particular concern to the cotton industry. In addition, a ...

  12. Induction of Systemic Resistance of Benzothiadiazole and Humic Acid in Soybean Plants Against Fusarium Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Mamdoh Ewis; Morsy, Kadry Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The ability of benzothiadiazole (BTH) and/or humic acid (HA) used as seed soaking to induce systemic resistance against a pathogenic strain of Fusarium oxysporum was examined in four soybean cultivars under greenhouse conditions. Alone and in combination the inducers were able to protect soybean plants against damping-off and wilt diseases compared with check treatment. These results were confirmed under field conditions in two different locations (Minia and New Valley governorates). The tested treatments significantly reduced damping-off and wilt diseases and increased growth parameters, except the number of branches per plant and also increased seed yield. Application of BTH (0.25 g/L) + HA (4 g/L) was the most potent in this respect. Soybean seed soaking in BTH + HA produced the highest activities of the testes of oxidative enzymes followed by BTH in the four soybean cultivars. HA treatment resulted in the lowest increases of these oxidative enzymes. Similar results were obtained with total phenol but HA increased total phenol more than did BTH in all tested cultivars. PMID:22783118

  13. Microsatellite markers in plant pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the genetic diversity of plant pathogenic fungi is essential in the management of crops and disease. The genetic variability of fungal pathogens can be evaluated using molecular markers, among which, microsatellites are a relatively inexpensive source of information. We have developed an e...

  14. Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides And Plant—pathogen Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M.-A. Newman; J. M. Dow; M. J. Daniels

    2001-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides are amphipathic molecules forming the outermost layer of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria. They are essential for protecting the cell from hostile environments and, in the case of pathogens, they play a direct role in interactions with eukaryotic host cells. Mutants with altered lipopolysaccharide structure have been obtained with several plant pathogenic bacteria; such mutants generally show reduced

  15. Cytotoxicity of Fusarium species mycotoxins and culture filtrates of Fusarium species isolated from the medicinal plant Tribulus terrestris to mammalian cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krishanthi Abeywickrama; G. A. Bean

    1992-01-01

    Ayurvedic medicine, which uses decoctions made of medicinal plants, is used to cure diseases in many Asian countries including Sri Lanka. Although proper storage facilities for medicinal plants are unavailable in Sri Lanka, neither the potential for growth of toxigenic fungi nor their ability to produce mycotoxins in stored medicinal plants has been investigated. We isolated three Fusarium species, F.

  16. Genomic Organization of Fungal Plant Pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent large scale genomic sequencing of fungal phytopathogens has revolutionized the study of plant pathogenesis. Initially, having whole genome sequence (WGS) data for individual fungal genomes has accelerated classical forward and reverse genetic approaches for identifying pathogenicity genes...

  17. Fusarium verticillioides dissemination among corn ears of field-grown plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consequences of the fungus, Fusarium verticillioides (Sacc.) Nirenberg (synonym F. moniliforme Sheldon) (teleomorph, Gibberella moniliformis), colonizing kernels of maize, Zea mays L., may be plant disease and/or mycotoxin production. Plant disease may reduce crop production and mycotoxins may cause...

  18. Fusarium verticillioides dissemination among corn ears of field-grown plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The consequences of Fusarium verticillioides colonization of kernels of corn, Zea mays L., may be plant disease and/or mycotoxin production. Plant disease results in reduced crop production and mycotoxins, in harmful, and often fatal, effects on humans and animals. The fungus grows as an endophyte...

  19. Fusarium verticilliodes dissemination among maize ears of field-grown plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The consequences of Fusarium verticillioides colonization of kernels of corn, Zea mays L., may be plant disease and/or mycotoxin production. Plant disease results in reduced crop production and mycotoxins cause harmful, and often fatal, effects on humans and animals. The fungus grows as an endophy...

  20. Adhesion Mechanisms of Plant-Pathogenic Xanthomonadaceae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadia Mhedbi-Hajri; Marie-Agnčs Jacques; Ralf Koebnik

    \\u000a The family Xanthomonadaceae is a wide-spread family of bacteria belonging to the gamma subdivision of the Gram-negative proteobacteria, including the\\u000a two plant-pathogenic genera Xanthomonas and Xylella, and the related genus Stenotrophomonas. Adhesion is a widely conserved virulence mechanism among Gram-negative bacteria, no matter whether they are human, animal\\u000a or plant pathogens, since attachment to the host tissue is one of

  1. MYT3, A Myb-Like Transcription Factor, Affects Fungal Development and Pathogenicity of Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hokyoung; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Lee, Yin-Won

    2014-01-01

    We previously characterized members of the Myb protein family, MYT1 and MYT2, in Fusarium graminearum. MYT1 and MYT2 are involved in female fertility and perithecium size, respectively. To expand knowledge of Myb proteins in F. graminearum, in this study, we characterized the functions of the MYT3 gene, which encodes a putative Myb-like transcription factor containing two Myb DNA-binding domains and is conserved in the subphylum Pezizomycotina of Ascomycota. MYT3 proteins were localized in nuclei during most developmental stages, suggesting the role of MYT3 as a transcriptional regulator. Deletion of MYT3 resulted in impairment of conidiation, germination, and vegetative growth compared to the wild type, whereas complementation of MYT3 restored the wild-type phenotype. Additionally, the ?myt3 strain grew poorly on nitrogen-limited media; however, the mutant grew robustly on minimal media supplemented with ammonium. Moreover, expression level of nitrate reductase gene in the ?myt3 strain was decreased in comparison to the wild type and complemented strain. On flowering wheat heads, the ?myt3 strain exhibited reduced pathogenicity, which corresponded with significant reductions in trichothecene production and transcript levels of trichothecene biosynthetic genes. When the mutant was selfed, mated as a female, or mated as a male for sexual development, perithecia were not observed on the cultures, indicating that the ?myt3 strain lost both male and female fertility. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MYT3 is required for pathogenesis and sexual development in F. graminearum, and will provide a robust foundation to establish the regulatory networks for all Myb-like proteins in F. graminearum. PMID:24722578

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Moths that Vector a Plant Pathogen also Transport

    E-print Network

    Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Moths that Vector a Plant Pathogen also Transport Endophytic Fungi Abstract Claviceps paspali, a common fungal pathogen of Paspalum grasses, attracts moth vectors asymptomatic plant tissue and may influence host susceptibility to pathogens. We quantified infections by C

  3. Insight into the molecular requirements for pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici through large-scale insertional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Michielse, Caroline B; van Wijk, Ringo; Reijnen, Linda; Cornelissen, Ben JC; Rep, Martijn

    2009-01-01

    Background Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is the causal agent of vascular wilt disease in tomato. In order to gain more insight into the molecular processes in F. oxysporum necessary for pathogenesis and to uncover the genes involved, we used Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis to generate 10,290 transformants and screened the transformants for loss or reduction of pathogenicity. Results This led to the identification of 106 pathogenicity mutants. Southern analysis revealed that the average T-DNA insertion is 1.4 and that 66% of the mutants carry a single T-DNA. Using TAIL-PCR, chromosomal T-DNA flanking regions were isolated and 111 potential pathogenicity genes were identified. Conclusions Functional categorization of the potential pathogenicity genes indicates that certain cellular processes, such as amino acid and lipid metabolism, cell wall remodeling, protein translocation and protein degradation, seem to be important for full pathogenicity of F. oxysporum. Several known pathogenicity genes were identified, such as those encoding chitin synthase V, developmental regulator FlbA and phosphomannose isomerase. In addition, complementation and gene knock-out experiments confirmed that a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, thought to be involved in cell wall integrity, a transcriptional regulator, a protein with unknown function and peroxisome biogenesis are required for full pathogenicity of F. oxysporum. PMID:19134172

  4. Evolution of a Secondary Metabolite Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Fusarium by Gene Relocation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichothecenes are secondary metabolites produced by multiple genera of fungi, including some plant pathogenic species of Fusarium. Trichothecenes contribute to virulence of Fusarium on some plants and are considered to be mycotoxins because of their human and animal toxicity. Previous analyses of...

  5. Induction of systemic resistance by Pseudomonas fluorescens in radish cultivars differing in susceptibility to fusarium wilt, using a novel bioassay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Leeman; J. A. van Pelt; F. M. den Ouden; M. Heinsbroek; P. A. H. M. Bakker; B. Schippers

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens-mediated induction of systemic resistance in radish against fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp.raphani) was studied in a newly developed bioassay using a rockwool system. In this bioassay the pathogen and bacterium were confirmed to be confined to spatially separate locations on the plant root, throughout the experiment. Pathogen inoculum obtained by mixing peat with microconidia and subsequent incubation

  6. Inoculum Densities of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum and Meloidogyne incognita in Relation to the Development of Fusarium Wilt and the Phenology of Cotton Plants (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Devay, J E; Gutierrez, A P; Pullman, G S; Wakeman, R J; Garber, R H; Jeffers, D P; Smith, S N; Goodell, P B; Roberts, P A

    1997-03-01

    ABSTRACT Development of Fusarium wilt in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) usually requires infections of plants by both Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum. In this study, the soil densities of M. incognita and F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum and the incidence of Fusarium wilt in three field sites were determined in 1982-1984. Multiple regression analysis of percent incidence of Fusarium wilt symptoms on population densities of M. incognita and F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum yielded a significant fit (R (2) = 0.64) only on F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum. Significant t-values for slope were also obtained for the interaction of M. incognita and F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, but densities of M. incognita and F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum were also related on a log(10) scale. The physiological time of appearance of first foliar symptoms of Fusarium wilt, based on a degree-days threshold of 11.9 degrees C (53.5 degrees F), was used as a basis for determining disease progress curves and the phenology of cotton plant growth and development. Effects of Fusarium wilt on plant height and boll set were determined in three successive years. Increases in both of these plant characteristics decreased or stopped before foliar symptoms were apparent. Seed cotton yields of plant cohorts that developed foliar wilt symptoms early in the season (before 2,000 F degree-days) were variable but not much different in these years. This contrasted with cohorts of plants that first showed foliar symptoms late in the season (after 2,400 F degree-days) and cohorts of plants that showed no foliar symptoms of wilt. Regression analyses for 1982-1984 indicated moderate to weak correlations (r = 0.16-0.74) of the time of appearance of the first foliar symptoms and seed cotton yields. PMID:18945178

  7. MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS OF FUNGAL PLANT PATHOGENS: GENERALISATIONS FROM FUSARIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation will focus on the importance of developing a robust phylogenetic framework for investigating species limits, evolution of virulence-associated factors such as toxins, host range, biogeography and global movement of agronomically important phytopathogens, drawing from examples of Fu...

  8. Incidence of Fusarium wilt in Cucumis sativus  L. is promoted by cinnamic acid, an autotoxin in root exudates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. F. Ye; J. Q. Yu; Y. H. Peng; J. H. Zheng; L. Y. Zou

    2004-01-01

    The effects of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum, the pathogen causing Fusarium wilt in cucumber and cinnamic acid, a principal autotoxic component in the root exudates of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), on plant growth, Photosynthesis and incidence of Fusarium wilt in cucumber were studied in order to elucidate the interaction of autotoxins and soil-borne pathogens in the soil sickness. F. oxysporum. f. sp. cucumerinum

  9. Plant—pathogen Interactions: Genetic and Comparative Analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert H. Ellingboe

    2001-01-01

    The interactions between plants and pathogens can be shifted to favor either plant of pathogen by small changes in the environment, primarily temperature and plant nutrition, and it leaves a quandary as to whether the plant on pathogen is most affected by the change in the environment. The stage of development of a plant can affect the resistance or susceptibility

  10. Candida and Fusarium species known as opportunistic human pathogens from customer-accessible parts of residential washing machines.

    PubMed

    Babi?, Monika Novak; Zalar, Polona; Ženko, Bernard; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Džeroski, Sašo; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2015-03-01

    Energy constraints have altered consumer practice regarding the use of household washing machines. Washing machines were developed that use lower washing temperatures, smaller amounts of water and biodegradable detergents. These conditions may favour the enrichment of opportunistic human pathogenic fungi. We focused on the isolation of fungi from two user-accessible parts of washing machines that often contain microbial biofilms: drawers for detergents and rubber door seals. Out of 70 residential washing machines sampled in Slovenia, 79% were positive for fungi. In total, 72 strains belonging to 12 genera and 26 species were isolated. Among these, members of the Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium solani species complexes, Candida parapsilosis and Exophiala phaeomuriformis represented 44% of fungi detected. These species are known as opportunistic human pathogens and can cause skin, nail or eye infections also in healthy humans. A machine learning analysis revealed that presence of detergents and softeners followed by washing temperature, represent most critical factors for fungal colonization. Three washing machines with persisting malodour that resulted in bad smelling laundry were analysed for the presence of fungi and bacteria. In these cases, fungi were isolated in low numbers (7.5 %), while bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Sphingomonas species prevailed. PMID:25749362

  11. [RAPD analysis of plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan-Ni; Chen, Yong-Fang; Li, Shi-Mo; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2005-12-01

    RAPD analysis was used for the taxonomy of plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria, especially for the classification of two new pathogens (Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. basellae pv. nov. and Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. beticola pv. nov.). 20 random primers were screened from 50 ones to detect polymorphism among the total strains used. 80.4% were polymorphic bands among the 225 ones produced. The results of pairwise similarity and UPGMA cluster analysis suggest that the two new pathovars of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris var. saccharifera) and malabar spinach (Basella rubra) are genetically close related with Curtobacterium flacumfaciens, and the minimal similarity coefficient is 0.6511. According to the RAPD analysis and previous research, some newly made taxonomic changes of the plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria are discussed. PMID:16496687

  12. Class V chitin synthase determines pathogenesis in the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum and mediates resistance to plant defence compounds.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Martan P; Di Pietro, Antonio; Roncero, M Isabel G

    2003-01-01

    Chitin, a beta-1,4-linked polysaccharide of N-acetylglucosamine, is a major structural component of fungal cell walls. Fungi have multiple classes of chitin synthases that catalyse N-acetylglucosamine polymerization. Here, we demonstrate the requirement for a class V chitin synthase during host infection by the vascular wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. The chsV gene was identified in an insertional mutagenesis screen for pathogenicity mutants. ChsV has a putative myosin motor and a chitin synthase domain characteristic of class V chitin synthases. The chsV insertional mutant and a gene replacement mutant of F. oxysporum display morphological abnormalities such as hyphal swellings that are indicative of alterations in cell wall structure and can be partially restored by osmotic stabilizer. The mutants are unable to infect and colonize tomato plants or to grow invasively on tomato fruit tissue. They are also hypersensitive to plant antimicrobial defence compounds such as the tomato phytoanticipin alpha-tomatine or H2O2. Reintroduction of a functional chsV copy into the mutant restored the growth phenotype of the wild-type strain. These data suggest that F. oxysporum requires a specific class V chitin synthase for pathogenesis, most probably to protect itself against plant defence mechanisms. PMID:12492869

  13. Basic insight in plant-pathogen interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Orlando Borrás-Hidalgo

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the perception, signaling and response in plant-pathogen interactions are major elements in the study of true resistance or susceptibilit y. As yet, there is no clear idea on what is really happening during certain molecular events. Nevertheless, this new insight offers us the possible answers to many questions on this topic. In this review, we

  14. Deciphering the cryptic genome: genome-wide analyses of the rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi reveal complex regulation of secondary metabolism and novel metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wiemann, Philipp; Sieber, Christian M K; von Bargen, Katharina W; Studt, Lena; Niehaus, Eva-Maria; Espino, Jose J; Huß, Kathleen; Michielse, Caroline B; Albermann, Sabine; Wagner, Dominik; Bergner, Sonja V; Connolly, Lanelle R; Fischer, Andreas; Reuter, Gunter; Kleigrewe, Karin; Bald, Till; Wingfield, Brenda D; Ophir, Ron; Freeman, Stanley; Hippler, Michael; Smith, Kristina M; Brown, Daren W; Proctor, Robert H; Münsterkötter, Martin; Freitag, Michael; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Güldener, Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi causes "bakanae" disease of rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs), but it is also known for producing harmful mycotoxins. However, the genetic capacity for the whole arsenal of natural compounds and their role in the fungus' interaction with rice remained unknown. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. fujikuroi that was assembled into 12 scaffolds corresponding to the 12 chromosomes described for the fungus. We used the genome sequence along with ChIP-seq, transcriptome, proteome, and HPLC-FTMS-based metabolome analyses to identify the potential secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and to examine their regulation in response to nitrogen availability and plant signals. The results indicate that expression of most but not all gene clusters correlate with proteome and ChIP-seq data. Comparison of the F. fujikuroi genome to those of six other fusaria revealed that only a small number of gene clusters are conserved among these species, thus providing new insights into the divergence of secondary metabolism in the genus Fusarium. Noteworthy, GA biosynthetic genes are present in some related species, but GA biosynthesis is limited to F. fujikuroi, suggesting that this provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Among the genome sequences analyzed, one cluster that includes a polyketide synthase gene (PKS19) and another that includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (NRPS31) are unique to F. fujikuroi. The metabolites derived from these clusters were identified by HPLC-FTMS-based analyses of engineered F. fujikuroi strains overexpressing cluster genes. In planta expression studies suggest a specific role for the PKS19-derived product during rice infection. Thus, our results indicate that combined comparative genomics and genome-wide experimental analyses identified novel genes and secondary metabolites that contribute to the evolutionary success of F. fujikuroi as a rice pathogen. PMID:23825955

  15. ?-Tomatine, the major saponin in tomato, induces programmed cell death mediated by reactive oxygen species in the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shin-ichi Ito; Takashi Ihara; Hideyuki Tamura; Shuhei Tanaka; Tsuyoshi Ikeda; Hiroshi Kajihara; Chandrika Dissanayake; Fatma F. Abdel-Motaal; Magdi A. El-Sayed

    2007-01-01

    The tomato saponin ?-tomatine has been proposed to kill sensitive cells by binding to cell membranes followed by leakage of cell components. However, details of the modes of action of the compound on fungal cells are poorly understood. In the present study, mechanisms involved in ?-tomatine-induced cell death of fungi were examined using a filamentous pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum. ?-Tomatine-induced

  16. Associations of planting date, drought stress, and insects with Fusarium ear rot and fumonisin B1 contamination in California maize.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M W; Munkvold, G P

    2010-05-01

    Fusarium ear rot, caused by Fusarium verticillioides, is one of the most common diseases of maize, causing yield and quality reductions and contamination of grain by fumonisins and other mycotoxins. Drought stress and various insects have been implicated as factors affecting disease severity. Field studies were conducted to evaluate the interactions and relative influences of drought stress, insect infestation, and planting date upon Fusarium ear rot severity and fumonisin B1 contamination. Three hybrids varying in partial resistance to Fusarium ear rot were sown on three planting dates and subjected to four irrigation regimes to induce differing levels of drought stress. A foliar-spray insecticide treatment was imposed to induce differing levels of insect injury. Populations of thrips (Frankliniella spp.), damage by corn earworm (Helicoverpa zeae), Fusarium ear rot symptoms, and fumonisin B1 levels were assessed. There were significant effects of hybrid, planting date, insecticide treatment, and drought stress on Fusarium ear rot symptoms and fumonisin B1 contamination, and these factors also had significant interacting effects. The most influential factors were hybrid and insecticide treatment, but their effects were influenced by planting date and drought stress. The more resistant hybrids and the insecticide-treated plots consistently had lower Fusarium ear rot severity and fumonisin B1 contamination. Later planting dates typically had higher thrips populations, more Fusarium ear rot, and higher levels of fumonisin B1. Insect activity was significantly correlated with disease severity and fumonisin contamination, and the correlations were strongest for thrips. The results of this study confirm the influence of thrips on Fusarium ear rot severity in California, USA, and also establish a strong association between thrips and fumonisin B1 levels. PMID:20127546

  17. A highly efficient Agrobacterium mediated transformation system for chickpea wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri using DsRed-Express to follow root colonisation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Nazrul; Nizam, Shadab; Verma, Praveen K

    2012-06-20

    The soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri (Foc) causes vascular wilt of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), resulting in substantial yield losses worldwide. Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation (ATMT) has served as a resourceful tool for plant-pathogen interaction studies and offers a number of advantages over conventional transformation systems. Here, we developed a highly efficient A. tumefaciens mediated transformation system for Foc. In addition, a binary vector for constitutive expression of red fluorescent protein (DsRed-Express) was used to study developmental stages and host-pathogen interactions. Southern hybridisation was performed to confirm the transformation event and the presence of T-DNA in selected hygromycin resistant transformants. Most of the transformants showed single copy integrations at random positions. Microscopic studies revealed significant levels of fluorescent protein, both in conidia and mycelia. Confocal microscopy of chickpea roots infected with the transformed Foc showed rapid colonisation. These studies will allow us to develop strategies to determine the mechanisms of Foc-chickpea interaction in greater detail and to apply functional genomics for the characterisation of involved genes at the molecular level either by insertional mutagenesis or gene knock-out. PMID:22397973

  18. The global regulator FfSge1 is required for expression of secondary metabolite gene clusters but not for pathogenicity in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Michielse, Caroline B; Studt, Lena; Janevska, Slavica; Sieber, Christian M K; Arndt, Birgit; Espino, Jose Juan; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Güldener, Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2014-08-12

    The plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is the causal agent of bakanae disease on rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins. Besides these phytohormones, F.?fujikuroi is able to produce several other secondary metabolites (SMs). Although much progress has been made in the field of secondary metabolism, the transcriptional regulation of SM biosynthesis is complex and still incompletely understood. Environmental conditions, global as well as pathway-specific regulators and chromatin remodelling have been shown to play major roles. Here, the role of FfSge1, a homologue of the morphological switch regulators Wor1 and Ryp1 in Candida albicans and Histoplasma capsulatum, respectively, is explored with emphasis on secondary metabolism. FfSge1 is not required for formation of conidia and pathogenicity but is involved in vegetative growth. Transcriptome analysis of the mutant ?ffsge1 compared with the wild type, as well as comparative chemical analysis between the wild type, ?ffsge1 and OE:FfSGE1, revealed that FfSge1 functions as a global activator of secondary metabolism in F.?fujikuroi. Double mutants of FfSGE1 and other SM regulatory genes brought insights into the hierarchical regulation of secondary metabolism. In addition, FfSge1 is also required for expression of a yet uncharacterized SM gene cluster containing a non-canonical non-ribosomal peptide synthetase. PMID:25115968

  19. Adhesion mechanisms of plant-pathogenic Xanthomonadaceae.

    PubMed

    Mhedbi-Hajri, Nadia; Jacques, Marie-Agnčs; Koebnik, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The family Xanthomonadaceae is a wide-spread family of bacteria belonging to the gamma subdivision of the Gram-negative proteobacteria, including the two plant-pathogenic genera Xanthomonas and Xylella, and the related genus Stenotrophomonas. Adhesion is a widely conserved virulence mechanism among Gram-negative bacteria, no matter whether they are human, animal or plant pathogens, since attachment to the host tissue is one of the key early steps of the bacterial infection process. Bacterial attachment to surfaces is mediated by surface structures that are anchored in the bacterial outer membrane and cover a broad group of fimbrial and non-fimbrial structures, commonly known as adhesins. In this chapter, we discuss recent findings on candidate adhesins of plant-pathogenic Xanthomonadaceae, including polysaccharidic (lipopolysaccharides, exopolysaccharides) and proteineous structures (chaperone/usher pili, type IV pili, autotransporters, two-partner-secreted and other outer membrane adhesins), their involvement in the formation of biofilms and their mode of regulation via quorum sensing. We then compare the arsenals of adhesins among different Xanthomonas strains and evaluate their mode of selection. Finally, we summarize the sparse knowledge on specific adhesin receptors in plants and the possible role of RGD motifs in binding to integrin-like plant molecules. PMID:21557058

  20. HapX-Mediated Iron Homeostasis Is Essential for Rhizosphere Competence and Virulence of the Soilborne Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    López-Berges, Manuel S.; Capilla, Javier; Turrŕ, David; Schafferer, Lukas; Matthijs, Sandra; Jöchl, Christoph; Cornelis, Pierre; Guarro, Josep; Haas, Hubertus; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Soilborne fungal pathogens cause devastating yield losses and are highly persistent and difficult to control. During the infection process, these organisms must cope with limited availability of iron. Here we show that the bZIP protein HapX functions as a key regulator of iron homeostasis and virulence in the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Deletion of hapX does not affect iron uptake but causes derepression of genes involved in iron-consuming pathways, leading to impaired growth under iron-depleted conditions. F. oxysporum strains lacking HapX are reduced in their capacity to invade and kill tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and immunodepressed mice. The virulence defect of ?hapX on tomato plants is exacerbated by coinoculation of roots with a biocontrol strain of Pseudomonas putida, but not with a siderophore-deficient mutant, indicating that HapX contributes to iron competition of F. oxysporum in the tomato rhizosphere. These results establish a conserved role for HapX-mediated iron homeostasis in fungal infection of plants and mammals. PMID:22968717

  1. Paleogene Radiation of a Plant Pathogenic Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Martin P. A.; Bloomer, Paulette; Wingfield, Michael J.; Wingfield, Brenda D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The global movement and speciation of fungal plant pathogens is important, especially because of the economic losses they cause and the ease with which they are able to spread across large areas. Understanding the biogeography and origin of these plant pathogens can provide insights regarding their dispersal and current day distribution. We tested the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin of the plant pathogenic mushroom genus Armillaria and the currently accepted premise that vicariance accounts for the extant distribution of the species. Methods The phylogeny of a selection of Armillaria species was reconstructed based on Maximum Parsimony (MP), Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian Inference (BI). A timeline was then placed on the divergence of lineages using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock approach. Results Phylogenetic analyses of sequenced data for three combined nuclear regions provided strong support for three major geographically defined clades: Holarctic, South American-Australasian and African. Molecular dating placed the initial radiation of the genus at 54 million years ago within the Early Paleogene, postdating the tectonic break-up of Gondwana. Conclusions The distribution of extant Armillaria species is the result of ancient long-distance dispersal rather than vicariance due to continental drift. As these finding are contrary to most prior vicariance hypotheses for fungi, our results highlight the important role of long-distance dispersal in the radiation of fungal pathogens from the Southern Hemisphere. PMID:22216099

  2. Plant-pathogen interactions and elevated CO2: morphological changes in favour of pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janice Ann Lake; Ruth Nicola Wade

    2009-01-01

    Crop losses caused by pests and weeds have been estimated at 42% worldwide, with plant pathogens responsible for almost $10 billion worth of damage in the USA in 1994 alone. Elevated carbon dioxide (ECO2) and associated climate change have the potential to accelerate plant pathogen evolution, which may, in turn, affect virulence. Plant- pathogen interactions under increasing CO2 concentrations have

  3. Npc1 is involved in sterol trafficking in the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ortholog of the human gene NPC1 was identified in the plant pathogenic, filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum by shared amino acid sequence, protein domain structure and cellular localization of the mature fungal protein. The Fusarium Npc1 gene shares 34% amino acid sequence identity and 51% s...

  4. Pathogens promote plant diversity through a compensatory response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Devon J. Bradley; Gregory S. Gilbert; Jennifer B. H. Martiny

    2008-01-01

    Pathogens are thought to promote diversity in plant communities by preventing competitive exclusion. Previous studies have focussed primarily on single-plant, single- pathogen interactions, yet the interactions between multiple pathogens and multiple hosts may have non-additive impacts on plant community composition. Here, we report that both a bacterial and a fungal pathogen maintained the diversity of a four-species plant community across

  5. Mycotoxigenic Fusarium species in animal feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium species are among the most studied plant pathogenic fungi, with several species causing diseases on corn, wheat, barley, and other food and feed grains. Decreased yield, as well as diminished quality and value of the grain, results in significant worldwide economic losses. Additionally, ...

  6. HISTOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight re-emerged as a devastating disease of wheat and barley in the 1990s in the midwestern U.S. Research efforts to control the disease have been hampered by limited knowledge of how the fungal head blight pathogens infect and damage head tissue and what natural defenses the plant h...

  7. Genome Sequences of Six Wheat-Infecting Fusarium Species Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Moolhuijzen, Paula M.; Manners, John M.; Wilcox, Stephen A.; Bellgard, Matthew I.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium pathogens represent a major constraint to wheat and barley production worldwide. To facilitate future comparative studies of Fusarium species that are pathogenic to wheat, the genome sequences of four Fusarium pseudograminearum isolates, a single Fusarium acuminatum isolate, and an organism from the Fusarium incarnatum-F. equiseti species complex are reported. PMID:24009115

  8. Interaction between Alternaria alternata or Fusarium equiseti and Glomus mosseae and its effects on plant growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. B. McAllister; J. M. Garcia-Garrido; I. Garcia-Romera; A. Godeas; J. A. Ocampo

    1997-01-01

    The effect of inoculation with the saprophytic fungi Alternaria alternata or Fusarium equiseti on maize (Zea mays) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization by Glomus mosseae was studied in a greenhouse trial. Plant dry weights of non-AM-inoculated maize and lettuce were unaffected by the presence\\u000a of A. alternata and F. equiseti. In contrast, A. alternata

  9. Plants, plant pathogens, and microgravity--a deadly trio.

    PubMed

    Leach, J E; Ryba-White, M; Sun, Q; Wu, C J; Hilaire, E; Gartner, C; Nedukha, O; Kordyum, E; Keck, M; Leung, H; Guikema, J A

    2001-06-01

    Plants grown in spaceflight conditions are more susceptible to colonization by plant pathogens. The underlying causes for this enhanced susceptibility are not known. Possibly the formation of structural barriers and the activation of plant defense response components are impaired in spaceflight conditions. Either condition would result from altered gene expression of the plant. Because of the tools available, past studies focused on a few physiological responses or biochemical pathways. With recent advances in genomics research, new tools, including microarray technologies, are available to examine the global impact of growth in the spacecraft on the plant's gene expression profile. In ground-based studies, we have developed cDNA subtraction libraries of rice that are enriched for genes induced during pathogen infection and the defense response. Arrays of these genes are being used to dissect plant defense response pathways in a model system involving wild-type rice plants and lesion mimic mutants. The lesion mimic mutants are ideal experimental tools because they erratically develop defense response-like lesions in the absence of pathogens. The gene expression profiles from these ground-based studies will provide the molecular basis for understanding the biochemical and physiological impacts of spaceflight on plant growth, development and disease defense responses. This, in turn, will allow the development of strategies to manage plant disease for life in the space environment. PMID:11865865

  10. Plants, plant pathogens, and microgravity--a deadly trio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J. E.; Ryba-White, M.; Sun, Q.; Wu, C. J.; Hilaire, E.; Gartner, C.; Nedukha, O.; Kordyum, E.; Keck, M.; Leung, H.; Guikema, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Plants grown in spaceflight conditions are more susceptible to colonization by plant pathogens. The underlying causes for this enhanced susceptibility are not known. Possibly the formation of structural barriers and the activation of plant defense response components are impaired in spaceflight conditions. Either condition would result from altered gene expression of the plant. Because of the tools available, past studies focused on a few physiological responses or biochemical pathways. With recent advances in genomics research, new tools, including microarray technologies, are available to examine the global impact of growth in the spacecraft on the plant's gene expression profile. In ground-based studies, we have developed cDNA subtraction libraries of rice that are enriched for genes induced during pathogen infection and the defense response. Arrays of these genes are being used to dissect plant defense response pathways in a model system involving wild-type rice plants and lesion mimic mutants. The lesion mimic mutants are ideal experimental tools because they erratically develop defense response-like lesions in the absence of pathogens. The gene expression profiles from these ground-based studies will provide the molecular basis for understanding the biochemical and physiological impacts of spaceflight on plant growth, development and disease defense responses. This, in turn, will allow the development of strategies to manage plant disease for life in the space environment.

  11. Banana infecting fungus, Fusarium musae, is also an opportunistic human pathogen: are bananas potential carriers and source of fusariosis?

    PubMed

    Triest, David; Stubbe, Dirk; De Cremer, Koen; Piérard, Denis; Detandt, Monique; Hendrickx, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    During re-identification of Fusarium strains in the BCCM™/IHEM fungal collection by multilocus sequence-analysis we observed that five strains, previously identified as Fusarium verticillioides, were Fusarium musae, a species described in 2011 from banana fruits. Four strains were isolated from blood samples or biopsies of immune-suppressed patients and one was isolated from the clinical environment, all originating from different hospitals in Belgium or France, 2001-2008. The F. musae identity of our isolates was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis using reference sequences of type material. Absence of the gene cluster necessary for fumonisin biosynthesis, characteristic to F. musae, was also the case for our isolates. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing revealed no important differences in their susceptibility compared to clinical F. verticillioides strains and terbinafine was the most effective drug. Additional clinical F. musae strains were searched by performing BLAST queries in GenBank. Eight strains were found, of which six were keratitis cases from the U.S. multistate contact lens-associated outbreak in 2005 and 2006. The two other strains were also from the U.S., causing either a skin infection or sinusitis. This report is the first to describe F. musae as causative agent of superficial and opportunistic, disseminated infections in humans. Imported bananas might act as carriers of F. musae spores and be a potential source of infection with F. musae in humans. An alternative hypothesis is that the natural distribution of F. musae is geographically a lot broader than originally suspected and F. musae is present on different plant hosts. PMID:25361833

  12. THE EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY OF NOVEL PLANT-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingrid M. Parker; Gregory S. Gilbert

    2004-01-01

    ? Abstract Novel plant-pathogen combinations,occur whenever,pathogen,or plant species are introduced to regions outside their native range. Whether a pathogen,is able to acquire a new host depends on the genetic compatibility between the two, through either preadaptation of the pathogen,or subsequent,evolutionary change. The ecological outcome of the novel interaction—for example, a spreading disease epidemic or the extinction of an incipient plant

  13. The need for culture collections to support plant pathogen diagnostic networks.

    PubMed

    Barba, Marina; Van den Bergh, Inge; Belisario, Alessandra; Beed, Fen

    2010-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic microorganisms, by virtue of their size, similarity in disease symptoms and closely related morphologies, are notoriously difficult to diagnose and detect. Diagnosis gives proof as to the causal agent of disease and is important for developing appropriate control measures. Detection shows the presence of a microorganism and is of importance for safeguarding national and international trade. Live reference collections are required to characterize the taxonomy and function of microorganisms as a prerequisite to development of tools for diagnosis and detection. Two case studies will be presented in this paper to demonstrate the importance of microorganism collections for facilitating knowledge sharing and the development of identification methods. Fusarium wilt of banana caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense and sharka disease of stone fruits caused by plum pox virus (PPV) are considered. Both diseases consist of different races/strains with different host specificities, but Fusarium wilt poses a threat to food security, while PPV poses a threat to trade due to its classification as a quarantine pest, since there is no anti-virus treatment available to control sharka disease in orchards. It is only through comprehensive collections of correctly identified and well-maintained strains representing the genetic diversity of a target organism that robust, specific, reliable and efficient diagnostic and detection tools can be developed. PMID:20457251

  14. ANALYSIS OF EXPRESSED SEQUENCE TAGS FROM GIBBERELLA ZEAE (ANAMORPH FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminearum is a broad host range pathogen that infects many crop plants, including wheat and barley, and causes head blight or rot diseases throughout the world. To better understand fungal development and pathogenicity in this important pathogen, we have now generated over 12,000 ESTs in...

  15. The xylanase inhibitor TAXI-III counteracts the necrotic activity of a Fusarium graminearum xylanase in?vitro and in durum wheat transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Faoro, Franco; Moro, Stefano; Sabbadin, Davide; Sella, Luca; Favaron, Francesco; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-08-01

    The xylanase inhibitor TAXI-III has been proven to delay Fusarium head blight (FHB) symptoms caused by Fusarium graminearum in transgenic durum wheat plants. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the capacity of the TAXI-III transgenic plants to limit FHB symptoms, we treated wheat tissues with the xylanase FGSG_03624, hitherto shown to induce cell death and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. Experiments performed on lemmas of flowering wheat spikes and wheat cell suspension cultures demonstrated that pre-incubation of xylanase FGSG_03624 with TAXI-III significantly decreased cell death. Most interestingly, a reduced cell death relative to control non-transgenic plants was also obtained by treating, with the same xylanase, lemmas of TAXI-III transgenic plants. Molecular modelling studies predicted an interaction between the TAXI-III residue H395 and residues E122 and E214 belonging to the active site of xylanase FGSG_03624. These results provide, for the first time, clear indications in?vitro and in?planta that a xylanase inhibitor can prevent the necrotic activity of a xylanase, and suggest that the reduced FHB symptoms on transgenic TAXI-III plants may be a result not only of the direct inhibition of xylanase activity secreted by the pathogen, but also of the capacity of TAXI-III to avoid host cell death. PMID:25346411

  16. Biocontrol of Plant Pathogens and Plant Growth Promotion by Bacillus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian B. McSpadden Gardener

    \\u000a Numerous Bacillus strains have been investigated for their capacities to protect plants from pathogens and stimulate plant growth. Studying\\u000a the diversity of these bacteria provides clues to the distinctiveness of beneficial strains and raises questions regarding\\u000a the scale and evolutionary forces that led to the development of biocontrol activities. Soils harbor vast spore banks of Bacillus, subsets of which germinate,

  17. New insight into a complex plant-fungal pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Balint-Kurti, Peter J; Holland, James B

    2015-02-01

    The coevolution of plants and microbes has shaped plant mechanisms that detect and repel pathogens. A newly identified plant gene confers partial resistance to a fungal pathogen not by preventing initial infection but by limiting its spread through the plant. PMID:25627898

  18. Active Oxygen Species in Plant Defense against Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mona C. Mehdy

    1993-01-01

    Plant disease resistance to pathogens such as fungi, bac- teria, and viruses often depends on whether the plant is able to recognize the pathogen early in the infection process. The recognition event leads to a rapid tissue necrosis at the site of infection, which is called the HR. The HR deprives the pathogen of nutrients and\\/or releases toxic molecules, thereby

  19. Gene-for-Gene Recognition in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian R. Crute

    1994-01-01

    Mediated through specifically matching allele pairs in the host and pathogen (at resistance and avirulence loci respectively), plants have a refined and highly discriminating capability to recognize and differentiate among genetic variants of potential pathogens. Knowledge of pathogen recognition by plants has primarily resulted from research associated with the selective breeding of crop species for disease resistance. The phenomenon is

  20. Resistance against various fungal pathogens and reniform nematode in transgenic cotton plants expressing Arabidopsis NPR1.

    PubMed

    Parkhi, Vilas; Kumar, Vinod; Campbell, LeAnne M; Bell, Alois A; Shah, Jyoti; Rathore, Keerti S

    2010-12-01

    Cotton is an economically important crop worldwide that suffers severe losses due to a wide range of fungal/bacterial pathogens and nematodes. Given its susceptibility to various pathogens, it is important to obtain a broad-spectrum resistance in cotton. Resistance to several fungal and bacterial diseases has been obtained by overexpressing the Non-expressor of Pathogenesis-Related genes-1 (NPR1) in various plant species with apparently minimal or no pleiotropic effects. We examined the efficacy of this approach in cotton by constitutive expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) NPR1 gene. The results show that NPR1-expressing lines exhibited significant resistance to Verticillium dahliae isolate TS2, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, Rhizoctonia solani, and Alternaria alternata. Interestingly, the transformants also showed significant resistance to reniform nematodes. Analysis of defense-related, biochemical and molecular responses suggest that when challenged with pathogens or certain systemic acquired resistance-inducing chemicals, the transgenic lines respond to a greater degree compared to the wild-type plants. Importantly, the basal activities of the defense-related genes and enzymes in uninduced transformants were no different than those in their non-transgenic counterparts. The results provide additional evidence supporting the role of NPR1 as an important part of the plant defense system and suggest a means to achieve broad-spectrum resistance to pathogens via genetic engineering. PMID:20151323

  1. The ATF/CREB transcription factor Atf1 is essential for full virulence, deoxynivalenol production, and stress tolerance in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen, Thuat; Kröger, Cathrin; Bönnighausen, Jakob; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Bormann, Jörg

    2013-12-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a necrotrophic plant pathogen of cereals that produces mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) in grains. The stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase FgOS-2 is a central regulator in F. graminearum and controls, among others, virulence and DON and ZEA production. Here, we characterized the ATF/CREB-activating transcription factor FgAtf1, a regulator that functions downstream of FgOS-2. We created deletion and overexpression mutants of Fgatf1, the latter being also in an FgOS-2 deletion mutant. FgAtf1 localizes to the nucleus and appears to interact with FgOS-2 under osmotic stress conditions. Deletion mutants in Fgatf1 (?Fgatf1) are more sensitive to osmotic stress and less sensitive to oxidative stress compared with the wild type. Furthermore, sexual reproduction is delayed. ?Fgatf1 strains produced higher amounts of DON under in vitro induction conditions than that of the wild type. However, during wheat infection, DON production by ?Fgatf1 is strongly reduced. The ?Fgatf1 strains displayed strongly reduced virulence to wheat and maize. Interestingly, constitutive expression of Fgatf1 in the wild type led to hypervirulence on wheat, maize, and Brachypodium distachyon. Moreover, constitutive expression of Fgatf1 in the ?FgOS-2 mutant background almost complements ?FgOS-2-phenotypes. These data suggest that FgAtf1 may be the most important transcription factor regulated by FgOS-2. PMID:23945004

  2. A Phenome-Based Functional Analysis of Transcription Factors in the Cereal Head Blight Fungus, Fusarium graminearum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hokyoung Son; Young-Su Seo; Kyunghun Min; Ae Ran Park; Jungkwan Lee; Jian-Ming Jin; Yang Lin; Peijian Cao; Sae-Yeon Hong; Eun-Kyung Kim; Seung-Ho Lee; Aram Cho; Seunghoon Lee; Myung-Gu Kim; Yongsoo Kim; Jung-Eun Kim; Jin-Cheol Kim; Gyung Ja Choi; Sung-Hwan Yun; Jae Yun Lim; Minkyun Kim; Yong-Hwan Lee; Yang-Do Choi; Yin-Won Lee

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is an important plant pathogen that causes head blight of major cereal crops. The fungus produces mycotoxins that are harmful to animal and human. In this study, a systematic analysis of 17 phenotypes of the mutants in 657 Fusarium graminearum genes encoding putative transcription factors (TFs) resulted in a database of over 11,000 phenotypes (phenome). This database provides

  3. Genomic Basis of Plant Pathogen Suppression by Biocontrol Pseudomonas Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various plant commensal bacterial species, which naturally colonize the plant rhizosphere, are able to suppress fungal, bacterial, viral and even insect plant pathogens. These biocontrol activities are elicited primarily through the production of secreted exoenzymes and secondary metabolites that ma...

  4. Field performance of maize grown from Fusarium verticillioides -inoculated seed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. E. Yates; N. W. Widstrom; C. W. Bacon; A. Glenn; D. M. Hinton; D. Sparks; A. J. Jaworski

    2005-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an important fungus occupying dual roles in the maize plant. The fungus functions as an endophyte, a fungal\\/host interaction beneficial to the growth of some plants. At other times, the fungus may function as a mycotoxin producing pathogen. The advantages and\\/or disadvantages of the endophytic relationship must be established in order to target appropriate sites for controlling

  5. Reliable detection of the fungal pathogen fusarium oxysporum f.sp. albedinis , causal agent of bayoud disease of date palm, using molecular techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanley Freeman; Marcel Maymon

    2000-01-01

    Bayoud, caused by the soilborne fungusFusarium oxysporum f.sp.albedinis (FOA), is the most serious disease of date palm. Since the disease is located in the North African countries of Morocco and\\u000a Algeria, and advancing steadily eastwards, the ultimate goal is to prevent spread of the pathogen to other date-growing areas\\u000a in the region and farther afield. Molecular diagnostic techniques have been

  6. Plant pathogenic RNAs and RNA catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Symons, R H

    1997-01-01

    The rolling circle replication of small circular plant pathogenic RNAs requires a processing step to convert multimeric intermediates to monomers which are then circularized. Eleven such RNAs are known so far, two are viroids, one is viroid-like and the remainder are satellite RNAs dependent on a helper virus for replication. The processing step is RNA-catalysed in all cases, at least in vitro. All plus forms of these RNAs self-cleave via the hammerhead structure whereas only eight of the minus RNAs self-cleave, five via the hammerhead structure and three via the hairpin structure. There are about 20 other viroids where the processing mechanism has yet to be determined but they are likely candidates for a new type of self-cleavage reaction which is predicted to be conserved in all these viroids. Hepatitis delta RNA is the only circular pathogenic RNA known to self-cleave in the animal kingdom. It is feasible that more single-stranded circular pathogenic RNAs are waiting to be discovered and these could be prospective for new types of self-cleavage reactions. PMID:9207012

  7. Comparative Genomics Yields Insights into Niche Adaptation of Plant Vascular Wilt Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Steven J.; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Kang, Seogchan; Veronese, Paola; Gold, Scott E.; Thomma, Bart P. H. J.; Chen, Zehua; Henrissat, Bernard; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Park, Jongsun; Garcia-Pedrajas, Maria D.; Barbara, Dez J.; Anchieta, Amy; de Jonge, Ronnie; Santhanam, Parthasarathy; Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Atallah, Zahi; Amyotte, Stefan G.; Paz, Zahi; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Hayes, Ryan J.; Heiman, David I.; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Engels, Reinhard; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Dobinson, Katherine F.; Ma, Li-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum infect over 200 plant species, causing billions of dollars in annual crop losses. The characteristic wilt symptoms are a result of colonization and proliferation of the pathogens in the xylem vessels, which undergo fluctuations in osmolarity. To gain insights into the mechanisms that confer the organisms' pathogenicity and enable them to proliferate in the unique ecological niche of the plant vascular system, we sequenced the genomes of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum and compared them to each other, and to the genome of Fusarium oxysporum, another fungal wilt pathogen. Our analyses identified a set of proteins that are shared among all three wilt pathogens, and present in few other fungal species. One of these is a homolog of a bacterial glucosyltransferase that synthesizes virulence-related osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria. Pathogenicity tests of the corresponding V. dahliae glucosyltransferase gene deletion mutants indicate that the gene is required for full virulence in the Australian tobacco species Nicotiana benthamiana. Compared to other fungi, the two sequenced Verticillium genomes encode more pectin-degrading enzymes and other carbohydrate-active enzymes, suggesting an extraordinary capacity to degrade plant pectin barricades. The high level of synteny between the two Verticillium assemblies highlighted four flexible genomic islands in V. dahliae that are enriched for transposable elements, and contain duplicated genes and genes that are important in signaling/transcriptional regulation and iron/lipid metabolism. Coupled with an enhanced capacity to degrade plant materials, these genomic islands may contribute to the expanded genetic diversity and virulence of V. dahliae, the primary causal agent of Verticillium wilts. Significantly, our study reveals insights into the genetic mechanisms of niche adaptation of fungal wilt pathogens, advances our understanding of the evolution and development of their pathogenesis, and sheds light on potential avenues for the development of novel disease management strategies to combat destructive wilt diseases. PMID:21829347

  8. COLONIZATION BY FUSARIUM AND ALTERNARIA SPP. OF SORGHUM GRAIN OF NEAR ISOGENIC LINES VARYING IN PLANT COLOR AND PERICARP COLOR.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colonization by Fusarium and Alternaria spp. of sorghum grain of near isogenic lines varying in plant color and pericarp color. Deanna L. Funnell and Jeffery F. Pedersen, Grain, Forage and Bioenergy Research, USDA-ARS; Departments of Plant Pathology (DLF) and Agronomy (JFP), University of Nebraska. ...

  9. Migration of Fusarium verticillioides between inoculated and non-inoculated ears of field-grown corn plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consequences of Fusarium verticillioides colonization of corn kernels may be plant disease and/or mycotoxin production. Plant disease may reduce crop production and mycotoxins may cause harmful, and often fatal, effects on humans and animals. Understanding migration patterns of F. verticillioides ...

  10. Proteins from Plant Cell Walls Inhibit Polygalacturonases Secreted by Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Albersheim, Peter; Anderson, Anne J.

    1971-01-01

    Proteins extracted from the cell walls of Red Kidney bean hypocotyls, tomato stems, and suspension-cultured sycamore cells can completely inhibit the activity of the polygalacturonases (polygalacturonide hydrolases, EC 3.2.1.15) secreted by the fungal plant pathogens Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Sclerotium rolfsii. The inhibitor of the C. lindemuthianum polygalacturonase, purified 560-fold from bean hypocotyl extracts, is 40 times as effective an inhibitor of the C. lindemuthianum polygalacturonase as of the F. oxysporum polygalacturonase, and does not demonstrably inhibit the S. rolfsii polygalacturonase. A crude hypocotyl extract that completely inhibits the three polygalacturonases does not inhibit C. lindemuthianum-secreted cellulase, xylanase, ?-galactosidase, ?-arabinofuranosidase, or ?-galacturonosidase. The purified bean hypocotyl protein combines with the C. lindemuthianum polygalacturonase to form a complex with a dissociation constant of 2 × 10-9 M or less. The physical properties of these inhibitors are similar to those of phytohemagglutinins and of the plant glycoproteins capable of agglutinating transformed animal cells. PMID:5288769

  11. Do Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Alter Plant-Pathogen Relations?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria A. Borowicz

    2001-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonize roots of terrestrial plants and have been hypothesized to reduce susceptibility or to improve the vigor of hosts challenged by root pathogens. Meta-analysis was used to test whether a broad pattern exists in which AM fungi not only enhance plant growth but fundamentally alter plant-pathogen interac- tions. Data were gathered from studies published between 1970

  12. Involvement of the salicylic acid signaling pathway in the systemic resistance induced in Arabidopsis by plant growth-promoting fungus Fusarium equiseti GF19-1.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hanae; Hossain, Md Motaher; Kubota, Mayumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF) are effective biocontrol agents for a number of soil-borne diseases and are known for their ability to trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms triggered by PGPF Fusarium equiseti GF19-1, which is known to increase pathogen resistance in plants, by using GF19-1 spores and the culture filtrate (CF) to treat the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Subsequently, the leaves were challenged with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst) bacteria. Arabidopsis plants treated with GF19-1 spores or the CF elicited ISR against the Pst pathogen, resulting in a restriction of disease severity and suppression of pathogen proliferation. Examination of ISR in various signaling mutants and transgenic plants showed that GF19-1-induced protection was observed in the jasmonate response mutant jar1 and the ethylene response mutant etr1, whereas it was blocked in Arabidopsis plants expressing the NahG transgene or demonstrating a disruption of the NPR1 gene (npr1). Analysis of systemic gene expression revealed that GF19-1 modulates the expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive PR-1, PR-2, and PR-5 genes. Moreover, transient accumulation of SA was observed in GF19-1-treated plant, whereas the level was further enhanced after Pst infection of GF19-1-pretreated plants, indicating that accumulation of SA was potentiated when Arabidopsis plants were primed for disease resistance by GF19-1. In conclusion, these findings imply that the induced protective effect conferred by F. equiseti GF19-1 against the leaf pathogen Pst requires responsiveness to an SA-dependent pathway. PMID:23728333

  13. First Report on Fusarium Wilt of Zucchini Caused by Fusarium oxysporum, in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In-Young; Kim, Ju-Hee; Lee, Wang-Hyu; Park, Ji-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt of zucchini in Jeonju, Korea, was first noticed in May 2013. Symptoms included wilting of the foliage, drying and withering of older leaves, and stunting of plants. Infected plants eventually died during growth. Based on morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analyses of the molecular markers (internal transcribed spacer rDNA and translation elongation factor 1?), the fungus was identified as Fusarium oxysporum. Pathogenicity of a representative isolate was demonstrated via artificial inoculation, and it satisfied Koch's postulates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of F. oxysporum causing wilt of zucchini in Korea.

  14. First Report on Fusarium Wilt of Zucchini Caused by Fusarium oxysporum, in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, In-Young; Kim, Ju-Hee; Lee, Wang-Hyu; Park, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Hyeon-Dong

    2015-06-01

    Fusarium wilt of zucchini in Jeonju, Korea, was first noticed in May 2013. Symptoms included wilting of the foliage, drying and withering of older leaves, and stunting of plants. Infected plants eventually died during growth. Based on morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analyses of the molecular markers (internal transcribed spacer rDNA and translation elongation factor 1?), the fungus was identified as Fusarium oxysporum. Pathogenicity of a representative isolate was demonstrated via artificial inoculation, and it satisfied Koch's postulates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of F. oxysporum causing wilt of zucchini in Korea. PMID:26190927

  15. Multiplex Detection of Plant Pathogens Using a Microsphere Immunoassay Technology

    PubMed Central

    Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Kumpoosiri, Mallika; Warin, Nuchnard; Oplatowska, Michalina; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Grant, Irene R.; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Elliott, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens are a serious problem for seed export, plant disease control and plant quarantine. Rapid and accurate screening tests are urgently required to protect and prevent plant diseases spreading worldwide. A novel multiplex detection method was developed based on microsphere immunoassays to simultaneously detect four important plant pathogens: a fruit blotch bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), chilli vein-banding mottle virus (CVbMV, potyvirus), watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, tospovirus serogroup IV) and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV, tospovirus). An antibody for each plant pathogen was linked on a fluorescence-coded magnetic microsphere set which was used to capture corresponding pathogen. The presence of pathogens was detected by R-phycoerythrin (RPE)-labeled antibodies specific to the pathogens. The assay conditions were optimized by identifying appropriate antibody pairs, blocking buffer, concentration of RPE-labeled antibodies and assay time. Once conditions were optimized, the assay was able to detect all four plant pathogens precisely and accurately with substantially higher sensitivity than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) when spiked in buffer and in healthy watermelon leaf extract. The assay time of the microsphere immunoassay (1 hour) was much shorter than that of ELISA (4 hours). This system was also shown to be capable of detecting the pathogens in naturally infected plant samples and is a major advancement in plant pathogen detection. PMID:23638044

  16. Abscisic acid in the plants-pathogen interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. V. Maksimov

    2009-01-01

    Information available concerning the role of ABA in the interaction between plants and pathogenic microorganisms allows a\\u000a conclusion that this phytohormone is required for plant defense. For the development of plant resistance, short-term increases\\u000a in the ABA level are of importance during the early stages of plant interaction with pathogens, which trigger anti-stress\\u000a programs in plants, primarily related to the

  17. Inactivation of Snt2, a BAH/PHD-containing transcription factor, impairs pathogenicity and increases autophagosome abundance in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Denisov, Youlia; Freeman, Stanley; Yarden, Oded

    2011-06-01

    The soil-borne, asexual fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis (FOM) is a causal agent of muskmelon wilt disease. The current study focused on the most virulent race of FOM-race 1,2. The tagged mutant D122, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, caused the delayed appearance of initial wilt disease symptoms, as well as a 75% reduction in pathogenicity. D122 was impaired in the gene product homologous to the Snt2-like transcription factor of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Involvement of snt2 in the early stage of FOM pathogenesis and its requirement for host colonization were confirmed by targeted disruption followed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of snt2 expression in planta. ?snt2 mutants of FOM and Neurospora crassa exhibited similar morphological abnormalities, including a reduction in conidia production and biomass accumulation, slower vegetative growth and frequent hyphal septation. In N. crassa, snt-2 is required for sexual development, as ?snt-2 mutants were unable to produce mature perithecia. Suppressive subtraction hybridization analysis of the D122 mutant versus wild-type isolate detected four genes (idi4, pdc, msf1, eEF1G) that were found previously in association with the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase pathway. Expression of the autophagy-related idi4 and pdc genes was found to be up-regulated in the ?snt2 FOM mutant. In N. crassa, disruption of snt-2 also conferred a significant over-expression of idi4. PMID:21535351

  18. Plant-Pathogen Interactions: From Genome Sequences to Genetic Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felipe Arredondo; Nathan Bruce; Marcus Chibucos; Daolong Dou; Lee Falin; Adriana Fereirra; Nik Galloway; Regina Hanlon; Rays Jiang; Shiv Kale; Konstantinos Krampis; Robert Presler; Brian Smith; Vignesh Sundararajan; Ken Tian; Trudy Torto-Alalibo; Sucheta Tripathy; Lachelle Waller; Xia Wang; Lecong Zhou

    Interconnected genetic regulatory networks govern the interactions of hosts and pathogens as a result of an ongoing co-evolutionary battle between the organisms. We are building data collections and tool sets for dissecting host-pathogen genetic networks, with a principal focus on oomycete pathogens of plants. To catalog the interacting genes we have sequenced the genomes of the oomycetes Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora

  19. RNA-Seq for Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A.; Di, Yanming; Cumbie, Jason S.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    The throughput and single-base resolution of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have contributed to a dramatic change in transcriptomic-based inquiries and resulted in many new insights into the complexities of bacterial transcriptomes. RNA-Seq could contribute to similar advances in our understanding of plant pathogenic bacteria but it is still a technology under development with limitations and unknowns that need to be considered. Here, we review some new developments for RNA-Seq and highlight recent findings for host-associated bacteria. We also discuss the technical and statistical challenges in the practical application of RNA-Seq for studying bacterial transcriptomes and describe some of the currently available solutions. PMID:24710287

  20. First report of Fusarium graminearum, F. asiaticum and F. cortaderiae as head blight pathogens of annual ryegrass in Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) cause Fusarium head blight (FHB) of small grains and several grasses, including annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), an important forage crop, but also a common weed in wheat, rice and maize agroecosystem in southern Brazil. Although i...

  1. Clonality, recombination, and hybridization in the plumbing-inhabiting human pathogen Fusarium keratoplasticum inferred from multilocus sequence typing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent work has shown that Fusarium species and genotypes most commonly associated with human infections, particularly of the cornea (mycotic keratitis), are the same as those most commonly isolated from plumbing systems. The species most dominant in plumbing biofilms is Fusarium keratoplasticum, a ...

  2. PATHOGENICITY AND IN PLANTA MYCOTOXIN ACCUMULATION AMONG MEMBERS OF THE FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM SPECIES COMPLEX ON WHEAT AND RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), or scab, is a destructive disease of small grains caused by members of the Fusarium graminearum (Fg) species complex, comprised of at least nine distinct, cryptic species. Members of this complex are known to produce mycotoxins including the trichothecenes deoxynivalenol ...

  3. Fusarium symbionts of an ambrosia beetle (Euwallacea sp.) in southern Florida are pathogens of avocado, Persea americana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium dieback, a destructive disease of avocado (Persea americana), was reported in California and Israel in 2012. It is associated with an ambrosia beetle, Euwallacea sp., and damage caused by an unnamed symbiont of the beetle in Clade 3 of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) designated p...

  4. The Venturia apple pathosystem: pathogenicity mechanisms and plant defense responses.

    PubMed

    Jha, Gopaljee; Thakur, Karnika; Thakur, Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    Venturia inaequalis is the causal agent of apple scab, a devastating disease of apple. We outline several unique features of this pathogen which are useful for molecular genetics studies intended to understand plant-pathogen interactions. The pathogenicity mechanisms of the pathogen and overview of apple defense responses, monogenic and polygenic resistance, and their utilization in scab resistance breeding programs are also reviewed. PMID:20150969

  5. The Venturia Apple Pathosystem: Pathogenicity Mechanisms and Plant Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Gopaljee; Thakur, Karnika; Thakur, Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    Venturia inaequalis is the causal agent of apple scab, a devastating disease of apple. We outline several unique features of this pathogen which are useful for molecular genetics studies intended to understand plant-pathogen interactions. The pathogenicity mechanisms of the pathogen and overview of apple defense responses, monogenic and polygenic resistance, and their utilization in scab resistance breeding programs are also reviewed. PMID:20150969

  6. Deciphering plant–pathogen interactions applying metabolomics: principles and applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Konstantinos A. Aliferis; Suha Jabaji

    2012-01-01

    The in-depth study of plant metabolic networks and their changes in response to biotic stimuli is an emerging field of metabolomics which has a great potential to provide new insights into plant physiology, plant–pathogen interactions, crop protection and breeding. In spite of the development of metabolomics in numerous applications, its application to the study of plant–pathogen interactions is still in

  7. Insights into Cross-Kingdom Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kirzinger, Morgan W.B.; Nadarasah, Geetanchaly; Stavrinides, John

    2011-01-01

    Plant and human pathogens have evolved disease factors to successfully exploit their respective hosts. Phytopathogens utilize specific determinants that help to breach reinforced cell walls and manipulate plant physiology to facilitate the disease process, while human pathogens use determinants for exploiting mammalian physiology and overcoming highly developed adaptive immune responses. Emerging research, however, has highlighted the ability of seemingly dedicated human pathogens to cause plant disease, and specialized plant pathogens to cause human disease. Such microbes represent interesting systems for studying the evolution of cross-kingdom pathogenicity, and the benefits and tradeoffs of exploiting multiple hosts with drastically different morphologies and physiologies. This review will explore cross-kingdom pathogenicity, where plants and humans are common hosts. We illustrate that while cross-kingdom pathogenicity appears to be maintained, the directionality of host association (plant to human, or human to plant) is difficult to determine. Cross-kingdom human pathogens, and their potential plant reservoirs, have important implications for the emergence of infectious diseases. PMID:24710301

  8. Emerging infectious diseases of plants: pathogen pollution, climate change

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Emerging infectious diseases of plants: pathogen pollution, climate change and agrotechnology, Boston, MA 02115, USA Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) pose threats to conservation and public health for the surveillance and control of plant EIDs. Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are caused by pathogens that: (i

  9. Cytokinins and auxins in plant-pathogen interactions – An overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula Jameson

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in plant development are frequently observed following pathogen infection. Infection by virus frequently results in stunting of growth, and the chlorosis and abscission of leaves; infection by fungi is often notable for green island formation and growth malformations; and infection by some bacteria results in the formation of galls. While the area of plant-pathogen interactions is currently receiving considerable

  10. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic approaches to understand plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graham Thurston; Sharon Regan; Chris Rampitsch; Tim Xing

    2005-01-01

    The regulation mechanisms of any plant–pathogen interaction are complex and dynamic. A proteomic approach is valuable in understanding regulatory networks because it deals with identifying new proteins in relation to their function and ultimately aims to unravel how their expression and modification is controlled. One of the major control mechanisms for protein activity in plant–pathogen interactions is protein phosphorylation. However,

  11. Coevolution of Plants and Their Pathogens in Natural Habitats

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jeremy J. Burdon (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO)â??Plant Industry; )

    2009-05-08

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Understanding of plant-pathogen coevolution in natural systems continues to develop as new theories at the population and species level are increasingly informed by studies unraveling the molecular basis of interactions between individual plants and their pathogens.

  12. Plant immunity: towards an integrated view of plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter N. Dodds; John P. Rathjen

    2010-01-01

    Plants are engaged in a continuous co-evolutionary struggle for dominance with their pathogens. The outcomes of these interactions are of particular importance to human activities, as they can have dramatic effects on agricultural systems. The recent convergence of molecular studies of plant immunity and pathogen infection strategies is revealing an integrated picture of the plant–pathogen interaction from the perspective of

  13. The plant defensin, NaD1, enters the cytoplasm of Fusarium oxysporum hyphae.

    PubMed

    van der Weerden, Nicole L; Lay, Fung T; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2008-05-23

    The plant defensin, NaD1, from the flowers of Nicotiana alata displays potent antifungal activity against a variety of agronomically important filamentous fungi including Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov). To understand the mechanism of this antifungal activity, the effect of NaD1 on Fov fungal membranes and the location of NaD1 in treated hyphae was examined using various fluorescence techniques. NaD1 permeabilized fungal plasma membranes via the formation of an aperture with an internal diameter of between 14 and 22A. NaD1 bound to the cell walls of all treated hyphae and entered several hyphae, resulting in granulation of the cytoplasm and cell death. These results suggest that the activity of antifungal plant defensins may not be restricted to the hyphal membrane and that they enter cells and affect intracellular targets. PMID:18339623

  14. The FUS3\\/KSS1Type MAP KinaseGene FPK1 Is Involved in Hyphal Growth, Conidiation and Plant Infection of Fusarium proliferatum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pei-Bao Zhao; Ai-Zhi Ren; Duo-Chuan Li

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium proliferatum is an important pathogen of maize that is responsible for ear rots, stalk rots and seeding blight worldwide. During the past decade, F. proliferatum has caused several severe epidemics of maize seedling blight in many areas of China, which led to significant losses in maize. To understand the molecular mechanisms in the fungal developmental regulation and pathogenicity, we

  15. Tomato Fusarium wilt and its chemical control strategies in a hydroponic system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weitang Song; Ligang Zhou; Chengzong Yang; Xiaodong Cao; Liqun Zhang; Xili Liu

    2004-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was cultivated in a hydroponic system with unlimited growth cultivation mode by using a deep flow technique. The identified wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum Klotz. was used to infect the plants. Seven fungicides, prochloraz, carbendazim, thiram, toclofos-methyl, hymexazol, azoxystrobin and carboxin, were tested in vitro for their inhibitory activities against the pathogen by mycelial growth inhibition with

  16. Endophytic Fusarium verticillioides â??reduces disease severity caused by Ustilago maydis on maize

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keunsub Lee; Jean J. Pan; Georgiana May

    2009-01-01

    Endophytic fungi represent diverse taxa that inhabit plant hosts without causing disease symptoms. We used endophytic isolates of Fusarium verticillioides (Sacc.) Nirenberg to understand how endophytic fungi interact with pathogens, in this case, the corn smut pathogen, Ustilago maydis DC (Corda). Endophytic F. verticillioides strains were inoculated onto maize seedlings before, simulta- neously, or after inoculation with U. maydis, and

  17. Plant–pathogen interactions and elevated CO2: morphological changes in favour of pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Janice Ann; Wade, Ruth Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Crop losses caused by pests and weeds have been estimated at 42% worldwide, with plant pathogens responsible for almost $10 billion worth of damage in the USA in 1994 alone. Elevated carbon dioxide [ECO2] and associated climate change have the potential to accelerate plant pathogen evolution, which may, in turn, affect virulence. Plant–pathogen interactions under increasing CO2 concentrations have the potential to disrupt both agricultural and natural systems severely, yet the lack of experimental data and the subsequent ability to predict future outcomes constitutes a fundamental knowledge gap. Furthermore, nothing is known about the mechanistic bases of increasing pathogen agressiveness. In the absence of information on crop species, it is shown here that plant pathogen (Erysiphe cichoracearum) aggressiveness is increased under ECO2, together with changes in the leaf epidermal characteristics of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana L. Stomatal density, guard cell length, and trichome numbers on leaves developing post-infection are increased under ECO2 in direct contrast to non-infected responses. As many plant pathogens utilize epidermal features for successful infection, these responses provide a positive feedback mechanism facilitating an enhanced susceptibility of newly developed leaves to further pathogen attack. Furthermore, a screen of resistant and susceptible ecotypes suggest inherent differences in epidermal responses to ECO2. PMID:19470658

  18. Molecular Characterization of MADS-BOX Transcription Factors and Analysis of Field Population Diversity in the Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    E-print Network

    Ortiz, Carlos S

    2013-04-10

    Fusarium verticillioides (Teleomorph Giberella moniliformis) is an ascomycete fungus responsible for ear and stalk rots of maize. Most importantly, it produces a group of mycotoxins called fumonisins upon colonization of maize kernels. Fumonisin B1...

  19. Recognition and response in plant-pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeong Mee Park; Kyung Hee Paek

    2007-01-01

    Most plants are resistant to the majority of pathogens. Susceptibility is the exception to the more common state of resistance,\\u000a i.e., being refractory to infection. However, plant pathogens cause serious economic losses by reducing crop yield and quality.\\u000a Although such organisms are relatively simple genetic entities, in plants, the mechanisms underlying the generation of disease\\u000a symptoms and resistance responses are

  20. [Effect of alcoholic extracts of wild plants on the inhibition of growth of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Fusarium moniliforme and Fusarium poae moulds].

    PubMed

    Tequida-Meneses, Martín; Cortez-Rocha, Mario; Rosas-Burgos, Ema Carina; López-Sandoval, Susana; Corrales-Maldonado, Consuelo

    2002-06-01

    Fungicidal activity of wild plants Larrea tridentata, Karwinskia humboldtiana, Ricinus communis, Eucalyptus globulus, Ambrosia ambrosioides, Nicotiana glauca, Ambrosia confertiflora, Datura discolor, Baccharis glutinosa, Proboscidea parviflora, Solanum rostratum, Jatropha cinerea, Salpianthus macrodonthus y Sarcostemma cynanchoides was evaluated against the moulds species Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Fusarium poae y Fusarium moniliforme moulds species. Alcoholic extracts 6% (w/v) were prepared using six grams of dried plant powders (leaves and stems) and alcohol (70% ethanol or 70% methanol). A spore suspension (1x10(6); ufc/ml) of each mould was prepared by adding saline solution (0.85%) and 0.1% tween 80. The extracts were mixed with Czapeck yeast agar (CYA) at 45-50 degrees C in 1:10 relation on Petri dishes. Triplicate Petri dishes of each treatment and for each mould were centrally inoculated and three Petri dishes were used without treatment as controls. The inoculated dishes and controls were incubated at 25 +/- 2 degrees C for eight days. The incubated dishes were examined each 48 h and after the colony diameter (radial growth) was measured. Two mould species were controlled by L. tridentata, B. glutinosa and P. parviflora. Extracts of L. tridentata in methanol or ethanol at 41.5-100% inhibited all six species of moulds. PMID:12828509

  1. Fot 1 insertions in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis genome provide diagnostic PCR targets for detection of the date palm pathogen.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, D; Ouinten, M; Tantaoui, A; Geiger, J P; Daboussi, M J; Langin, T

    1998-02-01

    Populations of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis, the causal agent of Bayoud disease of date palm, are derivatives of a single clonal lineage and exhibit very similar Fot 1 hybridization patterns. In order to develop a sensitive diagnostic tool for F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis detection, we isolated several DNA clones containing a copy of the transposable element Fot 1 from a genomic library of the date palm pathogen. Regions flanking the insertion sites were sequenced, and these sequences were used to design PCR primers that amplify the DNA regions at several Fot 1 insertion sites. When tested on a large sample of Fusarium isolates, including 286 F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis isolates, 17 other special forms, nonpathogenic F. oxysporum isolates from palm grove soils, and 8 other Fusarium species, the primer pair TL3-FOA28 allowed amplification of a 400-bp fragment found only in F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis. Sequence analysis showed that one of the Fot 1 copies was truncated, lacking 182 bp at its 3' terminus. The primer pair BI03-FOA1 amplified a 204-bp fragment which overlapped the Fot 1 truncated copy and its 3' site of insertion in the F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis genome and identified 95% of the isolates. The primer pairs BIO3-FOA1 and TL3-FOA28 used in PCR assays thus provide a useful diagnostic tool for F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis isolates. PMID:9464402

  2. Fot 1 Insertions in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis Genome Provide Diagnostic PCR Targets for Detection of the Date Palm Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Diana; Ouinten, Mohamed; Tantaoui, Abdelaziz; Geiger, Jean-Paul; Daboussi, Marie-Josée; Langin, Thierry

    1998-01-01

    Populations of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis, the causal agent of Bayoud disease of date palm, are derivatives of a single clonal lineage and exhibit very similar Fot 1 hybridization patterns. In order to develop a sensitive diagnostic tool for F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis detection, we isolated several DNA clones containing a copy of the transposable element Fot 1 from a genomic library of the date palm pathogen. Regions flanking the insertion sites were sequenced, and these sequences were used to design PCR primers that amplify the DNA regions at several Fot 1 insertion sites. When tested on a large sample of Fusarium isolates, including 286 F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis isolates, 17 other special forms, nonpathogenic F. oxysporum isolates from palm grove soils, and 8 other Fusarium species, the primer pair TL3-FOA28 allowed amplification of a 400-bp fragment found only in F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis. Sequence analysis showed that one of the Fot 1 copies was truncated, lacking 182 bp at its 3? terminus. The primer pair BI03-FOA1 amplified a 204-bp fragment which overlapped the Fot 1 truncated copy and its 3? site of insertion in the F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis genome and identified 95% of the isolates. The primer pairs BIO3-FOA1 and TL3-FOA28 used in PCR assays thus provide a useful diagnostic tool for F. oxysporum f. sp. albedinis isolates. PMID:9464402

  3. Fusarium proliferatum Soft Tissue Infection at the Site of a Puncture by a Plant: Recovery, Isolation, and Direct Molecular Identification ?

    PubMed Central

    Palmore, Tara N.; Shea, Yvonne R.; Childs, Richard W.; Sherry, Richard M.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    After allogeneic stem cell transplantation, a 49-year-old man developed fever and inflammation at the site of a plant puncture on a finger. A hyalohyphomycete was recovered by incubating the plant spine fragment following surgery. Amplification of the internal transcribed spacer region and 5.8S rRNA, ?-tubulin, and translation elongation factor coding genes identified Fusarium proliferatum, which was confirmed later by culture. PMID:19923491

  4. Incidence of Fusarium wilt of cotton as affected by pathogen propagule type, age and source 

    E-print Network

    McEntee, James Philip

    1989-01-01

    zones of Australia, China, the Soviet Union, the Far East, Africa, and North and South America (96). The United States, which produced an estimated 14. 7 million bales (218 kg/bale) on 4. 7 million ha in 1988 currently ranks second in cotton... production behind China, with 21 million bales harvested on 5. 5 million ha. Texas is ranked first in cotton production in the United States with an annual production of 3. 6 million bales from 2. 2 million ha (1981-1985); however, hectares planted...

  5. Incidence of Fusarium wilt of cotton as affected by pathogen propagule type, age and source

    E-print Network

    McEntee, James Philip

    1989-01-01

    zones of Australia, China, the Soviet Union, the Far East, Africa, and North and South America (96). The United States, which produced an estimated 14. 7 million bales (218 kg/bale) on 4. 7 million ha in 1988 currently ranks second in cotton... production behind China, with 21 million bales harvested on 5. 5 million ha. Texas is ranked first in cotton production in the United States with an annual production of 3. 6 million bales from 2. 2 million ha (1981-1985); however, hectares planted...

  6. Antifungal activity of nettle (Urtica dioica L.), colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), oleander (Nerium oleander L.) and konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) extracts on plants pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh, I; Peivastegan, B; Kolahi, M

    2009-01-01

    Anti-mycotic activity of the ethanol extracts from Nettle (Urtica dioica L.), Colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), Konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) and Oleander (Nerium oleander L.) floral parts were screened in vitro against four important plant pathogenic fungi viz.; Alternaria alternate, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani and Rizoctonia solani using agar dilution bioassay. Extracts showed antifungal activity against all the tested fungi. Among the plants, Nettle and Colocynth were the most effective against A. alternate and R. solani while Oleander possesses the best inhibition on F. oxysporum and F. solani. Konar was the most effective extract by reducing the growth of Rizoctonia solani than other fungi. These results showed that extracts could be considered suitable alternatives to chemical additives for the control of fungal diseases in plants. PMID:19579919

  7. Induced Release of a Plant-Defense Volatile ‘Deceptively’ Attracts Insect Vectors to Plants Infected with a Bacterial Pathogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajinder S. Mann; Jared G. Ali; Sara L. Hermann; Siddharth Tiwari; Kirsten S. Pelz-Stelinski; Hans T. Alborn; Lukasz L. Stelinski

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of plant pathogens by insect vectors is a complex biological process involving interactions between the plant, insect, and pathogen. Pathogen-induced plant responses can include changes in volatile and nonvolatile secondary metabolites as well as major plant nutrients. Experiments were conducted to understand how a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), affects host preference behavior of its psyllid (Diaphorina

  8. Early signal transduction pathways in plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo Blumwald; Gilad S Aharon; Bernard C. H. Lam

    1998-01-01

    Disease resistance depends on the ability of the plant to recognize a pathogen early in the infection process. Molecules that indicate the presence of the pathogen (elicitors) activate host receptors and these rapidly generate an internal signal that triggers early defense responses. Several transduction pathways that relay the initial recognition signal through a series of cytosolic and membrane-delimited pathways have

  9. The plant pathogen Phytophthora andina emerged via hybridization of an unknown Phytophthora species and the Irish famine pathogen, P. infestans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global movement of plant pathogens threatens natural ecosystems, food security, and commercial interests. Introduction of a plant pathogen to new geographic regions has been the primary mechanism by which new pathogens have emerged. Another documented mechanism for the emergence of plant pathoge...

  10. Single-stranded DNA Plant Pathogens in Eilat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Hohn; Thomas Hohn

    2006-01-01

    An international conference on ``Inter- and Intracellular Dynamics of ssDNA Plant Pathogens: Implications for Improving Resistance''\\u000a was sponsored by the United States-Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Deveoplment Fund (BARD) and organized in Eilat,\\u000a Israel in November 2005. The topic of this meeting was single-stranded plant pathogens, their inter- as well as intra-cellular\\u000a dynamics and their implications for improving resistance. Most

  11. The cuticle and plant defense to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mario; Coluccia, Fania; Torres, Martha; L’Haridon, Floriane; Métraux, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The cuticle provides a physical barrier against water loss and protects against irradiation, xenobiotics, and pathogens. Components of the cuticle are perceived by invading fungi and activate developmental processes during pathogenesis. In addition, cuticle alterations of various types induce a syndrome of reactions that often results in resistance to necrotrophs. This article reviews the current knowledge on the role of the cuticle in relation to the perception of pathogens and activation of defenses. PMID:24982666

  12. In vitro antifugal activity of medicinal plant extract against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 the causal agent of tomato wilt.

    PubMed

    Isaac, G S; Abu-Tahon, M A

    2014-03-01

    Medicinal plant extracts of five plants; Adhatoda vasica, Eucalyptus globulus, Lantana camara, Nerium oleander and Ocimum basilicum collected from Cairo, Egypt were evaluated against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 in vitro conditions using water and certain organic solvents. The results revealed that cold distilled water extracts of O. basilicum and E. globulus were the most effective ones for inhibiting the growth of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Butanolic and ethanolic extracts of the tested plants inhibited the pathogen growth to a higher extent than water extracts. Butanolic extract of O. basilicum completely inhibited the growth of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici at concentrations 1.5 and 2.0% (v/v). Butanolic extracts (2.0%) of tested plants had a strong inhibitory effect on hydrolytic enzymes; ?-glucosidase, pectin lyase and protease of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. This study has confirmed that the application of plant extracts, especially from O. basilicum for controlling F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is environmentally safe, cost effective and does not disturb ecological balance. Investigations are in progress to test the efficacy of O. basilicum extract under in vivo conditions. PMID:24561899

  13. Aromatic plants essential oils activity on Fusarium verticillioides Fumonisin B(1) production in corn grain.

    PubMed

    López, A G; Theumer, M G; Zygadlo, J A; Rubinstein, H R

    2004-10-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Origanum vulgare, Aloysia triphylla, Aloysia polystachya and Mentha piperita essential oils (EOs) against Fusarium verticillioides M 7075 (F. moniliforme, Sheldon) were assessed, using the semisolid agar antifungal susceptibility (SAAS) technique. O. vulgare, A. triphylla, A. polystachya and M. piperita EOs were evaluated at final concentrations of 10, 20, 40, 50, 100, 200, 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 epsilonl per litre (epsilonl/l) of culture medium. A. triphylla and O. vulgare EOs showed the highest inhibitory effects on F. verticillioides mycelial development. This inhibition was observed at 250 and 500 epsilonl/l for EOs coming from Aloysia triphylla and O. vulgare, respectively. Thus, the effects of EOs on FB(1) production were evaluated using corn grain (Zea mays) as substrate. The EOs were inserted on the 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th day of maize postinoculation with a conidia suspension of F. verticillioides. O. vulgare and A. triphylla were applied to give final concentrations of 30 ppm and 45 ppm, respectively. Different effects were observed in the toxicogenicity at the 20th day treatment. The O. vulgare EO decreased the production level of FB(1) (P < 0.01) while A. triphyla EO increased it (P < 0.001) with respect to those obtained in the inoculated maize, not EOs treated. Results obtained in the present work indicate that fumonisin production could be inhibited or stimulated by some constituents of EOs coming from aromatic plants. Further studies should be performed to identify the components of EOs with modulatory activity on the growth and fumonisins production of Fusarium verticillioides. PMID:15702272

  14. Migrate or evolve: options for plant pathogens under climate change.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2013-07-01

    Findings on climate change influence on plant pathogens are often inconsistent and context dependent. Knowledge of pathogens affecting agricultural crops and natural plant communities remains fragmented along disciplinary lines. By broadening the perspective beyond agriculture, this review integrates cross-disciplinary knowledge to show that at scales relevant to climate change, accelerated evolution and changing geographic distribution will be the main implications for pathogens. New races may evolve rapidly under elevated temperature and CO2 , as evolutionary forces act on massive pathogen populations boosted by a combination of increased fecundity and infection cycles under favourable microclimate within enlarged canopy. Changing geographic distribution will bring together diverse lineages/genotypes that do not share common ecological niche, potentially increasing pathogen diversity. However, the uncertainty of model predictions and a lack of synthesis of fragmented knowledge remain as major deficiencies in knowledge. The review contends that the failure to consider scale and human intervention through new technology are major sources of uncertainty. Recognizing that improved biophysical models alone will not reduce uncertainty, it proposes a generic framework to increase focus and outlines ways to integrate biophysical elements and technology change with human intervention scenarios to minimize uncertainty. To synthesize knowledge of pathogen biology and life history, the review borrows the concept of 'fitness' from population biology as a comprehensive measure of pathogen strengths and vulnerabilities, and explores the implications of pathogen mode of nutrition to fitness and its interactions with plants suffering chronic abiotic stress under climate change. Current and future disease management options can then be judged for their ability to impair pathogenic and saprophytic fitness. The review pinpoints improving confidence in model prediction by minimizing uncertainty, developing management strategies to reduce overall pathogen fitness, and finding new sources of data to trawl for climate signatures on pathogens as important challenges for future research. PMID:23554235

  15. Plant physiology meets phytopathology: plant primary metabolism and plant pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne Berger; Alok K. Sinha; Thomas Roitsch

    2007-01-01

    Phytopathogen infection leads to changes in second- ary metabolism based on the induction of defence programmes as well as to changes in primary metab- olism which affect growth and development of the plant. Therefore, pathogen attack causes crop yield losses even in interactions which do not end up with disease or death of the plant. While the regulation of defence

  16. Evolutionary forces in plant pathogen population: empirical prospects Shiferaw Gizaw and Kebede Muleta

    E-print Network

    Gomulkiewicz, Richard

    Evolutionary forces in plant pathogen population: empirical prospects Shiferaw University The genetic structure of pathogen population is affected by the complex interactions among the pathogen, its host plant and other variables

  17. 14-3-3 proteins in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Robatzek, Silke

    2015-05-01

    14-3-3 proteins define a eukaryotic-specific protein family with a general role in signal transduction. Primarily, 14-3-3 proteins act as phosphosensors, binding phosphorylated client proteins and modulating their functions. Since phosphorylation regulates a plethora of different physiological responses in plants, 14-3-3 proteins play roles in multiple signaling pathways, including those controlling metabolism, hormone signaling, cell division, and responses to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Increasing evidence supports a prominent role of 14-3-3 proteins in regulating plant immunity against pathogens at various levels. In this review, potential links between 14-3-3 function and the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions are discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in response to pathogen perception, interactions between 14-3-3 proteins and defense-related proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins as targets of pathogen effectors. PMID:25584723

  18. Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Joseph R. (Erial, NJ); Staskawicz, Brian J. (Castro Valley, CA); Bent, Andrew F. (Piedmont, CA); Innes, Roger W. (Bloomington, IN)

    1997-10-07

    A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described.

  19. Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

    1997-10-07

    A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

  20. A Ligand-Receptor Mechanism in Plant-Pathogen Recognition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chris Lamb (Salk Institute for Biological Studies; Plant Biology Laboratory)

    1996-12-20

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Two reports in this issue (p. 2060 and p. 2063) illustrate the molecular mechanism underlying the specificity of plant pathogens for certain plant species. In his Perspective, Lamb explains what these results teach us about signal transduction pathways in plants and how they provide a new tool for engineering crop plants.

  1. The effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on interactions between plant roots, arbuscular-mycorrhizal and pathogenic fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Rillig, M.C.; Klironomos, J.N.; Allen, M.F. [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Of all effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plants and ecosystems, the least is known about plant rhizosphere responses. Rhizosphere fungi are fed primarily by root-derived substrates, and fulfill functions such as immobilization, decomposition, pathogeneity, and improvement of plant nutrition. This study describes the effect of elevated CO{sub 2} on the interaction between the pathogen Fusarium solani and the AM fungus Glomus intraradices in the rhizosphere of Artemisia tridentata. We measured intraradical infection and extraradical growth by the two fungi under elevated and ambient CO{sub 2} concentrations. We found a strong interaction between the two fungi. Root infection by and extraradical hyphal length of solani did not differ significantly between CO{sub 2} treatments in the presence of G. intraradices. In the absence of G. intraradices, however, infection by F. solani and its extraradical hyphal length increased under elevated CO{sub 2}. Our results indicate that pathogenic fungi do respond to elevated CO{sub 2} by increased hyphal growth and root infection (potential response), but also show that mycorrhizal fungi can profit more from the new conditions and serve to suppress the pathogen.

  2. Analysis of deoxynivalenol and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside in hard red spring wheat inoculated with Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin which isproduced by plant pathogens such as Fusarium species. The formation of the "masked" mycotoxin deoxinyvalenol-3-glucoside (D3G) results from a defense mechanism the plant uses for detoxification. These two mycotoxins are important from the food safety poi...

  3. Regulation of primary plant metabolism during plant-pathogen interactions and its contribution to plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Clemencia M.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Tzin, Vered; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to microorganisms in the environment and, as a result, have evolved intricate mechanisms to recognize and defend themselves against potential pathogens. One of these responses is the downregulation of photosynthesis and other processes associated with primary metabolism that are essential for plant growth. It has been suggested that the energy saved by downregulation of primary metabolism is diverted and used for defense responses. However, several studies have shown that upregulation of primary metabolism also occurs during plant-pathogen interactions. We propose that upregulation of primary metabolism modulates signal transduction cascades that lead to plant defense responses. In support of this thought, we here compile evidence from the literature to show that upon exposure to pathogens or elicitors, plants induce several genes associated with primary metabolic pathways, such as those involved in the synthesis or degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids. In addition, genetic studies have confirmed the involvement of these metabolic pathways in plant defense responses. This review provides a new perspective highlighting the relevance of primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against pathogens with the hope to stimulate further research in this area. PMID:24575102

  4. The transmembrane protein Sho1 cooperates with the mucin Msb2 to regulate invasive growth and plant infection in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nadales, Elena; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    In the vascular wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Fmk1 is essential for plant infection. The mucin-like membrane protein Msb2 regulates a subset of Fmk1-dependent functions. Here, we examined the role of the tetraspan transmembrane protein Sho1 as an additional regulator of the Fmk1 pathway and determined its genetic interaction with Msb2. Targeted ?sho1 mutants were generated in wild-type and ?msb2 backgrounds to test possible interactions between the two genes. The mutants were examined for hyphal growth under different stress conditions, phosphorylation of the MAPK Fmk1 and an array of Fmk1-dependent virulence functions. Similar to Msb2, Sho1 was required for the activation of Fmk1 phosphorylation, as well as Fmk1-dependent gene expression and invasive growth functions, including extracellular pectinolytic activity, cellophane penetration, plant tissue colonization and virulence on tomato plants. ?sho1 mutants were hypersensitive to the cell wall-perturbing compound Calcofluor White, and this phenotype was exacerbated in the ?msb2 ?sho1 double mutant. These results highlight that Sho1 and Msb2 have partially overlapping functions upstream of the Fmk1 MAPK cascade, to promote invasive growth and plant infection, as well as cell wall integrity, in F.?oxysporum. PMID:25382187

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies on the biosynthesis of fusaric acid from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium oxysporum is a fungal pathogen that attacks many economically important plants. Uniquely pathogenic strains of F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum were inadvertently imported into the United States on live cottonseed for dairy cattle feed. These strains produce exceptionally high concentratio...

  6. Underexplored Niches in Research on Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caitilyn Allen; Andrew Bent; Amy Charkowski

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite rapid advances on certain aspects of plant pathogenic bacteria, many economically important pathosystems are largely unexplored and biologically relevant life stages of even familiar systems remain poorly understood. We know remarkably little about end-stage disease, latent infections, survival away from the host, interactions among multiple microbes in a plant, and the effects of quantitative virulence factors. While no

  7. COMMON MECHANISMS FOR PATHOGENS OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hui Cao; Regina L. Baldini; Laurence G. Rahme

    2001-01-01

    ? Abstract The vast evolutionary gulf between plants and animals—in terms of structure, composition, and many environmental factors—would seem to preclude the possibility that these organisms could act as receptive hosts to the same microorga- nism. However, some pathogens are capable of establishing themselves and thriving in members of both the plant and animal kingdoms. The identification of functionally conserved

  8. Plants, Pathogens, and People: Extending the Classroom to the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Bertram C.; Dowd, Heather; Eastburn, Darin M.; D'arcy, Cleora J.

    2005-01-01

    Plants, Pathogens, and People is a Web site promoting agricultural awareness via multimedia lectures about plant diseases and online lab activities in which students investigate phenomena. The use of the site in large-enrollment classes for 6-plus years affords a well-documented case of Web-enhanced instruction. Qualitative and quantitative data…

  9. Fungal entomopathogens with activity against plant pathogens: ecology and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual biological control, of both insect pests and plant pathogens, has been reported for the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Lecanicillium spp. However, the primary mechanisms of plant disease suppression are different for these fungi. Beauveria produces an array of bioactive metabolit...

  10. Enzyme-inhibitor interactions at the plant-pathogen interface.

    PubMed

    Misas-Villamil, Johana C; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2008-08-01

    The plant apoplast during plant-pathogen interactions is an ancient battleground that holds an intriguing range of attacking enzymes and counteracting inhibitors. Examples are pathogen xylanases and polygalacturonases that are inhibited by plant proteins like TAXI, XIP, and PGIP; and plant glucanases and proteases, which are targeted by pathogen proteins such as GIP1, EPI1, EPIC2B, and AVR2. These seven well-characterized inhibitors have different modes of action and many probably evolved from inactive enzymes themselves. Detailed studies of the structures, sequence variation, and mutated proteins uncovered molecular struggles between these enzymes and their inhibitors, resulting in positive selection for variant residues at the contact surface, where single residues determine the outcome of the interaction. PMID:18550418

  11. Proteomic dissection of plant responses to various pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Jianping; Dai, Liangying; Ma, Huasheng; Zhang, Hengmu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Fang; Yan, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    During their growth and development, plants are vulnerable to the effects of a variety of pathogens. Proteomics technology plays an important role in research studies of plant defense mechanisms by mining the expression changes of proteins in response to various biotic stresses. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in international proteomic research on plant biotic stress. It summarizes the methods commonly used in plant proteomic research to investigate biotic stress, analyze the protein responses of plants in adverse conditions, and reviews the applications of proteomics combined with transgenic technology in plant protection. PMID:25641875

  12. From agricultural, medical and veterinary points of view, the genus Fusarium represents a very important group of fungi. Fusarium species can colonize all vegetative and reproductive organs of plants, where they are capable of

    E-print Network

    will certainly reveal numerous new species which will improve the phylogenetic resolution of the GFC important group of fungi. Fusarium species can colonize all vegetative and reproductive organs of plants, where they are capable of causing devastating diseases (Fig. 1). Some species can also affect humans

  13. Emerging Plant Pathogenic Bacteria and Global Warming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman W. Schaad

    Several bacteria, previously classified as non-fluorescent, oxidase positive pseudomonads, Ralstonia, Acidovorax, and Burkholderia have emerged as serious problems worldwide. Perhaps the most destructive is R. solanacearum (RS), a soilborne pathogen with a very wide host range. RS race 3, biovar 2 infects potato and geranium during cooler weather\\u000a making it an additional threat. Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae has emerged as

  14. Genome sequence of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Salanoubat; S. Genin; F. Artiguenave; J. Gouzy; S. Mangenot; M. Arlat; A. Billault; P. Brottier; J. C. Camus; L. Cattolico; M. Chandler; N. Choisne; C. Claudel-Renard; S. Cunnac; N. Demange; C. Gaspin; M. Lavie; A. Moisan; C. Robert; W. Saurin; T. Schiex; P. Siguier; P. Thébault; M. Whalen; P. Wincker; M. Levy; J. Weissenbach; C. A. Boucher

    2002-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a devastating, soil-borne plant pathogen with a global distribution and an unusually wide host range. It is a model system for the dissection of molecular determinants governing pathogenicity. We present here the complete genome sequence and its analysis of strain GMI1000. The 5.8-megabase (Mb) genome is organized into two replicons: a 3.7-Mb chromosome and a 2.1-Mb megaplasmid.

  15. Plant-pathogen interactions: microbial pathogenesis, plant immunity and plant-pathogen crosstalk

    E-print Network

    Jones, Alexander Morgan

    2009-01-01

    oxidative stress, and signal transduction. Annu Rev Plantoxidative damage generated by NaCl and osmotic stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. Plantoxidative stress, and H2O2-metabolizing enzymes - Salicylic acid-mediated oxidative damage requires H2O2. Plant

  16. Nucleic Acid Transport in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Lartey; Vitaly Citovsky

    \\u000a Transport of nucleic acid molecules is central to many plant-pathogen interactions. Nucleic acids are transported between\\u000a cells when plant viruses move their genomes from the infected into adjacent uninfected cells through plant intercellular connections,\\u000a the plasmodesmata. DNA and RNA molecules are also transported from the host cell cytoplasm into the nucleus during many viral\\u000a infections. In addition, nuclear import of

  17. Pathogen resistance of transgenic tobacco plants producing caffeine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yun-Soo Kim; Hiroshi Sano

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid, and produced by a variety of plants such as coffee and tea. Its physiological function, however, is not completely understood, but chemical defense against pathogens and herbivores, and allelopathic effects against competing plant species have been proposed. Previously, we constructed transgenic tobacco plants, which produced caffeine up to 5?g per gram fresh weight

  18. Pathogenic amoebae in power-plant cooling lakes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Willaert, E.; Stevens, A.R.

    1981-06-01

    Cooling waters and associated algae and sediments from four northern and four southern/western electric power plants were tested for the presence of pathogenic amoebae. Unheated control waters and algae/sediments from four northern and five southern/western sites were also tested. When comparing results from the test versus control sites, a significantly higher proportion (P less than or equal to 0.05) of the samples from the test sites were positive for thermophilic amoeba, thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic Naegleria. The difference in number of samples positive for thermophilic Naegleria between heated and unheated waters, however, was attributable predominantly to the northern waters and algae/sediments. While two of four northern test sites yielded pathogenic Naegleria, seven of the eight isolates were obtained from one site. Seasonality effects relative to the isolation of the pathogen were also noted at this site. One pathogen was isolated from a southwestern test site. Pathogens were not isolated from any control sites. Some of the pathogenic isolates were analyzed serologically and classified as pathogenic Naegleria fowleri. Salinity, pH, conductivity, and bacteriological profiles did not obviously correlate with the presence or absence of pathogenic Naegleria. While thermal addition was significantly associated with the presence of thermophilic Naegleria (P less than or equal to 0.05), the data implicate other as yet undefined parameters associated with the presence of the pathogenic thermophile. Until further delineation of these parameters is effected, generalizations cannot be made concerning the effect of thermal impact on the growth of pathogenic amoeba in a particular cooling system.

  19. Gall midges (hessian flies) as plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gall midges constitute an important group of plant-parasitic insects. The Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor), the most investigated gall midge, was the first insect hypothesized to have a gene-for-gene interaction with its host plant, wheat (Triticum spp.). Recent investigations support that h...

  20. Phylogenetic signal in plant pathogen-host range Gregory S. Gilbert, and Campbell O. Webb

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Phylogenetic signal in plant pathogen-host range Gregory S. Gilbert, and Campbell O. Webb doi:10 in plant pathogen­host range Gregory S. Gilbert* and Campbell O. Webb§ *Environmental Studies Department are susceptible to a given plant pathogen is poorly understood. Experimental inoculations with fungal pathogens

  1. Profiling of small RNAs involved in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dongdong; Wang, Zhaoyun; Wang, Shune; Qiao, Lulu; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing is an important gene expression regulatory mechanism conserved in eukaryotes. Such sRNAs, first discovered in plants, are involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, sRNAs participate in many growth and developmental processes, such as embryo development, seed germination, flowering, hormone synthesis and distribution, and nutrient assimilation. However, the significance of sRNA in shaping the relationship between plants and their symbiotic microbes or pathogens has been underestimated. Recent progress in profiling sRNA, especially advances in next-generation sequencing technology, has revealed its extensive and complicated involvement in interactions between plants and viruses, bacteria, and fungi. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding sRNA in plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:25740356

  2. Fusarium graminearum Isolates from Wheat and Maize in New York Show Similar Range of Aggressiveness and Toxigenicity in Cross-Species Pathogenicity Tests.

    PubMed

    Kuhnem, Paulo R; Del Ponte, Emerson M; Dong, Yanhong; Bergstrom, Gary C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to assess whether pathogenic Fusarium graminearum isolates from wheat and maize were more aggressive on their host of origin and whether aggressiveness was influenced further by B-trichothecene chemotype. Fifteen isolates were selected from a contemporary collection of isolates surveyed in New York in 2011 to 2012 to represent diversity of host of origin and chemotype. Three pathogenicity assays were used to evaluate and compare these isolates. Fusarium head blight (FHB) severity and trichothecene production in wheat, and maize seedling blight were evaluated in greenhouse inoculation experiments, and Gibberella ear rot (GER) severity and trichothecene production were evaluated in maize ears inoculated in the field. Our results showed among F. graminearum isolates a wide variation in aggressiveness and mycotoxin production toward wheat and maize and these isolates could not be structured by their host of origin or by chemotype. Moreover, aggressiveness rank order changed according to the host/organ evaluated. This indicates that relative susceptibility at the seedling stage may not predict susceptibility of ears. Significant correlations were observed of total trichothecenes (deoxynivalenol [DON] and its acetylated derivatives) produced with FHB and GER severity on wheat and maize, respectively. One isolate did not produce DON or ADON in wheat or maize kernels, yet was aggressive on both hosts. Nine of the fifteen isolates produced small amounts of zearalenone (ZON) in maize kernels, but not in wheat kernels, and ZON level was not correlated with GER severity. F. graminearum isolates from New York showed wide variation in aggressiveness and mycotoxin production toward susceptible wheat and maize. Neither host of origin nor trichothecene chemotype appeared to structure the populations we sampled. PMID:25338173

  3. Arabidopsis defense response against Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Molina, Antonio

    2008-03-01

    The plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Fox) is the causal agent of root rot or wilt diseases in several plant species, including crops such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), banana (Musa sapientum) and asparagus (Asparagus officinalis). Colonization of plants by Fox leads to the necrosis of the infected tissues, a subsequent collapse of vascular vessels and decay of the plant. Plant resistance to Fox appears to be monogenic or oligogenic depending on the host. Perception of Fox by plants follows the concept of elicitor-induced immune response, which in turn activates several plant defense signaling pathways. Here, we review the Fox-derived elicitors identified so far and the interaction among the different signaling pathways mediating plant resistance to Fox. PMID:18289920

  4. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) on health of Linum usitatissimum L. infected by fungal pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Dugassa; H. von Alten; F. Schönbeck

    1996-01-01

    Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis on health ofLinum usitatissimum infected by fungal pathogens were investigated exemplarily. Physiological and biochemical analyses were done to explain the mechanisms underlying the AM effects. AM plants showed increased resistance against the wilt pathogen (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp.lini), the level of this effects depended on the plant cultivars which all showed the same level

  5. Rerouting of plant late endocytic trafficking toward a pathogen interface.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Tolga O; Belhaj, Khaoula; Dagdas, Yasin F; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Wu, Chih-Hang; Cano, Liliana M; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-02-01

    A number of plant pathogenic and symbiotic microbes produce specialized cellular structures that invade host cells where they remain enveloped by host-derived membranes. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and functions of host-microbe interfaces are poorly understood. Here, we show that plant late endocytic trafficking is diverted toward the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM); a host-pathogen interface that develops in plant cells invaded by Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans. A late endosome and tonoplast marker protein Rab7 GTPase RabG3c, but not a tonoplast-localized sucrose transporter, is recruited to the EHM, suggesting specific rerouting of vacuole-targeted late endosomes to a host-pathogen interface. We revealed the dynamic nature of this process by showing that, upon activation, a cell surface immune receptor traffics toward the haustorial interface. Our work provides insight into the biogenesis of the EHM and reveals dynamic processes that recruit membrane compartments and immune receptors to this host-pathogen interface. PMID:25430691

  6. Mycoses of wheat stem sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) larvae by Fusarium spp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Wenda-Piesik, Anna; Sun, Zhitan; Grey, William E; Weaver, David K; Morrill, Wendell L

    2009-04-01

    A complex of Fusarium spp., including F. pseudograminearum, F. culmorum, F. avenaceum, F. equiseti, and F. acuminatum, was isolated from field-collected larval cadavers of wheat stem sawfly at two locations for 2 yr. The Fusarium spp. isolates caused mortality in both diapausing larvae in a topical bioassay and in developing larvae feeding in infected stems in a greenhouse experiment. Larval mortality was >90% in both experiments at the highest dose. The pattern of correlation between integument discoloration, hyphal growth, and larval mortality showed that the Fusarium spp. isolates actively infect larvae and kill them, rather than colonizing larval tissue as secondary postmortem invaders. The versatility of Fusarium spp. as plant and insect pathogens enables colonization that results in disease in wheat plants and subsequent mortality of the wheat stem sawfly larvae developing within the same tissue. PMID:19389287

  7. Unraveling Plant Responses to Bacterial Pathogens through Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zimaro, Tamara; Gottig, Natalia; Garavaglia, Betiana S.; Gehring, Chris; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2011-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria cause diseases in important crops and seriously and negatively impact agricultural production. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants resist bacterial infection at the stage of the basal immune response or mount a successful specific R-dependent defense response is crucial since a better understanding of the biochemical and cellular mechanisms underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches to crops with increased biotic resistance. In recent years, proteomics has been used to gain in-depth understanding of many aspects of the host defense against pathogens and has allowed monitoring differences in abundance of proteins as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes, protein activation/inactivation, and turnover. Proteomics also offers a window to study protein trafficking and routes of communication between organelles. Here, we summarize and discuss current progress in proteomics of the basal and specific host defense responses elicited by bacterial pathogens. PMID:22131803

  8. EFFECTS OF RAINFALL ACIDIFICATION ON PLANT PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wind-blown rain, rain splash, and films of free moisture play important roles in the epidemiology of many plant diseases. The chemical nature of the aqueous microenvironment at the infection court is a potentially significant factor in the successful dissemination, establishment,...

  9. Enzymatic response of cotton plants to the pathogen, Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogen infection initiates a set of local and systemic responses in plants. These responses include local oxidative burst, which may lead to death of infected cells, and changes of cell walls composition in neighbouring tissues, and de novo synthesis of antimicrobial compounds (phytoalexins) and P...

  10. Focus on food safety: Human pathogens on plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article introduces the first Focus Issue of Phytopathology, a dedicated issue of the journal that highlights a topic of significant interest to our readership. This first Focus Issue addresses the topic of food safety and the biology of human pathogens on plants, a relatively new problem in pla...

  11. Innovative tools for detection of plant pathogenic viruses and bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María M. López; Edson Bertolini; Antonio Olmos; Paola Caruso; MaríaTeresa Gorris; Pablo Llop; Ramón Penyalver; Mariano Cambra

    2003-01-01

    Detection of harmful viruses and bacteria in plant material, vectors or natural reservoirs is essential to ensure safe and sustainable agriculture. The techniques available have evolved significantly in the last few years to achieve rapid and reliable detection of pathogens, extraction of the target from the sample being important for optimising detection. For viruses, sample preparation has been simplified by

  12. EFFECTS OF COMPOSTED MUNICIPAL SLUDGE ON SOILBORNE PLANT PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of composted municipal sludge (CMS) on soilborne plant pathogens was evaluated in three sets of experiments. Studies with soybeans over three growing seasons investigated the effect of CMS on root rot severity and yield in Phytophthora-infested soil, the effect of appl...

  13. Genome sequence of the necrotrophic plant pathogen Pythium ultimum reveals original pathogenicity mechanisms and effector repertoire

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C André Lévesque; Henk Brouwer; Liliana Cano; John P Hamilton; Carson Holt; Edgar Huitema; Sylvain Raffaele; Gregg P Robideau; Marco Thines; Joe Win; Marcelo M Zerillo; Gordon W Beakes; Jeffrey L Boore; Dana Busam; Bernard Dumas; Steve Ferriera; Susan I Fuerstenberg; Claire MM Gachon; Elodie Gaulin; Francine Govers; Laura Grenville-Briggs; Neil Horner; Jessica Hostetler; Rays HY Jiang; Justin Johnson; Theerapong Krajaejun; Haining Lin; Harold JG Meijer; Barry Moore; Paul Morris; Vipaporn Phuntmart; Daniela Puiu; Jyoti Shetty; Jason E Stajich; Sucheta Tripathy; Stephan Wawra; Pieter van West; Brett R Whitty; Pedro M Coutinho; Bernard Henrissat; Frank Martin; Paul D Thomas; Brett M Tyler; Ronald P De Vries; Sophien Kamoun; Mark Yandell; Ned Tisserat; C Robin Buell

    2010-01-01

    Background  \\u000a Pythium ultimum is a ubiquitous oomycete plant pathogen responsible for a variety of diseases on a broad range of crop and ornamental species.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  The P. ultimum genome (42.8 Mb) encodes 15,290 genes and has extensive sequence similarity and synteny with related Phytophthora species, including the potato blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Whole transcriptome sequencing revealed expression of 86% of genes,

  14. Micro-Review Roadmap for future research on plant pathogen effectors

    E-print Network

    Micro-Review Roadmap for future research on plant pathogen effectors JAMES R. ALFANO* The Center 68588-0660, USA SUMMARY Bacterial and eukaryotic plant pathogens deliver effector pro- teins into plant are known to inject many of these effectors into plant cells. More recently, oomycete pathogens have been

  15. List of New Names of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria (2008-2010)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2010 the International Society of Plant Pathology Committee on the Taxonomy of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria published the Comprehensive List of Names of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria, 1980-2007 to provide an authoritative register of names of plant pathogens. In this manuscript we up-date the list of na...

  16. The antioxidant systems vis-ŕ-vis reactive oxygen species during plant–pathogen interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura De Gara; Maria C. de Pinto; Franca Tommasi

    2003-01-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens requires the activation of complex metabolic pathways in the infected cells, aimed at recognizing pathogen presence and hindering its propagation within plant tissues. In spite of this both compatible and incompatible responses induce alterations in plant metabolism, only in the latter the plant is able to efficiently block pathogen penetration without suffering excessive damage. One of

  17. The broad host range pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 carries two pathogenicity islands harboring plant and animal virulence genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianxin He; Regina L. Baldini; Eric Déziel; Maude Saucier; Qunhao Zhang; Nicole T. Liberati; Daniel Lee; Jonathan Urbach; Howard M. Goodman; Laurence G. Rahme

    2004-01-01

    The ubiquitous bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the quintessential opportunistic pathogen. Certain isolates infect a broad range of host organisms, from plants to humans. The pathogenic promiscuity of particular variants may reflect an increased virulence gene repertoire beyond the core P. aeruginosa genome. We have identified and characterized two P. aeruginosa pathogenicity islands (PAPI-1 and PAPI-2) in the genome of PA14,

  18. The adenylyl cyclase plays a regulatory role in the morphogenetic switch from vegetative to pathogenic lifestyle of Fusarium graminearum on wheat.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Jörg; Boenisch, Marike Johanne; Brückner, Elena; Firat, Demet; Schäfer, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a nucleotide derived from adenosine triphosphate that acts as a second messenger throughout all kingdoms. Intracellular cAMP levels are synthesized by a membrane-bound protein, the adenylyl cyclase. In order to analyze the function of this gene and the importance of cAMP in the life cycle of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum, the adenylyl cyclase gene (FGSG_01234) was deleted by gene replacement (?Fgac1). The ?Fgac1 mutant displayed a drastically reduced growth on agar medium which could be rescued by a cAMP analogon. Furthermore, the ?Fgac1 mutant was unable to produce perithecia on detached wheat nodes. However, artificial conditions like carrot agar allowed perithecia development. Pathogenicity towards wheat was drastically reduced in ?Fgac1 compared to the wild type. Point-inoculated spikelets showed only small lesions but no typical head blight disease symptoms. Fluorescence microscopy using dsRed-expressing strains revealed that the ?Fgac1 strain was unable to develop any complex infection structures like lobate appressoria and infection cushions. Instead, hyphal anastomosis occurs frequently. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the lack of fungal penetration. Hence, the formation of compound appressoria seems to be essential for infection of wheat. Hyphae on flower leaves produced huge amounts of new conidia, thereby circumventing the infection cycle. This abundant sporulation on wheat epidermis was not observed in wild type. Intriguingly, the Fgac1 deletion mutant was able to infect maize cobs as wild type, indicating that cAMP signaling is not important for maize infection. The ?Fgac1 mutant was unable to produce the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol both in vitro and during wheat infection. In this study, we show that cAMP signaling controls important cellular processes such as development of infection structures, pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production and sexual reproduction. For the first time, we show that cAMP regulates the switch from vegetative to pathogenic lifestyle of F. graminearum on wheat. PMID:24603887

  19. The Adenylyl Cyclase Plays a Regulatory Role in the Morphogenetic Switch from Vegetative to Pathogenic Lifestyle of Fusarium graminearum on Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Bormann, Jörg; Boenisch, Marike Johanne; Brückner, Elena; Firat, Demet; Schäfer, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic 3?,5?-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a nucleotide derived from adenosine triphosphate that acts as a second messenger throughout all kingdoms. Intracellular cAMP levels are synthesized by a membrane-bound protein, the adenylyl cyclase. In order to analyze the function of this gene and the importance of cAMP in the life cycle of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum, the adenylyl cyclase gene (FGSG_01234) was deleted by gene replacement (?Fgac1). The ?Fgac1 mutant displayed a drastically reduced growth on agar medium which could be rescued by a cAMP analogon. Furthermore, the ?Fgac1 mutant was unable to produce perithecia on detached wheat nodes. However, artificial conditions like carrot agar allowed perithecia development. Pathogenicity towards wheat was drastically reduced in ?Fgac1 compared to the wild type. Point-inoculated spikelets showed only small lesions but no typical head blight disease symptoms. Fluorescence microscopy using dsRed-expressing strains revealed that the ?Fgac1 strain was unable to develop any complex infection structures like lobate appressoria and infection cushions. Instead, hyphal anastomosis occurs frequently. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the lack of fungal penetration. Hence, the formation of compound appressoria seems to be essential for infection of wheat. Hyphae on flower leaves produced huge amounts of new conidia, thereby circumventing the infection cycle. This abundant sporulation on wheat epidermis was not observed in wild type. Intriguingly, the Fgac1 deletion mutant was able to infect maize cobs as wild type, indicating that cAMP signaling is not important for maize infection. The ?Fgac1 mutant was unable to produce the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol both in vitro and during wheat infection. In this study, we show that cAMP signaling controls important cellular processes such as development of infection structures, pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production and sexual reproduction. For the first time, we show that cAMP regulates the switch from vegetative to pathogenic lifestyle of F. graminearum on wheat. PMID:24603887

  20. Antifungal activity of essential oils from basil (Ocimum basilicum Linn.) and sweet fennel (Ocimum gratissimum Linn.): Alternative strategies to control pathogenic fungi in organic rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Apinya Piyo; Pitipong Thobunluepop

    This in vitro study was aimed to evaluate the mycelium growth and spore germination inhibition properties of Thai medicinal essential oils. The oil from two species of Thai medicinal plant; Basil (Ocimum basilicum Linn) and Sweet Fennel (Ocimum gratissimum linn.), were applied against 7 species of rice pathogenic fungi; Alternaria brassicicola, Aspergillus flavus, Bipolaris oryzae, Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium proliferatum, Pyricularia

  1. Pathogenicity of and plant immunity to soft rot pectobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Pär R.; Kariola, Tarja; Niemi, Outi; Palva, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Soft rot pectobacteria are broad host range enterobacterial pathogens that cause disease on a variety of plant species including the major crop potato. Pectobacteria are aggressive necrotrophs that harbor a large arsenal of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes as their primary virulence determinants. These enzymes together with additional virulence factors are employed to macerate the host tissue and promote host cell death to provide nutrients for the pathogens. In contrast to (hemi)biotrophs such as Pseudomonas, type III secretion systems (T3SS) and T3 effectors do not appear central to pathogenesis of pectobacteria. Indeed, recent genomic analysis of several Pectobacterium species including the emerging pathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae has shown that many strains lack the entire T3SS as well as the T3 effectors. Instead, this analysis has indicated the presence of novel virulence determinants. Resistance to broad host range pectobacteria is complex and does not appear to involve single resistance genes. Instead, activation of plant innate immunity systems including both SA (salicylic acid) and JA (jasmonic acid)/ET (ethylene)-mediated defenses appears to play a central role in attenuation of Pectobacterium virulence. These defenses are triggered by detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or recognition of modified-self such as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in enhancement of basal immunity (PAMP/DAMP-triggered immunity or pattern-triggered immunity, PTI). In particular plant cell wall fragments released by the action of the degradative enzymes secreted by pectobacteria are major players in enhanced immunity toward these pathogens. Most notably bacterial pectin-degrading enzymes release oligogalacturonide (OG) fragments recognized as DAMPs activating innate immune responses. Recent progress in understanding OG recognition and signaling allows novel genetic screens for OG-insensitive mutants and will provide new insights into plant defense strategies against necrotrophs such as pectobacteria. PMID:23781227

  2. Plant disease epidemics resulting from introduction of exotic fungal pathogens are a well-known phenom-

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Plant disease epidemics resulting from introduction of exotic fungal pathogens are a well-known phenom- enon. Limited resistance in the host and excessive aggres- siveness in the pathogen (reflecting present a window of evolutionary op- portunity for the pathogen. In its endemic location, a plant pathogen

  3. Identification of Ina proteins from Fusarium acuminatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Freezing of water above -36° C is based on ice nucleation activity (INA) mediated by ice nucleators (IN) which can be of various origins. Beside mineral IN, biological particles are a potentially important source of atmospheric IN. The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is induced by a surface protein on the outer cell membrane, which is fully characterized. In contrast, much less is known about the nature of fungal IN. The fungal genus Fusarium is widely spread throughout the earth. It belongs to the Ascomycota and is one of the most severe fungal pathogens. It can affect a variety of organisms from plants to animals including humans. INA of Fusarium was already described about 30 years ago and INA of Fusarium as well as other fungal genera is assumed to be mediated by proteins or at least to contain a proteinaceous compound. Although many efforts were made the precise INA machinery of Fusarium and other fungal species including the proteins and their corresponding genes remain unidentified. In this study preparations from living fungal samples of F. acuminatum were fractionated by liquid chromatography and IN active fractions were identified by freezing assays. SDS-page and de novo sequencing by mass spectrometry were used to identify the primary structure of the protein. Preliminary results show that the INA protein of F. acuminatum is contained in the early size exclusion chromatography fractions indicating a high molecular size. Moreover we could identify a single protein band from IN active fractions at 130-145 kDa corresponding to sizes of IN proteins from bacterial species. To our knowledge this is for the first time an isolation of a single protein from in vivo samples, which can be assigned as IN active from Fusarium.

  4. Effects of the Fusarium verticillioides mycotoxin, fumonisin B1, on maize stomatal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium verticillioides is a non-obligate plant pathogen causing a number of maize diseases and is responsible for the production of fumonisin B1 (FB1), a potential human carcinogen and agent of fatal farm animal diseases. The effect of FB1 on the health and development of maize seedlings was recen...

  5. BREEDING FOR FUSARIUM WILT RACE 4 RESISTANCE IN COTTON UNDER FIELD AND GREENHOUSE CONDITIONS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV) Atk. Sny & Hans represents a continuing threat to cotton production in the U.S. that warrants attention in plant breeding efforts. Several troubling developments concerning this pathogen (e.g., newly-recognized Australian FOV races and race 4 FOV identific...

  6. Development of a new MLST scheme for differentiation of Fusarium solani Species Complex (FSSC) isolates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Debourgogne; Cécile Gueidan; Christophe Hennequin; Nelly Contet-Audonneau; Sybren de Hoog; Marie Machouart

    2010-01-01

    Fungi belonging to the Fusarium solani Species Complex (FSSC) are well known plant pathogens. In addition to being the causative agent of some superficial infections, FSSC has recently emerged as a group of common opportunistic moulds, mainly in patients with haematological malignancies. Molecular typing methods are essential in order to better understand the epidemiology of such opportunistic agents with the

  7. Innovative tools for detection of plant pathogenic viruses and bacteria.

    PubMed

    López, María M; Bertolini, Edson; Olmos, Antonio; Caruso, Paola; Gorris, María Teresa; Llop, Pablo; Penyalver, Ramón; Cambra, Mariano

    2003-12-01

    Detection of harmful viruses and bacteria in plant material, vectors or natural reservoirs is essential to ensure safe and sustainable agriculture. The techniques available have evolved significantly in the last few years to achieve rapid and reliable detection of pathogens, extraction of the target from the sample being important for optimising detection. For viruses, sample preparation has been simplified by imprinting or squashing plant material or insect vectors onto membranes. To improve the sensitivity of techniques for bacterial detection, a prior enrichment step in liquid or solid medium is advised. Serological and molecular techniques are currently the most appropriate when high numbers of samples need to be analysed. Specific monoclonal and/or recombinant antibodies are available for many plant pathogens and have contributed to the specificity of serological detection. Molecular detection can be optimised through the automatic purification of nucleic acids from pathogens by columns or robotics. New variants of PCR, such as simple or multiplex nested PCR in a single closed tube, co-operative-PCR and real-time monitoring of amplicons or quantitative PCR, allow high sensitivity in the detection of one or several pathogens in a single assay. The latest development in the analysis of nucleic acids is micro-array technology, but it requires generic DNA/RNA extraction and pre-amplification methods to increase detection sensitivity. The advances in research that will result from the sequencing of many plant pathogen genomes, especially now in the era of proteomics, represent a new source of information for the future development of sensitive and specific detection techniques for these microorganisms. PMID:13680391

  8. SCREENING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF STREPTOMYCES ISOLATES FOR BIOCONTROL OF RHIZOCTONIA SOLANI AND OTHER PLANT PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani, a ubiquitous soilborne fungal plant pathogen, is responsible for economic losses of agricultural, forestry, horticultural and ornamental crops worldwide. Soil actinomycetes are known to enhance fertility and possess antimicrobial properties against various plant pathogens. One hu...

  9. Clonality, recombination, and hybridization in the plumbing-inhabiting human pathogen Fusarium keratoplasticum inferred from multilocus sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent work has shown that Fusarium species and genotypes most commonly associated with human infections, particularly of the cornea (mycotic keratitis), are the same as those most commonly isolated from plumbing systems. The species most dominant in plumbing biofilms is Fusarium keratoplasticum, a cosmopolitan fungus known almost exclusively from animal infections and biofilms. To better understand its diversity and population dynamics, we developed and utilized a nine-locus sequence-based typing system to make inferences about clonality, recombination, population structure, species boundaries and hybridization. Results High levels of genetic diversity and evidence for recombination and clonality were detected among 75 clinical and 156 environmental isolates of Fusarium keratoplasticum. The multilocus sequence typing system (MLST) resolved 111 unique nine-locus sequence types (STs). The single locus bifactorial determinants of mating compatibility (mating types MAT1-1 and MAT1-2), were found in a ratio of 70:30. All but one of the 49 isolates of the most common ST (FSSC 2d-2) came from human infections, mostly of the cornea, and from biofilms associated with contact lenses and plumbing surfaces. Significant levels of phylogenetic incongruence were found among loci. Putative clonal relationships among genotypes were estimated, showing a mixture of large clonal complexes and unrelated singletons. Discordance between the nuclear ribosomal rRNA and other gene genealogies is consistent with introgression of ribosomal RNA alleles of phylogenetic species FSSC 9 into F. keratoplasticum. No significant population subdivision based on clinical versus non-clinical sources was found. Conclusions Incongruent phylogenetic trees and the presence of both mating types within otherwise identical STs were observed, providing evidence for sexuality in F. keratoplasticum. Cryptic speciation suggested in a published three-locus MLST system was not supported with the addition of new loci, but evidence of introgression of ribosomal RNA genes from another strongly supported phylogenetic species (FSSC 9), also known from plumbing systems and human infections, was detected in two isolates. Overall, F. keratoplasticum is a diverse and geographically unstructured species with a mixed clonal and recombinant life history. PMID:24766947

  10. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for the production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly cellulolytic and is a major industrial microbial source for commercial cellulases, xylanases and other cell wall degrading enzymes. However, enzyme-prospecting research continues to identify opportunities to enhance the activity of T. reesei enzyme preparations by supplementing with enzymatic diversity from other microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic potential of a broad range of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi for their ability to degrade plant biomass and isolated polysaccharides. Results Large-scale screening identified a range of hydrolytic activities among 348 unique isolates representing 156 species of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify groups of species with similar hydrolytic profiles. Among moderately and highly active species, plant pathogenic species were found to be more active than non-pathogens on six of eight substrates tested, with no significant difference seen on the other two substrates. Among the pathogenic fungi, greater hydrolysis was seen when they were tested on biomass and hemicellulose derived from their host plants (commelinoid monocot or dicot). Although T. reesei has a hydrolytic profile that is highly active on cellulose and pretreated biomass, it was less active than some natural isolates of fungi when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. Conclusions Several highly active isolates of plant pathogenic fungi were identified, particularly when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. There were statistically significant preferences for biomass type reflecting the monocot or dicot host preference of the pathogen tested. These highly active fungi are promising targets for identification and characterization of novel cell wall degrading enzymes for industrial applications. PMID:21324176

  11. Fusarium species from the cassava root rot complex in west Africa.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Ranajit; Mwangi, Maina; Aigbe, Sylvester O; Leslie, John F

    2006-06-01

    ABSTRACT Fusarium species are a significant component of the set of fungi associated with cassava root rot. Yield losses due to root rot average 0.5 to 1 ton/ha but losses >3 ton/ha, an equivalent of 15 to 20% yield, often occur. This paper reviews previous work on cassava root rot and summarizes a few recent studies on Fusarium species associated with the disease. Our studies in Cameroon showed that 30% of rotted tubers were infected by Fusarium spp. 12 months after planting and represented 25% of all the fungal isolates recovered. Other commonly recovered fungi were Botryodiplodia theobromae and Armillaria spp. Numerous and diverse species of Fusarium were associated with rotted cassava roots in Nigeria and Cameroon. At least 13 distinct amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) groups of Fusarium were distinguishable, each group probably a distinct species, and many of them might represent previously undescribed Fusarium species. The two largest of the AFLP groups correspond to F. oxysporum and F. solani species complex. The distribution of Fusarium spp. varied among countries and among locations within a country, suggesting that germ plasm resistant at one location may not be resistant at another. Fusarium spp. also cause seedling blight of cassava and can be recovered from the stems of infected plants up to 1 m above the ground. Therefore, the pathogen can spread with stems cut as planting material. Fusarium spp. also can colonize Chromolaena odorata, the dominant weed in short fallows, which could further complicate management efforts by serving as an alternative host for strains that colonize cassava. PMID:18943189

  12. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a Cutinase from the Fungal Plant Pathogen Monilinia fructicola (Wint.) Honey

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Affinity Purification and Characterization of a Cutinase from the Fungal Plant Pathogen Monilinia from other fungi, particularly the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Our study illustrates the potential shown to facilitate penetration of the cuticle by certain plant pathogenic fungi during the initial

  13. Indirect effects of one plant pathogen on the transmission of a second mediated by vector behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogens can influence the behavior and performance of insect herbivore vectors. Studies of these associations typically focus on tripartite interactions between a plant host, a plant pathogen, and its insect vector. However, an unrelated herbivore or pathogen also could influence host-pathog...

  14. Human pathogens on plants: designing a multidisciplinary strategy for research.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jacqueline; Leach, Jan E; Eversole, Kellye; Tauxe, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Recent efforts to address concerns about microbial contamination of food plants and resulting foodborne illness have prompted new collaboration and interactions between the scientific communities of plant pathology and food safety. This article provides perspectives from scientists of both disciplines and presents selected research results and concepts that highlight existing and possible future synergisms for audiences of both disciplines. Plant pathology is a complex discipline that encompasses studies of the dissemination, colonization, and infection of plants by microbes such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and oomycetes. Plant pathologists study plant diseases as well as host plant defense responses and disease management strategies with the goal of minimizing disease occurrences and impacts. Repeated outbreaks of human illness attributed to the contamination of fresh produce, nuts and seeds, and other plant-derived foods by human enteric pathogens such as Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. have led some plant pathologists to broaden the application of their science in the past two decades, to address problems of human pathogens on plants (HPOPs). Food microbiology, which began with the study of microbes that spoil foods and those that are critical to produce food, now also focuses study on how foods become contaminated with pathogens and how this can be controlled or prevented. Thus, at the same time, public health researchers and food microbiologists have become more concerned about plant-microbe interactions before and after harvest. New collaborations are forming between members of the plant pathology and food safety communities, leading to enhanced research capacity and greater understanding of the issues for which research is needed. The two communities use somewhat different vocabularies and conceptual models. For example, traditional plant pathology concepts such as the disease triangle and the disease cycle can help to define cross-over issues that pertain also to HPOP research, and can suggest logical strategies for minimizing the risk of microbial contamination. Continued interactions and communication among these two disciplinary communities is essential and can be achieved by the creation of an interdisciplinary research coordination network. We hope that this article, an introduction to the multidisciplinary HPOP arena, will be useful to researchers in many related fields. PMID:23406434

  15. Greasy tactics in the plant-pathogen molecular arms race.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Patrick C; Martin, Gregory B

    2015-03-01

    The modification of proteins by the attachment of fatty acids is a targeting tactic involved in mechanisms of both plant immunity and bacterial pathogenesis. The plant plasma membrane (PM) is a key battleground in the war against disease-causing microbes. This membrane is armed with an array of sensor proteins that function as a surveillance system to detect invading pathogens. Several of these sensor proteins are directed to the plasma membrane through the covalent addition of fatty acids, a process termed fatty acylation. Phytopathogens secrete effector proteins into the plant cell to subvert these surveillance mechanisms, rendering the host susceptible to infection. The targeting of effectors to specific locales within plant cells, particularly the internal face of the host PM, is critical for their virulence function. Several bacterial effectors hijack the host fatty acylation machinery to be modified and directed to this contested locale. To find and fight these fatty acylated effectors the plant leverages lipid-modified intracellular sensors. This review provides examples featuring how fatty acylation is a battle tactic used by both combatants in the molecular arms race between plants and pathogens. Also highlighted is the exploitation of a specific form of host-mediated fatty acid modification, which appears to be exclusively employed by phytopathogenic effector proteins. PMID:25725095

  16. Antifungal activity of alkyl gallates against plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinsaku; Nakagawa, Yasutaka; Yazawa, Satoru; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2014-04-01

    The antifungal activity of alkyl gallates against plant pathogenic fungi was evaluated. All of the fungi tested in this study were susceptible to some alkyl gallates, and the effect of linear alkyl gallates against plant pathogenic fungi was similar to the previously reported effects against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. We found that branched alkyl gallates showed stronger activity than did linear alkyl gallates with similar logP values. In addition, the antifungal activity of alkyl gallates was correlated with gallate-induced inhibition of the activity of mitochondrial complex II. The antifungal activity of alkyl gallates likely originates, at least in part, from their ability to inhibit the membrane respiratory chain. PMID:24618299

  17. Effects of alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinsaku; Yazawa, Satoru; Nakagawa, Yasutaka; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2015-04-15

    Alkyl parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in cosmetics, food, and pharmaceutical products. However, the mode of action of these chemicals has not been assessed thoroughly. In this study, we determined the effects of alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi. All the fungi tested, were susceptible to parabens. The effect of linear alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi was related to the length of the alkyl chain. In addition, the antifungal activity was correlated with the paraben-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. The antifungal activity of linear alkyl parabens likely originates, at least in part, from their ability to inhibit the membrane respiratory chain, especially mitochondrial complex II. Additionally, we determined that some alkyl parabens inhibit Alternaria brassicicola infection of cabbage. PMID:25791450

  18. The Top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Sophien; Furzer, Oliver; Jones, Jonathan D G; Judelson, Howard S; Ali, Gul Shad; Dalio, Ronaldo J D; Roy, Sanjoy Guha; Schena, Leonardo; Zambounis, Antonios; Panabičres, Franck; Cahill, David; Ruocco, Michelina; Figueiredo, Andreia; Chen, Xiao-Ren; Hulvey, Jon; Stam, Remco; Lamour, Kurt; Gijzen, Mark; Tyler, Brett M; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Tomé, Daniel F A; Tör, Mahmut; Van Den Ackerveken, Guido; McDowell, John; Daayf, Fouad; Fry, William E; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele; Meijer, Harold J G; Petre, Benjamin; Ristaino, Jean; Yoshida, Kentaro; Birch, Paul R J; Govers, Francine

    2015-05-01

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens which threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant-pathogenic oomycete species based on scientific and economic importance. In total, we received 263 votes from 62 scientists in 15 countries for a total of 33 species. The Top 10 species and their ranking are: (1) Phytophthora infestans; (2, tied) Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis; (2, tied) Phytophthora ramorum; (4) Phytophthora sojae; (5) Phytophthora capsici; (6) Plasmopara viticola; (7) Phytophthora cinnamomi; (8, tied) Phytophthora parasitica; (8, tied) Pythium ultimum; and (10) Albugo candida. This article provides an introduction to these 10 taxa and a snapshot of current research. We hope that the list will serve as a benchmark for future trends in oomycete research. PMID:25178392

  19. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Alexander Rolfe; Julie Diane Scholes

    2010-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging provides a noninvasive, non-destructive method with which to measure heterogenous changes\\u000a in photosynthetic metabolism in plants infected by pathogens. The availability of commercial imaging fluorimeters has helped\\u000a make this technique available to the wider scientific community, but considerable care is needed, both in experimental design\\u000a and in the interpretation of results, to make the most of this

  20. Transcriptomic approaches to unravel plant–pathogen interactions in legumes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carine Ameline-Torregrosa; Bernard Dumas; Franziska Krajinski; Marie-Thérčse Esquerre-Tugaye; Christophe Jacquet

    2006-01-01

    Summary  The use of in silico and in vivo transcriptomic tools have revolutionized the way biological processes are studied. These technologies provide a global approach\\u000a that is well suited for the analysis of plant–pathogen interactions, in which complex gene networks are regulated. Most of\\u000a the available studies involving gene arrays were reported in\\u000a Arabidopsis thaliana, but recent evidence showed that the

  1. Candidate genes associated with QTL controlling resistance to fusarium root rot in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium root rot (FRR) of pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a serious pathogen in the USA and Europe and genetic resistance offers an effective and economical control for this pathogen. Fusarium root rot is caused by the fungus pathogen (Haematonectria haematococca (Berk. & Broome) (Anamorph): Fusarium sol...

  2. Development of a novel multiplex DNA microarray for Fusarium graminearum and analysis of azole fungicide responses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rayko Becher; Fabian Weihmann; Holger B Deising; Stefan GR Wirsel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The toxigenic fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum compromises wheat production worldwide. Azole fungicides play a prominent role in controlling this pathogen. Sequencing of its genome stimulated the development of high-throughput technologies to study mechanisms of coping with fungicide stress and adaptation to fungicides at a previously unprecedented precision. DNA-microarrays have been used to analyze genome-wide gene expression patterns and

  3. Manipulation of Plant Programmed Cell Death Pathways During Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory B

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of plants with bacterial pathogens involves the manipulation of programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. During a resistance interaction PCD is induced in a process termed the hypersensitive response (HR) which may function to limit pathogen spread. In a susceptible plant-pathogen interactions, the pathogen both inhibits and/or induces host PCD depending on the infection stage and lifestyle of the pathogen. Genes/pathways regulating PCD in plants have been difficult to identify due to a lack of homologous sequences in plants for mammalian genes that control apoptosis and possibly due to functional redundancy. Our labs study plant PCD pathways and bacterial speck disease in tomato which is caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). We recently identified the tomato protein kinases Pdk1 and Adi3 as negative regulators of plant PCD. The plant Pdk1/Adi3 pathway appears to function similarly to the Pdk1/PKB (Akt) pathway in mammals which functions as a major apoptosis negative regulation pathway. Here we discuss regulation of Pdk1/Adi3 and targeting of this pathway during the tomato-Pst interaction for modulation of host PCD. PMID:19704693

  4. Auxin crosstalk to plant immune networks: a plant-pathogen interaction perspective.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Muhammad; Srivastava, Mugdha; Tehseen, Muhammad; Ahmed, Nazeer

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin regulates a whole repertoire of plant growth and development. Many plant-associated microorganisms, by virtue of their auxin production capability, mediate phytostimulation effects on plants. Recent studies, however, demonstrate diverse mechanisms whereby plant pathogens manipulate auxin biosynthesis, signaling and transport pathways to promote host susceptibility. Auxin responses have been coupled to their antagonistic and synergistic interactions with salicylic acid and jasmonate mediated defenses, respectively. Here, we discuss that a better understanding of auxin crosstalk to plant immune networks would enable us to engineer crop plants with higher protection and low unintended yield losses. PMID:25824384

  5. Advances in Bacteriophage-Mediated Control of Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Rebekah A.; Pitman, Andrew R.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    There is continuing pressure to maximise food production given a growing global human population. Bacterial pathogens that infect important agricultural plants (phytopathogens) can reduce plant growth and the subsequent crop yield. Currently, phytopathogens are controlled through management programmes, which can include the application of antibiotics and copper sprays. However, the emergence of resistant bacteria and the desire to reduce usage of toxic products that accumulate in the environment mean there is a need to develop alternative control agents. An attractive option is the use of specific bacteriophages (phages), viruses that specifically kill bacteria, providing a more targeted approach. Typically, phages that target the phytopathogen are isolated and characterised to determine that they have features required for biocontrol. In addition, suitable formulation and delivery to affected plants are necessary to ensure the phages survive in the environment and do not have a deleterious effect on the plant or target beneficial bacteria. Phages have been isolated for different phytopathogens and have been used successfully in a number of trials and commercially. In this paper, we address recent progress in phage-mediated control of plant pathogens and overcoming the challenges, including those posed by CRISPR/Cas and abortive infection resistance systems. PMID:22934116

  6. The effectiveness of plant essential oils on the growth of Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sp. and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitra J Daferera; Basil N Ziogas; Moschos G Polissiou

    2003-01-01

    Oregano, thyme, dictamnus, marjoram, lavender, rosemary, sage and pennyroyal essential oils were tested for their effectiveness against Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sp. (Fusarium solani var. coeruleum), and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis on artificial growth media. The chemical composition of the oils was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The growth of Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sp. and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis was

  7. Fusarium infection in maize: Volatile induction of infected and neighboring uninfected plants has the potential to attract a pest cereal leaf beetle, Oulema melanopus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium infection of maize leaves and/or roots through the soil can stimulate the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). It is also well known that VOC emission from maize plants can repel or attract pests. In our experiments, we studied VOC induction responses of Zea mays L. ssp. mays cv. ...

  8. alpha-Tomatine, the major saponin in tomato, induces programmed cell death mediated by reactive oxygen species in the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shin-Ichi; Ihara, Takashi; Tamura, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Shuhei; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Kajihara, Hiroshi; Dissanayake, Chandrika; Abdel-Motaal, Fatma F; El-Sayed, Magdi A

    2007-07-10

    The tomato saponin alpha-tomatine has been proposed to kill sensitive cells by binding to cell membranes followed by leakage of cell components. However, details of the modes of action of the compound on fungal cells are poorly understood. In the present study, mechanisms involved in alpha-tomatine-induced cell death of fungi were examined using a filamentous pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum. alpha-Tomatine-induced cell death of F. oxysporum (TICDF) occurred only under aerobic conditions and was blocked by the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)-ATPase inhibitor oligomycin, the caspase inhibitor D-VAD-fmk, and protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Fungal cells exposed to alpha-tomatine showed TUNEL-positive nuclei, depolarization of transmembrane potential of mitochondria, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. These results suggest that TICDF occurs through a programmed cell death process in which mitochondria play a pivotal role. Pharmacological studies using inhibitors suggest that alpha-tomatine activates phosphotyrosine kinase and monomeric G-protein signaling pathways leading to Ca(2+) elevation and ROS burst in F. oxysporum cells. PMID:17585910

  9. Natural and natural-like phenolic inhibitors of type B trichothecene in vitro production by the wheat (Triticum sp.) pathogen Fusarium culmorum.

    PubMed

    Pani, Giovanna; Scherm, Barbara; Azara, Emanuela; Balmas, Virgilio; Jahanshiri, Zahra; Carta, Paola; Fabbri, Davide; Dettori, Maria Antonietta; Fadda, Angela; Dessě, Alessandro; Dallocchio, Roberto; Migheli, Quirico; Delogu, Giovanna

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium culmorum, a fungal pathogen of small grain cereals, produces 4-deoxynivalenol and its acetylated derivatives that may cause toxicoses on humans or animals consuming contaminated food or feed. Natural and natural-like compounds belonging to phenol and hydroxylated biphenyl structural classes were tested in vitro to determine their activity on vegetative growth and trichothecene biosynthesis by F. culmorum. Most of the compounds tested at 1.5 or 1.0 mM reduced 3-acetyl-4-deoxynivalenol production by over 70% compared to the control, without affecting fungal growth significantly. Furthermore, several compounds retained their ability to inhibit toxin in vitro production at the lowest concentrations of 0.5 and 0.25 mM. Magnolol 27 showed fungicidal activity even at 0.1 mM. No linear correlation was observed between antioxidant properties of the compounds and their ability to inhibit fungal growth and mycotoxigenic capacity. A guaiacyl unit in the structure may play a key role in trichothecene inhibition. PMID:24820850

  10. The transmembrane protein FgSho1 regulates fungal development and pathogenicity via the MAPK module Ste50-Ste11-Ste7 in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qin; Chen, Yun; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Chengqi; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-04-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways have been characterized in Fusarium graminearum. Currently, the upstream sensors of these pathways are unknown. Biological functions of a transmembrane protein FgSho1 were investigated using a target gene deletion strategy. The relationship between FgSho1 and the MAPK cassette FgSte50-Ste11-Ste7 was analyzed in depth. The transmembrane protein FgSho1 is required for conidiation, full virulence, and deoxynivalenol (DON) biosynthesis in F. graminearum. Furthermore, FgSho1 and FgSln1 have an additive effect on virulence of F. graminearum. The yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, colocalization and affinity capture-mass spectrometry analyses strongly indicated that FgSho1 physically interacts with the MAPK module FgSte50-Ste11-Ste7. Similar to the FgSho1 mutant, the mutants of FgSte50, FgSte11, and FgSte7 were defective in conidiation, pathogenicity, and DON biosynthesis. In addition, FgSho1 plays a minor role in the response to osmotic stress but it is involved in the cell wall integrity pathway, which is independent of the module FgSte50-Ste11-Ste7 in F. graminearum. Collectively, results of this study strongly indicate that FgSho1 regulates fungal development and pathogenicity via the MAPK module FgSte50-Ste11-Ste7 in F. graminearum, which is different from what is known in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:25388878

  11. Characterization of Novel Di-, Tri-, and Tetranucleotide Microsatellite Primers Suitable for Genotyping Various Plant Pathogenic Fungi with Special Emphasis on Fusaria and Mycospherella graminicola

    PubMed Central

    Bahkali, Ali H.; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Guo, Jian-Rong; Khiyami, Mohamed A.; Verreet, Joseph-Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The goals of this investigation were to identify and evaluate the use of polymorphic microsatellite marker (PMM) analysis for molecular typing of seventeen plant pathogenic fungi. Primers for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide loci were designed directly from the recently published genomic sequence of Mycospherlla graminicola and Fusarium graminearum. A total of 20 new microsatellite primers as easy-to-score markers were developed. Microsatellite primer PCR (MP-PCR) yielded highly reproducible and complex genomic fingerprints, with several bands ranging in size from 200 to 3000 bp. Of the 20 primers tested, only (TAGG)4, (TCC)5 and (CA)7T produced a high number of polymorphic bands from either F. graminearum or F. culmorum. (ATG)5 led to successful amplifications in M. graminicola isolates collected from Germany. Percentage of polymorphic bands among Fusarium species ranged from 9 to 100%. Cluster analysis of banding patterns of the isolates corresponded well to the established species delineations based on morphology and other methods of phylogenetic analysis. The current research demonstrates that the newly designed microsatellite primers are reliable, sensitive and technically simple tools for assaying genetic variability in plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:22489135

  12. Genomic Cross Comparison of Soybean Pathogens and the Symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are under constant attack from a variety of pathogens and respond with dramatic changes in gene expression. Some well-studied diseases of soybean include those induced by the pathogens Pseudomonas syringae, Fusarium virguliforme, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. To assist in the identification ...

  13. TAL effectors--pathogen strategies and plant resistance engineering.

    PubMed

    Boch, Jens; Bonas, Ulla; Lahaye, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from plant pathogenic Xanthomonas spp. and the related RipTALs from Ralstonia solanacearum are DNA-binding proteins with a modular DNA-binding domain. This domain is both predictable and programmable, which simplifies elucidation of TALE function in planta and facilitates generation of DNA-binding modules with desired specificity for biotechnological approaches. Recently identified TALE host target genes that either promote or stop bacterial disease provide new insights into how expression of TALE genes affects the plant–pathogen interaction. Since its elucidation the TALE code has been continuously refined and now provides a mature tool that, in combination with transcriptome profiling, allows rapid isolation of novel TALE target genes. The TALE code is also the basis for synthetic promoter-traps that mediate recognition of TALE or RipTAL proteins in engineered plants. In this review, we will summarize recent findings in plant-focused TALE research. In addition, we will provide an outline of the newly established gene isolation approach for TALE or RipTAL host target genes with an emphasis on potential pitfalls. PMID:25539004

  14. A ROOT-KNOT NEMATODE PATHOGENIC TO COCK'S COMB, CELOSIA ARGENTEA L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. ANWAR; A. ZIA; Q. SHAKEEL

    The presence of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita was assessed on roots and rhizosphere soil of cock's comb (Celosia argentea L.) planted in 5 lawns located at the campus of University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. The infected plants were stunted with galled and rotted roots. Four fungal pathogens including Fusarium, Pythium, Rhizoctonia and Sclerotia were isolated from nematode-fungal complex infected roots. Plant

  15. TRANSFORMATION TO PRODUCE BARLEY RESISTANT TO FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum destroys barley and wheat crops by causing scab disease (Fusarium head blight, FHB). Spores infect seed spike tissues, leading to production of mycotoxins. There are no known barleys with biochemical resistance to Fusarium, although some have various levels ...

  16. Effects of the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici and of the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS365 on the composition of organic acids and sugars in tomato root exudate.

    PubMed

    Kamilova, Faina; Kravchenko, Lev V; Shaposhnikov, Alexander I; Makarova, Nataliya; Lugtenberg, Ben

    2006-10-01

    The effects of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici and of the bacterial biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS365, and of both microbes, on the amounts and composition of root exudate components of tomato plants grown in a gnotobiotic stonewool substrate system were studied. Conditions were selected under which introduction of F. oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici caused severe foot and root rot, whereas inoculation of the seed with P. fluorescens WCS365 decreased the percentage of diseased plants from 96 to 7%. This is a much better disease control level than was observed in potting soil. Analysis of root exudate revealed that the presence of F. oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici did not alter the total amount of organic acids, but that the amount of citric acid decreased and that of succinic acid increased compared with the nontreated control. In contrast, in the presence of the P. fluorescens biocontrol strain WCS365, the total amount of organic acid increased, mainly due to a strong increase of the amount of citric acid, whereas the amount of succinic acid decreased dramatically. Under biocontrol conditions, when both microbes are present, the content of succinic acid decreased and the level of citric acid was similar to that in the nontreated control. The amount of sugar was approximately half that of the control sample when either one of the microbes was present alone or when both were present. Analysis of the interactions between the two microbes grown together in sterile tomato root exudate showed that WCS365 inhibited multiplication of F. oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici, whereas the fungus did not affect the number of CFU of the bacterium. PMID:17022176

  17. RNA-Seq analysis reveals new gene models and alternative splicing in the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genome of Fusarium graminearum has been sequenced and annotated previously, but correct gene annotation remains a challenge. In addition, posttranscriptional regulations, such as alternative splicing and RNA editing, are poorly understood in F. graminearum. Here we took advantage of RNA-Seq to improve gene annotations and to identify alternative splicing and RNA editing in F. graminearum. Results We identified and revised 655 incorrectly predicted gene models, including revisions of intron predictions, intron splice sites and prediction of novel introns. 231 genes were identified with two or more alternative splice variants, mostly due to intron retention. Interestingly, the expression ratios between different transcript isoforms appeared to be developmentally regulated. Surprisingly, no RNA editing was identified in F. graminearum. Moreover, 2459 novel transcriptionally active regions (nTARs) were identified and our analysis indicates that many of these could be missed genes. Finally, we identified the 5? UTR and/or 3? UTR sequences of 7666 genes. A number of representative novel gene models and alternatively spliced genes were validated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the generated amplicons. Conclusions We have developed novel and efficient strategies to identify alternatively spliced genes and incorrect gene models based on RNA-Seq data. Our study identified hundreds of alternatively spliced genes in F. graminearum and for the first time indicated that alternative splicing is developmentally regulated in filamentous fungi. In addition, hundreds of incorrect predicted gene models were identified and revised and thousands of nTARs were discovered in our study, which will be helpful for the future genomic and transcriptomic studies in F. graminearum. PMID:23324402

  18. Flavonoids and Strigolactones in Root Exudates as Signals in Symbiotic and Pathogenic Plant-Fungus Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siegrid Steinkellner; Venasius Lendzemo; Ingrid Langer; Peter Schweiger; Thanasan Khaosaad; Jean-Patrick Toussaint; Horst Vierheilig

    2007-01-01

    Secondary plant compounds are important signals in several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. The present review is limited to two groups of secondary plant compounds, flavonoids and strigolactones, which have been reported in root exudates. Data on flavonoids as signaling compounds are available from several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions, whereas only recently initial data on the role of strigolactones

  19. Evolution of RXLR-Class Effectors in the Oomycete Plant Pathogen Phytophthora ramorum

    E-print Network

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    Evolution of RXLR-Class Effectors in the Oomycete Plant Pathogen Phytophthora ramorum Erica M. Goss pathogens contain many hundreds of effectors potentially involved in infection of host plants. Comparative death pathogen, P. ramorum. We found that P. ramorum RXLR effectors have taken multiple evolutionary

  20. The impact of genomic approaches on our understanding of diversity and taxonomy of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our understanding of the diversity of bacterial plant pathogens has changed dramatically over the past 100 years. Initially it was thought that each newly described disease was caused by a distinct plant pathogen species. Later, similarities in the physiology of these pathogens as well as inadequate...

  1. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteria and nematodes need to degrade the plant cell wall at a certain stage of their infection process, to obtain nutrients for their growth. Plants have developed a system for sensing pathogens and monitoring the cell wall integrity, upon which they activate defense responses that lead to a dynamic cell wall remodeling required to prevent the disease. Pathogens, on the other hand, may exploit the host cell wall metabolism to support the infection. We review here the strategies utilized by both plants and pathogens to prevail in the cell wall battleground. PMID:24904623

  2. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces acidiscabies 84-104, an emergent plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Huguet-Tapia, José C; Loria, Rosemary

    2012-04-01

    A draft genome sequence of the plant pathogen Streptomyces acidiscabies 84-104, an emergent plant pathogen, is presented here. The genome is among the largest of streptomycetes, at more than 11 Mb, and encodes a 100-kb pathogenicity island (PAI) shared with other plant-pathogenic streptomycetes. The presence of this conserved PAI, and the remnants of a conserved integrase/recombinase at its 3' end, supports the hypothesis that S. acidiscabies emerged as a plant pathogen as a result of this acquisition. PMID:22408247

  3. Antifungal activity and enhancement of plant growth by Bacillus cereus grown on shellfish chitin wastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Teish Chang; Yu-Chung Chen; Chia-Ling Jao

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus cereus QQ308 produced antifungal hydrolytic enzymes, comprising chitinase, chitosanase and protease, when grown in a medium containing shrimp and crab shell powder (SCSP) produced from marine waste. The growth of the plant-pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Pythium ultimum were considerably affected by the presence of the QQ308 culture supernatant. The supernatant inhibited spore germination and germ tube

  4. Dual metabolomics: A novel approach to understanding plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. William Allwood; Andrew Clarke; Royston Goodacre; Luis A. J. Mur

    2010-01-01

    One of the most well-characterised plant pathogenic interactions involves Arabidopsis thaliana and the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst). The standard Pst inoculation procedure involves infiltration of large populations of bacteria into plant leaves which means that metabolite changes cannot be readily assigned to the host or pathogen. A plant cell–pathogen co-culture based approach has been developed where the plant

  5. Bacterial hrp and Avirulence Genes are Key Determinants in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulla Bonas; Guido Van den Ackerveken

    Among the 1600 different species known in the bacterial kingdom only a small number are plant pathogenic. In fact, most pathogens\\u000a can only infect a limited number of host plant species. On the other hand, many bacteria live in the plant’s phyllosphere\\u000a and rhizosphere without causing any harm. To be successful as a pathogen, i.e., live on the expense of

  6. Detection of 3-hydroxykynurenine in a plant pathogenic fungus.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, T J Greer; Thomsen, Karl Kristian; Petersen, Bent O; Duus, Jens Ř; Oliver, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    A redox-active compound has been purified from the barley powdery mildew fungus Blumeria ( Erysiphe ) graminis f. sp. hordei. A combination of spectrophotometry, MS and NMR has identified it as 3-hydroxykynurenine (3OHKyn). This compound, never previously detected in any fungus or pathogen, is best known for its role in vertebrate cataracts. It is found abundantly in developing and germinating spores and also in runner hyphae. Two roles for 3OHKyn are discussed: first, the presence of active oxygen species would enable 3OHKyn to cross-link the spore chemically with the plant. Secondly, it may be acting as an UV protectant and an antioxidant. PMID:12556224

  7. Relationship of substrate and surfactin production by Bacillus mojavensis strains and their antagonistical response to Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endophytic bacterium, Bacillus mojavensis, RRC 101 controls fungal diseases in maize and other plants. The bacterium and its cultural extracts have been shown to be antagonistic to the pathogenic and mycotoxic fungus, Fusarium verticillioides. An antifungal lipopeptide produced by B. mojavensi...

  8. Commercial and improved germplasm evaluations for Fusarium wilt, FOV race 1 with root-knot nematodes and race 4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host plant resistance is the most economic and effective strategy for Fusarium wilt control. To implement steps to develop resistant germplasm to this pathogen, existing commercial Acala, non-Acala Upland (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and Pima (G. barbadense) cultivars, as well as improved germplasm were ...

  9. Proteomic approaches to study plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Quirino, B F; Candido, E S; Campos, P F; Franco, O L; Krüger, R H

    2010-03-01

    The analysis of plant proteomes has drastically expanded in the last few years. Mass spectrometry technology, stains, software and progress in bioinformatics have made identification of proteins relatively easy. The assignment of proteins to particular organelles and the development of better algorithms to predict sub-cellular localization are examples of how proteomic studies are contributing to plant biology. Protein phosphorylation and degradation are also known to occur during plant defense signaling cascades. Despite the great potential to give contributions to the study of plant-pathogen interactions, only recently has the proteomic approach begun to be applied to this field. Biological variation and complexity in a situation involving two organisms in intimate contact are intrinsic challenges in this area, however, for proteomics studies yet, there is no substitute for in planta studies with pathogens, and ways to address these problems are discussed. Protein identification depends not only on mass spectrometry, but also on the existence of complete genome sequence databases for comparison. Although the number of completely sequenced genomes is constantly growing, only four plants have their genomes completely sequenced. Additionally, there are already a number of pathosystems where both partners in the interaction have genomes fully sequenced and where functional genomics tools are available. It is thus to be expected that great progress in understanding the biology of these pathosystems will be made over the next few years. Cheaper sequencing technologies should make protein identification in non-model species easier and the bottleneck in proteomic research should shift from unambiguous protein identification to determination of protein function. PMID:20005547

  10. Trehalose Biosynthesis Promotes Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pathogenicity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Djonovi?, Slavica; Urbach, Jonathan M.; Drenkard, Eliana; Bush, Jenifer; Feinbaum, Rhonda; Ausubel, Jonathan L.; Traficante, David; Risech, Martina; Kocks, Christine; Fischbach, Michael A.; Priebe, Gregory P.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is a multi-host pathogen that infects plants, nematodes, insects, and vertebrates. Many PA14 factors are required for virulence in more than one of these hosts. Noting that plants have a fundamentally different cellular architecture from animals, we sought to identify PA14 factors that are specifically required for plant pathogenesis. We show that synthesis by PA14 of the disaccharide trehalose is required for pathogenesis in Arabidopsis, but not in nematodes, insects, or mice. In-frame deletion of two closely-linked predicted trehalose biosynthetic operons, treYZ and treS, decreased growth in Arabidopsis leaves about 50 fold. Exogenously co-inoculated trehalose, ammonium, or nitrate, but not glucose, sulfate, or phosphate suppressed the phenotype of the double ?treYZ?treS mutant. Exogenous trehalose or ammonium nitrate does not suppress the growth defect of the double ?treYZ?treS mutant by suppressing the plant defense response. Trehalose also does not function intracellularly in P. aeruginosa to ameliorate a variety of stresses, but most likely functions extracellularly, because wild-type PA14 rescued the in vivo growth defect of the ?treYZ?treS in trans. Surprisingly, the growth defect of the double ?treYZ?treS double mutant was suppressed by various Arabidopsis cell wall mutants that affect xyloglucan synthesis, including an xxt1xxt2 double mutant that completely lacks xyloglucan, even though xyloglucan mutants are not more susceptible to pathogens and respond like wild-type plants to immune elicitors. An explanation of our data is that trehalose functions to promote the acquisition of nitrogen-containing nutrients in a process that involves the xyloglucan component of the plant cell wall, thereby allowing P. aeruginosa to replicate in the intercellular spaces in a leaf. This work shows how P. aeruginosa, a multi-host opportunistic pathogen, has repurposed a highly conserved “house-keeping” anabolic pathway (trehalose biosynthesis) as a potent virulence factor that allows it to replicate in the intercellular environment of a leaf. PMID:23505373

  11. The Ecological Genetics of Plant-Pathogen Interactions in Natural Communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. D. Harrison; A. M. Jarosz

    1988-01-01

    Plant-fungal pathogen interactions are among the most convenient systems in which to study the full complexity of co-evolved associations. Despite this, the potential ramifications of pathogen-induced damage in plant communities have yet to be widely recognized. Pathogens affect host fitness by reducing fecundity or increasing mortality or both. The consequences of infection by pathogens that have an immediate effect on

  12. Disrupting the Transmission of a Vector-Borne Plant Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Arash; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Approaches to control vector-borne diseases rarely focus on the interface between vector and microbial pathogen, but strategies aimed at disrupting the interactions required for transmission may lead to reductions in disease spread. We tested if the vector transmission of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was affected by three groups of molecules: lectins, carbohydrates, and antibodies. Although not comprehensively characterized, it is known that X. fastidiosa adhesins bind to carbohydrates, and that these interactions are important for initial cell attachment to vectors, which is required for bacterial transmission from host to host. Lectins with affinity to substrates expected to occur on the cuticular surface of vectors colonized by X. fastidiosa, such as wheat germ agglutinin, resulted in statistically significant reductions in transmission rate, as did carbohydrates with N-acetylglucosamine residues. Presumably, lectins bound to receptors on the vector required for cell adhesion/colonization, while carbohydrate-saturated adhesins on X. fastidiosa's cell surface. Furthermore, antibodies against X. fastidiosa whole cells, gum, and afimbrial adhesins also resulted in transmission blockage. However, no treatment resulted in the complete abolishment of transmission, suggesting that this is a complex biological process. This work illustrates the potential to block the transmission of vector-borne pathogens without directly affecting either organism. PMID:22101059

  13. Stimulation of nodulation and plant growth of chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L . ) by Pseudomonas spp. antagonistic to fungal pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Goel; S. S. Sindhu; K. R. Dadarwal

    2002-01-01

    Two strains of Pseudomonas MRS23 and CRP55b showed antagonistic activity towards the pathogenic fungi Aspergillus sp., Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri, Pythium aphanidermatum and Rhizoctonia solani under culture conditions. Larger growth inhibition zones were obtained on nutrient agar (NA) and King's B media in comparison to potato dextrose agar and pigment production media. Both the strains produced siderophore in agar

  14. On the trail of a cereal killer: recent advances in Fusarium graminearum pathogenomics and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Kemal; Gardiner, Donald M; Manners, John M

    2012-05-01

    The ascomycete fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum (sexual stage: Gibberella zeae) causes the devastating head blight or scab disease on wheat and barley, and cob or ear rot disease on maize. Fusarium graminearum infection causes significant crop and quality losses. In addition to roles as virulence factors during pathogenesis, trichothecene mycotoxins (e.g. deoxynivalenol) produced by this pathogen constitute a significant threat to human and animal health if consumed in respective food or feed products. In the last few years, significant progress has been made towards a better understanding of the processes involved in F. graminearum pathogenesis, toxin biosynthesis and host resistance mechanisms through the use of high-throughput genomic and phenomic technologies. In this article, we briefly review these new advances and also discuss how future research can contribute to the development of sustainable plant protection strategies against this important plant pathogen. PMID:22098555

  15. UC Davis Policies and Practices for Work with Transgenic Plants and Plant Pathogens 1 | P a g e

    E-print Network

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    UC Davis Policies and Practices for Work with Transgenic Plants and Plant Pathogens 1 | P a g e rev. 9110 Work with recombinant DNA organisms (transgenic plants, animal and microbes) and plant of the research area. Tracking and identity of transgenic plants All transgenic plants will be labeled

  16. The Plant Cell, Vol. 10, 371382, March 1998 1998 American Society of Plant Physiologists Ethylene Regulates the Susceptible Response to Pathogen

    E-print Network

    Klee, Harry J.

    genotypes with virulent bacterial (Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato) and fungal (Fusarium oxysporum f sp lycopersici) pathogens. Bacterial spot disease symptoms were also reduced that infections by or- ganisms that produce phytotoxins, such as Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Palmer and Bender

  17. N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria protect plants against plant and human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schenk, Sebastian T; Neumann, Christina; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of beneficial microorganisms for plant protection has a long history. Many rhizobia bacteria are able to influence the immune system of host plants by inducing resistance towards pathogenic microorganisms. In this report, we present a translational approach in which we demonstrate the resistance-inducing effect of Ensifer meliloti (Sinorhizobium meliloti) on crop plants that have a significant impact on the worldwide economy and on human nutrition. Ensifer meliloti is usually associated with root nodulation in legumes and nitrogen fixation. Here, we suggest that the ability of S. meliloti to induce resistance depends on the production of the quorum-sensing molecule, oxo-C14-HSL. The capacity to enhanced resistance provides a possibility to the use these beneficial bacteria in agriculture. Using the Arabidopsis-Salmonella model, we also demonstrate that the application of N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria could be a successful strategy to prevent plant-originated infections with human pathogens. PMID:25234390

  18. Endogenous Methyl Salicylate in Pathogen-Inoculated Tobacco Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Seskar, Mirjana; Shulaev, Vladimir; Raskin, Ilya

    1998-01-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivar Xanthi-nc (genotype NN) produces high levels of salicylic acid (SA) after inoculation with the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Gaseous methyl salicylate (MeSA), a major volatile produced in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants, was recently shown to be an airborne defense signal. Using an assay developed to measure the MeSA present in tissue, we have shown that in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants the level of MeSA increases dramatically, paralleling increases in SA. MeSA accumulation was also observed in upper, noninoculated leaves. In TMV-inoculated tobacco shifted from 32 to 24°C, the MeSA concentration increased from nondetectable levels to 2318 ng/g fresh weight 12 h after the temperature shift, but subsequently decreased with the onset of the hypersensitive response. Similar results were observed in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola, in which MeSA levels were highest just before the hypersensitive response-induced tissue desiccation. Transgenic NahG plants unable to accumulate SA also did not accumulate MeSA after TMV inoculation, and did not show increased resistance to TMV following MeSA treatment. Based on the spatial and temporal kinetics of its accumulation, we conclude that tissue MeSA may play a role similar to that of volatile MeSA in the pathogen-induced defense response.

  19. The FgHOG1 Pathway Regulates Hyphal Growth, Stress Responses, and Plant Infection in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Wang, Chenfang; Xiang, Ping; Zheng, Qian; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium graminearum is a destructive disease of wheat and barley worldwide. In a previous study of systematic characterization of protein kinase genes in F. graminearum, mutants of three putative components of the osmoregulation MAP kinase pathway were found to have distinct colony morphology and hyphal growth defects on PDA plates. Because the osmoregulation pathway is not known to regulate aerial hyphal growth and branching, in this study we further characterized the functions of the FgHog1 pathway in growth, pathogenesis, and development. The Fghog1, Fgpbs2, and Fgssk2 mutants were all reduced in growth rate, aerial hyphal growth, and hyphal branching angle. These mutants were not only hypersensitive to osmotic stress but also had increased sensitivity to oxidative, cytoplasm membrane, and cell wall stresses. The activation of FgHog1 was blocked in the Fgpbs2 and Fgssk2 mutants, indicating the sequential activation of FgSsk2-FgPbs2-FgHog1 cascade. Interestingly, the FgHog1 MAPK pathway mutants appeared to be sensitive to certain compounds present in PDA. They were female sterile but retained male fertility. We also used the metabolomics profiling approach to identify compatible solutes that were accumulated in the wild type but not in the Fghog1 deletion mutant. Overall, our results indicate that the FgSsk2-FgPbs2-FgHog1 MAPK cascade is important for regulating hyphal growth, branching, plant infection, and hyperosmotic and general stress responses in F. graminearum. PMID:23166686

  20. Contribution of Peroxisomes to Secondary Metabolism and Pathogenicity in the Fungal Plant Pathogen Alternaria alternata ? †

    PubMed Central

    Imazaki, Ai; Tanaka, Aiko; Harimoto, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Park, Pyoyun; Tsuge, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Alternaria alternata includes seven pathogenic variants (pathotypes) which produce different host-selective toxins and cause diseases on different plants. The Japanese pear pathotype produces the host-selective AK-toxin, an epoxy-decatrienoic acid ester, and causes black spot of Japanese pear. Previously, we identified four genes, AKT1, AKT2, AKT3, and AKTR, involved in AK toxin biosynthesis. AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3 encode enzyme proteins with peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1)-like tripeptides, SKI, SKL, and PKL, respectively, at the C-terminal ends. In this study, we verified the peroxisome localization of Akt1, Akt2, and Akt3 by using strains expressing N-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged versions of the proteins. To assess the role of peroxisome function in AK-toxin production, we isolated AaPEX6, which encodes a peroxin protein essential for peroxisome biogenesis, from the Japanese pear pathotype and made AaPEX6 disruption-containing transformants from a GFP-Akt1-expressing strain. The ?AaPEX6 mutant strains did not grow on fatty acid media because of a defect in fatty acid ? oxidation. The import of GFP-Akt1 into peroxisomes was impaired in the ?AaPEX6 mutant strains. These strains completely lost AK toxin production and pathogenicity on susceptible pear leaves. These data show that peroxisomes are essential for AK-toxin biosynthesis. The ?AaPEX6 mutant strains showed a marked reduction in the ability to cause lesions on leaves of a resistant pear cultivar with defense responses compromised by heat shock. This result suggests that peroxisome function is also required for plant invasion and tissue colonization in A. alternata. We also observed that mutation of AaPEX6 caused a marked reduction of conidiation. PMID:20348386

  1. Influence of Soil Fumigation on the Fusarium-Root-knot Nematode Disease Complex of Cotton in California.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, E C; Hyer, A H; Garber, R H; Smith, S N

    1978-07-01

    For control of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, and the pathogenic wilt fungus, Fusarium oxysporum, on cotton, soil fumigants were applied in the field at conventional and higher rates. Conventional rates suppressed Fusarium wilt but higher rates gave quicker early growth, better stands, less stand loss over the season, a lower percentage of plants infected with wilt, fewer plants with vascular discoloration, and fewer nematodes. The best treatment about doubled the yields of untreated controls in one experiment and quadrupled them in another. PMID:19305846

  2. Influence of Soil Fumigation on the Fusarium-Root-knot Nematode Disease Complex of Cotton in California

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, E. C.; Hyer, A. H.; Garber, R. H.; Smith, Shirley N.

    1978-01-01

    For control of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, and the pathogenic wilt fungus, Fusarium oxysporum, on cotton, soil fumigants were applied in the field at conventional and higher rates. Conventional rates suppressed Fusarium wilt but higher rates gave quicker early growth, better stands, less stand loss over the season, a lower percentage of plants infected with wilt, fewer plants with vascular discoloration, and fewer nematodes. The best treatment about doubled the yields of untreated controls in one experiment and quadrupled them in another. PMID:19305846

  3. Induced release of a plant-defense volatile 'deceptively' attracts insect vectors to plants infected with a bacterial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rajinder S; Ali, Jared G; Hermann, Sara L; Tiwari, Siddharth; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S; Alborn, Hans T; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of plant pathogens by insect vectors is a complex biological process involving interactions between the plant, insect, and pathogen. Pathogen-induced plant responses can include changes in volatile and nonvolatile secondary metabolites as well as major plant nutrients. Experiments were conducted to understand how a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), affects host preference behavior of its psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) vector. D. citri were attracted to volatiles from pathogen-infected plants more than to those from non-infected counterparts. Las-infected plants were more attractive to D. citri adults than non-infected plants initially; however after feeding, psyllids subsequently dispersed to non-infected rather than infected plants as their preferred settling point. Experiments with Las-infected and non-infected plants under complete darkness yielded similar results to those recorded under light. The behavior of psyllids in response to infected versus non-infected plants was not influenced by whether or not they were carriers of the pathogen. Quantification of volatile release from non-infected and infected plants supported the hypothesis that odorants mediate psyllid preference. Significantly more methyl salicylate, yet less methyl anthranilate and D-limonene, was released by infected than non-infected plants. Methyl salicylate was attractive to psyllids, while methyl anthranilate did not affect their behavior. Feeding on citrus by D. citri adults also induced release of methyl salicylate, suggesting that it may be a cue revealing location of conspecifics on host plants. Infected plants were characterized by lower levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, zinc, and iron, as well as, higher levels of potassium and boron than non-infected plants. Collectively, our results suggest that host selection behavior of D. citri may be modified by bacterial infection of plants, which alters release of specific headspace volatiles and plant nutritional contents. Furthermore, we show in a laboratory setting that this apparent pathogen-mediated manipulation of vector behavior may facilitate pathogen spread. PMID:22457628

  4. Controls on pathogen species richness in plants introduced and native ranges: roles of residence

    E-print Network

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    LETTER Controls on pathogen species richness in plantsŐ introduced and native ranges: roles,4 Emily E. Puckett1 and Petr Pysek3,4 Abstract Introduced species escape many pathogens and other enemies, raising three questions. How quickly do introduced hosts accumulate pathogen species? What factors control

  5. Regulation of tradeoffs between plant defenses against pathogens with different lifestyles

    E-print Network

    Spoel, Steven

    Regulation of tradeoffs between plant defenses against pathogens with different lifestyles Steven H important signaling roles. SA induces defense against biotrophic pathogens that feed and re- produce on live host cells, whereas JA activates defense against necrotrophic pathogens that kill host cells

  6. Immunocytochemical localization of fusarium toxins in infected wheat spikes by Fusarium culmorum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z KANG; H BUCHENAUER

    1999-01-01

    Two antisera raised against deoxynivalenol (DON) and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON) were used to investigate the subcellular localization of the fusarium toxins, DON, 3-ADON and 15-ADON, in Fusarium culmorum infected wheat spikes and kernels by means of the immunogold labelling technique. The hyphae of the pathogen produced the toxins when they grew on the surface of the lemma and the ovary as

  7. An endo-polygalacturonase (PG) of Fusarium moniliforme escaping inhibition by plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) provides new insights into the PG–PGIP interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luca Sella; Carla Castiglioni; Serena Roberti; Renato D’Ovidio; Francesco Favaron

    2004-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant defence molecules inhibiting the activity of fungal endo-polygalacturonases (endo-PGs). We found that soybean and bean PGIPs inhibited the endo-PG activity produced by the isolate FC-10 of Fusarium moniliforme but not the enzyme activity produced by the isolate PD of F. moniliforme. The bean PGIP proved to be ineffective against all the PG isoforms produced by

  8. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) can be either an endophyte of maize, causing no visible disease, or a pathogen causing disease of ears, stalks, roots and seedlings. At any stage, this fungus can synthesize fumonisins, a family of mycotoxins structurally similar to the ...

  9. Genomic analysis of Fusarium verticillioides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Brown; R. A. E. Butchko; R. H. Proctor

    2008-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) can be either an endophyte of maize, causing no visible disease, or a pathogen-causing disease of ears, stalks, roots and seedlings. At any stage, this fungus can synthesize fumonisins, a family of mycotoxins structurally similar to the sphingolipid sphinganine. Ingestion of fumonisin-contaminated maize has been associated with a number of animal diseases, including cancer in

  10. Innate immunity in plants: An arms race between pattern recognition receptors in plants and effectors in microbial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Boller, Thomas; He, Sheng Yang

    2009-01-01

    For many years, research on a suite of plant defense responses initiated when plants are exposed to general microbial elicitors was underappreciated, for a good reason: There has been no critical experimental demonstration of their importance in mediating plant resistance during pathogen infection. Today, these microbial elicitors are named pathogen/microbe - associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or MAMPs) and the plant responses called PAMP - triggered immunity (PTI). Recent studies provide an elegant explanation for the difficulty of demonstrating the role of PTI in plant disease resistance. It turns out that the important contribution of PTI to disease resistance is masked by pathogen virulence effectors that have evolved to suppress it. PMID:19423812

  11. Indigenous Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Assemblages Protect Grassland Host Plants from Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Jeannine; Antunes, Pedro M.; Powell, Jeff R.; Caruso, Tancredi; Rillig, Matthias C.

    2011-01-01

    Plant roots can establish associations with neutral, beneficial and pathogenic groups of soil organisms. Although it has been recognized from the study of individual isolates that these associations are individually important for plant growth, little is known about interactions of whole assemblages of beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms associating with plants. We investigated the influence of an interaction between local arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal and pathogenic/saprobic microbial assemblages on the growth of two different plant species from semi-arid grasslands in NE Germany (Mallnow near Berlin). In a greenhouse experiment each plant species was grown for six months in either sterile soil or in sterile soil with one of three different treatments: 1) an AM fungal spore fraction isolated from field soil from Mallnow; 2) a soil pathogen/saprobe fraction consisting of a microbial community prepared with field soil from Mallnow and; 3) the combined AM fungal and pathogen/saprobe fractions. While both plant species grew significantly larger in the presence of AM fungi, they responded negatively to the pathogen/saprobe treatment. For both plant species, we found evidence of pathogen protection effects provided by the AM fungal assemblages. These results indicate that interactions between assemblages of beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms can influence the growth of host plants, but that the magnitude of these effects is plant species-specific. PMID:22110635

  12. Fusarium graminearum and Its Interactions with Cereal Heads: Studies in the Proteomics Era

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fen; Jacobsen, Susanne; Jřrgensen, Hans J. L.; Collinge, David B.; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycete fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph stage: Gibberella zeae) is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in wheat and barley. This disease leads to significant losses of crop yield, and especially quality through the contamination by diverse fungal mycotoxins, which constitute a significant threat to the health of humans and animals. In recent years, high-throughput proteomics, aiming at identifying a broad spectrum of proteins with a potential role in the pathogenicity and host resistance, has become a very useful tool in plant-fungus interaction research. In this review, we describe the progress in proteomics applications toward a better understanding of F. graminearum pathogenesis, virulence, and host defense mechanisms. The contribution of proteomics to the development of crop protection strategies against this pathogen is also discussed briefly. PMID:23450732

  13. Role of Soil, Crop Debris, and a Plant Pathogen in Salmonella enterica Contamination of Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Jeri D.; Liang, Anita S.

    2008-01-01

    Background In the U.S., tomatoes have become the most implicated vehicle for produce-associated Salmonellosis with 12 outbreaks since 1998. Although unconfirmed, trace backs suggest pre-harvest contamination with Salmonella enterica. Routes of tomato crop contamination by S. enterica in the absence of direct artificial inoculation have not been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings This work examined the role of contaminated soil, the potential for crop debris to act as inoculum from one crop to the next, and any interaction between the seedbourne plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and S. enterica on tomato plants. Our results show S. enterica can survive for up to six weeks in fallow soil with the ability to contaminate tomato plants. We found S. enterica can contaminate a subsequent crop via crop debris; however a fallow period between crop incorporation and subsequent seeding can affect contamination patterns. Throughout these studies, populations of S. enterica declined over time and there was no bacterial growth in either the phyllosphere or rhizoplane. The presence of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria on co-colonized tomato plants had no effect on the incidence of S. enterica tomato phyllosphere contamination. However, growth of S. enterica in the tomato phyllosphere occurred on co-colonized plants in the absence of plant disease. Conclusions/Significance S. enterica contaminated soil can lead to contamination of the tomato phyllosphere. A six week lag period between soil contamination and tomato seeding did not deter subsequent crop contamination. In the absence of plant disease, presence of the bacterial plant pathogen, X. campestris pv. vesicatoria was beneficial to S. enterica allowing multiplication of the human pathogen population. Any event leading to soil contamination with S. enterica could pose a public health risk with subsequent tomato production, especially in areas prone to bacterial spot disease. PMID:18301739

  14. The regulation of host translation initiation in plant-pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jackson Russell Moeller

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens dramatically alter plant mRNA transcript levels by activating and repressing a variety of signaling pathways. However, the effects of plant pathogens on host mRNA translation have not been explored on a genome-wide scale. To assess pathogen-induced changes in host mRNA transcription and translation, we conducted DNA microarray analysis of total and polyribosomal RNA fractions in the Arabidopsis thaliana–Turnip mosaic

  15. The Relationship Between Pathogen-induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) and Multigenic (horizontal) Resistance in Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sadik Tuzun

    2001-01-01

    Plants have developed mechanisms to successfully co-exist in the presence of pathogenic organisms. Some interactions between plants and pathogens are based on recognition of specific elicitor molecules from avirulent pathogen races (avr gene products), which is described in the gene-for-gene resistance theory. Another type of resistance, multigenic (horizontal) resistance, is a less well-studied phenomenon that depends upon multiple genes in

  16. Pathogenicity to Ornamental Plants of Some Existing Species and New Taxa of Phytophthora from Irrigation Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chuanxue Hong; Patricia A. Richardson; Ping Kong

    2008-01-01

    Hong, C., Richardson, P. A., and Kong, P. 2008. Pathogenicity to ornamental plants of some existing species and new taxa of Phytophthora from irrigation water. Plant Dis. 92:1201-1207. Eighteen isolates from 12 species of Phytophthora, including several new taxa, were tested for pathogenicity to six ornamental and four vegetable species. The following three inoculation methods were used depending on infection

  17. Biological Control of Plant Pathogens: Research, Commercialization, and Application in the USA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brian B. McSpadden Gardener (The Ohio State University-OARDC; )

    2002-05-10

    This article describes the current status of research, commercial development, and application of biocontrol strategies targeted at plant pathogens. Also included is a description of future prospects for using biological control to limit the damage of plant pathogens in both conventional and organic agriculture.

  18. Epidemiology and disease-control under gene-for-gene plant–pathogen interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akiko Ohtsuki; Akira Sasaki

    2006-01-01

    An introduction of disease-resistant variety of a crop plant often leads to the development of a virulent race in pathogen species that restores the pathogenicity to the resistant crop. This often makes disease control of crop plants extremely difficult. In this paper, we theoretically explore the optimal ‘multiline’ control, which makes use of several different resistant varieties, that minimizes the

  19. PARTICIPATION OF CHITIN SPECIFIC ISOFORMS OF PEROXIDASE IN PROTECTIVE REACTION OF PLANTS INFECTED BY PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are interested in how isoforms of peroxidases may influence the cotton plant's resistance to pathogens. Cotton is a member of the Malvaceae and we have been investigating the resistance of wild members of the Malvaceae to the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Using electrophoresis, we have obs...

  20. Apicidin F: Characterization and Genetic Manipulation of a New Secondary Metabolite Gene Cluster in the Rice Pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, Christian M. K.; Harrer, Henning; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    The fungus F. fujikuroi is well known for its production of gibberellins causing the ‘bakanae’ disease of rice. Besides these plant hormones, it is able to produce other secondary metabolites (SMs), such as pigments and mycotoxins. Genome sequencing revealed altogether 45 potential SM gene clusters, most of which are cryptic and silent. In this study we characterize a new non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster that is responsible for the production of the cyclic tetrapeptide apicidin F (APF). This new SM has structural similarities to the known histone deacetylase inhibitor apicidin. To gain insight into the biosynthetic pathway, most of the 11 cluster genes were deleted, and the mutants were analyzed by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-HRMS for their ability to produce APF or new derivatives. Structure elucidation was carried out be HPLC-HRMS and NMR analysis. We identified two new derivatives of APF named apicidin J and K. Furthermore, we studied the regulation of APF biosynthesis and showed that the cluster genes are expressed under conditions of high nitrogen and acidic pH in a manner dependent on the nitrogen regulator AreB, and the pH regulator PacC. In addition, over-expression of the atypical pathway-specific transcription factor (TF)-encoding gene APF2 led to elevated expression of the cluster genes under inducing and even repressing conditions and to significantly increased product yields. Bioinformatic analyses allowed the identification of a putative Apf2 DNA-binding (“Api-box”) motif in the promoters of the APF genes. Point mutations in this sequence motif caused a drastic decrease of APF production indicating that this motif is essential for activating the cluster genes. Finally, we provide a model of the APF biosynthetic pathway based on chemical identification of derivatives in the cultures of deletion mutants. PMID:25058475

  1. Effect of acidic electrolyzed water on the viability of bacterial and fungal plant pathogens and on bacterial spot disease of tomato.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, P A; Lazarovits, G

    2006-10-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW), known to have germicidal activity, was obtained after electrolysis of 0.045% aqueous solution of sodium chloride. Freshly prepared AEW (pH 2.3-2.6, oxidation-reduction potential 1007-1025 mV, and free active chlorine concentration 27-35 ppm) was tested in vitro and (or) on tomato foliage and seed surfaces for its effects on the viability of plant pathogen propagules that could be potential seed contaminants. Foliar sprays of AEW were tested against bacterial spot disease of tomato under greenhouse and field conditions. The viability of propagules of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (bacterial spot pathogen), Streptomyces scabies (potato scab pathogen), and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (root rot pathogen) was significantly reduced 4-8 log units within 2 min of exposure to AEW. Immersion of tomato seed from infected fruit in AEW for 1 and 3 min significantly reduced the populations of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria from the surface of the seed without affecting seed germination. Foliar sprays of AEW reduced X. campestris pv. vesicatoria populations and leaf spot severity on tomato foliage in the greenhouse. In the field, multiple sprays of AEW consistently reduced bacterial spot severity on tomato foliage. Disease incidence and severity was also reduced on fruit, but only in 2003. Fruit yield was either enhanced or not affected by the AEW sprays. These results indicate a potential use of AEW as a seed surface disinfectant or contact bactericide. PMID:17110959

  2. Predators indirectly reduce the prevalence of an insect-vectored plant pathogen independent of predator diversity.

    PubMed

    Long, Elizabeth Y; Finke, Deborah L

    2015-04-01

    A widely cited benefit of predator diversity is greater suppression of insect herbivores, with corresponding increases in plant biomass. In the context of a vector-borne pathogen system, predator species richness may also influence plant disease risk via the direct effects of predators on the abundance and behavior of herbivores that also act as pathogen vectors. Using an assemblage of generalist insect predators, we examined the relationship between predator species richness and the prevalence of the aphid-vectored cereal yellow dwarf virus in wheat. We found that increasing predator richness enhanced suppression of the vector population and that pathogen prevalence was reduced when predators were present, but the reduction in prevalence was independent of predator species richness. To determine the mechanism(s) by which predator species richness contributes to vector suppression, but not pathogen prevalence, we evaluated vector movement and host plant occupancy in response to predator treatments. We found that pathogen prevalence was unrelated to vector suppression because host plant occupancy by vectors did not vary as a function of vector abundance. However, the presence of predators reduced pathogen prevalence because predators stimulated greater plant-to-plant movement by vectors, which likely diminished vector feeding time and reduced the transmission efficiency of this persistent pathogen. We conclude that community structure (i.e., the presence of predators), but not predator diversity, is a potential factor influencing local plant infection by this insect-vectored pathogen. PMID:25561170

  3. Plant immunity and film Noir: what gumshoe detectives can teach us about plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David S

    2002-05-31

    Plant cells practice constant vigilance using resistance (R) proteins to monitor pathogenic processes. Three papers published recently in Cell and one in Science provide support for a model in which plant cells set up surveillance of signal transduction pathways, preparing to destroy the cell if any untoward fiddling with cellular physiology is detected. The demonstration of three separate examples of such a system suggests that it is broadly used and should provoke a reexamination of microbial pathogenesis in animal cells to look for similar mechanisms. PMID:12062095

  4. PLEXdb: Plant and Pathogen Expression Database and Tools for Comparative and Functional Genomics Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PLEXdb is a plant expression database that supports all Affymetrix microarray designs for plants and plant pathogens. PLEXdb provides annotation and hand-curated microarray data. Experiments deposited in PLEXdb are checked for MIAME/Plant compliance and completeness, then processed by normalizing th...

  5. Genome Sequence of the Plant Pathogen and Biotechnology Agent Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brad Goodner; Gregory Hinkle; Stacie Gattung; Nancy Miller; Mary Blanchard; Barbara Qurollo; Barry S. Goldman; Yongwei Cao; Manor Askenazi; Conrad Halling; Lori Mullin; Kathryn Houmiel; Jeffrey Gordon; Mark Vaudin; Oleg Iartchouk; Andrew Epp; Fang Liu; Clifford Wollam; Mike Allinger; Dahlia Doughty; Charlaine Scott; Courtney Lappas; Brian Markelz; Casey Flanagan; Chris Crowell; Jordan Gurson; Caroline Lomo; Carolyn Sear; Graham Strub; Chris Cielo; Steven Slater

    2001-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen capable of transferring a defined segment of DNA to a host plant, generating a gall tumor. Replacing the transferred tumor-inducing genes with exogenous DNA allows the introduction of any desired gene into the plant. Thus, A. tumefaciens has been critical for the development of modern plant genetics and agricultural biotechnology. Here we describe the

  6. The Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies: molecular investigation of gram-positive bacterial plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies are actinomycete plant pathogens residing mainly in the xylem vessels that infect economically important host plants. In the Clavibacter subspecies michiganensis and sepedonicus, infecting tomato and potato, respectively, essential factors for disease induction are plasmid encoded and loss of the virulence plasmids converts these biotrophic pathogens into endophytes. The genes responsible for successful colonization of the host plant, including evasion/suppression of plant defense reactions, are chromosomally encoded. Several serine proteases seem to be involved in colonization. They are secreted by Clavibacter, but their targets remain unknown. A type 3 secretion system (T3SS) translocating effectors into the plant cells is absent in these gram-positive pathogens. With the development of the modern 'omics technologies for RNA and proteins based on the known genome sequences, a new phase in the investigation of the mechanisms of plant pathogenicity has begun to allow the genome-wide investigation of the Clavibacter-host interaction. PMID:21438679

  7. Plant mitochondria under pathogen attack: a sigh of relief or a last breath?

    PubMed

    Colombatti, Francisco; Gonzalez, Daniel H; Welchen, Elina

    2014-11-01

    Plants constitute excellent sources for pathogen nutrition and survival. To fight against pathogen attack, higher plants have developed a sophisticated immune system responsible for pathogen recognition and activation of downstream defense responses. After pathogen perception, mitochondria play an important role in the defense strategy of the plant cell, integrating and amplifying diverse signals such as salicylic acid, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) or pathogen elicitors. Signals perceived by mitochondria usually impact on their normal function, destabilizing the organelle, generating changes in respiration, membrane potential and ROS production. At this stage, mitochondria produce several signals influencing the redox state of the cell and promoting changes in the expression of nuclear genes by mitochondrial retrograde regulation. At more advanced stages, they promote programmed cell death in order to avoid pathogen propagation to the whole plant. Recent evidence indicates that plants and pathogens have evolved mechanisms to modulate the immune response by acting on mitochondrial functions. In this review, we summarize knowledge about the involvement of mitochondria in different aspects of the response of plants to pathogen attack. PMID:24704804

  8. Isoflavonoid accumulation in soybean hairy roots upon treatment with Fusarium solani

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vera V. Lozovaya; Anatoliy V. Lygin; Olga V. Zernova; Shuxian Li; Glen L. Hartman; Jack M. Widholm

    2004-01-01

    Hairy roots were initiated from two soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes with different susceptibility (susceptible ‘Spencer’ and partially resistant ‘PI567.374’) to the disease sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG) to study the role of isoflavonoids in the plant response to FSG infection. Hairy root cultures obtained by transformation with

  9. Pantothenate synthetase from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp . lycopersici is induced by a-tomatine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Pérez-Espinosa; T. Roldán-Arjona; M. Ruiz-Rubio

    2001-01-01

    The steroidal glycoalkaloid !-tomatine which is present in tomato (Lycopersicum sculentum) is assumed to protect the plant against phytopathogenic fungi. We have isolated a gene from the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici that is induced by this glycoalkaloid. This gene, designated panC, encodes a predicted protein with a molecular mass of 41 kDa that shows a high degree

  10. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Positive-Sense, Single-Stranded RNA Mycovirus Infecting the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Xie, Jiatao

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that a diverse array of mycoviruses infect the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Here, we report the molecular characterization of a newly identified mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum fusarivirus 1 (SsFV1), which was isolated from a sclerotia-defective strain JMTJ14 of S. sclerotiorum. Excluding a poly (A) tail, the genome of SsFV1 comprises 7754 nucleotides (nts) in length with 83 and 418 nts for 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. SsFV1 has four non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs): ORF1 encodes a 191 kDa polyprotein (1664 amino acid residues in length) containing conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and helicase domains; the other three ORFs encode three putative hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Phylogenetic analysis, based on RdRp and Helicase domains, indicated that SsFV1 is phylogenetically related to Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1), Fusarium graminearum virus-DK21 (FgV1), and Penicillium roqueforti RNA mycovirus 1 (PrRV1), a cluster of an independent group belonging to a newly proposed family Fusarividae. However, SsFV1 is markedly different from FgV1 and RnFV1 in genome organization and nucleotide sequence. SsFV1 was transmitted successfully to two vegetatively incompatible virus-free strains. SsFV1 is not responsible for the abnormal phenotype of strain JMTJ14. PMID:26008696

  11. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Positive-Sense, Single-Stranded RNA Mycovirus Infecting the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Xie, Jiatao

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that a diverse array of mycoviruses infect the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Here, we report the molecular characterization of a newly identified mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum fusarivirus 1 (SsFV1), which was isolated from a sclerotia-defective strain JMTJ14 of S. sclerotiorum. Excluding a poly (A) tail, the genome of SsFV1 comprises 7754 nucleotides (nts) in length with 83 and 418 nts for 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. SsFV1 has four non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs): ORF1 encodes a 191 kDa polyprotein (1664 amino acid residues in length) containing conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and helicase domains; the other three ORFs encode three putative hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Phylogenetic analysis, based on RdRp and Helicase domains, indicated that SsFV1 is phylogenetically related to Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1), Fusarium graminearum virus-DK21 (FgV1), and Penicillium roqueforti RNA mycovirus 1 (PrRV1), a cluster of an independent group belonging to a newly proposed family Fusarividae. However, SsFV1 is markedly different from FgV1 and RnFV1 in genome organization and nucleotide sequence. SsFV1 was transmitted successfully to two vegetatively incompatible virus-free strains. SsFV1 is not responsible for the abnormal phenotype of strain JMTJ14. PMID:26008696

  12. Endophytic fungal entomopathogens with activity against plant pathogens: ecology and evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie H. OwnleyKimberly; Kimberly D. Gwinn; Fernando E. Vega

    \\u000a Dual biological control, of both insect pests and plant pathogens, has been reported for the fungal entomopathogens, Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill. (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) and Lecanicillium spp. (Ascomycota: Hypocreales). However, the primary mechanisms of plant disease suppression are different for these fungi.\\u000a Beauveria spp. produce an array of bioactive metabolites, and have been reported to limit growth of fungal plant pathogens

  13. Endophytic fungal entomopathogens with activity against plant pathogens: ecology and evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie H. OwnleyKimberly; Kimberly D. Gwinn; Fernando E. Vega

    2010-01-01

    Dual biological control, of both insect pests and plant pathogens, has been reported for the fungal entomopathogens, Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill. (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) and Lecanicillium spp. (Ascomycota: Hypocreales). However, the primary mechanisms of plant disease suppression are different for these fungi.\\u000a Beauveria spp. produce an array of bioactive metabolites, and have been reported to limit growth of fungal plant pathogens

  14. Arabidopsis: A weed leading the field of plant-pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Robin Buell

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana, like other flowering plants, exhibits specificity in resistance to plant pathogens. Using the genetic diversity present in differential accessions of Arabidopsis, over 49 loci which govern pathogen specificity have been identified. Similar to resistance genes from other plant species, the Arabidopis RPS2, RPM1, and RPP5 resistance genes encode leucine-rich repeat proteins, suggesting that Arabidopsis behaves in a manner

  15. Recognition and Signaling in Plant-Pathogen Interactions: Implications for Genetic Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Lawton

    \\u000a Plants are continually exposed to potential pathogens yet for the most part they remain healthy. The ability to resist disease\\u000a reflects the operation of highly effective defense mechanisms. Plant defenses make use of pre-existing, static mechanisms\\u000a (1) as well as responses that are invoked during attempted infection (2). To successfully infect a plant, a pathogen must overcome these defenses or

  16. Thermal and Chlorophyll-Fluorescence Imaging Distinguish Plant-Pathogen Interactions at an Early Stage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laury Chaerle; Dik Hagenbeek; Erik De Bruyne; Roland Valcke; Dominique Van Der Straeten

    2004-01-01

    ; Different biotic stresses yield specific symptoms, owing to their distinct influence on a plant's physiological status. To monitor early changes in a plant's physiological status upon pathogen attack, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (Chl-FI) and thermography, which respectively visualize photosynthetic efficiency and transpiration, were carried out in parallel for two fundamentally different plant-pathogen interactions. These non-destructive imaging techniques were able to

  17. Deciphering the cryptic genome: Genome-wide analyses of the rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi reveal complex regulation of secondary metabolism and novel metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is agriculturally important because it produces the phytohormones gibberellic acids (GAs) and causes bakanae (“foolish seedling”) disease of rice. The fungus also produces multiple other secondary metabolites, including pigments and mycotoxins. Here, we present a high-q...

  18. In vitro: Response of plant growth regulators and antimalformins on conidia germination of Fusarium mangiferae and incidence of mango malformation.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohammad Wahid; Tula, Suresh; Shukla, Alok; Pant, Ramesh Chandra; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-11-01

    Mango malformation is the most important and threatening disease of recent times, primarily because of persistent lacuna in complete understanding of its nature. Diverse Fusarium spp, including F. mangiferae, were found to be associated with the disease. Here, F. mangiferae from mango cv Dashehri was morphologically characterized. Typically, oval-shaped microconidia without septum and crescent-shaped macroconidia with 3-septate were more often observed, whereas not a single chlamydospore was detected. The length and width of micro- and macro-conidia were 7.5, 55, 3.2, and 3.5, respectively. The plant growth regulators such as NAA, GA3, BAP and ethrel were found to induce in vitro germination of conidia of F. mangiferae after 12 h. In contrast, antimalformin silver nitrate (AgNO3) inhibits conidial germination in vitro and none of conidia was germinated beyond 500 ppm, however antimalformin glutathione was highly effective in stimulating conidial germination of F. mangiferae in vitro at > 1000 ppm after 24 h. We observed that the response of F. mangiferae to germinate the conidia in vitro under influence of plant growth regulators and antimalformins is not coincided with earlier findings of reduced disease incidence by exogenous application of these compounds. The present findings do not authenticate the involvement of F. mangiferae in the disease, however hormonal imbalance, most probably ethylene, might be responsible for deformed functional morphology of panicle. Further, a signal transduction mechanism of stress-stimulated ethylene imbalance causing physio-morphological changes in reproductive organs of mango flower and thereby failure of fertilization and fruit set, which needs to be investigated. PMID:24505497

  19. Rapid genetic diversification and high fitness penalties associated with pathogenicity evolution in a plant virus.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Aurora; Pagán, Israel; Anastasio, Germán; Sáez, Elisa; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2011-04-01

    Under the gene-for-gene model of host-pathogen coevolution, recognition of pathogen avirulence factors by host resistance factors triggers host defenses and limits infection. Theory predicts that the evolution of higher levels of pathogenicity will be associated with fitness penalties and that the cost of higher pathogenicity must be much smaller than that of not infecting the host. The analysis of pathogenicity costs is of academic and applied relevance, as these are determinants for the success of resistance genes bred into crops for disease control. However, most previous attempts of addressing this issue in plant pathogens yielded conflicting and inconclusive results. We have analyzed the costs of pathogenicity in pepper-infecting tobamoviruses defined by their ability to infect pepper plants with different alleles at the resistance locus L. We provide conclusive evidence of pathogenicity-associated costs by comparison of pathotype frequency with the fraction of the crop carrying the various resistance alleles, by timescaled phylogenies, and by temporal analyses of population dynamics and selection pressures using nucleotide sequences. In addition, experimental estimates of relative fitness under controlled conditions also provided evidence of high pathogenicity costs. These high pathogenicity costs may reflect intrinsic properties of plant virus genomes and should be considered in future models of host-parasite coevolution. PMID:21131559

  20. eFG: an electronic resource for Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Luonan; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a plant pathogen, which causes crop diseases and further leads to huge economic damage worldwide in past decades. Recently, the accumulation of different types of molecular data provides insights into the pathogenic mechanism of F. graminearum, and might help develop efficient strategies to combat this destructive fungus. Unfortunately, most available molecular data related to F. graminearum are distributed in various media, where each single source only provides limited information on the complex biological systems of the fungus. In this work, we present a comprehensive database, namely eFG (Electronic resource for Fusarium graminearum), to the community for further understanding this destructive pathogen. In particular, a large amount of functional genomics data generated by our group is deposited in eFG, including protein subcellular localizations, protein–protein interactions and orthologous genes in other model organisms. This valuable knowledge can not only help to disclose the molecular underpinnings of pathogenesis of the destructive fungus F. graminearum but also help the community to develop efficient strategies to combat this pathogen. To our best knowledge, eFG is the most comprehensive functional genomics database for F. graminearum until now. The eFG database is freely accessible at http://csb.shu.edu.cn/efg/ with a user-friendly and interactive interface, and all data can be downloaded freely. Database URL: http://csb.shu.edu.cn/efg/ PMID:23798489

  1. The xylem as battleground for plant hosts and vascular wilt pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Yadeta, Koste A.; J. Thomma, Bart P. H.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular wilts are among the most destructive plant diseases that occur in annual crops as well as in woody perennials. These diseases are generally caused by soil-borne bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes that infect through the roots and enter the water-conducting xylem vessels where they proliferate and obstruct the transportation of water and minerals. As a consequence, leaves wilt and die, which may lead to impairment of the whole plant and eventually to death of the plant. Cultural, chemical, and biological measures to control this group of plant pathogens are generally ineffective, and the most effective control strategy is the use of genetic resistance. Owing to the fact that vascular wilt pathogens live deep in the interior of their host plants, studies into the biology of vascular pathogens are complicated. However, to design novel strategies to combat vascular wilt diseases, understanding the (molecular) biology of vascular pathogens and the molecular mechanisms underlying plant defense against these pathogens is crucial. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on interactions of vascular wilt pathogens with their host plants, with emphasis on host defense responses against this group of pathogens. PMID:23630534

  2. Exserohilum rostratum: characterization of a cross-kingdom pathogen of plants and humans.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kalpana; Goss, Erica M; Dickstein, Ellen R; Smith, Matthew E; Johnson, Judith A; Southwick, Frederick S; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen host shifts represent a major source of new infectious diseases. There are several examples of cross-genus host jumps that have caused catastrophic epidemics in animal and plant species worldwide. Cross-kingdom jumps are rare, and are often associated with nosocomial infections. Here we provide an example of human-mediated cross-kingdom jumping of Exserohilum rostratum isolated from a patient who had received a corticosteroid injection and died of fungal meningitis in a Florida hospital in 2012. The clinical isolate of E. rostratum was compared with two plant pathogenic isolates of E. rostratum and an isolate of the closely related genus Bipolaris in terms of morphology, phylogeny, and pathogenicity on one C3 grass, Gulf annual rye grass (Lolium multiflorum), and two C4 grasses, Japanese stilt grass (Microstegium vimineum) and bahia grass (Paspalum notatum). Colony growth and color, as well as conidia shape and size were the same for the clinical and plant isolates of E. rostratum, while these characteristics differed slightly for the Bipolaris sp. isolate. The plant pathogenic and clinical isolates of E. rostratum were indistinguishable based on morphology and ITS and 28S rDNA sequence analysis. The clinical isolate was as pathogenic to all grass species tested as the plant pathogenic strains that were originally isolated from plant hosts. The clinical isolate induced more severe symptoms on stilt grass than on rye grass, while this was the reverse for the plant isolates of E. rostratum. The phylogenetic similarity between the clinical and plant-associated E. rostratum isolates and the ability of the clinical isolate to infect plants suggests that a plant pathogenic strain of E. rostratum contaminated the corticosteroid injection fluid and was able to cause systemic disease in the affected patient. This is the first proof that a clinical isolate of E. rostratum is also an effective plant pathogen. PMID:25285444

  3. Impact of Vector Dispersal and Host-Plant Fidelity on the Dissemination of an Emerging Plant Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Johannesen, Jes; Foissac, Xavier; Kehrli, Patrik; Maixner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dissemination of vector-transmitted pathogens depend on the survival and dispersal of the vector and the vector's ability to transmit the pathogen, while the host range of vector and pathogen determine the breath of transmission possibilities. In this study, we address how the interaction between dispersal and plant fidelities of a pathogen (stolbur phytoplasma tuf-a) and its vector (Hyalesthes obsoletus: Cixiidae) affect the emergence of the pathogen. Using genetic markers, we analysed the geographic origin and range expansion of both organisms in Western Europe and, specifically, whether the pathogen's dissemination in the northern range is caused by resident vectors widening their host-plant use from field bindweed to stinging nettle, and subsequent host specialisation. We found evidence for common origins of pathogen and vector south of the European Alps. Genetic patterns in vector populations show signals of secondary range expansion in Western Europe leading to dissemination of tuf-a pathogens, which might be newly acquired and of hybrid origin. Hence, the emergence of stolbur tuf-a in the northern range was explained by secondary immigration of vectors carrying stinging nettle-specialised tuf-a, not by widening the host-plant spectrum of resident vectors with pathogen transmission from field bindweed to stinging nettle nor by primary co-migration from the resident vector's historical area of origin. The introduction of tuf-a to stinging nettle in the northern range was therefore independent of vector's host-plant specialisation but the rapid pathogen dissemination depended on the vector's host shift, whereas the general dissemination elsewhere was linked to plant specialisation of the pathogen but not of the vector. PMID:23284774

  4. The role of effectors in nonhost resistance to filamentous plant pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Remco; Mantelin, Sophie; McLellan, Hazel; Thilliez, Gaëtan

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most plants are resistant to a wide range of phytopathogens. However, mechanisms contributing to this so-called nonhost resistance (NHR) are poorly understood. Besides constitutive defenses, plants have developed two layers of inducible defense systems. Plant innate immunity relies on recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In compatible interactions, pathogenicity effector molecules secreted by the invader can suppress host defense responses and facilitate the infection process. Additionally, plants have evolved pathogen-specific resistance mechanisms based on recognition of these effectors, which causes secondary defense responses. The current effector-driven hypothesis is that NHR in plants that are distantly related to the host plant is triggered by PAMP recognition that cannot be efficiently suppressed by the pathogen, whereas in more closely related species, nonhost recognition of effectors would play a crucial role. In this review we give an overview of current knowledge of the role of effector molecules in host and NHR and place these findings in the context of the model. We focus on examples from filamentous pathogens (fungi and oomycetes), discuss their implications for the field of plant-pathogen interactions and relevance in plant breeding strategies for development of durable resistance in crops. PMID:25426123

  5. Genome Sequence of Phytophthora fragariae var. fragariae, a Quarantine Plant-Pathogenic Fungus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruifang; Cheng, Yinghui; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying; Guo, Liyun; Zhang, Guiming

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora fragariae var. fragariae is a serious plant-pathogenic fungus causing red core disease in strawberries, resulting in a larger number of fruit produced, and the fungus has been regulated as a quarantine pest of many countries and regions. Here, we announce the genome sequence of P. fragariae var. fragariae, and this information might provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenicity and host specificity of this pathogen, as well as help us further identify targets for fungicides. PMID:25814589

  6. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continual use of fungicides in agriculture often results in development of resistance in pathogens. A new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides by chemosensitization. This involves combining fungicides with certain non-fungicida...

  7. Identification of a Chitinase-modifying Protein from Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Todd A.; Wicklow, Donald T.; Price, Neil P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Chitinase-modifying proteins (cmps) are proteases secreted by fungal pathogens that truncate the plant class IV chitinases ChitA and ChitB during maize ear rot. cmp activity has been characterized for Bipolaris zeicola and Stenocarpella maydis, but the identities of the proteases are not known. Here, we report that cmps are secreted by multiple species from the genus Fusarium, that cmp from Fusarium verticillioides (Fv-cmp) is a fungalysin metalloprotease, and that it cleaves within a sequence that is conserved in class IV chitinases. Protein extracts from Fusarium cultures were found to truncate ChitA and ChitB in vitro. Based on this activity, Fv-cmp was purified from F. verticillioides. N-terminal sequencing of truncated ChitA and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of reaction products showed that Fv-cmp is an endoprotease that cleaves a peptide bond on the C-terminal side of the lectin domain. The N-terminal sequence of purified Fv-cmp was determined and compared with a set of predicted proteins, resulting in its identification as a zinc metalloprotease of the fungalysin family. Recombinant Fv-cmp also truncated ChitA, confirming its identity, but had reduced activity, suggesting that the recombinant protease did not mature efficiently from its propeptide-containing precursor. This is the first report of a fungalysin that targets a nonstructural host protein and the first to implicate this class of virulence-related proteases in plant disease. PMID:21878653

  8. Mycosphaerella graminicola sequencing heads towards the first finished genome of a filamentous plant pathogenic fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella is one of the largest genera of plant pathogenic fungi with more than 1,000 named species, a few of which cause disease in humans and other vertebrates. The genomes of M. graminicola and M. fijiensis, two of the most economically important pathogens of wheat and banana, respectively, ...

  9. USE OF LEAF TEMPERATURE TO ASSESS THE RESPONSE OF GERANIUM PLANTS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO SOIL PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early response of geranium plants (Pelargonium x hortorum cv. "Maverick Red") exposed to soil pathogens was assessed by measuring changes in leaf temperature. Differences between air temperature and leaf temperature were noticed 7 days after exposure to pathogens. Differences were greatest between...

  10. The Effect of Nitrogen on Disease Development and Gene Expression in Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandor S. Snoeijers; Alejandro Pérez-García; Matthieu H. A. J. Joosten

    2000-01-01

    Successful colonisation of plants by pathogens requires efficient utilisation of nutrient resources available in host tissues. Several bacterial and fungal genes are specifically induced during pathogenesis and under nitrogen-limiting conditions in vitro. This suggests that a nitrogen-limiting environment may be one of the cues for disease symptom development during growth of the pathogens in planta. Here we review recent literature

  11. A generic risk-based surveying method for invading plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive plant pathogens are increasing with international trade and travel with damaging environmental and economic consequences. Recent examples include tree diseases such as Sudden Oak Death in the Western US and Ash Dieback in Europe. To control an invading pathogen it is crucial that newly in...

  12. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Potential of Some Plants Against Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Satish; M. P. Raghavendra; K. A. Raveesha

    Plants are rich source of antibacterial agents, which could be exploited in human disease management. Aqueous extracts of leaves of 46 plants selected based on an ethnobotanical survey from Mysore region Karnataka (India) were subjected to in vitro antibacterial activity assay against 14 important human pathogenic bacteria employing cup diffusion method. Antibacterial activity of the twelve plants aqueous extracts was

  13. Genome of the Actinomycete Plant Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus Suggests Recent Niche Adaptation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen D. Bentley; Craig Corton; Susan E. Brown; Andrew Barron; Louise Clark; Jon Doggett; Barbara Harris; Doug Ormond; Michael A. Quail; Georgiana May; David Francis; Dennis Knudson; Julian Parkhill; Carol A. Ishimaru

    2008-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus is a plant-pathogenic bacterium and the causative agent of bacterial ring rot, a devastating agricultural disease under strict quarantine control and zero tolerance in the seed potato industry. This organism appears to be largely restricted to an endophytic lifestyle, proliferating within plant tissues and unable to persist in the absence of plant material. Analysis of the

  14. Cello-oligosaccharides released from host plants induce pathogenicity in scab-causing Streptomyces species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thaxtomin, a phytotoxic dipeptide that inhibits cellulose synthesis in expanding plant cells, is a pathogenicity determinant in scab-causing Streptomyces species. Cellobiose and cellotriose, the smallest subunits of cellulose, stimulated thaxtomin production in a defined medium, while other oligosa...

  15. Effect of clove oil on plant pathogenic bacteria and bacterial wilt of tomato and geranium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined the antibacterial activity of clove oil against seven different genera of plant pathogenic bacteria including Gram-negative Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia carotovora pv. carotovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii...

  16. Characterization of strains of Bacillus mojavensis for biocontrol of a maize pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endophytic bacterium, Bacillus mojavensis controls fungal diseases in maize and other plants. The bacterium and its cultural extracts have been shown to be antagonistic to a pathogenic and mycotoxic fungus, Fusarium verticillioides. Extracts prepared from cultures of B. mojavensis contained an...

  17. Polygalacturonases, polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins and pectic oligomers in plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renato D'Ovidio; Benedetta Mattei; Serena Roberti; Daniela Bellincampi

    2004-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (PGs) are produced by fungal pathogens during early plant infection and are believed to be important pathogenicity factors. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant defense proteins which reduce the hydrolytic activity of endoPGs and favor the accumulation of long-chain oligogalacturonides (OGs) which are elicitors of a variety of defense responses. PGIPs belong to the superfamily of leucine reach repeat (LRR)

  18. Dothideomycete Plant Interactions Illuminated by Genome Sequencing and EST Analysis of the Wheat Pathogen Stagonospora nodorum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James K. Hane; Rohan G. T. Lowe; Peter S. Solomon; Kar-Chun Tan; Conrad L. Schoch; Joseph W. Spatafora; Pedro W. Crous; Chinappa Kodira; Bruce W. Birren; James E. Galagan; Stefano F. F. Torriani; Bruce A. McDonald; R. P. Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Stagonospora nodorum is a major necrotrophic fungal pathogen of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and a member of the Dothideomycetes, a large fungal taxon that includes many important plant pathogens affecting all major crop plant families. Here,we report the acquisition and initial analysis of a draft genome sequence for this fungus.The assembly comprises 37,164,227 bp of nuclear DNA contained in 107 scaffolds.

  19. Effects of plant pathogens on population dynamics and community composition in grassland ecosystems: two case studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Jeger; Nabeil K. G. Salama; Michael Shaw; F. van den Berg; Frank Van Den Bosch

    2014-01-01

    Grassland ecosystems comprise a major portion of the earth’s terrestrial surface, ranging from high-input cultivated monocultures or simple species-mixtures to relatively unmanaged but dynamic systems. Plant pathogens are a component of these systems with their impact dependent on many interacting factors, including grassland species population dynamics and community composition, the topics covered in this paper. Plant pathogens are affected by

  20. Exploiting generic platform technologies for the detection and identification of plant pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil Boonham; Rachel Glover; Jenny Tomlinson; Rick Mumford

    2008-01-01

    The detection and identification of plant pathogens currently relies upon a very diverse range of techniques and skills, from\\u000a traditional culturing and taxonomic skills to modern molecular-based methods. The wide range of methods employed reflects\\u000a the great diversity of plant pathogens and the hosts they infect. The well-documented decline in taxonomic expertise, along\\u000a with the need to develop ever more

  1. Enterococcus faecalis Mammalian Virulence-Related Factors Exhibit Potent Pathogenicity in the Arabidopsis thaliana Plant Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ajay K. Jha; Harsh P. Bais; Jorge M. Vivanco

    2005-01-01

    Some pathogenic bacteria belong to a large, diverse group of species capable of infecting plants, animals, and humans. Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of infecting patients with a deficient immune system. Here we report that three E. faecalis strains (FA-2-2, V583, and OG1RF) are capable of infecting the leaves and roots of the model plant species Arabidopsis

  2. Hyphal Growth of Phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum Causes Cell Lysis and Death of Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host. PMID:25025395

  3. BEET ROOT-ROT INDUCING ISOLATES OF FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM FROM COLORADO AND MONTANA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium root rot, a rot of the root top of sugar beet, caused by Fusarium oxysporum has been confirmed only in Texas, USDA, to date. Isolates of Fusarium were obtained from beets with tip rot symptoms from Montana and Colorado. Isolates were identified and tested for pathogenicity on sugar beet. ...

  4. Specific Detection of Fusarium Species in Blood and Tissues by a PCR Technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    FRANCOIS-XAVIER HUE; MICHEL HUERRE; MARIE ANGE ROUFFAULT; CLAUDE DE BIEVRE

    1999-01-01

    Fusarium species are opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that often cause fatal invasive mycoses. We designed a primer pair that amplifies by PCR a fragment of a gene coding for the rRNA of Fusarium species. The DNAs of the main Fusarium species and Neocosmospora vasinfecta but not the DNAs from 11 medically important fungi were amplified by these primers. The lower limit

  5. Aggressiveness of Fusarium species and impact of root infection on growth and yield of soybeans.

    PubMed

    Arias, María M Díaz; Leandro, Leonor F; Munkvold, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Fusarium spp. are commonly isolated from soybean roots but the pathogenic activity of most species is poorly documented. Aggressiveness and yield impact of nine species of Fusarium were determined on soybean in greenhouse (50 isolates) and field microplot (19 isolates) experiments. Root rot severity and shoot and root dry weights were compared at growth stages V3 or R1. Root systems were scanned and digital image analysis was conducted; yield was measured in microplots. Disease severity and root morphology impacts varied among and within species. Fusarium graminearum was highly aggressive (root rot severity >90%), followed by F. proliferatum and F. virguliforme. Significant variation in damping-off (20 to 75%) and root rot severity (<20 to >60%) was observed among F. oxysporum isolates. In artificially-infested microplots, root rot severity was low (<25%) and mean yield was not significantly reduced. However, there were significant linear relationships between yield and root symptoms for some isolates. Root morphological characteristics were more consistent indicators of yield loss than root rot severity. This study provides the first characterization of aggressiveness and yield impact of Fusarium root rot species on soybean at different plant stages and introduces root image analysis to assess the impact of root pathogens on soybean. PMID:23514263

  6. What does it take to be a plant pathogen: genomic insights from Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Bignell, Dawn R D; Huguet-Tapia, José C; Joshi, Madhumita V; Pettis, Gregg S; Loria, Rosemary

    2010-08-01

    Plant pathogenicity is rare in the genus Streptomyces, with only a dozen or so species possessing this trait out of the more than 900 species described. Nevertheless, such species have had a significant impact on agricultural economies throughout the world due to their ability to cause important crop diseases such as potato common scab, which is characterized by lesions that form on the potato tuber surface. All pathogenic species that cause common scab produce a family of phytotoxins called the thaxtomins, which function as cellulose synthesis inhibitors. In addition, the nec1 and tomA genes are conserved in several pathogenic streptomycetes, the former of which is predicted to function in the suppression of plant defense responses. Streptomyces scabies is the oldest plant pathogen described and has a world-wide distribution, whereas species such as S. turgidiscabies and S. acidiscabies are believed to be newly emergent pathogens found in more limited geographical locations. The genome sequence of S. scabies 87-22 was recently completed, and comparative genomic analyses with other sequenced microbial pathogens have revealed the presence of additional genes that may play a role in plant pathogenicity, an idea that is supported by functional analysis of one such putative virulence locus. In addition, the availability of multiple genome sequences for both pathogenic and nonpathogenic streptomycetes has provided an opportunity for comparative genomic analyses to identify the Streptomyces pathogenome. Such genomic analyses will contribute to the fundamental understanding of the mechanisms and evolution of plant pathogenicity and plant-microbe biology within this genus. PMID:20396949

  7. Studying plant-pathogen interactions in the genomics era: beyond molecular Koch's postulates to systems biology.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David J; Collmer, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Molecular factors enabling microbial pathogens to cause plant diseases have been sought with increasing efficacy over three research eras that successively introduced the tools of disease physiology, single-gene molecular genetics, and genomics. From this work emerged a unified model of the interactions of biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens, which posits that successful pathogens typically defeat two levels of plant defense by translocating cytoplasmic effectors that suppress the first defense (surface arrayed against microbial signatures) while evading the second defense (internally arrayed against effectors). As is predicted from this model and confirmed by sequence pattern-driven discovery of large repertoires of cytoplasmic effectors in the genomes of many pathogens, the coevolution of (hemi)biotrophic pathogens and their hosts has generated pathosystems featuring extreme complexity and apparent robustness. These findings highlight the need for a fourth research era of systems biology in which virulence factors are studied as pathosystem components, and pathosystems are studied for their emergent properties. PMID:20687834

  8. Other Fusarium - Associated Problems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to Fusarium yellows and Fusarium root rot, caused by Fusarium oxysporum, other species of Fusarium can infect sugar beet and cause foliar yellowing, root rot, or other symptoms. The importance of many of these problems is not well understood. This chapter discusses some of what is know...

  9. Diversity of the Fusarium graminearum species complex on French cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminearum is an important pathogen causing Fusarium head blight (FHB) on wheat and barley and Gibberella ear rot (GER) on maize, and harvested grains often are contaminated with trichothecenes such as deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) that are a major health and food safety concern...

  10. Consequences of combined herbivore feeding and pathogen infection for fitness of Barbarea vulgaris plants.

    PubMed

    van Mölken, Tamara; Kuzina, Vera; Munk, Karen Rysbjerg; Olsen, Carl Erik; Sundelin, Thomas; van Dam, Nicole M; Hauser, Thure P

    2014-06-01

    Plants are often attacked by pathogens and insects. Their combined impact on plant performance and fitness depends on complicated three-way interactions and the plant's ability to compensate for resource losses. Here, we evaluate the response of Barbarea vulgaris, a wild crucifer, to combined attack by an oomycete Albugo sp., a plant pathogen causing white rust, and a flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum. Plants from two B. vulgaris types that differ in resistance to P. nemorum were exposed to Albugo and P. nemorum alone and in combination and then monitored for pathogen infection, herbivore damage, defence compounds, nutritional quality, biomass and seed production. Albugo developed infections in the insect-resistant plants, whereas insect-susceptible plants were scarcely infected. Concentrations of Albugo DNA were higher in plants also exposed to herbivory; similarly, flea beetle larvae caused more damage on Albugo-infected plants. Concentrations of saponins and glucosinolates strongly increased when the plants were exposed to P. nemorum and when the insect-susceptible plants were exposed to Albugo, and some of these compounds increased even more in the combined treatment. The biomass of young insect-susceptible plants was lower following exposure to flea beetles, and the number of leaves of both plant types was negatively affected by combined exposure. After flowering, however, adult plants produced similar numbers of viable seeds, irrespective of treatment. Our findings support the concept that pathogens and herbivores can affect each other's performance on a host plant and that the plant reacts by inducing specific and general defences. However, plants may be able to compensate for biomass loss from single and combined attacks over time. PMID:24687328

  11. Genome sequence of the necrotrophic plant pathogen Pythium ultimum reveals original pathogenicity mechanisms and effector repertoire.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The P. ultimum DAOM BR144 (=CBS 805.95 = ATCC200006) genome (42.8 Mb) encodes 15,290 genes, and has extensive sequence similarity and synteny with related Phytophthora spp., including the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Whole transcriptome sequencing revealed expression of 86 % o...

  12. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  13. Understanding the plant-pathogen interactions in the context of proteomics-generated apoplastic proteins inventory

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Lee, So Eui; Agrawal, Ganesh K.; Rakwal, Randeep; Park, Sangryeol; Wang, Yiming; Kim, Sun T.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular space between cell wall and plasma membrane acts as the first battle field between plants and pathogens. Bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes that colonize the living plant tissues are encased in this narrow region in the initial step of infection. Therefore, the apoplastic region is believed to be an interface which mediates the first crosstalk between host and pathogen. The secreted proteins and other metabolites, derived from both host and pathogen, interact in this apoplastic region and govern the final relationship between them. Hence, investigation of protein secretion and apoplastic interaction could provide a better understanding of plant-microbe interaction. Here, we are briefly discussing the methods available for the isolation and normalization of the apoplastic proteins, as well as the current state of secretome studies focused on the in-planta interaction between the host and the pathogen. PMID:26082784

  14. Understanding the plant-pathogen interactions in the context of proteomics-generated apoplastic proteins inventory.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Lee, So Eui; Agrawal, Ganesh K; Rakwal, Randeep; Park, Sangryeol; Wang, Yiming; Kim, Sun T

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular space between cell wall and plasma membrane acts as the first battle field between plants and pathogens. Bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes that colonize the living plant tissues are encased in this narrow region in the initial step of infection. Therefore, the apoplastic region is believed to be an interface which mediates the first crosstalk between host and pathogen. The secreted proteins and other metabolites, derived from both host and pathogen, interact in this apoplastic region and govern the final relationship between them. Hence, investigation of protein secretion and apoplastic interaction could provide a better understanding of plant-microbe interaction. Here, we are briefly discussing the methods available for the isolation and normalization of the apoplastic proteins, as well as the current state of secretome studies focused on the in-planta interaction between the host and the pathogen. PMID:26082784

  15. Forest species diversity reduces disease risk in a generalist plant pathogen invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, Sarah E.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Rizzo, David M.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that biodiversity loss can increase disease transmission, yet our understanding of the 'diversity-disease hypothesis' for generalist pathogens in natural ecosystems is limited. We used a landscape epidemiological approach to examine two scenarios regarding diversity effects on the emerging plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum across a broad, heterogeneous ecoregion: (1) an amplification effect exists where disease risk is greater in areas with higher plant diversity due to the pathogen's wide host range, or (2) a dilution effect where risk is reduced with increasing diversity due to lower competency of alternative hosts. We found evidence for pathogen dilution, whereby disease risk was lower in sites with higher species diversity, after accounting for potentially confounding effects of host density and landscape heterogeneity. Our results suggest that although nearly all plants in the ecosystem are hosts, alternative hosts may dilute disease transmission by competent hosts, thereby buffering forest health from infectious disease.

  16. Mitochondrial Nitric Oxide Synthesis During Plant–Pathogen Interactions: Role of Nitrate Reductase in Providing Substrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ione Salgado; Luzia Modolo; Ohara Augusto; Márcia Braga; Halley Oliveira

    Nitric oxide (.\\u000a NO) is an important signaling\\u000a molecule that regulates plant metabolism and mediates defense responses against biotic and abiotic stresses.\\u000a Although the cellular mechanisms by which .NO is generated in plants have been\\u000a intensively investigated, they still remain controversial, particularly those implicated in plant resistance\\u000a to pathogens. .NO can be synthesized in plants via the oxidation of l-arginine

  17. Peptidotriazoles with antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Güell, Imma; Micaló, Lluís; Cano, Laura; Badosa, Esther; Ferre, Rafael; Montesinos, Emilio; Bardají, Eduard; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta

    2012-01-01

    We designed and prepared peptidotriazoles based on the antimicrobial peptide BP100 (LysLysLeuPheLysLysIleLeuLysTyrLeu-NH(2)) by introducing a triazole ring in the peptide backbone or onto the side chain of a selected residue. These compounds were screened for their in vitro growth inhibition of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and for their cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells and tobacco leaves. Their proteolytic susceptibility was also analyzed. The antibacterial activity and the hemolysis were influenced by the amino acid that was modified with the triazole as well as by the absence of presence of a substituent in this heterocyclic ring. We identified sequences active against the bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (MIC of 1.6-12.5 ?M), and against the fungi Fusarium oxysporum (MIC<6.2-12.5 ?M) with low hemolytic activity (0-23% at 50 ?M), high stability to protease digestion and no phytotoxicity. These peptidotriazoles constitute good candidates to design new antimicrobial agents. PMID:22198367

  18. Innate Immunity in Plants: An Arms Race Between Pattern Recognition Receptors in Plants and Effectors in Microbial Pathogens

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Thomas Boller (University of Basel; Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center, Botanical Institute)

    2009-05-08

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Plant defense responses known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) begin when the plant is exposed to microbial elicitors named pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or MAMPs). Recent studies provide an elegant explanation for the difficulty of demonstrating the role of PTI in plant disease resistance. It turns out that the important contribution of PTI to disease resistance is masked by pathogen virulence effectors that have evolved to suppress it.

  19. Infection of an Insect Vector with a Bacterial Plant Pathogen Increases Its Propensity for Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Monique R.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of vector-transmitted pathogens relies on complex interactions between host, vector and pathogen. In sessile plant pathosystems, the spread of a pathogen highly depends on the movement and mobility of the vector. However, questions remain as to whether and how pathogen-induced vector manipulations may affect the spread of a plant pathogen. Here we report for the first time that infection with a bacterial plant pathogen increases the probability of vector dispersal, and that such movement of vectors is likely manipulated by a bacterial plant pathogen. We investigated how Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) affects dispersal behavior, flight capacity, and the sexual attraction of its vector, the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama). CLas is the putative causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), which is a disease that threatens the viability of commercial citrus production worldwide. When D. citri developed on CLas-infected plants, short distance dispersal of male D. citri was greater compared to counterparts reared on uninfected plants. Flight by CLas-infected D. citri was initiated earlier and long flight events were more common than by uninfected psyllids, as measured by a flight mill apparatus. Additionally, CLas titers were higher among psyllids that performed long flights than psyllid that performed short flights. Finally, attractiveness of female D. citri that developed on infected plants to male conspecifics increased proportionally with increasing CLas bacterial titers measured within female psyllids. Our study indicates that the phytopathogen, CLas, may manipulate movement and mate selection behavior of their vectors, which is a possible evolved mechanism to promote their own spread. These results have global implications for both current HLB models of disease spread and control strategies. PMID:26083763

  20. Synergisms between microbial pathogens in plant disease complexes: a growing trend

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Plant diseases are often thought to be caused by one species or even by a specific strain. Microbes in nature, however, mostly occur as part of complex communities and this has been noted since the time of van Leeuwenhoek. Interestingly, most laboratory studies focus on single microbial strains grown in pure culture; we were therefore unaware of possible interspecies and/or inter-kingdom interactions of pathogenic microbes in the wild. In human and animal infections, it is now being recognized that many diseases are the result of multispecies synergistic interactions. This increases the complexity of the disease and has to be taken into consideration in the development of more effective control measures. On the other hand, there are only a few reports of synergistic pathogen–pathogen interactions in plant diseases and the mechanisms of interactions are currently unknown. Here we review some of these reports of synergism between different plant pathogens and their possible implications in crop health. Finally, we briefly highlight the recent technological advances in diagnostics as these are beginning to provide important insights into the microbial communities associated with complex plant diseases. These examples of synergistic interactions of plant pathogens that lead to disease complexes might prove to be more common than expected and understanding the underlying mechanisms might have important implications in plant disease epidemiology and management.

  1. Does biopolymers composition in seeds contribute to the flax resistance against the Fusarium infection?

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Ahmed M; Preisner, Marta; Kulma, Anna; Dymi?ska, Lucyna; Hanuza, Jerzy; Starzycki, Michal; Szopa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, the cultivation of fibrous flax declined heavily. There are number of reasons for that fact; one of them is flax susceptibility to the pathogen infection. Damages caused mainly by fungi from genus Fusarium lead to the significant losses when cultivating flax, which in turn discourage farmers to grow flax. Therefore, to launch the new products from flax with attractive properties there is a need to obtain new flax varieties with increased resistance to pathogens. In order to obtain the better quality of flax fiber, we previously generated flax with reduced pectin or lignin level (cell wall polymers). The modifications altered also plants' resistance to the Fusarium infection. Undoubtedly, the plant defense system is complex, however, in this article we aimed to investigate the composition of modified flax seeds and to correlate it with the observed changes in the flax resistance to the pathogen attack. In particular, we evaluated the content and composition of carbohydrates (cell wall polymers: pectin, cellulose, hemicelluloses and mucilage), and phenylpropanoid compounds (lignin, lignans, phenolics). From the obtained results we concluded that the observed changes in the vulnerability to pathogens putatively correlate with the antioxidant potential of phenylpropanoids accumulated in seeds, seco-isolariciresinol and coumaric acid diglycosides in particular, and with pectin level as a carbon source for pathogens. Surprisingly, relatively less important for the resistance was the physical barrier, including lignin and cellulose amount and cellulose structure. Certainly, the hypothesis should be verified on a larger number of genotypes. PMID:25080398

  2. PLANT-PATHOGENIC STREPTOMYCES: BREACHING THE WALL BY SENSING THE WALL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thaxtomin family of phytotoxins, produced by plant-pathogenic Streptomyces species that cause common scab of potato, are required for disease development. These phytotoxins disrupt plant cell wall formation by inhibiting cellulose synthesis. Significant production of thaxtomins in culture only...

  3. List of new names of plant pathogenic bacteria (2011-2012)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Society of Plant Pathology Committee on the Taxonomy of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria has responsibility to evaluate the names of newly proposed pathovars for adherence to the International Standards for Naming Pathovars of Phytopathogenic Bacteria. Currently, the Comprehensive List of...

  4. Paleogene Radiation of a Plant Pathogenic Mushroom Martin P. A. Coetzee1

    E-print Network

    Paleogene Radiation of a Plant Pathogenic Mushroom Martin P. A. Coetzee1 *, Paulette Bloomer2 of the economic losses they cause and the ease with which they are able to spread across large areas their dispersal and current day distribution. We tested the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin of the plant

  5. Exopolysaccharides in the pathogenic interaction of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis with tomato plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Bermpohl; Jens Dreier; Rainer Bahro; Rudolf Eichenlaub

    1996-01-01

    The extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) of seven strains of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, a pathogen of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was isolated and the carbohydrate composition was determined. Based on the EPS analyses and the interaction with tomato plants the strains could be placed into two groups. Strains of Group I efficiently colonize tomato plants and produce an EPS with an

  6. NO way to live; the various roles of nitric oxide in plant-pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis A. J. Mur; Tim L. W. Carver; Elena Prats

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide has attracted considerable interest from plant pathologists due its established role in regulat- ing mammalian anti-microbial defences, particularly via programmed cell death (PCD). Although NO plays a major role in plant PCD elicited in response to certain types of pathogenic challenge, the race-specific hyper- sensitive response (HR), it is now evident that NO also acts in the regulation

  7. Fun Microbiology: Using a Plant Pathogenic Fungus To Demonstrate Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; Orsted, Kathy M.; Warnes, Carl E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a plant pathogenic fungus in which students learn to follow aseptic techniques, grow and produce spores of a fungus, use a hemacytometer for enumerating spores, prepare serial dilutions, grow and inoculate plants, isolate a pure culture using agar streak plates, and demonstrate the four steps of Koch's postulates.…

  8. Antimicrobial activities of extracts from tropical Atlantic marine plants against marine pathogens and saprophytes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian Engel; Melany P. Puglisi; Paul R. Jensen; William Fenical

    2006-01-01

    Studies investigating disease resistance in marine plants have indicated that secondary metabolites may have important defensive functions against harmful marine microorganisms. The goal of this study was to systematically screen extracts from marine plants for antimicrobial effects against marine pathogens and saprophytes. Lipophilic and hydrophilic extracts from species of 49 marine algae and 3 seagrasses collected in the tropical Atlantic

  9. Verticillium comparative genomics yields insights into niche adaptation by plant vascular wilt pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum infect over 200 plant species worldwide, causing recurring crop losses estimated in the billions of dollars annually. Plant pathogenic Verticillium species are soilborne, and produce dormant structures that enable survival for years in ...

  10. Plant-in-chip: Microfluidic system for studying root growth and pathogenic interactions in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Archana; Pandey, Santosh

    2011-06-01

    We report a microfluidic platform for the hydroponic growth of Arabidopsis plants with high-resolution visualization of root development and root-pathogen interactions. The platform comprises a set of parallel microchannels with individual input/output ports where 1-day old germinated seedlings are initially placed. Under optimum conditions, a root system grows in each microchannel and its images are recorded over a 198-h period. Different concentrations of plant growth media show different root growth characteristics. Later, the developed roots are inoculated with two plant pathogens (nematodes and zoospores) and their physicochemical interactions with the live root systems are observed.

  11. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jinrong (Columbia, MO); Stacey, Gary (Columbia, MO); Stacey, Minviluz (Columbia, MO); Zhang, Xuecheng (Columbia, MO)

    2012-01-17

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  12. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Wan, Jinrong; Stacey, Gary; Stacey, Minviluz; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2013-10-15

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  13. Terrific Protein Traffic: The Mystery of Effector Protein Delivery by Filamentous Plant Pathogens

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ralph Panstruga (Max-Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research; Department of Plant-Microbe Interactions)

    2009-05-08

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Many biotrophic fungal and oomycete plant pathogens deliver effector proteins directly into host cells during infection. Recent advances are revealing the extensive effector repertoires of these pathogens and are beginning to shed light on how they manipulate host cells to establish a parasitic relationship. The current explosion of information is opening new research avenues in molecular plant pathology and is providing new opportunities to limit the impact of plant disease on food production.

  14. Host structural carbohydrate induces vector transmission of a bacterial plant pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Killiny, Nabil; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2009-01-01

    Many insect-borne pathogens have complex life histories because they must colonize both hosts and vectors for successful dissemination. In addition, the transition from host to vector environments may require changes in gene expression before the pathogen's departure from the host. Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited plant-pathogenic bacterium transmitted by leafhopper vectors that causes diseases in a number of economically important plants. We hypothesized that factors of host origin, such as plant structural polysaccharides, are important in regulating X. fastidiosa gene expression and mediating vector transmission of this pathogen. The addition of pectin and glucan to a simple defined medium resulted in dramatic changes in X. fastidiosa's phenotype and gene-expression profile. Cells grown in the presence of pectin became more adhesive than in other media tested. In addition, the presence of pectin and glucan in media resulted in significant changes in the expression of several genes previously identified as important for X. fastidiosa's pathogenicity in plants. Furthermore, vector transmission of X. fastidiosa was induced in the presence of both polysaccharides. Our data show that host structural polysaccharides mediate gene regulation in X. fastidiosa, which results in phenotypic changes required for vector transmission. A better understanding of how vector-borne pathogens transition from host to vector, and vice versa, may lead to previously undiscovered disease-control strategies. PMID:20018775

  15. Ecology and Human Pathogenicity of Plant-Associated Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriele Berg; Christin Zachow; Massimiliano Cardinale; Henry Müller

    \\u000a Plant species and organs are colonised by diverse bacterial communities, which fulfil important functions for their host.\\u000a Plant-associated bacteria have a great potential in diverse areas of biotechnology, e.g. as biological control agents (BCAs)\\u000a in plant protection. Although many of them have a positive interaction with their host plants, they can interact with other\\u000a eukaryotic hosts like humans in a

  16. Image-based Analysis to Study Plant Infection with Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schikora, Marek; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Our growing awareness that contaminated plants, fresh fruits and vegetables are responsible for a significant proportion of food poisoning with pathogenic microorganisms indorses the demand to understand the interactions between plants and human pathogens. Today we understand that those pathogens do not merely survive on or within plants, they actively infect plant organisms by suppressing their immune system. Studies on the infection process and disease development used mainly physiological, genetic, and molecular approaches, and image-based analysis provides yet another method for this toolbox. Employed as an observational tool, it bears the potential for objective and high throughput approaches, and together with other methods it will be very likely a part of data fusion approaches in the near future. PMID:25505501

  17. Image-based Analysis to Study Plant Infection with Human Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schikora, Marek; Schikora, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Our growing awareness that contaminated plants, fresh fruits and vegetables are responsible for a significant proportion of food poisoning with pathogenic microorganisms indorses the demand to understand the interactions between plants and human pathogens. Today we understand that those pathogens do not merely survive on or within plants, they actively infect plant organisms by suppressing their immune system. Studies on the infection process and disease development used mainly physiological, genetic, and molecular approaches, and image-based analysis provides yet another method for this toolbox. Employed as an observational tool, it bears the potential for objective and high throughput approaches, and together with other methods it will be very likely a part of data fusion approaches in the near future. PMID:25505501

  18. Limitations of exotic and indigenous isolates of Fusarium avenaceum for the biological control of spotted knapweed — Centaurea maculosa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Czembor; G. A. Strobel

    1997-01-01

    Three isolates ofFusarium avenaceum are pathogenic on spotted knapweed(Centaurea maculosa), a major weed plant of pasturelands and rangelands of the Pacific Northwestern USA. One isolate (no. 1) obtained from the\\u000a European centre of origin of knapweed and isolate no. 365 native to Montana, did not significantly affect knapweed seed germination.\\u000a However,F. avenaceum no. 1003, another Montana native isolate, caused a

  19. Field response of some asparagus varieties to rust, Fusarium crown root rot, and violet root rot.

    PubMed

    Fiume, F; Fiume, G

    2003-01-01

    Research was carried out to evaluate the behaviour of some asparagus genotypes against three most important fungal diseases: 1) asparagus rust caused by Puccinia asparagi D.C.; 2) Fusarium crown and root rot caused by Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht.) f.sp. asparagi (Cohen & Heald) and Fusarium proliferatum (Matstush.) Nirenberg; 3) violet root rot caused by Rhizoctonia violacea Tul. The object of this research was also to found an eventual correlation between the plant susceptibility to asparagus rust and the sensibility to Fusarium crown root rot and violet root rot attacks. Resistant genotypes to rust should be less susceptible to attacks from F. oxysporum f.sp. asparagi, F. proliferatum and R. violacea, a fungal complex causing the plant decline. Asparagus genotypes were compared in a randomized complete block experiment design, replicated four times, in order to search that ones showing the best behaviour to escape the diseases. Phytopathological observations were carried out on November when the control plots showed 100% infected plants. The pathogens were isolated and identified. The diseased plants were registered. According to symptom evaluation scales, all the plants were grouped into infection classes, calculating frequency and McKinney index. Wishing to learn something about the infection trend of F. oxysporum f.sp. asparagi or R. violacea in relation to P. asparagi attack, the relative curvilinear regressions were calculated. The Italian cultivars "Marte" and "Grande" showed significantly the best behaviour in terms of resistance to asparagus rust, exhibiting 37% and 42% of diseased plants. The McKinney index was 9.1% and 15.6%, respectively. The susceptible plots showed 100% of infected plants and different McKinney index: 46% for "Eros", about 60% for "H 519", "Atlas" and "Golia", over 70% for the remainder. "Marte" and "Grande" showed good tolerance to F. oxysporum f.sp. asparagi and to R. violacea exhibiting up to 100% of healthy plants. The regression between plants affected by asparagus rust and those diseased by Fusarium crown root rot showed a linear equation with a regression coefficient b = 1.186 and a correlation coefficient R2 = 0.98. The regression between infection caused by rust and that caused by violet root rot exhibited a regression coefficient b = 1.03 and a coefficient of correlation R2 = 0.9. "Marte" and "Grande" exhibited the best behaviour against the rust attacks. Plants without rust were tolerant to pathogens causing plant decline. PMID:15151301

  20. Grassland fires may favor native over introduced plants by reducing pathogen loads.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bitty A; Hudson, Kenneth; Visser, Matt; Johnson, Bart R

    2014-07-01

    Grasslands have been lost and degraded in the United States since Euro-American settlement due to agriculture, development, introduced invasive species, and changes in fire regimes. Fire is frequently used in prairie restoration to control invasion by trees and shrubs, but may have additional consequences. For example, fire might reduce damage by herbivore and pathogen enemies by eliminating litter, which harbors eggs and spores. Less obviously, fire might influence enemy loads differently for native and introduced plant hosts. We used a controlled burn in a Willamette Valley (Oregon) prairie to examine these questions. We expected that, without fire, introduced host plants should have less damage than native host plants because the introduced species are likely to have left many of their enemies behind when they were transported to their new range (the enemy release hypothesis, or ERH). If the ERH holds, then fire, which should temporarily reduce enemies on all species, should give an advantage to the natives because they should see greater total reduction in damage by enemies. Prior to the burn, we censused herbivore and pathogen attack on eight plant species (five of nonnative origin: Bromus hordaceous, Cynosuros echinatus, Galium divaricatum, Schedonorus arundinaceus (= Festuca arundinacea), and Sherardia arvensis; and three natives: Danthonia californica, Epilobium minutum, and Lomatium nudicale). The same plots were monitored for two years post-fire. Prior to the burn, native plants had more kinds of damage and more pathogen damage than introduced plants, consistent with the ERH. Fire reduced pathogen damage relative to the controls more for the native than the introduced species, but the effects on herbivory were negligible. Pathogen attack was correlated with plant reproductive fitness, whereas herbivory was not. These results suggest that fire may be useful for promoting some native plants in prairies due to its negative effects on their pathogens. PMID:25163122

  1. Genetic characteristics of Fusarium verticillioides from corn in the Philippines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Joseph R. Cumagun; Josephine S. Ramos; Arvin O. Dimaano; Françoise Munaut; François Van Hove

    2009-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph: Gibberella moniliformis = G. fujikuroi mating population A) is one of the most important fungal pathogens of corn worldwide. The pathogen produces fumonisins, mycotoxins\\u000a that are potentially harmful to humans and animals. Thirty-five Fusarium isolates from Laguna and Isabela, Philippines were identified morphologically and molecularly as F. verticillioides and characterized by PCR for mating type (MAT). Twenty-six isolates were

  2. Population dynamics and identification of endophytic bacteria antagonistic toward plant-pathogenic fungi in cotton root.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Hong; Zhao, Ming-Wen; Tang, Can-Ming; Li, Shun-Peng

    2010-02-01

    The antagonistic potentials of endophytic bacteria isolated from the roots of six cotton cultivars at different developmental stages were determined in vitro toward three pathogens: Verticillium dahliae Kleb V107 and V396 and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum (F108). The populations of antagonistic endophytic bacteria (AEB) toward V107, V396, and F108 at the flowering and maturation stages were significantly higher than those at the seedling stage were. More AEB were found to be antagonistic toward pathogens V396 and F108 than V107. Results from the multivariate analysis of variance showed that the populations of AEB were significantly different for the main factors of cultivars, stages, and their interactions. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the 39 AEB isolates that antagonized V107, V396, and F108 (BAEB) consisted of seven genera, in which the genus of Enterobacter (17 out of 39) and Pantoea (14 out of 39) were predominant among the BAEB isolates. Characterized by BOX-PCR fingerprints, these 39 BAEB isolates represented 35 different cluster types. To explore the antagonistic mechanisms, the agar diffusion method was used to detect cell-wall-degrading enzyme activity and siderophore secretion. Nearly half of these BAEB isolates showed protease and chitinase activity, while all 39 BAEB isolates excreted siderophores. However, pectinase, cellulase, and xylanase activity were hardly detected. A germination experiment revealed that nine of the 39 BAEB isolates significantly improved the vigor index of the cotton seedlings. PMID:19669227

  3. Population Structure and Genetic Diversity of the Fusarium graminearum Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Ndoye, Mbacke; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2011-01-01

    The Fusarium graminearum species complex (Fg complex) consists of phylogenetically distinct species some of which cannot be discriminated based on their morphology. Their chemotypes and geographic distributions are dramatically different, and these highlight the challenges that Fusarium head blight (FHB) poses to plant disease specialists and plant breeders, thereby requiring that quarantine officials employ molecular diagnostic tools in their active surveillance programs. Molecular marker technologies play essential roles in species identification of the Fg complex, and they are being used widely to assess the genetic diversity of the clade. The utility, applicability and limitations of molecular methods for assessing the population structure and genetic diversity within the Fg complex are discussed with suitable examples. Knowledge gained from these studies will provide a baseline for monitoring changes in FHB pathogen diversity and mycotoxin potential over time, both of which are critical to the ultimate control and elimination of this economically devastating disease. PMID:22069755

  4. The Ascomycete Verticillium longisporum Is a Hybrid and a Plant Pathogen with an Expanded Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Inderbitzin, Patrik; Davis, R. Michael; Bostock, Richard M.; Subbarao, Krishna V.

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization plays a central role in plant evolution, but its overall importance in fungi is unknown. New plant pathogens are thought to arise by hybridization between formerly separated fungal species. Evolution of hybrid plant pathogens from non-pathogenic ancestors in the fungal-like protist Phytophthora has been demonstrated, but in fungi, the most important group of plant pathogens, there are few well-characterized examples of hybrids. We focused our attention on the hybrid and plant pathogen Verticillium longisporum, the causal agent of the Verticillium wilt disease in crucifer crops. In order to address questions related to the evolutionary origin of V. longisporum, we used phylogenetic analyses of seven nuclear loci and a dataset of 203 isolates of V. longisporum, V. dahliae and related species. We confirmed that V. longisporum was diploid, and originated three different times, involving four different lineages and three different parental species. All hybrids shared a common parent, species A1, that hybridized respectively with species D1, V. dahliae lineage D2 and V. dahliae lineage D3, to give rise to three different lineages of V. longisporum. Species A1 and species D1 constituted as yet unknown taxa. Verticillium longisporum likely originated recently, as each V. longisporum lineage was genetically homogenous, and comprised species A1 alleles that were identical across lineages. PMID:21455321

  5. Differential accumulation of host mRNAs on polyribosomes during obligate pathogen-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Jackson R; Moscou, Matthew J; Bancroft, Tim; Skadsen, Ronald W; Wise, Roger P; Whitham, Steven A

    2012-08-01

    Plant pathogens elicit dramatic changes in the expression of host genes during both compatible and incompatible interactions. Gene expression profiling studies of plant-pathogen interactions have only considered messenger RNAs (mRNAs) present in total RNA, which contains subpopulations of actively translated mRNAs associated with polyribosomes (polysomes) and non-translated mRNAs that are not associated with polysomes. The goal of this study was to enhance previous gene expression analyses by identifying host mRNAs that become differentially associated with polysomes following pathogen inoculation. Total and polysomal RNA were extracted from barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants at 32 h after inoculation with Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei, and Arabidopsis thaliana plants at 10 days after inoculation with Turnip mosaic virus. Gene expression profiles were obtained for each pathosystem, which represent diverse plant host-obligate pathogen interactions. Using this approach, host mRNAs were identified that were differentially associated with polysomes in response to pathogen treatment. Approximately 18% and 26% of mRNAs represented by probe sets on the Affymetrix Barley1 and Arabidopsis ATH1 GeneChips, respectively, differentially accumulated in the two populations in one or more combinations of treatment and genotype. Gene ontology analysis of mRNAs sharing the same pattern of accumulation in total and polysomal RNA identified gene sets that contained a significant number of functionally related annotations, suggesting both transcript accumulation and recruitment to polyribosomes are coordinately regulated in these systems. PMID:22660698

  6. Multiplex PCR to detect four different tomato-infecting pathogens.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Vásquez, Gabriela Alejandra; Bazán-Tejeda, María Luisa; Martínez-Peńafiel, Eva; Kameyama-Kawabe, Luis; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María

    2013-07-01

    This work was aimed to develop a multiplex PCR assay to detect infectious agents such as Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Fusarium sp, Leveillula taurica, and begomoviruses in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Specific primer sets of each pathogen were designed based on intergenic ribosomal RNA sequences for the first three, whereas for begomoviruses, primers were designed based on conserved regions. The design also considered that the length (200-800 bp) of the PCR products was resolvable by electrophoresis; thus 296, 380, 457, and 731 bp fragments for Clavibacter, Fusarium, Leveillula, and begomoviruses, respectively, were considered. PCR conditions were optimized to amplify all the products in a single tube from genomic DNA and circumvent PCR inhibitors from infected plants. Finally, when the multiplex PCR assay was tested with tomato plants infected with any of the four pathogens, specific PCR products confirmed the presence of the pathogens. Optimized PCR multiplex allowed for the accurate and simultaneous detection of Clavibacter, Fusarium, Leveillula, and begomoviruses in infected plants or seeds from tomato. PMID:23135900

  7. Agriculturally important yeasts: Biological control of field and postharvest diseases using yeast antagonists, and yeasts as pathogens of plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two important agricultural aspects of yeasts, control of plant diseases through application of yeasts as the control agent, and yeasts that are plant pathogens are reviewed. Yeasts as biocontrol organisms are presented first, followed by a discussion of some of the more common plant pathogenic yeas...

  8. Probing plant-pathogen interactions and downstream defense signaling using DNA microarrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinrong Wan; Mark F. Dunning; Andrew F. Bent

    2002-01-01

    .   The interaction between a plant and a pathogen activates a wide variety of defense responses. The recent development of microarray-based\\u000a expression profiling methods, together with the availability of genomic and\\/or EST (expressed sequence tag) sequence data\\u000a for some plant species, has allowed significant progress in the characterization of plant pathogenesis-related responses.\\u000a The small number of expression profiling studies completed

  9. Synergy Between Pathogen Release and Resource Availability in Plant Invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Why do some exotic plant species become invasive? Two common hypotheses, increased resource availability and enemy release, may more effectively explain invasion if they favor the same species, and therefore act in concert. This would be expected if plant species adapted to high levels of available ...

  10. Proteomic approaches to study plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. F. Quirino; E. S. Candido; P. F. Campos; O. L. Franco; R. H. Krüger

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of plant proteomes has drastically expanded in the last few years. Mass spectrometry technology, stains, software and progress in bioinformatics have made identification of proteins relatively easy. The assignment of proteins to particular organelles and the development of better algorithms to predict sub-cellular localization are examples of how proteomic studies are contributing to plant biology. Protein phosphorylation and

  11. Fungal volatiles: an environmentally friendly tool to control pathogenic microorganisms in plants.

    PubMed

    Schalchli, H; Tortella, G R; Rubilar, O; Parra, L; Hormazabal, E; Quiroz, A

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Fungi are an extraordinary and immensely diverse group of microorganisms that colonize many habitats even competing with other microorganisms. Fungi have received recognition for interesting metabolic activities that have an enormous variety of biotechnological applications. Previously, volatile organic compounds produced by fungi (FVOCs) have been demonstrated to have a great capacity for use as antagonist products against plant pathogens. However, in recent years, FVOCs have been received attention as potential alternatives to the use of traditional pesticides and, therefore, as important eco-friendly biotechnological tools to control plant pathogens. Therefore, highlighting the current state of knowledge of these fascinating FVOCs, the actual detection techniques and the bioactivity against plant pathogens is essential to the discovery of new products that can be used as biopesticides. PMID:25198437

  12. Interplays between the cell wall and phytohormones in interaction between plants and necrotrophic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Nafisi, Majse; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-04-01

    The plant cell wall surrounds every cell in plants. During microbial infection, the cell wall provides a dynamic interface for interaction with necrotrophic phytopathogens as a rich source of carbohydrates for the growth of pathogens, as a physical barrier restricting the progression of the pathogens, and as an integrity sensory system that can activate intracellular signaling cascades and ultimately lead to a multitude of inducible host defense responses. Studies over the last decade have provided evidence of interplays between the cell wall and phytohormone signaling. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the cell wall-phytohormone interplays, with the focus on auxin, cytokinin, brassinosteroids, and abscisic acid, and discuss how they impact the outcome of plant-necrotrophic pathogen interaction. PMID:25496656

  13. Metabolic environments and genomic features associated with pathogenic and mutualistic interactions between bacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Karpinets, Tatiana V; Park, Byung H; Syed, Mustafa H; Klotz, Martin G; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2014-07-01

    Genomic characteristics discriminating parasitic and mutualistic relationship of bacterial symbionts with plants are poorly understood. This study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 54 mutualists and pathogens to discover genomic markers associated with the different phenotypes. Using metabolic network models, we predict external environments associated with free-living and symbiotic lifestyles and quantify dependences of symbionts on the host in terms of the consumed metabolites. We show that specific differences between the phenotypes are pronounced at the levels of metabolic enzymes, especially carbohydrate active, and protein functions. Overall, biosynthetic functions are enriched and more diverse in plant mutualists whereas processes and functions involved in degradation and host invasion are enriched and more diverse in pathogens. A distinctive characteristic of plant pathogens is a putative novel secretion system with a circadian rhythm regulator. A specific marker of plant mutualists is the co-residence of genes encoding nitrogenase and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). We predict that RuBisCO is likely used in a putative metabolic pathway to supplement carbon obtained heterotrophically with low-cost assimilation of carbon from CO2. We validate results of the comparative analysis by predicting correct phenotype, pathogenic or mutualistic, for 20 symbionts in an independent set of 30 pathogens, mutualists, and commensals. PMID:24580106

  14. Colonization of plants by human pathogenic bacteria in the course of organic vegetable production

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Andreas; Fischer, Doreen; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of outbreaks caused by the consumption of vegetables contaminated with human pathogenic bacteria were reported. The application of organic fertilizers during vegetable production is one of the possible reasons for contamination with those pathogens. In this study laboratory experiments in axenic and soil systems following common practices in organic farming were conducted to identify the minimal dose needed for bacterial colonization of plants and to identify possible factors like bacterial species or serovariation, plant species or organic fertilizer types used, influencing the success of plant colonization by human pathogenic bacteria. Spinach and corn salad were chosen as model plants and were inoculated with different concentrations of Salmonella enterica sv. Weltevreden, Listeria monocytogenes sv. 4b and EGD-E sv. 1/2a either directly (axenic system) or via agricultural soil amended with spiked organic fertilizers (soil system). In addition to PCR- and culture-based detection methods, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied in order to localize bacteria on or in plant tissues. Our results demonstrate that shoots were colonized by the pathogenic bacteria at inoculation doses as low as 4 × 10 CFU/ml in the axenic system or 4 × 105 CFU/g in the soil system. In addition, plant species dependent effects were observed. Spinach was colonized more often and at lower inoculation doses compared to corn salad. Differential colonization sites on roots, depending on the plant species could be detected using FISH-CLSM analysis. Furthermore, the transfer of pathogenic bacteria to plants via organic fertilizers was observed more often and at lower initial inoculation doses when fertilization was performed with inoculated slurry compared to inoculated manure. Finally, it could be shown that by introducing a simple washing step, the bacterial contamination was reduced in most cases or even was removed completely in some cases. PMID:24829562

  15. Management of plant pathogens and pests using microbial biological control agents. In: Trigiano, R.N. and Ownley, B.H., editors. Plant Pathology Concepts and Laboratory Exercises

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All parts of plants face continual attack by plant pathogens and insects. Some insects are vectors of pathogens. Plant pests can be controlled by a variety of methods including application of pesticides but one of the most stainable and environmentally friendly approaches is biological control. Mic...

  16. Mulberry Shoot Blight: Axenic Culture, Pathogenicity and Plant-Pathogen Interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. P. Gupta; Vineet Kumar; R. K. Mishra; D. D. Sharma; A. Sarkar; V. Thiagarajan

    2002-01-01

    Occurrence of a new disease, shoot blight was observed afflicting mulberry (Morus spp.) in the southern peninsula of India. The disease initiated as marginal burning or blackening of leaf lamina which later spread across the whole lamina and then to the stems of affected shoots, resulting in the drooping of the entire shoot and complete death of the affected plants.

  17. Proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in spring barley with three fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Leufen, Georg; Noga, Georg; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    In the last years fluorescence spectroscopy has come to be viewed as an essential approach in key research fields of applied plant sciences. However, the quantity and particularly the quality of information produced by different equipment might vary considerably. In this study we investigate the potential of three optical devices for the proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in four genotypes of spring barley. For this purpose, the fluorescence lifetime, the image-resolved multispectral fluorescence and selected indices of a portable multiparametric fluorescence device were recorded at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation (dai) from healthy leaves as well as from leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) or leaf rust (Puccinia hordei). Genotype-specific responses to pathogen infections were revealed already at 3 dai by higher fluorescence mean lifetimes in the spectral range from 410 to 560 nm in the less susceptible varieties. Noticeable pathogen-induced modifications were also revealed by the 'Blue-to-Far-Red Fluorescence Ratio' and the 'Simple Fluorescence Ratio'. Particularly in the susceptible varieties the differences became more evident in the time-course of the experiment i.e., following the pathogen development. The relevance of the blue and green fluorescence to exploit the plant-pathogen interaction was demonstrated by the multispectral fluorescence imaging system. As shown, mildewed leaves were characterized by exceptionally high blue fluorescence, contrasting the values observed in rust inoculated leaves. Further, we confirm that the intensity of green fluorescence depends on the pathogen infection and the stage of disease development; this information might allow a differentiation of both diseases. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the detection area might influence the quality of the information, although it had a minor impact only in the current study. Finally, we highlight the relevance of different excitation-emission channels to better understand and evaluate plant-physiological alterations due to pathogen infections. PMID:24961211

  18. Phytophthora ramorum is a generalist plant pathogen with differences in virulence between isolates from infectious and dead-end hosts

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Phytophthora ramorum is a generalist plant pathogen with differences in virulence between isolates size were measured, suggesting virulence in this pathogen is also controlled by epigenetic factors evidence P. ramorum is a generalist pathogen that lacks host specificity. Isolates from non

  19. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Fungi and the Effects of Database Composition on Protein Inferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass spectrometry has shown potential for identifying and detecting plant pathogens. Unlike antibody-based assays like ELISA, mass spectrometry does not require the use of pathogen-specific reagents for the detection of pathogen-specific proteins and peptides. However, the mass spectrometry appro...

  20. Pseudomonas syringae manipulates systemic plant defenses against pathogens and herbivores

    E-print Network

    Pierce, Naomi E.

    to herbivory by an insect (Trichoplusia ni, cabbage looper), but this susceptibility is not caused by COR. Arabidopsis induced susceptibility coronatine Trichoplusia ni As immobile organisms, plants have little choice

  1. Molecular Identification and Databases in Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence-based methods for identifying pathogenic and mycotoxigenic Fusarium isolates have become the gold standard worldwide. Moreover, fusarial DNA sequence data are increasing rapidly in several web-accessible databases for comparative purposes. Unfortunately, the use of Basic Alignment Sea...

  2. FUMONISIN MYCOTOXIN BIOSYNTHESIS IN FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonsins are mycotoxins produced by the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides. These toxins are of concern because of their association with cancer in experimental rodents and the epidemiological correlation between consumption of fumonisin-contaminated maize and human esophageal cancer. We hav...

  3. Morphogenesis in germinating Fusarium graminearum macroconidia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven D. Harris

    2005-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph Gibber- ella zeae) is a significant pathogen of wheat and corn. F. graminearum forms multicellular macroconidia that play an important role in dissemination of the disease. The spatial pattern of morphogenesis in ger- minating macroconidia is described. Germ tubes preferentially emerge from the apical cells in a bi- polar pattern that appears to be common to filamen-

  4. Plant–Pathogen Interactions: What Microarray Tells About It?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Lodha; J. Basak

    Plant defense responses are mediated by elementary regulatory proteins that affect expression of thousands of genes. Over\\u000a the last decade, microarray technology has played a key role in deciphering the underlying networks of gene regulation in\\u000a plants that lead to a wide variety of defence responses. Microarray is an important tool to quantify and profile the expression\\u000a of thousands of

  5. The roles of ABA in plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng Yi Cao; Keiko Yoshioka; Darrell Desveaux

    Defence against abiotic and biotic stresses is crucial for the fitness and survival of plants under adverse or suboptimal\\u000a growth conditions. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is not only important for mediating abiotic stress responses, but\\u000a also plays a multifaceted and pivotal role in plant immunity. This review presents examples demonstrating the importance of\\u000a crosstalk between ABA and the key

  6. Airborne signalling by methyl salicylate in plant pathogen resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir Shulaev; Paul Silverman; Ilya Raskin

    1997-01-01

    Methyl salicylate, a volatile liquid, also known as oil of winter-green, is made by a number of plants1-9. Here we show that methyl salicylate is a major volatile compound produced by tobacco plants inoculated with tobacco mosaic virus. Methyl salicylate is synthesized from salicylic acid, a non-volatile chemical signal required for the establishment of acquired resistance10 and local and systemic

  7. Brachypodium distachyon: a new pathosystem to study Fusarium head blight and other Fusarium diseases of wheat

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fusarium species cause Fusarium head blight (FHB) and other important diseases of cereals. The causal agents produce trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). The dicotyledonous model species Arabidopsis thaliana has been used to study Fusarium-host interactions but it is not ideal for model-to-crop translation. Brachypodium distachyon (Bd) has been proposed as a new monocotyledonous model species for functional genomic studies in grass species. This study aims to assess the interaction between the most prevalent FHB-causing Fusarium species and Bd in order to develop and exploit Bd as a genetic model for FHB and other Fusarium diseases of wheat. Results The ability of Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum to infect a range of Bd tissues was examined in various bioassays which showed that both species can infect all Bd tissues examined, including intact foliar tissues. DON accumulated in infected spike tissues at levels similar to those of infected wheat spikes. Histological studies revealed details of infection, colonisation and host response and indicate that hair cells are important sites of infection. Susceptibility to Fusarium and DON was assessed in two Bd ecotypes and revealed variation in resistance between ecotypes. Conclusions Bd exhibits characteristics of susceptibility highly similar to those of wheat, including susceptibility to spread of disease in the spikelets. Bd is the first reported plant species to allow successful infection on intact foliar tissues by FHB-causing Fusarium species. DON appears to function as a virulence factor in Bd as it does in wheat. Bd is proposed as a valuable model for undertaking studies of Fusarium head blight and other Fusarium diseases of wheat. PMID:21639892

  8. An endo-polygalacturonase (PG) of Fusarium moniliforme escaping inhibition by plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) provides new insights into the PG-PGIP interaction.

    PubMed

    Sella, Luca; Castiglioni, Carla; Roberti, Serena; D'Ovidio, Renato; Favaron, Francesco

    2004-11-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant defence molecules inhibiting the activity of fungal endo-polygalacturonases (endo-PGs). We found that soybean and bean PGIPs inhibited the endo-PG activity produced by the isolate FC-10 of Fusarium moniliforme but not the enzyme activity produced by the isolate PD of F. moniliforme. The bean PGIP proved to be ineffective against all the PG isoforms produced by the PD isolate. Deduced amino acid sequence comparison between PGs from PD, FC-10 and 62264 isolates identified the structural regions of the enzyme possibly related to its resistance to PGIP inhibition. These include one region at the N-terminal portion of the enzyme and a few single amino acid substitutions along the entire sequence, two of which surrounding the active site. PMID:15500988

  9. Mixtures of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria enhance biological control of multiple cucumber pathogens.

    PubMed

    Raupach, G S; Kloepper, J W

    1998-11-01

    ABSTRACT Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains INR7 (Bacillus pumilus), GB03 (Bacillus subtilis), and ME1 (Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens) were tested singly and in combinations for biological control against multiple cucumber pathogens. Investigations under greenhouse conditions were conducted with three cucumber pathogens-Colletotrichum orbiculare (causing anthracnose), Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans (causing angular leaf spot), and Erwinia tracheiphila(causing cucurbit wilt disease)-inoculated singly and in all possible combinations. There was a general trend across all experiments toward greater suppression and enhanced consistency against multiple cucumber pathogens using strain mixtures. The same three PGPR strains were evaluated as seed treatments in two field trials over two seasons, and two strains, IN26 (Burkholderia gladioli) and INR7 also were tested as foliar sprays in one of the trials. In the field trials, the efficacy of induced systemic resistance activity was determined against introduced cucumber pathogens naturally spread within plots through placement of infected plants into the field to provide the pathogen inoculum. PGPR-mediated disease suppression was observed against angular leaf spot in 1996 and against a mixed infection of angular leaf spot and anthracnose in 1997. The three-way mixture of PGPR strains (INR7 plus ME1 plus GB03) as a seed treatment showed intensive plant growth promotion and disease reduction to a level statistically equivalent to the synthetic elicitor Actigard applied as a spray. PMID:18944848

  10. Role of Cereal Secondary Metabolites Involved in Mediating the Outcome of Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Du Fall, Lauren A.; Solomon, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Cereal crops such as wheat, rice and barley underpin the staple diet for human consumption globally. A multitude of threats to stable and secure yields of these crops exist including from losses caused by pathogens, particularly fungal. Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to resist pathogens including programmed cell death responses, the release of pathogenicity-related proteins and oxidative bursts. Another such mechanism is the synthesis and release of secondary metabolites toxic to potential pathogens. Several classes of these compounds have been identified and their anti-fungal properties demonstrated. However the lack of suitable analytical techniques has hampered the progress of identifying and exploiting more of these novel metabolites. In this review, we summarise the role of the secondary metabolites in cereal crop diseases and briefly touch on the analytical techniques that hold the key to unlocking their potential in reducing yield losses. PMID:24957244

  11. Filamentous Fungi (Magnaporthe grisea and Fusarium oxysporum).

    PubMed

    Khang, Chang Hyun; Park, Sook-Young; Rho, Hee-Sool; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Seogchan

    2006-01-01

    A better understanding of fungal biology will facilitate judicious use of beneficial fungi and will also advance our efforts to control pathogenic fungi. Molecular studies of fungal biology have been greatly aided by transformation-mediated mutagenesis techniques. Transformation via nonhomologous integration of plasmid DNA bearing a selectable marker (e.g., antibiotic resistance gene) has been widely used for the random insertional mutagenesis of fungi - as an alternative to chemical and radiation mutagens - mainly because the integration of plasmid into the genome provides a convenient tag for subsequent identification and isolation of the mutated gene. Homologous recombination between a target gene on the chromosome and the introduced DNA carrying its mutant allele results in targeted gene knock-out. An important advance in fungal transformation methodology is the development of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) protocols for fungi. ATMT has been successfully applied to a phylogenetically diverse group of fungi and offers a number of advantages over conventional transformation techniques in both the random insertional mutagenesis and targeted gene knock-out. In this chapter, we describe ATMT protocols and vectors for fungal gene manipulation using two plant pathogenic fungi, Magnaporthe grisea and Fusarium oxysporum, as target organisms. PMID:17033082

  12. Belowground effects of organic and conventional farming on aboveground plant–herbivore and plant–pathogen interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katja Poveda; Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter; Stefan Scheu; Teja Tscharntke

    2006-01-01

    Soil organisms may significantly affect the aboveground system. However, the influence of farming practices in modifying the effects of soil organisms on aboveground systems is poorly understood. The aim of our study was to investigate: (1) How important are soil organisms for plant growth and the development of herbivores and pathogens above the ground? (2) How do agricultural management practices

  13. When plants encounter pathogens, resistance mechanisms are activated

    E-print Network

    Delaney, Terrence

    is required for the induction of SAR. Application of salicylic acid or its synthetic analogs [2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) or benzo (1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbo- thioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH)] to plants that express salicylate hydroxylase, whichisencodedbythebacterialnahG gene,canneitheraccumulatesalicylic acid

  14. Structural and functional characterization of the TRI101 trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium graminearum: kinetic insights to combating fusarium head blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a plant disease with serious economic and health impacts. It is caused by fungal species belonging to the genus Fusarium and the mycotoxins they produce. Although it has proved difficult to combat this disease, one strategy that has been examined is the introduction o...

  15. Virulence genes are carried by a megaplasmid of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas solanacearum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Boucher; Anne Martinel; Patrick Barberis; Genevieve Alloing; Claudine Zischek

    1986-01-01

    A class of avirulent mutants of the plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas solanacearum, strain GMI1000, resistant to acridine orange (Acrr), harbour a deletion of over 85 kb in their genome. This deletion affects, a=1,000 kb megaplasmid which has previously been shown to be present in most of the strains of this species. In addition at least 11 out of 13 independent

  16. Insights from the genome of the biotrophic fungal plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ustilago maydis is a ubiquitous pathogen of maize and a well-established model organism for the study of plant-microbe interactions. This basidiomycete fungus does not use aggressive virulence strategies to kill its host. U. maydis belongs to the group of biotrophic parasites (the smuts) that depend...

  17. Genomic Insights into the Origin of Parasitism in the Emerging Plant Pathogen Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taisei Kikuchi; James A. Cotton; Jonathan J. Dalzell; Koichi Hasegawa; Natsumi Kanzaki; Paul McVeigh; Takuma Takanashi; Isheng J. Tsai; Samuel A. Assefa; Peter J. A. Cock; Thomas Dan Otto; Martin Hunt; Adam J. Reid; Alejandro Sanchez-Flores; Kazuko Tsuchihara; Toshiro Yokoi; Mattias C. Larsson; Johji Miwa; Aaron G. Maule; Norio Sahashi; John T. Jones; Matthew Berriman

    2011-01-01

    Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the nematode responsible for a devastating epidemic of pine wilt disease in Asia and Europe, and represents a recent, independent origin of plant parasitism in nematodes, ecologically and taxonomically distinct from other nematodes for which genomic data is available. As well as being an important pathogen, the B. xylophilus genome thus provides a unique opportunity to study

  18. Non-oak native plants are main hosts for sudden oak death pathogen in California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matteo Garbelotto; Jennifer M. Davidson; Kelly Ivors; Patricia E. Maloney; Daniel Hüberli; Steven T. Koike; David M. Rizzo

    2002-01-01

    The finding of Phytophthora ramorum — the pathogen that causes sudden oak death in four California native trees — on rhododendron in Europe led us to hypothesize that its host range in California's natural forests was much greater than previously suspected. In addition to the affected oak species, we have now identified an additional 13 species from 10 plant families

  19. PCR Amplification of Ribosomal DNA for Species Identification in the Plant Pathogen Genus Phytophthora

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEAN B. RISTAINO; MICHAEL MADRITCH; CAROL L. TROUT; GREGORY PARRA

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a PCR procedure to amplify DNA for quick identification of the economically important species from each of the six taxonomic groups in the plant pathogen genus Phytophthora. This procedure involves amplification of the 5.8S ribosomal DNA gene and internal transcribed spacers (ITS) with the ITS primers ITS 5 and ITS 4. Restriction digests of the amplified DNA

  20. Verticillium comparative genomics yields insights into niche adaptation by plant vascular wilt pathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum infect over 200 plant species, causing billions of dollars in annual losses. The characteristic vascular wilt symptoms are a result of colonization and proliferation of the pathogens in the xylem vessels. To gain insights into the mechan...

  1. Meiosis Drives Extraordinary Genome Plasticity in the Haploid Fungal Plant Pathogen Mycosphaerella Graminicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiosis in the plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola results in eight ascospores due to a mitotic division following the two meiotic divisions. The transient diploid phase allows for recombination among homologous chromosomes. However, some chromosomes of M. graminicola lack homologs an...

  2. In vitro assessment of N-(benzyl)chitosan derivatives against some plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Entsar I. Rabea; Mohamed E. I. Badawy; Walter Steurbaut; Christian V. Stevens

    2009-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi negatively affect a large number of important fruit and vegetables during the growing season and throughout postharvest storage. Therefore, the current study focuses on the preparation of N-(benzyl)chitosan derivatives as antimicrobial agents to control these microorganisms. Chitosan was reacted with a set of aromatic aldehydes by reductive amination involving formation of the corresponding imines, followed

  3. Expression Analysis of Small Heat Shock Proteins During Compatible and Incompatible Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cecilia G. Garofalo; Betiana S. Garavaglia; Germán Dunger; Natalia Gottig; Elena G. Orellano; Jorgelina Ottado

    The study of small heat shock proteins in plant-pathogen interactions is a subject that has to be further investigated. While Hsp70 and Hsp90 participate in the defense response, the role of this small Hsps remains elusive. In this work we analyzed the expression of small Hsps in citrus canker and the bacterial spot of pepper as well as in the

  4. Plant–pathogen interactions: will the understanding of common mechanisms lead to the unification of concepts?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Reignault; Michel Sancholle

    2005-01-01

    Plant–pathogen interactions are still classically described using concepts that make a distinction between qualitative and quantitative aspects linked to these concepts. This article first describes these aspects, using the terminology associated with them. It then presents some recent experimental observations that demonstrate that such concepts share either common or closely related mechanisms at the cellular and molecular levels. The emergence

  5. Draft genome sequence of Dactylonectria macrodydima, a plant pathogenic fungus in the Nectriaceae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dactylonectria macrodidyma is part of the Nectriaceae, a family containing important plant pathogens. This species possesses the ability to induce disease on grapevine, avocado and olive. Here, we report the first draft genome of D. macrodidyma isolate JAC15-08. The assembled genome was 58 Mbp and c...

  6. Comparative genomics yields insights into niche adaptation of plant vascular wilt pathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum infect over 200 plant species, causing billions of dollars in annual crop losses. The characteristic wilt symptoms are a result of colonization and proliferation of the pathogens in the xylem vessels, which undergo fluctuations in osmola...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Dactylonectria macrodidyma, a Plant-Pathogenic Fungus in the Nectriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Demers, Jill; Veltri, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Dactylonectria macrodidyma is part of the Nectriaceae, a family containing important plant pathogens. This species possesses the ability to induce disease on grapevine, avocado, and olive. Here, we report the first draft genome of D. macrodidyma isolate JAC15-245. The assembled genome was 58 Mbp and contained an estimated 16,454 genes. PMID:25883288

  8. Sequencing of K60, Type Strain of the Major Plant Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Remenant, Benoît; Babujee, Lavanya; Lajus, Aurélie; Médigue, Claudine; Prior, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a widespread and destructive plant pathogen. We present the genome of the type strain, K60 (phylotype IIA, sequevar 7). Sequevar 7 strains cause ongoing tomato bacterial wilt outbreaks in the southeastern United States. K60 generally resembles R. solanacearum CFBP2957, a Caribbean tomato isolate, but has almost 360 unique genes. PMID:22535929

  9. Insights from the genome of the biotrophic fungal plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jörg Kämper; Regine Kahmann; Michael Bölker; Li-Jun Ma; Thomas Brefort; Barry J. Saville; Flora Banuett; James W. Kronstad; Scott E. Gold; Olaf Müller; Michael H. Perlin; Han A. B. Wösten; Ronald de Vries; José Ruiz-Herrera; Cristina G. Reynaga-Peńa; Karen Snetselaar; Michael McCann; José Pérez-Martín; Michael Feldbrügge; Christoph W. Basse; Gero Steinberg; Jose I. Ibeas; William Holloman; Plinio Guzman; Mark Farman; Jason E. Stajich; Rafael Sentandreu; Juan M. González-Prieto; John C. Kennell; Lazaro Molina; Jan Schirawski; Artemio Mendoza-Mendoza; Doris Greilinger; Karin Münch; Nicole Rössel; Mario Scherer; Miroslav Vranes; Oliver Ladendorf; Volker Vincon; Uta Fuchs; Björn Sandrock; Shaowu Meng; Eric C. H. Ho; Matt J. Cahill; Kylie J. Boyce; Jana Klose; Steven J. Klosterman; Heine J. Deelstra; Lucila Ortiz-Castellanos; Weixi Li; Patricia Sanchez-Alonso; Peter H. Schreier; Isolde Häuser-Hahn; Martin Vaupel; Edda Koopmann; Gabi Friedrich; Hartmut Voss; Thomas Schlüter; Jonathan Margolis; Darren Platt; Candace Swimmer; Andreas Gnirke; Feng Chen; Valentina Vysotskaia; Gertrud Mannhaupt; Ulrich Güldener; Martin Münsterkötter; Dirk Haase; Matthias Oesterheld; Hans-Werner Mewes; Evan W. Mauceli; David Decaprio; Claire M. Wade; Jonathan Butler; Sarah Young; David B. Jaffe; Sarah Calvo; Chad Nusbaum; James Galagan; Bruce W. Birren

    2006-01-01

    Ustilago maydis is a ubiquitous pathogen of maize and a well-established model organism for the study of plant-microbe interactions. This basidiomycete fungus does not use aggressive virulence strategies to kill its host. U. maydis belongs to the group of biotrophic parasites (the smuts) that depend on living tissue for proliferation and development. Here we report the genome sequence for a

  10. Comprehensive list of names of plant pathogenic bacteria, 1980-2007.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This list contains the names of all plant pathogenic bacteria which have been effectively and validly published in terms of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria and the Standards for Naming Pathovars and their revisions. Included are species names from the Approved Lists of Bacterial N...

  11. A Pathogenic Fungi Diphenyl Ether Phytotoxin Targets Plant Enoyl (Acyl Carrier Protein) Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyperin is a natural phytotoxic diphenyl ether produced by several fungal plant pathogens. At high concentrations, this metabolite inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase, a key enzyme in porphyrin synthesis. However, unlike its herbicide structural analogues, the mode of action of cyperin is not ligh...

  12. Genome-Wide Identification of Transcriptional Start Sites in the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato

    E-print Network

    Myers, Chris

    Genome-Wide Identification of Transcriptional Start Sites in the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas, establishing a broad foundation for future investigations of regulation at the genomic and single gene levels. Citation: Filiatrault MJ, Stodghill PV, Myers CR, Bronstein PA, Butcher BG, et al. (2011) Genome

  13. SEWAGE SLUDGE VIRAL AND PATHOGENIC AGENTS IN SOIL-PLANT-ANIMAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multidisciplinary study was carried out to determine the ultimate fate of various toxic elements or pathogens associated with Florida and Chicago municipal sludges when applied to soil-plant-water systems and to determine physiologic, pathologic, growth, and reproductive respon...

  14. THE POTENTIAL FOR INCREASING PHYTOALEXINS TO ENHANCE PLANT RESISTANCE TO OOMYCETE PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoalexins have been shown to be important natural components in plant defense against pathogens. Although the tropical fruit crop papaya (Carica papaya L.) produces several classes of phytoalexins that have been shown to have anti-microbial activity, it is nevertheless highly susceptible to fung...

  15. Contamination of Bananas with Beauvericin and Fusaric Acid Produced by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Ruibin; Yang, Qiaosong; Hu, Chunhua; Sheng, Ou; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Lijun; Wei, Yuerong; Yang, Jing; Liu, Siwen; Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Viljoen, Altus; Yi, Ganjun

    2013-01-01

    Background Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is one of the most destructive diseases of banana. Toxins produced by Foc have been proposed to play an important role during the pathogenic process. The objectives of this study were to investigate the contamination of banana with toxins produced by Foc, and to elucidate their role in pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty isolates of Foc representing races 1 and 4 were isolated from diseased bananas in five Chinese provinces. Two toxins were consistently associated with Foc, fusaric acid (FA) and beauvericin (BEA). Cytotoxicity of the two toxins on banana protoplast was determined using the Alamar Blue assay. The virulence of 20 Foc isolates was further tested by inoculating tissue culture banana plantlets, and the contents of toxins determined in banana roots, pseudostems and leaves. Virulence of Foc isolates correlated well with toxin deposition in the host plant. To determine the natural occurrence of the two toxins in banana plants with Fusarium wilt symptoms, samples were collected before harvest from the pseudostems, fruit and leaves from 10 Pisang Awak ‘Guangfen #1’ and 10 Cavendish ‘Brazilian’ plants. Fusaric acid and BEA were detected in all the tissues, including the fruits. Conclusions/Signficance The current study provides the first investigation of toxins produced by Foc in banana. The toxins produced by Foc, and their levels of contamination of banana fruits, however, were too low to be of concern to human and animal health. Rather, these toxins appear to contribute to the pathogenicity of the fungus during infection of banana plants. PMID:23922960

  16. Biological control of Fusarium wilt of tomato with Fusarium equiseti GF191 in both rock wool and soil systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayato Horinouchi; Hideki Watanabe; Yoshihiro Taguchi; Ahmed Muslim; Mitsuro Hyakumachi

    The plant growth-promoting fungus (PGPF) Fusarium equiseti GF191 was tested for its ability to control Fusarium wilt of tomato (FWT) caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL) in both a hydroponic rock wool and soil system. F. equiseti effectively controlled FWT, with protective effects based on disease severity of 66.7–88.6% in four experiments. The numbers\\u000a of colony-forming units of

  17. Endogenous Methyl Salicylate in Pathogen-Inoculated Tobacco Plants1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mirjana Seskar; Vladimir Shulaev; Ilya Raskin

    1998-01-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivar Xanthi-nc (genotype NN) produces high levels of salicylic acid (SA) after inoculation with the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Gaseous methyl salicylate (MeSA), a major volatile produced in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants, was recently shown to be an airborne defense signal. Using an assay developed to measure the MeSA present in tissue, we have shown that in

  18. Molecular variability among isolates of Fusarium oxysporum associated with root rot disease of Agave tequilana.

    PubMed

    Vega-Ramos, Karla L; Uvalle-Bueno, J Xavier; Gómez-Leyva, Juan F

    2013-04-01

    In this study, 115 isolates of Fusarium oxysporum from roots of Agave tequilana Weber cv azul plants and soil in commercial plantations in western Mexico were characterized using morphological and molecular methods. Genetic analyses of monosporic isolates included restriction enzyme analysis of rDNA (ARDRA) using HaeIII and HinfI, and genetic diversity was determined using Box-PCR molecular markers. Box-PCR analysis generated 14 groups. The groups correlated highly with the geographic location of the isolate and sample type. These results demonstrate the usefulness of ARDRA and Box-PCR techniques in the molecular characterization of the Fusarium genus for the discrimination of pathogenic isolates. PMID:23315087

  19. UV Light Inactivation of Human and Plant Pathogens in Unfiltered Surface Irrigation Water

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lisa A.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2014-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 108 or 109 CFU/liter for bacteria or 104 or 105 zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively. PMID:24242253

  20. Distribution of disease symptoms and mycotoxins in maize ears infected by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Elisabeth; Ellner, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Red ear rot an important disease of maize cultivated in Europe is caused by toxigenic Fusarium species like Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum. To get detailed information on the time course of the infection process leading to the accumulation of Fusarium mycotoxins in maize ears, a field study was conducted over 2 years with two maize varieties, which were inoculated with F. culmorum or F. graminearum isolates at the stage of female flowering. Every fortnight after inoculation, infection and contamination progress in the ears was followed by visually evaluating disease signs and analysing Fusarium toxin concentrations in the infected ear tissues. In principle, infection and mycotoxin distribution were similar in respect of pathogens, varieties, and years. External infection symptoms showing some small pale or brown-marbled kernels with dark brown pedicels were mainly seen at the ear tip, whereas internal infection symptoms on the rachis were much more pronounced and spread in the upper half showing greyish brownish or pink discoloration of the pith. Well correlated with disease symptoms, a top-down gradient from high to low toxin levels within the ear with considerably higher concentrations in the rachis compared with the kernels was observed. It is suggested that both Fusarium pathogens primarily infect the rachis from the tip toward the bottom, whereas the kernels are subsequently infected via the rachillae connected to the rachis. A special focus on the pronounced disease symptoms visible in the rachis may be an approach to improve the evaluation of maize-genotype susceptibility against red ear rot pathogens. It has to be underlined that the accumulation of Fusarium mycotoxins in the rachis greatly accelerated 6 weeks after inoculation; therefore, highest contamination risk is indicated for feedstuffs containing large amounts of rachis (e.g., corn cob mix), especially when cut late in growing season. PMID:25904523

  1. Chemical Diversity and Defence Metabolism: How Plants Cope with Pathogens and Ozone Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Iriti, Marcello; Faoro, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Chemical defences represent a main trait of the plant innate immune system. Besides regulating the relationship between plants and their ecosystems, phytochemicals are involved both in resistance against pathogens and in tolerance towards abiotic stresses, such as atmospheric pollution. Plant defence metabolites arise from the main secondary metabolic routes, the phenylpropanoid, the isoprenoid and the alkaloid pathways. In plants, antibiotic compounds can be both preformed (phytoanticipins) and inducible (phytoalexins), the former including saponins, cyanogenic glycosides and glucosinolates. Chronic exposure to tropospheric ozone (O3) stimulates the carbon fluxes from the primary to the secondary metabolic pathways to a great extent, inducing a shift of the available resources in favour of the synthesis of secondary products. In some cases, the plant defence responses against pathogens and environmental pollutants may overlap, leading to the unspecific synthesis of similar molecules, such as phenylpropanoids. Exposure to ozone can also modify the pattern of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), emitted from plant in response to herbivore feeding, thus altering the tritrophic interaction among plant, phytophagy and their natural enemies. Finally, the synthesis of ethylene and polyamines can be regulated by ozone at level of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the biosynthetic precursor of both classes of hormones, which can, therefore, mutually inhibit their own biosynthesis with consequence on plant phenotype. PMID:20111684

  2. Genome of the actinomycete plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus suggests recent niche adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Stephen D; Corton, Craig; Brown, Susan E; Barron, Andrew; Clark, Louise; Doggett, Jon; Harris, Barbara; Ormond, Doug; Quail, Michael A; May, Georgiana; Francis, David; Knudson, Dennis; Parkhill, Julian; Ishimaru, Carol A

    2008-03-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus is a plant-pathogenic bacterium and the causative agent of bacterial ring rot, a devastating agricultural disease under strict quarantine control and zero tolerance in the seed potato industry. This organism appears to be largely restricted to an endophytic lifestyle, proliferating within plant tissues and unable to persist in the absence of plant material. Analysis of the genome sequence of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus and comparison with the genome sequences of related plant pathogens revealed a dramatic recent evolutionary history. The genome contains 106 insertion sequence elements, which appear to have been active in extensive rearrangement of the chromosome compared to that of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. There are 110 pseudogenes with overrepresentation in functions associated with carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and pathogenicity. Genome comparisons also indicated that there is substantial gene content diversity within the species, probably due to differential gene acquisition and loss. These genomic features and evolutionary dating suggest that there was recent adaptation for life in a restricted niche where nutrient diversity and perhaps competition are low, correlated with a reduced ability to exploit previously occupied complex niches outside the plant. Toleration of factors such as multiplication and integration of insertion sequence elements, genome rearrangements, and functional disruption of many genes and operons seems to indicate that there has been general relaxation of selective pressure on a large proportion of the genome. PMID:18192393

  3. Presence of pathogenic amoebae in power plant cooling waters. Final report, October 15, 1977-September 30, 1979. [Naegleria fowleri

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Willaert, E.; Stevens, A.R.

    1981-03-01

    Cooling-water-associated algae and sediments from five northern and five southern or western electric power plants were tested for the presence of pathogenic amoebae. In addition, water algae and sediments from five northern and five southern/western sites not associated with power plants were tested. There was a significant correlation at northern power plants between the presence of thermophilic, pathogenic amoebae in cooling waters and thermal additions. Presence of the pathogenic did not correlate with salinity, pH, conductivity, or a variety of various chemical components of the cooling waters. Selected pathogenic isolates were tested serologically and were classified as Naegleria fowleri. Although thermal additions were shown to be contributing factor in predisposing cooling waters to the growth of pathogenic amoebae, the data suggest the involvement of other currently undefined parameters associated with the presence of the pathogenic amoebae. 35 refs., 21 tabs.

  4. Characterization of a novel plant growth-promoting bacteria strain Delftia tsuruhatensis HR4 both as a diazotroph and a potential biocontrol agent against various plant pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jigang Han; Lei Sun; Xiuzhu Dong; Zhengqiu Cai; Xiaolu Sun; Hailian Yang; Yunshan Wang; Wei Song

    2005-01-01

    A novel, plant growth-promoting bacterium Delftia tsuruhatensis, strain HR4, was isolated from the rhizoplane of rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Yueguang) in North China. In vitro antagonistic assay showed this strain could suppress the growth of various plant pathogens effectively, especially the three main rice pathogens (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Rhizoctonia solani and Pyricularia oryzae Cavara). Treated with strain HR4

  5. ABA is an essential signal for plant resistance to pathogens affecting JA biosynthesis and the activation of plant defenses in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant defense responses have been studied through a limited number of models that may have constrained our view of plant-pathogen interactions. Discovery of new defense mechanisms should be favored by broadening the range of pathogens under study. With this aim, Arabidopsis defense response to the ‘...

  6. Separation of plant pathogens from different hosts and tissues by capillary electromigration techniques.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Horký, Jaroslav; Matousková, Hana; Slais, Karel

    2007-12-15

    In this contribution capillary isoelectric focusing and capillary zone electrophoresis were applied for the separation and detection of different plant pathogens including Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, P. syringae pv. lachrymans, Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. fraxinus, P. savastanoi pv. olea, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A vitis, Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis, X. campestris pv. zinniae, and Curtobacterium sp.. The UV detection and sensitive fluorescence detection of the native phytopathogens or those dynamically modified by the nonionogenic fluorescent tenside based on pyrenebutanoate were used. The isoelectric points of the labeled phytopathogens were found comparable with the pI of the native compounds. No influence of the hosts on pIs of the strains of the genus Pseudomonas was observed. The identification of plant pathogens by gas chromatographic analysis of fatty acid methyl esters was compared with results of capillary isoelectric focusing. Capillary electromigration was successfully applied for the separation of microbes directly from plant tissue suspensions. PMID:17997525

  7. Perturbation of host ubiquitin systems by plant pathogen/pest effector proteins

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Microbial pathogens and pests of animals and plants secrete effector proteins into host cells, altering cellular physiology to the benefit of the invading parasite. Research in the past decade has delivered significant new insights into the molecular mechanisms of how these effector proteins function, with a particular focus on modulation of host immunity-related pathways. One host system that has emerged as a common target of effectors is the ubiquitination system in which substrate proteins are post-translationally modified by covalent conjugation with the small protein ubiquitin. This modification, typically via isopeptide bond formation through a lysine side chain of ubiquitin, can result in target degradation, relocalization, altered activity or affect protein–protein interactions. In this review, I focus primarily on how effector proteins from bacterial and filamentous pathogens of plants and pests perturb host ubiquitination pathways that ultimately include the 26S proteasome. The activities of these effectors, in how they affect ubiquitin pathways in plants, reveal how pathogens have evolved to identify and exploit weaknesses in this system that deliver increased pathogen fitness. PMID:25339602

  8. Gene expression profile of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa during biofilm formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Alessandra A; Takita, Marco A; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Caldana, Camila; Yanai, Giane M; Muto, Nair H; de Oliveira, Regina C; Nunes, Luiz R; Machado, Marcos A

    2004-08-15

    A biofilm is a community of microorganisms attached to a solid surface. Cells within biofilms differ from planktonic cells, showing higher resistance to biocides, detergent, antibiotic treatments and host defense responses. Even though there are a number of gene expression studies in bacterial biofilm formation, limited information is available concerning plant pathogen. It was previously demonstrated that the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa could grow as a biofilm, a possibly important factor for its pathogenicity. In this study we utilized analysis of microarrays to specifically identify genes expressed in X. fastidiosa cells growing in a biofilm, when compared to planktonic cells. About half of the differentially expressed genes encode hypothetical proteins, reflecting the large number of ORFs with unknown functions in bacterial genomes. However, under the biofilm condition we observed an increase in the expression of some housekeeping genes responsible for metabolic functions. We also found a large number of genes from the pXF51 plasmid being differentially expressed. Some of the overexpressed genes in the biofilm condition encode proteins involved in attachment to surfaces. Other genes possibly confer advantages to the bacterium in the environment that it colonizes. This study demonstrates that the gene expression in the biofilm growth condition of the plant pathogen X. fastidiosa is quite similar to other characterized systems. PMID:15321682

  9. A hyperparasite affects the population dynamics of a wild plant pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Tollenaere, C; Pernechele, B; Mäkinen, H S; Parratt, S R; Németh, M Z; Kovács, G M; Kiss, L; Tack, A J M; Laine, A-L

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the impact of natural enemies of plant and animal pathogens on their host's population dynamics is needed to determine the role of hyperparasites in affecting disease dynamics, and their potential for use in efficient control strategies of pathogens. Here, we focus on the long-term study describing metapopulation dynamics of an obligate pathogen, the powdery mildew (Podosphaera plantaginis) naturally infecting its wild host plant (Plantago lanceolata) in the fragmented landscape of the Ĺland archipelago (southwest Finland). Regionally, the pathogen persists through a balance of extinctions and colonizations, yet factors affecting extinction rates remain poorly understood. Mycoparasites of the genus Ampelomyces appear as good candidates for testing the role of a hyperparasite, i.e. a parasite of other parasites, in the regulation of their fungal hosts' population dynamics. For this purpose, we first designed a quantitative PCR assay for detection of Ampelomyces spp. in field-collected samples. This newly developed molecular test was then applied to a large-scale sampling within the Ĺland archipelago, revealing that Ampelomyces is a widespread hyperparasite in this system, with high variability in prevalence among populations. We found that the hyperparasite was more common on leaves where multiple powdery mildew strains coexist, a pattern that may be attributed to differential exposure. Moreover, the prevalence of Ampelomyces at the plant level negatively affected the overwinter survival of its fungal host. We conclude that this hyperparasite may likely impact on its host population dynamics and argue for increased focus on the role of hyperparasites in disease dynamics. PMID:25204419

  10. Elite-upland cotton germplasm-pool assessment of Fusarium wilt resistance in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host-plant resistance is currently the most economic and effective strategy for managing Fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV)] disease. Over the past nine years, a new race of Fusarium (FOV race 4) has increasingly impacted cotton (Gossypium spp.) in production fields in the Sa...

  11. Endophytic Fusarium spp. from Roots of Lawn Grass (Axonopus compressus)

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Latiffah; Ning, Chua Harn

    2013-01-01

    Fungal endophytes are found inside host plants but do not produce any noticeable disease symptoms in their host. In the present study, endophytic Fusarium species were isolated from roots of lawn grass (Axonopus compressus). A total of 51 isolates were recovered from 100 root segments. Two Fusarium species, F. oxysporum (53%) and F. solani (47%), were identified based on macroconidia and conidiogenous cell morphology. The detection of endophytic F. oxysporum and F. solani in the roots of lawn grass contributes to the knowledge of both the distribution of the two Fusarium species and the importance of roots as endophytic niches for Fusarium species. PMID:24575251

  12. Species-Specific Detection and Identification of Fusarium Species Complex, the Causal Agent of Sugarcane Pokkah Boeng in China

    PubMed Central

    Que, Youxiong; Wang, Jihua; Comstock, Jack C.; Wei, Jinjin; McCord, Per H.; Chen, Baoshan; Chen, Rukai; Zhang, Muqing

    2014-01-01

    Background Pokkah boeng disease caused by the Fusarium species complex results in significant yield losses in sugarcane. Thus, the rapid and accurate detection and identification of the pathogen is urgently required to manage and prevent the spreading of sugarcane pokkah boeng. Methods A total of 101 isolates were recovered from the pokkah boeng samples collected from five major sugarcane production areas in China throughout 2012 and 2013. The causal pathogen was identified by morphological observation, pathogenicity test, and phylogenetic analysis based on the fungus-conserved rDNA-ITS. Species-specific TaqMan real-time PCR and conventional PCR methods were developed for rapid and accurate detection of the causal agent of sugarcane pokkah boeng. The specificity and sensitivity of PCR assay were also evaluated on a total of 84 isolates of Fusarium from China and several isolates from other fungal pathogens of Sporisorium scitamineum and Phoma sp. and sugarcane endophyte of Acremonium sp. Result Two Fusarium species (F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum) that caused sugarcane pokahh boeng were identified by morphological observation, pathogenicity test, and phylogenetic analysis. Species-specific TaqMan PCR and conventional PCR were designed and optimized to target their rDNA-ITS regions. The sensitivity of the TaqMan PCR was approximately 10 pg of fungal DNA input, which was 1,000-fold over conventional PCR, and successfully detected pokkah boeng in the field-grown sugarcane. Conclusions/Significance This study was the first to identify two species, F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, that were causal pathogens of sugarcane pokkah boeng in China. It also described the development of a species-specific PCR assay to detect and confirm these pathogens in sugarcane plants from mainland China. This method will be very useful for a broad range of research endeavors as well as the regulatory response and management of sugarcane pokkah boeng. PMID:25141192

  13. Methylobacterium-induced endophyte community changes correspond with protection of plants against pathogen attack.

    PubMed

    Ardanov, Pavlo; Sessitsch, Angela; Häggman, Hely; Kozyrovska, Natalia; Pirttilä, Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Plant inoculation with endophytic bacteria that normally live inside the plant without harming the host is a highly promising approach for biological disease control. The mechanism of resistance induction by beneficial bacteria is poorly understood, because pathways are only partly known and systemic responses are typically not seen. The innate endophytic community structures change in response to external factors such as inoculation, and bacterial endophytes can exhibit direct or indirect antagonism towards pathogens. Earlier we showed that resistance induction by an endophytic Methylobacterium sp. in potato towards Pectobacterium atrosepticum was dependent on the density of the inoculum, whereas the bacterium itself had no antagonistic activity. To elucidate the role of innate endophyte communities in plant responses, we studied community changes in both in vitro and greenhouse experiments using various combinations of plants, endophyte inoculants, and pathogens. Induction of resistance was studied in several potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars by Methylobacterium sp. IMBG290 against the pathogens P. atrosepticum, Phytophthora infestans and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, and in pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) by M. extorquens DSM13060 against Gremmeniella abietina. The capacities of the inoculated endophytic Methylobacterium spp. strains to induce resistance were dependent on the plant cultivar, pathogen, and on the density of Methylobacterium spp. inoculum. Composition of the endophyte community changed in response to inoculation in shoot tissues and correlated with resistance or susceptibility to the disease. Our results demonstrate that endophytic Methylobacterium spp. strains have varying effects on plant disease resistance, which can be modulated through the endophyte community of the host. PMID:23056459

  14. Multihost experimental evolution of the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum unveils genes involved in adaptation to plants.

    PubMed

    Guidot, Alice; Jiang, Wei; Ferdy, Jean-Baptiste; Thébaud, Christophe; Barberis, Patrick; Gouzy, Jérôme; Genin, Stéphane

    2014-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of a lethal bacterial wilt plant disease, infects an unusually wide range of hosts. These hosts can further be split into plants where R. solanacearum is known to cause disease (original hosts) and those where this bacterium can grow asymptomatically (distant hosts). Moreover, this pathogen is able to adapt to many plants as supported by field observations reporting emergence of strains with enlarged pathogenic properties. To investigate the genetic bases of host adaptation, we conducted evolution experiments by serial passages of a single clone of the pathogen on three original and two distant hosts over 300 bacterial generations and then analyzed the whole-genome of nine evolved clones. Phenotypic analysis of the evolved clones showed that the pathogen can increase its fitness on both original and distant hosts although the magnitude of fitness increase was greater on distant hosts. Only few genomic modifications were detected in evolved clones compared with the ancestor but parallel evolutionary changes in two genes were observed in independent evolved populations. Independent mutations in the regulatory gene efpR were selected for in three populations evolved on beans, a distant host. Reverse genetic approaches confirmed that these mutations were associated with fitness gain on bean plants. This work provides a first step toward understanding the within-host evolutionary dynamics of R. solanacearum during infection and identifying bacterial genes subjected to in planta selection. The discovery of EfpR as a determinant conditioning host adaptation of the pathogen illustrates how experimental evolution coupled with whole-genome sequencing is a potent tool to identify novel molecular players involved in central life-history traits. PMID:25086002

  15. The plant metacaspase AtMC1 in pathogen-triggered programmed cell death and aging: functional linkage

    E-print Network

    Dangl, Jeff

    plants that acts in parallel to a similar pro-survival function of autophagy. This novel pro-survival In plants, autophagy can also have both pro-survival and pro-death functions. Autophagy-deficient plantsThe plant metacaspase AtMC1 in pathogen-triggered programmed cell death and aging: functional

  16. An Exploration of Hypotheses that Explain Herbivore and Pathogen Attack in Restored Plant Communities

    PubMed Central

    Blaisdell, G. Kai; Roy, Bitty A.; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Bridgham, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Many hypotheses address the associations of plant community composition with natural enemies, including: (i) plant species diversity may reduce enemy attack, (ii) attack may increase as host abundance increases, (iii) enemy spillover may lead to increased attack on one host species due to transmission from another host species, or enemy dilution may lead to reduced attack on a host that would otherwise have more attack, (iv) physical characteristics of the plant community may influence attack, and (v) plant vigor may affect attack. Restoration experiments with replicated plant communities provide an exceptional opportunity to explore these hypotheses. To explore the relative predictive strengths of these related hypotheses and to investigate the potential effect of several restoration site preparation techniques, we surveyed arthropod herbivore and fungal pathogen attack on the six most common native plant species in a restoration experiment. Multi-model inference revealed a weak but consistent negative correlation with pathogen attack and host diversity across the plant community, and no correlation between herbivory and host diversity. Our analyses also revealed host species-specific relationships between attack and abundance of the target host species, other native plant species, introduced plant species, and physical community characteristics. We found no relationship between enemy attack and plant vigor. We found minimal differences in plant community composition among several diverse site preparation techniques, and limited effects of site preparation techniques on attack. The strongest associations of community characteristics with attack varied among plant species with no community-wide patterns, suggesting that no single hypothesis successfully predicts the dominant community-wide trends in enemy attack. PMID:25699672

  17. The feruloyl esterase gene family of Fusarium graminearum is differentially regulated by aromatic compounds and hosts.

    PubMed

    Balcerzak, Margaret; Harris, Linda J; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Ouellet, Thérčse

    2012-04-01

    Feruloyl esterases can liberate ferulic acid (FA) from plant cell wall polymers. They are expressed by plant pathogenic fungi and could play a role in pathogenicity, although this question has not been addressed yet. The fungus Fusarium graminearum is the principal causal agent of fusarium head blight (FHB) and gibberella ear rot (GER), major diseases of wheat, barley, and maize in all temperate regions of the world. The F. graminearum genome contains seven genes with strong homology to feruloyl esterase (FAE) sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these included three type B, three type C, and one type D FAE genes. Expression profiling of the seven FAE genes showed complex regulation patterns unique to each gene. In F. graminearum-infected plant tissues, the FAE genes exhibited host-specific gene expression. On wheat, FAEB1 and FAED1 were strongly expressed while FAEB2, FAEB3, and FAEC1 were expressed at more modest levels. On maize, only FAEB3, FAEC1, and FAED1 were expressed and at low levels. When growing F. graminearum in liquid culture, only FAEB1 and FAEC1 were expressed. Both genes were induced by a small group of related aromatic compounds including FA, caffeic acid, and p-coumaric acid. FAEB1 was induced by xylose, while repressed by glucose and galactose. FAEC1 was constitutively expressed at low levels in the presence of those sugars. Expression of the other five FAE genes was not detected in the culture conditions used. To determine if FAE genes were important for pathogenicity of F. graminearum, mutant strains inactivated for faeB1?, faeD1? or both genes were constructed and tested on wheat plants. No statistically significant change in pathogenicity and no compensatory expression of the other FAE genes were observed in the fae gene mutants. Our results show that FAEB1 and FAED1 are not required for pathogenicity of F. graminearum on wheat. PMID:22483046

  18. Influence of the pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum on tomato host plant volatiles and psyllid vector settlement.

    PubMed

    Mas, Flore; Vereijssen, Jessica; Suckling, David M

    2014-12-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso) is an unculturable bacterium vectored by the tomato potato psyllid (TPP) Bactericera cockerelli and has been associated with Zebra chip disease in potato and with other economically relevant symptoms observed in solanaceous crops. By altering their host and vector's biological system, pathogens are able to induce changes that benefit them by increasing their transmission rate. Understanding these changes can enable better targeting of mechanisms to control pathogen outbreaks. Here, we explored how the CLso infectious status affects the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of the tomato plant, and whether the CLso infectious status of TPP influences host plant settlement. These chemical and behavioral changes can ultimately affect the rate of encounter between the host and the vector. Results from headspace volatile collection of tomato plants showed that CLso infected tomato plants emitted a qualitatively and quantitatively different blend of VOCs compared to sham-infected plants. By a factorial experiment, we showed that CLso negative (CLso-) TPP preferred to settle 70 % more often on infected tomato plants, while CLso positive (CLso+) TPP were found 68 % more often on sham-infected tomato plants. These results provide new evidence in favor of both host and vector manipulation by CLso. PMID:25378121

  19. Studies of a New Fusarium Wilt of Spinach in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

    1926-01-01

    associated with Fusarium wilt. ...................... 21 1 1 Methods of control. .......................................... 21 j Summary .................................................. 22 I Acknowledgment... spinach wilt infects any of the parts of the plant above ground, although he points out that F~csarium spinaciae is an organism which invades the ' vascular system of the spinach root. The Fusarium here described, on the other hand, is found to invade...

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Isolates of Fusarium graminearum collected 40320 meters

    E-print Network

    Ross, Shane

    , and summer months caused Fusarium head blight on a susceptible cultivar of spring wheat. Trichothecene Fusarium head blight in wheat and produce trichothecene mycotoxins D. G. Schmale III · S. D. Ross · T. L from infected wheat plants in the eastern United States. Our data are considered in the context