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Sample records for plant transpiration rate

  1. Zinc and copper uptake by plants under two transpiration rates. Part I. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Tani, F H; Barrington, S

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the environmental risk of irrigating crops with treated wastewater, an experiment was conducted using two growth chambers, each offering a different vapour pressure deficit (VPD) for high and low transpiration rates (TR), respectively. One of the two sets of 24 pots planted with 6 week old wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), was placed in each growth chamber, and irrigated in triplicates for 20 days with 8 Zn and Cu solutions (0 and 25 mg Zn/L combined with 0, 5, 15 and 30 mg Cu/L). Water losses from planted and non-planted pots served to measure evapo-transpiration and evaporation, respectively. Pots were monitored for Cu and Zn uptake by collecting three plants (shoot and grain)/pots after 0, 10 and 20 days, and roots in each pot after 20 days, and analyzing these plant parts for dry mass, and Cu and Zn levels. Transpiration rate was not affected by any Cu/Zn treatment, but Cu and Zn uptake increase with the time, irrigation solution level and higher TR, with the roots retaining most Cu and Zn, compared to the shoot followed by the grain. For the shoot and grain, Cu had a significant synergetic effect on Zn uptake, when Zn had slight but insignificant antagonistic effects on Cu uptake. For the roots, Cu and Zn had significant synergetic effect on each other. Regression equations obtained from the data indicate that Cu and Zn levels normally found in treated wastewater (0.08 mg/L) are 300 times lower than those used for the most concentrated experimental solutions (30 and 25 mg/L, respectively) and may, on a long term basis, be beneficial rather than toxic to wheat plants and do not acidify soil pH. PMID:16043273

  2. Development of synchronized, autonomous, and self-regulated oscillations in transpiration rate of a whole tomato plant under water stress

    PubMed Central

    Wallach, Rony; Da-Costa, Noam; Raviv, Michael; Moshelion, Menachem

    2010-01-01

    Plants respond to many environmental changes by rapidly adjusting their hydraulic conductivity and transpiration rate, thereby optimizing water-use efficiency and preventing damage due to low water potential. A multiple-load-cell apparatus, time-series analysis of the measured data, and residual low-pass filtering methods were used to monitor continuously and analyse transpiration of potted tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Ailsa Craig) grown in a temperature-controlled greenhouse during well-irrigated and drought periods. A time derivative of the filtered residual time series yielded oscillatory behaviour of the whole plant's transpiration (WPT) rate. A subsequent cross-correlation analysis between the WPT oscillatory pattern and wet-wick evaporation rates (vertical cotton fabric, 0.14 m2 partly submerged in water in a container placed on an adjacent load cell) revealed that autonomous oscillations in WPT rate develop under a continuous increase in water stress, whereas these oscillations correspond with the fluctuations in evaporation rate when water is fully available. The relative amplitude of these autonomous oscillations increased with water stress as transpiration rate decreased. These results support the recent finding that an increase in xylem tension triggers hydraulic signals that spread instantaneously via the plant vascular system and control leaf conductance. The regulatory role of synchronized oscillations in WPT rate in eliminating critical xylem tension points and preventing embolism is discussed. PMID:20558570

  3. Silver and zinc inhibitors influence transpiration rate and aquaporin transcript levels in intact soybean plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) have been identified that expressed limited transpiration rate (TR) above a threshold vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Restriction of TR at high VPD conditions is considered a water conservation trait that allows water to be retained in the soil to benefit of crop...

  4. Plant transpiration distillation of water

    SciTech Connect

    Virostko, M.K.; Spielberg, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    A project using solar energy and the transpiration of plants for the distillation of water is described. Along with determining which of three plants thrived best growing in a still, the experiment also revealed that the still functioned nearly as well in inclement weather as in fair weather.

  5. Hydraulic Limits on Maximum Plant Transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, S.; Vico, G.; Katul, G. G.; Palmroth, S.; Jackson, R. B.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Photosynthesis occurs at the expense of water losses through transpiration. As a consequence of this basic carbon-water interaction at the leaf level, plant growth and ecosystem carbon exchanges are tightly coupled to transpiration. In this contribution, the hydraulic constraints that limit transpiration rates under well-watered conditions are examined across plant functional types and climates. The potential water flow through plants is proportional to both xylem hydraulic conductivity (which depends on plant carbon economy) and the difference in water potential between the soil and the atmosphere (the driving force that pulls water from the soil). Differently from previous works, we study how this potential flux changes with the amplitude of the driving force (i.e., we focus on xylem properties and not on stomatal regulation). Xylem hydraulic conductivity decreases as the driving force increases due to cavitation of the tissues. As a result of this negative feedback, more negative leaf (and xylem) water potentials would provide a stronger driving force for water transport, while at the same time limiting xylem hydraulic conductivity due to cavitation. Here, the leaf water potential value that allows an optimum balance between driving force and xylem conductivity is quantified, thus defining the maximum transpiration rate that can be sustained by the soil-to-leaf hydraulic system. To apply the proposed framework at the global scale, a novel database of xylem conductivity and cavitation vulnerability across plant types and biomes is developed. Conductivity and water potential at 50% cavitation are shown to be complementary (in particular between angiosperms and conifers), suggesting a tradeoff between transport efficiency and hydraulic safety. Plants from warmer and drier biomes tend to achieve larger maximum transpiration than plants growing in environments with lower atmospheric water demand. The predicted maximum transpiration and the corresponding leaf water

  6. Zinc uptake by young wheat plants under two transpiration regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Grifferty, A.; Barrington, S.

    2000-04-01

    Treated wastewater for crop irrigation is an alternative for countries with a shortage of fresh water. Such practice requires strict wastewater application criteria and a better understanding of the effects of transpiration rate on plant heavy metal uptake. The experiment measured Zn uptake by young wheat plants (Triticum aestvum L.) grown in triplicated experimental pots and held in two growth chambers with constant environmental conditions (relative humidity, light and temperature) but with a different air water vapor pressure deficit to produce two different transpiration rates. After 5 wk of growth in a greenhouse, the plants were transferred to the controlled chambers and irrigated using a fertilized solution with five different levels of Zn: 0, 2, 10, 25, and 50 mg/L. These Zn levels were low enough to have no significant effect on plant growth and transpiration rate. The wheat plants started to produce their grain at 6 wk. Plants were collected at 0, 3, and 10 d of incubation in the controlled chambers and analyzed for dry matter and total Zn content. The pots were weighed daily to measure their transpiration rates. On Day 10, the remaining plants were collected and their roots, shoots, and grain were separated, weighed, dried, and analyzed for total Zn. Time and plant transpiration rate were found to affect significantly plant Zn uptake. The higher transpiration rate enhanced plant Zn uptake. The roots had the highest Zn uptake followed by the shoots and then the grain.

  7. Drought, Abscisic Acid and Transpiration Rate Effects on the Regulation of PIP Aquaporin Gene Expression and Abundance in Phaseolus vulgaris Plants

    PubMed Central

    AROCA, RICARDO; FERRANTE, ANTONIO; VERNIERI, PAOLO; CHRISPEELS, MAARTEN J.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Drought causes a decline of root hydraulic conductance, which aside from embolisms, is governed ultimately by aquaporins. Multiple factors probably regulate aquaporin expression, abundance and activity in leaf and root tissues during drought; among these are the leaf transpiration rate, leaf water status, abscisic acid (ABA) and soil water content. Here a study is made of how these factors could influence the response of aquaporin to drought. • Methods Three plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) or aquaporins were cloned from Phaseolus vulgaris plants and their expression was analysed after 4 d of water deprivation and also 1 d after re-watering. The effects of ABA and of methotrexate (MTX), an inhibitor of stomatal opening, on gene expression and protein abundance were also analysed. Protein abundance was examined using antibodies against PIP1 and PIP2 aquaporins. At the same time, root hydraulic conductance (L), transpiration rate, leaf water status and ABA tissue concentration were measured. • Key Results None of the treatments (drought, ABA or MTX) changed the leaf water status or tissue ABA concentration. The three treatments caused a decline in the transpiration rate and raised PVPIP2;1 gene expression and PIP1 protein abundance in the leaves. In the roots, only the drought treatment raised the expression of the three PIP genes examined, while at the same time diminishing PIP2 protein abundance and L. On the other hand, ABA raised both root PIP1 protein abundance and L. • Conclusions The rise of PvPIP2;1 gene expression and PIP1 protein abundance in the leaves of P. vulgaris plants subjected to drought was correlated with a decline in the transpiration rate. At the same time, the increase in the expression of the three PIP genes examined caused by drought and the decline of PIP2 protein abundance in the root tissues were not correlated with any of the parameters measured. PMID:17028296

  8. Quality assessment of plant transpiration water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macler, Bruce A.; Janik, Daniel S.; Benson, Brian L.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed to use plants as elements of biologically-based life support systems for long-term space missions. Three roles have been brought forth for plants in this application: recycling of water, regeneration of air and production of food. This report discusses recycling of water and presents data from investigations of plant transpiration water quality. Aqueous nutrient solution was applied to several plant species and transpired water collected. The findings indicated that this water typically contained 0.3-6 ppm of total organic carbon, which meets hygiene water standards for NASA's space applications. It suggests that this method could be developed to achieve potable water standards.

  9. Characterizing photosynthesis and transpiration of plant communities in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1996-01-01

    CO2 and water vapor fluxes of hydroponically grown wheat and soybean canopies were measured continuously in several environments with an open gas exchange system. Canopy CO2 fluxes reflect the photosynthetic efficiency of a plant community, and provide a record of plant growth and health. There were significant diurnal fluctuations in root and shoot CO2 fluxes, and in shoot water vapor fluxes. Canopy stomatal conductance (Gc) to water vapor was calculated from simultaneous measurements of canopy temperature (Tcan) and transpiration rates (Tr). Tr in the dark was substantial, and there were large diurnal fluctuations in both Gc and Tr. Canopy net Photosynthesis (Pnet), Tr, and Gc increased with increasing net radiation. Gc increased with Tr, suggesting that the stomata of plants in controlled environments (CEs) behave differently from field-grown plants. A transpiration model based on measurements of Gc was developed for CEs. The model accurately predicted Tr from a soybean canopy.

  10. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, Lisa

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  11. How-to-Do-It: Using Computers in Measuring Transpiration Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligmann, Peter F.; Thompson, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an activity in which a computer is used to acquire temperature and humidity data useful in investigating transpiration in plants. Materials and procedures are discussed and examples of results are presented. Factors which influence the rate of transpiration are discussed. (CW)

  12. Transpiration rate measurement using miniature temperature/humidity sensors.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Satoshi; Amano, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    A novel method for the evaluating the transpiration rate (TR) has been proposed. Miniature temperature/humidity loggers were attached onto the leaf surface of a mangrove plant, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, via a spacer. TR values were calculated using the mass-balance equation; the results showed good agreement with those measured using a conventional porometer when the plant root was surrounded by water. In a saline environment, on the other hand, the correlation became poor. The method was shown to require not only minimal invasion, but also a very short time for attaching leaves. PMID:20631447

  13. Acclimation of whole-plant Acacia farnesiana transpiration to carbon dioxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Dugas, W A; Polley, H W; Mayeux, H S; Johnson, H B

    2001-07-01

    Transpiration per unit leaf area of Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd. plants grown at a CO2 concentration ([CO2]) of 385 micromol x mol(-1) was about twice that of plants grown at 980 micromol x mol(-1). However, whes plants grown for more than a year at 980 micromol x mol(-1) were exposed to 380 micromol x mol(-1) for 9 days, they transpired at half the rate of those that had been grown at 380 micromol x mol(-1)1. Similarly, plants grown at 380 micromol x mol(-1), when exposed to 980 micromol x mol(-1), transpired at twice the rate of those grown at 980 micromol x mol(-1). Thus, the effects of elevated [CO2] on whole-plant transpiration, like those on photosynthesis, respiration and stomatal conductance, cannot reliably be extrapolated from measurements made during short-term exposure to elevated [CO2]. PMID:11470664

  14. Root water compensation sustains transpiration rates in an Australian woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Parikshit; Loheide, Steven P.; Eamus, Derek; Daly, Edoardo

    2014-12-01

    We apply a model of root-water uptake to a woodland in Australia to examine the regulation of transpiration by root water compensation (i.e., the ability of roots to regulate root water uptake from different parts of the soil profile depending on local moisture availability). We model soil water movement using the Richards equation and water flow in the xylem with Darcy's equation. These two equations are coupled by a term that governs the exchange of water between soil and root xylem as a function of the difference in water potential between the two. The model is able to reproduce measured diurnal patterns of sap flux and results in leaf water potentials that are consistent with field observations. The model shows that root water compensation is a key process to allow for sustained rates of transpiration across several months. Scenarios with different root depths showed the importance of having a root system deeper than about 2 m to achieve the measured transpiration rates without reducing the leaf water potential to levels inconsistent with field measurements. The model suggests that the presence of more than 5 % of the root system below 0.6 m allows trees to maintain sustained transpiration rates keeping leaf water potential levels within the range observed in the field. According to the model, a large contribution to transpiration in dry periods was provided by the roots below 0.3 m, even though the percentage of roots at these depths was less than 40 % in all scenarios.

  15. [Plant transpiration in a maize/soybean intercropping system measured with heat balance method].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Duan, Ai-wang; Qiu, Xin-qiang; Zhang, Jun-peng; Sun, Jing-sheng; Wang, He-zhou

    2010-05-01

    In an experimental field with maize/soybean strip intercropping, the transpiration of maize and soybean plants was measured with sap flow gauge based on heat balance method. In the intercropping system, the diurnal change of the sap flow rates of the plants fitted single-peak curve in sunny day and multi-peak curve in cloudy day. The plant sap flow rates were affected by many environmental factors, among which, solar radiation was the most important meteorological factor. The daily sap flow per maize or soybean plant showed significant correlations with solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and soil heat flux. During the observation period (June 1-30, 2008), the mean daily transpiration of maize plant (1.44 mm x d(-1)) was about 1.8 times of that of soybean plant (0.79 mm x d(-1)). Maize transpiration and soybean transpiration contributed 64% and 36% to the total transpiration of the intercropping system, respectively. Due to the spatial variation of stem diameter and leaf area, it would be necessary to install more sap flow gauges to accurately measure the sap flow of maize and soybean plants. PMID:20707114

  16. Barley yellow dwarf virus effects on cereal plant growth and transpiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about how changes in root system biomass caused by barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) infection impact water relations in cereal plants. Objectives of these greenhouse studies were to elucidate virus infection effects on plant growth and apparent transpiration rate in oats (Avena sati...

  17. Global separation of plant transpiration from groundwater and streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evaristo, Jaivime; Jasechko, Scott; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2015-09-01

    Current land surface models assume that groundwater, streamflow and plant transpiration are all sourced and mediated by the same well mixed water reservoir--the soil. However, recent work in Oregon and Mexico has shown evidence of ecohydrological separation, whereby different subsurface compartmentalized pools of water supply either plant transpiration fluxes or the combined fluxes of groundwater and streamflow. These findings have not yet been widely tested. Here we use hydrogen and oxygen isotopic data (2H/1H (δ2H) and 18O/16O (δ18O)) from 47 globally distributed sites to show that ecohydrological separation is widespread across different biomes. Precipitation, stream water and groundwater from each site plot approximately along the δ2H/δ18O slope of local precipitation inputs. But soil and plant xylem waters extracted from the 47 sites all plot below the local stream water and groundwater on the meteoric water line, suggesting that plants use soil water that does not itself contribute to groundwater recharge or streamflow. Our results further show that, at 80% of the sites, the precipitation that supplies groundwater recharge and streamflow is different from the water that supplies parts of soil water recharge and plant transpiration. The ubiquity of subsurface water compartmentalization found here, and the segregation of storm types relative to hydrological and ecological fluxes, may be used to improve numerical simulations of runoff generation, stream water transit time and evaporation-transpiration partitioning. Future land surface model parameterizations should be closely examined for how vegetation, groundwater recharge and streamflow are assumed to be coupled.

  18. Global separation of plant transpiration from groundwater and streamflow.

    PubMed

    Evaristo, Jaivime; Jasechko, Scott; McDonnell, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-01

    Current land surface models assume that groundwater, streamflow and plant transpiration are all sourced and mediated by the same well mixed water reservoir--the soil. However, recent work in Oregon and Mexico has shown evidence of ecohydrological separation, whereby different subsurface compartmentalized pools of water supply either plant transpiration fluxes or the combined fluxes of groundwater and streamflow. These findings have not yet been widely tested. Here we use hydrogen and oxygen isotopic data ((2)H/(1)H (δ(2)H) and (18)O/(16)O (δ(18)O)) from 47 globally distributed sites to show that ecohydrological separation is widespread across different biomes. Precipitation, stream water and groundwater from each site plot approximately along the δ(2)H/δ(18)O slope of local precipitation inputs. But soil and plant xylem waters extracted from the 47 sites all plot below the local stream water and groundwater on the meteoric water line, suggesting that plants use soil water that does not itself contribute to groundwater recharge or streamflow. Our results further show that, at 80% of the sites, the precipitation that supplies groundwater recharge and streamflow is different from the water that supplies parts of soil water recharge and plant transpiration. The ubiquity of subsurface water compartmentalization found here, and the segregation of storm types relative to hydrological and ecological fluxes, may be used to improve numerical simulations of runoff generation, stream water transit time and evaporation-transpiration partitioning. Future land surface model parameterizations should be closely examined for how vegetation, groundwater recharge and streamflow are assumed to be coupled. PMID:26333467

  19. Hydraulic resistances and root geometry parameters in plant transpiration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-04-01

    Three approximate mesoscopic solutions of soil water flow towards roots: (1) finite difference approximation, (2) steady-state solution, and (3) steady-rate solution, were examined from the point of view of their ability to predict the pressure head variations in the vicinity of roots. The individual solutions were then alternatively used to determine the macroscopic soil hydraulic resistance between bulk soil and root surface. In the next step, macroscopic simulations of coupled soil water flow and root water uptake at a forest site under humid temperate climate were performed. The predicted soil water pressure heads and actual transpiration rates were compared with observed data. The simulation results illustrate uncertainties associated with the estimation of root geometric and hydraulic properties. Regarding the prediction of actual transpiration, the correct characterization of active root system geometry and its hydraulic properties seems far more important than the choice of a particular macroscopic soil hydraulic resistance formula.

  20. Development of the deuterium tracing method for the estimation of transpiration rates and transpiration parameters of trees

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, I.R.

    1992-12-31

    Recent developments relating to the theory and practice of the deuterium tracing method are reviewed. Theoretical developments have shown that the method is applicable to the fluctuating flow regime which occurs in trees and that the method provides an estimate of the weighted mean flow over the time period that the tracer is present at the sampling point. A practical development of the method for estimating transpiration rates and transpiration parameters which uses time averaged sampling is described and it is shown that with this method only one deuterium tracer concentration analysis is required per tree compared with 90 using an earlier method. The calculation of surface resistance through solution of the convolution integral of the transpiration rate and the tracer concentration-time curve is also described and the sensitivity of the surface resistance estimate to the flow parameters is investigated using as an example observations made on a three year old plantation of Eucalyptus tereticornis growing in Karnataka, southern India.

  1. Predicting the effects of gas diffusivity on photosynthesis and transpiration of plants grown under hypobaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohil, Hemant L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Sinclair, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    As part of a Bio-regenerative Life Support System (BLSS) for long-term space missions, plants will likely be grown at reduced pressure. This low pressure will minimize structural requirements for growth chambers on missions to the Moon or Mars. However, at reduced pressures the diffusivity of gases increases. This will affect the rates at which CO2 is assimilated and water is transpired through stomata. To understand quantitatively the possible effects of reduced pressure on plant growth, CO2 and H2O transport were calculated for atmospheres of various total pressures (101, 66, 33, 22, 11 kPa) and CO2 concentrations (0.04, 0.1 and 0.18 kPa). The diffusivity of a gas is inversely proportional to total pressure and shows dramatic increases at pressures below 33 kPa (1/3 atm). A mathematical relationship based on the principle of thermodynamics was applied to low pressure conditions and can be used for calculating the transpiration and photosynthesis of plants grown in hypobaria. At 33 kPa total pressure, the stomatal conductance increases by a factor of three with the boundary layer conductance increasing by a factor of ˜1.7, since the leaf conductance is a function of both stomatal and the boundary layer conductance, the overall conductance will increase resulting in significantly higher levels of transpiration as the pressure drops. The conductance of gases is also regulated by stomatal aperture in an inverse relationship. The higher CO2 concentration inside the leaf air space during low pressure treatments may result in higher CO2 assimilation and partial stomata closure, resulting in a decrease in transpiration rate. The results of this analysis offer guidelines for experiments in pressure and high CO2 environments to establish ideal conditions for minimizing transpiration and maximizing the plant biomass yield in BLSS.

  2. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in Arabidopsis lines with different transpiration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, N.; Lawson, T.; Eley, Y.; McAusland, L.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen are used widely to investigate modern and ancient water cycles. The D/H composition of organic compounds derived from terrestrial plants has recently attracted significant attention as a proxy for palaeohydrology. However, the role of various plant physiological and biochemical factors in controlling the D/H signature of leaf wax lipids in extant plants remains unclear. The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of plant transpiration on the D/H composition of n-alkanes in terrestrial plants. This experiment includes 4 varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana that differ with respect to stomatal density and stomatal geometry. All 4 varieties were grown indoors under identical temperature, relative humidity, light and watering regimes and then sampled for leaf wax and leaf water stable isotopic measurements. During growth, stomatal conductance to carbon dioxide and water vapour were also determined. We found that the plants varied significantly in terms of their transpiration rates. Transpiration rates were significantly higher in Arabidopsis ost1 and ost1-1 varieties (2.4 and 3.2 mmol m-2 s-1, respectively) than in Arabidopsis RbohD and Col-0 (1.5 and 1.4). However, hydrogen isotope measurements of n-alkanes extracted from leaf waxes revealed a very different pattern. Varieties ost1, ost1-1, and RbohD have very similar deltaD values of n-C29 alkane (-125, -128, and -127 per mil), whereas the deltaD value of Col-0 is more negative (-137 per mil). The initial results of this work suggest that plant transpiration is decoupled from the D/H composition of n-alkanes. In other words, physical processes that affect water vapour movement between the plant and its environment apparently cannot account for the stable hydrogen isotope composition of organic compounds that comprise leaf waxes. Additional, perhaps biochemical, processes that affect hydrogen isotope fractionation during photosynthesis might need to be invoked

  3. Investigation of transpiration and/or accumulation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, R.L.; Carlsen, T.M.

    1994-12-31

    The authors are in the planning stages of an investigation to explore plant transpiration and/or accumulation of VOCs (primarily Trichloroethylene [TCE]) by native vegetation. Such processes may naturally remediate these compounds in shallow ground water. To adequately quantify the amount of TCE in ground water prior to vegetation uptake, the authors will first install shallow piezometers adjacent to existing vegetation. Vegetation sampling will be synchronized with the ground water sampling to establish baseline conditions. They will conduct a literature search to identify potential structures with high lipid content in the plant species of interest (Populus fremontii, Typha latifolia and Salix). To investigate VOC distribution in the plant, individual morphological segments of the plant will be analyzed. The vegetation will be dissected into distinct segments, such as the vegetative (stem and leaves) and reproductive structures, to determine the possible accumulation of TCE at various points within the plant. They have completed preliminary development of analytical methods that they will use to analyze the samples. In the field, plastic (Tedlar) bags will be tightly secured onto the vegetation and a direct head-space analysis will be conducted on the bags, thus providing information on the rate of transpiration compared to the actual accumulation of VOCs within the plant. At a minimum, they expect to document VOC losses from the ground water via plant transpiration.

  4. Gravimetric phenotyping of whole plant transpiration responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit identifies genotypic variation in water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Dodd, Ian C; Rothwell, Shane A; Jones, Ros; Tardieu, Francois; Draye, Xavier; Davies, William J

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in rapidly identifying genotypes with improved water use efficiency, exemplified by the development of whole plant phenotyping platforms that automatically measure plant growth and water use. Transpirational responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and whole plant water use efficiency (WUE, defined as the accumulation of above ground biomass per unit of water used) were measured in 100 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes. Using a glasshouse based phenotyping platform with naturally varying VPD (1.5-3.8kPa), a 2-fold variation in WUE was identified in well-watered plants. Regression analysis of transpiration versus VPD under these conditions, and subsequent whole plant gas exchange at imposed VPDs (0.8-3.4kPa) showed identical responses in specific genotypes. Genotype response of transpiration versus VPD fell into two categories: 1) a linear increase in transpiration rate with VPD with low (high WUE) or high (low WUE) transpiration rate at all VPDs, 2) a non-linear response with a pronounced change point at low VPD (high WUE) or high VPD (low WUE). In the latter group, high WUE genotypes required a significantly lower VPD before transpiration was restricted, and had a significantly lower rate of transpiration in response to VPD after this point, when compared to low WUE genotypes. Change point values were significantly positively correlated with stomatal sensitivity to VPD. A change point in stomatal response to VPD may explain why some genotypes show contradictory WUE rankings according to whether they are measured under glasshouse or field conditions. Furthermore, this novel use of a high throughput phenotyping platform successfully reproduced the gas exchange responses of individuals measured in whole plant chambers, accelerating the identification of plants with high WUE. PMID:27593468

  5. A Transpiration Experiment Requiring Critical Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Rosemary H.

    1998-01-01

    Details laboratory procedures that enable students to understand the concept of how differences in water potential drive the movement of water within a plant in response to transpiration. Students compare transpiration rates for upper and lower surfaces of leaves. (DDR)

  6. Hydraulic limits on maximum plant transpiration and the emergence of the safety-efficiency trade-off.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Stefano; Vico, Giulia; Katul, Gabriel; Palmroth, Sari; Jackson, Robert B; Porporato, Amilcare

    2013-04-01

    Soil and plant hydraulics constrain ecosystem productivity by setting physical limits to water transport and hence carbon uptake by leaves. While more negative xylem water potentials provide a larger driving force for water transport, they also cause cavitation that limits hydraulic conductivity. An optimum balance between driving force and cavitation occurs at intermediate water potentials, thus defining the maximum transpiration rate the xylem can sustain (denoted as E(max)). The presence of this maximum raises the question as to whether plants regulate transpiration through stomata to function near E(max). To address this question, we calculated E(max) across plant functional types and climates using a hydraulic model and a global database of plant hydraulic traits. The predicted E(max) compared well with measured peak transpiration across plant sizes and growth conditions (R = 0.86, P < 0.001) and was relatively conserved among plant types (for a given plant size), while increasing across climates following the atmospheric evaporative demand. The fact that E(max) was roughly conserved across plant types and scales with the product of xylem saturated conductivity and water potential at 50% cavitation was used here to explain the safety-efficiency trade-off in plant xylem. Stomatal conductance allows maximum transpiration rates despite partial cavitation in the xylem thereby suggesting coordination between stomatal regulation and xylem hydraulic characteristics. PMID:23356378

  7. Plant transpiration and groundwater dynamics in water-limited climates: Impacts of hydraulic redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiangyu; Liang, Xu; Lin, Jeen-Shang

    2016-06-01

    The role of groundwater in sustaining plant transpiration constitutes an important but not well-understood aspect of the interactions between groundwater, vegetation, the land surface, and the atmosphere. The effect of the hydraulic redistribution (HR) process by plant roots on the interplay between plant transpiration and groundwater dynamics under water-limited climates is investigated by using the Variable Infiltration Capacity Plus (VIC+) land surface model. Numerical experiments, with or without explicitly considering HR, are conducted on soil columns over a range of groundwater table depths (GWTDs) under different vegetative land covers, soil types, and precipitation conditions. When HR is not included, this study obtains transpiration-GWTD relationships consistent with those from watershed studies that do not include HR. When HR is included, the transpiration-GWTD relationships are modified. The modification introduced by HR is manifested in the soil moisture of the root zone. The mechanism of HR is explained by detailing the roles of the hydraulically redistributed water, the upward diffusion of soil water, and the daytime root uptake. We have found that HR is particularly important in water-limited climates under which plants have high transpiration demand. At the beginning stage of a dry period, HR modulates the severe impacts that climate has on plant transpiration. Only after a prolonged dry period, impacts of HR are lessened when the groundwater table drops below the depth of water uptake by roots and are diminished when plant transpiration is decoupled from groundwater dynamics.

  8. Photosynthesis, Transpiration, Leaf Temperature, and Stomatal Activity of Cotton Plants under Varying Water Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pallas, J. E.; Michel, B. E.; Harris, D. G.

    1967-01-01

    Cotton plants, Gossypium hirsutum L. were grown in a growth room under incident radiation levels of 65, 35, and 17 Langleys per hour to determine the effects of vapor pressure deficits (VPD's) of 2, 9, and 17 mm Hg at high soil water potential, and the effects of decreasing soil water potential and reirrigation on transpiration, leaf temperature, stomatal activity, photosynthesis, and respiration at a VPD of 9 mm Hg. Transpiration was positively correlated with radiation level, air VPD and soil water potential. Reirrigation following stress led to slow recovery, which may be related to root damage occurring during stress. Leaf water potential decreased with, but not as fast as, soil water potential. Leaf temperature was usually positively correlated with light intensity and negatively correlated with transpiration, air VPD, and soil water. At high soil water, leaf temperatures ranged from a fraction of 1 to a few degrees above ambient, except at medium and low light and a VPD of 19 mm Hg when they were slightly below ambient, probably because of increased transpirational cooling. During low soil water leaf temperatures as high as 3.4° above ambient were recorded. Reirrigation reduced leaf temperature before appreciably increasing transpiration. The upper leaf surface tended to be warmer than the lower at the beginning of the day and when soil water was adequate; otherwise there was little difference or the lower surface was warmer. This pattern seemed to reflect transpiration cooling and leaf position effects. Although stomata were more numerous in the lower than the upper epidermis, most of the time a greater percentage of the upper were open. With sufficient soil water present, stomata opened with light and closed with darkness. Fewer stomata opened under low than high light intensity and under even moderate, as compared with high soil water. It required several days following reirrigation for stomata to regain original activity levels. Apparent photosynthesis

  9. Assessment of actual transpiration rate in olive tree field combining sap-flow, leaf area index and scintillometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, C.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Minacapilli, M.; Provenzano, G.; Rallo, G.; de Bruin, H. A. R.

    2009-09-01

    Models to estimate the actual evapotranspiration (ET) in sparse vegetation area can be fundamental for agricultural water managements, especially when water availability is a limiting factor. Models validation must be carried out by considering in situ measurements referred to the field scale, which is the relevant scale of the modelled variables. Moreover, a particular relevance assumes to consider separately the components of plant transpiration (T) and soil evaporation (E), because only the first is actually related to the crop stress conditions. Objective of the paper was to assess a procedure aimed to estimate olive trees actual transpiration by combining sap flow measurements with the scintillometer technique at field scale. The study area, located in Western Sicily (Italy), is mainly cultivated with olive crop and is characterized by typical Mediterranean semi-arid climate. Measurements of sap flow and crop actual evapotranspiration rate were carried out during 2008 irrigation season. Crop transpiration fluxes, measured on some plants by means of sap flow sensors, were upscaled considering the leaf area index (LAI). The comparison between evapotranspiration values, derived by displaced-beam small-aperture scintillometer (DBSAS-SLS20, Scintec AG), with the transpiration fluxes obtained by the sap flow sensors, also allowed to evaluate the contribute of soil evaporation in an area characterized by low vegetation coverage.

  10. Transpiration rate. An important factor controlling the sucrose content of the guard cell apoplast of broad bean.

    PubMed

    Outlaw, W H; De Vlieghere-He, X

    2001-08-01

    Evaporation of water from the guard cell wall concentrates apoplastic solutes. We hypothesize that this phenomenon provides two mechanisms for responding to high transpiration rates. First, apoplastic abscisic acid is concentrated in the guard cell wall. Second, by accumulating in the guard cell wall, apoplastic sucrose (Suc) provides a direct osmotic feedback to guard cells. As a means of testing this second hypothesized mechanism, the guard cell Suc contents at a higher transpiration rate (60% relative humidity [RH]) were compared with those at a lower transpiration rate (90% RH) in broad bean (Vicia faba), an apoplastic phloem loader. In control plants (constant 60% RH), the guard cell apoplast Suc content increased from 97 +/- 81 femtomol (fmol) guard cell pair(-1) to 701 +/- 142 fmol guard cell pair(-1) between daybreak and midday. This increase is equivalent to approximately 150 mM external, which is sufficient to decrease stomatal aperture size. In plants that were shifted to 90% RH before daybreak, the guard cell apoplast Suc content did not increase during the day. In accordance, in plants that were shifted to 90% RH at midday, the guard cell apoplast Suc content declined to the daybreak value. Under all conditions, the guard cell symplast Suc content increased during the photoperiod, but the guard cell symplast Suc content was higher (836 +/- 33 fmol guard cell pair(-1)) in plants that were shifted to 90% RH. These results indicate that a high transpiration rate may result in a high guard cell apoplast Suc concentration, which diminishes stomatal aperture size. PMID:11500569

  11. A microfluidic pump/valve inspired by xylem embolism and transpiration in plants.

    PubMed

    Jingmin, Li; Chong, Liu; Zheng, Xu; Kaiping, Zhang; Xue, Ke; Liding, Wang

    2012-01-01

    In plants, transpiration draws the water upward from the roots to the leaves. However, this flow can be blocked by air bubbles in the xylem conduits, which is called xylem embolism. In this research, we present the design of a biomimetic microfluidic pump/valve based on water transpiration and xylem embolism. This micropump/valve is mainly composed of three parts: the first is a silicon sheet with an array of slit-like micropores to mimic the stomata in a plant leaf; the second is a piece of agarose gel to mimic the mesophyll cells in the sub-cavities of a stoma; the third is a micro-heater which is used to mimic the xylem embolism and its self-repairing. The solution in the microchannels of a microfluidic chip can be driven by the biomimetic "leaf" composed of the silicon sheet and the agarose gel. The halting and flowing of the solution is controlled by the micro-heater. Results have shown that a steady flow rate of 1.12 µl/min can be obtained by using this micropump/valve. The time interval between the turning on/off of the micro-heater and the halt (or flow) of the fluid is only 2∼3 s. This micropump/valve can be used as a "plug and play" fluid-driven unit. It has the potential to be used in many application fields. PMID:23209709

  12. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  13. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  14. FPGA-based Fused Smart Sensor for Real-Time Plant-Transpiration Dynamic Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Millan-Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Contreras-Medina, Luis Miguel; Carrillo-Serrano, Roberto Valentin; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Rios-Alcaraz, Miguel Angel; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2010-01-01

    Plant transpiration is considered one of the most important physiological functions because it constitutes the plants evolving adaptation to exchange moisture with a dry atmosphere which can dehydrate or eventually kill the plant. Due to the importance of transpiration, accurate measurement methods are required; therefore, a smart sensor that fuses five primary sensors is proposed which can measure air temperature, leaf temperature, air relative humidity, plant out relative humidity and ambient light. A field programmable gate array based unit is used to perform signal processing algorithms as average decimation and infinite impulse response filters to the primary sensor readings in order to reduce the signal noise and improve its quality. Once the primary sensor readings are filtered, transpiration dynamics such as: transpiration, stomatal conductance, leaf-air-temperature-difference and vapor pressure deficit are calculated in real time by the smart sensor. This permits the user to observe different primary and calculated measurements at the same time and the relationship between these which is very useful in precision agriculture in the detection of abnormal conditions. Finally, transpiration related stress conditions can be detected in real time because of the use of online processing and embedded communications capabilities. PMID:22163656

  15. FPGA-based fused smart sensor for real-time plant-transpiration dynamic estimation.

    PubMed

    Millan-Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Contreras-Medina, Luis Miguel; Carrillo-Serrano, Roberto Valentin; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Rios-Alcaraz, Miguel Angel; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2010-01-01

    Plant transpiration is considered one of the most important physiological functions because it constitutes the plants evolving adaptation to exchange moisture with a dry atmosphere which can dehydrate or eventually kill the plant. Due to the importance of transpiration, accurate measurement methods are required; therefore, a smart sensor that fuses five primary sensors is proposed which can measure air temperature, leaf temperature, air relative humidity, plant out relative humidity and ambient light. A field programmable gate array based unit is used to perform signal processing algorithms as average decimation and infinite impulse response filters to the primary sensor readings in order to reduce the signal noise and improve its quality. Once the primary sensor readings are filtered, transpiration dynamics such as: transpiration, stomatal conductance, leaf-air-temperature-difference and vapor pressure deficit are calculated in real time by the smart sensor. This permits the user to observe different primary and calculated measurements at the same time and the relationship between these which is very useful in precision agriculture in the detection of abnormal conditions. Finally, transpiration related stress conditions can be detected in real time because of the use of online processing and embedded communications capabilities. PMID:22163656

  16. Plant canopy transpiration in bioregenerative life support systems - The link between mechanistic and empirical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirko, Robert J.; Mccormack, Ann C.; Edeen, Marybeth A.

    1992-01-01

    A model of water transpiration in a plant canopy that combines two approaches is presented. The first approach is to account for underlying physical processes, while the second is to empirically incorporate transpiration data now being generated at the Johnson Center Variable Pressure Growth Chamber. The two approaches, physical modeling and data analysis, make it possible to produce a model that is more robust than either the standard first-principles model or a straightforward empirical model. It is shown that the present transpiration model is able to efficiently capture the dynamic behavior of the plant canopy over the entire range of environmental parameters now envisioned to be important in an operating controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). Examples of the use of this model in assessing plant canopy dynamics and CELSS design options are also presented.

  17. Role of transpiration and metabolism in translocation and accumulation of cadmium in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiwei; Wang, Haiyun; Ma, Yibing; Wang, Haohao; Shi, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in pots and in hydroponic culture accumulated cadmium (Cd) particularly: the Cd content of tobacco leaves exceeded 100 mg/kg and the enrichment factor (the ratio of Cd in leaves to that in soil) was more than 4. These high levels of accumulation identify tobacco as a hyperaccumulator of Cd. Two transpiration inhibitors (paraffin or CaCl2) and shade decreased the Cd content of tobacco leaves, and the decrease showed a linear relationship with the leaf transpiration rate. A metabolism inhibitor, namely 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and low temperature (4 °C) also lowered the Cd content of tobacco leaves, but the inhibitory effect of low temperature was greater. In the half number of leaves that were shaded, the Cd content decreased to 26.5% of that in leaves that were not shaded in the same tobacco plants. These results suggests that translocation of Cd from the medium to the leaves is driven by the symplastic and the apoplastic pathways. Probably, of the two crucial steps in the translocation of Cd in tobacco plants, one, namely uptake from the medium to the xylem, is energy-dependent whereas the other, namely the transfer from the xylem to the leaves, is driven mainly by transpiration. PMID:26547876

  18. Effect of Transpiration on Plant Accumulation and Translocation of PPCP/EDCs

    PubMed Central

    Dodgen, Laurel K; Ueda, Aiko; Wu, Xiaoqin; Parker, David R; Gan, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The reuse of treated wastewater for agricultural irrigation in arid and hot climates where plant transpiration is high may affect plant accumulation of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this study, carrot, lettuce, and tomato plants were grown in solution containing 16 PPCP/EDCs in either a cool-humid or a warm-dry environment. Leaf bioconcentration factors (BCF) were positively correlated with transpiration for chemical groups of different ionized states (p < 0.05). However, root BCFs were correlated with transpiration only for neutral PPCP/EDCs (p < 0.05). Neutral and cationic PPCP/EDCs showed similar accumulation, while anionic PPCP/EDCs had significantly higher accumulation in roots and significantly lower accumulation in leaves (p < 0.05). Results show that plant transpiration may play a significant role in the uptake and translocation of PPCP/EDCs, which may have a pronounced effect in arid and hot climates where irrigation with treated wastewater is common. PMID:25594843

  19. Effect of transpiration on plant accumulation and translocation of PPCP/EDCs.

    PubMed

    Dodgen, Laurel K; Ueda, Aiko; Wu, Xiaoqin; Parker, David R; Gan, Jay

    2015-03-01

    The reuse of treated wastewater for agricultural irrigation in arid and hot climates where plant transpiration is high may affect plant accumulation of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this study, carrot, lettuce, and tomato plants were grown in solution containing 16 PPCP/EDCs in either a cool-humid or a warm-dry environment. Leaf bioconcentration factors (BCF) were positively correlated with transpiration for chemical groups of different ionized states (p < 0.05). However, root BCFs were correlated with transpiration only for neutral PPCP/EDCs (p < 0.05). Neutral and cationic PPCP/EDCs showed similar accumulation, while anionic PPCP/EDCs had significantly higher accumulation in roots and significantly lower accumulation in leaves (p < 0.05). Results show that plant transpiration may play a significant role in the uptake and translocation of PPCP/EDCs, which may have a pronounced effect in arid and hot climates where irrigation with treated wastewater is common. PMID:25594843

  20. Applicability of high rate transpiration system for treatment of biologically treated distillery effluent.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Juwarkar, Asha A; Pandey, R A; Chakrabarti, T

    2008-06-01

    The biologically treated distillery effluent (BTDE) contains intense colour, high total dissolved solids (TDS), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). These properties even after primary, secondary and tertiary treatments contain high concentrations of TDS, COD and BOD. The paper highlights the safe disposal and treatment of BTDE on land through High Rate Transpiration System (HRTS). HRTS is a zero discharge, low cost, high-tech method for improving the quality of BTDE for potential reuse. The experiments conducted at bench and pilot scale showed that HRTS having coconut husk as a bedding material could successfully treat the BTDE with a hydraulic load of 200 m3 ha(-1) day(-1) having BOD of 100 mg l(-1) and 500 m3 ha(-1) day(-1) having BOD of 500 mg l(-1) with average COD load of 0.686 and 2.88 ton ha(-1) day(-1) during the post and pre monsoon periods respectively. There was no significant increase in the organic carbon of the soil irrigated with BTDE. The concentrations of various pollutants analyzed in the leachate were within the prescribed limit for the drinking water sources. The colour removal was 99 to 100% and BOD and COD were possible to treat with optimum hydraulic loading of BTDE through HRTS planted with Dendrocalamus strictus. PMID:17882528

  1. A Laboratory Exercise to Assess Transpiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrock, Gould F.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are outlined for a laboratory exercise in which students use a gravimetric method to determine the rate of transpiration in sunflower seedlings. Discusses the data in terms of the effectiveness of stomatal openings, mechanisms for water movement in plants, and the role of transpiration in the environment. (DC)

  2. From evaporating pans to transpiring plants (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, Michael

    2013-04-01

    observations that win. That is the basis of science. In this Dalton Medal lecture we first examine pan evaporation observations and show why pan evaporation has declined. Armed with that knowledge we then investigate the consequences for plant water use and how this is directly coupled to the catchment water balance.

  3. Mesoscopic aspects of root water uptake modeling - Hydraulic resistances and root geometry interpretations in plant transpiration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-02-01

    In the context of soil water flow modeling, root water uptake is often evaluated based on water potential difference between the soil and the plant (the water potential gradient approach). Root water uptake rate is modulated by hydraulic resistance of both the root itself, and the soil in the root vicinity. The soil hydraulic resistance is a function of actual soil water content and can be assessed assuming radial axisymmetric water flow toward a single root (at the mesoscopic scale). In the present study, three approximate solutions of mesoscopic root water uptake - finite difference approximation, steady-state solution, and steady-rate solution - are examined regarding their ability to capture the pressure head variations in the root vicinity. Insignificance of their differences when implemented in the macroscopic soil water flow model is demonstrated using the critical root water uptake concept. Subsequently, macroscopic simulations of coupled soil water flow and root water uptake are presented for a forest site under temperate humid climate. Predicted soil water pressure heads and actual transpiration rates are compared with observed data. Scenario simulations illustrate uncertainties associated with estimates of root geometrical and hydraulic properties. Regarding the actual transpiration prediction, the correct characterization of active root system geometry and hydraulic properties seems far more important than the choice of a particular mesoscopic model.

  4. The stable isotope composition of transpired water and the rate of change in leaf water enrichment in response to variable environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, K. A.; Roddy, A. B.; Link, P.; Apodaca, R. L.; Tu, K. P.; Hu, J.; Dawson, T. E.; Barbour, M.

    2012-12-01

    Previous research has shown that during daylight hours the isotope composition of leaf water is generally well approximated by steady-state leaf water isotope enrichment models. However, there is little direct confirmation of isotopic steady state (ISS) transpiration. Here we use a novel method to evaluate the frequency (or infrequency) of ISS transpiration and the rate of change in leaf water enrichment when leaves are exposed to a variable environment. Specifically, our study had three goals. First, we wanted to develop a new method to measure the isotope fluxes of transpiration that relies on isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) and highlight how an IRIS instrument can be coupled to plant gas exchange systems. In doing so, we also developed a method for controlling the absolute humidity entering the gas exchange cuvettes across a wide range of concentrations (approximately 4000 ppmv to 22000 ppmv) without changing the isotope composition of water vapour entering the cuvette. Second, we quantified variation in the isotope composition of transpired water vapor and the rate of change in leaf water enrichment that can occur as a result of changes in relative humidity, leaf surface conductance to water vapour, leaf temperature and the isotope composition of atmospheric water vapor. Third, we examine the differences between steady state and non-steady state model predictions of leaf water enrichment at the site of evaporation. In our measurements the isotopic compositions of transpired water were neither stable nor equal to source water until leaves had been maintained at physiological steady state for at least 40 minutes. Additionally when transpiration was not at ISS, the steady state model predictions of leaf water enrichment at the site of evaporation exceeded non steady-state model predictions by up to 8 per mil. Further, the rate of change in leaf water enrichment was highly sensitive to variation in leaf water content. Our results suggest that a variable

  5. Measuring diurnal cycles of plant transpiration fluxes in the Arctic with an automated clear chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, L. R.; Raz Yaseef, N.; Curtis, J. B.; Rahn, T. A.; Young, J. M.; Newman, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important greenhouse gas and a major component of the hydrological cycle, but methodological challenges still limit our knowledge of this flux. Measuring evapotranspiration is even more difficult when aiming to partition plant transpiration and soil evaporation. Information on this process for arctic systems is very limited. In order to decrease this gap, our objective was to directly measure plant transpiration in Barrow, Alaska (71.3°N 156.7°W). A commercial system allows measuring carbon soil respiration fluxes with an automated clear chamber connected to an infrared gas-analyzer (Licor 8100), and while it simultaneously measures water concentrations, it is not calibrated to measure vapor fluxes. We calibrated the clear chamber against a previously established method based on a Licor 6400 soil chamber, and we developed a code to calculate fluxes. We performed laboratory comparisons in New Mexico and field comparisons in the Arctic, suggesting that this is a valid tool for a large range of climates. In the field we found a strong correlation between the two instruments with R2 of 0.79. Even with 24 hours of daylight in the Arctic, the system captures a clear diurnal transpiration flux, peaking at 0.9 mmol m-2 s-1 and showing no flux at the lowest points. This new method should be a powerful approach for long term measurements of specific vegetation types or surface features. Such Data can also be used to help understand controls on larger scale eddy covariance tower measurements of evapotranspiration.

  6. The Arabidopsis outward K+ channel GORK is involved in regulation of stomatal movements and plant transpiration

    PubMed Central

    Hosy, Eric; Vavasseur, Alain; Mouline, Karine; Dreyer, Ingo; Gaymard, Frédéric; Porée, Fabien; Boucherez, Jossia; Lebaudy, Anne; Bouchez, David; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Simonneau, Thierry; Thibaud, Jean-Baptiste; Sentenac, Hervé

    2003-01-01

    Microscopic pores present in the epidermis of plant aerial organs, called stomata, allow gas exchanges between the inner photosynthetic tissue and the atmosphere. Regulation of stomatal aperture, preventing excess transpirational vapor loss, relies on turgor changes of two highly differentiated epidermal cells surrounding the pore, the guard cells. Increased guard cell turgor due to increased solute accumulation results in stomatal opening, whereas decreased guard cell turgor due to decreased solute accumulation results in stomatal closing. Here we provide direct evidence, based on reverse genetics approaches, that the Arabidopsis GORK Shaker gene encodes the major voltage-gated outwardly rectifying K+ channel of the guard cell membrane. Expression of GORK dominant negative mutant polypeptides in transgenic Arabidopsis was found to strongly reduce outwardly rectifying K+ channel activity in the guard cell membrane, and disruption of the GORK gene (T-DNA insertion knockout mutant) fully suppressed this activity. Bioassays on epidermal peels revealed that disruption of GORK activity resulted in impaired stomatal closure in response to darkness or the stress hormone azobenzenearsonate. Transpiration measurements on excised rosettes and intact plants (grown in hydroponic conditions or submitted to water stress) revealed that absence of GORK activity resulted in increased water consumption. The whole set of data indicates that GORK is likely to play a crucial role in adaptation to drought in fluctuating environments. PMID:12671068

  7. Genetic variation in transpiration efficiency and relationships between whole plant and leaf gas exchange measurements in Saccharum spp. and related germplasm.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Phillip; Basnayake, Jaya; Inman-Bamber, Geoff; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Natarajan, Sijesh; Stokes, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Fifty-one genotypes of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) or closely related germplasm were evaluated in a pot experiment to examine genetic variation in transpiration efficiency. Significant variation in whole plant transpiration efficiency was observed, with the difference between lowest and highest genotypes being about 40% of the mean. Leaf gas exchange measurements were made across a wide range of conditions. There was significant genetic variation in intrinsic transpiration efficiency at a leaf level as measured by leaf internal CO2 (Ci) levels. Significant genetic variation in Ci was also observed within subsets of data representing narrow ranges of stomatal conductance. Ci had a low broad sense heritability (Hb = 0.11) on the basis of single measurements made at particular dates, because of high error variation and genotype × date interaction, but broad sense heritability for mean Ci across all dates was high (Hb = 0.81) because of the large number of measurements taken at different dates. Ci levels among genotypes at mid-range levels of conductance had a strong genetic correlation (-0.92 ± 0.30) with whole plant transpiration efficiency but genetic correlations between Ci and whole plant transpiration efficiency were weaker or not significant at higher and lower levels of conductance. Reduced Ci levels at any given level of conductance may result in improved yields in water-limited environments without trade-offs in rates of water use and growth. Targeted selection and improvement of lowered Ci per unit conductance via breeding may provide longer-term benefits for water-limited environments but the challenge will be to identify a low-cost screening methodology. PMID:26628517

  8. Genetic variation in transpiration efficiency and relationships between whole plant and leaf gas exchange measurements in Saccharum spp. and related germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Phillip; Basnayake, Jaya; Inman-Bamber, Geoff; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Natarajan, Sijesh; Stokes, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-one genotypes of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) or closely related germplasm were evaluated in a pot experiment to examine genetic variation in transpiration efficiency. Significant variation in whole plant transpiration efficiency was observed, with the difference between lowest and highest genotypes being about 40% of the mean. Leaf gas exchange measurements were made across a wide range of conditions. There was significant genetic variation in intrinsic transpiration efficiency at a leaf level as measured by leaf internal CO2 (Ci) levels. Significant genetic variation in Ci was also observed within subsets of data representing narrow ranges of stomatal conductance. Ci had a low broad sense heritability (Hb = 0.11) on the basis of single measurements made at particular dates, because of high error variation and genotype × date interaction, but broad sense heritability for mean Ci across all dates was high (Hb = 0.81) because of the large number of measurements taken at different dates. Ci levels among genotypes at mid-range levels of conductance had a strong genetic correlation (−0.92 ± 0.30) with whole plant transpiration efficiency but genetic correlations between Ci and whole plant transpiration efficiency were weaker or not significant at higher and lower levels of conductance. Reduced Ci levels at any given level of conductance may result in improved yields in water-limited environments without trade-offs in rates of water use and growth. Targeted selection and improvement of lowered Ci per unit conductance via breeding may provide longer-term benefits for water-limited environments but the challenge will be to identify a low-cost screening methodology. PMID:26628517

  9. Photosynthesis, transpiration and water use efficiencies of a plant canopy and plant leaves under restricted air current conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Toshio; Tsuruyama, Joshin

    A fundamental study was conducted to obtain the knowledge for culturing plants and exchanging gases with plants under restricted air circulation conditions in space agriculture. The effects of air velocities less than 1.3 m s-1 on net photosynthetic rates (Pn), transpiration rates (Tr) and Pn/Tr, water use efficiencies (WUE), of a canopy of cucumber seedlings and of single leaves of cucumber, sweet potato and barley were assessed with assimilation chamber methods in ground based experiments. The cucumber seedling canopy, which had a LAI of 1.4 and height of 0.1 m, was set in a wind tunnel installed in a plant canopy assimilation chamber. Each of the attached single leaves was set in a leaf assimilation chamber. The Pn and Tr of the plant canopy increased to 1.2 and 2.8 times, respectively, and WUE decreased to 0.4 times with increasing the air velocity from 0.02 to 1.3 m s-1. The Pn and Tr of the single leaves of all the species increased by 1.3-1.7 and 1.9-2.2 times, respectively, and WUE decreased to 0.6-0.8 times as the air velocity increased from 0.05 to 0.8 m s-1. The effect of air velocity was more significant on Tr than on Pn and thus WUE decreased with increasing air velocity in both the plant canopy and the individual leaves. The leaf boundary layer resistance was approximately proportional to the minus 1/3 power of the air velocity. Stomatal resistance was almost constant during the experiment. The CO2 concentrations in the sub-stomatal cavity in leaves of cucumber, sweet potato and barley, respectively, were 43, 31 and 58 mmol mol-1 lower at the air velocity of 0.05 m s-1 than at the air velocity of 0.8 m s-1, while the water vapor pressure in the sub-stomatal cavity was constant. We concluded that the change in the CO2 concentration in the sub-stomatal cavity was a cause of the different effect of the air velocity on Pn and Tr, and thus on WUE. The phenomenon will be more remarkable under restricted air convection conditions at lower gravity in space.

  10. Validation of canopy transpiration in a mixed-species foothill eucalypt forest using a soil-plant-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharun, Mana; Turnbull, Tarryn L.; Adams, Mark A.

    2013-06-01

    Studies of the hydrology of native eucalypt forests in south-east Australia have focused on ash-type eucalypt species that are largely confined to Victoria and Tasmania. Mixed species foothill forests comprise the largest proportion of the forest estate in south-east Australia, yet are poorly known hydrologically. The ability to predict forest transpiration, both with reasonable accuracy and in response to changes in the environment, is essential for catchment management. A soil-plant-atmosphere model (SPA) was validated for 222 days in a mature, mixed species forest of north-east Victoria using measurements of overstorey transpiration (Eucalyptus radiata and Eucalyptus goniocalyx) and site-specific climate and vegetation parameters. There was a stronger relationship between average daily transpiration (0.71 mm day-1) and daily minimum relative humidity (R2 = 0.71), than between average daily transpiration and daily maximum temperature (R2 = 0.65). Stand water use could be predicted best from vapour pressure deficit (R2 = 0.89). SPA successfully predicted stand transpiration (R2 = 0.85) over a range of soil water and climatic conditions. A sensitivity analysis suggests that among the various required inputs, leaf area index (LAI) was the most important, and accurate estimates of LAI could significantly improve estimation of stand transpiration.

  11. Overexpression of Rice NAC Gene SNAC1 Improves Drought and Salt Tolerance by Enhancing Root Development and Reducing Transpiration Rate in Transgenic Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanze; Li, Xuelin; Jin, Shuangxia; Liu, Xuyan; Zhu, Longfu; Nie, Yichun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-01-01

    The SNAC1 gene belongs to the stress-related NAC superfamily of transcription factors. It was identified from rice and overexpressed in cotton cultivar YZ1 by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. SNAC1-overexpressing cotton plants showed more vigorous growth, especially in terms of root development, than the wild-type plants in the presence of 250 mM NaCl under hydroponic growth conditions. The content of proline was enhanced but the MDA content was decreased in the transgenic cotton seedlings under drought and salt treatments compared to the wild-type. Furthermore, SNAC1-overexpressing cotton plants also displayed significantly improved tolerance to both drought and salt stresses in the greenhouse. The performances of the SNAC1-overexpressing lines under drought and salt stress were significantly better than those of the wild-type in terms of the boll number. During the drought and salt treatments, the transpiration rate of transgenic plants significantly decreased in comparison to the wild-type, but the photosynthesis rate maintained the same at the flowering stage in the transgenic plants. These results suggested that overexpression of SNAC1 improve more tolerance to drought and salt in cotton through enhanced root development and reduced transpiration rates. PMID:24489802

  12. Transpiration and metabolisation of TCE by willow plants - a pot experiment.

    PubMed

    Schöftner, Philipp; Watzinger, Andrea; Holzknecht, Philipp; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G

    2016-07-01

    Willows were grown in glass cylinders filled with compost above water-saturated quartz sand, to trace the fate of TCE in water and plant biomass. The experiment was repeated once with the same plants in two consecutive years. TCE was added in nominal concentrations of 0, 144, 288, and 721 mg l(-1). Unplanted cylinders were set-up and spiked with nominal concentrations of 721 mg l(-1) TCE in the second year. Additionally, (13)C-enriched TCE solution (δ(13)C = 110.3 ‰) was used. Periodically, TCE content and metabolites were analyzed in water and plant biomass. The presence of TCE-degrading microorganisms was monitored via the measurement of the isotopic ratio of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) in TCE, and the abundance of (13)C-labeled microbial PLFAs (phospholipid fatty acids). More than 98% of TCE was lost via evapotranspiration from the planted pots within one month after adding TCE. Transpiration accounted to 94 to 78% of the total evapotranspiration loss. Almost 1% of TCE was metabolized in the shoots, whereby trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) were dominant metabolites; less trichloroethanol (TCOH) and TCE accumulated in plant tissues. Microbial degradation was ruled out by δ(13)C measurements of water and PLFAs. TCE had no detected influence on plant stress status as determined by chlorophyll-fluorescence and gas exchange. PMID:26684839

  13. Ecohydrology of groundwater-dependent ecosystems: a stochastic framework for plant transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamea, S.; Laio, F.; Ridolfi, L.; D'Odorico, P.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater-dependent ecosystems are found in areas with a shallow water table, where the groundwater plays a key role on the ecosystem functions. In these areas, the water table depth, the capillary fluxes, and the soil moisture content exert a major control on most ecohydrologic processes, such as infiltration, surface runoff, aquifer recharge, land-atmosphere feedbacks, vegetation dynamics, nutrient cycling, and pollutant transport. Understanding and modeling the soil water balance and its relationships with climate, soil, and vegetation is therefore a crucial aspect for geosciences such as hydrology and ecology. The ecohydrology of groundwater-dependent ecosystems can be described with a modeling framework based on a stochastic process-based water balance. The model is driven by a compound marked Poisson noise representing the rainfall events and, under some simplifying, yet realistic, assumptions, it includes rainfall infiltration, root water uptake, capillary flux, and subsurface flow to/from an external water body. The framework provides the long-term probability distribution of water table depth and of soil moisture vertical profiles, enabling a quantitative study of the local hydrology with a limited number of parameters. We here apply this framework to investigate plant transpiration and root water uptake. The probability distributions of water uptake are derived from those of the soil water content and are investigated for different scenarios of climate, soil, and vegetation. The results of this approach allow for interesting speculations about the groundwater contribution to root uptake, the soil water available for plant transpiration, and the optimal strategies of root growth and plant competition. This information is useful to assess the impact of climate changes, vegetation modification, and water management operations.

  14. Transpiration cooling of hypersonic blunt bodies with finite rate surface reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The convective heat flux blockage to blunt body and hypersonic vehicles by transpiration cooling are presented. The general problem of mass addition to laminar boundary layers is reviewed. Results of similarity analysis of the boundary layer problem are provided for surface heat flux with transpiration cooling. Detailed non-similar results are presented from the numerical program, BLIMPK. Comparisons are made with the similarity theory. The effects of surface catalysis are investigated.

  15. Isotopic composition of transpiration and rates of change in leaf water isotopologue storage in response to environmental variables.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Roddy, Adam B; Link, Percy; Apodaca, Randy; Tu, Kevin P; Hu, Jia; Dawson, Todd E; Barbour, Margaret M

    2013-12-01

    During daylight hours, the isotope composition of leaf water generally approximates steady-state leaf water isotope enrichment model predictions. However, until very recently there was little direct confirmation that isotopic steady-state (ISS) transpiration in fact exists. Using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) and leaf gas exchange systems we evaluated the isotope composition of transpiration and the rate of change in leaf water isotopologue storage (isostorage) when leaves were exposed to variable environments. In doing so, we developed a method for controlling the absolute humidity entering the gas exchange cuvette for a wide range of concentrations without changing the isotope composition of water vapour. The measurement system allowed estimation of (18)O enrichment both at the evaporation site and for bulk leaf water, in the steady state and the non-steady state. We show that non-steady-state effects dominate the transpiration isoflux even when leaves are at physiological steady state. Our results suggest that a variable environment likely prevents ISS transpiration from being achieved and that this effect may be exacerbated by lengthy leaf water turnover times due to high leaf water contents. PMID:23647101

  16. High resolution mapping of traits related to whole-plant transpiration under increasing evaporative demand in wheat.

    PubMed

    Schoppach, Rémy; Taylor, Julian D; Majerus, Elisabeth; Claverie, Elodie; Baumann, Ute; Suchecki, Radoslaw; Fleury, Delphine; Sadok, Walid

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) is a key component of drought and has a strong influence on yields. Whole-plant transpiration rate (TR) response to increasing VPD has been linked to drought tolerance in wheat, but because of its challenging phenotyping, its genetic basis remains unexplored. Further, the genetic control of other key traits linked to daytime TR such as leaf area, stomata densities and - more recently - nocturnal transpiration remains unknown. Considering the presence of wheat phenology genes that can interfere with drought tolerance, the aim of this investigation was to identify at an enhanced resolution the genetic basis of the above traits while investigating the effects of phenology genes Ppd-D1 and Ppd-B1 Virtually all traits were highly heritable (heritabilities from 0.61 to 0.91) and a total of mostly trait-specific 68 QTL were detected. Six QTL were identified for TR response to VPD, with one QTL (QSLP.ucl-5A) individually explaining 25.4% of the genetic variance. This QTL harbored several genes previously reported to be involved in ABA signaling, interaction with DREB2A and root hydraulics. Surprisingly, nocturnal TR and stomata densities on both leaf sides were characterized by highly specific and robust QTL. In addition, negative correlations were found between TR and leaf area suggesting trade-offs between these traits. Further, Ppd-D1 had strong but opposite effects on these traits, suggesting an involvement in this trade-off. Overall, these findings revealed novel genetic resources while suggesting a more direct role of phenology genes in enhancing wheat drought tolerance. PMID:27001921

  17. High resolution mapping of traits related to whole-plant transpiration under increasing evaporative demand in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Schoppach, Rémy; Taylor, Julian D; Majerus, Elisabeth; Claverie, Elodie; Baumann, Ute; Suchecki, Radoslaw; Fleury, Delphine; Sadok, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) is a key component of drought and has a strong influence on yields. Whole-plant transpiration rate (TR) response to increasing VPD has been linked to drought tolerance in wheat, but because of its challenging phenotyping, its genetic basis remains unexplored. Further, the genetic control of other key traits linked to daytime TR such as leaf area, stomata densities and – more recently – nocturnal transpiration remains unknown. Considering the presence of wheat phenology genes that can interfere with drought tolerance, the aim of this investigation was to identify at an enhanced resolution the genetic basis of the above traits while investigating the effects of phenology genes Ppd-D1 and Ppd-B1. Virtually all traits were highly heritable (heritabilities from 0.61 to 0.91) and a total of mostly trait-specific 68 QTL were detected. Six QTL were identified for TR response to VPD, with one QTL (QSLP.ucl-5A) individually explaining 25.4% of the genetic variance. This QTL harbored several genes previously reported to be involved in ABA signaling, interaction with DREB2A and root hydraulics. Surprisingly, nocturnal TR and stomata densities on both leaf sides were characterized by highly specific and robust QTL. In addition, negative correlations were found between TR and leaf area suggesting trade-offs between these traits. Further, Ppd-D1 had strong but opposite effects on these traits, suggesting an involvement in this trade-off. Overall, these findings revealed novel genetic resources while suggesting a more direct role of phenology genes in enhancing wheat drought tolerance. PMID:27001921

  18. TRANSPIRATION EFFECT ON THE UPTAKE AND DISTRIBUTION OF BROMACIL, NITROBENZENE, AND PHENOL IN SOYBEAN PLANTS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of transpiration rate on the uptake and translocation of two industrial waste compounds, phenol and nitrobenzene, and one pesticide, 5-bromo-3-sec-butyl-6-methyluracil (bromacil), was examined. Carbon-14 moieties of each compound were provided separately in hydropon...

  19. Sapfluxnet: a global database of sap flow measurements to unravel the ecological factors of transpiration regulation in woody plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyatos, Rafael; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Molowny-Horas, Roberto; Steppe, Kathy; Oren, Ram; Katul, Gabriel; Mahecha, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Plant transpiration is one of the main components of the global water cycle, it controls land energy balance, determines catchment hydrological responses and exerts strong feedbacks on regional and global climate. At the same time, plant productivity, growth and survival are severely constrained by water availability, which is expected to decline in many areas of the world because of global-change driven increases in drought conditions. While global surveys of drought tolerance traits at the organ level are rapidly increasing our knowledge of the diversity in plant functional strategies to cope with drought stress, a whole-plant perspective of drought vulnerability is still lacking. Sap flow measurements using thermal methods have now been applied to measure seasonal patterns in water use and the response of transpiration to environmental drivers across hundreds of species of woody plants worldwide, covering a wide range of climates, soils and stand structural characteristics. Here, we present the first effort to build a global database of sub-daily, tree-level sap flow (SAPFLUXNET) that will be used to improve our understanding of physiological and structural determinants of plant transpiration and to further investigate the role of vegetation in controlling global water balance. We already have the expression of interest of data contributors representing >115 globally distributed sites, > 185 species and > 700 trees, measured over at least one growing season. However, the potential number of available sites and species is probably much higher given that > 2500 sap flow-related papers have been identified in a Scopus literature search conducted in November 2015. We will give an overview of how data collection, harmonisation and quality control procedures are implemented within the project. We will also discuss potential analytical strategies to synthesize hydroclimatic controls on sap flow into biologically meaningful traits related to whole-plant transpiration

  20. Effectiveness of cuticular transpiration barriers in a desert plant at controlling water loss at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Ann-Christin; Burghardt, Markus; Alfarhan, Ahmed; Bueno, Amauri; Hedrich, Rainer; Leide, Jana; Thomas, Jacob; Riederer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the cuticular transpiration barrier even at elevated temperatures is of vital importance especially for hot-desert plants. Currently, the temperature dependence of the leaf cuticular water permeability and its relationship with the chemistry of the cuticles are not known for a single desert plant. This study investigates whether (i) the cuticular permeability of a desert plant is lower than that of species from non-desert habitats, (ii) the temperature-dependent increase of permeability is less pronounced than in those species and (iii) whether the susceptibility of the cuticular permeability barrier to high temperatures is related to the amounts or properties of the cutin or the cuticular waxes. We test these questions with Rhazya stricta using the minimum leaf water vapour conductance (gmin) as a proxy for cuticular water permeability. gmin of R. stricta (5.41 × 10(-5) m s(-1) at 25 °C) is in the upper range of all existing data for woody species from various non-desert habitats. At the same time, in R. stricta, the effect of temperature (15-50 °C) on gmin (2.4-fold) is lower than in all other species (up to 12-fold). Rhazya stricta is also special since the temperature dependence of gmin does not become steeper above a certain transition temperature. For identifying the chemical and physical foundation of this phenomenon, the amounts and the compositions of cuticular waxes and cutin were determined. The leaf cuticular wax (251.4 μg cm(-2)) is mainly composed of pentacyclic triterpenoids (85.2% of total wax) while long-chain aliphatics contribute only 3.4%. In comparison with many other species, the triterpenoid-to-cutin ratio of R. stricta (0.63) is high. We propose that the triterpenoids deposited within the cutin matrix restrict the thermal expansion of the polymer and, thus, prevent thermal damage to the highly ordered aliphatic wax barrier even at high temperatures. PMID:27154622

  1. Effectiveness of cuticular transpiration barriers in a desert plant at controlling water loss at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Ann-Christin; Burghardt, Markus; Alfarhan, Ahmed; Bueno, Amauri; Hedrich, Rainer; Leide, Jana; Thomas, Jacob; Riederer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the cuticular transpiration barrier even at elevated temperatures is of vital importance especially for hot-desert plants. Currently, the temperature dependence of the leaf cuticular water permeability and its relationship with the chemistry of the cuticles are not known for a single desert plant. This study investigates whether (i) the cuticular permeability of a desert plant is lower than that of species from non-desert habitats, (ii) the temperature-dependent increase of permeability is less pronounced than in those species and (iii) whether the susceptibility of the cuticular permeability barrier to high temperatures is related to the amounts or properties of the cutin or the cuticular waxes. We test these questions with Rhazya stricta using the minimum leaf water vapour conductance (gmin) as a proxy for cuticular water permeability. gmin of R. stricta (5.41 × 10−5 m s−1 at 25 °C) is in the upper range of all existing data for woody species from various non-desert habitats. At the same time, in R. stricta, the effect of temperature (15–50 °C) on gmin (2.4-fold) is lower than in all other species (up to 12-fold). Rhazya stricta is also special since the temperature dependence of gmin does not become steeper above a certain transition temperature. For identifying the chemical and physical foundation of this phenomenon, the amounts and the compositions of cuticular waxes and cutin were determined. The leaf cuticular wax (251.4 μg cm−2) is mainly composed of pentacyclic triterpenoids (85.2% of total wax) while long-chain aliphatics contribute only 3.4%. In comparison with many other species, the triterpenoid-to-cutin ratio of R. stricta (0.63) is high. We propose that the triterpenoids deposited within the cutin matrix restrict the thermal expansion of the polymer and, thus, prevent thermal damage to the highly ordered aliphatic wax barrier even at high temperatures. PMID:27154622

  2. Transpiration cooling in hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, Domingo; Roberts, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary numerical study of transpiration cooling applied to a hypersonic configuration is presented. Air transpiration is applied to the NASA all-body configuration flying at an altitude of 30500 m with a Mach number of 10.3. It was found that the amount of heat disposal by convection is determined primarily by the local geometry of the aircraft for moderate rates of transpiration. This property implies that different areas of the aircraft where transpiration occurs interact weakly with each other. A methodology for quick assessments of the transpiration requirements for a given flight configuration is presented.

  3. Simulating canopy transpiration and photosynthesis of corn plants under contrasting water regimes using a coupled model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A process-based corn simulation model (MaizeSim) was coupled with a two-dimensional soil simulator (2DSOIL) to simulate the transpiration and photosynthesis of corn under drought stress. To simulate stomatal reaction to drought stress, two stomatal controlling algorithms (control by hydraulic signal...

  4. Rates of nocturnal transpiration in two evergreen temperate woodland species with differing water-use strategies.

    PubMed

    Zeppel, Melanie; Tissue, David; Taylor, Daniel; Macinnis-Ng, Catriona; Eamus, Derek

    2010-08-01

    Nocturnal fluxes may be a significant factor in the annual water budget of forested ecosystems. Here, we assessed sap flow in two co-occurring evergreen species (Eucalyptus parramattensis and Angophora bakeri) in a temperate woodland for 2 years in order to quantify the magnitude of seasonal nocturnal sap flow (E(n)) under different environmental conditions. The two species showed different diurnal water relations, demonstrated by different diurnal curves of stomatal conductance, sap flow and leaf water potential. The relative influence of several microclimatic variables, including wind speed (U), vapour pressure deficit (D), the product of U and D (UD) and soil moisture content, were quantified. D exerted the strongest influence on E(n) (r² = 0.59-0.86), soil moisture content influenced E(n) when D was constant, but U and UD did not generally influence E(n). In both species, cuticular conductance (G(c)) was a small proportion of total leaf conductance (G(s)) and was not a major pathway for E(n). We found that E(n) was primarily a function of transpiration from the canopy rather than refilling of stem storage, with canopy transpiration accounting for 50-70% of nocturnal flows. Mean E(n) was 6-8% of the 24-h flux across seasons (spring, summer and winter), but was up to 19% of the 24-h flux on some days in both species. Despite different daytime strategies in water use of the two species, both species demonstrated low night-time water loss, suggesting similar controls on water loss at night. In order to account for the impact of E(n) on pre-dawn leaf water potential arising from the influence of disequilibria between root zone and leaf water potential, we also developed a simple model to more accurately predict soil water potential (ψ(s)). PMID:20566582

  5. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon–juniper woodland

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pangle, Robert E.; Limousin, Jean -Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A.; Yepez, Enrico A.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Boutz, Amanda L.; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T.; McDowell, Nate G.

    2015-03-23

    Plant hydraulic conductance (ks) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between ks and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (EC) and conductance (GC). For both species, we observed significant reductionsmore » in plant transpiration (E) and ks under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and ks in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in ks under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant ks also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthesis (An) declined strongly with decreasing ks. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant ks was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy EC and GC. Our data indicate that significant reductions in ks precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon–juniper woodlands can be expected due to reduced plant hydraulic conductance and increased mortality of both piñon pine and juniper under anticipated future conditions of more frequent and persistent

  6. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon–juniper woodland

    PubMed Central

    Pangle, Robert E; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A; Yepez, Enrico A; Hudson, Patrick J; Boutz, Amanda L; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T; McDowell, Nate G

    2015-01-01

    Plant hydraulic conductance (ks) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between ks and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (EC) and conductance (GC). For both species, we observed significant reductions in plant transpiration (E) and ks under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and ks in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in ks under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant ks also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthesis (An) declined strongly with decreasing ks. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant ks was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy EC and GC. Our data indicate that significant reductions in ks precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon–juniper woodlands can be expected due to reduced plant hydraulic conductance and increased mortality of both piñon pine and juniper under anticipated future conditions of more frequent and persistent

  7. Unveiling stomata 24/7: can we use carbonyl sulfide (COS) and oxygen isotopes (18O) to constrain estimates of nocturnal transpiration across different evolutionary plant forms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, Teresa E.; Ogee, Jerome; Bosc, Alexander; Genty, Bernard; Wohl, Steven; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    Numerous studies have reported a continued flux of water through plants at night, suggesting that stomata are not fully closed. Growing evidence indicates that this nocturnal flux of transpiration might constitute an important fraction of total ecosystem water use in certain environments. However, because evaporative demand is usually low at night, nocturnal transpiration fluxes are generally an order of magnitude lower than rates measured during the day and perilously close to the measurement error of traditional gas-exchange porometers. Thus estimating rates of stomatal conductance in the dark (gnight) precisely poses a significant methodological challenge. As a result, we lack accurate field estimates of gnight and how it responds to different atmospheric drivers, indicating the need for a different measurement approach. In this presentation we propose a novel method to obtain detectable and robust estimates of gnight. We will demonstrate using mechanistic theory how independent tracers including the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 (δ18O) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) can be combined to obtain robust estimates of gnight. This is because COS and CO18O exchange within leaves are controlled by the light insensitive enzyme carbonic anhydrase. Thus, if plant stomata are open in the dark we will continue to observe COS and CO18O exchange. Using our theoretical model we will demonstrate that the exchange of these tracers can now be measured using advances in laser spectrometry techniques at a precision high enough to determine robust estimates of gnight. We will also present our novel experimental approach designed to measure simultaneously the exchange of CO18O and COS alongside the conventional technique that relies on measuring the total water flux from leaves in the dark. Using our theoretical approach we will additionally explore the feasibility of our proposed experimental design to detect variations in gnight during drought stress and across a variety of plant

  8. Thermophoretically enhanced mass transport rates to solid and transpiration-cooled walls across turbulent (law-of-the-wall) boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1985-01-01

    Convective-diffusion mass transfer rate predictions are made for both solid wall and transpiration-cooled 'law-of-the-wall' nonisothermal turbulent boundary layers (TBLs), including the mechanism of thermophoresis, i.e., small particle mass transport 'down a temperature gradient'. The present calculations are confined to low mass-loading situations but span the entire particle size range from vapor molecules to particles near the onset of inertial ('eddy') impaction. It is shown that, when Sc is much greater than 1, thermophoresis greatly increases particle deposition rates to internally cooled solid walls, but only partially offsets the appreciable reduction in deposition rates associated with dust-free gas-transpiration-cooled surfaces. Thus, efficient particle sampling from hot dusty gases can be carried out using transpiration 'shielded' probe surfaces.

  9. Climate Change at Northern Latitudes: Rising Atmospheric Humidity Decreases Transpiration, N-Uptake and Growth Rate of Hybrid Aspen

    PubMed Central

    Tullus, Arvo; Kupper, Priit; Sellin, Arne; Parts, Leopold; Sõber, Jaak; Tullus, Tea; Lõhmus, Krista; Sõber, Anu; Tullus, Hardi

    2012-01-01

    At northern latitudes a rise in atmospheric humidity and precipitation is predicted as a consequence of global climate change. We studied several growth and functional traits of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L.×P. tremuloides Michx.) in response to elevated atmospheric humidity (on average 7% over the ambient level) in a free air experimental facility during three growing seasons (2008–2010) in Estonia, which represents northern temperate climate (boreo-nemoral zone). Data were collected from three humidified (H) and three control (C) plots, and analysed using nested linear models. Elevated air humidity significantly reduced height, stem diameter and stem volume increments and transpiration of the trees whereas these effects remained highly significant also after considering the side effects from soil-related confounders within the 2.7 ha study area. Tree leaves were smaller, lighter and had lower leaf mass per area (LMA) in H plots. The magnitude and significance of the humidity treatment effect – inhibition of above-ground growth rate – was more pronounced in larger trees. The lower growth rate in the humidified plots can be partly explained by a decrease in transpiration-driven mass flow of NO3− in soil, resulting in a significant reduction in the measured uptake of N to foliage in the H plots. The results suggest that the potential growth improvement of fast-growing trees like aspens, due to increasing temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration, might be smaller than expected at high latitudes if a rise in atmospheric humidity simultaneously takes place. PMID:22880067

  10. Quantifying the Components of Evapotranspiration from Plant Communities, Soil Evaporation and Plant Transpiration, with Isotopes and Micrometeorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denmead, O. Tom; Heng, L.; Zeeman, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Isotope fractionation has been used in recent years to separate the components of evapotranspiration (ET):soil evaporation (E) and plant transpiration T. The technique estimates the ratio of T to ET, but without further information on the magnitude of ET, can not estimate the magnitudes of the components. To accomplish this, we conducted a study using the micrometeorological technique of eddy covariance to determine ET for a developing crop of winter wheat in conjunction with measurement of enrichment of the isotopes 18O and H2 in the vertical profiles of water vapour within and above the crop canopy. As well, the study employed a second micrometeorological technique based on a Lagrangian description of dispersion in the canopy (Raupach, 1989) to infer the source strengths for water vapour at the soil surface and in the various foliage layers in the canopy. Lagrangian dispersion analysis provides a means of linking canopy sources and sinks with mean concentration profiles using statistics of the turbulence in and above the canopy. Forward Lagrangian dispersion analysis predicts mean concentration profiles generated by given canopy source distributions. It uses a Lagrangian (fluid-following) framework to track an ensemble of "marked fluid particles" as they disperse. Inverse Lagrangian dispersion analysis does the reverse of the forward analysis: it predicts source profiles from mean concentration profiles. The dispersion equation uses information on the turbulence and gas concentrations in the canopy to relate the concentrations at any level to the source strengths at all levels. The necessary turbulence statistics are the friction velocity (a measure of vertical turbulent exchange in the air flow over the plant canopy), the standard deviation of the vertical wind velocity, and the Lagrangian time scale (a measure of eddy coherence). The analysis calculates the contributions of the various canopy layers to the net flux. In this study, agreement between the

  11. Impacts of forest thinning and climate change on transpiration and runoff rates in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksa, P. C.; Ray, R. L.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Using a spatially explicit hydro-ecological model, impacts from forest thinning and climate change on snowpack, evapotranspiration (ET) rates, soil moisture storage, and runoff were investigated in Sierra Nevada headwater catchments spanning elevations of 1,500 to 2,000-m. Along this elevation gradient, precipitation changes from rain-dominated to snow-dominated, so precipitation phase will be strongly impacted by increases in temperature. Mixed-conifer forests in the Sierra Nevada near the 2,000-m elevation band also transpire at a high rate relative to upper elevation forests that are more restricted by colder winter temperatures and lower elevation forests that are more restricted by lower summer soil moisture, increasing the potential of reduced transpiration with vegetation thinning. Forest treatment and climate change scenarios were modeled using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys), calibrated with two years of snow, soil moisture, and streamflow observations. Simulations of forest thinning at moderate (66% of current vegetation density) and restoration (33% density) levels were combined with precipitation changes up to 20% and temperature increases up to 6οC for projecting impacts on ET and runoff rates. Model results indicated that moderate thinning alone could increase runoff by 3%, but additional temperature increases of 2-4οC could increase runoff rates another 6% - similar to a restoration level thinning. Modifying temperature and precipitation separately showed that the two methods of climate forcing both led to fluctuations in soil moisture, caused by changes in precipitation phase (snow/rain) and final day of snowpack melt. The snowmelt timing affected runoff rates by causing changes in the spring soil moisture recession, and showed that it may be one of the critical processes that affects annual runoff rates, not just runoff timing. Simulations of precipitation and temperature changes together showed that precipitation would

  12. Quantifying the feedback of evaporation and transpiration rates to soil moisture dynamics and meteorological condition changes by a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ye; Shao, Wei; Vlček, Lukáš; Langhammer, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    Evapotranspiration drives the hydrological process through energy-driven water-phase changes between systems of soil-vegetation-atmosphere. Evapotranspiration performs a rather complex process attributable to the spatial and temporal variation of soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. For vegetation-covered land surfaces, the transpiration process is governed by the stomatal behavior and water uptake from the root zone, and evaporation is related with the interception of rainfall and radiation on the canopy and soil surface. This study is emphasized on describing the hydrological process and energy cycle in a basic hydrological response unit, a hillslope. The experimental hillslope is located in an experimental catchment of the Bohemian Forest Mountains' headwaters in the Czech Republic, where is mostly covered by dead Norway spruce forest (Picea abies) stands caused by balk beetle outbreak. High-frequency monitoring network of the hydro-climatic data, soil pore water pressure and soil temperature has been launched since 2012. To conceptualize the land-surface energy and water fluxes in a complex hillslope, a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transport (SVAT) model, coupled with a multi-phase soil physics process (i.e. the water, vapor and heat flow transport) is used. We selected an 8-week basis dataset from 2013 as a pilot for partitioning the evapotranspiration into three interactive components: transpiration (Et), canopy interception evaporation (Ei), and soil evaporation (Es), by using this numerical model. Within such model framework, the sensitive feedback of evapotranspiration rates to rainfall intensity, soil moisture, and solar radiation will be examined by conducting numerical experiments to better understand the mechanism of evapotranspiration process under various influencing factors. Such application study and followed numerical simulations provide a new path for quantifying the behaviors of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system.

  13. Continuous measurement of macronutrient ions in the transpiration stream of intact plants using the meadow spittlebug coupled with ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Malone, Michael; Herron, Michelle; Morales, M-Angeles

    2002-11-01

    A method is described for continuous, nondestructive analysis of xylem-borne mineral nutrients in intact transpiring plants. The method uses the xylem-feeding insect the meadow spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius L. [Homoptera: Cercopidae]). This insect will feed from a wide range of plant species and organs. Insect excreta can be collected at all times of the day and night, and its mineral ion content can be analyzed rapidly, and without purification, by ion chromatography. The excreta will have a mineral content virtually identical to that of xylem sap. Cages suitable for containing the insects and collecting excreta from any desired location on plants in both laboratory and greenhouse are described. Even in the greenhouse, evaporation had only a minor effect on the sample ion content. Example results are presented which illustrate dynamics, over several days, in the xylem concentrations of sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), NH(4)(+), magnesium (Mg(2+)), calcium (Ca(2+)), chloride (Cl(-)), NO(3)(-), PO(4)(3-), and SO(4)(2-). These data were collected from young plants growing in pots of compost in the laboratory and from fully mature pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv Bellboy) plants growing in hydroponics (rockwool) in the greenhouse. This method should facilitate studies of macronutrient uptake and transport in a range of plants and environments. PMID:12428008

  14. Nighttime transpiration is highly variable within a tallgrass prairie community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, K.; Nippert, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Nighttime transpiration may have significant consequences on plant functioning and earth-atmosphere water fluxes, yet little is known about how this process can vary among species or with environmental changes, particularly in grassland ecosystems. We measured leaf-level nighttime transpiration and daytime photosynthetic rates, as well as whole-plant sap flow rates on eight grass, forb and shrub species in a Kansas tallgrass prairie. Measurements were made periodically across a single growing season (May-August 2014) on three C4 grasses (Andropogon gerardii, Sorghastrum nutans and Panicum virgatum), two C3 forbs (Vernonia baldwinii and Solidago canidensis), and three C3 shrubs (Cornus drummondii, Rhus glabra and Amorpha canescens). At the leaf level, nighttime transpiration rates varied among species and across the growing season. Nighttime transpiration was greater in the three grass species compared to the forbs and shrubs early in the growing season. As the growing season progressed, nighttime transpiration increased and then decreased in all species. These results are consistent with patterns of decreasing daytime stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rates as the growing season became hotter and drier. Nighttime sap flow rates also varied among species and typically accounted for over 10% of total daily water flux at the whole-plant level. These results show that nighttime transpiration is species specific and variable at a small spatial scale. Nighttime transpiration can therefore be a significant portion of a plant water budget in a tallgrass prairie, is highly variable within a community, and is dynamic in response to changing environmental conditions. Forecasts of future ecosystem responses to a changing climate must account for plant water use and loss at night.

  15. Genetic variation in a grapevine progeny (Vitis vinifera L. cvs Grenache×Syrah) reveals inconsistencies between maintenance of daytime leaf water potential and response of transpiration rate under drought

    PubMed Central

    Coupel-Ledru, Aude; Lebon, Éric; Christophe, Angélique; Doligez, Agnès; Cabrera-Bosquet, Llorenç; Péchier, Philippe; Hamard, Philippe; This, Patrice; Simonneau, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In the face of water stress, plants evolved with different abilities to limit the decrease in leaf water potential, notably in the daytime (ΨM). So-called isohydric species efficiently maintain high ΨM, whereas anisohydric species cannot prevent ΨM from dropping as soil water deficit develops. The genetic and physiological origins of these differences in (an)isohydric behaviours remain to be clarified. This is of particular interest within species such as Vitis vinifera L. where continuous variation in the level of isohydry has been observed among cultivars. With this objective, a 2 year experiment was conducted on the pseudo-F1 progeny from a cross between the two widespread cultivars Syrah and Grenache using a phenotyping platform coupled to a controlled-environment chamber. Potted plants of all the progeny were analysed for ΨM, transpiration rate, and soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance, under both well-watered and water deficit conditions. A high genetic variability was found for all the above traits. Four quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected for ΨM under water deficit conditions, and 28 other QTLs were detected for the different traits in either condition. Genetic variation in ΨM maintenance under water deficit weakly correlated with drought-induced reduction in transpiration rate in the progeny, and QTLs for both traits did not completely co-localize. This indicates that genetic variation in the control of ΨM under water deficit was not due simply to variation in transpiration sensitivity to soil drying. Possible origins of the diversity in (an)isohydric behaviours in grapevine are discussed on the basis of concurrent variations in soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance and stomatal control of transpiration. PMID:25381432

  16. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon–juniper woodland

    SciTech Connect

    Pangle, Robert E.; Limousin, Jean -Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A.; Yepez, Enrico A.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Boutz, Amanda L.; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T.; McDowell, Nate G.

    2015-03-23

    Plant hydraulic conductance (ks) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between ks and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (EC) and conductance (GC). For both species, we observed significant reductions in plant transpiration (E) and ks under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and ks in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in ks under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant ks also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthesis (An) declined strongly with decreasing ks. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant ks was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy EC and GC. Our data indicate that significant reductions in ks precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon–juniper woodlands can be

  17. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon-juniper woodland.

    PubMed

    Pangle, Robert E; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A; Yepez, Enrico A; Hudson, Patrick J; Boutz, Amanda L; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T; McDowell, Nate G

    2015-04-01

    Plant hydraulic conductance (k s) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between k s and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (E C) and conductance (G C). For both species, we observed significant reductions in plant transpiration (E) and k s under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and k s in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in k s under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant k s also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (g s) and net photosynthesis (A n) declined strongly with decreasing k s. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant k s was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy E C and G C. Our data indicate that significant reductions in k s precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon-juniper woodlands can be expected due to reduced plant hydraulic conductance and increased mortality of both piñon pine and juniper under anticipated future conditions of more frequent and

  18. Sap flow measurements to determine the transpiration of facade greenings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Marie-Therese; Nehls, Thomas; Wessolek, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Facade greening is expected to make a major contribution to the mitigation of the urban heat-island effect through transpiration cooling, thermal insulation and shading of vertical built structures. However, no studies are available on water demand and the transpiration of urban vertical green. Such knowledge is needed as the plants must be sufficiently watered, otherwise the posited positive effects of vertical green can turn into disadvantages when compared to a white wall. Within the framework of the German Research Group DFG FOR 1736 "Urban Climate and Heat Stress" this study aims to test the practicability of the sap flow technique for transpiration measurements of climbing plants and to obtain potential transpiration rates for the most commonly used species. Using sap flow measurements we determined the transpiration of Fallopia baldschuanica, Parthenocissus tricuspidata and Hedera helix in pot experiments (about 1 m high) during the hot summer period from August 17th to August 30th 2012 under indoor conditions. Sap flow measurements corresponded well to simultaneous weight measurement on a daily base (factor 1.19). Fallopia baldschuanica has the highest daily transpiration rate based on leaf area (1.6 mm d-1) and per base area (5.0 mm d-1). Parthenocissus tricuspidata and Hedera helix show transpiration rates of 3.5 and 0.4 mm d-1 (per base area). Through water shortage, transpiration strongly decreased and leaf temperature measured by infrared thermography increased by 1 K compared to a well watered plant. We transferred the technique to outdoor conditions and will present first results for facade greenings in the inner-city of Berlin for the hottest period in summer 2013.

  19. Water- and nitrogen-dependent alterations in the inheritance mode of transpiration efficiency in winter wheat at the leaf and whole-plant level.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Dominika; Górny, Andrzej G

    2012-11-01

    The effects of contrasting water and nitrogen (N) supply on the observed inheritance mode of transpiration efficiency (TE) at the flag-leaf and whole-season levels were examined in winter wheat. Major components of the photosynthetic capacity of leaves and the season-integrated efficiency of water use in vegetative and grain mass formation were evaluated in parental lines of various origins and their diallel F(2)-hybrids grown in a factorial experiment under different moisture and N status of the soil. A broad genetic variation was mainly found for the season-long TE measures. The variation range in the leaf photosynthetic indices was usually narrow, but tended to slightly enhance under water and N shortage. Genotype-treatment interaction effects were significant for most characters. No consistency between the leaf- and season-long TE measures was observed. Preponderance of additivity-dependent variance was mainly identified for the season-integrated TE and leaf CO(2) assimilation rate. Soil treatments exhibited considerable influence on the phenotypic expression of gene action for the residual leaf measures. The contribution of non-additive gene effects and degree of dominance tended to increase in water- and N-limited plants, especially for the leaf transpiration rate and stomatal conductance. The results indicate that promise exists to improve the season-integrated TE. However, selection for TE components should be prolonged for later hybrid generations to eliminate the masking of non-additive causes. Such evaluation among families grown under sub-optimal water and nitrogen supply seems to be the most promising strategy in winter wheat. PMID:22878956

  20. Estimating High Rates of Transpiration in Woody Vines with the Heat-Balance Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat-balance sap flow gauges were configured to produce a more thermally uniform stem cross section under high flow rates. On mature grapevines (Vitis labruscana) either undisturbed in the field or transplanted to large containers (ca. 1m3 volume), with stem diameters up to 46 mm and leaf area per v...

  1. Estimating High Rates of Transpiration in Woody Vines with the Heat-Balance Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat-balance sap flow gauges were configured to produce a more thermally uniform stem cross-section under high flow rates. On mature grapevines (Vitis labruscana) either undisturbed in the field or transplanted to large containers (ca. 1m^3 volume), with stem diameters up to 46 mm and leaf area per ...

  2. Localization of the Transpiration Barrier in the Epi- and Intracuticular Waxes of Eight Plant Species: Water Transport Resistances Are Associated with Fatty Acyl Rather Than Alicyclic Components.

    PubMed

    Jetter, Reinhard; Riederer, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Plant cuticular waxes play a crucial role in limiting nonstomatal water loss. The goal of this study was to localize the transpiration barrier within the layered structure of cuticles of eight selected plant species and to put its physiological function into context with the chemical composition of the intracuticular and epicuticular wax layers. Four plant species (Tetrastigma voinierianum, Oreopanax guatemalensis, Monstera deliciosa, and Schefflera elegantissima) contained only very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derivatives such as alcohols, alkyl esters, aldehydes, and alkanes in their waxes. Even though the epicuticular and intracuticular waxes of these species had very similar compositions, only the intracuticular wax was important for the transpiration barrier. In contrast, four other species (Citrus aurantium, Euonymus japonica, Clusia flava, and Garcinia spicata) had waxes containing VLCFA derivatives, together with high percentages of alicyclic compounds (triterpenoids, steroids, or tocopherols) largely restricted to the intracuticular wax layer. In these species, both the epicuticular and intracuticular waxes contributed equally to the cuticular transpiration barrier. We conclude that the cuticular transpiration barrier is primarily formed by the intracuticular wax but that the epicuticular wax layer may also contribute to it, depending on species-specific cuticle composition. The barrier is associated mainly with VLCFA derivatives and less (if at all) with alicyclic wax constituents. The sealing properties of the epicuticular and intracuticular layers were not correlated with other characteristics, such as the absolute wax amounts and thicknesses of these layers. PMID:26644508

  3. Modeling the water use efficiency of soybean and maize plants under environmental stresses: application of a synthetic model of photosynthesis-transpiration based on stomatal behavior.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gui-Rui; Wang, Qiu-Feng; Zhuang, Jie

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the variability of plant WUE and its control mechanism can promote the comprehension to the coupling relationship of water and carbon cycle in terrestrial ecosystem, which is the foundation for developing water-carbon coupling cycle model. In this paper, we made clear the differences of net assimilation rate, transpiration rate, and WUE between the two species by comparing the experiment data of soybean (Glycine max Merr.) and maize (Zea mays L.) plants under water and soil nutrient stresses. WUE of maize was about two and a half times more than that of soybean in the same weather conditions. Enhancement of water stresses led to the marked decrease of Am and Em of two species, but water stresses of some degree could improve WUE, and this effect was more obvious for soybean. WUE of the two species changed with psiL in a second-order curve relation, and the WUE at high fertilization was higher than that at low fertilization, this effect was especially obvious for maize. Moreover, according to the synthetic model of photosynthesis-transpiration based on stomatal behavior (SMPTSB) presented by Yu et al. (2001), the WUE model and its applicability were discussed with the data measured in this experiment. The WUE estimated by means of the model accorded well with the measured values. However, this model underestimated the WUE for maize slightly, thus further improvement on the original model was made in this study. Finally, by discussing some physiological factors controlling Am and WUE, we made clear the physiological explanation for differences of the relative contributions of stomata- and mesophyll processes to control of Am and WUE, and the applicability of WUE model between the two species. Because the requirement to stomatal conductance by unit change of net assimilation rate is different, the responses of opening-closing activity of stomata to environmental stresses are different between the two species. To obtain the same level of net assimilation

  4. The effects of CO2 on growth and transpiration of radish (Raphanus sativus) in hypobaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohil, H. L.; Bucklin, R. A.; Correll, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    Plants grown on long-term space missions will likely be grown in low pressure environments (i.e., hypobaria). However, in hypobaria the transpiration rates of plants can increase and may result in wilting if the water is not readily replaced. It is possible to reduce transpiration by increasing the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), but the effects of pCO2 at high levels (>120 Pa) on the growth and transpiration of plants in hypobaria are not known. Therefore, the effects of pCO2 on the growth and transpiration of radish (Raphanus sativus var. Cherry Bomb II) in hypobaria were studied. The fresh weight (FW), leaf area, dry weight (DW), CO2 assimilation rates (CA), dark respiration rates (DR), and transpiration rates from 26 day-old radish plants that were grown for an additional seven days at different total pressures (33, 66 or 101 kPa) and pCO2 (40 Pa, 100 Pa and 180 Pa) were measured. In general, the dry weight of plants increased with CO2 enrichment and with lower total pressure. In limiting pCO2 (40 Pa) conditions, the transpiration for plants grown at 33 kPa was approximately twice that of controls (101 kPa total pressure with 40 Pa pCO2). Increasing the pCO2 from 40 Pa to 180 Pa reduced the transpiration rates for plants grown in hypobaria and in standard atmospheric pressures. However, for plants grown in hypobaria and high pCO2 (180 Pa) leaf damage was evident. Radish growth can be enhanced and transpiration reduced in hypobaria by enriching the gas phase with CO2 although at high levels leaf damage may occur.

  5. Where do roots take up water? Neutron radiography of water flow into the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil.

    PubMed

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kim, Yangmin X; Carminati, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Where and how fast does water flow from soil into roots? The answer to this question requires direct and in situ measurement of local flow of water into roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. We used neutron radiography to trace the transport of deuterated water (D₂O) in lupin (Lupinus albus) roots. Lupins were grown in aluminum containers (30 × 25 × 1 cm) filled with sandy soil. D₂O was injected in different soil regions and its transport in soil and roots was monitored by neutron radiography. The transport of water into roots was then quantified using a convection-diffusion model of D₂O transport into roots. The results showed that water uptake was not uniform along roots. Water uptake was higher in the upper soil layers than in the lower ones. Along an individual root, the radial flux was higher in the proximal segments than in the distal segments. In lupins, most of the water uptake occurred in lateral roots. The function of the taproot was to collect water from laterals and transport it to the shoot. This function is ensured by a low radial conductivity and a high axial conductivity. Lupin root architecture seems well designed to take up water from deep soil layers. PMID:23692148

  6. Wheat Transpiration Response to Soil Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langensiepen, M.; Kupisch, M.; Cai, G.; Vanderborght, J.; Stadler, A.; Hüging, H.; Ewert, F.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring sap-flow in thin wheat tillers has been difficult so far due to technical difficulties associated with the application of the heat-balance method for this purpose. We developed a new method which solved this problem (Langensiepen et al. 2014) and applied it during four consecutive vegetation seasons for determining tiller transpiration rates in a wheat field with strong soil heterogeneity. The transpiration rates differed insignificantly between different field sections characterized by strong differences in physical soil conditions, regardless whether the crop was irrigated or supplied with variable rainwater. Tiller transpiration in a sheltered section was slightly reduced. Maximum leaf vapor conductance didn't differ among these different conditions, except under severe water stress conditions. Leaf water potential varied considerably during daily cycles under all circumstances. These responses are typical for plants with anisohydric behaviors which are characterized by small sensitivities of guard cells to critical leaf water potential thresholds and high photosynthetic productivity under absent or mild water stress. Recent studies conducted in Eucalyptus, tomato, and Arabidopsis plants have shown that the transition from mild to severe stress in anisohydric plants is marked by an increasing sensitivity of stomatal control to the transpiration rate. The results of this study demonstrate that this also seems to be the case for wheat. This practically implies that the parameterization of models calculating wheat canopy flux responses to soil heterogeneity patterns must not only account for the crop-type specific soil-vegetation pattern interaction under absent or mild stress, but also for additional mechanisms which kick in when water stress becomes severe. Langensiepen, M., Kupisch, M., Graf, A., Schmidt, M., Ewert, F. (2014) Improving the stem heat balance method for determining sap-flow in wheat. Agric. For. Met. 186: 34-42

  7. Effects of contrasting rooting distribution patterns on plant transpiration along a precipitation gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding and predicting ecosystem functioning in water limited ecosystems requires a thorough assessment of the role plant root systems. Widespread ecological phenomena such as shrub encroachment may drastically change root distribution in the soil profile affecting the uptake of water and nutr...

  8. Using ISBA model for partitioning evapotranspiration into soil evaporation and plant transpiration of irrigated crops under semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouade, Ghizlane; Jarlan, Lionel; Ezzahar, Jamal; Er-raki, Salah; Napoly, Adrien; Benkaddour, Abdelfettah; Khabba, Said; Boulet, Gilles; Chehbouni, Abdelghani; Boone, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    The Haouz region, typical of southern Mediterranean basins, is characterized by a semi-arid climate, with average annual rainfall of 250, whilst evaporative demand is about 1600 mm per year. Under these conditions, crop irrigation is inevitable for growth and development. Irrigated agriculture currently consumes the majority of total available water (up to 85%), making it critical for more efficient water use. Flood irrigation is widely practiced by the majority of the farmers (more than 85 %) with an efficiency which does not exceed 50%. In this context, a good knowledge of the partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) into soil evaporation and plant transpiration is of crucial need for improving the irrigation scheduling and thus water use efficiency. In this study, the ISBA (Interactions Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere) model was used for estimating ET and its partition over an olive orchard and a wheat field located near to the Marrakech City (Centre of Morocco). Two versions were evaluated: standard version which simulates a single energy balance for the soil and vegetation and the recently developed multiple energy balance (MEB) version which solves a separate energy balance for each of the two sources. Eddy covariance system, which provides the sensible and latent heat fluxes and meteorological instruments were operated during years 2003-2004 for the Olive Orchard and during years 2013 for wheat. The transpiration component was measured using a Sap flow system during summer over the wheat crop and stable isotope samples were gathered over wheat. The comparison between ET estimated by ISBA model and that measured by the Eddy covariance system showed that MEB version yielded a remarkable improvement compared to the standard version. The root mean square error (RMSE) and the correlation coefficient (R²) were about 45wm-2 and 0.8 for MEB version. By contrast, for the standard version, the RMSE and R² were about 60wm-2 and 0.7, respectively. The result also showed that

  9. Control of transpiration by radiation.

    PubMed

    Pieruschka, Roland; Huber, Gregor; Berry, Joseph A

    2010-07-27

    The terrestrial hydrological cycle is strongly influenced by transpiration--water loss through the stomatal pores of leaves. In this report we present studies showing that the energy content of radiation absorbed by the leaf influences stomatal control of transpiration. This observation is at odds with current concepts of how stomata sense and control transpiration, and we suggest an alternative model. Specifically, we argue that the steady-state water potential of the epidermis in the intact leaf is controlled by the difference between the radiation-controlled rate of water vapor production in the leaf interior and the rate of transpiration. Any difference between these two potentially large fluxes is made up by evaporation from (or condensation on) the epidermis, causing its water potential to pivot around this balance point. Previous work established that stomata in isolated epidermal strips respond by opening with increasing (and closing with decreasing) water potential. Thus, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate should increase when there is condensation on (and decrease when there is evaporation from) the epidermis, thus tending to maintain homeostasis of epidermal water potential. We use a model to show that such a mechanism would have control properties similar to those observed with leaves. This hypothesis provides a plausible explanation for the regulation of leaf and canopy transpiration by the radiation load and provides a unique framework for studies of the regulation of stomatal conductance by CO(2) and other factors. PMID:20624981

  10. Nutrient availability moderates transpiration in Ehrharta calycina.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Michael D; Hoffmann, Vera; Verboom, G Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Transpiration-driven 'mass-flow' of soil-water can increase nutrient flow to the root surface. Here it was investigated whether transpiration could be partially regulated by nutrient status. Seeds of Ehrharta calycina from nine sites across a rainfall gradient were supplied with slow-release fertilizer dibbled into the sand surrounding the roots and directly available through interception, mass-flow and diffusion (dubbed 'interception'), or sequestered behind a 40-microm mesh and not directly accessible by the roots, but from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (dubbed 'mass-flow'). Although mass-flow plants were significantly smaller than interception plants as a consequence of nutrient limitation, they transpired 60% faster, had 90% higher photosynthesis relative to transpiration (A/E), and 40% higher tissue P, Ca and Na concentrations than plants allowed to intercept nutrients directly. Tissue N and K concentrations were similar for interception and mass-flow plants. Transpiration was thus higher in the nutrient-constrained 'mass-flow' plants, increasing the transport of nutrients to the roots by mass-flow. Transpiration may have been regulated by N availability, resulting in similar tissue concentration between treatments. It is concluded that, although transpiration is a necessary consequence of photosynthetic CO(2) uptake in C(3) plants, plants can respond to nutrient limitation by varying transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients. PMID:18537891

  11. Transpiration of urban forests in the Los Angeles metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Pataki, Diane E; McCarthy, Heather R; Litvak, Elizaveta; Pincetl, Stephanie

    2011-04-01

    Despite its importance for urban planning, landscape management, and water management, there are very few in situ estimates of urban-forest transpiration. Because urban forests contain an unusual and diverse mix of species from many regions worldwide, we hypothesized that species composition would be a more important driver of spatial variability in urban-forest transpiration than meteorological variables in the Los Angeles (California, USA) region. We used constant-heat sap-flow sensors to monitor urban tree water use for 15 species at six locations throughout the Los Angeles metropolitan area. For many of these species no previous data on sap flux, water use, or water relations were available in the literature. To scale sap-flux measurements to whole trees we conducted a literature survey of radial trends in sap flux across multiple species and found consistent relationships for angiosperms vs. gymnosperms. We applied this relationship to our measurements and estimated whole-tree and plot-level transpiration at our sites. The results supported very large species differences in transpiration, with estimates ranging from 3.2 +/- 2.3 kg x tree(-1) x d(-1) in unirrigated Pinus canariensis (Canary Island pine) to 176.9 +/- 75.2 kg x tree(-1) x d(-1) in Platanus hybrida (London planetree) in the month of August. Other species with high daily transpiration rates included Ficus microcarpa (laurel fig), Gleditsia triacanthos (honeylocust), and Platanus racemosa (California sycamore). Despite irrigation and relatively large tree size, Brachychiton populneas (kurrajong), B. discolor (lacebark), Sequoia sempervirens (redwood), and Eucalyptus grandis (grand Eucalyptus) showed relatively low rates of transpiration, with values < 45 kg x tree(-1) x d(-1). When scaled to the plot level, transpiration rates were as high as 2 mm/d for sites that contained both species with high transpiration rates and high densities of planted trees. Because plot-level transpiration is highly

  12. Maize transpiration in response to meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimešová, Jana; Stŕedová, Hana; Stŕeda, Tomáš

    2013-09-01

    Differences in transpiration of maize (Zea mays L.) plants in four soil moisture regimes were quantified in a pot experiment. The transpiration was measured by the "Stem Heat Balance" method. The dependence of transpiration on air temperature, air humidity, global solar radiation, soil moisture, wind speed and leaf surface temperature were quantified. Significant relationships among transpiration, global radiation and air temperature (in the first vegetation period in the drought non-stressed variant, r = 0.881**, r = 0.934**) were found. Conclusive dependence of transpiration on leaf temperature (r = 0.820**) and wind speed (r = 0.710**) was found. Transpiration was significantly influenced by soil moisture (r = 0.395**, r = 0.528**) under moderate and severe drought stress. The dependence of transpiration on meteorological factors decreased with increasing deficiency of water. Correlation between transpiration and plant dry matter weight (r = 0.997**), plant height (r = 0.973**) and weight of corn cob (r = 0.987**) was found. The results of instrumental measuring of field crops transpiration under diverse moisture conditions at a concurrent monitoring of the meteorological elements spectra are rather unique. These results will be utilized in the effort to make calculations of the evapotranspiration in computing models more accurate.

  13. Steady state or non-steady state? Identifying driving mechanisms of oxygen isotope signatures of leaf transpiration in functionally distinct plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Isotope techniques are widely applied in ecosystem studies. For example, isoflux models are used to separate soil evaporation from transpiration in ecosystems. These models often assume that plant transpiration occurs at isotopic steady state, i.e. that the transpired water shows the same isotopic signature as the source water. Yet, several studies found that transpiration did not occur at isotopic steady state, under both controlled and field conditions. Here we focused on identifying the internal and external factors which drive the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the effect of both environmental variables and leaf physiological traits on δ18OT was investigated under controlled conditions. Six plant species with distinct leaf physiological traits were exposed to step changes in relative air humidity (RH), their response in δ18OT and gas exchange parameters and their leaf physiological traits were assessed. Moreover, two functionally distinct plant types (tree, i.e. Quercus suber, and grassland) of a semi-arid Mediterranean oak-woodland where observed under natural conditions throughout an entire growth period in the field. The species differed substantially in their leaf physiological traits and their turn-over times of leaf water. They could be grouped in species with fast (<60 min.), intermediate (ca. 120 min.) and slow (>240 min.) turn-over times, mostly due to differences in stomatal conductance, leaf water content or a combination of both. Changes in RH caused an immediate response in δ18OT, which were similarly strong in all species, while leaf physiological traits affected the subsequent response in δ18OT. The turn-over time of leaf water determined the speed of return to the isotopic steady or a stable δ18OT value (Dubbert & Kübert et al., in prep.). Under natural conditions, changes in environmental conditions over the diurnal cycle had a huge impact on the diurnal development of δ18OT in both

  14. Transpiration- and growth-induced water potentials in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Westgate, M.E.; Boyer, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Recent evidence from leaves and stems indicates that gradients in water potential (psi/sub w/) necessary for water movement through growing tissues are larger than previously assumed. Because growth is sensitive to tissue psi/sub w/ and the behavior of these gradients has not been investigated in transpiring plants, the authors examined the water status of all the growing and mature vegetative tissues of maize (Zea mays L.) during high and low rates of transpiration. The psi/sub w/ measured in the mature regions of the plant responded primarily to transpiration, while the psi/sub w/ in the growing regions was affected both by transpiration and growth. The transpiration-induced potentials of the mature tissue formed a gradient of decreasing psi/sub w/ along the transpiration stream while the growth-induced potentials formed a gradient of decreasing psi/sub w/ from the transpiration stream to the expanding cells in the growing tissue. The growth-induced gradient in psi/sub w/ within the leaf remained fairly constant as the xylem psi/sub w/ decreased during the day and was associated with a decreased osmotic potential (psi/sub s/) of the growing region (osmotic adjustment). The growth-induced gradient in psi/sub w/ was not caused by excision of the tissue because intact maize stems exhibited a similar psi/sub w/. These observations support the concept that large gradients in psi/sub w/ are required to maintain water flow to expanding cells within all the vegetative tissues and suggest that the maintenance of a favorable gradient in psi/sub w/ for cell enlargement may be an important role for osmotic adjustment. 33 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  15. Effects of Planting Density on Transpiration, Stem Flow and Interception for Two Clones Differing in Drought Tolerance in a High Productivity Eucalyptus Plantation in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, R. M.; Hakemada, R.; Ferraz, S.

    2015-12-01

    Eucalypt plantations cover about 20 M hectares worldwide and expansion is expected to mainly occur in marginal growing areas where dry conditions may lead to water conflicts. One of the principal reasons for the expansion of Eucalyptus plantations is rapid wood growth but these forests also transpire large amounts of water. Genotype selection and planting density, are key factors regulating carbon and water tradeoffs at a stand scale, but few studies have examined these simultaneously especially in highly productive clonal plantations. Our goal in this study was to examine the effects of planting density on carbon and water interactions using a drought tolerant and drought sensitive eucalyptus clone. This work is part of a larger study (TECHS project - Tolerance of Eucalyptus Clones to Hydric and Thermal Stresses) and is located in a flat Oxisol in southeast of Brazil. A drought tolerant (E. grandis x E. camaldulensis (Grancam) and drought sensitive clone E. grandis x E. urophylla (Urograndis) were planted at four densities ranging from 600 to 3.000 stem ha-1. We measured transpiration using thermal heat dissipation probes, wood growth, canopy interception and stemflow during a full year (21 to 33 months old). Precipitation during the study period was 738 mm. Independently of genetics, growth increased with increasing density. Transpiration also increased with planting density and ranged from 515-595 mm at wider spacing to 735-978 mm at tighter spacing. Interception increased with planting density representing 18-22% of precipitation versus 13-14% in wider spacing while stem flow represented 2-5% in denser spacing and 1-2% at broader spacing. When density was higher than 1.250 and 1.750 stems ha-1 in Urograndis and Grancam clones, respectively, the water balance were negative. On a stand scale, results show both genetics and spacing can be used as silvicultural tools to better manage the tradeoff between wood growth and water consumption.

  16. Transpiration cooling using air as a coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kikkawa, Shinzo; Senda, Mamoru; Sakagushi, Katsuji; Shibutani, Hideki )

    1993-02-01

    Transpiration cooling is one of the most effective techniques for protecting a surface exposed to a high-temperature gas stream. In the present paper, the transpiration cooling effectiveness was measured under steady state. Air as a coolant was transpired from the surface of a porous plate exposed to hot gas stream, and the transpiration rate was varied in the range of 0.001 [approximately] 0.006. The transpiration cooling effectiveness was evaluated by measuring the temperature of the upper surface of the plate. Also, a theoretical study was performed and it was clarified that the effectiveness increases with increasing transpiration rate and heat-transfer coefficient of the upper surface. Further, the effectiveness was expressed as a function of the blowing parameter only. The agreement between the experimental results and theoretical ones was satisfactory.

  17. Transpiration cooled throat for hydrocarbon rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Lee R.; Burkhardt, Wendel M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective for the Transpiration Cooled Throat for Hydrocarbon Rocket Engines Program was to characterize the use of hydrocarbon fuels as transpiration coolants for rocket nozzle throats. The hydrocarbon fuels investigated in this program were RP-1 and methane. To adequately characterize the above transpiration coolants, a program was planned which would (1) predict engine system performance and life enhancements due to transpiration cooling of the throat region using analytical models, anchored with available data; (2) a versatile transpiration cooled subscale rocket thrust chamber was designed and fabricated; (3) the subscale thrust chamber was tested over a limited range of conditions, e.g., coolant type, chamber pressure, transpiration cooled length, and coolant flow rate; and (4) detailed data analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between the key performance and life enhancement variables.

  18. Fruit load governs transpiration of olive trees.

    PubMed

    Bustan, Amnon; Dag, Arnon; Yermiyahu, Uri; Erel, Ran; Presnov, Eugene; Agam, Nurit; Kool, Dilia; Iwema, Joost; Zipori, Isaac; Ben-Gal, Alon

    2016-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that whole-tree water consumption of olives (Olea europaea L.) is fruit load-dependent and investigated the driving physiological mechanisms. Fruit load was manipulated in mature olives grown in weighing-drainage lysimeters. Fruit was thinned or entirely removed from trees at three separate stages of growth: early, mid and late in the season. Tree-scale transpiration, calculated from lysimeter water balance, was found to be a function of fruit load, canopy size and weather conditions. Fruit removal caused an immediate decline in water consumption, measured as whole-plant transpiration normalized to tree size, which persisted until the end of the season. The later the execution of fruit removal, the greater was the response. The amount of water transpired by a fruit-loaded tree was found to be roughly 30% greater than that of an equivalent low- or nonyielding tree. The tree-scale response to fruit was reflected in stem water potential but was not mirrored in leaf-scale physiological measurements of stomatal conductance or photosynthesis. Trees with low or no fruit load had higher vegetative growth rates. However, no significant difference was observed in the overall aboveground dry biomass among groups, when fruit was included. This case, where carbon sources and sinks were both not limiting, suggests that the role of fruit on water consumption involves signaling and alterations in hydraulic properties of vascular tissues and tree organs. PMID:26802540

  19. Near-optimal response of instantaneous transpiration efficiency to vapour pressure deficit, temperature and [CO2] in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The instantaneous transpiration efficiency (ITE, the ratio of photosynthesis rate to transpiration) is an important variable for crops, because it ultimately affects dry mass production per unit of plant water lost to the atmosphere. The theory that stomata optimize carbon uptake per unit water used...

  20. Estimation of Soil Evaporation and Plant Transpiration of Sparse Steppes by Using Ground-based Infrared Thermal Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, G. Y.; Feng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Separately estimation of soil evaporation (E) and vegetation transpiration (T) is important for water management. In this study, a methodology to estimate the ratio of vegetation cover, soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration in a sparse steppe is developed based on a previous published model, the three-temperatures (3T) model. The input parameters of the model includes the surface temperatures of soil and vegetation (from thermal image), net radiation (estimated from surface temperature and solar radiation), and air temperature. The approach of unsupervised classification was used to separate the bare soil and vegetation pixels from the images. The areas with higher temperature could be regarded as the bare soil and E was estimated by the evaporation sub-model in the 3T model; while the areas with lower temperature could be regarded as pure vegetation and T was estimated by the transpiration sub-model in the 3T model. Afterward, the estimated E and T were converted into daily values and compared with the measured E and T by using Bowen Ratio and micro-lysimeter methods. Results show that the proposed approach is a useful way to separately estimated E and T in sparse steppe.

  1. Comparison of corn transpiration, eddy covariance, and soil water loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem flow gages are used to estimate plant transpiration, but only a few studies compare transpiration with other measures of soil water loss. The purpose of this study was to compare transpiration from stem flow measurements with soil water changes estimated by daily neutron probe readings. Monitor...

  2. The function of nocturnal transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfautsch, Sebastian; Resco de Dios, Víctor; Loik, Michael; Tissue, David

    2014-05-01

    Nocturnal transpiration is an important source of water loss, accounting for up to 25% of daytime transpiration in some species. Nocturnal water losses cannot be explained under the prevailing 'paradigm' of optimizing carbon gain while minimizing water loss because carbon fixation does not occur at night. Alternative explanations regarding the function and potential evolutionary advantage of nocturnal transpiration have been proposed, such as enhanced nutrient uptake and transport or delivery of O2 to parenchyma cells for respiration. However, recent evidence suggests that the role of nocturnal transpiration in supplementing the overall plant nutrient budget is relatively small, and the O2 hypothesis is difficult to test experimentally. Here, we propose that the main function of nocturnal transpiration (and water transport) is to prevent catastrophic xylem failure by restoring depleted stem 'capacitors' and enhancing early morning CO2 uptake, as stomata 'prepare' for daytime conditions. Nocturnal sap flux was highest in Eucalyptus grandis trees in the field following a heat wave (reaching 47C with VPDs > 8kPa in the daytime) generating maximal daytime water losses compared with cooler and lower VPD periods, indicating the importance of nocturnal stomatal conductance for stem refilling. Moreover, we observed that the time for stomata to respond to light early in the morning (dawn) across 25 different genotypes of E. camaldulensis in a glasshouse was shortest in those genotypes with highest nocturnal stomatal conductance, which was also correlated with higher daytime photosynthesis. This observation is consistent with previous observations that nocturnal stomatal conductance is partially controlled by the clock, which is utilised to anticipate daytime conditions. Data from the literature suggests that eucalypts respond similarly to other C3 species, suggesting that mechanisms regulating night-time transpiration may be universal.

  3. Combining field performance with controlled environment plant imaging to identify the genetic control of growth and transpiration underlying yield response to water-deficit stress in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Boris; Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Maphosa, Lance; Berger, Bettina; Rabie, Huwaida; Chalmers, Ken; Kovalchuk, Alex; Langridge, Peter; Fleury, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Crop yield in low-rainfall environments is a complex trait under multigenic control that shows significant genotype×environment (G×E) interaction. One way to understand and track this trait is to link physiological studies to genetics by using imaging platforms to phenotype large segregating populations. A wheat population developed from parental lines contrasting in their mechanisms of yield maintenance under water deficit was studied in both an imaging platform and in the field. We combined phenotyping methods in a common analysis pipeline to estimate biomass and leaf area from images and then inferred growth and relative growth rate, transpiration, and water-use efficiency, and applied these to genetic analysis. From the 20 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) found for several traits in the platform, some showed strong effects, accounting for between 26 and 43% of the variation on chromosomes 1A and 1B, indicating that the G×E interaction could be reduced in a controlled environment and by using dynamic variables. Co-location of QTLs identified in the platform and in the field showed a possible common genetic basis at some loci. Co-located QTLs were found for average growth rate, leaf expansion rate, transpiration rate, and water-use efficiency from the platform with yield, spike number, grain weight, grain number, and harvest index in the field. These results demonstrated that imaging platforms are a suitable alternative to field-based screening and may be used to phenotype recombinant lines for positional cloning. PMID:26179580

  4. Uncertainty in sap flow-based transpiration due to xylem properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, N. T.; Hu, J.; Martin, J. T.; Jencso, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Transpiration, the evaporative loss of water from plants through their stomata, is a key component of the terrestrial water balance, influencing streamflow as well as regional convective systems. From a plant physiological perspective, transpiration is both a means of avoiding destructive leaf temperatures through evaporative cooling and a consequence of water loss through stomatal uptake of carbon dioxide. Despite its hydrologic and ecological significance, transpiration remains a notoriously challenging process to measure in heterogeneous landscapes. Sap flow methods, which estimate transpiration by tracking the velocity of a heat pulse emitted into the tree sap stream, have proven effective for relating transpiration dynamics to climatic variables. To scale sap flow-based transpiration from the measured domain (often <5 cm of tree cross-sectional area) to the whole-tree level, researchers generally assume constancy of scale factors (e.g., wood thermal diffusivity (k), radial and azimuthal distributions of sap velocity, and conducting sapwood area (As)) through time, across space, and within species. For the widely used heat-ratio sap flow method (HRM), we assessed the sensitivity of transpiration estimates to uncertainty in k (a function of wood moisture content and density) and As. A sensitivity analysis informed by distributions of wood moisture content, wood density and As sampled across a gradient of water availability indicates that uncertainty in these variables can impart substantial error when scaling sap flow measurements to the whole tree. For species with variable wood properties, the application of the HRM assuming a spatially constant k or As may systematically over- or underestimate whole-tree transpiration rates, resulting in compounded error in ecosystem-scale estimates of transpiration.

  5. Effects of overcast and foggy conditions on transpiration rates of Pinus patula trees along a chronosequence within the cloud belt of the Sierra Madre Oriental, central Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado-Barrientos, M. S.; Holwerda, F.; Asbjornsen, H.; Sauer, T.; Dawson, T. E.; Bruijnzeel, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    Pinus patula is a native tree species of the montane cloud belt of central Veracruz, Mexico, and one of the most popular species for regional reforestation efforts, both within and outside its natural range of occurrence. Projected regional climate change is likely to cause a rise in the average cloud condensation level by several hundred meters, thereby reducing fog occurrence, whilst overcast conditions are likely to remain similar. To improve our understanding of how water use of P. patula plantations is affected by changes in climatic conditions, we analyzed the response of transpiration rates to fine-scale variations in microclimate, particularly fog immersion and the occurrence of high clouds. We conducted measurements of micrometeorological parameters and transpiration (Et, using the heat ratio sap flow technique) of 15 pine trees representing a range of ages (10-34 years) and sizes (7-60 cm of dbh) during one and a half years (Nov 2008 - May 2010), covering two dry seasons and one wet season. Foggy days were defined using daytime “M-of-N” constructs (at least 4 hours with visibility <1000 m within 6 consecutive hourly observations), and days with overcast conditions as having a median daytime visibility > 1000 m and a maximum incoming solar radiation (Sin) < 700 W m-2. Precipitation and leaf wetness data were used to distinguish between (partly) wet and dry canopy conditions. Daily transpiration rates were normalized for climatic conditions using the FAO reference evaporation ETo to allow determination of the proportional contributions to Et suppression by reductions in Sin and VPD relative to leaf wetness. We found that both foggy and overcast conditions without rainfall produced similar % of Et reduction compared to sunny conditions (60-70%). The strongest Et suppression effects occurred when foggy or overcast conditions were associated with rainfall. However, there was just a slight and non significant difference between the average Et/ETo ratio for

  6. Continuous Measurement of Macronutrient Ions in the Transpiration Stream of Intact Plants Using the Meadow Spittlebug Coupled with Ion Chromatography1

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Michael; Herron, Michelle; Morales, M.-Angeles

    2002-01-01

    A method is described for continuous, nondestructive analysis of xylem-borne mineral nutrients in intact transpiring plants. The method uses the xylem-feeding insect the meadow spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius L. [Homoptera: Cercopidae]). This insect will feed from a wide range of plant species and organs. Insect excreta can be collected at all times of the day and night, and its mineral ion content can be analyzed rapidly, and without purification, by ion chromatography. The excreta will have a mineral content virtually identical to that of xylem sap. Cages suitable for containing the insects and collecting excreta from any desired location on plants in both laboratory and greenhouse are described. Even in the greenhouse, evaporation had only a minor effect on the sample ion content. Example results are presented which illustrate dynamics, over several days, in the xylem concentrations of sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), NH4+, magnesium (Mg2+), calcium (Ca2+), chloride (Cl−), NO3−, PO43−, and SO42−. These data were collected from young plants growing in pots of compost in the laboratory and from fully mature pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv Bellboy) plants growing in hydroponics (rockwool) in the greenhouse. This method should facilitate studies of macronutrient uptake and transport in a range of plants and environments. PMID:12428008

  7. The contribution of large trees to total transpiration rates in a pre-montane tropical forest and its implications for selective logging practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, G.; Moore, G. W.; Miller, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    In the humid tropics, conservationists generally prefer selective logging practices over clearcutting. Large valuable timber is removed while the remaining forest is left relatively undisturbed. However, little is known about the impact of selective logging on site water balance. Because large trees have very deep sapwood and exposed canopies, they tend to have high transpiration. The first objective was to evaluate the methods used for scaling sap flow measurements to the watershed with particular emphasis on large trees. The second objective of this study was to determine the relative contribution of large trees to site water balance. Our study was conducted in a pre-montane transitional forest at the Texas A&M University Soltis Center in north-central Costa Rica. During the period between January and July 2012, sap flux was monitored in a 30-m diameter plot within a 10-ha watershed. Two pairs of heat dissipation sensors were installed in the outer 0-20 mm of each of 15 trees selected to represent the full range of tree sizes. In six of the largest trees, depth profiles were recorded at 10-mm intervals to a depth of 60 mm using compensation heat pulse sensors. To estimate sapwood basal area of the entire watershed, a stand survey was conducted in three 30-m-diameter plots. In each plot, we measured basal area of all trees and estimated sapwood basal area from sapwood depth measured in nearly half of the trees. An estimated 36.5% of the total sapwood area in this watershed comes from the outer 20 mm of sapwood, with the remaining 63.5% of sapwood from depths deeper than 20 mm. Nearly 13% of sapwood is from depths beyond 60 mm. Sap velocity profiles indicate the highest flow rates occurred in the 0-2 cm depths, with declines of 17% and 25% in the 20-40 mm and 40-60 mm ranges, respectively. Our results demonstrate the need to measure sap velocity profiles in large tropical trees. If total transpiration had been estimated solely from the 0-20 mm heat dissipation

  8. Seasonal, synoptic and diurnal variation of atmospheric water-isotopologues in the boundary layer of Southwestern Germany caused by plant transpiration, cold-front passages and dewfall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christner, Emanuel; Dyroff, Christoph; Kohler, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Gonzales, Yenny; Schneider, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric water is an enormously crucial trace gas. It is responsible for ~70 % of the natural greenhouse effect (Schmidt et al., JGR, 2010) and carries huge amounts of latent heat. The isotopic composition of water vapor is an elegant tracer for a better understanding and quantification of the extremely complex and variable hydrological cycle in Earth's atmosphere (evaporation, cloud condensation, rainout, re-evaporation, snow), which in turn is a prerequisite to improve climate modeling and predictions. As H216O, H218O and HDO differ in vapor pressure and mass, isotope fractionation occurs due to condensation, evaporation and diffusion processes. In contrast to that, plants are able to transpire water with almost no isotope fractionation. For that reason the ratio of isotopologue concentrations in the boundary layer (BL) provides, compared to humidity measurements alone, independent and additional constraints for quantifying the strength of evaporation and transpiration. Furthermore the isotope ratios contain information about transport history of an air mass and microphysical processes, that is not accessible by humidity measurements. Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) a commercial Picarro Analyzer L2120-i is operated at Karlsruhe in Southwestern Germany, which is continuously measuring the isotopologues H216O, HDO and H218O of atmospheric water vapor since January 2012. A one year record of H216O, HDO and H218O shows clear seasonal, synoptic and diurnal characteristics and reveals the main driving processes affecting the isotopic composition of water vapor in the Middle European BL. Changes in continental plant transpiration and evaporation throughout the year lead to a slow seasonal HDO/H216O-variation, that cannot be explained by pure Rayleigh condensation. Furthermore, cold-front passages from NW lead to fast and pronounced depletion of the HDO/H216O-ratio within

  9. Terrestrial water fluxes dominated by transpiration.

    PubMed

    Jasechko, Scott; Sharp, Zachary D; Gibson, John J; Birks, S Jean; Yi, Yi; Fawcett, Peter J

    2013-04-18

    Renewable fresh water over continents has input from precipitation and losses to the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration. Global-scale estimates of transpiration from climate models are poorly constrained owing to large uncertainties in stomatal conductance and the lack of catchment-scale measurements required for model calibration, resulting in a range of predictions spanning 20 to 65 per cent of total terrestrial evapotranspiration (14,000 to 41,000 km(3) per year) (refs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Here we use the distinct isotope effects of transpiration and evaporation to show that transpiration is by far the largest water flux from Earth's continents, representing 80 to 90 per cent of terrestrial evapotranspiration. On the basis of our analysis of a global data set of large lakes and rivers, we conclude that transpiration recycles 62,000 ± 8,000 km(3) of water per year to the atmosphere, using half of all solar energy absorbed by land surfaces in the process. We also calculate CO2 uptake by terrestrial vegetation by connecting transpiration losses to carbon assimilation using water-use efficiency ratios of plants, and show the global gross primary productivity to be 129 ± 32 gigatonnes of carbon per year, which agrees, within the uncertainty, with previous estimates. The dominance of transpiration water fluxes in continental evapotranspiration suggests that, from the point of view of water resource forecasting, climate model development should prioritize improvements in simulations of biological fluxes rather than physical (evaporation) fluxes. PMID:23552893

  10. Interspecies comparison of transpiration in Cambodia for the prediction of water use under the tropical monsoon climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Makiko; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomo'Omi, Kumagai; Ma, Vuthy; Sokh, Heng; Mizoue, Nobuya

    2010-05-01

    Recently exotic fast-growing trees are planted in Southeast Asia, since economical profits of fast-growing tree plantations are expected. However, fast-growing species are also thought to consume more water than native species. There is concern these exotic species may influence water resources because of their large water consumption, especially during the dry season. In Cambodia there is a clear rainy season and extremely dry season with hardly any rainfall. Whether fast-growing trees adapt to such dry season and their effect on water resources is unconcern. To evaluate the impact of planting exotic trees, it is critical to know how much water these trees transpired and how they control water use under drought condition. To more thoroughly understand these processes, water flow was monitored in the stem of 4 species continuously using sap flux measurement to estimate transpiration of individual trees. For this experiment, we selected 6 trees of each species; two native species (Dipterocarpus obtusifolius and Shorea roxburghii) and 2 exotic species (Acacia auriculiformis and Eucalyptus camaldulensis). Meteorological observations were also conducted. All species had similar transpiration rates under the same environmental condition in the rainy season. Although there was a relationship between tree size and transpiration, difference among the tree species was not clear. That is to say, the difference of transpiration between small size trees and large trees was larger than interspecies variation in that period. From long-term observations, we found that transpiration of native and exotic species in the dry season show different responses to environmental conditions. While transpiration of A. auriculiformis slightly decreased during the dry season, the transpiration rate of S. roxburghii, a native species, remained high despite diminished groundwater at the end of the dry season. This result implies S. roxburghii develops deeper roots to access groundwater for

  11. Simple relations for different stomatal control mechanisms link partially drying soil and transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Katrin; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Stomata can close to regulate plant water loss under unfavourable water availability. This closure can be triggered by hydraulic ('H') and/or chemical signals ('C', 'H+C'). By combining plant hydraulic relations with a model for stomatal conductance, including chemical signalling, our aim was to derive a simple relation that links soil water availability, expressed as the fraction of roots in dry soil, to transpiration. We used the detailed mechanistic soil-root water flow model R-SWMS to verify this relation. Virtual split root experiments were simulated, comparing horizontally and vertically split domains with varying fractions of roots in dry soil and comparing different strengths of stomatal regulation by chemical and hydraulic signals. Transpiration predicted by the relation was in good agreement with numerical simulations. Under certain conditions H+C control leads to isohydric plant behaviour, which means that stomata close to keep leaf water potential constant after reaching a certain level. C control on the other hand exerts anisohydric behaviour, meaning that stomata remain fully open during changes in leaf water potential. For C control the relation between transpiration reduction and fraction of roots in dry soil becomes independent of transpiration rate whereas H+C control results in stronger reduction for higher transpiration rates. Simple relations that link effective soil and leaf water potential can describe different stomatal control resulting in contrasting behaviour.

  12. Localization of the Transpiration Barrier in the Epi- and Intracuticular Waxes of Eight Plant Species: Water Transport Resistances Are Associated with Fatty Acyl Rather Than Alicyclic Components1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jetter, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Plant cuticular waxes play a crucial role in limiting nonstomatal water loss. The goal of this study was to localize the transpiration barrier within the layered structure of cuticles of eight selected plant species and to put its physiological function into context with the chemical composition of the intracuticular and epicuticular wax layers. Four plant species (Tetrastigma voinierianum, Oreopanax guatemalensis, Monstera deliciosa, and Schefflera elegantissima) contained only very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derivatives such as alcohols, alkyl esters, aldehydes, and alkanes in their waxes. Even though the epicuticular and intracuticular waxes of these species had very similar compositions, only the intracuticular wax was important for the transpiration barrier. In contrast, four other species (Citrus aurantium, Euonymus japonica, Clusia flava, and Garcinia spicata) had waxes containing VLCFA derivatives, together with high percentages of alicyclic compounds (triterpenoids, steroids, or tocopherols) largely restricted to the intracuticular wax layer. In these species, both the epicuticular and intracuticular waxes contributed equally to the cuticular transpiration barrier. We conclude that the cuticular transpiration barrier is primarily formed by the intracuticular wax but that the epicuticular wax layer may also contribute to it, depending on species-specific cuticle composition. The barrier is associated mainly with VLCFA derivatives and less (if at all) with alicyclic wax constituents. The sealing properties of the epicuticular and intracuticular layers were not correlated with other characteristics, such as the absolute wax amounts and thicknesses of these layers. PMID:26644508

  13. Stem girdling evidences a trade-off between cambial activity and sprouting and dramatically reduces plant transpiration due to feedback inhibition of photosynthesis and hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    López, Rosana; Brossa, Ricard; Gil, Luis; Pita, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthesis source–sink relationship in young Pinus canariensis seedlings was modified by stem girdling to investigate sprouting and cambial activity, feedback inhibition of photosynthesis, and stem and root hydraulic capacity. Removal of bark tissue showed a trade-off between sprouting and diameter growth. Above the girdle, growth was accelerated but the number of sprouts was almost negligible, whereas below the girdle the response was reversed. Girdling resulted in a sharp decrease in whole plant transpiration and root hydraulic conductance. The reduction of leaf area after girdling was strengthened by the high levels of abscisic acid found in buds which pointed to stronger bud dormancy, preventing a new needle flush. Accumulation of sugars in leaves led to a coordinated reduction in net photosynthesis (AN) and stomatal conductance (gS) in the short term, but later (gS below 0.07 mol m-2 s-1) AN decreased faster. The decrease in maximal efficiency of photosystem II (FV/FM) and the operating quantum efficiency of photosystem II (ΦPSII) in girdled plants could suggest photoprotection of leaves, as shown by the vigorous recovery of AN and ΦPSII after reconnection of the phloem. Stem girdling did not affect xylem embolism but increased stem hydraulic conductance above the girdle. This study shows that stem girdling affects not only the carbon balance, but also the water status of the plant. PMID:25972884

  14. Compensating effect of sap velocity for stand density leads to uniform hillslope-scale forest transpiration across a steep valley cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Maik; Hassler, Sibylle; Blume, Theresa; Weiler, Markus; Hildebrandt, Anke; Guderle, Marcus; Schymanski, Stan; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Roberts (1983) found that forest transpiration is relatively uniform across different climatic conditions and suggested that forest transpiration is a conservative process compensating for environmental heterogeneity. Here we test this hypothesis at a steep valley cross-section composed of European Beech in the Attert basin in Luxemburg. We use sapflow, soil moisture, biometric and meteorological data from 6 sites along a transect to estimate site scale transpiration rates. Despite opposing hillslope orientation, different slope angles and forest stand structures, we estimated relatively similar transpiration responses to atmospheric demand and seasonal transpiration totals. This similarity is related to a negative correlation between sap velocity and site-average sapwood area. At the south facing sites with an old, even-aged stand structure and closed canopy layer, we observe significantly lower sap velocities but similar stand-average transpiration rates compared to the north-facing sites with open canopy structure, tall dominant trees and dense understorey. This suggests that plant hydraulic co-ordination allows for flexible responses to environmental conditions leading to similar transpiration rates close to the water and energy limits despite the apparent heterogeneity in exposition, stand density and soil moisture. References Roberts, J. (1983). Forest transpiration: A conservative hydrological process? Journal of Hydrology 66, 133-141.

  15. Tritium Concentrations in Environmental Samples and Transpiration Rates from the Vicinity of Mary's Branch Creek and Background Areas, Barnwell, South Carolina, 2007-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Canova, Judy L.; Bradley, Paul M.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Tritium in groundwater from a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Barnwell, South Carolina, is discharging to Mary's Branch Creek. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted an investigation from 2007 to 2009 to examine the tritium concentration in trees and air samples near the creek and in background areas, in groundwater near the creek, and in surface water from the creek. Tritium was found in trees near the creek, but not in trees from background areas or from sites unlikely to be in direct root contact with tritium-contaminated groundwater. Tritium was found in groundwater near the creek and in the surface water of the creek. Analysis of tree material has the potential to be a useful tool in locating shallow tritium-contaminated groundwater. A tritium concentration of 1.4 million picocuries per liter was measured in shallow groundwater collected near a tulip poplar located in an area of tritium-contaminated groundwater discharge. Evapotranspiration rates from the tree and tritium concentrations in water extracted from tree cores indicate that during the summer, this tulip poplar may remove more than 17.1 million picocuries of tritium per day from the groundwater that otherwise would discharge to Mary's Branch Creek. Analysis of air samples near the tree showed no evidence that the transpirative release of tritium to the air created a vapor hazard in the forest.

  16. Estimation of Transpiration and Water Use Efficiency Using Satellite and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Quick, B. E.

    2003-01-01

    Structure and function of terrestrial plant communities bring about intimate relations between water, energy, and carbon exchange between land surface and atmosphere. Total evaporation, which is the sum of transpiration, soil evaporation and evaporation of intercepted water, couples water and energy balance equations. The rate of transpiration, which is the major fraction of total evaporation over most of the terrestrial land surface, is linked to the rate of carbon accumulation because functioning of stomata is optimized by both of these processes. Thus, quantifying the spatial and temporal variations of the transpiration efficiency (which is defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and transpiration), and water use efficiency (defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and total evaporation), and evaluation of modeling results against observations, are of significant importance in developing a better understanding of land surface processes. An approach has been developed for quantifying spatial and temporal variations of transpiration, and water-use efficiency based on biophysical process-based models, satellite and field observations. Calculations have been done using concurrent meteorological data derived from satellite observations and four dimensional data assimilation for four consecutive years (1987-1990) over an agricultural area in the Northern Great Plains of the US, and compared with field observations within and outside the study area. The paper provides substantive new information about interannual variation, particularly the effect of drought, on the efficiency values at a regional scale.

  17. Numerical Analysis of Convection/Transpiration Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1999-01-01

    An innovative concept utilizing the natural porosity of refractory-composite materials and hydrogen coolant to provide CONvective and TRANspiration (CONTRAN) cooling and oxidation protection has been numerically studied for surfaces exposed to a high heat flux high temperature environment such as hypersonic vehicle engine combustor walls. A boundary layer code and a porous media finite difference code were utilized to analyze the effect of convection and transpiration cooling on surface heat flux and temperature. The boundary layer code determined that transpiration flow is able to provide blocking of the surface heat flux only if it is above a minimum level due to heat addition from combustion of the hydrogen transpirant. The porous media analysis indicated that cooling of the surface is attained with coolant flow rates that are in the same range as those required for blocking, indicating that a coupled analysis would be beneficial.

  18. Numerical Analysis of Convection/Transpiration Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1999-01-01

    An innovative concept utilizing the natural porosity of refractory-composite materials and hydrogen coolant to provide CONvective and TRANspiration (CONTRAN) cooling and oxidation protection has been numerically studied for surfaces exposed to a high heat flux, high temperature environment such as hypersonic vehicle engine combustor walls. A boundary layer code and a porous media finite difference code were utilized to analyze the effect of convection and transpiration cooling on surface heat flux and temperature. The boundary, layer code determined that transpiration flow is able to provide blocking of the surface heat flux only if it is above a minimum level due to heat addition from combustion of the hydrogen transpirant. The porous media analysis indicated that cooling of the surface is attained with coolant flow rates that are in the same range as those required for blocking, indicating that a coupled analysis would be beneficial.

  19. Correlation of thermophoretically-modified small particle diffusional deposition rates in forced convection systems with variable properties, transpiration cooling and/or viscous dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A cooled object (heat exchanger tube or turbine blade) is considered to be immersed in a hot fluid stream containing trace amounts of suspended vapors and/or small particles. Numerical prediction calculations were done for self-similar laminar boundary layers and law-of-the-wall turbulent boundary layers. Correlations are presented for the effect of thermophoresis in the absence of transpiration cooling and viscous dissipation; the effect of real suction and blowing in the absence of thermophoresis; the effect of viscous dissipation on thermophoresis in the absence of transpiration cooling; and the combined effect of viscous dissipation and transpiration cooling on thermophoresis. The final correlation, St/St-sub-zero, is insensitive to particle properties, Euler number, and local mainstream temperature.

  20. PILOT PLANT EXPLORATION OF SLOW RATE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternatives to conventional coagulation water filtration plants (those that utilize coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation and filtration) may be appropriate for some small water utilities. One such alternative is slow rate filtration. This paper describes pilot plant studies ...

  1. Transpiration and CO/sub 2/ fixation of selected desert shrubs as related to soil-water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.B.; Letey, J. Jr.; Lunt, O.R.; Wallace, A.; Kleinkopf, G.E.; Romney, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    In desert plants, transpiration rates decreased before photosynthetic rates when plants were entering a period of water stress. This may have adaptive consequences. A difference of -5 bars in the soil-moisture potential had considerable importance in reducing the rate of transpiration. In Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower) the photosynthetic rate decreased before the transpiration rate in contrast to Great Basin-Mojave Desert plants, and the changes occurred with a -1 bar difference in soil-moisture potential. Morphological changes in three desert plant species (Artemisia tridentata Nutt., Ambrosia dumosa (Gray) Payne, Larrea tridentata (Ses. Moc. ex DC) Cov.) as the soil-moisture potential decreased are given. With a mesic species, H. annuus, 20% reduction in photosynthesis and transpiration was reached at higher soil-moisture potentials than with the desert plants. Loss of net photosynthesis occurred in A. dumosa (a summer deciduous shrub) as PSI soil reached -48 bars in the field, whereas L. tridentata (an evergreen shrub) at the same time was able to maintain a water potential difference between soil and plant of -10 to -15 bars and continue net CO/sub 2/ gain well into the summer months.

  2. Fruit transpiration in kiwifruit: environmental drivers and predictive model

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Giuseppe; Dichio, Bartolomeo; Xiloyannis, Cristos; Lang, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims In most fruit crops, storage quality varies greatly between regions and seasons, causing significant commercial loss. Understanding the sources of this variability will contribute to the knowledge of fruit developmental physiology and may also benefit commercial fruit production via altered managements that reduce it or forecasts that predict it. A causal-chain relationship is proposed to help elucidate the sources of variability in fruit storage quality: the weather →(i)→ fruit transpiration →(ii)→ fruit calcium →(iii)→ fruit storage quality. This paper explores the first link of this hypothesis, →(i)→, for Hayward kiwifruit using field measurements of fruit transpiration rate and concurrent meteorological recordings. The aims are to identify the key environmental variables driving fruit transpiration and develop a predictive fruit transpiration model. Methodology Fruit transpiration was determined hourly over several 24-h periods by recording weight loss of detached fruit, on Days 23, 35, 49, 65, 94 and 140 after full bloom. Meteorological records were made every 15 min throughout the season at an adjacent regional weather station. A model of fruit transpiration was developed in which the usual meteorological variables (radiation, temperature, windspeed and relative humidity) were incorporated in a Fick's Law transpiration flux equation. Principal results Fruit transpiration rate (i.e. the molar flux density, mmol cm−2 h−1) varied diurnally and decreased during the season. The dominant fruit variable governing transpiration rate was skin conductance and the dominant environmental variables were relative humidity and temperature. Radiation and windspeed were not significantly influential. Conclusions The model provides a good fit to the fruit transpiration rate measurements regardless of the time of day/night or the stage of fruit development. The model allows reasonably accurate and continuous predictions of fruit

  3. Deposition control using transpiration: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlu, H.; Louis, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of deposition of small particles is presented to evaluate the concept of transpiration as a deposition control strategy. The application of this work is the control of the deposition of small particles (0.5 to 3 ..mu..m) in turbines burning fuels derived from coal. The study is carried out in a wind tunnel facility containing a flat porous transpired section. Similar flows and particle motions are achieved by choosing the proper Reynolds and Stokes numbers representative of the conditions found in industrial gas turbines. Measurements of the velocity profiles were conducted for high injection rates (1.5% < F < 3%). A theory developed for the transpired turbulent boundary layer, which is described by an ''outer boundary layer'' entraining the transpired flow for large injection rates, agrees well with the experimental data. Concentration profiles of glass particles of both very narrow and wide size distributions were conducted for different injection rates under isothermal conditions. The measurements indicate clearly the conditions under which transpiration can prevent the deposition of particles and they show the effect of particle size. The interaction between transpiration and the inertial impaction of particulates is determined in an experimental set-up using an identical inclined transpired plate. Using the experimental data, the effect of the density of particles on concentration profiles is predicted. Present study also provides a clear insight into the turbulent diffusion of particles for a Stokes number of between 1 and 3.5 (and a turbulent Schmidt number range of 2 to 6). The turbulent Schmidt numbers obtained from the measurements are in agreement with the theoretical prediction of Tchen. 26 refs., 25 figs.

  4. A high CO2 -driven decrease in plant transpiration leads to perturbations in the hydrological cycle and may link terrestrial and marine loss of biodiversity: deep-time evidence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Woodward, F. Ian; Surlyk, Finn; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2013-04-01

    CO2 is obtained and water vapor simultaneously transpired through plant stomata, driving the water uptake of roots. Stomata are key elements of the Earth's hydrological cycle, since a large part of the evapotranspiration from the surface to the atmosphere takes place via stomatal pores. Plants exercise stomatal control, by adjusting stomatal size and/or density in order to preserve water while maintaining carbon uptake for photosynthesis. A global decrease in stomatal density and/or size causes a decrease in transpiration and has the potential to increase global runoff. Here we show, from 91 fossil leaf cuticle specimens from the Triassic/Jurassic boundary transition (Tr-J) of East Greenland, that both stomatal size and density decreased dramatically during the Tr-J, coinciding with mass extinctions, major environmental upheaval and a negative C-isotope excursion. We estimate that these developmental and structural changes in stomata resulted in a 50-60% drop in stomatal and canopy transpiration as calibrated using a stomatal model, based on empirical measurements and adjusted for fossil plants. We additionally present new field evidence indicating a change to increased erosion and bad-land formation at the Tr-J. We hypothesize that plant physiological responses to high carbon dioxide concentrations at the Tr-J may have increased runoff at the local and perhaps even regional scale. Increased runoff may result in increased flux of nutrients from land to oceans, leading to eutrophication, anoxia and ultimately loss of marine biodiversity. High-CO2 driven changes in stomatal and canopy transpiration therefore provide a possible mechanistic link between terrestrial ecological crisis and marine mass extinction at the Tr-J.

  5. Interannual Variation in Stand Transpiration is Dependent Upon Tree Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewers, B. E.; Mackay, D. S.; Burrows, S. N.; Ahl, D. E.; Samanta, S.

    2003-12-01

    In order to successfully predict transpirational water fluxes from forested watersheds, interannual variability in transpiration must be quantified and understood. In a heterogeneous forested landscape in northern Wisconsin, we quantified stand transpiration across four forest cover types representing more than 80 percent of the land area in order to 1) quantify differences in stand transpiration and leaf area over two years and 2) determine the mechanisms governing the changes in transpiration over two years. We measured sap flux in eight trees of each tree species in the four cover types. We found that in northern hardwoods, the leaf area of sugar maple increased between the two measurement years with transpiration per unit ground area increasing even more than could be explained by leaf area. In an aspen stand, tent caterpillars completely defoliated the stand for approximately a month until a new set of leaves flushed out. The new set of leaves resulted in a lower leaf area but the same transpiration per unit leaf area indicating there was no physiological compensation for the lower leaf area. At the same time, balsam fir growing underneath the aspen increased their transpiration rate in response to greater light penetration through the dominant aspen canopy Red pine had a thirty percent change in leaf area within a growing season due to multiple cohorts of leaves and transpiration followed this leaf area dynamic. In a forested wetland, white cedar transpiration was proportional to surface water depth between the two years. Despite the specific tree species' effects on stand transpiration, all species displayed a minimum water potential regulation resulting in a saturating response of transpiration to vapor pressure deficit that did not vary across the two years. This physiological set point will allow future water flux models to explain mechanistically interannual variability in transpiration of this and similar forests.

  6. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed M; Condon, Laura E

    2016-07-22

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes. PMID:27463671

  7. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Condon, Laura E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  8. Transpiration and yield relationships of grain sorghum grown in a field environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of plants to convert transpiration into dry matter has been studied since the early 20th century. Research has compared differences among species using transpiration efficiency (TE), the ratio of biomass yield (Yb) to transpiration (T); and m and k, which are the slopes of the linear Yb...

  9. Transpiration purged optical probe

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John; Woodruff, Steven

    2004-01-06

    An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

  10. Measurement of transpiration in Pinus taeda L. and Liquidambar styraciflua L. in an environmental chamber using tritiated water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, G. F.; Sonenshine, D. E.; Czoch, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    Transpiration rates of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) were measured at two different atmospheric water vapor pressure deficits (V.P.D.) in a controlled environment growth chamber using tritiated water as a tracer. The trees were maintained in a sealed plant bed containing a hydroponic nutrient solution into which labeled water (spike) was introduced. Samples of leaves, chamber air, spiked nutrient solution and control water were assayed for ratio-activity using liquid scintillation techniques to determine transpiration rates. The transpiration rate of sweetgum in ml./hr./gm. (4.95) was found to be 5 times greater than that of loblolly pine (1.03) at 1.84 V.P.D. and 8 times greater at 6.74 V.P.D. (15.99 for sweetgum vs. 2.19 for pine). Transpiration (based on measurements of leaf radioactivity) in both species rose with increasing deficit; however sweetgum increased its output by 3 times while pine only doubled its rate. Cyclical changes in transpiration rates were noted in both species; the sweetgum cycle required a 6 hour interval whereas the pine cycle required a 9 hour interval.

  11. Transpiration Control Of Aerodynamics Via Porous Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1993-01-01

    Quasi-active porous surface used to control pressure loading on aerodynamic surface of aircraft or other vehicle, according to proposal. In transpiration control, one makes small additions of pressure and/or mass to cavity beneath surface of porous skin on aerodynamic surface, thereby affecting rate of transpiration through porous surface. Porous skin located on forebody or any other suitable aerodynamic surface, with cavity just below surface. Device based on concept extremely lightweight, mechanically simple, occupies little volume in vehicle, and extremely adaptable.

  12. Export of Abscisic Acid, 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid, Phosphate, and Nitrate from Roots to Shoots of Flooded Tomato Plants (Accounting for Effects of Xylem Sap Flow Rate on Concentration and Delivery).

    PubMed Central

    Else, M. A.; Hall, K. C.; Arnold, G. M.; Davies, W. J.; Jackson, M. B.

    1995-01-01

    We determined whether root stress alters the output of physiologically active messages passing from roots to shoots in the transpiration stream. Concentrations were not good measures of output. This was because changes in volume flow of xylem sap caused either by sampling procedures or by effects of root stress on rates of whole-plant transpiration modified concentrations simply by dilution. Thus, delivery rate (concentration x sap flow rate) was preferred to concentration as a measure of solute output from roots. To demonstrate these points, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), abscisic acid, phosphate, nitrate, and pH were measured in xylem sap of flooded and well-drained tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., cv Ailsa Craig) plants expressed at various rates from pressurized detopped roots. Concentrations decreased as sap flow rates were increased. However, dilution of solutes was often less than proportional to flow, especially in flooded plants. Thus, sap flowing through detopped roots at whole-plant transpiration rates was used to estimate solute delivery rates in intact plants. On this basis, delivery of ACC from roots to shoots was 3.1-fold greater in plants flooded for 24 h than in well-drained plants, and delivery of phosphate was 2.3-fold greater. Delivery rates of abscisic acid and nitrate in flooded plants were only 11 and 7%, respectively, of those in well-drained plants. PMID:12228364

  13. Evapotranspiration crop coefficients for mixed riparian plant community and transpiration crop coefficients for Common reed, Cottonwood and Peach-leaf willow in the Platte River Basin, Nebraska-USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmak, S.; Kabenge, I.; Rudnick, D.; Knezevic, S.; Woodward, D.; Moravek, M.

    2013-02-01

    SummaryApplication of two-step approach of evapotranspiration (ET) crop coefficients (Kc) to "approximate" a very complex process of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) for field crops has been practiced by water management community. However, the use of Kc, and in particular the concept of growing degree days (GDD) to estimate Kc, have not been sufficiently studied for estimation of evaporative losses from riparian vegetation. Our study is one of the first to develop evapotranspiration crop coefficient (KcET) curves for mixed riparian vegetation and transpiration (TRP) crop coefficients (KcTRP) for individual riparian species as a function GDD through extensive field campaigns conducted in 2009 and 2010 in the Platte River Basin in central Nebraska, USA. KcTRP values for individual riparian vegetation species [Common reed (Phragmites australis), Cottonwood (Populus deltoids) and Peach-leaf willow (Salix amygdaloides)] were quantified from the TRP rates obtained using scaled-up canopy resistance from measured leaf-level stomatal resistance and reference evapotranspiration. The KcET and KcTRP curves were developed for alfalfa-reference (KcrET and KcrTRP) surface. The seasonal average mixed riparian plant community KcrET was 0.89 in 2009 and 1.27 in 2010. In 2009, the seasonal average KcrTRP values for Common reed, Cottonwood and Peach-leaf willow were 0.57, 0.51 and 0.62, respectively. In 2010, the seasonal average KcrTRP were 0.69, 0.62 and 0.83 for the same species, respectively. In general, TRP crop coefficients had less interannual variability than the KcrET. Response of the vegetation to flooding in 2010 played an important role on the interannual variability of KcrET values. We demonstrated good performance and reliability of developed GDD-based KcrTRP curves by using the curves developed for 2009 to predict TRP rates of individual species in 2010. Using the KcrTRP curves developed during the 2009 season, we were able to predict the TRP rates for Common reed

  14. Reduced nighttime transpiration is a relevant breeding target for high water-use efficiency in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Coupel-Ledru, Aude; Lebon, Eric; Christophe, Angélique; Gallo, Agustina; Gago, Pilar; Pantin, Florent; Doligez, Agnès; Simonneau, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    Increasing water scarcity challenges crop sustainability in many regions. As a consequence, the enhancement of transpiration efficiency (TE)-that is, the biomass produced per unit of water transpired-has become crucial in breeding programs. This could be achieved by reducing plant transpiration through a better closure of the stomatal pores at the leaf surface. However, this strategy generally also lowers growth, as stomatal opening is necessary for the capture of atmospheric CO2 that feeds daytime photosynthesis. Here, we considered the reduction in transpiration rate at night (En) as a possible strategy to limit water use without altering growth. For this purpose, we carried out a genetic analysis for En and TE in grapevine, a major crop in drought-prone areas. Using recently developed phenotyping facilities, potted plants of a cross between Syrah and Grenache cultivars were screened for 2 y under well-watered and moderate soil water deficit scenarios. High genetic variability was found for En under both scenarios and was primarily associated with residual diffusion through the stomata. Five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected that underlay genetic variability in En Interestingly, four of them colocalized with QTLs for TE. Moreover, genotypes with favorable alleles on these common QTLs exhibited reduced En without altered growth. These results demonstrate the interest of breeding grapevine for lower water loss at night and pave the way to breeding other crops with this underexploited trait for higher TE. PMID:27457942

  15. Streamwise-varying steady transpiration control in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Blackburn, H. M.; Rudman, M.; Sharma, A. S.; McKeon, B. J.

    2016-06-01

    A study of the the main features of low- and high amplitude steady streamwise wall transpiration applied to pipe flow is presented. The effect of the two transpiration parameters, amplitude and wavenumber, on the flow have been investigated by means of direct numerical simulation at a moderate turbulent Reynolds number. The behaviour of the three identified mechanisms that act in the flow: modification of Reynolds shear stress, steady streaming and generation of non-zero mean streamwise gradients, have been linked to the transpiration parameters. The observed trends have permitted the identification of wall transpiration configurations able to reduce or increase the overall flow rate in -36.1% and 19.3% respectively. A resolvent analysis has been carried out to obtain a description of the reorganization of the flow structures induced by the transpiration.

  16. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  17. Role of aquaporins in determining transpiration and photosynthesis in water-stressed plants: crop water-use efficiency, growth and yield.

    PubMed

    Moshelion, Menachem; Halperin, Ofer; Wallach, Rony; Oren, Ram; Way, Danielle A

    2015-09-01

    The global shortage of fresh water is one of our most severe agricultural problems, leading to dry and saline lands that reduce plant growth and crop yield. Here we review recent work highlighting the molecular mechanisms allowing some plant species and genotypes to maintain productivity under water stress conditions, and suggest molecular modifications to equip plants for greater production in water-limited environments. Aquaporins (AQPs) are thought to be the main transporters of water, small and uncharged solutes, and CO2 through plant cell membranes, thus linking leaf CO2 uptake from the intercellular airspaces to the chloroplast with water loss pathways. AQPs appear to play a role in regulating dynamic changes of root, stem and leaf hydraulic conductivity, especially in response to environmental changes, opening the door to using AQP expression to regulate plant water-use efficiency. We highlight the role of vascular AQPs in regulating leaf hydraulic conductivity and raise questions regarding their role (as well as tonoplast AQPs) in determining the plant isohydric threshold, growth rate, fruit yield production and harvest index. The tissue- or cell-specific expression of AQPs is discussed as a tool to increase yield relative to control plants under both normal and water-stressed conditions. PMID:25039365

  18. Growth and transpiration of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and Hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) seedlings in response to soil water content.

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Junko; Shigenaga, Hidetoshi; Akama, Akio; Takahashi, Masamichi

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the effects of soil water content on growth and transpiration of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) and Hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa (Siebold et Zucc.) Endl.), potted seedlings were grown in well-watered soil (wet treatment) or in drying soil (dry treatment) for 12 weeks. Seedlings in the wet treatment were watered once every 2 or 3 days, whereas seedlings in the dry treatment were watered when soil water content (Theta; m3 m(-3)) reached 0.30, equivalent to a soil matric potential of -0.06 MPa. From Weeks 7 to 12 after the onset of the treatments, seedling transpiration was measured by weighing the potted seedlings. After the last watering, changes in transpiration rate during soil drying were monitored intensely. The dry treatment restricted aboveground growth but increased biomass allocation to the roots in both species, resulting in no significant treatment difference in whole-plant biomass production. The species showed similar responses in relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR) and shoot mass ratio (SMR) to the dry treatment. Although NAR did not change significantly in either C. japonica or C. obtusa as the soil dried, the two species responded differently to the dry treatment in terms of mean transpiration rate (E) and water-use efficiency (WUE), which are parameters that relate to NAR. In the dry treatment, both E and WUE of C. japonica were stable, whereas in C. obtusa, E decreased and WUE increased (E and WUE counterbalanced to maintain a constant NAR). Transpiration rates were lower in C. obtusa seedlings than in C. japonica seedlings, even in well-watered conditions. During soil drying, the transpiration rate decreased after Theta reached about 0.38 (-0.003 MPa) in C. obtusa and 0.32 (-0.028 MPa) in C. japonica. We conclude that C. obtusa has more water-saving characteristics than C. japonica, particularly when water supply is limited. PMID:15339729

  19. Enhanced transpiration in response to wind effects at the edge of a blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) plantation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P J; Nuberg, I K; Hatton, T J

    2001-04-01

    In Australia, tree planting has been widely promoted to alleviate dryland salinity and one proposed planting configuration is that of strategically placed interception belts. We conducted an experiment to determine the effect of tree position in a belt on transpiration rate. We also assessed how much the effect of tree position can be explained by advection and environmental conditions. Daily transpiration rates were determined by the heat pulse velocity technique for four edge and 12 inner trees in a 7-year-old Tasmanian blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) plantation in South Australia. Various climatic variables were logged automatically at one edge of the plantation. The relationship between daily sap flow and sapwood area was strongly linear for the edge trees (r2 = 0.97), but only moderately correlated for the inner trees (r2 = 0.46), suggesting an edge effect. For all trees, sap flow normalized to sapwood area (Qs) increased with potential evaporation (PE) initially and then became independent as PE increased further. There was a fairly close correlation between transpiration of the edge and inner trees, implying that water availability was partially responsible for the difference between inner and edge trees. However, the ratio of edge tree to inner tree transpiration differed from unity, indicating differences in canopy conductance, which were estimated by an inverse form of the Penman-Monteith equation. When canopy conductances were less than a critical value, there was a strong linear relationship between Qs of the edge and inner trees. When canopy conductances of the edge trees were greater than the critical value, the slope of the linear relationship was steeper, indicating greater transpiration of the edge trees compared with the inner trees. This was interpreted as evidence for enhancement of transpiration of the edge trees by advection of wind energy. PMID:11282580

  20. Expression of Arabidopsis Hexokinase in Citrus Guard Cells Controls Stomatal Aperture and Reduces Transpiration.

    PubMed

    Lugassi, Nitsan; Kelly, Gilor; Fidel, Lena; Yaniv, Yossi; Attia, Ziv; Levi, Asher; Alchanatis, Victor; Moshelion, Menachem; Raveh, Eran; Carmi, Nir; Granot, David

    2015-01-01

    Hexokinase (HXK) is a sugar-phosphorylating enzyme involved in sugar-sensing. It has recently been shown that HXK in guard cells mediates stomatal closure and coordinates photosynthesis with transpiration in the annual species tomato and Arabidopsis. To examine the role of HXK in the control of the stomatal movement of perennial plants, we generated citrus plants that express Arabidopsis HXK1 (AtHXK1) under KST1, a guard cell-specific promoter. The expression of KST1 in the guard cells of citrus plants has been verified using GFP as a reporter gene. The expression of AtHXK1 in the guard cells of citrus reduced stomatal conductance and transpiration with no negative effect on the rate of photosynthesis, leading to increased water-use efficiency. The effects of light intensity and humidity on stomatal behavior were examined in rooted leaves of the citrus plants. The optimal intensity of photosynthetically active radiation and lower humidity enhanced stomatal closure of AtHXK1-expressing leaves, supporting the role of sugar in the regulation of citrus stomata. These results suggest that HXK coordinates photosynthesis and transpiration and stimulates stomatal closure not only in annual species, but also in perennial species. PMID:26734024

  1. Expression of Arabidopsis Hexokinase in Citrus Guard Cells Controls Stomatal Aperture and Reduces Transpiration

    PubMed Central

    Lugassi, Nitsan; Kelly, Gilor; Fidel, Lena; Yaniv, Yossi; Attia, Ziv; Levi, Asher; Alchanatis, Victor; Moshelion, Menachem; Raveh, Eran; Carmi, Nir; Granot, David

    2015-01-01

    Hexokinase (HXK) is a sugar-phosphorylating enzyme involved in sugar-sensing. It has recently been shown that HXK in guard cells mediates stomatal closure and coordinates photosynthesis with transpiration in the annual species tomato and Arabidopsis. To examine the role of HXK in the control of the stomatal movement of perennial plants, we generated citrus plants that express Arabidopsis HXK1 (AtHXK1) under KST1, a guard cell-specific promoter. The expression of KST1 in the guard cells of citrus plants has been verified using GFP as a reporter gene. The expression of AtHXK1 in the guard cells of citrus reduced stomatal conductance and transpiration with no negative effect on the rate of photosynthesis, leading to increased water-use efficiency. The effects of light intensity and humidity on stomatal behavior were examined in rooted leaves of the citrus plants. The optimal intensity of photosynthetically active radiation and lower humidity enhanced stomatal closure of AtHXK1-expressing leaves, supporting the role of sugar in the regulation of citrus stomata. These results suggest that HXK coordinates photosynthesis and transpiration and stimulates stomatal closure not only in annual species, but also in perennial species. PMID:26734024

  2. Performance of a transpiration-regenerative cooled rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valler, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis, design, fabrication, and testing of a liquid rocket engine thrust chamber which is gas transpiration cooled in the high heat flux convergent portion of the chamber and water jacket cooled (simulated regenerative) in the barrel and divergent sections of the chamber are described. The engine burns LOX-hydrogen propellants at a chamber pressure of 600 psia. Various transpiration coolant flow rates were tested with resultant local hot gas wall temperatures in the 800 F to 1400 F range. The feasibility of transpiration cooling with hydrogen and helium, and the use of photo-etched copper platelets for heat transfer and coolant metering was successfully demonstrated.

  3. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant failure rate database

    SciTech Connect

    Alber, T.G.; Hunt, C.R.; Fogarty, S.P.; Wilson, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    This report represents the first major upgrade to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Failure Rate Database. This upgrade incorporates additional site-specific and generic data while improving on the previous data reduction techniques. In addition, due to a change in mission at the ICPP, the status of certain equipment items has changed from operating to standby or off-line. A discussion of how this mission change influenced the relevance of failure data also has been included. This report contains two data sources: the ICPP Failure Rate Database and a generic failure rate database. A discussion is presented on the approaches and assumptions used to develop the data in the ICPP Failure Rate Database. The generic database is included along with a short discussion of its application. A brief discussion of future projects recommended to strengthen and lend credibility to the ICPP Failure Rate Database also is included.

  4. Wind-induced leaf transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Chu, Chia-Ren; Hsieh, Cheng-I.; Palmroth, Sari; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2015-12-01

    While the significance of leaf transpiration (fe) on carbon and water cycling is rarely disputed, conflicting evidence has been reported on how increasing mean wind speed (U) impacts fe from leaves. Here, conditions promoting enhancement or suppression of fe with increasing U for a wide range of environmental conditions are explored numerically using leaf-level gas exchange theories that combine a stomatal conductance model based on optimal water use strategies (maximizing the 'net' carbon gain at a given fe), energy balance considerations, and biochemical demand for CO2. The analysis showed monotonic increases in fe with increasing U at low light levels. However, a decline in modeled fe with increasing U were predicted at high light levels but only in certain instances. The dominant mechanism explaining this decline in modeled fe with increasing U is a shift from evaporative cooling to surface heating at high light levels. New and published sap flow measurements for potted Pachira macrocarpa and Messerschmidia argentea plants conducted in a wind tunnel across a wide range of U (2 - 8 m s-1) and two different soil moisture conditions were also employed to assess how fe varies with increasing U. The radiative forcing imposed in the wind tunnel was only restricted to the lower end of expected field conditions. At this low light regime, the findings from the wind tunnel experiments were consistent with the predicted trends.

  5. Rising CO2 widens the transpiration-photosynthesis optimality space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Hugo J.; Eppinga, Maarten B.; Dekker, Stefan C.

    2016-04-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthetic biochemistry, typically expressed by the temperature-adjusted maximum rates of carboxylation (V cmax) and electron transport (Jmax), are key traits in land ecosystem models. Contrary to the many approaches available for simulating gs responses, the biochemical parameters V cmax and Jmax are often treated as static traits in ecosystem models. However, observational evidence indicates that V cmax and Jmax respond to persistent changes in atmospheric CO2. Hence, ecosystem models may be improved by incorporating coordinated responses of photosynthetic biochemistry and gs to atmospheric CO2. Recently, Prentice et al. (2014) proposed an optimality framework (referred to as the Prentice framework from here on) to predict relationships between V cmax and gs based on Fick's law, Rubisco-limited photosynthesis and the carbon costs of transpiration and photosynthesis. Here we show that this framework is, in principle, suited to predict CO2-induced changes in the V cmax ‑gs relationships. The framework predicts an increase in the V cmax:gs-ratio with higher atmospheric CO2, whereby the slope of this relationship is determined by the carbon costs of transpiration and photosynthesis. For our empirical analyses we consider that the carbon cost of transpiration is positively related to the plant's Huber value (sapwood area/leaf area), while the carbon cost of photosynthesis is positively related to the maintenance cost of the photosynthetic proteins. We empirically tested the predicted effect of CO2 on the V cmax:gs-ratio in two genotypes of Solanum dulcamara (bittersweet) that were grown from seeds to maturity under 200, 400 and 800 ppm CO2 in walk-in growth chambers with tight control on light, temperature and humidity. Seeds of the two Solanum genotypes were obtained from two distinct natural populations; one adapted to well-drained sandy soil (the 'dry' genotype) and one adapted to poorly-drained clayey soil (the 'wet' genotype

  6. Reduced nighttime transpiration is a relevant breeding target for high water-use efficiency in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Coupel-Ledru, Aude; Lebon, Eric; Christophe, Angélique; Gallo, Agustina; Gago, Pilar; Pantin, Florent; Doligez, Agnès; Simonneau, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Increasing water scarcity challenges crop sustainability in many regions. As a consequence, the enhancement of transpiration efficiency (TE)—that is, the biomass produced per unit of water transpired—has become crucial in breeding programs. This could be achieved by reducing plant transpiration through a better closure of the stomatal pores at the leaf surface. However, this strategy generally also lowers growth, as stomatal opening is necessary for the capture of atmospheric CO2 that feeds daytime photosynthesis. Here, we considered the reduction in transpiration rate at night (En) as a possible strategy to limit water use without altering growth. For this purpose, we carried out a genetic analysis for En and TE in grapevine, a major crop in drought-prone areas. Using recently developed phenotyping facilities, potted plants of a cross between Syrah and Grenache cultivars were screened for 2 y under well-watered and moderate soil water deficit scenarios. High genetic variability was found for En under both scenarios and was primarily associated with residual diffusion through the stomata. Five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected that underlay genetic variability in En. Interestingly, four of them colocalized with QTLs for TE. Moreover, genotypes with favorable alleles on these common QTLs exhibited reduced En without altered growth. These results demonstrate the interest of breeding grapevine for lower water loss at night and pave the way to breeding other crops with this underexploited trait for higher TE. PMID:27457942

  7. Spatial patterns of simulated transpiration response to climate variability in a snow dominated mountain ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, L.; Tague, C.L.; Baron, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Transpiration is an important component of soil water storage and stream-flow and is linked with ecosystem productivity, species distribution, and ecosystem health. In mountain environments, complex topography creates heterogeneity in key controls on transpiration as well as logistical challenges for collecting representative measurements. In these settings, ecosystem models can be used to account for variation in space and time of the dominant controls on transpiration and provide estimates of transpiration patterns and their sensitivity to climate variability and change. The Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys) model was used to assess elevational differences in sensitivity of transpiration rates to the spatiotemporal variability of climate variables across the Upper Merced River watershed, Yosemite Valley, California, USA. At the basin scale, predicted annual transpiration was lowest in driest and wettest years, and greatest in moderate precipitation years (R2 = 0.32 and 0.29, based on polynomial regression of maximum snow depth and annual precipitation, respectively). At finer spatial scales, responsiveness of transpiration rates to climate differed along an elevational gradient. Low elevations (1200-1800 m) showed little interannual variation in transpiration due to topographically controlled high soil moistures along the river corridor. Annual conifer stand transpiration at intermediate elevations (1800-2150 m) responded more strongly to precipitation, resulting in a unimodal relationship between transpiration and precipitation where highest transpiration occurred during moderate precipitation levels, regardless of annual air temperatures. Higher elevations (2150-2600 m) maintained this trend, but air temperature sensitivities were greater. At these elevations, snowfall provides enough moisture for growth, and increased temperatures influenced transpiration. Transpiration at the highest elevations (2600-4000 m) showed strong sensitivity to

  8. TaER Expression Is Associated with Transpiration Efficiency Traits and Yield in Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiacheng; Yang, Zhiyuan; Madgwick, Pippa J.; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Parry, Martin A. J.; Hu, Yin-Gang

    2015-01-01

    ERECTA encodes a receptor-like kinase and is proposed as a candidate for determining transpiration efficiency of plants. Two genes homologous to ERECTA in Arabidopsis were identified on chromosomes 6 (TaER2) and 7 (TaER1) of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), with copies of each gene on the A, B and D genomes of wheat. Similar expression patterns were observed for TaER1 and TaER2 with relatively higher expression of TaER1 in flag leaves of wheat at heading (Z55) and grain-filling (Z73) stages. Significant variations were found in the expression levels of both TaER1 and TaER2 in the flag leaves at both growth stages among 48 diverse bread wheat varieties. Based on the expression of TaER1 and TaER2, the 48 wheat varieties could be classified into three groups having high (5 varieties), medium (27 varieties) and low (16 varieties) levels of TaER expression. Significant differences were also observed between the three groups varying for TaER expression for several transpiration efficiency (TE)- related traits, including stomatal density (SD), transpiration rate, photosynthetic rate (A), instant water use efficiency (WUEi) and carbon isotope discrimination (CID), and yield traits of biomass production plant-1 (BYPP) and grain yield plant-1 (GYPP). Correlation analysis revealed that the expression of TaER1 and TaER2 at the two growth stages was significantly and negatively associated with SD (P<0.01), transpiration rate (P<0.05) and CID (P<0.01), while significantly and positively correlated with flag leaf area (FLA, P<0.01), A (P<0.05), WUEi (P<0.05), BYPP (P<0.01) and GYPP (P<0.01), with stronger correlations for TaER1 than TaER2 and at grain-filling stage than at heading stage. These combined results suggested that TaER involved in development of transpiration efficiency -related traits and yield in bread wheat, implying a function for TaER in regulating leaf development of bread wheat and contributing to expression of these traits. Moreover, the results indicate

  9. Coordination of Leaf Photosynthesis, Transpiration, and Structural Traits in Rice and Wild Relatives (Genus Oryza)1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Rita; Koteyeva, Nuria; Voznesenskaya, Elena; Evans, Marc A.; Cousins, Asaph B.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Oryza, which includes rice (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) and wild relatives, is a useful genus to study leaf properties in order to identify structural features that control CO2 access to chloroplasts, photosynthesis, water use efficiency, and drought tolerance. Traits, 26 structural and 17 functional, associated with photosynthesis and transpiration were quantified on 24 accessions (representatives of 17 species and eight genomes). Hypotheses of associations within, and between, structure, photosynthesis, and transpiration were tested. Two main clusters of positively interrelated leaf traits were identified: in the first cluster were structural features, leaf thickness (Thickleaf), mesophyll (M) cell surface area exposed to intercellular air space per unit of leaf surface area (Smes), and M cell size; a second group included functional traits, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, M conductance to CO2 diffusion (gm), stomatal conductance to gas diffusion (gs), and the gm/gs ratio. While net photosynthetic rate was positively correlated with gm, neither was significantly linked with any individual structural traits. The results suggest that changes in gm depend on covariations of multiple leaf (Smes) and M cell (including cell wall thickness) structural traits. There was an inverse relationship between Thickleaf and transpiration rate and a significant positive association between Thickleaf and leaf transpiration efficiency. Interestingly, high gm together with high gm/gs and a low Smes/gm ratio (M resistance to CO2 diffusion per unit of cell surface area exposed to intercellular air space) appear to be ideal for supporting leaf photosynthesis while preserving water; in addition, thick M cell walls may be beneficial for plant drought tolerance. PMID:23669746

  10. Measurements of transpiration from Eucalyptus plantations, India, using deuterium tracing

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, I.R.; Swaminath, M.H.; Kariyappa, G.S.; Srinivasalu, N.V.; Murthy, K.V.; Mumtaz, J.

    1992-12-31

    Measurements of transpiration from individual trees in Eucalyptus plantations at four different sites in Karnataka, southern India, are presented. These show large (as much as tenfold) differences in the transpiration between pre and post monsoon periods; a reflection of the effects of soil moisture stress in the pre monsoon periods. For trees with diameters at breast height (DBH) less than 10 cm the transpiration rate of individual trees is proportional to the square of the DBH. For trees which are not experiencing soil water stress the daily transpiration rate of individual trees, q, is well represented by the relation: q= (6.6 {+-} 0.3)g m{sup 3}d{sup {minus}1} where g (m{sup 2}) is the tree basal area. On a unit ground area basis the transpiration rate, expressed as a depth per day, is given by the relation: E{sub t}= (0.66 {+-} 0.03)G (mm d{sup {minus}1}) where G (m{sup 2} ha{sup {minus}1}) is the total basal area per hectare. For all the sites studied, although there is evidence for the mining of soil water as roots penetrate deeper depths in the soil each year, there is no evidence for direct abstraction from the watertable.

  11. Partitioning evapotranspiration into evaporation and transpiration in a corn field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a main component of the hydrology cycle. It consists of soil water evaporation (E) and plant transpiration (T). Accurate partitioning of ET into E and T is challenging. We measured soil water E using heat pulse sensors and a micro-Bowen ratio system, T using stem flow gaug...

  12. Nitrogen regulation of transpiration controls mass-flow acquisition of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Matimati, Ignatious; Verboom, G Anthony; Cramer, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Transpiration may enhance mass-flow of nutrients to roots, especially in low-nutrient soils or where the root system is not extensively developed. Previous work suggested that nitrogen (N) may regulate mass-flow of nutrients. Experiments were conducted to determine whether N regulates water fluxes, and whether this regulation has a functional role in controlling the mass-flow of nutrients to roots. Phaseolus vulgaris were grown in troughs designed to create an N availability gradient by restricting roots from intercepting a slow-release N source, which was placed at one of six distances behind a 25 μm mesh from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (termed 'mass-flow' treatment). Control plants had the N source supplied directly to their root zone so that N was available through interception, mass-flow, and diffusion (termed 'interception' treatment). 'Mass-flow' plants closest to the N source exhibited 2.9-fold higher transpiration (E), 2.6-fold higher stomatal conductance (gs), 1.2-fold higher intercellular [CO2] (Ci), and 3.4-fold lower water use efficiency than 'interception' plants, despite comparable values of photosynthetic rate (A). E, gs, and Ci first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the N source to values even lower than those of 'interception' plants. 'Mass-flow' plants accumulated phosphorus and potassium, and had maximum concentrations at 10mm from the N source. Overall, N availability regulated transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients from substrate zones that were inaccessible to roots. Thus when water is available, mass-flow may partially substitute for root density in providing access to nutrients without incurring the costs of root extension, although the efficacy of mass-flow also depends on soil nutrient retention and hydraulic properties. PMID:24231035

  13. Nitrogen regulation of transpiration controls mass-flow acquisition of nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Matimati, Ignatious

    2014-01-01

    Transpiration may enhance mass-flow of nutrients to roots, especially in low-nutrient soils or where the root system is not extensively developed. Previous work suggested that nitrogen (N) may regulate mass-flow of nutrients. Experiments were conducted to determine whether N regulates water fluxes, and whether this regulation has a functional role in controlling the mass-flow of nutrients to roots. Phaseolus vulgaris were grown in troughs designed to create an N availability gradient by restricting roots from intercepting a slow-release N source, which was placed at one of six distances behind a 25 μm mesh from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (termed ‘mass-flow’ treatment). Control plants had the N source supplied directly to their root zone so that N was available through interception, mass-flow, and diffusion (termed ‘interception’ treatment). ‘Mass-flow’ plants closest to the N source exhibited 2.9-fold higher transpiration (E), 2.6-fold higher stomatal conductance (g s), 1.2-fold higher intercellular [CO2] (C i), and 3.4-fold lower water use efficiency than ‘interception’ plants, despite comparable values of photosynthetic rate (A). E, g s, and C i first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the N source to values even lower than those of ‘interception’ plants. ‘Mass-flow’ plants accumulated phosphorus and potassium, and had maximum concentrations at 10mm from the N source. Overall, N availability regulated transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients from substrate zones that were inaccessible to roots. Thus when water is available, mass-flow may partially substitute for root density in providing access to nutrients without incurring the costs of root extension, although the efficacy of mass-flow also depends on soil nutrient retention and hydraulic properties. PMID:24231035

  14. Transpiration during life cycle in controlled wheat growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rummel, John D.

    1989-01-01

    A previously-developed model of wheat growth, designed for convenient incorporation into system-level models of advanced space life support systems is described. The model is applied to data from an experiment that grew wheat under controlled conditions and measured fresh biomass and cumulated transpiration as a function of time. The adequacy of modeling the transpiration as proportional to the inedible biomass, and an age factor which varies during the life cycle, are examined. Results indicate that during the main phase of vegetative growth in the first half of the life cycle, the rate of transpiration per unit mass of inedible biomass is more than double the rate during the phase of grain development and maturation during latter half of the life cycle.

  15. An experimental set-up to study carbon, water, and nitrate uptake rates by hydroponically grown plants.

    PubMed

    Andriolo, J L; Le Bot, J; Gary, C; Sappe, G; Orlando, P; Brunel, B; Sarrouy, C

    1996-01-01

    The experimental system described allows concomitant hourly measurements of CO2, H2O, and NO3 uptake rates by plants grown hydroponically in a greenhouse. Plants are enclosed in an airtight chamber through which air flows at a controlled speed. Carbon dioxide exchange and transpiration rates are determined from respective differences of concentrations of CO2 and water vapor of the air at the system inlet and outlet. This set-up is based on the "open-system" principle with improvements made on existing systems. For instance, propeller anemometers are used to monitor air flow rates in the chamber. From their signal it is possible to continuously adjust air speed to changing environmental conditions and plant activity. The air temperature inside the system therefore never rises above that outside. Water and NO3 uptake rates are calculated at time intervals from changes in the volume and the NO3 concentration of the nutrient solution in contact with the roots. The precise measurement of the volume of solution is achieved using a balance which has a higher precision than any liquid level sensors. Nitrate concentration is determined in the laboratory from aliquots of solution sampled at time intervals. A number of test runs are reported which validate the measurements and confirm undisturbed conditions within the system. Results of typical diurnal changes in CO2, H2O, and NO3 uptake rates by fruiting tomato plants are also presented. PMID:11541097

  16. Transpiration as landfill leachate phytotoxicity indicator.

    PubMed

    Białowiec, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    An important aspect of constructed wetlands design for landfill leachate treatment is the assessment of landfill leachate phytotoxicity. Intravital methods of plants response observation are required both for lab scale toxicity testing and field examination of plants state. The study examined the toxic influence of two types of landfill leachate from landfill in Zakurzewo (L1) and landfill in Wola Pawłowska (L2) on five plant species: reed Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud, manna grass Glyceria maxima (Hartm.) Holmb., bulrush Schoenoplectus lacustris (L.) Palla, sweet flag Acorus calamus L., and miscanthus Miscanthus floridulus (Labill) Warb. Transpiration measurement was used as indicator of plants response. The lowest effective concentration causing the toxic effect (LOEC) for each leachate type and plant species was estimated. Plants with the highest resistance to toxic factors found in landfill leachate were: sweet flag, bulrush, and reed. The LOEC values for these plants were, respectively, 17%, 16%, 9% in case of leachate L1 and 21%, 18%, 14% in case of L2. Leachate L1 was more toxic than L2 due to a higher pH value under similar ammonia nitrogen content, i.e. pH 8.74 vs. pH 8.00. PMID:25708408

  17. Temporal variations of the 18O/16O signal of the whole-canopy transpiration in a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Xuhui; Kim, Kyounghee; Smith, Ronald

    2007-09-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of water vapor isotopes plays an important role in the global atmospheric 18O-CO2 and 18O-O2 budgets. In this paper, we report the results of the first continuous measurements of isotope ratios of water vapor and the evapotranspiration flux in a temperate forest over one full growing season. We found that the 18O/16O isotopic signal of the whole-canopy transpiration (δT) was not in steady state with respect to plant source water. The departure from steady state was greatest at night and on days of low transpiration rates. Relative humidity was an important driver on timescales shorter than a few hours; on the diurnal timescale, the nonsteady state behavior was driven by relative humidity and the covarying transpiration rate. On average, δT was lowest in midmorning and highest at midnight, with an average peak-to-peak variation on the order of 15‰ over the growing season. A diurnal variation of 60‰ or more was observed on some days. On the seasonal timescale, δT was tightly coupled with the precipitation isotope ratio in the early growing season and fluctuated around the isotope ratio of the stem water of overstory trees in the late growing season. The temporal shift suggests that the forest switched its water source from the shallow to the deep soil pool and that the overstory trees dominated the whole stand transpiration in the late growing season. Using isotopic partitioning, we estimated that the overstory trees contributed roughly 70% to the whole-stand transpiration water loss during the growing season.

  18. The positive effect of skin transpiration in peach fruit growth.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Brunella; Manfrini, Luigi; Losciale, Pasquale; Zibordi, Marco; Corelli-Grappadelli, Luca

    2010-09-01

    The effect of fruit transpiration on the mechanisms driving peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) daily growth was investigated. In peach, fruit water losses increase during the season and might play a key role in determining fruit growth. Skin transpiration was reduced during the cell expansion stage by enclosing fruit in plastic bags fitted with holes. In the first year, diameter changes of bagged and control fruit were precisely monitored for 15 days, and percentage dry matter and soluble solids content were determined during the experiment and at harvest. In the second year, midday fruit water potential, daily patterns of fruit growth and of vascular and transpiration flows were monitored. Bagging reduced fruit daily growth on some days, and negatively affected both fruit dry matter percentage and soluble solids content. Fruit transpiration rate was reduced during the midday hours, thus increasing midday fruit water potential and lowering xylem inflows. In accordance with the Münch hypothesis on traslocation, these conditions likely decreased the necessary gradient needed for the transport of phloem sap to sink organs, as in the afternoon, bagged fruit showed lower phloem inflows. These data suggest that skin transpiration in peach has a positive effect on fruit growth, as it enhances fruit phloem import. PMID:20417987

  19. Environmental controls on saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) transpiration and stomatal conductance and implications for determining evapotranspiration by remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.; morino, K.

    2012-12-01

    /day, while LAI varied over a narrower range, from 2.0 - 2.9. Differences in leaf-level transpiration were due to differences in stomatal conductance among sites. Sites close to the river had higher transpiration rates than sites further away, and sites with more saline water had lower leaf-level transpiration rates. Leaf-level transpiration rates were higher in June and July, when aquifers were closer to the surface, than in August and September, when water levels had dropped. High transpiration rates were associated with finer textured soil compared to plants growing in sandy soils. Low transpiration rates were manifested by moderate to severe midday depression of stomatal conductance and transpiration. These limitations constrained the rate of saltcedar ET to about 40% of ETo, and also reduced the accuracy of remote sensing estimates of ET, which assume a constant rate of stomatal conductance during midday.

  20. Transpiring Cooling of a Scram-Jet Engine Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Song, Kyo D.; Ries,Heidi

    1997-01-01

    The peak cold-wall heating rate generated in a combustion chamber of a scram-jet engine can exceed 2000 Btu/sq ft sec (approx. 2344 W/sq cm). Therefore, a very effective heat dissipation mechanism is required to sustain such a high heating load. This research focused on the transpiration cooling mechanism that appears to be a promising approach to remove a large amount of heat from the engine wall. The transpiration cooling mechanism has two aspects. First, initial computations suggest that there is a reduction, as much as 75%, in the heat flux incident on the combustion chamber wall due to the transpirant modifying the combustor boundary layer. Secondly, the heat reaching the combustor wall is removed from the structure in a very effective manner by the transpirant. It is the second of these two mechanisms that is investigated experimentally in the subject paper. A transpiration cooling experiment using a radiant heating method, that provided a heat flux as high as 200 Btu/sq ft sec ( approx. 234 W/sq cm) on the surface of a specimen, was performed. The experiment utilized an arc-lamp facility (60-kW radiant power output) to provide a uniform heat flux to a test specimen. For safety reasons, helium gas was used as the transpirant in the experiments. The specimens were 1.9-cm diameter sintered, powdered-stainless-steel tubes of various porosities and a 2.54cm square tube with perforated multi-layered walls. A 15-cm portion of each specimen was heated. The cooling effectivenes and efficiencies by transpiration for each specimen were obtained using the experimental results. During the testing, various test specimens displayed a choking phenomenon in which the transpirant flow was limited as the heat flux was increased. The paper includes a preliminary analysis of the transpiration cooling mechanism and a scaling conversion study that translates the results from helium tests into the case when a hydrogen medium is used.

  1. Photosynthetic Rate of Soybean at Various Planting Dates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] yield is typically maximized by early planting in the upper Midwest USA. Seasonal carbon dioxide exchange rate (CER) has not been quantified to explain the positive yield response to early planting. Five planting dates were established between 18-April and 22-May nea...

  2. Gas-phase and transpiration-driven mechanisms for volatilization through wetland macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Reid, Matthew C; Jaffé, Peter R

    2012-05-15

    Natural and constructed wetlands have gained attention as potential tools for remediation of shallow sediments and groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Wetland macrophytes are known to enhance rates of contaminant removal via volatilization, but the magnitude of different volatilization mechanisms, and the relationship between volatilization rates and contaminant physiochemical properties, remain poorly understood. Greenhouse mesocosm experiments using the volatile tracer sulfur hexafluoride were conducted to determine the relative magnitudes of gas-phase and transpiration-driven volatilization mechanisms. A numerical model for vegetation-mediated volatilization was developed, calibrated with tracer measurements, and used to predict plant-mediated volatilization of common VOCs as well as quantify the contribution of different volatilization pathways. Model simulations agree with conclusions from previous work that transpiration is the main driver for volatilization of VOCs, but also demonstrate that vapor-phase transport in wetland plants is significant, and can represent up to 50% of the total flux for compounds with greater volatility like vinyl chloride. PMID:22509995

  3. Tamarix transpiration along a semiarid river has negligible impact on water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Alyson K.; Wilcox, Bradford P.; Moore, Georgianne W.; Hart, Charles R.; Sheng, Zhuping; Owens, M. Keith

    2015-07-01

    The proliferation of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) along regulated rivers in the western United States has transformed riparian plant communities. It is commonly assumed that transpiration by these alien plants has led to large losses of water that would otherwise contribute to streamflow. Control of saltcedar, therefore, has been considered a viable strategy for conserving water and increasing streamflow in these regions. In an effort to better understand the linkage between transpiration by saltcedar and streamflow, we monitored transpiration, stream stage, and groundwater elevations within a saltcedar stand along the Pecos River during June 2004. Transpiration, as determined by sap flow measurements, exhibited a strong diel pattern; stream stage did not. Diel fluctuations in groundwater levels were observed, but only in one well, which was located in the center of the saltcedar stand. In that well, the correlation between maximal transpiration and minimal groundwater elevation was weak (R2 = 0.16). No effects of transpiration were detected in other wells within the saltcedar stand, nor in the stream stage. The primary reason, we believe, is that the saltcedar stand along this reach of the Pecos River has relatively low sapwood area and a limited spatial extent resulting in very low transpiration compared with the stream discharge. Our results are important because they provide a mechanistic explanation for the lack of increase in streamflow following large-scale control of invasive trees along semiarid rivers.

  4. Transpiration of urban trees and its cooling effect in a high latitude city.

    PubMed

    Konarska, Janina; Uddling, Johan; Holmer, Björn; Lutz, Martina; Lindberg, Fredrik; Pleijel, Håkan; Thorsson, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    An important ecosystem service provided by urban trees is the cooling effect caused by their transpiration. The aim of this study was to quantify the magnitude of daytime and night-time transpiration of common urban tree species in a high latitude city (Gothenburg, Sweden), to analyse the influence of weather conditions and surface permeability on the tree transpiration, and to find out whether tree transpiration contributed to daytime or nocturnal cooling. Stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration at day and night were measured on mature street and park trees of seven common tree species in Gothenburg: Tilia europaea, Quercus robur, Betula pendula, Acer platanoides, Aesculus hippocastanum, Fagus sylvatica and Prunus serrulata. Transpiration increased with vapour pressure deficit and photosynthetically active radiation. Midday rates of sunlit leaves ranged from less than 1 mmol m(-2) s(-1) (B. pendula) to over 3 mmol m(-2) s(-1) (Q. robur). Daytime stomatal conductance was positively related to the fraction of permeable surfaces within the vertically projected crown area. A simple estimate of available rainwater, comprising of precipitation sum and fractional surface permeability within the crown area, was found to explain 68% of variation in midday stomatal conductance. Night-time transpiration was observed in all studied species and amounted to 7 and 20% of midday transpiration of sunlit and shaded leaves, respectively. With an estimated night-time latent heat flux of 24 W m(-2), tree transpiration significantly increased the cooling rate around and shortly after sunset, but not later in the night. Despite a strong midday latent heat flux of 206 W m(-2), a cooling effect of tree transpiration was not observed during the day. PMID:26048702

  5. Transpiration of urban trees and its cooling effect in a high latitude city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konarska, Janina; Uddling, Johan; Holmer, Björn; Lutz, Martina; Lindberg, Fredrik; Pleijel, Håkan; Thorsson, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    An important ecosystem service provided by urban trees is the cooling effect caused by their transpiration. The aim of this study was to quantify the magnitude of daytime and night-time transpiration of common urban tree species in a high latitude city (Gothenburg, Sweden), to analyse the influence of weather conditions and surface permeability on the tree transpiration, and to find out whether tree transpiration contributed to daytime or nocturnal cooling. Stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration at day and night were measured on mature street and park trees of seven common tree species in Gothenburg: Tilia europaea, Quercus robur, Betula pendula, Acer platanoides, Aesculus hippocastanum, Fagus sylvatica and Prunus serrulata. Transpiration increased with vapour pressure deficit and photosynthetically active radiation. Midday rates of sunlit leaves ranged from less than 1 mmol m-2 s-1 ( B. pendula) to over 3 mmol m-2 s-1 ( Q. robur). Daytime stomatal conductance was positively related to the fraction of permeable surfaces within the vertically projected crown area. A simple estimate of available rainwater, comprising of precipitation sum and fractional surface permeability within the crown area, was found to explain 68 % of variation in midday stomatal conductance. Night-time transpiration was observed in all studied species and amounted to 7 and 20 % of midday transpiration of sunlit and shaded leaves, respectively. With an estimated night-time latent heat flux of 24 W m-2, tree transpiration significantly increased the cooling rate around and shortly after sunset, but not later in the night. Despite a strong midday latent heat flux of 206 W m-2, a cooling effect of tree transpiration was not observed during the day.

  6. Transpiration in an oil palm landscape: effects of palm age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röll, A.; Niu, F.; Meijide, A.; Hardanto, A.; Hendrayanto; Knohl, A.; Hölscher, D.

    2015-06-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantations cover large and continuously increasing areas of humid tropical lowlands. Landscapes dominated by oil palms usually consist of a mosaic of mono-cultural, homogeneous stands of varying age, which may be heterogeneous in their water use characteristics. However, studies on the water use characteristics of oil palms are still at an early stage and there is a lack of knowledge on how oil palm expansion will affect the major components of the hydrological cycle. To provide first insights into hydrological landscape-level consequences of oil palm cultivation, we derived transpiration rates of oil palms in stands of varying age, estimated the contribution of palm transpiration to evapotranspiration, and analyzed the influence of fluctuations in environmental variables on oil palm water use. We studied 15 two- to 25 year old stands in the lowlands of Jambi, Indonesia. A sap flux technique with an oil palm specific calibration and sampling scheme was used to derive leaf-, palm- and stand-level water use rates in all stands under comparable environmental conditions. Additionally, in a two- and a 12 year old stand, eddy covariance measurements were conducted to derive evapotranspiration rates. Water use rates per leaf and palm increased 5-fold from an age of two years to a stand age of approx. 10 years and then remained relatively constant. A similar trend was visible, but less pronounced, for estimated stand transpiration rates of oil palms; they varied 12-fold, from 0.2 mm day-1 in a 2 year old to 2.5 mm day-1 in a 12 year old stand, showing particularly high variability in transpiration rates among medium-aged stands. Confronting sap flux and eddy-covariance derived water fluxes suggests that transpiration contributed 8 % to evapotranspiration in the 2 year old stand and 53 % in the 12 year old stand, indicating variable and substantial additional sources of evaporation, e.g. from the soil, the ground vegetation and from trunk

  7. Uncertainty in the response of transpiration to CO2 and implications for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengis, N.; Keller, D. P.; Eby, M.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-09-01

    While terrestrial precipitation is a societally highly relevant climate variable, there is little consensus among climate models about its projected 21st century changes. An important source of precipitable water over land is plant transpiration. Plants control transpiration by opening and closing their stomata. The sensitivity of this process to increasing CO2 concentrations is uncertain. To assess the impact of this uncertainty on future climate, we perform experiments with an intermediate complexity Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) for a range of model-imposed transpiration-sensitivities to CO2. Changing the sensitivity of transpiration to CO2 causes simulated terrestrial precipitation to change by -10% to +27% by 2100 under a high emission scenario. This study emphasises the importance of an improved assessment of the dynamics of environmental impact on vegetation to better predict future changes of the terrestrial hydrological and carbon cycles.

  8. Uncertainty in the response of transpiration to CO2 and implications for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengis, Nadine; Keller, David; Eby, Michael; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    While terrestrial precipitation is a societally highly relevant climate variable, there is little consensus among climate models about its projected 21st century changes. The main source of precipitable water over land is plant transpiration. Plants control transpiration by opening and closing their stomata. The sensitivity of this process to increasing CO2 concentrations is uncertain. To assess the impact of this uncertainty on future climate, we perform experiments with an intermediate complexity Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) for a range of model-imposed transpiration-sensitivities to CO2. Changing the sensitivity of transpiration to CO2 causes simulated terrestrial precipitation to change by -10 % to +27 % by 2100 under a high emission scenario. This study emphasises the importance of an improved assessment of the dynamics of environmental impact on vegetation to better predict future changes of the terrestrial hydrological and carbon cycle.

  9. Decreased transpiration in poplar trees exposed to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.L.; Ramer, L.A.; Guffey, A.P.; Schnoor, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The improper handling of the toxic compound 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) has led to the contamination of soil and groundwater, and the uptake of TNT by a variety of plants has been established. This article discusses the effects of various concentrations of the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on the transpiration of hybrid poplar trees growing in hydroponic media. Transpiration was measured daily by gravimetric means. The rapid removal of TNT from hydroponic solutions was a result of plant uptake and required a daily dosage of TNT to ensure a relatively constant exposure over time. Transpiration decreased with increasing TNT concentrations {ge}5 mg/L. Decreases in transpiration were accompanied by leaf chlorosis and abscission. A comparison between a laboratory study and a pilot-scale experiment showed good scale-up potential.

  10. Spatial Variability of Tree Transpiration Along a Soil Drainage Gradient of Boreal Black Spruce Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, J. L.; Ewers, B. E.; Kwon, H.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Amiro, B.; Gower, S. T.

    2008-12-01

    results of Picea mariana differed between drainage conditions when expressed per unit xylem area with trees in poorly-drained soils experiencing higher rates than trees in well-drained areas (101.79 and 83.02 g cm-2 day-1 respectively). In contrast, when expressed as transpiration per tree, trees on well-drained soils had higher rates than those in poorly-drained locations (366.96 and 216.82 g tree-1 day-1 respectively). This indicates that tree size, reflected in sapwood area per ground area, which is constrained by anaerobic conditions across well- to poorly-drained areas, is driving differences in tree transpiration. Initial spatial analyses show that spatial autocorrelation decreases from 51.3 to 24.6 meters as D increases from 0.9 to 2.1 kPa. This phenomenon is explained by tree hydraulics and more patchy stomatal response as trees regulate water loss. Thus, regional scale bottom-up process models of boreal forest transpiration can be simplified with respect to soil drainage while retaining mechanistic rigor with respect to plant hydraulics.

  11. Transpiration in an oil palm landscape: effects of palm age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röll, A.; Niu, F.; Meijide, A.; Hardanto, A.; Hendrayanto; Knohl, A.; Hölscher, D.

    2015-10-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantations cover large and continuously increasing areas of humid tropical lowlands. Landscapes dominated by oil palms usually consist of a mosaic of mono-cultural, homogeneous stands of varying age, which may be heterogeneous in their water use characteristics. However, studies on the water use characteristics of oil palms are still at an early stage and there is a lack of knowledge on how oil palm expansion will affect the major components of the hydrological cycle. To provide first insights into hydrological landscape-level consequences of oil palm cultivation, we derived transpiration rates of oil palms in stands of varying age, estimated the contribution of palm transpiration to evapotranspiration, and analyzed the influence of fluctuations in environmental variables on oil palm water use. We studied 15 two- to 25-year old stands in the lowlands of Jambi, Indonesia. A sap flux technique with an oil palm specific calibration and sampling scheme was used to derive leaf-, palm- and stand-level water use rates in all stands under comparable environmental conditions. Additionally, in a two- and a 12-year old stand, eddy covariance measurements were conducted to derive evapotranspiration rates. Water use rates per leaf and palm increased 5-fold from an age of 2 years to a stand age of approx. 10 years and then remained relatively constant. A similar trend was visible, but less pronounced, for estimated stand transpiration rates of oil palms; they varied 12-fold, from 0.2 mm day-1 in a 2-year old to 2.5 mm day-1 in a 12-year old stand, showing particularly high variability in transpiration rates among medium-aged stands. Comparing sap flux and eddy-covariance derived water fluxes suggests that transpiration contributed 8 % to evapotranspiration in the 2-year old stand and 53 % in the 12-year old stand, indicating variable and substantial additional sources of evaporation, e.g., from the soil, the ground vegetation and from trunk

  12. Transpiration Cooling Of Hypersonic Blunt Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Results on analytical approximation and numerical simulation compared. Report presents theoretical study of degree to which transpiration blocks heating of blunt, axisymmetric body by use of injected air. Transpiration cooling proposed to reduce operating temperatures on nose cones of proposed hypersonic aerospace vehicles. Analyses important in design of thermal protection for such vehicles.

  13. Transpiration of shrub species, Alnus firma under changing atmospheric environments in montane area, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Maruyama, A.; Inoue, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the large caldera of Mt. Aso in Japan, grasslands have been traditionally managed by the farmers. Due to changes in the social structure of the region, a large area of the grassland has been abandoned and was invaded by the shrubs with different hydrological and ecophysiological traits. Ecophysiological traits and their responses to seasonally changing environments are fundamental to project the transpiration rates under changing air and soil water environments, but less is understood. We measured the tree- and leaf-level ecophysiological traits of a shrub, Alnus firma in montane region where both rainfall and soil water content drastically changes seasonally. Sap flux reached the annual peak in evaporative summer (July-August) both in 2013 and 2014, although the duration was limited within a short period due to the prolonged rainy season before summer (2014) and rapid decrease in the air vapor pressure deficit (D) in late summer. Leaf ecophysiological traits in close relationship with gas exchange showed modest seasonal changes and the values were kept at relatively high levels typical in plants with nitrogen fixation under nutrient-poor environments. Stomatal conductance, which was measured at leaf-level measurements and sap flux measurements, showed responses to D, which coincided with the theoretical response for isohydric leaves. A multilayer model, which estimates stand-level transpiration by scaling up the leaf-level data, successfully captured the temporal trends in sap flux, suggesting that major processes were incorporated. Thus, ecophysiological traits of A. firma were characterized by the absence of responses to seasonally changing environments and the transpiration rate was the function of the interannually variable environmental conditions.

  14. Auxin metabolism rates and implications for plant development.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Eric M; Ackelsberg, Ethan M

    2015-01-01

    Studies of auxin metabolism rarely express their results as a metabolic rate, although the data obtained would often permit such a calculation to be made. We analyze data from 31 previously published papers to quantify the rates of auxin biosynthesis, conjugation, conjugate hydrolysis, and catabolism in seed plants. Most metabolic pathways have rates in the range 10 nM/h-1 μM/h, with the exception of auxin conjugation, which has rates as high as ~100 μM/h. The high rates of conjugation suggest that auxin metabolic sinks may be very small, perhaps as small as a single cell. By contrast, the relatively low rate of auxin biosynthesis requires plants to conserve and recycle auxin during long-distance transport. The consequences for plant development are discussed. PMID:25852709

  15. Auxin metabolism rates and implications for plant development

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Eric M.; Ackelsberg, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of auxin metabolism rarely express their results as a metabolic rate, although the data obtained would often permit such a calculation to be made. We analyze data from 31 previously published papers to quantify the rates of auxin biosynthesis, conjugation, conjugate hydrolysis, and catabolism in seed plants. Most metabolic pathways have rates in the range 10 nM/h–1 μM/h, with the exception of auxin conjugation, which has rates as high as ~100 μM/h. The high rates of conjugation suggest that auxin metabolic sinks may be very small, perhaps as small as a single cell. By contrast, the relatively low rate of auxin biosynthesis requires plants to conserve and recycle auxin during long-distance transport. The consequences for plant development are discussed. PMID:25852709

  16. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber

  17. Plant respirometer enables high resolution of oxygen consumption rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Plant respirometer permits high resolution of relatively small changes in the rate of oxygen consumed by plant organisms undergoing oxidative metabolism in a nonphotosynthetic state. The two stage supply and monitoring system operates by a differential pressure transducer and provides a calibrated output by digital or analog signals.

  18. Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R.

    2006-07-01

    relationship between plant transpiration, soil moisture, and groundwater flow in a phyto-remediation system. The existing monitoring program was expanded in 2004 in order to evaluate the interactions among these processes. The purpose of this monitoring program was to determine the rate of contaminant removal and to more accurately predict the amount of time needed to remediate the contaminated groundwater. Initial planting occurred in 1999 at the X-740 area, with additional replanting in 2001 and 2002. In 2003, coring of selected trees and chemical analyses illustrated the presence of TCE; however, little impact was observed in groundwater levels, analytical monitoring, and periodic tree diameter monitoring at the X-740 area. To provide better understanding of how these phyto-remediation systems work, a portable weather station was installed at the X-740 area to provide data for estimating transpiration and two different systems for measuring sap flow and sap velocity were outfitted to numerous trees. After evaluating and refining the groundwater flow and contaminant transport models, the data gathered by these two inventive methods can be used to establish a rate of contaminant removal and to better predict the time required in order to meet remediation goals for the phyto-remediation systems located at the PORTS site. (authors)

  19. Mostly Plants. Individualized Biology Activities on: I. Investigating Bread Mold; II. Transpiration; III. Botany Project; IV. Collecting/Preserving/Identifying Leaves; [and] V. Student Science Laboratory Write-Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Paul R.

    Individualized biology activities for secondary students are presented in this teaching guide. The guide is divided into five sections: (1) investigating bread mold; (2) investigating transpiration; (3) completing a botany project; (4) collecting, preserving, and identifying leaves; and (5) writing up science laboratory investigations. The…

  20. Nitrogen assimilation and transpiration: key processes conditioning responsiveness of wheat to elevated [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Iván; Aroca, Ricardo; Garnica, María; Zamarreño, Ángel M; García-Mina, José M; Serret, Maria D; Parry, Martin; Irigoyen, Juan J; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-11-01

    Although climate scenarios have predicted an increase in [CO(2)] and temperature conditions, to date few experiments have focused on the interaction of [CO(2)] and temperature effects in wheat development. Recent evidence suggests that photosynthetic acclimation is linked to the photorespiration and N assimilation inhibition of plants exposed to elevated CO(2). The main goal of this study was to analyze the effect of interacting [CO(2)] and temperature on leaf photorespiration, C/N metabolism and N transport in wheat plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature conditions. For this purpose, wheat plants were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] (400 vs 700 µmol mol(-1)) and temperature (ambient vs ambient + 4°C) in CO(2) gradient greenhouses during the entire life cycle. Although at the agronomic level, elevated temperature had no effect on plant biomass, physiological analyses revealed that combined elevated [CO(2)] and temperature negatively affected photosynthetic performance. The limited energy levels resulting from the reduced respiratory and photorespiration rates of such plants were apparently inadequate to sustain nitrate reductase activity. Inhibited N assimilation was associated with a strong reduction in amino acid content, conditioned leaf soluble protein content and constrained leaf N status. Therefore, the plant response to elevated [CO(2)] and elevated temperature resulted in photosynthetic acclimation. The reduction in transpiration rates induced limitations in nutrient transport in leaves of plants exposed to elevated [CO(2)] and temperature, led to mineral depletion and therefore contributed to the inhibition of photosynthetic activity. PMID:25958969

  1. Modeling the uptake and transpiration of TCE using phreatophytic trees. Master`s Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.P.

    1997-12-01

    Phytoremediation is a recent addition to the numerous methods used today to remediate ground water contaminants. It is proving more effective and efficient compared to existing remediation techniques. The use of phreatophytes, or water seeking trees, has great potential for phytoremediation. These trees are fast growing, long lived, grow their roots down to the ground water table, transpire large amounts of water, and are proven to actively remove contaminants from the soil horizon. The purpose of this research is to develop quantitative concepts for understanding the dynamics of TCE uptake and transpiration by phreatophytic trees over a short rotation woody crop time frame. This will he done by constructing a system dynamics model of this process and running it over a wide range of conditions. This research will offer managers a tool to simulate long-term uptake and transpiration of TCE at potential sites. The results of this study indicate that TCE is actively removed from the soil horizon by phreatophytic trees and a significant proportion of this TCE is then transpired. Changes in soil horizon parameters, xylem flow rates, and variables in the uptake equation greatly influence TCE uptake rates as well as transpiration. Also, parameters used in equations representing flows in and out of the leaf greatly influence transpiration. Better understanding of these processes is essential for managers to accurately predict the amount of TCE removed and transpired during potential phytoremediation projects.

  2. Habitat Temperature and Precipitation of Arabidopsis thaliana Ecotypes Determine the Response of Foliar Vasculature, Photosynthesis, and Transpiration to Growth Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Adams, William W.; Stewart, Jared J.; Cohu, Christopher M.; Muller, Onno; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Acclimatory adjustments of foliar vascular architecture, photosynthetic capacity, and transpiration rate in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes (Italian, Polish [Col-0], Swedish) were characterized in the context of habitat of origin. Temperatures of the habitat of origin decreased linearly with increasing habitat latitude, but habitat precipitation was greatest in Italy, lowest in Poland, and intermediate in Sweden. Plants of the three ecotypes raised under three different growth temperature regimes (low, moderate, and high) exhibited highest photosynthetic capacities, greatest leaf thickness, highest chlorophyll a/b ratio and levels of β-carotene, and greatest levels of wall ingrowths in phloem transfer cells, and, in the Col-0 and Swedish ecotypes, of phloem per minor vein in plants grown at the low temperature. In contrast, vein density and minor vein tracheary to sieve element ratio increased with increasing growth temperature – most strongly in Col-0 and least strongly in the Italian ecotype – and transpirational water loss correlated with vein density and number of tracheary elements per minor vein. Plotting of these vascular features as functions of climatic conditions in the habitat of origin suggested that temperatures during the evolutionary history of the ecotypes determined acclimatory responses of the foliar phloem and photosynthesis to temperature in this winter annual that upregulates photosynthesis in response to lower temperature, whereas the precipitation experienced during the evolutionary history of the ecotypes determined adjustment of foliar vein density, xylem, and transpiration to temperature. In particular, whereas photosynthetic capacity, leaf thickness, and foliar minor vein phloem features increased linearly with increasing latitude and decreasing temperature of the habitats of origin in response to experimental growth at low temperature, transpiration rate, foliar vein density, and minor vein tracheary element numbers and cross

  3. Habitat Temperature and Precipitation of Arabidopsis thaliana Ecotypes Determine the Response of Foliar Vasculature, Photosynthesis, and Transpiration to Growth Temperature.

    PubMed

    Adams, William W; Stewart, Jared J; Cohu, Christopher M; Muller, Onno; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Acclimatory adjustments of foliar vascular architecture, photosynthetic capacity, and transpiration rate in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes (Italian, Polish [Col-0], Swedish) were characterized in the context of habitat of origin. Temperatures of the habitat of origin decreased linearly with increasing habitat latitude, but habitat precipitation was greatest in Italy, lowest in Poland, and intermediate in Sweden. Plants of the three ecotypes raised under three different growth temperature regimes (low, moderate, and high) exhibited highest photosynthetic capacities, greatest leaf thickness, highest chlorophyll a/b ratio and levels of β-carotene, and greatest levels of wall ingrowths in phloem transfer cells, and, in the Col-0 and Swedish ecotypes, of phloem per minor vein in plants grown at the low temperature. In contrast, vein density and minor vein tracheary to sieve element ratio increased with increasing growth temperature - most strongly in Col-0 and least strongly in the Italian ecotype - and transpirational water loss correlated with vein density and number of tracheary elements per minor vein. Plotting of these vascular features as functions of climatic conditions in the habitat of origin suggested that temperatures during the evolutionary history of the ecotypes determined acclimatory responses of the foliar phloem and photosynthesis to temperature in this winter annual that upregulates photosynthesis in response to lower temperature, whereas the precipitation experienced during the evolutionary history of the ecotypes determined adjustment of foliar vein density, xylem, and transpiration to temperature. In particular, whereas photosynthetic capacity, leaf thickness, and foliar minor vein phloem features increased linearly with increasing latitude and decreasing temperature of the habitats of origin in response to experimental growth at low temperature, transpiration rate, foliar vein density, and minor vein tracheary element numbers and cross

  4. Material Response of One-Dimensional, Steady-State Transpiration Cooling in Radiative and Convective Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, Hirotoshi

    1975-01-01

    A simplified analytical solution for thermal response of a transpiration-cooled porous heat-shield material in an intense radiative-convective heating environment is presented. Essential features of this approach are "two-flux method" for radiative transfer process and "two-temperature" assumption for solid and gas temperatures. Incident radiative-convective heatings are specified as boundary conditions. Sample results are shown using porous silica with CO2 transpiration and some parameters quantitatively show the effect on this transpiration cooling system. Summarized maps for mass injection rate, porosity and blowing correction factor for radiation are obtained in order to realize such a cooling system.

  5. Impact of the hydraulic capacity of plants on water and carbon fluxes in tropical South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Eun; Boyce, Kevin

    2010-12-01

    Angiosperms (flowering plants) have higher transpirational capacities than any other plants. Here we use climate model simulation to test the hypothesis that the high transpirational capacity of angiosperms plays a unique role in the maintenance of tropical rainforest. Their elevated transpiration rates are shown to increase recycling of precipitation up to ˜300 mm/yr (˜20% of total precipitation) averaged over the whole of tropical South America and to increase the wet season duration over the Amazon basin. Transpiration triggers convection by increasing moisture in the boundary layer and thereby decreasing atmospheric stability. If the moisture content of the boundary layer is sufficient, a double Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is generated in October around 60°W-50°W, as observed in present-day climate, and the eastern part of the Amazon basin becomes wet (˜200 mm/month of precipitation). This double ITCZ is lost, however, and the region becomes dry (<50 mm/month of precipitation) in the absence of full angiosperm transpiration. Although higher water use efficiency is usually associated with plants with lower transpiration rates, water use efficiency actually increases with higher hydraulic capacity in our simulations as a result of the higher humidity and, thus, lower vapor pressure gradient between the intercellular air space within the leaf and the external atmosphere. We speculate that the high transpirational capacity of angiosperms played a significant role in the expansion of tropical rain forest.

  6. Transpiration And Regenerative Cooling Of Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    Transpiration cooling extends limits of performance. Addition of transpiration cooling to regeneratively-cooled rocket-engine combustion chamber proposed. Modification improves performance of engine by allowing use of higher chamber pressure. Throat section of combustion-chamber wall cooled by transpiration, while chamber and nozzle sections cooled by fluid flowing in closed channels. Concept applicable to advanced, high-performance terrestrial engines or some kinds of industrial combustion chambers. With proper design, cooling scheme makes possible to achieve higher chamber pressure and higher overall performance in smaller engine.

  7. Resistance to Water Flow in the Sorghum Plant 1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Wayne S.; Ritchie, Joe T.

    1980-01-01

    Knowledge of the location and magnitude of the resistance to water flow in a plant is fundamental for describing whole plant response to water stress. The reported magnitudes of these resistances vary widely, principally because of the difficulty of measuring water potential within the plant. A number of interrelated experiments are described in which the water potential of a covered, nontranspiring leaf attached to a transpiring sorghum plant (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) was used as a measure of the potential at the root-shoot junction. This allowed a descriptive evaluation of plant resistance to be made. The water potentials of a covered, nontranspiring leaf and a nonabsorbing root in solution, both attached to an otherwise actively transpiring and absorbing plant, were found to be similar. This supported the hypothesis that covered leaf water potential was equilibrating at a point shared by the vascular connections of both leaves and roots, i.e. the nodal complex of the root-shoot junction or crown. The difference in potential between a covered and exposed leaf together with calculated individual leaf transpiration rates were used to evaluate the resistance between the plant crown and the exposed leaf lamina called the connection resistance. There was an apparent decrease in the connection resistance as the transpiration rate increased; this is qualitatively explained as plant capacitance. Assuming that the covered leaf water potential was equal to that in the root xylem at the point of water absorption in the experimental plants with relatively short root axes, calculated radial root resistances were strongly dependent on the transpiration rate. For plants with moderate to high transpiration rates the roots had a slightly larger resistance than the shoots. PMID:16661138

  8. Transpiration characteristics of forests and shrubland under land cover change within the large caldera of Mt. Aso, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Inoue, A.; Maruyama, A.

    2013-12-01

    Grassland within a caldera of Mt. Aso has been maintained for fertilizer production from grasses and cattle feeding. Due to the changes in the agricultural and social structure since 1950's, a large part of the grassland was converted to plantations or abandoned to shrublands. Because vegetations of different plant functional types differ in evapotranspiration; ET, a research project was launched to examine the effects of the ongoing land use change on the ET within the caldera, and consequently affect the surface and groundwater discharge of the region. As the part of the project, transpiration rate; E of the major 3 forest types were investigated using sap flow measurements. Based on the measured data, stomatal conductance; Gs was inversely calculated and its response to the environmental factors was modeled using Jarvis-type equation in order to estimate ET of a given part of the caldera based on the plant functional type and the weather data. The selected forests were conifer plantation, deciduous broadleaved plantation and shrubland, which were installed with sap flow sensors to calculate stand-level transpiration rate. Sap flux; Js did not show clear differences among sites despite the large differences in sapwood area. In early summer solar radiation was limited to low levels due to frequent rainfall events and therefore, Js was the function of solar radiation rather than other environmental factors, such as vapor pressure deficit and soil water content. Gs was well regressed with the vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation. The estimated E based on Gs model and the weather data was 0.3-1.2 mm day-1 for each site and was comparable to the E of grassland in other study sites. Results suggested that transpiration rate in growing was not different between vegetations but its annual value are thought to differ due to the different phenology.

  9. Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

  10. Uptake rate of nitrogen dioxide by potato plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sinn, J.P.; Pell, E.J.; Kabel, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Greenhouse-grown potato plants were exposed to nitrogen dioxide in an exposure chamber to determine the rate of NO/sub 2/ uptake at concentrations from 228 to 817 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ (0.12-0.43 ppm). Results show that a consistent increase in uptake rate accompanied an increase in NO/sub 2/ exposure concentrations. Exposure in the range of concentration had no significant effect on leaf diffusive resistance.

  11. PLANT CULTURAL SYSTEM FOR MONITORING EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A plant culture system incorporating the water-table root-screen method for controlling plant water status was adapted for use in open-top field exposure chambers for studying the effects of drought stress on physiological responses. The daily transpiration rates of the plants we...

  12. Improvements in plant growth rate using underwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, K.; Takahata, J.; Watanabe, S.; Satta, N.; Yamada, O.; Fujio, T.; Sasaki, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The drainage water from plant pots was irradiated by plasma and then recycled to irrigate plants for improving the growth rate by supplying nutrients to plants and inactivating the bacteria in the bed-soil. Brassica rapa var. perviridis (Chinese cabbage; Brassica campestris) plants were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included the use of chicken droppings as a fertiliser. The water was recycled once per day from a drainage water pool and added to the bed-soil in the pots. A magnetic compression type pulsed power generator was used to produce underwater discharge with repetition rate of 250 pps. The plasma irradiation times were set as 10 and 20 minutes per day over 28 days of cultivation. The experimental results showed that the growth rate increased significantly with plasma irradiation into the drainage water. The growth rate increased with the plasma irradiation time. The nitrogen concentration of the leaves increased as a result of plasma irradiation based on chlorophyll content analysis. The bacteria in the drainage water were inactivated by the plasma irradiation.

  13. Relationships between xylem anatomy, root hydraulic conductivity, leaf/root ratio and transpiration in citrus trees on different rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gamir, Juan; Intrigliolo, Diego S; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, M Angeles

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the extent in which leaf and whole plant transpiration (Tp) were influenced by root hydraulic conductance (K(r)), leaf to root ratio and leaf mass. Also, the relationships between the anatomic characteristics of roots and K(r) were investigated. To this end, 9-month-old seedlings of the citrus rootstocks Cleopatra mandarin (CM), Poncirus trifoliata (PT), and their hybrids Forner-Alcaide no 5 (FA-5) and Forner-Alcaide no 13 (FA-13) and 15-month-old trees of Valencia orange budded on these four rootstocks were tested. The hybrid FA-13 and PT had higher values of K(r) and leaf transpiration rates (E) than FA-5 and CM. There was a positive curvilinear correlation between E and K(r). Furthermore, E levels in the different types of plants decreased with increased leaf/root (L/R) ratios. Pruning of the roots and defoliation confirmed that transpiration rates were strongly influenced by the L/R ratio. However, variations in E because of differences in L/R ratios were less pronounced in trees budded on FA-13 and PT than on the other two rootstocks. In addition, there was a positive correlation between Tp and leaf biomass, although differences between rootstocks may be attributed to differences in K(r). The average lumen diameter of xylem vessels was greater in rootstocks with high K(r). Size of epidermal and hypodermal cells of fibrous roots may also restrict K(r). PMID:20088906

  14. Global transpiration, recharge and runoff tracked with stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasechko, S.

    2015-12-01

    The transformations of precipitation into soil-, ground- or stream-water constitute fundamental components of the hydrologic cycle. Hydrometric data are well suited to track propagations of pressures through the landscape, but tell us little about the transport of water itself. Conversely, isotopic data track movements of molecules, providing quantitative insights into subsurface processes. This presentation reviews recent uses of isotopic data to quantify the velocity, storage and mixing of precipitation as it flushes into plants (1. transpiration), aquifers (2. recharge) and streams (3. runoff). (1) Plant transpiration comprises the largest flux of fresh water from the continents, exceeding global river flows by a factor of ~1.5. Mounting evidence suggests that water used by plants is poorly connected to water flowing into streams and aquifers, contrasting most earth system model parameterizations. (2) This partitioning of precipitation into "blue" (recharge, runoff) and "green" (transpiration) water storages is further evidenced by relating precipitation and groundwater isotope contents. Global precipitation-groundwater isotope data show that snowmelt pulses (extratropics) and intensive rainfall (tropics) lead to disproportionately large groundwater recharge fluxes—that is, recharge/precipitation ratios exceeding the local annual average. Across the low latitudes, these results mean that the ongoing intensification of precipitation brought on by global warming may serve to promote groundwater recharge in the tropics, where, by 2050, half of the world's population is projected to live. (3) This presentation concludes by relating precipitation and streamflow isotope contents to show that ~1/3 of global river discharges are generated by precipitation that reaches the stream in less than 3 months (i.e., "young water" in rivers). Substantial and pervasive young, month(s)-old water in global rivers means that biogeochemical processes taking place in the critical

  15. Mycorrhizal response trades off with plant growth rate and increases with plant successional status.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Liz; Bever, James D

    2015-07-01

    Early-successional plant species invest in rapid growth and reproduction in contrast to slow growing late-successional species. We test the consistency of "trade-offs between plant life history and responsiveness on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We selected four very early-, seven early-, 11 middle-, and eight late-successional plant species from six different families and functional groups and grew them with and without a mixed fungal inoculum and compared root architecture, mycorrhizal responsiveness, and plant growth rate. Our results indicate mycorrhizal responsiveness increases with plant successional stage and that this effect explains more variation in mycorrhizal response than is explained by phylogenetic relatedness. The mycorrhizal responsiveness of individual plant species was positively correlated with mycorrhizal root infection and negatively correlated with average plant mass and the number of root tips per unit mass, indicating that both plant growth rate and root architecture trade off with investment in mycorrhizal mutualisms. Because late-successional plants are very responsive to mycorrhizal fungi, our results suggest that fungal community dynamics may be an important driver of plant succession. PMID:26378299

  16. Effect of plants on sunspace passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Best, E.D.; McFarland, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of plants on sunspace thermal performance is investigated, based on experiments done in Los Alamos using two test rooms with attached sunspaces, which were essentially identical except for the presence of plants in one. Performance is related to plant transpiration, evaporation from the soil, condensation on the glazing and the absorbtance of solar energy by the lightweight leaves. Performance effects have been quantified by measurements of auxiliary heat consumption in the test rooms and analyzed by means of energy balance calculations. A method for estimating the transpiration rate is presented.

  17. Effect of different densities of the twospotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae on CO2 assimilation, transpiration, and stomatal behaviour in rose leaves.

    PubMed

    Landeros, J; Guevara, L P; Badii, M H; Flores, A E; Pámanes, A

    2004-01-01

    The effect of population density of Tetranychus urticae Koch on CO2 assimilation, transpiration and stomatal behaviour in rose leaves and on the diameter and length of stems and flower buds was investigated under greenhouse conditions. The investigation was performed in order to gain more insight into integrated control systems in rose crops grown under greenhouse conditions. Physiological processes, such as photosynthesis and transpiration, as well as stomatal behaviour and chlorophyll content, were studied as they form part of the plant's nutrition mechanism and therefore affect the quantity and quality of the flowers. Information related to the effect of spider mite population density on bloom quality, diameter and length of stems and flower buds was also collected. The data indicate that increased mite density coincides with a decrease in the net photosynthetic rate, transpiration and chlorophyll content. Higher mite densities on leaves cause stomata to remain open for longer periods, which allows a greater loss of water. Spider mite densities of 10 and 50 mites per leaf cause a reduction in flower stem length of 17 and 26%, respectively, as compared to plants with no mites present. PMID:15139084

  18. Transpiration from forest dwelling and woodland Mygalomorphae (Araneae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloudsley-Thompson, J. L.; Constantinou, C.

    1983-03-01

    Rates of water loss in dry air at room temperature (21±2°C) have been measured from seven species of forest-dwelling mygalomorph spiders. They range from 0.260% body wt h-1 in the tube-dwelling trapdoor spider Dyarcyops sp. (from the humid coastal regions of eastern Australia) to 0.030% wt h-1 in Brachypelma smithi (from drier environments in Mexico). There is a tendency for rates of transpiration to be related to the humidities of the spiders' normal environments and micro-habitats.

  19. Transpiration and canopy conductance variations of shelterbelt in an arid inland river basin of northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, G.

    2015-12-01

    The knowledge of plant water use characteristics under changing environmental conditions is essential for ecosystem management and water resources distribution in water-stressed environments. This study was conducted to quantify variations in transpiration and canopy conductance in a shelterbelt in the middle of the Heihe River Basin, China. Sap flow of eight Gansu Poplar trees (Populus gansuensis) with different diameters at breast height (DBH) was measured over three consecutive growing seasons (2012-2014). The evapotranspiration of groundwater via plant use was estimated by the White method, with diurnal water table fluctuations. Results showed that mean sap flow density varied between 30.62 ±11.44 and 101.88 ±28.98 kg m-2 h-1, and it increased linearly with the DBH. Variations of sap flow density were mainly controlled by meteorological factors in addition to water table depth. Average stand transpiration during the growing season was about 4.85 mm day-1, and it had a logarithmic relationship with reference crop evapotranspiration. Precipitation increased stand transpiration, but not at a statistically significant level (p>0.05). The recharge of soil water by irrigation significantly accelerated stand transpiration (p<0.05). Stand transpiration and canopy conductance increased by 27% and 31%, respectively, when soil water conditions changed from dry to wet. Canopy conductance decreased logarithmically with vapor pressure deficit, whereas there was no apparent relationship between canopy conductance and solar radiation. The sensitivity of canopy conductance to vapor pressure deficit decreased under dry soil conditions. Groundwater evapotranspiration (0.6-7.1 mm day-1) was linearly correlated with stand transpiration (1.1-6.5 mm day-1) (R2 = 0.71). During the drought period, approximately 80% of total stand transpiration came from groundwater evapotranspiration. This study highlighted the critical role of irrigation and groundwater for shelterbelts, and might

  20. Transpiration by trees under seasonal water logging and drought in monsoon central Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Tateishi, M.; Kajisa, T.; Ma, V.; Heng, S.; Kumagai, T.; Mizoue, N.

    2012-04-01

    Cambodia is situated in the center of Indochina Peninsula and experiences severe drought for 5 months of dry season and subsequent rainy season. Around the Tonlesap Lake where both natural and secondary forests exist without intensive destruction by human activity, forest hydrology is characterized by seasonal water logging in mid rainy season. Tree- and stand-scale transpiration is thought to be influenced by the changing soil water conditions and trees' site-specific adaptation to the environment, but less is measured about transpiration and leaf ecophysiological traits in this region. The objectives of this study is to reveal the ecophysiology of the two native (Dipterocarpus obtusifolius and Shorea roxburghii) and two exotic species (Acacia auriculiformis and Eucalyptus camaldulensis) and to detect the effects of soil water conditions on day to week scale transpiration in mid rainy and dry season. Seasonal leaf-level photosynthesis measurements suggested that photosynthetic capacity (Vcmax25) showed no clear seasonal change in each species without clear interspecific variation. Two native species had stomatal control in response to the environment different from previous studies and showed stomatal conductance higher than most woody species in other seasonal tropical forests, suggesting the species- and site-specific adaptation to the easy access to the ground water. Sap flow rate per leaf area was expressed in two parameters: measured transpiration rate based on the continuous sap flow measurements (Esap) and modeled transpiration rate (Emod) using a multilayer model based on the measured data of atmospheric environments, radiation and the leaf ecophysiological traits. Esap was lower in rainy season than those in dry season, with short but pronounced drop near the end of the dry season, although Emod was higher in rainy season than in dry season. In dry season, Emod well fit the diurnal and day to day trend of Esap, suggesting that soil drought did not limit

  1. Variable coupling between sap-flow and transpiration in pine trees under drought conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisler, Yakir; Tatarinov, Fyodor; Rohatyn, Shani; Rotenberg, Eyal; Grunzweig, Jose M.; Yakir, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Changes in diurnal patterns in water transport and physiological activities in response to changes in environmental conditions are important adjustments of trees to drought. The rate of sap flow (SF) in trees is expected to be in agreement with the rate of tree-scale transpiration (T) and provides a powerful measure of water transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. The aim of this five-years study was to investigate the temporal links between SF and T in Pinus halepensis exposed to extreme seasonal drought in the Yatir forest in Israel. We continuously measured SF (20 trees), the daily variations in stem diameter (ΔDBH, determined with high precision dendrometers; 8 trees), and ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET; eddy covariance), which were complemented with short-term campaigns of leaf-scale measurements of H2O and CO2 gas exchange, water potentials, and hydraulic conductivity. During the rainy season, tree SF was well synchronized with ecosystem ET, reaching maximum rates during midday in all trees. However, during the dry season, the daily SF trends greatly varied among trees, allowing a classification of trees into three classes: 1) Trees that remain with SF maximum at midday, 2) trees that advanced their SF peak to early morning, and 3) trees that delayed their SF peak to late afternoon hours. This classification remained valid for the entire study period (2010-2015), and strongly correlated with tree height and DBH, and to a lower degree with crown size and competition index. In the dry season, class 3 trees (large) tended to delay the timing of SF maximum to the afternoon, and to advance their maximum diurnal DBH to early morning, while class 2 trees (smaller) advanced their SF maximum to early morning and had maximum daily DBH during midday and afternoon. Leaf-scale transpiration (T), measurements showed a typical morning peak in all trees, irrespective of classification, and a secondary peak in the afternoon in large trees only. Water potential and

  2. Wind increases "evaporative demand" but reduces plant water requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.

    2015-12-01

    Transpiration is commonly conceptualised as a fraction of some potential rate, determined by stomatal or canopy resistance. Therefore, so-called "atmospheric evaporative demand" or "potential evaporation" is generally used alongside with precipitation and soil moisture to characterise the environmental conditions that affect plant water use. An increase in potential evaporation (e.g. due to climate change) is generally believed to cause increased transpiration and/or vegetation water stress, aggravating drought effects. In the present study, we investigated the question whether potential evaporation constitutes a meaningful reference for transpiration and compared sensitivity of potential evaporation and leaf transpiration to atmospheric forcing. Based on modelling results and supporting experimental evidence, we conclude that stomatal resistance cannot be parameterised as a factor relating transpiration to potential evaporation, as the ratio between transpiration and potential evaporation not only varies with stomatal resistance, but also with wind speed, air temperature, irradiance and relative humidity. Furthermore, the effect of wind speed in particular implies increase in potential evaporation, which is commonly interpreted as increased "water stress", but at the same time can reduce leaf transpiration, implying a decrease in water demand at the leaf scale. In fact, in a range of field measurements, we found that water use efficiency (WUE, carbon uptake per water transpired) commonly increases with increasing wind speed, enabling plants to conserve water during photosynthesis. We estimate that the observed global decrease in terrestrial near-surface wind speeds could have reduced WUE at a magnitude similar to the increase in WUE attributed to global rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We conclude that trends in wind speed and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have to be considered explicitly for the estimation of drought effects on

  3. Disentangling effects of vector birth rate, mortality rate, and abundance on spread of a plant pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For insect-transmitted plant pathogens, rates of pathogen spread are a function of vector abundance. While vector abundance is recognized to be important, parameters that govern vector population size receive little attention. For example, epidemiological models often fix vector population size by a...

  4. Whole-plant capacitance, embolism resistance and slow transpiration rates all contribute to longer desiccation times in woody angiosperms from arid and wet habitats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low water potentials in xylem can result in damaging levels of cavitation, yet little is understood about which hydraulic traits have most influence in delaying the onset of hydraulic dysfunction during periods of drought. We examined three traits contributing to longer desiccation times in excised ...

  5. Coupling gross primary production and transpiration for a consistent estimate of canopy water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yebra, Marta; van Dijk, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of transpiration or evapotranspiration per unit gross (GPP) or net CO2 uptake) is key in all areas of plant production and forest management applications. Therefore, mutually consistent estimates of GPP and transpiration are needed to analysed WUE without introducing any artefacts that might arise by combining independently derived GPP and ET estimates. GPP and transpiration are physiologically linked at ecosystem level by the canopy conductance (Gc). Estimates of Gc can be obtained by scaling stomatal conductance (Kelliher et al. 1995) or inferred from ecosystem level measurements of gas exchange (Baldocchi et al., 2008). To derive large-scale or indeed global estimates of Gc, satellite remote sensing based methods are needed. In a previous study, we used water vapour flux estimates derived from eddy covariance flux tower measurements at 16 Fluxnet sites world-wide to develop a method to estimate Gc using MODIS reflectance observations (Yebra et al. 2013). We combined those estimates with the Penman-Monteith combination equation to derive transpiration (T). The resulting T estimates compared favourably with flux tower estimates (R2=0.82, RMSE=29.8 W m-2). Moreover, the method allowed a single parameterisation for all land cover types, which avoids artefacts resulting from land cover classification. In subsequent research (Yebra et al, in preparation) we used the same satellite-derived Gc values within a process-based but simple canopy GPP model to constrain GPP predictions. The developed model uses a 'big-leaf' description of the plant canopy to estimate the mean GPP flux as the lesser of a conductance-limited and radiation-limited GPP rate. The conductance-limited rate was derived assuming that transport of CO2 from the bulk air to the intercellular leaf space is limited by molecular diffusion through the stomata. The radiation-limited rate was estimated assuming that it is proportional to the absorbed photosynthetically

  6. Application of crop gas exchange and transpiration data obtained with CEEF to global change problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tako, Y.; Arai, R.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.

    In order to predict carbon sequestration of vegetation with the future rise in atmospheric CO 2 concentration, [CO 2] and temperature, long term effects of high [CO 2] and high temperature on responses of both photosynthesis and transpiration of plants as a whole community to environmental parameters need to be elucidated. Especially in the last decade, many studies on photosynthetic acclimation to elevated [CO 2] at gene, cell, tissue or leaf level for only vegetative growth phase ( i.e. before formation of reproductive organs) have been conducted all over the world. However, CO 2 acclimation studies at population or community level for a whole growing season are thus far very rare. Data obtained from repeatable experiments at population or community level for a whole growing season are necessary for modeling carbon sequestration of a plant community. On the other hand, in order to stabilize material circulation in the artificial ecological system of Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF), it is necessary to predict material exchange rates in the biological systems. In particular, the material exchange rate in higher plant systems is highly variable during growth periods and there is a strong dependence on environmental conditions. For this reason, dependencies of both CO 2 exchange rate and transpiration rate of three rice populations grown from seed under differing conditions of [CO 2] and day/night air temperature (350 μL CO 2 L -1, 24/17°C (population A); 700 μL CO 2 L -1, 24/17°C (population B) and 700 μL CO 2 L -1, 26/19°C (population C)) upon PPFD, leaf temperature and [CO 2] were investigated every two weeks during whole growing season. Growth of leaf lamina, leaf sheath, panicle and root was also compared. From this experiment, it was elucidated that acclimation of instantaneous photosynthetic response of rice population to [CO 2] occurs in vegetative phase through changes in ratio of leaf area to whole plant dry weight, LAR. But, in

  7. Experimental studies of transpiration cooling with shock interaction in hypersonic flow, part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the result of experimental studies conducted to examine the effects of the impingement of an oblique shock on the flowfield and surface characteristics of a transpiration-cooled wall in turbulent hypersonic flow. The principal objective of this work was to determine whether the interaction between the oblique shock and the low-momentum region of the transpiration-cooled boundary layer created a highly distorted flowfield and resulted in a significant reduction in the cooling effectiveness of the transpiration-cooled surface. As a part of this program, we also sought to determine the effectiveness of transpiration cooling with nitrogen and helium injectants for a wide range of blowing rates under constant-pressure conditions in the absence of shock interaction. This experimental program was conducted in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach numbers of 6 and 8, for a Reynolds number of 7.5 x 10(exp 6). For these test conditions, we obtained fully turbulent boundary layers upstream of the interaction regions over the transpiration-cooled segment of the flat plate. The experimental program was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, we examined the effects of mass-addition level and coolant properties on the cooling effectiveness of transpiration-cooled surfaces in the absence of shock interaction. In the second phase of the program, we examined the effects of oblique shock impingement on the flowfield and surface characteristics of a transpiration-cooled surface. The studies were conducted for a range of shock strengths with nitrogen and helium coolants to examine how the distribution of heat transfer and pressure and the characteristics of the flowfield in the interaction region varied with shock strength and the level of mass addition from the transpiration-cooled section of the model. The effects of the distribution of the blowing rate along the interaction regions were also examined for a range of blowing rates through the

  8. Cross-scale modelling of transpiration from stomata via the leaf boundary layer

    PubMed Central

    Defraeye, Thijs; Derome, Dominique; Verboven, Pieter; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf transpiration is a key parameter for understanding land surface–climate interactions, plant stress and plant structure–function relationships. Transpiration takes place at the microscale level, namely via stomata that are distributed discretely over the leaf surface with a very low surface coverage (approx. 0·2–5 %). The present study aims to shed more light on the dependency of the leaf boundary-layer conductance (BLC) on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Methods An innovative three-dimensional cross-scale modelling approach was applied to investigate convective mass transport from leaves, using computational fluid dynamics. The gap between stomatal and leaf scale was bridged by including all these scales in the same computational model (10−5–10−1 m), which implies explicitly modelling individual stomata. Key Results BLC was strongly dependent on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Leaf BLC at low surface coverage ratios (CR), typical for stomata, was still relatively high, compared with BLC of a fully wet leaf (hypothetical CR of 100 %). Nevertheless, these conventional BLCs (CR of 100 %), as obtained from experiments or simulations on leaf models, were found to overpredict the convective exchange. In addition, small variations in stomatal CR were found to result in large variations in BLCs. Furthermore, stomata of a certain size exhibited a higher mass transfer rate at lower CRs. Conclusions The proposed cross-scale modelling approach allows us to increase our understanding of transpiration at the sub-leaf level as well as the boundary-layer microclimate in a way currently not feasible experimentally. The influence of stomatal size, aperture and surface density, and also flow-field parameters can be studied using the model, and prospects for further improvement of the model are presented. An important conclusion of the study is that existing measures of conductances (e.g. from artificial leaves) can be

  9. Cyclic Variations in Nitrogen Uptake Rate of Soybean Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Leslie Tolley; Raper, C. David

    1989-01-01

    When NO3− is the sole nitrogen source in flowing solution culture, the net rate of nitrogen uptake by nonnodulated soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Ransom) plants cycles between maxima and minima with a periodicity of oscillation that corresponds with the interval of leaf emergence. Since soybean plants accumulate similar quantities of nitrogen when either NH4+ or NO3− is the sole source in solution culture controlled at pH 6.0, an experiment was conducted to determine if the oscillations in net rate of nitrogen uptake also occur when NH4+ is the nitrogen source. During a 21-day period of vegetative development, net uptake of NH4+ was measured daily by ion chromatography as depletion of NH4+ from a replenished nutrient solution containing 1.0 millimolar NH4+. The net rate of NH4+ uptake oscillated with a periodicity that was similar to the interval of leaf emergence. Instances of negative net rates of uptake indicate that the transition between maxima and minima involved changes in influx and efflux components of net NH4+ uptake. PMID:11537458

  10. Relating xylem cavitation to transpiration in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic emmisions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Even though a body of work employing AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. A few s...

  11. SEWAGE DISPOSAL BY EVAPORATION-TRANSPIRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the methods for on-site disposal of wastewater from individual homes is by evaporation. Two types of evaporative disposal systems have been investigated in this study; evapo-transpiration (ET) beds and mechanical evaporation units. Twenty nine test lysimeters of 0.22 cubic...

  12. Riparian buffer transpiration and watershed scale impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forested riparian buffers are prevalent throughout the Southeastern Coastal Plain Region of the United States (US). Because they make up a significant portion of the regional landscape, transpiration within these riparian buffers is believed to have an important impact on the hydrologic budget of r...

  13. Make Your Own Transpiring Tree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez Vilalta, Jordi; Sauret, Miquel; Duro, Alicia; Pinol, Josep

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple set-up that illustrates the mechanism of sap ascent in plants and demonstrates that it can easily draw water up to heights of a few meters. The set-up consists of a tube with the lower end submerged in water and the upper one connected to a filter supported by a standard filter-holder. The evaporation of water…

  14. The stem heat balance method to measure transpiration:Evaluation of a new sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The direct measurement of crop transpiration (Tcrop) under field conditions and throughout the growing season is difficult to obtain. An available method uses stem flow gauge sensors, based on the stem heat balance. The sensor consists of a small heater that is wrapped around the stem of the plant a...

  15. Free convection over a vertical porous plate with transpiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.; Bershader, D.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of free convection over an isothermal vertical porous plate with transpiration is studied both numerically and experimentally. Numerical solutions to the variable-property transpired free-convection boundary layer equations have been obtained using the finite difference procedure of Patankar and Spalding (1967). The effects of uniform transpiration on heat transfer and on temperature and velocity profiles are predicted. Interferometrically measured nondimensional temperature profiles for the uniform wall temperature and transpiration case agreed closely with these numerical predictions.

  16. Responses of canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach (Prunus persica) trees to alternate partial root zone drip irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Daozhi; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Jianhua

    2005-08-01

    We investigated canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach trees under three irrigation patterns: fixed 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (FPRDI), alternate 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (APRDI) and full root zone drip irrigation (FDI). Canopy transpiration was measured using heat pulse sensors, and canopy conductance was calculated using the Jarvis model and the inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. Results showed that the transpiration rate and canopy conductance in FPRDI and APRDI were smaller than those in FDI. More significantly, the total irrigation amount was greatly reduced, by 34.7% and 39.6%, respectively for APRDI and FPRDI in the PRDI (partial root zone drip irrigation) treatment period. The daily transpiration was linearly related to the reference evapotranspiration in the three treatments, but daily transpiration of FDI is more than that of APRDI and FPRDI under the same evaporation demand, suggesting a restriction of transpiration water loss in the APRDI and FPRDI trees. FDI needed a higher soil water content to carry the same amount of transpiration as the APRDI and FPRDI trees, suggesting the hydraulic conductance of roots of APRDI and FPRDI trees was enhanced, and the roots had a greater water uptake than in FDI when the average soil water content in the root zone was the same. By a comparison between the transpiration rates predicted by the Penman-Monteith equation and the measured canopy transpiration rates for 60 days during the experimental period, an excellent correlation along the 1:1 line was found for all the treatments (R2 > 0.80), proving the reliability of the methodology.

  17. Active microbreak effects on musculoskeletal comfort ratings in meatpacking plants.

    PubMed

    Genaidy, A M; Delgado, E; Bustos, T

    1995-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine whether a system of active microbreaks can reduce the discomfort perceived by employees in a meatpacking plant. Moreover, the relationship between the discomfort perceived on the job and musculoskeletal capability was investigated. Twenty-eight men employed in a local meatpacking plant participated in a study conducted over a period of four weeks. Results indicated that active microbreaks significantly reduced the level of discomfort perceived by employees during the course of the working day. The subjective ratings of perceived discomfort correlated significantly with anthropometric, strength and background information (R2 = 0.66). The physical characteristics of Caucasian employees were higher than those of their Hispanic counterparts. Moreover, the physical characteristics of meatpacking employees were significantly lower than those reported in the literature for employees engaged in manual handling tasks. PMID:7895738

  18. Mercaptan removal rate exceeds 99% at Canadian gas plant

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B. )

    1993-08-16

    Installation of a Selexol solvent unit at Pembina Resources Ltd.'s Diamond Valley gas plant has been effective in polishing mercaptans and other sulfur-bearing compounds from a variable gas stream. The actual removal rate exceeds 99%, and an absolute treated gas target of < 100 ppm total sulfur is maintained. In addition, hydrocarbon pick up is restricted sufficiently so that slugs of hydrocarbon are not carried through the system to destabilize incineration of the mercaptans. The paper discusses start-up problems, the gas treating process, mercaptans in the feed gas, the solvent unit, and its operation.

  19. Photosynthesis and transpiration of loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by moisture-stress conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Seiler, J.R.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    One-yr-old seedlings were exposed to 8 wk of moisture stress conditioning (MSC); seedlings were watered only when pre-dawn needle water potential fell below -1.4 MPa. Water was then withheld and photosynthesis and transpiration rates recorded. Photosynthesis in well-watered controls and MSC seedlings was reduced to zero in 12 and 17 days respectively. Seedlings were harvested and water use efficiency calculated using photosynthesis and transpiration data; it was expressed as mg of CO/sub 2/ fixed per g of water lost. Seedlings exposed to MSC continued to photosynthesize to much lower needle water potentials. This response is at least partly attributed to the significant decrease (0.45 MPa) in needle osmotic potential found in MSC seedlings, which were able to maintain turgor to lower needle water potentials. Transpiration rate decreased 30% and water use efficiency increased 67% as a result of MSC. 26 references.

  20. Transpired Air Collectors - Ventilation Preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.

    2006-06-22

    Many commercial and industrial buildings have high ventilation rates. Although all that fresh air is great for indoor air quality, heating it can be very expensive. This short (2-page) fact sheet describes a technology available to use solar energy to preheat ventilation air and dramatically reduce utility bills.

  1. HYDROLOGICAL IMPACTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT IN ARID AND SEMIARID GRASSLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Woody plants may be able to access deeper groundwater for year-round transpiration and thus consume more water than grasses, affecting recharge, soil moisture and runoff. Amount of water available to plants from precipitation is determined in part by nfiltration rates into...

  2. Transpiration characteristics of a rubber plantation in central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Nakako; Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Tateishi, Makiko; Lim, Tiva K; Mudd, Ryan G; Ziegler, Alan D; Giambelluca, Thomas W; Yin, Song

    2014-03-01

    The rapid and widespread expansion of rubber plantations in Southeast Asia necessitates a greater understanding of tree physiology and the impacts of water consumption on local hydrology. Sap flow measurements were used to study the intra- and inter-annual variations in transpiration rate (Et) in a rubber stand in the low-elevation plain of central Cambodia. Mean stand sap flux density (JS) indicates that rubber trees actively transpire in the rainy season, but become inactive in the dry season. A sharp, brief drop in JS occurred simultaneously with leaf shedding in the middle of the dry season in January. Although the annual maxima of JS were approximately the same in the two study years, the maximum daily stand Et of ∼2.0 mm day(-1) in 2010 increased to ∼2.4 mm day(-1) in 2011. Canopy-level stomatal response was well explained by changes in solar radiation, vapor pressure deficit, soil moisture availability, leaf area, and stem diameter. Rubber trees had a relatively small potential to transpire at the beginning of the study period, compared with average diffuse-porous species. After 2 years of growth in stem diameter, transpiration potential was comparable to other species. The sensitivity of canopy conductance (gc) to atmospheric drought indicates isohydric behavior of rubber trees. Modeling also predicted a relatively small sensitivity of gc to the soil moisture deficit and a rapid decrease in gc under extreme drought conditions. However, annual observations suggest the possibility of a change in leaf characteristics with tree maturity and/or initiation of latex tapping. The estimated annual stand Et was 469 mm year(-1) in 2010, increasing to 658 mm year(-1) in 2011. Diagnostic analysis using the derived gc model showed that inter-annual change in stand Et in the rapidly growing young rubber stand was determined mainly by tree growth rate, not by differences in air and soil variables in the surrounding environment. Future research should focus on the

  3. A New Method to Quantify the Isotopic Signature of Leaf Transpiration: Implications for Landscape-Scale Evapotranspiration Partitioning Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Good, S. P.; Caylor, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Characterizing the constituent components of evapotranspiration is crucial to better understand ecosystem-level water budgets and water use dynamics. Isotope based evapotranspiration partitioning methods are promising but their utility lies in the accurate estimation of the isotopic composition of underlying transpiration and evaporation. Here we report a new method to quantify the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration under field conditions. This method utilizes a commercially available laser-based isotope analyzer and a transparent leaf chamber, modified from Licor conifer leaf chamber. The method is based on the water mass balance in ambient air and leaf transpired air. We verified the method using “artificial leaves” and glassline extracted samples. The method provides a new and direct way to estimate leaf transpiration isotopic signatures and it has wide applications in ecology, hydrology and plant physiology.

  4. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration.

    PubMed

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8 mm yr(-1)). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake. PMID:26074373

  5. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G.; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-06-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8 mm yr-1). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake.

  6. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration

    PubMed Central

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G.; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12–23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51–98 vs. 7–8 mm yr−1). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake. PMID:26074373

  7. Disentangling Effects of Vector Birth Rate, Mortality Rate, and Abundance on Spread of Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sisterson, Mark S; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-04-01

    Models on the spread of insect-transmitted plant pathogens often fix vector population size by assuming that deaths are offset by births. Although such mathematical simplifications are often justified, deemphasizing parameters that govern vector population size is problematic, as reproductive biology and mortality schedules of vectors of plant pathogens receive little empirical attention. Here, the importance of explicitly including parameters for vector birth and death rates was evaluated by comparing results from models with fixed vector population size with models with logistic vector population growth. In fixed vector population size models, increasing vector mortality decreased percentage of inoculative vectors, but had no effect on vector population size, as deaths were offset by births. In models with logistic vector population growth, increasing vector mortality decreased percentage of inoculative vectors and decreased vector population size. Consequently, vector mortality had a greater effect on pathogen spread in models with logistic vector population growth than in models with fixed vector population size. Further, in models with logistic vector population growth, magnitude of vector birth rate determined time required for vector populations to reach large size, thereby determining when pathogen spread occurred quickly. Assumptions regarding timing of vector mortality within a time step also affected model outcome. A greater emphasis of vector entomologists on studying reproductive biology and mortality schedules of insect species that transmit plant pathogens will facilitate identification of conditions associated with rapid growth of vector populations and could lead to development of novel control strategies. PMID:26637536

  8. Transpiration in the Global Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, W. H.; Jasechko, S.

    2014-12-01

    A compilation of 81 studies that have partitioned evapotranspiration (ET) into its components—transpiration (T) and evaporation (E)—at the ecosystem scale indicates that T accounts for 61% (±15% s.d.) of ET and returns approximately 39±10% of incident precipitation (P) to the atmosphere, creating a dominant force in the global water cycle. T as a proportion of ET is highest in tropical rainforests (70±14 %) and lowest in steppes, shrublands and deserts (51±15%), but there is no relationship of T/ET versus P across all available data (R2 = 0.01). Changes to transpiration due to increasing CO2 concentrations, land use changes, shifting ecozones and climate warming are expected to have significant impacts upon runoff and groundwater recharge, reflecting human impacts on the global biogeochemical cycle of water.

  9. 78 FR 78352 - Plant-E Corp; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Plant-E Corp; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization This is a supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of Plant-E...

  10. Transpiration efficiency of a tropical pioneer tree (Ficus insipida) in relation to soil fertility.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Winter, Klaus; Aranda, Jorge; Turner, Benjamin L; Marshall, John D

    2007-01-01

    The response of whole-plant water-use efficiency, termed transpiration efficiency (TE), to variation in soil fertility was assessed in a tropical pioneer tree, Ficus insipida Willd. Measurements of stable isotope ratios (delta(13)C, delta(18)O, delta(15)N), elemental concentrations (C, N, P), plant growth, instantaneous leaf gas exchange, and whole-plant water use were used to analyse the mechanisms controlling TE. Plants were grown individually in 19 l pots with non-limiting soil moisture. Soil fertility was altered by mixing soil with varying proportions of rice husks, and applying a slow release fertilizer. A large variation was observed in leaf photosynthetic rate, mean relative growth rate (RGR), and TE in response to experimental treatments; these traits were well correlated with variation in leaf N concentration. Variation in TE showed a strong dependence on the ratio of intercellular to ambient CO(2) mole fractions (c(i)/c(a)); both for instantaneous measurements of c(i)/c(a) (R(2)=0.69, P <0.0001, n=30), and integrated estimates based on C isotope discrimination (R(2)=0.88, P <0.0001, n=30). On the other hand, variations in the leaf-to-air humidity gradient, unproductive water loss, and respiratory C use probably played only minor roles in modulating TE in the face of variable soil fertility. The pronounced variation in TE resulted from a combination of the strong response of c(i)/c(a) to leaf N, and inherently high values of c(i)/c(a) for this tropical tree species; these two factors conspired to cause a 4-fold variation among treatments in (1-c(i)/c(a)), the term that actually modifies TE. Results suggest that variation in plant N status could have important implications for the coupling between C and water exchange in tropical forest trees. PMID:18057036

  11. EFFECT, UPTAKE AND DISPOSITION OF NITROBENZENE IN SEVERAL TERRESTRIAL PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight species of plants were exposed to nitrobenzene in a hydroponic solution. our species experienced no depression of either transpiration or photosynthetic rates, while one was rapidly killed and the other three were temporarily affected but recovered from the treatment. ptake...

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in intact plants--quantitative observation of flow in plant vessels.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbrod, E; Kahler, E; Thürmer, F; Deichmann, R; Zimmermann, U; Haase, A

    1998-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) images of flow velocities in intact corn plants were acquired using magnetization-prepared MR microscopy. A phase contrast flow imaging technique was used to quantitate water flow velocities and total volume flow rates in small xylem vessels. The simultaneous measurement of the transpiration of the whole plant was achieved by using a closed climate chamber within the MR magnet. The total volume flow rate and the transpiration values were in close correlation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in intact plants was performed by light stimulation of the transpiration inside of the magnet. The change in the flow velocities in the xylem vessels of single vascular bundles was in correlation with the changes in the transpiration. Significant differences were observed between the xylem vessels in different vascular bundles. Furthermore, flow velocity measurements were performed on excised plant stems and visualized by the uptake of the MR contrast agent, gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). A comparison between the phase contrast flow imaging and the contrast media uptake showed to be in good agreement with each other. PMID:9621974

  13. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-08

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  14. Advanced control strategy for plant heat rate improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.; Frerichs, D.K.; Kyr, D.

    1995-12-31

    Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) supplies electricity to about half of the population of Florida, roughly 6.5 million people. The load base is largely residential/business with the obvious seasonal extremes due to the climate. FPL`s generating capacity is 16,320 MW composed of 70% traditional fossil cycle, 18% nuclear, and 12% gas turbine. The system load profile coupled with bulk power purchases is such that the 400 MW class units (9 Foster Wheeler drum type units comprising 24% of total capacity) are now forced to cycle daily all year, and to come off line on weekends during the winter months. The current economic realities of power generation force utility companies to seek methods to improve plant heat rate, and FPL is no exception. FPL believed it possible to achieve the goal of lower heat rate and follow the required load demand with the 400 MW class units through the use of an advanced control strategy implemented totally within the unit`s Distributed Control System (DCS). As of the writing of this paper, the project is still ongoing. This paper will present the theory and methodology of the advanced control strategy along with the current design and implementation status and results obtained to date.

  15. Studies of shock/shock interaction on smooth and transpiration-cooled hemispherical nosetips in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M. S.; Rodriguez, K. M.; Nowak, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental studies are conducted to examine the utilization of transpiration cooling to reduce the peak-heating loads in areas of shock/shock interaction. Smooth and transpiration-cooled nosetip models, 12 inches in diameter, were employed in these studies, which focused on defining the pressure distributions and heat transfer in type III and IV interaction areas. Transpiration cooling was determined to significantly increase the size of the shock layer and to move the peak-heating point around the body. A transpiration-cooling rate of more than 30 percent of the freestream maximum flux did not lower the peak-heating level more than 10 percent, but the integrated heating loads were reduced.

  16. Modelling orange tree root water uptake active area by minimally invasive ERT data and transpiration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanella, Daniela; Boaga, Jacopo; Perri, Maria Teresa; Consoli, Simona; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The comprehension of the hydrological processes involving plant root dynamics is crucial for implementing water saving measures in agriculture. This is particular urgent in areas, like those Mediterranean, characterized by scarce water availability. The study of root water dynamics should not be separated from a more general analysis of the mass and energy fluxes transferred in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. In our study, in order to carry this inclusive approach, minimal invasive 3D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for soil moisture estimation was combined with plant transpiration fluxes directly measured with Sap Flow (SF) techniques and Eddy Covariance methods, and volumetric soil moisture measurements by TDR probes. The main objective of this inclusive approach was to accurately define root-zone water dynamics and individuate the root-area effectively active for water and nutrient uptake process. The monitoring was carried out in Eastern Sicily (south Italy) in summers 2013 and 2014, within an experimental orange orchard farm. During the first year of experiment (October 2013), ERT measurements were carried out around the pertinent volume of one fully irrigated tree, characterized by a vegetation ground cover of 70%; in the second year (June 2014), ERT monitoring was conducted considering a cutting plant, thus to evaluate soil water dynamics without the significant plant transpiration contribution. In order to explore the hydrological dynamics of the root zone volume surrounded by the monitored tree, the resistivity data acquired during the ERT monitoring were converted into soil moisture content distribution by a laboratory calibration based on the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and pore water electrical conductivity. By using ERT data in conjunction with the agro-meteorological information (i.e. irrigation rates, rainfall, evapotranspiration by Eddy Covariance, transpiration by Sap Flow and soil moisture

  17. Do root hydraulic properties change during the early vegetative stage of plant development in barley (Hordeum vulgare)?

    PubMed Central

    Suku, Shimi; Knipfer, Thorsten; Fricke, Wieland

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims As annual crops develop, transpirational water loss increases substantially. This increase has to be matched by an increase in water uptake through the root system. The aim of this study was to assess the contributions of changes in intrinsic root hydraulic conductivity (Lp, water uptake per unit root surface area, driving force and time), driving force and root surface area to developmental increases in root water uptake. Methods Hydroponically grown barley plants were analysed during four windows of their vegetative stage of development, when they were 9–13, 14–18, 19–23 and 24–28 d old. Hydraulic conductivity was determined for individual roots (Lp) and for entire root systems (Lpr). Osmotic Lp of individual seminal and adventitious roots and osmotic Lpr of the root system were determined in exudation experiments. Hydrostatic Lp of individual roots was determined by root pressure probe analyses, and hydrostatic Lpr of the root system was derived from analyses of transpiring plants. Key Results Although osmotic and hydrostatic Lp and Lpr values increased initially during development and were correlated positively with plant transpiration rate, their overall developmental increases (about 2-fold) were small compared with increases in transpirational water loss and root surface area (about 10- to 40-fold). The water potential gradient driving water uptake in transpiring plants more than doubled during development, and potentially contributed to the increases in plant water flow. Osmotic Lpr of entire root systems and hydrostatic Lpr of transpiring plants were similar, suggesting that the main radial transport path in roots was the cell-to-cell path at all developmental stages. Conclusions Increase in the surface area of root system, and not changes in intrinsic root hydraulic properties, is the main means through which barley plants grown hydroponically sustain an increase in transpirational water loss during their vegetative

  18. Inferring dominant controls on transpiration across a hillslope transect from ecohydrological measurements and thermodynamic limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Maik; Hassler, Sibylle; Blume, Theresa; Weiler, Markus; Hildebrandt, Anke; Guderle, Marcus; Schymanki, Stan; Kleidon, Axel

    2015-04-01

    hillslopes and stand characteristics were found to be the major long term control: the south-facing sites with larger atmospheric demand show significantly lower sensitivity to atmospheric demand than the north-facing sites. Interestingly, we find that the sensitivity is decreasing with stand density, which is markedly different between the contrasting hillslopes. Thus periodical water limitation induced by larger absorption of solar radiation on the south-facing slopes may have led to long term plant adaptation or forest management strategies which satisfy the trade-off between highly variable atmospheric demand and the depletion of soil water storage. In summary, the strong linear link of daily transpiration to atmospheric demand as well as the more long-term adaptation to soil moisture availability may allow for the spatially explicit prediction of forest transpiration from solar radiation, temperature and stand characteristics.

  19. Phylogenetic and ecological patterns in nighttime transpiration among five members of the genus Rubus co-occurring in western Oregon

    PubMed Central

    McNellis, Brandon; Howard, Ava R

    2015-01-01

    Nighttime transpiration is a substantial portion of ecosystem water budgets, but few studies compare water use of closely related co-occurring species in a phylogenetic context. Nighttime transpiration can range up to 69% of daytime rates and vary between species, ecosystem, and functional type. We examined leaf-level daytime and nighttime gas exchange of five species of the genus Rubus co-occurring in the Pacific Northwest of western North America in a greenhouse common garden. Contrary to expectations, nighttime transpiration was not correlated to daytime water use. Nighttime transpiration showed pronounced phylogenetic signals, but the proportion of variation explained by different phylogenetic groupings varied across datasets. Leaf osmotic water potential, water potential at turgor loss point, stomatal size, and specific leaf area were correlated with phylogeny but did not readily explain variation in nighttime transpiration. Patterns in interspecific variation as well as a disconnect between rates of daytime and nighttime transpiration suggest that variation in nighttime water use may be at least partly driven by genetic factors independent of those that control daytime water use. Future work with co-occurring congeneric systems is needed to establish the generality of these results and may help determine the mechanism driving interspecific variation in nighttime water use. PMID:26380686

  20. Toward an improved understanding of the role of transpiration in critical zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, B.; Papuga, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the total water balance across any ecosystem. In subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems, transpiration (T) often dominates the total water flux and therefore improved understanding of T is critical for accurate assessment of catchment water balance and for understanding of the processes that governs the complex dynamics across critical zone (CZ). The interaction between T and plant vegetation not only modulates soil water balance but also influences water transit time and hydrochemical flux - key factors in our understanding of how the CZ evolves and responds. Unlike an eddy covariance system which provides only an integrated ET flux from an ecosystem, a sap flow system can provide an estimate of the T flux from the ecosystem. By isolating T, the ecohydrological drivers of this major water loss from the CZ can be identified. Still, the species composition of mixed-conifer ecosystems vary and the drivers of T associated with each species are expected to be different. Therefore, accurate quantification of T from a mixed-conifer requires knowledge of the unique transpiration dynamics of each of the tree species. Here, we installed a sap flow system within two mixed-conifer study sites of the Jemez River Basin - Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (JRB - SCM CZO). At both sites, we identified the dominant tree species and installed sap flow sensors on healthy representatives for each of those species. At the JRB CZO site, sap sensors were installed in fir (4) and spruce (4) trees; at the SCM CZO site, sap sensors were installed at white fir (4) and maple (4) and one dead tree. Meteorological data as well as soil temperature (Ts) and soil moisture (θ) at multiple depths were also collected from each of the two sites. Preliminary analysis of two years of sap flux rate at JRB - SCM CZO shows that the environmental drivers of fir, spruce, and maple are different and also vary throughout the year. For JRB fir

  1. Dominant controls of transpiration along a hillslope transect inferred from ecohydrological measurements and thermodynamic limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Maik; Hassler, Sibylle K.; Blume, Theresa; Weiler, Markus; Hildebrandt, Anke; Guderle, Marcus; Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-05-01

    We combine ecohydrological observations of sap flow and soil moisture with thermodynamically constrained estimates of atmospheric evaporative demand to infer the dominant controls of forest transpiration in complex terrain. We hypothesize that daily variations in transpiration are dominated by variations in atmospheric demand, while site-specific controls, including limiting soil moisture, act on longer timescales. We test these hypotheses with data of a measurement setup consisting of five sites along a valley cross section in Luxembourg. Both hillslopes are covered by forest dominated by European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Two independent measurements are used to estimate stand transpiration: (i) sap flow and (ii) diurnal variations in soil moisture, which were used to estimate the daily root water uptake. Atmospheric evaporative demand is estimated through thermodynamically constrained evaporation, which only requires absorbed solar radiation and temperature as input data without any empirical parameters. Both transpiration estimates are strongly correlated to atmospheric demand at the daily timescale. We find that neither vapor pressure deficit nor wind speed add to the explained variance, supporting the idea that they are dependent variables on land-atmosphere exchange and the surface energy budget. Estimated stand transpiration was in a similar range at the north-facing and the south-facing hillslopes despite the different aspect and the largely different stand composition. We identified an inverse relationship between sap flux density and the site-average sapwood area per tree as estimated by the site forest inventories. This suggests that tree hydraulic adaptation can compensate for heterogeneous conditions. However, during dry summer periods differences in topographic factors and stand structure can cause spatially variable transpiration rates. We conclude that absorption of solar radiation at the surface forms a dominant control for turbulent heat and

  2. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  3. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  4. Heat exchanger with transpired, highly porous fins

    DOEpatents

    Kutscher, Charles F.; Gawlik, Keith

    2002-01-01

    The heat exchanger includes a fin and tube assembly with increased heat transfer surface area positioned within a hollow chamber of a housing to provide effective heat transfer between a gas flowing within the hollow chamber and a fluid flowing in the fin and tube assembly. A fan is included to force a gas, such as air, to flow through the hollow chamber and through the fin and tube assembly. The fin and tube assembly comprises fluid conduits to direct the fluid through the heat exchanger, to prevent mixing with the gas, and to provide a heat transfer surface or pathway between the fluid and the gas. A heat transfer element is provided in the fin and tube assembly to provide extended heat transfer surfaces for the fluid conduits. The heat transfer element is corrugated to form fins between alternating ridges and grooves that define flow channels for directing the gas flow. The fins are fabricated from a thin, heat conductive material containing numerous orifices or pores for transpiring the gas out of the flow channel. The grooves are closed or only partially open so that all or substantially all of the gas is transpired through the fins so that heat is exchanged on the front and back surfaces of the fins and also within the interior of the orifices, thereby significantly increasing the available the heat transfer surface of the heat exchanger. The transpired fins also increase heat transfer effectiveness of the heat exchanger by increasing the heat transfer coefficient by disrupting boundary layer development on the fins and by establishing other beneficial gas flow patterns, all at desirable pressure drops.

  5. Night-time transpiration can decrease hydraulic redistribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, Ava R; van Iersel, Marc W; Richards, James H; Donovan, Lisa A

    2009-08-01

    C(3) plants dominate many landscapes and are critically important for ecosystem water cycling. At night, plant water losses can include transpiration (E(night)) from the canopy and hydraulic redistribution (HR) from roots. We tested whether E(night) limits the magnitude of HR in a greenhouse study using Artemisia tridentata, Helianthus anomalus and Quercus laevis. Plants were grown with their roots split between two compartments. HR was initiated by briefly withholding all water, followed by watering only one rooting compartment. Under study conditions, all species showed substantial E(night) and HR (highest minus lowest soil water potential [Psi(s)] during a specified diel period). Suppressing E(night) by canopy bagging increased HR during the nightly bagging period (HR(N)) for A. tridentata and H. anomalus by 73 and 33% respectively, but did not affect HR(N) by Q. laevis. Total daily HR (HR(T)) was positively correlated with the Psi(s) gradient between the rooting compartments, which was correlated with light and/or atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPDa) the prior day. For A. tridentata, HR(T) was negatively correlated with night-time VPDa. Ecological implications of the impact of E(night) on HR may include decreased plant productivity during dry seasons, altered ecosystem water flux patterns and reduced nutrient cycling in drying soils. PMID:19422615

  6. Lattice Boltzmann approach to thermal transpiration

    SciTech Connect

    Sofonea, Victor

    2006-11-15

    Diffuse reflection boundary conditions are introduced in a thermal lattice Boltzmann model to allow for variable fluid density and temperature along the walls. The capability of this model to capture the main characteristics of the thermal transpiration phenomenon in a box at nonvanishing Knudsen numbers is demonstrated. The thermal creep velocity is found to be proportional to the temperature gradient imposed at the wall, whereas the accuracy of the simulation results are found to be of first or second order, depending on the numerical scheme.

  7. Simultaneous viscous-inviscid coupling via transpiration

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, K.F.C.; Giles, M.B.

    1995-09-01

    In viscous-inviscid coupling analysis, the direct coupling technique and the inverse coupling technique are commonly adopted. However, stability and convergence of the algorithms derived are usually very unsatisfactory. Here, by using the transpiration technique to simulate the effect of the displacement thickness, a new simultaneous coupling method is derived. The integral boundary layer equations and the full potential equation are chosen to be the viscous-inviscid coupled system. After discretization, the Newton-Raphson technique is proposed to solve the coupled nonlinear system. Several numerical results are used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. 15 refs., 23 figs.

  8. ESTIMATES OF ISOPRENE AND MONOTERPENE EMISSION RATES IN PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A range of plant species, including crops, shrubs, herbs, and trees, was surveyed to determine the magnitude of isoprene emissions. In studies to determine if plants emitted isoprene, greenhouse-grown plants were encapsulated in impermeable plastic bags and kept in a growth chamb...

  9. Responses of shelterbelt stand transpiration to drought and groundwater variations in an arid inland river basin of Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qin; Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Lü, Yihe

    2015-12-01

    Plant water use characteristics and transpiration responses under dry conditions are considered essential for effective and sustainable ecosystem management in arid areas. This study was conducted to evaluate the response of shelterbelt stand transpiration to precipitation, soil drought and groundwater variations in an oasis-desert ecotone in the middle of the Heihe River Basin, China. Sap flow was measured in eight Gansu Poplar trees (Populus Gansuensis) with different diameter at breast height over three consecutive growing seasons (2012-2014). The groundwater evapotranspiration via plant use was estimated by the White method with diurnal water table fluctuations. The results showed that precipitation increased the stand transpiration but not statistically significant (paired t-test, p > 0.05). The recharge of soil water by irrigation caused stand transpiration acceleration significantly (t-test, p < 0.05). Stand transpiration and canopy conductance increased by 27% and 31%, respectively, when soil water conditions changed from dry to wet. Canopy conductance decreased logarithmically with vapor pressure deficit, while there was no apparent relationship between canopy conductance and solar radiation. The sensitivity of canopy conductance to vapor pressure deficit decreased under dry soil conditions. Groundwater evapotranspiration (0.6-7.1 mm day-1) was linearly correlated with stand transpiration (1.1-6.5 mm day-1) (R2 = 0.71), and these two variables had similar variability. During the drought period, approximately 80% of total stand transpiration came from groundwater evapotranspiration. This study highlighted the critical role of irrigation and groundwater for shelterbelt, and might provide the basis for the development of water requirement schemes for shelterbelt growth in arid inland river basins.

  10. Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Wipke, K.

    1992-05-01

    The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69 percent more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44 percent less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration.

  11. Soil- and Atmosphere-Induced Plant Water Stress in Cotton as Inferred From Foliage Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idso, S. B.; Reginato, R. J.; Farah, S. M.

    1982-08-01

    Foliage temperatures of cotton obtained by means of infrared thermometry, along with air wet and dry bulb temperature measurements, were used to investigate certain relationships existing between the water contents of soil and air and the ability of the crop to maintain transpiration at the potential rate. It was found that as soil water content is progressively depleted following an irrigation, departure from potential transpiration begins to occur at smaller and smaller values of air vapor pressure deficit in a regularly predictable fashion. It was also demonstrated that the plant water potential of cotton transpiring at the potential rate is a function of the air vapor pressure deficit and that the difference between this base value and the tension that develops under nonpotential conditions is a unique function of a newly developed plant water stress index. Finally, an example of the application of this foliage temperature-based index to evaluating the effects of an irrigation event is presented.

  12. Plant genotypic diversity reduces the rate of consumer resource utilization

    PubMed Central

    McArt, Scott H.; Thaler, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    While plant species diversity can reduce herbivore densities and herbivory, little is known regarding how plant genotypic diversity alters resource utilization by herbivores. Here, we show that an invasive folivore—the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica)—increases 28 per cent in abundance, but consumes 24 per cent less foliage in genotypic polycultures compared with monocultures of the common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis). We found strong complementarity for reduced herbivore damage among plant genotypes growing in polycultures and a weak dominance effect of particularly resistant genotypes. Sequential feeding by P. japonica on different genotypes from polycultures resulted in reduced consumption compared with feeding on different plants of the same genotype from monocultures. Thus, diet mixing among plant genotypes reduced herbivore consumption efficiency. Despite positive complementarity driving an increase in fruit production in polycultures, we observed a trade-off between complementarity for increased plant productivity and resistance to herbivory, suggesting costs in the complementary use of resources by plant genotypes may manifest across trophic levels. These results elucidate mechanisms for how plant genotypic diversity simultaneously alters resource utilization by both producers and consumers, and show that population genotypic diversity can increase the resistance of a native plant to an invasive herbivore. PMID:23658201

  13. Transpiration and water relations of poplar trees growing close to the water table.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heping; Morison, James I. L.; Simmonds, Lester P.

    1999-07-01

    Sap flow was measured on five branches of two poplar (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & A. Gray x P. tacamahaca L.) trees from June to September 1994 in the south of England with stem-surface, heat balance gauges, and was scaled up to estimate transpiration from single trees on the basis of leaf area. On six days, stomatal conductance and plant water potential were measured simultaneously with a porometer and pressure chamber, respectively. The effects of solar radiation (S), vapor pressure deficit (D) and stomatal conductance on transpiration were evaluated. Sap flow per unit leaf area (F(a)) was closely related to the time course of demand attributable to S and D throughout the season, and only slightly affected by the water content of the top 120 cm of soil. Although F(a) increased linearly at low values of D, it showed a plateau with increases in D above 1.2 kPa. The canopy coupling coefficient (1 - Omega) ranged from 0.48 to 0.78 with a mean of 0.65 +/- 0.01, indicating that transpiration was controlled more by stomatal conductance than by incident radiation. The seasonal pattern of tree water loss followed potential evaporation with a peak in late June or early July. On bright days, daily transpiration over the projected crown area was 3.6 mm early in the season, 3.8 mm in mid-season, and 2.7 mm late in the season. The water balance of the system indicated that poplar trees took 15-60% of water transpired from groundwater, with the proportion increasing as the soil in the unsaturated zone dried out. Access to the water table resulted in high predawn water potentials throughout the season. Estimated hydraulic resistance to water flow in the soil-tree system was in the range of 1.5 to 1.93 x 10(6) MPa s m(-3). PMID:12651530

  14. Combustion chamber struts can be effectively transpiration cooled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. H.

    1966-01-01

    Vapor-deposited sintering technique increases the feasible temperature range of transpiration-cooled structural members in combustion chambers. This technique produces a porous mass of refractory metal wires around a combustion chamber structural member. This mass acts as a transpiration-cooled surface for a thick-walled tube.

  15. Evaluation of the tritiated water method for measurement of transpiration in young Pinus taeda L

    SciTech Connect

    Luvall, J.C.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The tritiated water (HTO) technique was evaluated as a method for measurement of transpiration of young loblolly pine. Twenty-one millicuries of tritium in 3 ml of water were injected into holes drilled at the base of the trees. The transpiration rate was estimated to average 8.3 liters/day per tree for three trees injected in February and 40.4 liters/day for a single tree injected in July. Several methods of collecting the water from the trees for tritium analysis were evaluated. The collection of water by condensation in clear plastic bags sealed around branch tips proved to be a simple, reliable method of collecting water. Difference in the integral tritium activity with distance from the injection site were found. Serious errors in the estimation of transpiration are possible if the difference in tritium activity in the canopy are not taken into account. The activity measured in the water collected nearest the injection point provided good estimation of transpiration when compared to evaporation determined by a soil water balance or by the Penman-Monteith evaporation formula.

  16. Design of Transpiration Cooled Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callens, E. Eugene, Jr.; Vinet, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    This study explored three approaches for the utilization of transpiration cooling in thermal protection systems. One model uses an impermeable wall with boiling water heat transfer at the backface (Model I). A second model uses a permeable wall with a boiling water backface and additional heat transfer to the water vapor as it flows in channels toward the exposed surface (Model II). The third model also uses a permeable wall, but maintains a boiling condition at the exposed surface of the material (Model III). The governing equations for the models were developed in non-dimensional form and a comprehensive parametric investigation of the effects of the independent variables on the important dependent variables was performed. In addition, detailed analyses were performed for selected materials to evaluate the practical limitations of the results of the parametric study.

  17. Tree sap flow and stand transpiration of two Acacia mangium plantations in Sabah, Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienciala, E.; Kučera, J.; Malmer, A.

    2000-09-01

    Water use of Acacia mangium trees grown in plantations was measured by a heat balance method in two stands that largely differed in tree density. Tree sap flow was closely coupled to climatic drivers and responded with minimal time delay. Using no time shift, sap flow rate could be tightly fitted to a simple equation that combined a parabolic response to radiation and an inverse linear response to air humidity. On the contrary, the analysis of canopy conductance showed no meaningful response to either individual or combined microclimatic variables. No indication of water deficit was observed, though the measurement period was during the dry period of the year. The measurements indicate a minimal diurnal use of water stored in plant tissues. The difference in tree water use from the two studied stands was effectively scaled by tree sapwood area. Canopy transpiration of the densest stand reached in average 3.9 mm d -1 compared with 2.7 mm d -1 for the stand representing the average conditions in the catchment.

  18. Advances in the two-source energy balance model:Partioning of evaporation and transpiration for row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate partitioning of the evaporation (E) and transpiration (T) components of evapotranspiration (ET) in remote sensing models is important for evaluating strategies aimed at increasing crop water productivity. The two-source energy balance (TSEB) model solves the energy balance of the soil-plant...

  19. Advances in the two-source energy balance model:Partioning of evaporation and transpiration for row crops for cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate partitioning of the evaporation (E) and transpiration (T) components of evapotranspiration (ET) in remote sensing models is important for evaluating strategies aimed at increasing crop water productivity. The two-source energy balance (TSEB) model solves the energy balance of the soil-plant...

  20. Transpiration affects soil CO2 production in a dry grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, János; Fóti, Szilvia; Pintér, Krisztina; Burri, Susanne; Eugster, Werner; Papp, Marianna; Nagy, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Although soil CO2 efflux can be highly variable on the diel time scale, it is often measured during daytime only. However, to get a full understanding of soil CO2 efflux and its impact on carbon cycle processes, looking at diurnal processes is crucial. Therefore, our aim was to investigate how diel variation in soil CO2 efflux from a dry, sandy grassland in Hungary depends on variations in potential drivers, such as gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). In order to reach this goal, we combined measurements of CO2 and H2O fluxes by eddy covariance, soil chambers and soil CO2 gradient system. Surface CO2 fluxes were partitioned into the three CO2 production components originating from the three soil layers to clarify the timing and the source of the CO2 within the top 50 cm of the soil. CO2 production rates during the growing season were higher during nighttime than during daytime. This diel course was not only driven by soil temperature and soil moisture, but also by ET. This was shown by changes of ET causing a hysteresis loop in the diel response of CO2 production to soil temperature. CO2 production was coupled to soil temperature at night and during midday (12-14 h), when ET remained relatively constant. However, when ET was changing over time, CO2 production was decoupled from soil temperature. In order to disentangle these effects, we carried out time-lag analyses between CO2 production and efflux residuals after having subtracted the main effects of soil temperature and soil water content from measured CO2 fluxes. The results showed a strong negative correlation between ET rates and residuals of soil CO2 production, and a less strong, but still significantly time-lagged positive correlation between GPP and residuals of soil CO2 production. Thus, we could show that there is a rapid negative response of soil CO2 production rates to transpiration (suggesting CO2 transport in the xylem stream) and a delayed positive response to GPP

  1. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO{sub 2} ON CANOPY TRANSPIRATION IN SENESCENT SPRING WHEAT

    SciTech Connect

    GROSSMAN,S.; KIMBALL,B.A.; HUNSAKER,D.J.; LONG,S.P.; GARCIA,R.L.; KARTSCHALL,TH.; WALL,G.W.; PINTER,P.J,JR.; WECHSUNG,F.; LAMORTE,R.L.

    1998-12-31

    The seasonal course of canopy transpiration and the diurnal courses of latent heat flux of a spring wheat crop were simulated for atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations of 370 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1} and 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}. The hourly weather data, soil parameters and the irrigation and fertilizer treatments of the Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment wheat experiment in Arizona (1992/93) were used to drive the model. The simulation results were tested against field measurements with special emphasis on the period between anthesis and maturity. A model integrating leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was scaled to a canopy level in order to be used in the wheat growth model. The simulated intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration, C{sub i} was determined from the ratio of C{sub i} to the CO{sub 2} concentration at the leaf surface, C{sub s} the leaf to air specific humidity deficit and a possibly unfulfilled transpiration demand. After anthesis, the measured assimilation rates of the flag leaves decreased more rapidly than their stomatal conductances, leading to a rise in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. In order to describe this observation, an empirical model approach was developed which took into account the leaf nitrogen content for the calculation of the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. Simulation results obtained with the new model version were in good agreement with the measurements. If changes in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio accorded to the decrease in leaf nitrogen content during leaf senescence were not considered in the model, simulations revealed an underestimation of the daily canopy transpiration of up to 20% and a decrease in simulated seasonal canopy transpiration by 10%. The measured reduction in the seasonal sum of canopy transpiration and soil evaporation owing to CO{sub 2} enrichment, in comparison, was only about 5%.

  2. Spatial Variation in Transpiration Within a Small Forest Patch in Hoa Binh, Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giambelluca, T. W.; Ziegler, A. D.; Nullet, M. A.; Dao, T. M.

    2001-12-01

    We conducted measurements of small-scale variations in microclimate and sapflow within and near a small forest patch in Ban Tat Hamlet, Hoa Binh, northern Vietnam. Our observations provide evidence of the influences of surrounding clearings on forest patch microclimate and transpiration. The effects of proximity to the forest edge can be seen in the gradients in temperature, humidity, wind, and soil moisture content. Sapflow measurements in sample trees strongly indicate that transpiration rates are higher near the edge of the patch (edge effect). This effect is seen in the averages for the whole study period, despite infrequent wind flow into the instrumented edge of the patch. Edge effect is observed during both dry and wet periods, but is most apparent on days when solar and net radiation are high, relative humidity is low, or wind direction is from the clearing into the forest edge. These conditions are conducive to high positive heat advection from the clearing to the forest edge. Transpiration in both edge and interior trees is highly correlated with conditions in the clearing. Our results suggest that greater land-cover fragmentation tends to increase regional evaporative flux, i.e. fragmentation of remaining forested areas partly reverses the reduction in regional evaporation due to deforestation. We can infer from the distance-to-edge dependency of transpiration that the magnitude of this regional effect depends on the size, shape, and spatial distribution of landscape patches. It is also likely that the replacement land cover and moisture status of the clearings affect this process. Although we found slightly greater edge effect during the dry period of our observations, it is possible that under more prolonged or severe dry conditions, the soil moisture storage at the forest edge would become depleted leading to a reversal the transpiration pattern. >http://webdata.soc.hawaii.edu/climate/Frags/Frags.html

  3. An Integrated View of Whole-Tree Hydraulic Architecture. Does Stomatal or Hydraulic Conductance Determine Whole Tree Transpiration?

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gamir, Juan; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductance exerts a strong influence on many aspects of plant physiology, namely: transpiration, CO2 assimilation, growth, productivity or stress response. However we lack full understanding of the contribution of root or shoot water transport capacity to the total water balance, something which is difficult to study in trees. Here we tested the hypothesis that whole plant hydraulic conductance modulates plant transpiration using two different seedlings of citrus rootstocks, Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. and Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort ex Tan.). The two genotypes presented important differences in their root or shoot hydraulic conductance contribution to whole plant hydraulic conductance but, even so, water balance proved highly dependent on whole plant conductance. Further, we propose there is a possible equilibrium between root and shoot hydraulic conductance, similar to that between shoot and root biomass production, which could be related with xylem anatomy. PMID:27223695

  4. Fluorometric Measurement of Individual Stomata Activity and Transpiration via a "Brush-on", Water-Responsive Polymer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minjeong; Park, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Chan Woo; Jaworski, Justyn; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-01-01

    Much of atmospheric water originates from transpiration, the process by which plants release H2O from pores, known as stomata, that simultaneously intake CO2 for photosynthesis. Controlling stomatal aperture can regulate the extent of water transport in response to dynamic environmental factors including osmotic stress, temperature, light, and wind. While larger leaf regions are often examined, the extent of water vapor release from individual stomata remains unexplored. Using a "brush-on" sensing material, we can now assess transpiration using a water-responsive, polydiacetylene-based coating on the leaves surfaces. By eliciting a fluorometric signal to passing water vapor, we obtained information regarding the activity of individual stomata. In this demonstration, our results prove that this coating can identify the proportion of active stomata and the extent of transpirational diffusion of water in response to different conditions. PMID:27578430

  5. Fluorometric Measurement of Individual Stomata Activity and Transpiration via a “Brush-on”, Water-Responsive Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minjeong; Park, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Chan Woo; Jaworski, Justyn; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-01-01

    Much of atmospheric water originates from transpiration, the process by which plants release H2O from pores, known as stomata, that simultaneously intake CO2 for photosynthesis. Controlling stomatal aperture can regulate the extent of water transport in response to dynamic environmental factors including osmotic stress, temperature, light, and wind. While larger leaf regions are often examined, the extent of water vapor release from individual stomata remains unexplored. Using a “brush-on” sensing material, we can now assess transpiration using a water-responsive, polydiacetylene-based coating on the leaves surfaces. By eliciting a fluorometric signal to passing water vapor, we obtained information regarding the activity of individual stomata. In this demonstration, our results prove that this coating can identify the proportion of active stomata and the extent of transpirational diffusion of water in response to different conditions. PMID:27578430

  6. ROW PATTERN, PLANT DENSITY, AND NITROGEN RATE ON CORN YIELD IN THE SOUTHEASTERN US.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is uncertain how corn (Zea mays L.) yield would be affected by planting in a twin-row orientation in the southeast. The objectives were to compare corn grain yield when: 1) planted in single and twin-rows, 2) plant densities at recommended (1R) and twice the recommended (2R) rate, and 3) nitrogen...

  7. Evaluating potential impacts of species conversion on transpiration in the Piedmont of North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, J.; Treasure, E.; Simpson, G.; Domec, J.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S.

    2010-12-01

    Land management practices that include species conversion or vegetation manipulation can have consequences to surface water availability, groundwater recharge, streamflow generation, and water quality through altering the transpiration processes in forested watersheds. Our objective in this study is to compare stand water use or transpiration in a piedmont mixed hardwood stand (i.e., present stand) to five hypothetical single species stands (i.e., management scenarios), [Quercus spp. (oak), Acer Rubrum (red maple), Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip poplar), and Pinus Taeda (loblolly pine]. Since October 2007, six watersheds with a flume or v-notch weir installed at the watershed outlet have been monitored for baseline streamflow rates (mm d-1). In the summer of 2010, five trees from each of the above species were instrumented with sap flow sensors in the riparian upland of one watershed to develop linkages between stand stream runoff and transpiration. The sap flow or thermal heat dissipation method was used to calculate tree sap flux density for the mixed hardwood stand. Tree sapwood area and stand tree density were then used to compute stand transpiration rates, mm d-1, from June - August 2010. The parameters of the hypothetical single species stands were based on values determined from mixed hardwood stand conditions (e.g., the same stand sapwood area and stand tree density were applied to each option). The diameter at beast height of the monitored trees ranged from 10 cm to 38 cm with a water use range of 1.8 kg d-1 to 104 kg d-1. From our preliminary data, we found daily transpiration from the mixed hardwood stand (2.8 mm d-1 ± 0.06) was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than daily transpiration from the red maple (3.7 mm d-1 ± 0.14) and tulip poplar (3.5 mm d-1 ± 0.12) single species stand management option and significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the loblolly pine (2.3 mm d-1 ± 0.08), sweetgum (2.1 mm d-1 ± 0.08) and oak

  8. Transpiration and root development of urban trees in structural soil stormwater reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Bartens, Julia; Day, Susan D; Harris, J Roger; Wynn, Theresa M; Dove, Joseph E

    2009-10-01

    Stormwater management that relies on ecosystem processes, such as tree canopy interception and rhizosphere biology, can be difficult to achieve in built environments because urban land is costly and urban soil inhospitable to vegetation. Yet such systems offer a potentially valuable tool for achieving both sustainable urban forests and stormwater management. We evaluated tree water uptake and root distribution in a novel stormwater mitigation facility that integrates trees directly into detention reservoirs under pavement. The system relies on structural soils: highly porous engineered mixes designed to support tree root growth and pavement. To evaluate tree performance under the peculiar conditions of such a stormwater detention reservoir (i.e., periodically inundated), we grew green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor Willd.) in either CUSoil or a Carolina Stalite-based mix subjected to three simulated below-system infiltration rates for two growing seasons. Infiltration rate affected both transpiration and rooting depth. In a factorial experiment with ash, rooting depth always increased with infiltration rate for Stalite, but this relation was less consistent for CUSoil. Slow-drainage rates reduced transpiration and restricted rooting depth for both species and soils, and trunk growth was restricted for oak, which grew the most in moderate infiltration. Transpiration rates under slow infiltration were 55% (oak) and 70% (ash) of the most rapidly transpiring treatment (moderate for oak and rapid for ash). We conclude this system is feasible and provides another tool to address runoff that integrates the function of urban green spaces with other urban needs. PMID:19707704

  9. Transpiration and Root Development of Urban Trees in Structural Soil Stormwater Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartens, Julia; Day, Susan D.; Harris, J. Roger; Wynn, Theresa M.; Dove, Joseph E.

    2009-10-01

    Stormwater management that relies on ecosystem processes, such as tree canopy interception and rhizosphere biology, can be difficult to achieve in built environments because urban land is costly and urban soil inhospitable to vegetation. Yet such systems offer a potentially valuable tool for achieving both sustainable urban forests and stormwater management. We evaluated tree water uptake and root distribution in a novel stormwater mitigation facility that integrates trees directly into detention reservoirs under pavement. The system relies on structural soils: highly porous engineered mixes designed to support tree root growth and pavement. To evaluate tree performance under the peculiar conditions of such a stormwater detention reservoir (i.e., periodically inundated), we grew green ash ( Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and swamp white oak ( Quercus bicolor Willd.) in either CUSoil or a Carolina Stalite-based mix subjected to three simulated below-system infiltration rates for two growing seasons. Infiltration rate affected both transpiration and rooting depth. In a factorial experiment with ash, rooting depth always increased with infiltration rate for Stalite, but this relation was less consistent for CUSoil. Slow-drainage rates reduced transpiration and restricted rooting depth for both species and soils, and trunk growth was restricted for oak, which grew the most in moderate infiltration. Transpiration rates under slow infiltration were 55% (oak) and 70% (ash) of the most rapidly transpiring treatment (moderate for oak and rapid for ash). We conclude this system is feasible and provides another tool to address runoff that integrates the function of urban green spaces with other urban needs.

  10. Venezuelan extraction plant expanding to 1 bcfd rating

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Gomez, H. )

    1990-12-03

    This paper discusses how modification of the two process trains at Corpoven's San Joaquin, Venezuela, extraction plant will increase each train's sustained capacity to 500 MMscfd and 1 bcfd total plant capacity. The San Joaquin 1000 project, set for completion in 1991, will represent an increase in NGL production of 8,000 b/d, with a gross revenue of $25 million/year for Corpoven S.A., a subsidiary of Petroleos de Venezuela. The San Joaquin extraction plant currently consists of two identical process trains, each designed to handle 400 MMscfd of rich gas. Original design also provided for future conversion for 70% ethane recovery with the installation of CO{sub 2}-removal units for the inlet gas. Because actual inlet gas has been much leaner than design, and excess capacity has existed in some vessels resulting from considerations for the 70% ethane-recovery case, true capacity of the plant is considerably higher than design. In addition, stream tests have shown peak processing capacity approaching 500 MMscfd/train.

  11. Aquaporin-Mediated Reduction in Maize Root Hydraulic Conductivity Impacts Cell Turgor and Leaf Elongation Even without Changing Transpiration1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ehlert, Christina; Maurel, Christophe; Tardieu, François; Simonneau, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Root hydraulic conductivity in plants (Lpr) exhibits large variations in response to abiotic stimuli. In this study, we investigated the impact of dynamic, aquaporin-mediated changes of Lpr on leaf growth, water potential, and water flux throughout the plant. For this, we manipulated Lpr by subjecting roots to four independent treatments, with aquaporin inhibitors applied either to transpiring maize (Zea mays) plants grown in hydroponics or to detopped root systems for estimation of Lpr. The treatments were acid load at pH 6.0 and 5.0 and hydrogen peroxide and anoxia applied for 1 to 2 h and subsequently reversed. First, we established that acid load affected cell hydraulic conductivity in maize root cortex. Lpr was reduced by all treatments by 31% to 63%, with half-times of about 15 min, and partly recovered when treatments were reversed. Cell turgor measured in the elongating zone of leaves decreased synchronously with Lpr, and leaf elongation rate closely followed these changes across all treatments in a dose-dependent manner. Leaf and xylem water potentials also followed changes in Lpr. Stomatal conductance and rates of transpiration and water uptake were not affected by Lpr reduction under low evaporative demand. Increased evaporative demand, when combined with acid load at pH 6.0, induced stomatal closure and amplified all other responses without altering their synchrony. Root pressurization reversed the impact of acid load or anoxia on leaf elongation rate and water potential, further indicating that changes in turgor mediated the response of leaf growth to reductions in Lpr. PMID:19369594

  12. Understanding Tree Water Use Across the Snow-Rain Transition in Idaho's Mountain Watersheds: Feedbacks Between Stream Networks, Transpiration, and Basin Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, J. A.; Godsey, S.; Reinhardt, K.; Thackray, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Warming trends are expected to reduce mountain snow pack, increase evapotranspiration, and thus diminish the sometimes limited water supplies of many intermountain streams and rivers. While it is believed that water that is transpired is no longer available for streamflow, it remains uncertain how the timing and quantity of transpiration differ between snow-dominated and rain-dominated elevations, and how alterations in transpiration in these regions affect surface water flow in mountain stream networks. To understand the spatiotemporal relationships of transpiration, we measured Douglas fir water use across the snow-rain transition line/elevation in the Pioneer Creek watershed of Idaho's Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness in 2014. We also recorded stream discharge and monitored surface flow areal extent in four subwatersheds with contrasting geomorphologic controls on the channel network, including moraine and fault controls. We sought to test the hypotheses that (1) Douglas fir trees at snow-dominated elevations would transpire less water each year, and do so later in the melt-season compared to Douglas fir trees at rain-dominated elevations, and (2), that patterns of stream network expansion and contraction will reflect patterns of timing in transpiration rates. Preliminary analyses suggest that transpiration timing is similar across all elevations, and that stream network extent varies minimally across a 20 to 60% variation in streamflow. Summer transpiration varied more strongly with tree size and age than with elevation. We present comparisons of drainage density across the sites at different flow rates, and relate them to geomorphic controls present within each basin. Understanding the present relationships of streamflow with transpiration across snowline contributes to more robust predictions of changes in water resources as a result of climate change.

  13. Isotopic steady state of transpired water in wheat leaves grown under different watering regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Simonin, K.; Barbour, M.

    2013-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes have been used to answer a range of ecological, hydrological, and climate questions. One important application is to use oxygen isotopes to partition ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET), since the two components, transpiration and evaporation have distinctly different isotopic compositions (δ18O). However, in order to partition ET using isotopes, accurate measurements or modeling of evaporation and transpiration, are needed. Many studies use the Craig-Gordon Model to model the isotopic composition of transpired water (δ18OT), which assume plants are transpiring at isotopic steady state (ISS), such that the isotopic composition of transpired water (δ18OT) is equal to the δ18O of stem water. However, many studies are questioning the assumption that plants are transpiring at ISS, especially across diurnal time scales. A significant motivation for assuming ISS is the difficulty of collecting transpired water for isotopic analysis. However, with the introduction of laser based spectroscopy methods for isotope analysis, we can now measure δ18O of water vapor at high frequency. Furthermore, these laser based instruments can also be coupled with gas exchange systems to not only measure the isotopic composition of δ18OT, but also to examine the physiological and environmental variables that influence the isotope values, and directly test process-based models. In our study, our first objective was to assess how quickly plants reached isotopic constancy (IC) under a range of environmental conditions. We used two different wheat cultivars that had different stomatal conductance (gs) and subjected them to two different watering treatments to extend the range of gs. Our second objective was to compare δ18OT at IC with δ18O of irrigation water to understand the difference between ISS and IC. We found a significant positive relationship between gs and time to IC (p<0.003, R2 = 0.78) and that the time ranged from 20 to 205 minutes. In order to further

  14. Transpiration efficiency over an annual cycle, leaf gas exchange and wood carbon isotope ratio of three tropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Winter, Klaus; Aranda, Jorge; Virgo, Aurelio; Garcia, Milton

    2009-09-01

    Variation in transpiration efficiency (TE) and its relationship with the stable carbon isotope ratio of wood was investigated in the saplings of three tropical tree species. Five individuals each of Platymiscium pinnatum (Jacq.) Dugand, Swietenia macrophylla King and Tectona grandis Linn. f. were grown individually in large (760 l) pots over 16 months in the Republic of Panama. Cumulative transpiration was determined by repeatedly weighing the pots with a pallet truck scale. Dry matter production was determined by destructive harvest. The TE, expressed as experiment-long dry matter production divided by cumulative water use, averaged 4.1, 4.3 and 2.9 g dry matter kg(-1) water for P. pinnatum, S. macrophylla and T. grandis, respectively. The TE of T. grandis was significantly lower than that of the other two species. Instantaneous measurements of the ratio of intercellular to ambient CO(2) partial pressures (c(i)/c(a)), taken near the end of the experiment, explained 66% of variation in TE. Stomatal conductance was lower in S. macrophylla than in T. grandis, whereas P. pinnatum had similar stomatal conductance to T. grandis, but with a higher photosynthetic rate. Thus, c(i)/c(a) and TE appeared to vary in response to both stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Stem-wood delta(13)C varied over a relatively narrow range of just 2.2 per thousand, but still explained 28% of variation in TE. The results suggest that leaf-level processes largely determined variation among the three tropical tree species in whole-plant water-use efficiency integrated over a full annual cycle. PMID:19661136

  15. A Continuum Theory of Thermal Transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielenberg, James; Brenner, Howard

    2003-11-01

    A rational, continuum mechanical description is given for the pressure drop that develops in a closed capillary tube subject to an imposed temperature gradient. This phenomenon, termed thermal transpiration, has been experimentally demonstrated in systems at vanishing Knudsen numbers, yet no purely continuum mechanical description has, until now, been given. Previous hybrid solutions (dating back to Maxwell in 1879) have utilized the classical, incompressible flow equations along with molecularly derived slip boundary conditions. This solution approach will be briefly discussed and shown to be dynamically consistent yet energetically flawed. Subsequently, we will apply a novel reformulation of continuum-mechanics and -thermodynamics, which clearly distinguishes between the Lagrangian (tracer) and the barycentric velocities, to generate a solution for the thermal pressure drop developed in a closed system. Explicitly, the phenomena at hand will be shown to be entirely analogous to Poiseuille flow in tube, albeit with the tacit recognition that the ``flow'' we are speaking of is defined in a dynamic sense rather than in the more traditional, kinematic mass-flux based sense. This solution will be show to be free of ad hoc parameters, consistent with experimental results, and in accordance with classical macroscopic thermodynamics. Beyond its purely scientific importance, this phenomenon may find applications in the emerging area of micro-fluidic pumping.

  16. When do plants modify fluvial processes? Plant-hydraulic interactions under variable flow and sediment supply rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, Rebecca B.; Wilcox, Andrew C.; Kui, Li; Lightbody, Anne F.; Stella, John C.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2015-02-01

    Flow and sediment regimes shape alluvial river channels; yet the influence of these abiotic drivers can be strongly mediated by biotic factors such as the size and density of riparian vegetation. We present results from an experiment designed to identify when plants control fluvial processes and to investigate the sensitivity of fluvial processes to changes in plant characteristics versus changes in flow rate or sediment supply. Live seedlings of two species with distinct morphologies, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) and cottonwood (Populus fremontii), were placed in different configurations in a mobile sand-bed flume. We measured the hydraulic and sediment flux responses of the channel at different flow rates and sediment supply conditions representing equilibrium (sediment supply = transport rate) and deficit (sediment supply < transport rate). We found that the hydraulic and sediment flux responses during sediment equilibrium represented a balance between abiotic and biotic factors and was sensitive to increasing flow rates and plant species and configuration. Species-specific traits controlled the hydraulic response: compared to cottonwood, which has a more tree-like morphology, the shrubby morphology of tamarisk resulted in less pronation and greater reductions in near-bed velocities, Reynolds stress, and sediment flux rates. Under sediment-deficit conditions, on the other hand, abiotic factors dampened the effect of variations in plant characteristics on the hydraulic response. We identified scenarios for which the highest stem-density patch, independent of abiotic factors, dominated the fluvial response. These results provide insight into how and when plants influence fluvial processes in natural systems.

  17. Community Level Offset of Rain Use- and Transpiration Efficiency for a Heavily Grazed Ecosystem in Inner Mongolia Grassland

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying Z.; Giese, Marcus; Gao, Qiang; Brueck, Holger; Sheng, Lian X.; Yang, Hai J.

    2013-01-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE) is a key indicator to assess ecosystem adaptation to water stress. Rain use efficiency (RUE) is usually used as a proxy for WUE due to lack of transpiration data. Furthermore, RUE based on aboveground primary productivity (RUEANPP) is used to evaluate whole plant water use because root production data is often missing as well. However, it is controversial as to whether RUE is a reliable parameter to elucidate transpiration efficiency (TE), and whether RUEANPP is a suitable proxy for RUE of the whole plant basis. The experiment was conducted at three differently managed sites in the Inner Mongolia steppe: a site fenced since 1979 (UG79), a winter grazing site (WG) and a heavily grazed site (HG). Site HG had consistent lowest RUEANPP and RUE based on total net primary productivity (RUENPP). RUEANPP is a relatively good proxy at sites UG79 and WG, but less reliable for site HG. Similarly, RUEANPP is good predictor of transpiration efficiency based on aboveground net primary productivity (TEANPP) at sites UG79 and WG but not for site HG. However, if total net primary productivity is considered, RUENPP is good predictor of transpiration efficiency based on total net primary productivity (TENPP) for all sites. Although our measurements indicate decreased plant transpiration and consequentially decreasing RUE under heavy grazing, productivity was relatively compensated for with a higher TE. This offset between RUE and TE was even enhanced under water limited conditions and more evident when belowground net primary productivity (BNNP) was included. These findings suggest that BNPP should be considered when studies fucus on WUE of more intensively used grasslands. The consideration of the whole plant perspective and “real” WUE would partially revise our picture of system performance and therefore might affect the discussion on the C-sequestration and resilience potential of ecosystems. PMID:24058632

  18. A dynamical system perspective on plant hydraulic failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, Stefano; Katul, Gabriel; Porporato, Amilcare

    2014-06-01

    Photosynthesis is governed by leaf water status that depends on the difference between the rates of transpiration and water supply from the soil and through the plant xylem. When transpiration increases compared to water supply, the leaf water potential reaches a more negative equilibrium, leading to water stress. Both high atmospheric vapor pressure deficit and low soil moisture increase the water demand while decreasing the supply due to lowered soil-to-root conductance and xylem cavitation. Therefore, dry conditions may eventually reduce the leaf water potential to the point of collapsing the plant hydraulic system. This "hydraulic failure" is shown to correspond to a fold bifurcation where the environmental parameters (vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture) trigger the loss of a physiologically sustainable equilibrium. Using a minimal plant hydraulic model, coordination among plant hydraulic traits is shown to result in increased resilience to environmental stresses, thereby impeding hydraulic failure unless hydraulic traits deteriorate due to prolonged water shortage or other damages.

  19. Canopy Transpiration in a Chronosequence of Central Siberian Pine Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, Z.; Ernst-Detler, S.; Christian, W.; Ernst-Eckart, S.; Waldemar, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Tree transpiration was measured in 28, 67, 204 and 383 - year old uniform stands and in a multi-cohort stand (140 t0 430) of Pinus sylvestris ssp. sibirica Lebed. in Central Siberia during August of 1995.

  20. Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, B.L.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G.; Rousar, D.C.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1/4 scale transpiring wall reactor was designed and fabricated by Aerojet using their platelet technology. Sandia`s Engineering Evaluation Reactor serves as a test bed to supply, pressurize and heat the waste; collect, measure and analyze the effluent; and control operation of the system. This report describes the design, test capabilities, and operation of this versatile and unique test system with the transpiring wall reactor.

  1. Leaf transpiration efficiency of some drought-resistant maize lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field measurements of leaf gas exchange in maize often indicate stomatal conductances higher than required to provide substomatal carbon dioxide concentrations saturating to photosynthesis. Thus maize leaves often operate at lower transpiration efficiency (TE) than potentially achievable for specie...

  2. Transpiration during life cycle in controlled wheat growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rummel, John D.

    1990-01-01

    A previously developed model of wheat growth, designed for convenient incorporation into system level models of advanced space life support systems is described. The model is applied to data from an experiment that grew wheat under controlled conditions and measured fresh biomass and cumulated transpiration as a function of time. The adequacy of modeling the transpiration as proportional to the inedible biomass and an age factor that varies during the life cycle are discussed.

  3. Predicting photosynthesis and transpiration responses to ozone: decoupling modeled photosynthesis and stomatal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardozzi, D.; Levis, S.; Bonan, G.; Sparks, J. P.

    2012-08-01

    Plants exchange greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and water with the atmosphere through the processes of photosynthesis and transpiration, making them essential in climate regulation. Carbon dioxide and water exchange are typically coupled through the control of stomatal conductance, and the parameterization in many models often predict conductance based on photosynthesis values. Some environmental conditions, like exposure to high ozone (O3) concentrations, alter photosynthesis independent of stomatal conductance, so models that couple these processes cannot accurately predict both. The goals of this study were to test direct and indirect photosynthesis and stomatal conductance modifications based on O3 damage to tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) in a coupled Farquhar/Ball-Berry model. The same modifications were then tested in the Community Land Model (CLM) to determine the impacts on gross primary productivity (GPP) and transpiration at a constant O3 concentration of 100 parts per billion (ppb). Modifying the Vcmax parameter and directly modifying stomatal conductance best predicts photosynthesis and stomatal conductance responses to chronic O3 over a range of environmental conditions. On a global scale, directly modifying conductance reduces the effect of O3 on both transpiration and GPP compared to indirectly modifying conductance, particularly in the tropics. The results of this study suggest that independently modifying stomatal conductance can improve the ability of models to predict hydrologic cycling, and therefore improve future climate predictions.

  4. Stomatal acclimation to vapour pressure deficit doubles transpiration of small tree seedlings with warming.

    PubMed

    Marchin, Renée M; Broadhead, Alice A; Bostic, Laura E; Dunn, Robert R; Hoffmann, William A

    2016-10-01

    Future climate change is expected to increase temperature (T) and atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) in many regions, but the effect of persistent warming on plant stomatal behaviour is highly uncertain. We investigated the effect of experimental warming of 1.9-5.1 °C and increased VPD of 0.5-1.3 kPa on transpiration and stomatal conductance (gs ) of tree seedlings in the temperate forest understory (Duke Forest, North Carolina, USA). We observed peaked responses of transpiration to VPD in all seedlings, and the optimum VPD for transpiration (Dopt ) shifted proportionally with increasing chamber VPD. Warming increased mean water use of Carya by 140% and Quercus by 150%, but had no significant effect on water use of Acer. Increased water use of ring-porous species was attributed to (1) higher air T and (2) stomatal acclimation to VPD resulting in higher gs and more sensitive stomata, and thereby less efficient water use. Stomatal acclimation maintained homeostasis of leaf T and carbon gain despite increased VPD, revealing that short-term stomatal responses to VPD may not be representative of long-term exposure. Acclimation responses differ from expectations of decreasing gs with increasing VPD and may necessitate revision of current models based on this assumption. PMID:27392307

  5. The importance of micrometeorological variations for photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurgers, G.; Lagergren, F.; Mölder, M.; Lindroth, A.

    2014-08-01

    Plant canopies affect the canopy micrometeorology, and thereby alter canopy exchange processes. For the simulation of these exchange processes on a regional or global scale, large-scale vegetation models often assume homogeneous environmental conditions within the canopy. In this study, we address the importance of vertical variations in light, temperature, CO2 concentration and humidity within the canopy for photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal coniferous forest in central Sweden. A leaf-level photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model was used for aggregating these processes to canopy level while applying the within-canopy distributions of these driving variables. The simulation model showed good agreement with eddy covariance-derived gross primary production (GPP) estimates on daily and annual timescales, and showed a reasonable agreement between transpiration and observed H2O fluxes, where discrepancies are largely attributable to a lack of forest floor evaporation in the model. Simulations in which vertical heterogeneity was artificially suppressed revealed that the vertical distribution of light is the driver of vertical heterogeneity. Despite large differences between above-canopy and within canopy humidity, and despite large gradients in CO2 concentration during early morning hours after nights with stable conditions, neither humidity nor CO2 played an important role for vertical heterogeneity of photosynthesis and transpiration.

  6. The importance of micrometeorological variations for photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurgers, G.; Lagergren, F.; Mölder, M.; Lindroth, A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopies affect the canopy micrometeorology, and thereby alter canopy exchange processes. For the simulation of these exchange processes on a regional or global scale, large-scale vegetation models often assume homogeneous environmental conditions within the canopy. In this study, we address the importance of vertical variations in light, temperature, CO2 concentration and humidity within the canopy for fluxes of photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal coniferous forest in central Sweden. A leaf-level photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model was used for aggregating these processes to canopy level while applying the within-canopy distributions of these driving variables. The simulation model showed good agreement with eddy covariance-derived gross primary production (GPP) estimates on daily and annual timescales, and showed a reasonable agreement between transpiration and observed H2O fluxes, where discrepancies are largely attributable to a lack of forest floor evaporation in the model. Simulations in which vertical heterogeneity was artificially suppressed revealed that the vertical distribution of light is the driver of vertical heterogeneity. Despite large differences between above-canopy and within-canopy humidity, and despite large gradients in CO2 concentration during early morning hours after nights with stable conditions, neither humidity nor CO2 played an important role for vertical heterogeneity of photosynthesis and transpiration.

  7. An experimental study on the efficiency of transpiration cooling in laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülhan, A.; Braun, S.

    2011-03-01

    An experimental study on the efficiency of transpiration cooling in hypersonic laminar and turbulent flow regimes is carried out in the Hypersonic Windtunnel Cologne with a focus on the aerothermal problems downstream of the cooled model part. The model is made of a material of low thermal conductivity (PEEK) with an integrated probe of a porous material. The experimental setup allows the direct comparison of the thermal behavior of transpiration cooling to a well-defined and radiatively cooled reference surface. Experiments are performed at Mach number of 6 and two different Reynolds numbers. Air, argon and helium are used as coolants at various flow rates, in order to identify the influence of coolant medium on cooling efficiency. The cooling efficiency of air and argon is comparable. Helium provides significantly higher cooling efficiency at the same blowing ratio, i.e. same coolant mass flow rate. The experimental data shows that the efficiency of the transpiration cooling in turbulent flows is much lower than in laminar flow.

  8. Grazing-induced losses of biodiversity affect the transpiration of an arid ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Verón, Santiago R; Paruelo, José M; Oesterheld, Martín

    2011-02-01

    Degradation processes often lead to species loss. Such losses would impact on ecosystem functioning depending on the extinction order and the functional and structural aspects of species. For the Patagonian arid steppe, we used a simulation model to study the effects of species loss on the rate and variability (i.e. stability) of transpiration as a key attribute of ecosystem functioning. We addressed (1) the differences between the overgrazing extinction order and other potential orders, and (2) the role of biomass abundance, biomass distribution, and functional diversity on the effect of species loss due to overgrazing. We considered a community composed of ten species which were assigned an order of extinction due to overgrazing based on their preference by livestock. We performed four model simulations to test for overgrazing effects through different combinations of species loss, and reductions of biomass and functional diversity. In general, transpiration rate and variability were positively associated to species richness and remained fairly constant until half the species were lost by overgrazing. The extinction order by overgrazing was the most conservative of all possible orders. The amount of biomass was more important than functional diversity in accounting for the impacts of species richness on transpiration. Our results suggest that, to prevent Patagonian steppes from shifting to stable, low-production systems (by overgrazing), maintaining community biomass is more important than preserving species richness or species functional diversity. PMID:20865282

  9. Implications of Advanced Crew Escape Suit Transpiration for the Orion Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Kuznetz, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Human testing was conducted to more fully characterize the integrated performance of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) with liquid cooling provide by an Individual Cooling Unit (ICU) across a broad range of environmental conditions and metabolic rates. Together with a correlation for the ACES Liquid Cooling Garment as a function of inlet temperature, metabolic rate, and crew size, a reasonably conservative correlation for core temperature was achieved for the human thermal model applied to the ACES with ICU cooling. A key observation for this correlation was accounting for transpiration of evaporated sweat through the Gortex(Registered TradeMark) liner of the ACES indicated by as much as 0.6 lbm of sweat evaporated over the course of the 1 hour test profile, most of which could not be attributed to respiration or head sweat evaporation of the crew. Historically it has been assumed that transpiration was not an important design feature of the ACES suit. The correlated human thermal model will show transpiration to be highly useful in hot survival situations for the Orion Program when adequate liquid cooling is not available.

  10. Stable isotopes in leaf water and transpiration - tools to assess leaf physiology and water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessler, Arthur; Roddy, Adam; Volkmann, Till; Haberer, Kristine

    2014-05-01

    New laser based isotope technology allows online determination of the isotopic composition of water transpired from leaves. With this tool we can get new insights into leaf water physiology during day-night-cycles but also track the dynamics of plant water uptake with high temporal resolution. This talk we will give an overview on the following emerging topics - Leaf level physiology: The isotopic non-steady state of leaf water during the diel course - Plant-soil-atmosphere coupling: Dynamics of water uptake by plants Brought together both topics allow to get deeper insights into the effects of environmental parameters on the water balance of ecosystems bridging temporal and spatial scales. The findings from this research might help integrating plant physiological information, soil hydrological processes and the interaction between plant and soil processes in hydrological models.

  11. Effects of thinning intensities on transpiration and productivity of 50-year-old Pinus koraeinsis stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kim, T.; Cho, S.; Ryu, D.; Moon, M.; Kim, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of thinning intensities on stand transpiration and productivity of 50-year-old Korean pine forests for three years. Forest thinning, which remove some fraction of trees from stand, alters the microclimatic conditions such as radiation distribution within canopy, vapor pressure deficit, and amount of available soil water. These changes influence on the tree water use, and related tree growth. Thinning was conducted on March, 2012 with two intensities (Control, Light-thinning, and Heavy-thinning). Transpiration was estimated from sap flux density, which was measured with Granier-type thermal dissipation sensors. Tree diameter growth was measured with dendrometer, and converted to tree productivity using allometric equations developed specifically in our study sites.The climatic conditions showed remarkable differences among three years. In 2012, total precipitation was highest but spring was dry. 2013 was normal year with frequent rain events. In contrast, 2014 was hot and extremely dry. Stand transpiration was initially decreased ca. 20% and 42% on light-thinning and heavy-thinning stand, respectively. In second year, it gradually recovered in both thinning intensities, and was 19% and 37% lower on light-thinning and heavy-thinning stand, respectively. However, the recovery trends were different between two thinning intensities. Transpiration of heavy-thinning stand was recovered slowly than that of light thinning stand. In 2014, heavy-thinning stand transpired ca. 5% more than control plot in early growing season, but severe drought had negative effects that caused reduction of stand transpiration in thinned stand on late growing season. The tree-level productivity was increased initially ca. 24% and 28% on light-thinning and heavy-thinning stand, respectively. During the following growing seasons, this thinning-induced enhancement of productivity was diminished in light-thinning stand (21% in 2013 and 20% in 2014), but was

  12. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  13. The effect of wind velocity on transpiration in a mixed broadleaved deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Oren, R.; Oishi, A. C.; Hsieh, C.; Phillips, N. G.; Novick, K. A.; Stoy, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Wind velocity (U) within and above forest canopies can alter the coupling between the vapor-saturated sub-stomatal airspace and the drier atmosphere aloft, thereby influencing transpiration rates. In practice, however, the actual increase in transpiration with increasing U depends on the aerodynamic resistance (RA) to vapor transfer compared to canopy resistance to water vapor flux out of leaves (RC, dominated by stomatal resistance, Rstom), and the rate at which RA decreases with increasing U. We investigated the effect of U on transpiration at the canopy scale using filtered meteorological data and sap flux measurements gathered from six diverse species of a mature broadleaved deciduous forest. Only under high light conditions, stand transpiration (EC) increased slightly (6.5%) with increasing U ranging from ~0.7 to ~4.7 m s-1. Under other conditions, sap flux density (Js) and EC responded weakly or did not change with U. RA, estimated from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, decreased with increasing U, but this decline was offset by increasing RC, estimated from a rearranged Penman-Monteith equation, due to a concurrent increase in vapor pressure deficit (D). The increase of RC with D over the observed range of U was consistent with increased Rstom by ~40% based on hydraulic theory. Except for very rare half-hourly values, the proportion of RA to total resistance (RT) remained < 15% over the observed range of conditions. These results suggest that in similar forests and conditions, accounting for the effects of U-D relationship on Rstom would reduce the uncertainty of modeling canopy gas exchange more than accounting for the direct effect of U on RA.

  14. Transpiration efficiency: new insights into an old story.

    PubMed

    Vadez, Vincent; Kholova, Jana; Medina, Susan; Kakkera, Aparna; Anderberg, Hanna

    2014-11-01

    Producing more food per unit of water has never been as important as it is at present, and the demand for water by economic sectors other than agriculture will necessarily put a great deal of pressure on a dwindling resource, leading to a call for increases in the productivity of water in agriculture. This topic has been given high priority in the research agenda for the last 30 years, but with the exception of a few specific cases, such as water-use-efficient wheat in Australia, breeding crops for water-use efficiency has yet to be accomplished. Here, we review the efforts to harness transpiration efficiency (TE); that is, the genetic component of water-use efficiency. As TE is difficult to measure, especially in the field, evaluations of TE have relied mostly on surrogate traits, although this has most likely resulted in over-dependence on the surrogates. A new lysimetric method for assessing TE gravimetrically throughout the entire cropping cycle has revealed high genetic variation in different cereals and legumes. Across species, water regimes, and a wide range of genotypes, this method has clearly established an absence of relationships between TE and total water use, which dismisses previous claims that high TE may lead to a lower production potential. More excitingly, a tight link has been found between these large differences in TE in several crops and attributes of plants that make them restrict water losses under high vapour-pressure deficits. This trait provides new insight into the genetics of TE, especially from the perspective of plant hydraulics, probably with close involvement of aquaporins, and opens new possibilities for achieving genetic gains via breeding focused on this trait. Last but not least, small amounts of water used in specific periods of the crop cycle, such as during grain filling, may be critical. We assessed the efficiency of water use at these critical stages. PMID:24600020

  15. PVUSA procurement, acceptance, and rating practices for photovoltaic power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Dows, R.N.; Gough, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report is one in a series of PVUSA reports on PVUSA experiences and lessons learned at the demonstration sites in Davis and Kerman, California, and from participating utility host sites. During the course of approximately 7 years (1988--1994), 10 PV systems have been installed ranging from 20 kW to 500 kW. Six 20-kW emerging module technology arrays, five on universal project-provided structures and one turnkey concentrator, and four turnkey utility-scale systems (200 to 500 kW) were installed. PVUSA took a very proactive approach in the procurement of these systems. In the absence of established procurement documents, the project team developed a comprehensive set of technical and commercial documents. These have been updated with each successive procurement. Working closely with vendors after the award in a two-way exchange provided designs better suited for utility applications. This report discusses the PVUSA procurement process through testing and acceptance, and rating of PV turnkey systems. Special emphasis is placed on the acceptance testing and rating methodology which completes the procurement process by verifying that PV systems meet contract requirements. Lessons learned and recommendations are provided based on PVUSA experience.

  16. Thermal transpiration through single walled carbon nanotubes and graphene channels

    SciTech Connect

    Thekkethala, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2013-11-07

    Thermal transpiration through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene channels is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The system consists of two reservoirs connected by a CNT. It is observed that a flow is developed inside the CNT from the low temperature reservoir to the high temperature reservoir when the two reservoirs are maintained at different temperatures. The influence of channel size and temperature gradient on the mean velocity is analysed by varying the CNT diameter and the temperature of one of the reservoirs. Larger flow rate is observed in the smaller diameter CNTs showing an increase in the mean velocity with increase in the temperature gradient. For the flow developed inside the CNTs, slip boundaries occur and the slip length is calculated using the velocity profile. We examine the effect of fluid-wall interaction strength (ε{sub fw}), diffusivity (D), and viscosity of the fluid (μ) on the temperature induced fluid transport through the CNTs. Similar investigations are also carried out by replacing the CNT with a graphene channel. Results show that the mean velocity of the fluid atoms in the graphene channel is lower than that through the CNTs. This can be attributed to the higher degree of confinement observed in the CNTs.

  17. Determination of methane emission rates on a biogas plant using data from laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groth, Angela; Maurer, Claudia; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the work was to establish a method for emission control of biogas plants especially the observation of fugitive methane emissions. The used method is in a developmental stage but the topic is crucial to environmental and economic issues. A remote sensing measurement method was adopted to determine methane emission rates of a biogas plant in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. An inverse dispersion model was used to deduce emission rates. This technique required one concentration measurement with an open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) downwind and upwind the source and basic wind information, like wind speed and direction. Different operating conditions of the biogas plant occurring on the measuring day (December 2013) could be represented roughly in the results. During undisturbed operational modes the methane emission rate averaged 2.8 g/s, which corresponds to 4% of the methane gas production rate of the biogas plant. PMID:25446786

  18. Small Variance in Growth Rate in Annual Plants has Large Effects on Genetic Drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When plant size is strongly correlated with plant reproduction, variance in growth rates results in a lognormal distribution of seed production within a population. Fecundity variance affects effective population size (Ne), which reflects the ability of a population to maintain beneficial mutations ...

  19. Relationship between Hexokinase and the Aquaporin PIP1 in the Regulation of Photosynthesis and Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Gilor; Sade, Nir; Attia, Ziv; Secchi, Francesca; Zwieniecki, Maciej; Holbrook, N. Michele; Levi, Asher; Alchanatis, Victor; Moshelion, Menachem; Granot, David

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression of the aquaporin NtAQP1, which is known to function as a plasmalemma channel for CO2 and water, increases the rate of both photosynthesis and transpiration. In contrast, increased expression of Arabidopsis hexokinase1 (AtHXK1), a dual-function enzyme that mediates sugar sensing, decreases the expression of photosynthetic genes and the rate of transpiration and inhibits growth. Here, we show that AtHXK1 also decreases root and stem hydraulic conductivity and leaf mesophyll CO2 conductance (gm). Due to their opposite effects on plant development and physiology, we examined the relationship between NtAQP1 and AtHXK1 at the whole-plant level using transgenic tomato plants expressing both genes simultaneously. NtAQP1 significantly improved growth and increased the transpiration rates of AtHXK1-expressing plants. Reciprocal grafting experiments indicated that this complementation occurs when both genes are expressed simultaneously in the shoot. Yet, NtAQP1 had only a marginal effect on the hydraulic conductivity of the double-transgenic plants, suggesting that the complementary effect of NtAQP1 is unrelated to shoot water transport. Rather, NtAQP1 significantly increased leaf mesophyll CO2 conductance and enhanced the rate of photosynthesis, suggesting that NtAQP1 facilitated the growth of the double-transgenic plants by enhancing mesophyll conductance of CO2. PMID:24498392

  20. Effect of aerosols on evapo-transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, B. S.; Latha, R.; Manoj, Kumar; Mahanti, N. C.

    2014-06-01

    Aerosol direct radiative forcing (ARF) at surface is estimated from instantaneous, simultaneous observations of global radiation and aerosol optical depth (AOD) during winter, pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons over a tropical Indian station at the south-eastern end of Indo Gangetic basin. A comparison of observed and model derived ARFs is made and possible reasons for mismatch are discussed. Aerosol-induced reduction in solar visible (0.4-0.7 μm) spectrum energy (SWvis), contributing 44% to total broad band (0.3-3.0 μm) energy (SW), and its effect on surface energy fluxes are discussed in this study. Aerosols on an average reduce SWvis at surface by ˜27%. SWvis reduces by 14.5 W m-2 for a 0.1 increase in AOD when single scattering albedo (SSA) is 0.979 where as it reduces by 67.5 W m-2 when SSA is 0.867 indicating the significant effect of absorbing aerosols. Effect of ARF on net radiation, Rn, sensible heat flux, H and latent heat flux/evapo-transpiration, LE are estimated using the observed ratios of Rn/SW, H/Rn and LE/Rn, having reasonably good correlation. Observed Rn/SW varies between 0.59 and 0.75 with a correlation of 0.99 between them. LE, calculated by energy balance method, varies from 56% to 74% of Rn but with a lesser correlation, the possible reasons are discussed. For a given ARF, LE decreases by ˜14% and Rn by ˜15% with respect to observed LE and Rn respectively. The reduction in LE increases from 37% to 54% of ARF when LE increases from 220 W m-2 to 440 W m-2, suggesting that wet soil induces relatively larger reduction in evaporation. The results agree with earlier model sensitivity studies that Rn reduces more with increase in aerosol absorption which is compensated by proportionate reductions in H and LE depending on soil and atmospheric conditions.

  1. Physiological studies in young Eucalyptus stands in southern India and their use in estimating forest transpiration

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.M.; Rosier, P.T.W.; Murthy, K.V.

    1992-12-31

    Stomatal conductance, leaf water potential and leaf area index were measured in adjacent plantations of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Eucalyptus tereticornis at Puradal, near Shimoga, Karnataka, southern India. The data were collected in a range of climatic conditions during a two year period immediately following plantation establishment. Physiological differences between the two species were small and confined largely to leaf area index. Stomatal conductance was highest in the post-monsoon period and declined to minimum values immediately prior to the onset of the monsoon, with the lowest conductances observed after the plantations had been established for more than one year. Stomatal conductance, leaf area index and above-canopy meteorological data were combined in a multi-layer transpiration model and used to calculate hourly values of transpiration from the two species. Rates of transpiration up to 6 mm d{sup {minus}1} were estimated for the post-monsoon period but fell to below 1 mm d{sup {minus}1} prior to the monsoon.

  2. The response of Pinus sylvestris to drought: stomatal control of transpiration and hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Irvine, J.; Perks, M. P.; Magnani, F.; Grace, J.

    1998-06-01

    We investigated the impact of drought on the physiology of 41-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in central Scotland. Measurements were made of the seasonal course of transpiration, canopy stomatal conductance, needle water potential, xylem water content, soil-to-needle hydraulic resistance, and growth. Comparison was made between drought-treated plots and those receiving average precipitation. In response to drought, transpiration rate declined once volumetric water content (VWC) over the top 20 cm of soil reached a threshold value of 12%. Thereafter, transpiration was a near linear function of soil water content. As the soil water deficit developed, the hydraulic resistance between soil and needles increased by a factor of three as predawn needle water potential declined from -0.54 to -0.71 MPa. A small but significant increase in xylem embolism was detected in 1-year-old shoots. Stomatal control of transpiration prevented needle water potential from declining below -1.5 MPa. Basal area, and shoot and needle growth were significantly reduced in the drought treatment. In the year following the drought, canopy stomatal conductance and soil-to-needle hydraulic resistance recovered. Current-year needle extension recovered, but a significant reduction in basal area increment was evident one year after the drought. The results suggest that, in response to soil water deficit, mature Scots pine closes its stomata sufficiently to prevent the development of substantial xylem embolism. Reduced growth in the year after a severe soil water deficit is most likely to be the result of reduced assimilation in the year of the drought, rather than to any residual embolism carried over from one year to the next. PMID:12651364

  3. Improvement of growth rate of plants by bubble discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahata, Junichiro; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Fujio, Takuya; Sasaki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bubble discharge in water on the growth rate of plants was investigated experimentally for application to plant cultivation systems. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea), radish (Raphanus sativus var. sativus), and strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) were used as specimens to clarify the effect of the discharge treatment on edible parts of the plants. The specimens were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included chicken manure charcoal. Distilled water was sprayed on the artificial soil and drained through a hole in the pots to a water storage tank. The water was circulated from the water storage tank to the cultivation pots after 15 or 30 min discharge treatment on alternate days. A magnetic compression-type pulsed power generator was used to produce the bubble discharge with a repetition rate of 250 pps. The plant height in the growth phase and the dry weight of the harvested plants were improved markedly by the discharge treatment in water. The soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD) value of the plants also improved in the growth phase of the plants. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen, which mainly contributed to the improvement of the growth rate, in the water increased with the discharge treatment. The Brix value of edible parts of Fragaria × ananassa increased with the discharge treatment. The inactivation of bacteria in the water was also confirmed with the discharge treatment.

  4. The Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum of Mangroves: A Simple Ecohydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Saverio; Viola, Francesco; Valerio Noto, Leonardo; Molini, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    Mangroves represent the only forest able to grow at the interface between a terrestrial and a marine habitat. Although globally they have been estimated to account only for 1% of carbon sequestration from forests, as coastal ecosystems they account for about 14% of carbon sequestration by the global ocean. Despite the continuously increasing number of hydrological and ecological field observations, the ecohydrology of mangroves remains largely understudied. Modeling mangrove response to variations in environmental conditions needs to take into account the effect of waterlogging and salinity on transpiration and CO2 assimilation. However, similar ecohydrological models for halophytes are not yet documented in the literature. In this contribution we adapt a Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) model to the mangrove ecosystems. Such SPAC model is based on a macroscopic approach and the transpiration rate is hence obtained by solving the plant and leaf water balance and the leaf energy balance, taking explicitly into account the role of osmotic water potential and salinity in governing plant resistance to water fluxes. Exploiting the well-known coupling of transpiration and CO2 exchange through the stomatal conductance, we also estimate the CO2 assimilation rate. The SPAC is hence tested against experimental data obtained from the literature, showing the reliability and effectiveness of this minimalist approach in reproducing observed processes. Results show that the developed SPAC model is able to realistically simulate the main ecohydrological traits of mangroves, indicating the salinity as a crucial limiting factor for mangrove trees transpiration and CO2 assimilation.

  5. Gas Exchange, Transpiration and Yield of Sweetpotato Grown in a Controlled Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith E.; Mortley, Desmond G.; Henninger, Donald L.

    2000-01-01

    Sweetpotato was grown to harvest maturity within NASA Johnson Space Center's Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC) to characterize crop performance for potential use in advanced life support systems as a contributor to food production, air revitalization and resource recovery. Stem cuttings of breeding clone "TU-82-155" were grown hydroponically at a density of 17 plants m(sup -2) using a modified pressure-plate growing system (Patent No. 4860-490, Tuskegee University). Lighting was provided by HPS lamps at a photoperiod of 12h light: 12h dark. The photosynthetic photon flux was maintained at 500, 750 and 1000 micro mol m(sup -2) s(sub -1) during days 1-15, 16-28, 29-119, respectively. Canopy temperatures were maintained at 28 C: light: 22 C:dark. During the light period, relative humidity and carbon dioxide were maintained at 70% and 1200 micro liters l(sup -1), respectively. Nutrient solution was manually adjusted 2 to 4 times per week by addition of 10X concentrated modified half-strength Hoagland nutrient salts and NaOH to return the electrical conductivity and pH to 1.2 mS cm(sup -1) and 6.0, respectively. At 17 weeks (119 days) from transplanting, a total of 56.5 kilograms fresh mass of storage roots (84.1% moisture) were harvested from the 11.2 m(sup 2) chamber, resulting in a yield 5.0 kilograms m(sup -2). Harvest index, based on fresh mass, was 38.6%. Rates of net photosynthesis, dark respiration, transpiration, and ethylene production will be reported.

  6. Rates of molecular evolution and diversification in plants: chloroplast substitution rates correlate with species-richness in the Proteaceae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many factors have been identified as correlates of the rate of molecular evolution, such as body size and generation length. Analysis of many molecular phylogenies has also revealed correlations between substitution rates and clade size, suggesting a link between rates of molecular evolution and the process of diversification. However, it is not known whether this relationship applies to all lineages and all sequences. Here, in order to investigate how widespread this phenomenon is, we investigate patterns of substitution in chloroplast genomes of the diverse angiosperm family Proteaceae. We used DNA sequences from six chloroplast genes (6278bp alignment with 62 taxa) to test for a correlation between diversification and the rate of substitutions. Results Using phylogenetically-independent sister pairs, we show that species-rich lineages of Proteaceae tend to have significantly higher chloroplast substitution rates, for both synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions. Conclusions We show that the rate of molecular evolution in chloroplast genomes is correlated with net diversification rates in this large plant family. We discuss the possible causes of this relationship, including molecular evolution driving diversification, speciation increasing the rate of substitutions, or a third factor causing an indirect link between molecular and diversification rates. The link between the synonymous substitution rate and clade size is consistent with a role for the mutation rate of chloroplasts driving the speed of reproductive isolation. We find no significant differences in the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions between lineages differing in net diversification rate, therefore we detect no signal of population size changes or alteration in selection pressures that might be causing this relationship. PMID:23497266

  7. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na(+) is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na(+) on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na(+) mediated stomatal opening than K(+) mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K(+)-mediated but not Na(+)-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na(+) on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  8. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na+ is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na+ on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na+ mediated stomatal opening than K+ mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K+-mediated but not Na+-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na+ on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  9. Transpiration and Evaporation measurements in a Mountain Ecosystem using Real-Time Field-Based Water Vapor Isotopes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, F.; Gochis, D. J.; Harley, P. C.; Turnipseed, A.; Hu, J.

    2010-12-01

    The partitioning of evapotranspiration between evaporation from bare soil and transpiration by vegetation is not adequately represented in land surface models coupled to atmospheric models. In this work we present measurements of stable water vapor isotopes (δD and δ18O) in Manitou Experimental Forest. At an elevation of approximately 2,400m in the Rocky Mountain foothills-pediment region the site is characterized by Ponderosa pine and a grass understory. We use a portable real time isotopic water vapor analyzer that allows us to partition evapotranspiration from the vegetated region into transpiration from plants and direct evaporation from the soil and canopy. The isotopic measurements are complementary to data from a network of eddy covariance towers and soil moisture measurements. We give particular emphasis to the temporal variability of the isotopic signature of transpiration presenting simultaneous measurements of water vapor isotopes, net photosynthesis, evapotranspiration and stomatal conductance measured using a dynamic flow-through gas exchange system. These observations are the first step towards improving our understanding and numerical modeling of the partitioning between evaporation and transpiration.

  10. Modeled hydraulic redistribution by Helianthus annuus L. matches observed data only after model modification to include nighttime transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Cardon, Z. G.; Rockwell, F. E.; Teshera-Levye, J.; Zwieniecki, M.; Holbrook, N. M.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical, and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, while the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two eco-types of Helianthus annuus L. in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modeling formulation developed by Ryel et al. (2002) could match experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive nighttime transpiration, and though over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that nighttime transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. (2002) formulation does not include the effect of nighttime transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of nighttime transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and nighttime stomatal behavior changed, both influencing HR.

  11. Transpiration and water-use efficiency in mixed-species forests versus monocultures: effects of tree size, stand density and season.

    PubMed

    Forrester, David I

    2015-03-01

    Mixtures can be more productive than monocultures and may therefore use more water, which may make them more susceptible to droughts. The species interactions that influence growth, transpiration and water-use efficiency (WUE, tree growth per unit transpiration) within a given mixture vary with intra- and inter-annual climatic variability, stand density and tree size, but these effects remain poorly quantified. These relationships were examined in mixtures and monocultures of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Acacia mearnsii de Wildeman. Growth and transpiration were measured between ages 14 and 15 years. All E. globulus trees in mixture that were growing faster than similar sized trees in monocultures had higher WUE, while trees with similar growth rates had similar WUE. By the age of 14 years A. mearnsii trees were beginning to senesce and there were no longer any relationships between tree size and growth or WUE. The relationship between transpiration and tree size did not differ between treatments for either species, so stand-level increases in transpiration simply reflected the larger mean tree size in mixtures. Increasing neighbourhood basal area increased the complementarity effect on E. globulus growth and transpiration. The complementarity effect also varied throughout the year, but this was not related to the climatic seasonality. This study shows that stand-level responses can be the net effect of a much wider range of individual tree-level responses, but at both levels, if growth has not increased for a given species, it appears unlikely that there will be differences in transpiration or WUE for that species. Growth data may provide a useful initial indication of whether mixtures have higher transpiration or WUE, and which species and tree sizes contribute to this effect. PMID:25732385

  12. Non-destructive testing for combined stresses using high-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing and ''three-temperature model'': A case study on mangrove plant Kandelia obovata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; LI, R.; Li, Y. H.; Chai, M. W.; Qiu, G. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Mangrove forests are currently facing serious heavy metal pollution and eutrophication problems. Remote sensing of vegetation is a non-invasive methodology to monitor physiological characteristics of plants. The potential of high-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing and the three-temperature model (3T model) for monitoring the effects of combined stresses on mangrove plant Kandelia obovata was assessed. The experiment consists of four levels of CdCl2 stress (0, 1, 5 and 10 mg·L-1) in each of four NH4Cl stress levels: 0, 10, 50 and 100 mg·L-1, respectively. The non-destructive testing indices, including plant transpiration transfer coefficient (hat) and estimated instant transpiration rate, were calculated from thermal images and the 3T model. The photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs) and transpiration rate (Tr) were also tested to validate the results of non-destructive testing. The results showed that: (1) The plant transpiration transfer coefficients (hat) were changed from 0.246 to 0.928 and the estimated instant transpiration rates ranged from 0.590 to 6.119 mmol H2O m-2s-1 among different combined stresses. With increasing stress, there were significant decreases for estimated instant transpiration rate and increases for hat (P < 0.05). (2) The photosynthetic characteristics, including Pn, Gs and Tr, were significantly decreased with the increasing combined stresses (P < 0.05). (3) The effects of Cd, N, and their interaction on non-destructive indices and photosynthetic parameters were significant (P < 0.05). (4) The hat was significantly negatively correlated with photosynthetic parameters and the T-3T was significantly positively correlated with photosynthetic parameters (P < 0.05). Therefore, the transpiration transfer coefficient (hat) andestimated instant transpiration rate detecting by infrared thermography device could be indicators to reflect the stress conditions. Based on high-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing, we

  13. Parasitic plants have increased rates of molecular evolution across all three genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Theoretical models and experimental evidence suggest that rates of molecular evolution could be raised in parasitic organisms compared to non-parasitic taxa. Parasitic plants provide an ideal test for these predictions, as there are at least a dozen independent origins of the parasitic lifestyle in angiosperms. Studies of a number of parasitic plant lineages have suggested faster rates of molecular evolution, but the results of some studies have been mixed. Comparative analysis of all parasitic plant lineages, including sequences from all three genomes, is needed to examine the generality of the relationship between rates of molecular evolution and parasitism in plants. Results We analysed DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial, nuclear and chloroplast genomes for 12 independent evolutionary origins of parasitism in angiosperms. We demonstrated that parasitic lineages have a faster rate of molecular evolution than their non-parasitic relatives in sequences for all three genomes, for both synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. Conclusions Our results prove that raised rates of molecular evolution are a general feature of parasitic plants, not confined to a few taxa or specific genes. We discuss possible causes for this relationship, including increased positive selection associated with host-parasite arms races, relaxed selection, reduced population size or repeated bottlenecks, increased mutation rates, and indirect causal links with generation time and body size. We find no evidence that faster rates are due to smaller effective populations sizes or changes in selection pressure. Instead, our results suggest that parasitic plants have a higher mutation rate than their close non-parasitic relatives. This may be due to a direct connection, where some aspect of the parasitic lifestyle drives the evolution of raised mutation rates. Alternatively, this pattern may be driven by an indirect connection between rates and parasitism: for example, parasitic

  14. Characterization of urania vaporization with transpiration coupled thermogravimetry

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, J. W.

    2015-12-05

    Determining equilibrium vapor pressures of materials is made easier by transpiration measurements. However, the traditional technique involves condensing the volatiles entrained in a carrier gas outside of the hot measurement zone. One potential problem is deposition en route to a cooled collector. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) can be used to measure in situ mass loss due to vaporization and therefore obviate the need to analyze the entire gas train due to premature plating of vapor species. Therefore, a transpiration coupled TGA technique was used to determine equilibrium pressures of UO3 gas over fluorite structure UO2+x and U3O8 at T = (1573 and 1773) K. Moreover, we compared to calculations from models and databases in the open literature. Our study gives clarity to the thermochemical data for UO3 gas and validates the mass loss transpiration method using thermogravimetry for determining equilibrium vapor pressures of non-stoichiometric oxides.

  15. Transpiration's inhibition of air pollution fluxes to substomatal cavities. [PRECP

    SciTech Connect

    Slinn, W.G.N.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents an estimate for the resistance to transport through stomatal openings, accounting for the counterflowing flux of water vapor associated with transpiration. The specific goal of this report is to estimate the influence of transpiration on the stomatal resistance, r/sub sto/; others have estimated the substomatal and mesophyll resistances r/sub ssc/ and r/sub mes/. It might be expected that any influence of the water-vapor flux on pollutant transport would be a maximum at the stomatal opening since, at the constricted area of the stoma, the water flux is a maximum. Transpiration through stomata appears to insigifnicantly inhibit the passage of relatively small molecules (e.g., SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, HNO/sub 3/, PAN, etc.) through the stomata, and therefore, by entering the substomatal cavity, such pollutants have greater potential for threatening plan survival, if their concentrations are excessive. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Characterization of urania vaporization with transpiration coupled thermogravimetry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McMurray, J. W.

    2015-12-05

    Determining equilibrium vapor pressures of materials is made easier by transpiration measurements. However, the traditional technique involves condensing the volatiles entrained in a carrier gas outside of the hot measurement zone. One potential problem is deposition en route to a cooled collector. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) can be used to measure in situ mass loss due to vaporization and therefore obviate the need to analyze the entire gas train due to premature plating of vapor species. Therefore, a transpiration coupled TGA technique was used to determine equilibrium pressures of UO3 gas over fluorite structure UO2+x and U3O8 at T = (1573more » and 1773) K. Moreover, we compared to calculations from models and databases in the open literature. Our study gives clarity to the thermochemical data for UO3 gas and validates the mass loss transpiration method using thermogravimetry for determining equilibrium vapor pressures of non-stoichiometric oxides.« less

  17. Upper-limit mutation rate estimation for a plant RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Agudelo-Romero, Patricia; Elena, Santiago F.

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that mutation rates of RNA viruses are inherently high due to the lack of proofreading mechanisms. However, direct estimates of mutation rate are surprisingly scarce, in particular for plant viruses. Here, based on the analysis of in vivo mutation frequencies in tobacco etch virus, we calculate an upper-bound mutation rate estimation of 3×10−5 per site and per round of replication; a value which turns out to be undistinguishable from the methodological error. Nonetheless, the value is barely on the lower side of the range accepted for RNA viruses, although in good agreement with the only direct estimate obtained for other plant viruses. These observations suggest that, perhaps, differences in the selective pressures operating during plant virus evolution may have driven their mutation rates towards values lower than those characteristic of other RNA viruses infecting bacteria or animals. PMID:19324646

  18. A study on the optimal hydraulic loading rate and plant ratios in recirculation aquaponic system.

    PubMed

    Endut, Azizah; Jusoh, A; Ali, N; Wan Nik, W B; Hassan, A

    2010-03-01

    The growths of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated in recirculation aquaponic system (RAS). Fish production performance, plant growth and nutrient removal were measured and their dependence on hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was assessed. Fish production did not differ significantly between hydraulic loading rates. In contrast to the fish production, the water spinach yield was significantly higher in the lower hydraulic loading rate. Fish production, plant growth and percentage nutrient removal were highest at hydraulic loading rate of 1.28 m/day. The ratio of fish to plant production has been calculated to balance nutrient generation from fish with nutrient removal by plants and the optimum ratio was 15-42 gram of fish feed/m(2) of plant growing area. Each unit in RAS was evaluated in terms of oxygen demand. Using specified feeding regime, mass balance equations were applied to quantify the waste discharges from rearing tanks and treatment units. The waste discharged was found to be strongly dependent on hydraulic loading rate. PMID:19819130

  19. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in a Plant RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tromas, Nicolas; Elena, Santiago F.

    2010-01-01

    Knowing mutation rates and the molecular spectrum of spontaneous mutations is important to understanding how the genetic composition of viral populations evolves. Previous studies have shown that the rate of spontaneous mutations for RNA viruses widely varies between 0.01 and 2 mutations per genome and generation, with plant RNA viruses always occupying the lower side of this range. However, this peculiarity of plant RNA viruses is based on a very limited number of studies. Here we analyze the spontaneous mutational spectrum and the mutation rate of Tobacco etch potyvirus, a model system of positive sense RNA viruses. Our experimental setup minimizes the action of purifying selection on the mutational spectrum, thus giving a picture of what types of mutations are produced by the viral replicase. As expected for a neutral target, we found that transitions and nonsynonymous (including a few stop codons and small deletions) mutations were the most abundant type. This spectrum was notably different from the one previously described for another plant virus. We have estimated that the spontaneous mutation rate for this virus was in the range 10−6−10−5 mutations per site and generation. Our estimates are in the same biological ballpark that previous values reported for plant RNA viruses. This finding gives further support to the idea that plant RNA viruses may have lower mutation rates than their animal counterparts. PMID:20439778

  20. Do low standing biomass and leaf area index of sub-tropical coastal dunes ensure that plants have an adequate supply of water?

    PubMed

    Ripley, Brad S; Pammenter, Norman W

    2004-05-01

    Water status in relation to standing biomass and leaf area indices (LAI) of the subtropical foredune species Arctotheca populifolia, Ipomoea pes-caprae and Scaevola plumieri were studied in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. The plants showed little evidence of water stress, never developing leaf water potentials more negative than -1.55 MPa, a value which is typical of mesophytes rather than xerophytes. The plants showed no seasonal changes in osmotic potential, an indication that they did not need to osmoregulate, nor were there significant alterations in tissue elasticity. Turgor potential for the most part remained positive throughout the day or recovered positive values at night, a condition suitable for the maintenance of growth that may be essential to cope with sand accretion. All three species show relatively high transpiration rates and only I. pes-caprae showed any evidence of strong limitations of transpiration rate through reductions in midday stomatal conductance. All three species had relatively high instantaneous water use efficiencies as a result of high assimilation rates rather than low transpiration rates. Simple water budgets, accounting for losses by transpiration and inputs from rainfall, suggest that the water stored in the dune sands is sufficient to meet the requirements of the plants, although water budgets calculated for I. pes-caprae suggest that this species may on occasion be water limited. The results suggest that it is the low biomass and LAI that lead to these favourable water relations. PMID:15042456

  1. Aftereffects of low and high temperature pretreatment on leaf resistance, transpiration, and leaf temperature in xanthium.

    PubMed

    Drake, B G; Salisbury, F B

    1972-11-01

    Leaf resistance for water vapor (total diffusion resistance minus boundary layer resistance), transpiration, and leaf temperature were measured in attached leaves of greenhouse-grown Xanthium strumarium L. plants that had been pretreated for 72 hours with high (40 C day, 35 C night), or low (10 C day, 5 C night) air temperatures. Measurements were made in a wind tunnel at light intensity of 1.15 cal cm(-2) min(-1), air temperatures between 5 and 45 C, and wind speed of 65 cm sec(-1). Leaf resistances in low temperature pretreated plants were higher (8 to 27 sec cm(-1)) than in controls or high temperature pretreated plants (0.5 to 3 sec cm(-1)) at leaf temperatures between 5 and 25 C. Thus, the pretreatment influenced stomatal aperture. PMID:16658219

  2. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on canopy transpiration in senescent spring wheat

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.; Kimball, B.A.; Hunsaker, D.J.; Long, S.P. et al

    1998-12-31

    The seasonal course of canopy transpiration and the diurnal courses of latent heat flux of a spring wheat crop were simulated for atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations of 370 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1} and 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}. The hourly weather data, soil parameters and the irrigation and fertilizer treatments of the Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment wheat experiment in Arizona (1992/93) were used to drive the model. The simulation results were tested against field measurements with special emphasis on the period between anthesis and maturity. A model integrating leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was scaled to a canopy level in order to be used in the wheat growth model. The simulated intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration, C{sub i} was determined from the ratio of C{sub i} to the CO{sub 2} concentration at the leaf surface, C{sub s}, the leaf to air specific humidity deficit and a possibly unfulfilled transpiration demand. After anthesis, the measured assimilation rates of the flag leaves decreased more rapidly than their stomatal conductances, leading to a rise in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. In order to describe this observation, an empirical model approach was developed which took into account the leaf nitrogen content for the calculation of the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. Simulation results obtained with the new model version were in good agreement with the measurements. If changes in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio accorded to the decrease in leaf nitrogen content during leaf senescence were not considered in the model, simulations revealed an underestimation of the daily canopy transpiration of up to twenty percent and a decrease in simulated seasonal canopy transpiration by ten percent. The measured reduction in the seasonal sum of canopy transpiration and soil evaporation owing to CO{sub 2} enrichment, in comparison, was only about five percent.

  3. Effects of wetland plants on denitrification rates: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Alldred, Mary; Baines, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is accelerating changes in biotic communities worldwide. Predicting impacts of these changes on ecosystem services such as denitrification, a process that mitigates the consequences of nitrogen pollution, remains one of the most important challenges facing ecologists. Wetlands especially are valued as important sites of denitrification, and wetland plants are expected to have differing effects on denitrification. We present the results of a meta-analysis, conducted on 419 published estimates of denitrification in wetlands dominated by different plant species. Plants increased denitrification rates by 55% on average. This effect varied significantly among communities as defined by the dominant plant species, but surprisingly did not differ substantially among methods for measuring denitrification or among types of wetlands. We conclude that mechanistically linking functional plant traits to denitrification will be key to predicting the role of wetlands in nitrogen mitigation in a changing world. PMID:27411242

  4. Rate variation in parasitic plants: correlated and uncorrelated patterns among plastid genes of different function

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nelson D; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2005-01-01

    Background The analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous rates of DNA change can help in the choice among competing explanations for rate variation, such as differences in constraint, mutation rate, or the strength of genetic drift. Nonphotosynthetic plants of the Orobanchaceae have increased rates of DNA change. In this study 38 taxa of Orobanchaceae and relatives were used and 3 plastid genes were sequenced for each taxon. Results Phylogenetic reconstructions of relative rates of sequence evolution for three plastid genes (rbcL, matK and rps2) show significant rate heterogeneity among lineages and among genes. Many of the non-photosynthetic plants have increases in both synonymous and nonsynonymous rates, indicating that both (1) selection is relaxed, and (2) there has been a change in the rate at which mutations are entering the population in these species. However, rate increases are not always immediate upon loss of photosynthesis. Overall there is a poor correlation of synonymous and nonsynonymous rates. There is, however, a strong correlation of synonymous rates across the 3 genes studied and the lineage-speccific pattern for each gene is strikingly similar. This indicates that the causes of synonymous rate variation are affecting the whole plastid genome in a similar way. There is a weaker correlation across genes for nonsynonymous rates. Here the picture is more complex, as could be expected if there are many causes of variation, differing from taxon to taxon and gene to gene. Conclusions The distinctive pattern of rate increases in Orobanchaceae has at least two causes. It is clear that there is a relaxation of constraint in many (though not all) non-photosynthetic lineages. However, there is also some force affecting synonymous sites as well. At this point, it is not possible to tell whether it is generation time, speciation rate, mutation rate, DNA repair efficiency or some combination of these factors. PMID:15713237

  5. Bacterial secondary production on vascular plant detritus: relationships to detritus composition and degradation rate.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, M A; Hodson, R E

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial production at the expense of vascular plant detritus was measured for three emergent plant species (Juncus effusus, Panicum hemitomon, and Typha latifolia) degrading in the littoral zone of a thermally impacted lake. Bacterial secondary production, measured as tritiated thymidine incorporation into DNA, ranged from 0.01 to 0.81 microgram of bacterial C mg of detritus-1 day-1. The three plant species differed with respect to the amount of bacterial productivity they supported per milligram of detritus, in accordance with the predicted biodegradability of the plant material based on initial nitrogen content, lignin content, and C/N ratio. Bacterial production also varied throughout the 22 weeks of in situ decomposition and was positively related to the nitrogen content and lignin content of the remaining detritus, as well as to the temperature of the lake water. Over time, production was negatively related to the C/N ratio and cellulose content of the degrading plant material. Bacterial production on degrading plant material was also calculated on the basis of plant surface area and ranged from 0.17 to 1.98 micrograms of bacterial C cm-2 day-1. Surface area-based calculations did not correlate well with either initial plant composition or changing composition of the remaining detritus during decomposition. The rate of bacterial detritus degradation, calculated from measured production of surface-attached bacteria, was much lower than the actual rate of weight loss of plant material. This discrepancy may be attributable to the importance of nonbacterial organisms in the degradation and loss of plant material from litterbags or to the microbially mediated solubilization of particulate material prior to bacterial utilization, or both. PMID:2802603

  6. The effect of land plants on weathering rates of silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drever, James I.

    1994-05-01

    Land plants and their associated microbiota directly affect silicate mineral weathering in several ways: by generation of chelating ligands, by modifying pH through production of CO 2 or organic acids, and by altering the physical properties of a soil, particularly the exposed surface areas of minerals and the residence time of water. In laboratory experiments far from equilibrium, 1 mM oxalate (a strong chelator of Al) has a negligible effect on the dissolution rate of alkali feldspars, but some effect on calcic feldspars and olivine. By analogy to oxalate, the overall effect of organic ligands on the weathering rate of silicate minerals in nature is likely to be small, except perhaps in microenvironments adjacent to roots and fungal hyphae. The effect of pH on silicate mineral dissolution rate depends on pH: below pH 4-5, the rate increases with decreasing pH, in the circumneutral region the rate is pH-independent, and at pH values above around 8 the rate increases with increasing pH. Vegetation should thus cause an increase in weathering rate through the pH effect only where the pH is below 4-5. As an overall generalization, the effect of plants on weathering rate through changes in soil-solution chemistry is probably small for granitic rocks; it may be greater for more mafic rocks. It is the release of Ca and Mg from mafic rocks that has the greatest influence on the global CO 2 budget. The effect of changes in soil physical properties on weathering rate can be major. By binding fine particles, plants can greatly increase weathering rates in areas of high physical erosion. Where erosion rates are lower, the effect of plants is less clear. On long timescales plants may decrease chemical weathering by binding secondary products and isolating unweathered minerals from meteoric water. A major unknown in estimating the effect of the advent of land plants on weathering rates is the nature (thickness, particle size distribution, permeability) of the regolith on the

  7. Ethylene synthesis and sensitivity in crop plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, Stephen P.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Closed and semi-closed plant growth chambers have long been used in studies of plant and crop physiology. These studies include the measurement of photosynthesis and transpiration via photosynthetic gas exchange. Unfortunately, other gaseous products of plant metabolism can accumulate in these chambers and cause artifacts in the measurements. The most important of these gaseous byproducts is the plant hormone ethylene (C2H4). In spite of hundreds of manuscripts on ethylene, we still have a limited understanding of the synthesis rates throughout the plant life cycle. We also have a poor understanding of the sensitivity of intact, rapidly growing plants to ethylene. We know ethylene synthesis and sensitivity are influenced by both biotic and abiotic stresses, but such whole plant responses have not been accurately quantified. Here we present an overview of basic studies on ethylene synthesis and sensitivity.

  8. Cancer rates after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident and proximity of residence to the plant.

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M C; Wallenstein, S; Beyea, J; Nieves, J W; Susser, M

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the light of a possible link between stress and cancer promotion or progression, and of previously reported distress in residents near the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant, we attempted to evaluate the impact of the March 1979 accident on community cancer rates. METHODS: Proximity of residence to the plant, which related to distress in previous studies, was taken as a possible indicator of accident stress; the postaccident pattern in cancer rates was examined in 69 "study tracts" within a 10-mile radius of TMI, in relation to residential proximity. RESULTS: A modest association was found between postaccident cancer rates and proximity (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.6). After adjusting for a gradient in cancer risk prior to the accident, the odds ratio contrasting those closest to the plant with those living farther out was 1.2 (95% CI = 1.0, 1.4). A postaccident increase in cancer rates near the Three Mile Island plant was notable in 1982, persisted for another year, and then declined. Radiation emissions, as modeled mathematically, did not account for the observed increase. CONCLUSION: Interpretation in terms of accident stress is limited by the lack of an individual measure of stress and by uncertainty about whether stress has a biological effect on cancer in humans. An alternative mechanism for the cancer increase near the plant is through changes in care-seeking and diagnostic practice arising from postaccident concern. PMID:2029040

  9. Measurement of Effective Canopy Temperature: The Missing Link to Modeling Transpiration in Controlled Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, O. A.; McCormack, Ann; Bugbee, Bruce; Jones, Harry W., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The objectives were to apply energy balance principles to plant canopies, and to determine which parameters are essential for predicting plant canopy transpiration (E) in controlled environments. Transpiration was accurately measured in a gas-exchange system. Absorbed radiation (R(sub abs)) by the canopy was measured with a net radiometer and calculated from short and long-wave radiation components. Average canopy foliar temperature T(sub L) can be measured with an infrared radiometer, but since T(sub L) is seldom uniform, a weighed average measurement of T(sub L) must be made. The effective canopy temperature T(sub C) is that temperature that balances the energy flux between absorbed radiation and latent heat L(sub E) and sensible heat (H) fluxes. TC should exactly equal air temperature T(sub A) when L(sub E) equals R(sub abs). When unnecessary thermal radiation from the lighting system is removed by a water filter, the magnitude of L(sub E) from transpiration approaches Rabs and T(sub C) is close to T(sub A). Unlike field models, we included the energy used in photosynthesis and found that up to 10% of Rabs was used in photosynthesis. We calculated aerodynamic conductance for H from measurements of wind speed and canopy height using the wind profile equation. Canopy aerodynamic conductance ranged from.03 to.04 m/s for wind speeds from.6 to 1 m/s; thus a 0.1 C canopy to air temperature difference results in a sensible heat flux of about 4 W/sq m, which is only 1% of R(sub abs). We examined the ability of wide angle infrared transducers to accurately integrate T(sub L) from the top to the bottom of the canopy. We measured evaporation from the hydroponic media to be approximately 1 micro mol/sq m s or 10% of R(sub abs). This result indicates that separating evaporation from transpiration is more important than exact measurement of canopy temperature.

  10. Response of ammonium removal to growth and transpiration of Juncus effusus during the treatment of artificial sewage in laboratory-scale wetlands.

    PubMed

    Wiessner, A; Kappelmeyer, U; Kaestner, M; Schultze-Nobre, L; Kuschk, P

    2013-09-01

    The correlation between nitrogen removal and the role of the plants in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands are the subject of continuous discussion, but knowledge is still insufficient. Since the influence of plant growth and physiological activity on ammonium removal has not been well characterized in constructed wetlands so far, this aspect is investigated in more detail in model wetlands under defined laboratory conditions using Juncus effusus for treating an artificial sewage. Growth and physiological activity, such as plant transpiration, have been found to correlate with both the efficiency of ammonium removal within the rhizosphere of J. effusus and the methane formation. The uptake of ammonium by growing plant stocks is within in a range of 45.5%, but under conditions of plant growth stagnation, a further nearly complete removal of the ammonium load points to the likely existence of additional nitrogen removal processes. In this way, a linear correlation between the ammonium concentration inside the rhizosphere and the transpiration of the plant stocks implies that an influence of plant physiological activity on the efficiency of N-removal exists. Furthermore, a linear correlation between methane concentration and plant transpiration has been estimated. The findings indicate a fast response of redox processes to plant activities. Accordingly, not only the influence of plant transpiration activity on the plant-internal convective gas transport, the radial oxygen loss by the plant roots and the efficiency of nitrification within the rhizosphere, but also the nitrogen gas released by phytovolatilization are discussed. The results achieved by using an unplanted control system are different in principle and characterized by a low efficiency of ammonium removal and a high methane enrichment of up to a maximum of 72.7% saturation. PMID:23764577

  11. Transpiration-Cooled Spacecraft-Insulation-Repair Fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Pettit, Donald R.; Glass, David; Scotti, Stephen J.; Vaughn, Wallace Lee; Rawal, Suraj

    2012-01-01

    Transpiration-cooled fasteners are proposed that operate like an open-loop heat pipe (self-tapping screws, bolts, and spikes) for use in on-orbit repair of thermal- insulation of a space shuttle or other spacecraft. By limiting the temperature rise of such a fastener and of the adjacent repair material and thermal protection system, the transpiration cooling would contribute to the ability of the repair to retain its strength and integrity in the high-heat-flux, oxidizing environment of reentry into the atmosphere of the Earth. A typical fastener according to the proposal would include a hollow refractory-metal, refractory-composite, or ceramic screw or bolt, the central cavity of which would be occupied by a porous refractory- metal or ceramic plug that would act as both a reservoir and a wick for a transpirant liquid. The plug dimensions, the plug material, and the sizes of the pores would be chosen in conjunction with the transpirant liquid so that (1) capillary pumping could be relied upon to transport the liquid to the heated surface, where the liquid would be vaporized, and (2) the amount of liquid would suffice for protecting against the anticipated heat flux and integrated heat load.

  12. Root controls on water redistribution and carbon uptake in the soil-plant system under current and future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, V.; Marani, M.; Albertson, J. D.; Katul, G.

    2013-10-01

    Understanding photosynthesis and plant water management as a coupled process remains an open scientific problem. Current eco-hydrologic models characteristically describe plant photosynthetic and hydraulic processes through ad hoc empirical parameterizations with no explicit accounting for the main pathways over which carbon and water uptake interact. Here, a soil-plant-atmosphere continuum model is proposed that mechanistically couples photosynthesis and transpiration rates, including the main leaf physiological controls exerted by stomata. The proposed approach links the soil-to-leaf hydraulic transport to stomatal regulation, and closes the coupled photosynthesis-transpiration problem by maximizing leaf carbon gain subject to a water loss constraint. The approach is evaluated against field data from a grass site and is shown to reproduce the main features of soil moisture dynamics and hydraulic redistribution. In particular, it is shown that the differential soil drying produced by diurnal root water uptake drives a significant upward redistribution of moisture both through a conventional Darcian flow and through the root system, consistent with observations. In a numerical soil drying experiment, it is demonstrated that more than 50% of diurnal transpiration is supplied by nocturnal upward water redistribution, and some 12% is provided directly through root hydraulic redistribution. For a prescribed leaf area density, the model is then used to diagnose how elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased air temperature jointly impact soil moisture, transpiration, photosynthesis, and whole-plant water use efficiency, along with compensatory mechanisms such as hydraulic lift using several canonical forms of root-density distribution.

  13. Gas crossflow effects on airflow through a wire-form transpiration cooling material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. S.; Russell, L. M.; Poferl, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental analysis was conducted to determine the effects of gas stream flow parallel to the discharging surface on the flow characteristics of a wire-form porous material. Flow data were obtained over a range of transpiration airflow rates from 0.129 to 0.695/grams per second-centimeter squared and external gas stream Mach numbers from 0 to 0.46. The conclusion was drawn that the flow characteristics of the wire cloth were not significantly affected by the external gas flows.

  14. Impact of plant shoot architecture on leaf cooling: a coupled heat and mass transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, L. J.; Franklin, K. A.; Homer, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Plants display a range of striking architectural adaptations when grown at elevated temperatures. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, these include elongation of petioles, and increased petiole and leaf angles from the soil surface. The potential physiological significance of these architectural changes remains speculative. We address this issue computationally by formulating a mathematical model and performing numerical simulations, testing the hypothesis that elongated and elevated plant configurations may reflect a leaf-cooling strategy. This sets in place a new basic model of plant water use and interaction with the surrounding air, which couples heat and mass transfer within a plant to water vapour diffusion in the air, using a transpiration term that depends on saturation, temperature and vapour concentration. A two-dimensional, multi-petiole shoot geometry is considered, with added leaf-blade shape detail. Our simulations show that increased petiole length and angle generally result in enhanced transpiration rates and reduced leaf temperatures in well-watered conditions. Furthermore, our computations also reveal plant configurations for which elongation may result in decreased transpiration rate owing to decreased leaf liquid saturation. We offer further qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of architectural parameters as key determinants of leaf-cooling capacity. PMID:23720538

  15. Heat-Rate Improvement Obtained by Retubing Power-Plant Condenser Enhanced Tubes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    A utility will only retube a condenser with enhanced tubes if the incremental cost of the enhanced tubes can be offset with reduced fuel costs. The reduced fuel cost is obtained for some units because of the higher heat-transfer coefficient of enhanced tubes. They lead to improved condenser performance measured by a lower condenser pressure and therefore a more efficient power plant. However, the higher haet-transfer coefficients do not always guarantee that enhanced tubes willmore » be more cost effective. Other issues must be considered such as the cooling-water flow reduction due to the increased pressure drop, the low-pressure turbine heat-rate variation with backpressure, and the cooling-water pump and system characteristics. These and other parameters must be considered to calculate the efficiency improvement of the power plant as commonly measured by the quantity known as the heat rate. Knowing the heat-rate improvement, the fuel cost, and the incremental increase of the enhanced tubes from the supplier, the payback time can be determined. This program calculates the heat-rate improvement that can be obtained by retubing a power plant condenser with enhanced tubes of a particular type called Korodense LPD made by Wolverine Tube, Inc. The fuel savings are easily established knowing the heat-rate improvement. All electrical utilities are potential users because a condenser is used as the heat sink for every power plant.« less

  16. Heat-Rate Improvement Obtained by Retubing Power-Plant Condenser Enhanced Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-21

    A utility will only retube a condenser with enhanced tubes if the incremental cost of the enhanced tubes can be offset with reduced fuel costs. The reduced fuel cost is obtained for some units because of the higher heat-transfer coefficient of enhanced tubes. They lead to improved condenser performance measured by a lower condenser pressure and therefore a more efficient power plant. However, the higher haet-transfer coefficients do not always guarantee that enhanced tubes will be more cost effective. Other issues must be considered such as the cooling-water flow reduction due to the increased pressure drop, the low-pressure turbine heat-rate variation with backpressure, and the cooling-water pump and system characteristics. These and other parameters must be considered to calculate the efficiency improvement of the power plant as commonly measured by the quantity known as the heat rate. Knowing the heat-rate improvement, the fuel cost, and the incremental increase of the enhanced tubes from the supplier, the payback time can be determined. This program calculates the heat-rate improvement that can be obtained by retubing a power plant condenser with enhanced tubes of a particular type called Korodense LPD made by Wolverine Tube, Inc. The fuel savings are easily established knowing the heat-rate improvement. All electrical utilities are potential users because a condenser is used as the heat sink for every power plant.

  17. HTRATE; Heat-Rate Improvement Obtained by Retubing Power-Plant Condenser Enhanced Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1990-06-01

    A utility will only retube a condenser with enhanced tubes if the incremental cost of the enhanced tubes can be offset with reduced fuel costs. The reduced fuel cost is obtained for some units because of the higher heat-transfer coefficient of enhanced tubes. They lead to improved condenser performance measured by a lower condenser pressure and therefore a more efficient power plant. However, the higher haet-transfer coefficients do not always guarantee that enhanced tubes will be more cost effective. Other issues must be considered such as the cooling-water flow reduction due to the increased pressure drop, the low-pressure turbine heat-rate variation with backpressure, and the cooling-water pump and system characteristics. These and other parameters must be considered to calculate the efficiency improvement of the power plant as commonly measured by the quantity known as the heat rate. Knowing the heat-rate improvement, the fuel cost, and the incremental increase of the enhanced tubes from the supplier, the payback time can be determined. This program calculates the heat-rate improvement that can be obtained by retubing a power plant condenser with enhanced tubes of a particular type called Korodense LPD made by Wolverine Tube, Inc. The fuel savings are easily established knowing the heat-rate improvement. All electrical utilities are potential users because a condenser is used as the heat sink for every power plant.

  18. Growth rates of rhizosphere microorganisms depend on competitive abilities of plants for nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Littschwager, Johanna; Lauerer, Marianna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Rhizosphere - one of the most important ‘hot spots' in soil - is characterized not only by accelerated turnover of microbial biomass and nutrients but also by strong intra- and inter-specific competition. Intra-specific competition occurs between individual plants of the same species, while inter-specific competition can occur both at population level (plant species-specific, microbial species-specific interactions) and at community level (plant - microbial interactions). Such plant - microbial interactions are mainly governed by competition for available N sources, since N is one of the main growth limiting nutrients in natural ecosystems. Functional structure and activity of microbial community in rhizosphere is not uniform and is dependent on quantity and quality of root exudates which are plant specific. It is still unclear how microbial growth and turnover in the rhizosphere are dependent on the features and competitive abilities of plants for N. Depending on C and N availability, acceleration and even retardation of microbial activity and carbon mineralization can be expected in the rhizosphere of plants with high competitive abilities for N. We hypothesized slower microbial growth rates in the rhizosphere of plants with smaller roots, as they usually produce less exudates compared to plants with small shoot-to-root ratio. As the first hypothesis is based solely on C availability, we also expected the greater effect of N availability on microbial growth in rhizosphere of plants with smaller root mass. These hypothesis were tested for two plant species of strawberry: Fragaria vesca L. (native species), and Duchesnea indica (Andrews) Focke (an invasive plant in central Europe) growing in intraspecific and interspecific competition. Microbial biomass and the kinetic parameters of microbial growth in the rhizosphere were estimated by dynamics of CO2 emission from the soil amended with glucose and nutrients. Specific growth rate (µ) of soil microorganisms was

  19. Wind drives nocturnal, but not diurnal, transpiration in Leucospermum conocarpodendron trees: implications for stilling on the Cape Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Karpul, Rebecca H; West, Adam G

    2016-08-01

    Surface winds have declined in many regions of the world over the past few decades. These trends are referred to as global stilling and have recently been observed in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. The potential consequences of such changes on ecosystem function and productivity are a particular concern for the highly diverse and endemic local flora, largely associated with the fynbos biome. Yet, few studies have directly examined the impact of wind in the region. In this study, we explored the importance of wind and other drivers of plant transpiration (E) in a stand of Leucospermum conocarpodendron (L.) Buek trees on the Cape Peninsula. Wind speeds can be high in the Cape and could play an important role in influencing the rate of E Overall, the influence of wind appeared to be significantly greater at night than during the day. While daytime E responded most strongly to changes in solar radiation (R(2) = 0.79) and vapour pressure deficit (R(2) = 0.57-0.67), night-time E (En) was primarily driven by wind speed (R(2) = 0.30-0.59). These findings have important implications for stilling and other aspects of climate change. Since En was found to be a regular and significant (P < 0.00) component of total daily E (10-27%), plants may conserve water should stilling continue. Still, the extent of this could be offset by strong daytime drivers. As such, plant water consumption will most likely increase in response to a warmer and drier climate. Changes in other biophysical variables are, however, clearly important to consider in the current debate on the impact of climate change. PMID:27174701

  20. Effect of heating rate and plant species on the size and uniformity of silver nanoparticles synthesized using aromatic plant extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pinero, Jorge Luis; Terrón-Rebolledo, Manuel; Foroughbakhch, Rahim; Moreno-Limón, Sergio; Melendrez, M. F.; Solís-Pomar, Francisco; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    Mixing aqueous silver solutions with aqueous leaf aromatic plant extracts from basil, mint, marjoram and peppermint resulted in the synthesis of quasi-spherical silver nanoparticles in a range of size between 2 and 80 nm in diameter as analyzed by analytical high-resolution electron microscopy. The average size could be controlled by applying heat to the initial reaction system at different rates of heating, and by the specific botanical species employed for the reaction. Increasing the rate of heating resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the size of the nanoparticles produced, regardless of the species employed. This fact was more evident in the case of marjoram, which decreased the average diameter from 27 nm at a slow rate of heating to 8 nm at a high rate of heating. With regard to the species, minimum sizes of <10 nm were obtained with basil and peppermint, while marjoram and mint yielded an average size between 10 and 25 nm. The results indicate that aromatic plant extracts can be used to achieve the controlled synthesis of metal nanoparticles.

  1. Somatic deleterious mutation rate in a woody plant: estimation from phenotypic data

    PubMed Central

    Bobiwash, K; Schultz, S T; Schoen, D J

    2013-01-01

    We conducted controlled crosses in populations of the long-lived clonal shrub, Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry) to estimate inbreeding depression and mutation parameters associated with somatic deleterious mutation. Inbreeding depression level was high, with many plants failing to set fruit after self-pollination. We also compared fruit set from autogamous pollinations (pollen collected from within the same inflorescence) with fruit set from geitonogamous pollinations (pollen collected from the same plant but from inflorescences separated by several meters of branch growth). The difference between geitonogamous versus autogamous fitness within single plants is referred to as ‘autogamy depression' (AD). AD can be caused by somatic deleterious mutation. AD was significantly different from zero for fruit set. We developed a maximum-likelihood procedure to estimate somatic mutation parameters from AD, and applied it to geitonogamous and autogamous fruit set data from this experiment. We infer that, on average, approximately three sublethal, partially dominant somatic mutations exist within the crowns of the plants studied. We conclude that somatic mutation in this woody plant results in an overall genomic deleterious mutation rate that exceeds the rate measured to date for annual plants. Some implications of this result for evolutionary biology and agriculture are discussed. PMID:23778990

  2. Enhanced transpiration by riparian buffer trees in response to advection in a humid temperate agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez-Santana, V.; Asbjornsen, H.; Sauer, T.; Isenhart, T.; Schilling, K.; Schultz, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Riparian buffers are designed as management practices to increase infiltration and reduce surface runoff and transport of sediment and nonpoint source pollutants from crop fields to adjacent streams. Achieving these ecosystem service goals depends, in part, on their ability to remove water from the soil via transpiration. In these systems, edges between crop fields and trees of the buffer systems can create advection processes, which could influence water use by trees. We conducted a field study in a riparian buffer system established in 1994 under a humid temperate climate, located in the Corn Belt region of the Midwestern U.S. (Iowa). The goals were to estimate stand level transpiration by the riparian buffer, quantify the controls on water use by the buffer system, and determine to what extent advective energy and tree position within the buffer system influence individual tree transpiration rates. We primarily focused on the water use response (determined with the Heat Ratio Method) of one of the dominant species (Acer saccharinum) and a subdominant (Juglans nigra). A few individuals of three additional species (Quercus bicolor, Betula nigra, Platanus occidentalis) were monitored over a shorter time period to assess the generality of responses. Meteorological stations were installed along a transect across the riparian buffer to determine the microclimate conditions. The differences found among individuals were attributed to differences in species sap velocities and sapwood depths, location relative to the forest edge and prevailing winds and canopy exposure and dominance. Sapflow rates for A. saccharinum trees growing at the SE edge (prevailing winds) were 39% greater than SE interior trees and 30% and 69% greater than NW interior and edge trees, respectively. No transpiration enhancement due to edge effect was detected in the subdominant J. nigra. The results were interpreted as indicative of advection effects from the surrounding crops. Further, significant

  3. Adapting FAO-56 Spreadsheet Program to estimate olive orchard transpiration fluxes under soil water stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, G.; Provenzano, G.; Manzano-Juárez, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the Mediterranean environment, where the period of crops growth does not coincide with the rainy season, the crop is subject to water stress periods that may be amplified with improper irrigation management. Agro-hydrological models can be considered an economic and simple tool to optimize irrigation water use, mainly when water represents a limiting factor for crop production. In the last two decades, agro-hydrological physically based models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system (Feddes et al., 1978; Bastiaanssen et al., 2007). Unfortunately these models, although very reliable, as a consequence of the high number of required variables and the complex computational analysis, cannot often be used. Therefore, simplified agro-hydrological models may represent an useful and simple tool for practical irrigation scheduling. The main objective of the work is to assess, for an olive orchard, the suitability of FAO-56 spreadsheet agro-hydrological model to estimate a long time series of field transpiration, soil water content and crop water stress dynamic. A modification of the spreadsheet is suggested in order to adapt the simulations to a crop tolerant to water stress. In particular, by implementing a new crop water stress function, actual transpiration fluxes and an ecophysiological stress indicator, i. e. the relative transpiration, are computed in order to evaluate a plant-based irrigation scheduling parameter. Validation of the proposed amendment is carried out by means of measured sap fluxes, measured on different plants and up-scaled to plot level. Spatial and temporal variability of soil water contents in the plot was measured, at several depths, using the Diviner 2000 capacitance probe (Sentek Environmental Technologies, 2000) and TDR-100 (Campbell scientific, Inc.) system. The detailed measurements of soil water content, allowed to explore the high spatial variability of soil water content due

  4. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. On developing and enhancing plant-level disease rating systems in real fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) is one of the most serious diseases in sugar beet plants causing an enormous decrease in the sugar production throughout the world. Agricultural researchers are continuously seeking CLS-resistant sugar beet cultivars. Normally human experts manually observe and rate the re...

  6. Chilling rate effects on pork loin tenderness in commercial processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to provide a large-scale objective comparison of pork LM tenderness and other meat quality traits between packing plants that differ in stunning method and carcass chilling rate. For each of two replicates, hogs were sourced from a single barn of a commercial fi...

  7. Planting date rate and twin-row vs single-row soybean in the mid south

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparisons of twin-row vs. single-row production of an irrigated MG IV soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) on a sandy loam soil and a clay indigenous to the Mississippi Delta were conducted in 2009 to 2010 at Stoneville, MS. Seeding rates of 20, 30, 40, and 50 seed m-2 were planted in four row plots ...

  8. Effect of frequency of dosing of plant sterols on plasma cholesterol levels and synthesis rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to compare the effects of plant sterols (PS) consumed as a single dose (single) at breakfast or as three doses consumed with breakfast, lunch and dinner (divided) on plasma lipoprotien levels and cholesterol endogenous fractional synthesis rate (FSR). A randomized, placebo-controll...

  9. Soybean Photosynthetic Rate and Carbon Fixation at Early and Late Planting Dates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early planting (late April to early May) is recommended for increasing soybean yield but a full understanding of the physiological response is lacking. This study was conducted to determine whether carbon dioxide exchange rate (CER) could explain this yield difference. A study with five (2007) and s...

  10. Effect of Seeding Rate and Planting Arrangement on Rye Cover Crop and Weed Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed growth in winter cover crops in warm climates may contribute to weed management costs in subsequent crops. A two year experiment was conducted on an organic vegetable farm in Salinas, California, to determine the impact of seeding rate and planting arrangement on rye (Secale cereale L. cv. Merc...

  11. [Response processes of Aralia elata photosynthesis and transpiration to light and soil moisture].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Guang-Can; Zhang, Shu-Yong; Wang, Meng-Jun

    2008-06-01

    By using CIRAS-2 portable photosynthesis system, the light response processes of Aralia elata photosynthesis and transpiration under different soil moisture conditions were studied, aimed to understand the adaptability of A. elata to different light and soil moisture conditions. The results showed that the response processes of A. elata net photosynthetic rate (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr), and water use efficiency (WUE) to photon flux density (PFD) were different. With the increasing PFD in the range of 800-1800 micromol x m2(-2) x s(-1), Pn changed less, Tr decreased gradually, while WUE increased obviously. The light saturation point (LSP) and light compensation point (LCP) were about 800 and 30 micromol m(-2) x s(-1), respectively, and less affected by soil water content; while the apparent photosynthetic quantum yield (Phi) and dark respiratory rate (Rd) were more affected by the moisture content. The Pn and WUE had evident threshold responses to the variations of soil water content. When the soil relative water content (RWC) was in the range of 44%-79%, A. elata could have higher levels of Pn and WUE. PMID:18808006

  12. Cooling Duct Analysis for Transpiration/Film Cooled Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micklow, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a low cost space transportation system requires that the propulsion system be reusable, have long life, with good performance and use low cost propellants. Improved performance can be achieved by operating the engine at higher pressure and temperature levels than previous designs. Increasing the chamber pressure and temperature, however, will increase wall heating rates. This necessitates the need for active cooling methods such as film cooling or transpiration cooling. But active cooling can reduce the net thrust of the engine and add considerably to the design complexity. Recently, a metal drawing process has been patented where it is possible to fabricate plates with very small holes with high uniformity with a closely specified porosity. Such a metal plate could be used for an inexpensive transpiration/film cooled liner to meet the demands of advanced reusable rocket engines, if coolant mass flow rates could be controlled to satisfy wall cooling requirements and performance. The present study investigates the possibility of controlling the coolant mass flow rate through the porous material by simple non-active fluid dynamic means. The coolant will be supplied to the porous material by series of constant geometry slots machined on the exterior of the engine.

  13. From Plants to Birds: Higher Avian Predation Rates in Trees Responding to Insect Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Alessio, Giorgio A.; Blande, James D.; Heijari, Juha; Holopainen, Jarmo K.; Laaksonen, Toni; Piirtola, Panu; Klemola, Tero

    2008-01-01

    Background An understanding of the evolution of potential signals from plants to the predators of their herbivores may provide exciting examples of co-evolution among multiple trophic levels. Understanding the mechanism behind the attraction of predators to plants is crucial to conclusions about co-evolution. For example, insectivorous birds are attracted to herbivore-damaged trees without seeing the herbivores or the defoliated parts, but it is not known whether birds use cues from herbivore-damaged plants with a specific adaptation of plants for this purpose. Methodology We examined whether signals from damaged trees attract avian predators in the wild and whether birds could use volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions or net photosynthesis of leaves as cues to detect herbivore-rich trees. We conducted a field experiment with mountain birches (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii), their main herbivore (Epirrita autumnata) and insectivorous birds. Half of the trees had herbivore larvae defoliating trees hidden inside branch bags and half had empty bags as controls. We measured predation rate of birds towards artificial larvae on tree branches, and VOC emissions and net photosynthesis of leaves. Principal Findings and Significance The predation rate was higher in the herbivore trees than in the control trees. This confirms that birds use cues from trees to locate insect-rich trees in the wild. The herbivore trees had decreased photosynthesis and elevated emissions of many VOCs, which suggests that birds could use either one, or both, as cues. There was, however, large variation in how the VOC emission correlated with predation rate. Emissions of (E)-DMNT [(E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene], β-ocimene and linalool were positively correlated with predation rate, while those of highly inducible green leaf volatiles were not. These three VOCs are also involved in the attraction of insect parasitoids and predatory mites to herbivore-damaged plants, which suggests that

  14. The Effect of Differential Growth Rates across Plants on Spectral Predictions of Physiological Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Tal; Hochberg, Uri; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Leaves of various ages and positions in a plant's canopy can present distinct physiological, morphological and anatomical characteristics, leading to complexities in selecting a single leaf for spectral representation of an entire plant. A fortiori, as growth rates between canopies differ, spectral-based comparisons across multiple plants – often based on leaves' position but not age – becomes an even more challenging mission. This study explores the effect of differential growth rates on the reflectance variability between leaves of different canopies, and its implication on physiological predictions made by widely-used spectral indices. Two distinct irrigation treatments were applied for one month, in order to trigger the formation of different growth rates between two groups of grapevines. Throughout the experiment, the plants were physiologically and morphologically monitored, while leaves from every part of their canopies were spectrally and histologically sampled. As the control vines were constantly developing new leaves, the water deficit plants were experiencing growth inhibition, resulting in leaves of different age at similar nodal position across the treatments. This modification of the age-position correlation was characterized by a near infrared reflectance difference between younger and older leaves, which was found to be exponentially correlated (R2 = 0.98) to the age-dependent area of intercellular air spaces within the spongy parenchyma. Overall, the foliage of the control plant became more spectrally variable, creating complications for intra- and inter-treatment leaf-based comparisons. Of the derived indices, the Structure-Insensitive Pigment Index (SIPI) was found indifferent to the age-position effect, allowing the treatments to be compared at any nodal position, while a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)-based stomatal conductance prediction was substantially affected by differential growth rates. As various biotic and

  15. Association between Residential Proximity to Fuel-Fired Power Plants and Hospitalization Rate for Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Lessner, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Background: Air pollution is known to cause respiratory disease. Unlike motor vehicle sources, fuel-fired power plants are stationary. Objective: Using hospitalization data, we examined whether living near a fuel-fired power plant increases the likelihood of hospitalization for respiratory disease. Methods: Rates of hospitalization for asthma, acute respiratory infection (ARI), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were estimated using hospitalization data for 1993–2008 from New York State in relation to data for residences near fuel-fired power plants. We also explored data for residential proximity to hazardous waste sites. Results: After adjusting for age, sex, race, median household income, and rural/urban residence, there were significant 11%, 15%, and 17% increases in estimated rates of hospitalization for asthma, ARI, and COPD, respectively, among individuals > 10 years of age living in a ZIP code containing a fuel-fired power plant compared with one that had no power plant. Living in a ZIP code with a fuel-fired power plant was not significantly associated with hospitalization for asthma or ARI among children < 10 years of age. Living in a ZIP code with a hazardous waste site was associated with hospitalization for all outcomes in both age groups, and joint effect estimates were approximately additive for living in a ZIP code that contained a fuel-fired power plant and a hazardous waste site. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to air pollution from fuel-fired power plants and volatile compounds coming from hazardous waste sites increases the risk of hospitalization for respiratory diseases. PMID:22370087

  16. Modeling Hydrogen Generation Rates in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Sherwood, David J.; Stock, Leon M.

    2004-03-29

    This presentation describes a project in which Hanford Site and Environmental Management Science Program investigators addressed issues concerning hydrogen generation rates in the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant. The hydrogen generation rates of radioactive wastes must be estimated to provide for safe operations. While an existing model satisfactorily predicts rates for quiescent wastes in Hanford underground storage tanks, pretreatment operations will alter the conditions and chemical composition of these wastes. Review of the treatment process flowsheet identified specific issues requiring study to ascertain whether the model would provide conservative values for waste streams in the plant. These include effects of adding hydroxide ion, alpha radiolysis, saturation with air (oxygen) from pulse-jet mixing, treatment with potassium permanganate, organic compounds from degraded ion exchange resins and addition of glass-former chemicals. The effects were systematically investigated through literature review, technical analyses and experimental work.

  17. Transpiration as the Leak in a Carbon Factory: A Model of Self-Optimising Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, M.; Schymanski, S. J.; Roderick, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    "Only now it occurred to me that plants are not water pumps but carbon factories" (Anonymous Hydrologist). When thinking of plants as `water pumps', we are led to the conclusion that vegetation would tend to maximise the total amount of transpiration while minimising the occurrence probability of periods without adequate water availability (`stress'). However, this does not do adequate justice to the fact that plants owe their existence to photosynthesis, and can thrive perfectly well even when the relative humidity of the air is very high and transpiration is almost negligible. In this paper, we present a model in which the maximisation of net CO2 uptake rather than maximisation of water use or minimisation of `stress' is assumed to be the driving force behind natural selection. Transpiration is the inevitable consequence of CO2 uptake from the atmosphere and water uptake from the soil incurs construction and maintenance costs of a root system, so that water use strategies become a consequence of the maximisation of net CO2 uptake and `stress' becomes an obsolete feature. We will demonstrate that a simple model based on ecological optimality is capable of reproducing some vegetation and water balance dynamics without any prior knowledge about the vegetation on a particular site. The model is based on a physical water balance model by Reggiani et al. (2000), an ecophysiological gas exchange and photosynthesis model (Cowan and Farquhar 1977; von Caemmerer 2000), and the hypothesis that natural selection leads to a vegetation type that optimally uses available resources to maximise its `net carbon profit' (the net tradeoff between carbon acquired by photosynthesis and carbon spent on maintenance of the organs involved in its uptake). While, at this early stage of its development, the site properties such as soil type and depth, topography and climate still have to be prescribed, the model creates the `optimal' dynamically adjusting vegetation for the particular site

  18. Does the stress-gradient hypothesis hold water? Disentangling spatial and temporal variation in plant effects on soil moisture in dryland systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterfield, Bradley J.; Bradford, John B.; Armas, Cristina; Prieto, Ivan; Pugnaire, Francisco I.

    2016-01-01

    Taken together, the results of this simulation study suggest that plant effects on soil moisture are predictable based on relatively general relationships between precipitation inputs and differential evaporation and transpiration rates between plant and interspace microsites that are largely driven by temperature. In particular, this study highlights the importance of differentiating between temporal and spatial variation in weather and climate, respectively, in determining plant effects on available soil moisture. Rather than focusing on the somewhat coarse-scale predictions of the SGH, it may be more beneficial to explicitly incorporate plant effects on soil moisture into predictive models of plant-plant interaction outcomes in drylands.

  19. Studies of shock/shock interaction on smooth and transpiration-cooled hemispherical nosetips in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen M.

    1992-01-01

    A program of experimental research and analysis was conducted to examine the heat transfer and pressure distributions in regions of shock/shock interaction over smooth and transpiration-cooled hemispherical noseshapes. The objective of this investigation was to determine whether the large heat transfer generated in regions of shock/shock interaction can be reduced by transpiration cooling. The experimental program was conducted at Mach numbers of 12 to 16 in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel. Type 3 and type 4 interaction regions were generated for a range of freestream unit Reynolds numbers to provide shear layer Reynolds numbers from 10 exp 4 to 10 exp 6 to enable laminar and turbulent interaction regions to be studied. Shock/shock interactions were investigated on a smooth hemispherical nosetip and a similar transpiration-cooled nosetip, with the latter configuration being examined for a range of surface blowing rates up to one-third of the freestream mass flux. While the heat transfer measurements on the smooth hemisphere without shock/shock interaction were in good agreement with Fay-Riddell predictions, those on the transpiration-cooled nosetip indicated that its intrinsic roughness caused heating-enhancement factors of over 1.5. In the shock/shock interaction studies on the smooth nosetip, detailed heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained to map the variation of the distributions with shock-impingement position for a range of type 3 and type 4 interactions. Such sets of measurements were obtained for a range of unit Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers to obtain both laminar and turbulent interactions. The measurements indicated that shear layer transition has a significant influence on the heating rates for the type 4 interaction as well as the anticipated large effects on type 3 interaction heating. In the absence of blowing, the peak heating in the type 3 and type 4 interaction regions, over the transpiration-cooled model, did not appear to be

  20. Initiating Event Rates at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants. 1988 - 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John A.; Bower, Gordon R.

    2014-02-01

    Analyzing initiating event rates is important because it indicates performance among plants and also provides inputs to several U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) risk-informed regulatory activities. This report presents an analysis of initiating event frequencies at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants since each plant’s low-power license date. The evaluation is based on the operating experience from fiscal year 1988 through 2013 as reported in licensee event reports. Engineers with nuclear power plant experience staff reviewed each event report since the last update to this report for the presence of valid scrams or reactor trips at power. To be included in the study, an event had to meet all of the following criteria: includes an unplanned reactor trip (not a scheduled reactor trip on the daily operations schedule), sequence of events starts when reactor is critical and at or above the point of adding heat, occurs at a U.S. commercial nuclear power plant (excluding Fort St. Vrain and LaCrosse), and is reported by a licensee event report. This report displays occurrence rates (baseline frequencies) for the categories of initiating events that contribute to the NRC’s Industry Trends Program. Sixteen initiating event groupings are trended and displayed. Initiators are plotted separately for initiating events with different occurrence rates for boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. p-values are given for the possible presence of a trend over the most recent 10 years.

  1. Measurements of transpiration isotopologues and leaf water to assess enrichment models in cotton.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Loucos, Karen E; Simonin, Kevin A; Farquhar, Graham D; Barbour, Margaret M

    2015-04-01

    The two-pool and Péclet effect models represent two theories describing mechanistic controls underlying leaf water oxygen isotope composition at the whole-leaf level (δ(18) OL ). To test these models, we used a laser spectrometer coupled to a gas-exchange cuvette to make online measurements of δ(18) O of transpiration (δ(18) Otrans ) and transpiration rate (E) in 61 cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) leaves. δ(18) Otrans measurements permitted direct calculation of δ(18) O at the sites of evaporation (δ(18) Oe ) which, combined with values of δ(18) OL from the same leaves, allowed unbiased estimation of the proportional deviation of enrichment of δ(18) OL from that of δ(18) Oe (f) under both steady-state (SS) and non-steady-state (NSS) conditions. Among all leaves measured, f expressed relative to both δ(18) O of transpired water (ftrans ) and source water (fsw ) remained relatively constant with a mean ± SD of 0.11 ± 0.05 and 0.13 ± 0.05, respectively, regardless of variation in E spanning 0.8-9.1 mmol m(-2)  s(-1) . Neither ftrans nor fsw exhibited a significant difference between the SS and NSS leaves at the P < 0.05 level. Our results suggest that the simpler two-pool model is adequate for predicting cotton leaf water enrichment at the whole-leaf level. We discuss the implications of adopting a two-pool concept for isotopic applications in ecological studies. PMID:25643590

  2. Effect, uptake and disposition of nitrobenzene in several terrestrial plants

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, C.; Pfleeger, T.; Fletcher, J.

    1990-01-01

    Eight species of plants were exposed to nitrobenzene in a hydroponic solution. Four species experienced no depression of either transpiration or photosynthetic rates, while one was rapidly killed and the other three were temporarily affected but recovered from the treatment. Uptake of nitrobenzene was passive and was shown to be proportional to the rate of water flux in each species. The transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF) was 0.72. The root concentration factor (RCF) was variable between the species and was higher than expected, presumably due to deposits of insoluble metabolic products. All of the species examined displayed a capacity to chemically alter nonpolar nitrobenzene into both polar and insoluble products. Volatilization of nitrobenzene from the leaves was a major route of chemical loss.

  3. Absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Hosoda, M; Fukushi, M; Furukawa, M; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    The monitoring of absorbed dose rate in air has been carried out continually at various locations in metropolitan Tokyo after the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. While the data obtained before the accident are needed to more accurately assess the effects of radionuclide contamination from the accident, detailed data for metropolitan Tokyo obtained before the accident have not been reported. A car-borne survey of the absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo was carried out during August to September 2003. The average absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo was 49±6 nGy h(-1). The absorbed dose rate in air in western Tokyo was higher compared with that in central Tokyo. Here, if the absorbed dose rate indoors in Tokyo is equivalent to that outdoors, the annual effective dose would be calculated as 0.32 mSv y(-1). PMID:25944962

  4. Legume presence reduces the decomposition rate of non-legume roots, role of plant traits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deyn, Gerlinde B.; Saar, Sirgi; Barel, Janna; Semchenko, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Plant litter traits are known to play an important role in the rate of litter decomposition and mineralization, both for aboveground and belowground litter. However also the biotic and abiotic environment in which the litter decomposes plays a significant role in the rate of decomposition. The presence of living plants may accelerate litter decomposition rates via a priming effects. The size of this effect is expected to be related to the traits of the litter. In this study we focus on root litter, given that roots and their link to ecosystem processes have received relatively little attention in trait-based research. To test the effect of a growing legume plant on root decomposition and the role of root traits in this we used dead roots of 7 different grassland species (comprising grasses, a forb and legumes), determined their C, N, P content and quantified litter mass loss after eight weeks of incubation in soil with and without white clover. We expected faster root decomposition with white clover, especially for root litter with low N content. In contrast we found slower decomposition of grass and forb roots which were poor in N (negative priming) in presence of white clover, while decomposition rates of legume roots were not affected by the presence of white clover. Overall we found that root decomposition can be slowed down in the presence of a living plant and that this effect depends on the traits of the decomposing roots, with a pronounced reduction in root litter poor in N and P, but not in the relatively nutrient-rich legume root litters. The negative priming effect of legume plants on non-legume litter decomposition may have resulted from preferential substrate utilisation by soil microbes.

  5. Loss rate of NO y from a power plant plume based on aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillani, N. V.; Luria, M.; Valente, R. J.; Tanner, R. L.; Imhoff, R. E.; Meagher, J. F.

    1998-09-01

    This study was motivated by the recent work of Buhr et al. [1996] which reported losses of NOy from large power plant plumes as high as 0.25 hour-1, much higher than generally accepted values. If true, conclusions pertaining to the efficiency of ozone and nitrate production in the lower troposphere would need major revisions. The results of Buhr et al. were based on aircraft measurements in four TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) power plant plumes on July 7, 1995, as part of the Nashville/Middle Tennessee Ozone Study, a measurement program of the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS), whereas the results reported in this paper are also based on measurements made in the same SOS study aboard another instrumented aircraft (the TVA helicopter), in plumes of one of these power plants (the Cumberland Steam Plant in northwestern Tennessee) during five different days in 1994 and 1995. Between the 1994 and 1995 sampling periods, emissions of SO2 at the Cumberland plant were reduced by nearly 95% by installation of scrubbers. Our data from the one 1994 day show that the ratio of excess SO2 to NOy, in the plume core increased significantly with plume age, indicating a potentially high differential loss rate of NOy (excess loss of NOy relative to SO2) of about 0.12 hour-1. However, results based on the larger 1995 data set indicate a low differential NOy loss rate of only 0.00±0.03 hour-1, consistent with accepted low loss rates. Because the SOS-Nashville/Middle Tennessee Ozone Study was not specifically designed to explore the NOy loss issue, the question of NOy loss rates in plumes is not currently resolved and additional focused field studies are needed.

  6. Numerical analysis of gas separator with thermal transpiration in micro channels II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaye, Shoeji; Sugimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    A membrane gas separator which operates with only a small temperature difference across a membrane is designed, and its capability is numerically proved. The separator system consists of three Knudsen pumps - a motionless pump that utilizes the thermal transpiration of the rarefied gas. Each pump is composed of a porous membrane and one channel along each of the two surfaces of the membrane. Two of the pumps induce a variation of mole fraction using a combination of the thermal transpiration and pressure driven flow through the membrane, and the other one provides the former two pumps with a required pressure difference. This paper reports the first numerical calculations that demonstrate a neon-argon binary gas mixture can be separated into pure neon gas and argon gas with the proposed design. The temperature difference is no more than 90 K, and the total length of the membrane is ˜ 15 cm at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The production rate of the separator is proportional to the width of the membrane. For example, when the width is 10 cm, the flow rates of the product gases are 0.8 sccm for argon and 1.9 sccm for neon.

  7. Canopy photosynthesis and transpiration in microgravity: gas exchange measurements aboard Mir.

    PubMed

    Monje, O; Bingham, G E; Carman, J G; Campbell, W F; Salisbury, F B; Eames, B K; Sytchev, V; Levinskikh, M A; Podolsky, I

    2000-01-01

    The SVET Greenhouse on-board the Orbital Station Mir was used to measure canopy photosynthesis and transpiration rates for the first time in space. During the Greenhouse IIB experiment on Mir (June-January 1997), carbon and water vapor fluxes from two wheat (cv. Superdwarf) canopies were measured using the US developed Gas Exchange Measurement System (GEMS). Gas analyzers capable of resolving CO2 concentration differences of 5 micromoles mol-1 against a background of 0.9% CO2, are necessary to measure photosynthetic and respiratory rates on Mir. The ability of the GEMS gas analyzers to measure these CO2 concentration differences was determined during extensive ground calibrations. Similarly, the sensitivity of the analyzers to water vapor was sufficient to accurately measure canopy evapotranspiration. Evapotranspiration, which accounted for over 90% of the water added to the root zone, was estimated using gas exchange and used to estimate substrate moisture content. This paper presents canopy photosynthesis and transpiration data during the peak vegetative phase of development in microgravity. PMID:11543166

  8. Direct measurement of sodium and potassium in the transpiration stream of salt-excluding and non-excluding varieties of wheat.

    PubMed

    Watson, R; Pritchard, J; Malone, M

    2001-09-01

    The xylem-feeding insect Philaenus spumarius was used to analyse sodium and potassium fluxes in the xylem of intact, transpiring wheat plants. Two cultivars were compared: the salt-excluding (Chinese Spring) and the non-excluding (Langdon). Chinese Spring accumulated much less sodium in its leaves than the salt-sensitive Langdon. After 7 d in 150 mol m(-3) NaCl, the sodium concentration in the leaf sap of Langdon reached over 600 mol m(-3). This was some three-fold greater than that in Chinese Spring. Similar findings have previously been reported from these cultivars. The reduced ion accumulation was specific to sodium; accumulation of K(+) was unaffected by NaCl in Chinese Spring, such that it developed a much lower leaf Na(+)/K(+) ratio than Langdon. The spittlebug, P. spumarius was used to sample xylem sap from both cultivars. This approach showed that the leaf xylem sap of Chinese Spring had much lower levels of sodium than that of Langdon. In the 150 mol m(-3) NaCl treatment, sodium levels in the leaf xylem reached only 2-3 mol m(-3) in Chinese Spring, compared with 8-10 mol m(-3) in Langdon. Transpiration rates were found to be similar in the two varieties. The lower leaf xylem content alone was thus sufficient to account for the reduced accumulation of sodium in leaves of Chinese Spring. The mechanisms by which xylem sodium might be lowered are discussed and it is concluded that sodium is probably excluded from the xylem in the root of Chinese Spring. PMID:11520876

  9. Transpiration cooled electrodes and insulators for MHD generators

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, Jr., Delmer Q.

    1981-01-01

    Systems for cooling the inner duct walls in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. The inner face components, adjacent the plasma, are formed of a porous material known as a transpiration material. Selected cooling gases are transpired through the duct walls, including electrically insulating and electrode segments, and into the plasma. A wide variety of structural materials and coolant gases at selected temperatures and pressures can be utilized and the gases can be drawn from the generation system compressor, the surrounding environment, and combustion and seed treatment products otherwise discharged, among many other sources. The conduits conducting the cooling gas are electrically insulated through low pressure bushings and connectors so as to electrically isolate the generator duct from the ground.

  10. Heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kays, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper contains a summarization of five years work on an investigation on heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer. Experimental results are presented for friction coefficient and Stanton number over a wide range of blowing and suction for the case of constant free-stream velocity, holding certain blowing parameters constant. The problem of the accelerated turbulent boundary layer with transpiration is considered, experimental data are presented and discussed, and theoretical models for solution of the momentum equation under these conditions are presented. Data on turbulent Prandtl number are presented so that solutions to the energy equation may be obtained. Some examples of boundary layer heat transfer and friction coefficient predictions are presented using one of the models discussed, employing a finite difference solution method.

  11. Reintroduction of rare arable plants by seed transfer. What are the optimal sowing rates?

    PubMed

    Lang, Marion; Prestele, Julia; Fischer, Christina; Kollmann, Johannes; Albrecht, Harald

    2016-08-01

    During the past decades, agro-biodiversity has markedly declined and some species are close to extinction in large parts of Europe. Reintroduction of rare arable plant species in suitable habitats could counteract this negative trend. The study investigates optimal sowing rates of three endangered species (Legousia speculum-veneris (L.) Chaix, Consolida regalis Gray, and Lithospermum arvense L.), in terms of establishment success, seed production, and crop yield losses.A field experiment with partial additive design was performed in an organically managed winter rye stand with study species added in ten sowing rates of 5-10,000 seeds m(-2). They were sown as a single species or as a three-species mixture (pure vs. mixed sowing) and with vs. without removal of spontaneous weeds. Winter rye was sown at a fixed rate of 350 grains m(-2). Performance of the study species was assessed as plant establishment and seed production. Crop response was determined as grain yield.Plant numbers and seed production were significantly affected by the sowing rate, but not by sowing type (pure vs. mixed sowing of the three study species), and weed removal. All rare arable plant species established and reproduced at sowing rates >25 seeds m(-2), with best performance of L. speculum-veneris. Negative density effects occurred to some extent for plant establishment and more markedly for seed production.The impact of the three study species on crop yield followed sigmoidal functions. Depending on the species, a yield loss of 10% occurred at >100 seeds m(-2). Synthesis and applications: The study shows that reintroduction of rare arable plants by seed transfer is a suitable method to establish them on extensively managed fields, for example, in organic farms with low nutrient level and without mechanical weed control. Sowing rates of 100 seeds m(-2) for C. regalis and L. arvense, and 50 seeds m(-2) for L. speculum-veneris are recommended, to achieve successful establishment

  12. Soil Penetration Rates by Earthworms and Plant Roots- Mechanical and Energetic Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Siul; Schymanski, Stan; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the implications of different soil burrowing rates by earthworms and growing plant roots using mechanical models that consider soil rheological properties. We estimate the energetic requirements for soil elasto-viscoplastic displacement at different rates for similar burrows and water contents. In the core of the mechanical model is a transient cavity expansion into viscoplastic wet soil that mimic an earthworm or root tip cone-like penetration and subsequent cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydrostatic skeleton or root radial growth. Soil matrix viscoplatic considerations enable separation of the respective energetic requirements for earthworms penetrating at 2 μm/s relative to plant roots growing at 0.2 μm/s . Typical mechanical and viscous parameters are obtained inversely for soils under different fixed water contents utilizing custom miniaturized cone penetrometers at different fixed penetration rates (1 to 1000 μm/s). Experimental results determine critical water contents where soil exhibits pronounced viscoplatic behavior (close to saturation), bellow which the soil strength limits earthworms activity and fracture propagation by expanding plant roots becomes the favorable mechanical mode. The soil mechanical parameters in conjunction with earthworm and plant root physiological pressure limitations (200 kPa and 2000 kPa respectively) enable delineation of the role of soil saturation in regulating biotic penetration rates for different soil types under different moisture contents. Furthermore, this study provides a quantitative framework for estimating rates of energy expenditure for soil penetration, which allowed us to determine maximum earthworm population densities considering soil mechanical properties and the energy stored in soil organic matter.

  13. How Landscape Characteristics Influence Spatial Patterns of Transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, S. K.; Weiler, M.; Zehe, E.; Blume, T.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying transpiration in landscapes remains a challenging task. Especially bridging the gap between tree- or plot-scale measurements and information on the landscape scale which could be gathered from remote sensing, digital elevation models or forest inventories still poses considerable problems. These problems reach from errors associated with the measurements to the reliability of representing transpiration amounts by large-scale data. In this study we analyse spatial patterns of sap velocity to identify the importance of tree- or site-specific characteristics for transpiration at the landscape scale. We set up multiple linear regression models for a dataset of daily sap velocities for 61 trees at 24 locations in mixed beech and oak forests in a catchment in Luxemburg, recorded during the growing season of 2014. As predictors we use the tree-specific characteristics species, diameter and height and the site-specific characteristics basal area and number of stems for the respective stands as well as landscape attributes such as aspect, slope position and geology. Analysing the importance of these predictors could be useful for upscaling tree-based measurements to the landscape-scale based on data from digital elevation models, forest inventories or remote sensing. We also assess the temporal dynamics of the importance of tree- vs. site-specific predictors and link them to typical controls for sap flow such as atmospheric demand and soil moisture. First results indicate that site-specific predictors contribute considerably to the explained variance of the linear models. However, remotely sensed information explained very little of the variation in daily sap velocity patterns. Further analyses will quantify to which extent we can use the landscape-scale information from digital elevation models, geology and forest inventories to upscale tree-based transpiration estimates.

  14. DSMC Simulation of thermal transpiration and accomodation pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.L.; Bartel, T.J.

    1998-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique is employed to evaluate several configurations of thermal transpiration and accommodation pumps. There is renewed interest in these rarefied flow pumping concepts for Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) due to advances in micro-fabrication. The simulation results are compared with existing data to understand gas-surface interaction uncertainties in the experiments. Parametric studies are performed to determine the effects of Knudsen number and surface temperature and roughness on the maximum pump pressure ratio.

  15. Study of deposition control using transpiration. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Kozlu, H.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the conditions under which transpiration may be actually used to avoid deposition of small particles. The application of this work is the control of the deposition of small particles over a surface kept at a temperature below the melting point of compounds likely to exist in the combustion products. A combined experimental and theoretical research program will be carried out to evaluate the concept of transpiration as a deposition control strategy. A first order theory will be refined by introducing an appropriate turbulence model. The experimental program is designed to evaluate and refine the theoretical model under conditions which provide the correct Reynolds and Stokes numbers. The experimental set up consists of a wind tunnel with a test section containing a flat porous transpired section. The measurements will determine the distribution of velocity and of particle concentration in the boundary layer. The experiments will be conducted for different particle sizes under conditions sumulating gas turbine conditions.

  16. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  17. Water-use efficiency and transpiration across European forests during the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D. C.; Poulter, B.; Saurer, M.; Esper, J.; Huntingford, C.; Helle, G.; Treydte, K.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Schleser, G. H.; Ahlström, A.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Levis, S.; Lomas, M.; Sitch, S.; Viovy, N.; Andreu-Hayles, L.; Bednarz, Z.; Berninger, F.; Boettger, T.; D`Alessandro, C. M.; Daux, V.; Filot, M.; Grabner, M.; Gutierrez, E.; Haupt, M.; Hilasvuori, E.; Jungner, H.; Kalela-Brundin, M.; Krapiec, M.; Leuenberger, M.; Loader, N. J.; Marah, H.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Pazdur, A.; Pawelczyk, S.; Pierre, M.; Planells, O.; Pukiene, R.; Reynolds-Henne, C. E.; Rinne, K. T.; Saracino, A.; Sonninen, E.; Stievenard, M.; Switsur, V. R.; Szczepanek, M.; Szychowska-Krapiec, E.; Todaro, L.; Waterhouse, J. S.; Weigl, M.

    2015-06-01

    The Earth’s carbon and hydrologic cycles are intimately coupled by gas exchange through plant stomata. However, uncertainties in the magnitude and consequences of the physiological responses of plants to elevated CO2 in natural environments hinders modelling of terrestrial water cycling and carbon storage. Here we use annually resolved long-term δ13C tree-ring measurements across a European forest network to reconstruct the physiologically driven response of intercellular CO2 (Ci) caused by atmospheric CO2 (Ca) trends. When removing meteorological signals from the δ13C measurements, we find that trees across Europe regulated gas exchange so that for one ppmv atmospheric CO2 increase, Ci increased by ~0.76 ppmv, most consistent with moderate control towards a constant Ci/Ca ratio. This response corresponds to twentieth-century intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) increases of 14 +/- 10 and 22 +/- 6% at broadleaf and coniferous sites, respectively. An ensemble of process-based global vegetation models shows similar CO2 effects on iWUE trends. Yet, when operating these models with climate drivers reintroduced, despite decreased stomatal opening, 5% increases in European forest transpiration are calculated over the twentieth century. This counterintuitive result arises from lengthened growing seasons, enhanced evaporative demand in a warming climate, and increased leaf area, which together oppose effects of CO2-induced stomatal closure. Our study questions changes to the hydrological cycle, such as reductions in transpiration and air humidity, hypothesized to result from plant responses to anthropogenic emissions.

  18. Comparative genomics reveals convergent rates of evolution in ant-plant mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Moreau, Corrie S

    2016-01-01

    Symbiosis-the close and often long-term interaction of species-is predicted to drive genome evolution in a variety of ways. For example, parasitic interactions have been shown to increase rates of molecular evolution, a trend generally attributed to the Red Queen Hypothesis. However, it is much less clear how mutualisms impact the genome, as both increased and reduced rates of change have been predicted. Here we sequence the genomes of seven species of ants, three that have convergently evolved obligate plant-ant mutualism and four closely related species of non-mutualists. Comparing these sequences, we investigate how genome evolution is shaped by mutualistic behaviour. We find that rates of molecular evolution are higher in the mutualists genome wide, a characteristic apparently not the result of demography. Our results suggest that the intimate relationships of obligate mutualists may lead to selective pressures similar to those seen in parasites, thereby increasing rates of evolution. PMID:27557866

  19. LM2500 plant for PNEM rated 21,500 kW base load

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.

    1982-09-01

    The first uprated version of BE's LM2500 generator set will produce an extra 1500 kW (2000 hp) for Provinciale Noordbrabantse Elektricitiets Maatschappij's (PNEM) Helmond power station in the Netherlands. Unlike conventional LM2500s, this natural-gas fueled unit carried a 21,500 kW baseload rating; moreover, it operates at a higher firing temperature, a hotter exhaust, an increased mass flow, and an improved system heat rate. Although the unit is currently slated for simple-cycle operation, PNEM plants to shift its role to combined service through retrofitting an exhaust-heat-recovery steam generator and turbine - perhaps as early as 1984.

  20. Hazard rating of ash and slag dumps of thermal power plants firing Kuznetskii coal

    SciTech Connect

    E.P. Dik; A.N. Soboleva

    2006-03-15

    Results of a study of the degree of toxicity and of the hazard rating of ash and slag waste due to firing Kuznetskii coals at thermal power plants are presented. Computation shows and biological tests prove that the waste belongs to the fifth hazard class, i.e., is virtually safe. Comparison of the results obtained with foreign data shows that the waste in question belongs to the safe category in accordance with foreign standards as well.

  1. Extinction rate estimates for plant populations in revisitation studies: Importance of detectability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, M.

    2004-01-01

    Many researchers have obtained extinction-rate estimates for plant populations by comparing historical and current records of occurrence. A population that is no longer found is assumed to have gone extinct. Extinction can then be related to characteristics of these populations, such as habitat type, size, or species, to test ideas about what factors may affect extinction. Such studies neglect the fact that a population may be overlooked, however, which may bias estimates of extinction rates upward. In addition, if populations are unequally detectable across groups to be compared, such as habitat type or population size, comparisons become distorted to an unknown degree. To illustrate the problem, I simulated two data sets, assuming a constant extinction rate, in which populations occurred in different habitats or habitats of different size and these factors affected their detectability The conventional analysis implicitly assumed that detectability equalled 1 and used logistic regression to estimate extinction rates. It wrongly identified habitat and population size as factors affecting extinction risk. In contrast, with capture-recapture methods, unbiased estimates of extinction rates were recovered. I argue that capture-recapture methods should be considered more often in estimations of demographic parameters in plant populations and communities.

  2. The effect of land plants on weathering rates of silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Drever, J.I. )

    1994-05-01

    Land plants and their associated microbiota directly affect silicate mineral weathering in several ways: by generation of chelating ligands, by modifying pH through production of CO[sub 2] or organic acids, and by altering the physical properties of a soil, particularly the exposed surface areas of minerals and the residence time of water. In laboratory experiments far from equilibrium, 1 mM oxalate (a strong chelator of Al) has a negligible effect on the dissolution rate of alkali feldspars, but some effect on calcic feldspars and olivine. By analogy to oxalate, the overall effect of organic ligands on the weathering rate of silicate minerals in nature is likely to be small, except perhaps in microenvironments adjacent to roots and fungal hyphae. The effect of pH on silicate mineral dissolution rate depends on pH: below pH 4-5, the rate increases with decreasing pH, in the circumneutral region the rate is pH-independent, and at pH values above around 8 the rate increases with increasing pH. Vegetation should thus cause an increase in weathering rate through the pH effect only where the pH is below 4-5. As an overall generalization, the effect of plants on weathering rate through changes in soil-solution chemistry is probably small for granitic rocks; it may be greater for more mafic rocks. It is the release of Ca and Mg from mafic rocks that has the greatest influence on the global CO[sub 2] budget.

  3. Levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids correlate with growth rate in plant cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Meï, Coline; Michaud, Morgane; Cussac, Mathilde; Albrieux, Catherine; Gros, Valérie; Maréchal, Eric; Block, Maryse A.; Jouhet, Juliette; Rébeillé, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    In higher plants, fatty acids (FAs) with 18 carbons (18C) represent about 70% of total FAs, the most abundant species being 18:2 and 18:3. These two polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) represent about 55% of total FAs in Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures, whereas 18:1 represents about 10%. The level of PUFAs may vary, depending on ill-defined factors. Here, we compared various sets of plant cell cultures and noticed a correlation between the growth rate of a cell population and the level of unsaturation of 18C FAs. These observations suggest that the final level of PUFAs might depend in part on the rate of cell division, and that FAD2 and FAD3 desaturases, which are respectively responsible for the formation of 18:2 and 18:3 on phospholipids, have limiting activities in fast-growing cultures. In plant cell culture, phosphate (Pi) deprivation is known to impair cell division and to trigger lipid remodeling. We observed that Pi starvation had no effect on the expression of FAD genes, and that the level of PUFAs in this situation was also correlated with the growth rate. Thus, the level of PUFAs appears as a hallmark in determining cell maturity and aging. PMID:26469123

  4. [Morphophysiological and biochemical characteristics of potato plants with various expression rates of the Δ12 acyl-lipid desaturase gene].

    PubMed

    Zagoskina, N V; Priadekhina, E V; Lapshin, P V; Iur'eva, N O; Goldenkova-Pavlova, I V

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on morphophysiological and biochemical characteristics of control and potato plants (Solarium tuberosum L., Skoroplodnyi cultivar) transformed with the Δ12 acyl-lipid desaturase gene (desA) grown long-term in vitro. The transformed plants showed faster growth and faster ontogenesis as compared to controls, which was accompanied with changes in the accumulation of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids) and phenolic compounds, including flavonoids in the leaves. These characteristics were pronounced to a high degree in Line II plants with high expression rates of the desA gene, whereas Line I plants (moderate expression rate) were similar to control plants in many parameters. PMID:25735165

  5. Evapo-transpiration, role of aerosol radiative forcing: a study over a dense canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanage, VInayak; Latha, R.; Murthy, B. S.

    2016-05-01

    Current study uses Satellite and Reanalysis data to quantify the effect of aerosol on ET at various space and time scales. All the data are obtained for the period June 2008 to May 2009 over Dibrugarh district, Assam, Indi a where NDVI has limited change of through the year. Monthly Evapo-Transpiration (ET, cumulative), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) are retrieved from satellite images of Terra-MODIS. The AOD data are evaluated against in-situ observations. Maximum values of AOD are observed in the pre-monsoon season while minimum AOD values are perceived in October and November. Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) is calculated by using the MERRA data sets of `clean-clear radiation' and `clear-radiation' at surface over the study area. Maximum aerosol radiative forcing is observed during the pre-monsoon season; this is in tune with ground observations. Strong positive correlation (r=0.75) between ET and NDVI is observed and it is found that the dense vegetative surfaces exhibit higher rate of evapo-transpiration. A strong positive correlation (r= -0.85) between ARF at surface and AOD is observed with radiative forcing efficiency of 35 W/m2. A statistical regression equation of ET a s a function of NDVI and AOD i.e. ET = 0.25 + (-84.27) * AOD + (131.51) * NDVI, is obtained that shows a correlation of 0.824.

  6. Island radiation on a continental scale: Exceptional rates of plant diversification after uplift of the Andes

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Colin; Eastwood, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Species radiations provide unique insights into evolutionary processes underlying species diversification and patterns of biodiversity. To compare plant diversification over a similar time period to the recent cichlid fish radiations, which are an order of magnitude faster than documented bird, arthropod, and plant radiations, we focus on the high-altitude flora of the Andes, which is the most species-rich of any tropical mountains. Because of the recent uplift of the northern Andes, the upland environments where much of this rich endemic flora is found have been available for colonization only since the late Pliocene or Pleistocene, 2–4 million years (Myr) ago. Using DNA sequence data we identify a monophyletic group within the genus Lupinus representing 81 species endemic to the Andes. The age of this clade is estimated to be 1.18–1.76 Myr, implying a diversification rate of 2.49–3.72 species per Myr. This exceeds previous estimates for plants, providing the most spectacular example of explosive plant species diversification documented to date. Furthermore, it suggests that the high cichlid diversification rates are not unique. Lack of key innovations associated with the Andean Lupinus clade suggests that diversification was driven by ecological opportunities afforded by the emergence of island-like habitats after Andean uplift. Data from other genera indicate that lupines are one of a set of similarly rapid Andean plant radiations, continental in scale and island-like in stimulus, suggesting that the high-elevation Andean flora provides a system that rivals other groups, including cichlids, for understanding rapid species diversification. PMID:16801546

  7. Fire and Grazing Influences on Rates of Riparian Woody Plant Expansion along Grassland Streams

    PubMed Central

    Veach, Allison M.; Dodds, Walter K.; Skibbe, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Grasslands are threatened globally due to the expansion of woody plants. The few remaining headwater streams within tallgrass prairies are becoming more like typical forested streams due to rapid conversion of riparian zones from grassy to wooded. Forestation can alter stream hydrology and biogeochemistry. We estimated the rate of riparian woody plant expansion within a 30 m buffer zone surrounding the stream bed across whole watersheds at Konza Prairie Biological Station over 25 years from aerial photographs. Watersheds varied with respect to experimentally-controlled fire and bison grazing. Fire frequency, presence or absence of grazing bison, and the historical presence of woody vegetation prior to the study time period (a proxy for proximity of propagule sources) were used as independent variables to predict the rate of riparian woody plant expansion between 1985 and 2010. Water yield was estimated across these years for a subset of watersheds. Riparian woody encroachment rates increased as burning became less frequent than every two years. However, a higher fire frequency (1–2 years) did not reverse riparian woody encroachment regardless of whether woody vegetation was present or not before burning regimes were initiated. Although riparian woody vegetation cover increased over time, annual total precipitation and average annual temperature were variable. So, water yield over 4 watersheds under differing burn frequencies was quite variable and with no statistically significant detected temporal trends. Overall, burning regimes with a frequency of every 1–2 years will slow the conversion of tallgrass prairie stream ecosystems to forested ones, yet over long time periods, riparian woody plant encroachment may not be prevented by fire alone, regardless of fire frequency. PMID:25192194

  8. Fire and grazing influences on rates of riparian woody plant expansion along grassland streams.

    PubMed

    Veach, Allison M; Dodds, Walter K; Skibbe, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Grasslands are threatened globally due to the expansion of woody plants. The few remaining headwater streams within tallgrass prairies are becoming more like typical forested streams due to rapid conversion of riparian zones from grassy to wooded. Forestation can alter stream hydrology and biogeochemistry. We estimated the rate of riparian woody plant expansion within a 30 m buffer zone surrounding the stream bed across whole watersheds at Konza Prairie Biological Station over 25 years from aerial photographs. Watersheds varied with respect to experimentally-controlled fire and bison grazing. Fire frequency, presence or absence of grazing bison, and the historical presence of woody vegetation prior to the study time period (a proxy for proximity of propagule sources) were used as independent variables to predict the rate of riparian woody plant expansion between 1985 and 2010. Water yield was estimated across these years for a subset of watersheds. Riparian woody encroachment rates increased as burning became less frequent than every two years. However, a higher fire frequency (1-2 years) did not reverse riparian woody encroachment regardless of whether woody vegetation was present or not before burning regimes were initiated. Although riparian woody vegetation cover increased over time, annual total precipitation and average annual temperature were variable. So, water yield over 4 watersheds under differing burn frequencies was quite variable and with no statistically significant detected temporal trends. Overall, burning regimes with a frequency of every 1-2 years will slow the conversion of tallgrass prairie stream ecosystems to forested ones, yet over long time periods, riparian woody plant encroachment may not be prevented by fire alone, regardless of fire frequency. PMID:25192194

  9. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate of soybean plants: ammonium as a nitrogen source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr

    1989-01-01

    When NO3- is the sole nitrogen source in flowing solution culture, the net rate of nitrogen uptake by nonnodulated soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Ransom) plants cycles between maxima and minima with a periodicity of oscillation that corresponds with the interval of leaf emergence. Since soybean plants accumulate similar quantities of nitrogen when either NH4+ or NO3- is the sole source in solution culture controlled at pH 6.0, an experiment was conducted to determine if the oscillations in net rate of nitrogen uptake also occur when NH4+ is the nitrogen source. During a 21-day period of vegetative development, net uptake of NH4+ was measured daily by ion chromatography as depletion of NH4+ from a replenished nutrient solution containing 1.0 millimolar NH4+. The net rate of NH4+ uptake oscillated with a periodicity that was similar to the interval of leaf emergence. Instances of negative net rates of uptake indicate that the transition between maxima and minima involved changes in influx and efflux components of net NH4+ uptake.

  10. A chamber for applying pressure to roots of intact plants.

    PubMed

    Gee, G W

    1973-11-01

    A chamber was designed to apply up to 20 bars pressure to roots of intact plants. The unique features of this chamber are a split top arrangement to permit enclosing roots of intact plants within the chamber, a circulation coil to control temperature of rooting media, and a valve arrangement to permit changing solution without disturbing the plant. Changes in transpiration in response to changes in the pressure applied to roots of intact pepper plants illustrate one use of the equipment. Well watered plants at low light (0.05 langley/min) were observed to exude water from the leaf margins when 5 bars pressure was applied to the roots. When roots were cut off, a 1 bar pressure caused exudation. Plants with cooled roots or plants in dry soil did not exude water when as much as 6 bars pressure was applied. Transient response of transpiration rates to sudden application and release of pressure was observed in pepper and bean plants but not in rhododendron. The magnitude of this transient response was highly dependent upon light intensity and CO(2) concentration in the aerial environment. PMID:16658586

  11. Effects of plant genotype and insect dispersal rate on the population dynamics of a forest pest.

    PubMed

    Moran, Emily V; Bewick, Sharon; Cobbold, Christina A

    2013-12-01

    It has been shown that plant genotype can strongly affect not only individual herbivore performance, but also community composition and ecosystem function. Few studies, however, have addressed how plant genotype affects herbivore population dynamics. In this paper, we used a simulation modeling approach to ask how the genetic composition of a forest influences pest outbreak dynamics, using the example of aspen (Populus tremuloides) and forest tent caterpillars (FTC; Malacosoma disstria). Specifically, we examined how plant genotype, the relative size of genotypic patches, and the rate of insect dispersal between them, affect the frequency, amplitude, and duration of outbreaks. We found that coupling two different genotypes does not necessarily result in an averaging of insect dynamics. Instead, depending on the ratio of patch sizes, when dispersal rates are moderate, outbreaks in the two-genotype case may be more or less severe than in forests of either genotype alone. Thresholds for different dynamic behaviors were similar for all genotypic combinations. Thus, the qualitative behavior of a stand of two different genotypes can be predicted based on the response of the insect to each genotype, the relative sizes of the two patches, and the scale of insect dispersal. PMID:24597225

  12. Labile soil carbon inputs mediate the soil microbial community composition and plant residue decomposition rates

    SciTech Connect

    De Graaff, Marie-Anne; Classen, Aimee T; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2010-01-01

    Root carbon (C) inputs may regulate decomposition rates in soil, and in this study we ask: how do labile C inputs regulate decomposition of plant residues, and soil microbial communities? In a 14 d laboratory incubation, we added C compounds often found in root exudates in seven different concentrations (0, 0.7, 1.4, 3.6, 7.2, 14.4 and 21.7 mg C g{sup -1} soil) to soils amended with and without {sup 13}C-labeled plant residue. We measured CO{sub 2} respiration and shifts in relative fungal and bacterial rRNA gene copy numbers using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Increased labile C input enhanced total C respiration, but only addition of C at low concentrations (0.7 mg C g{sup -1}) stimulated plant residue decomposition (+2%). Intermediate concentrations (1.4, 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) had no impact on plant residue decomposition, while greater concentrations of C (> 7.2 mg C g{sup -1}) reduced decomposition (-50%). Concurrently, high exudate concentrations (> 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased fungal and bacterial gene copy numbers, whereas low exudate concentrations (< 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased metabolic activity rather than gene copy numbers. These results underscore that labile soil C inputs can regulate decomposition of more recalcitrant soil C by controlling the activity and relative abundance of fungi and bacteria.

  13. Ozone uptake and effects on transpiration, net photosynthesis, and dark respiration in Scots pine. [Pinus sylvestris L

    SciTech Connect

    Skaerby, L.; Troeng, E.; Bostroem, C.

    1987-09-01

    Ozone uptake, transpiration, net photosynthesis, and dark respiration were studied in the field by using an open gas exchange system in a 20-year-old stand of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). A current shoot was treated with ozone concentrations ranging from 120 to 400 ..mu..g x m/sup -3/ during one month. During daytime there was a linear relationship between ozone concentration and ozone uptake, and the deposition rate varied between 0.05 and 0.13 cm x s/sup -1/. Ozone at the highest concentrations seemed to decrease transpiration somewhat during daytime. At night, ozone was taken up only at the highest concentration. Both transpiration and stomatal conductance increased at night when ozone concentration was 250..mu..g x m/sup -3/ and higher. There was no significant influence on the net photosynthetic performance during exposure to ozone. Dark respiration, however, increased throughout the experimental period, and the accumulated respiration was about 60% higher for the ozone-exposed shoot at the end of the experiment.

  14. Microclimatological and Physiological Controls of Stomatal Conductance and Transpiration of Co-Occurring Seedlings with Varying Shade Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, C. M.; Levia, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    Forest ecosystems provide a significant portion of fresh water to the hydrologic cycle through transpiration, the majority of which is supplied by saplings and mature trees. However, a smaller, yet measurable, proportion is also supplied by seedlings. The contribution of seedlings is dependent upon physiological characteristics of the species, whose range of habitat is ultimately controlled by microclimate. The objectives of this study were to (1) observe meteorological conditions of two forest microlimates and (2) assess the intra- and interspecific stomatal conductance and transpiration responses of naturally occurring seedlings of varying shade tolerance. Naturally established seedlings in a deciduous forest understory and an adjacent clearing were monitored throughout the 2008 growing season in southeastern Pennsylvania (39°49'N, 75°43'W). Clear spatial and temporal trends of stomatal conductance and transpiration were observed throughout this study. The understory microclimate conditions overall had a lower degree of variability and had consistently lower mean quantum flux density, air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, volumetric water content, and soil temperature than the clearing plot. Shade tolerant understory seedlings (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) and Prunus serotina L. (black cherry)) had significantly lower mean monthly rates of water loss (p = 0.05) than shade intolerant clearing seedlings (P. serotina and Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar)). Additionally, water loss by shade grown P. serotina was significantly lower (p = 0.05) than by sun grown P. serotina. Significant intraspecific responses (p = 0.05) were also observed on a monthly basis, with the exception of L. tulipifera. These findings indicate that physiological differences, specifically shade tolerance, play an important role in determining rates of stomatal conductance and transpiration in tree seedlings. To a lesser degree, microclimate variability was also shown

  15. Enhancement of the Initial Growth Rate of Agricultural Plants by Using Static Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung C; Mason, Alex; Im, Wooseok

    2016-01-01

    Electronic devices and high-voltage wires induce magnetic fields. A magnetic field of 1,300-2,500 Gauss (0.2 Tesla) was applied to Petri dishes containing seeds of Garden Balsam (Impatiens balsamina), Mizuna (Brassica rapa var. japonica), Komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. perviridis), and Mescluns (Lepidium sativum). We applied magnets under the culture dish. During the 4 days of application, we observed that the stem and root length increased. The group subjected to magnetic field treatment (n = 10) showed a 1.4 times faster rate of growth compared with the control group (n = 11) in a total of 8 days (p <0.0005). This rate is 20% higher than that reported in previous studies. The tubulin complex lines did not have connecting points, but connecting points occur upon the application of magnets. This shows complete difference from the control, which means abnormal arrangements. However, the exact cause remains unclear. These results of growth enhancement of applying magnets suggest that it is possible to enhance the growth rate, increase productivity, or control the speed of germination of plants by applying static magnetic fields. Also, magnetic fields can cause physiological changes in plant cells and can induce growth. Therefore, stimulation with a magnetic field can have possible effects that are similar to those of chemical fertilizers, which means that the use of fertilizers can be avoided. PMID:27500712

  16. A contribution of groundwater to Mojave Desert shrub transpiration

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.B.

    1988-12-31

    Soil moisture was measured to 1-m depths in the northern Mojave Desert on two plots, one of which was denuded of shrubs. The pattern of wetting-drying near the surface and below the depth wet by rainfall suggested roughly 2 mm per month of transpired water was supplied by percolation upward from below the root zone. This deep moisture built up during fall and winter and depleted in spring and summer, which correlates well with local shrub phenology. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Wire Cloth as Porous Material for Transpiration-cooled Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Kinsler, Martin R; Cochran, Reeves B

    1951-01-01

    The permeability characteristics and tensile strength of a porous material developed from stainless-steel corduroy wire cloth for use in transpiration-cooled walls where the primary stresses are in one direction were investigated. The results of this investigation are presented and compared with similar results obtained with porous sintered metal compacts. A much wider range of permeabilities is obtainable with the wire cloth than with the porous metal compacts considered and the ultimate tensile strength in the direction of the primary stresses for porous materials produced from three mesh sizes of wire cloth are from two to three times the ultimate tensile strengths of the porous metal compacts.

  18. Control and Augmentation of Passive Porosity through Transpiration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Bauer, Steven X. S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A device for controlling pressure loading of a member caused by a fluid moving past the member or the member moving through a fluid. The device consists of a porous skin mounted over the solid surface of the member and separated from the solid surface by a plenum. Fluid from an area exerting high pressure on the member may enter the plenum through the porous surface and exit into an area exerting a lower pressure on the member, thus controlling pressure loading of the member. A transpirational control device controls the conditions within the plenum thus controlling the side force and yaw moment on the forebody.

  19. Thermal/structural analysis of a transpiration cooled nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Thompson, Jon E.; Babcock, Dale A.; Gray, Carl E., Jr.; Mouring, Chris A.

    1992-01-01

    The 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel (HTT) at LaRC is a combustion driven, high enthalpy blow down wind tunnel. In Mar. 1991, during check out of the transpiration cooled nozzle, pieces of platelets were found in the tunnel test section. It was determined that incorrect tolerancing between the platelets and the housing was the primary cause of the platelet failure. An analysis was performed to determine the tolerance layout between the platelets and the housing to meet the structural and performance criteria under a range of thermal, pressure, and bolt preload conditions. Three recommendations resulted as a product of this analysis.

  20. Rates of conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfate in a scrubbed power plant plume.

    PubMed

    Luria, M; Imhoff, R E; Valente, R J; Parkhurst, W J; Tanner, R L

    2001-10-01

    The rate of conversion of SO2 to SO4(2-) was re-estimated from measurements made in the plume of the Cumberland power plant, located on the Cumberland River in north-central Tennessee, after installation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers for SO2 removal in 1994. The ratio of SO2 to NOy emissions into the plume has been reduced to approximately 0.1, compared with a prescrubber value of approximately 2. To determine whether the SO2 emissions reduction has correspondingly reduced plume-generated particulate SO4(2-) production, we have compared the rates of conversion before and after scrubber installation. The prescrubber estimates were developed from measurements made during the Tennessee Plume Study conducted in the late 1970s. The postscrubber estimates are based upon two series of research flights in the summers of 1998 and 1999. During two of these flights, the Cumberland plume did not mix with adjacent power plant plumes, enabling rate constants for conversion to be estimated from samples taken in the plume at three downwind distances. Dry deposition losses and the fact the fact that SO2 is no longer in large excess compared with SO4(2-) have been taken into account, and an upper limit for the conversion rate constant was re-estimated based on plume excess aerosol volume. The estimated upper limit values are 0.069 hr(-1) and 0.034 hr(-1) for the 1998 and 1999 data, respectively. The 1999 rate is comparable with earlier values for nonscrubbed plumes, and although the 1998 upper limit value is higher than expected, these estimates do not provide strong evidence for deviation from a linear relationship between SO2 emissions and SO4(2-) formation. PMID:11686244

  1. [Rate of microsuccessions: Structure and floristic richness recovery after sod transplantation in alpine plant communities].

    PubMed

    Kipkeev, A M; Cherednichenko, O V; Tekeev, D K; Onipchenko, V G

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal transplantations of sod pieces have been conducted in alpine plant communities of the northwestern Caucasus. During 25 years, the changes in floristic richness and successional rates have been registered. Study objects were chosen to be. plant communities located along the toposequence from ridges to hollows with gradient of snow. cover thickness increase and vegetation period decrease, namely alpine lichen heath (ALH), Festuca varia grasslands (FVG), Geranium-Hedysarum meadows (GHM), and snow bed communities (SBC). The results of the study confirm the hypothesis about floristic richness of transplanted pieces to come closer to that of a background acceptor community. It is shown that during succession the variability reduces if sod pieces from different communities are transplanted into a common one. In particular, this is evident in case of SBC, where floristic richness of sod pieces transplanted from ALH and GHM has reduced noticeably. Also, it is evident from the results that the more different are donor and acceptor communities the higher is the rate of their changing. However, the assumption of higher succession rate in more productive communities has not been affirmed. On the opposite, communities with initially low productivity turned out to change faster than those with high productivity. It is found out that sod pieces transplanted to upper areas of the toposequence have had higher rate of alteration in comparison with those transplanted to lower areas. The reason behind this, as it may be suggested, is a longer growth season, which means a more prolonged period of high functional activity, and, accordingly, more time for the effects of competition, bringing seeds over, etc. In whole, the rate of succession decreases as the time from the moment of transplantation.increases, especially in communities with low productivity. PMID:26852571

  2. Dynamic aspects of soil water availability for isohydric plants: Focus on root hydraulic resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Draye, X.; Javaux, M.

    2014-11-01

    Soil water availability for plant transpiration is a key concept in agronomy. The objective of this study is to revisit this concept and discuss how it may be affected by processes locally influencing root hydraulic properties. A physical limitation to soil water availability in terms of maximal flow rate available to plant leaves (Qavail) is defined. It is expressed for isohydric plants, in terms of plant-centered variables and properties (the equivalent soil water potential sensed by the plant, ψs eq; the root system equivalent conductance, Krs; and a threshold leaf water potential, ψleaf lim). The resulting limitation to plant transpiration is compared to commonly used empirical stress functions. Similarities suggest that the slope of empirical functions might correspond to the ratio of Krs to the plant potential transpiration rate. The sensitivity of Qavail to local changes of root hydraulic conductances in response to soil matric potential is investigated using model simulations. A decrease of radial conductances when the soil dries induces earlier water stress, but allows maintaining higher night plant water potentials and higher Qavail during the last week of a simulated 1 month drought. In opposition, an increase of radial conductances during soil drying provokes an increase of hydraulic redistribution and Qavail at short term. This study offers a first insight on the effect of dynamic local root hydraulic properties on soil water availability. By better understanding complex interactions between hydraulic processes involved in soil-plant hydrodynamics, better prospects on how root hydraulic traits mitigate plant water stress might be achieved.

  3. Effect of plant-uptake representation on the water-optimal root depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guswa, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    The depth of roots depends on a variety of conditions, including soil properties, plant type, nutrient availability, and climate. A focus on water enables the determination of a water-optimal root depth by equating the marginal carbon cost of deeper roots with the benefit of those roots to continued transpiration and carbon assimilation. Calculation of the transpiration benefit requires the mathematical representation of plant uptake as a function of root depth and soil moisture. This work compares the effect of two bounding representations of plant uptake on the water-optimal root depth and the response of that depth to changes in precipitation. Soil-moisture dynamics are driven by precipitation events that arrive as a Poisson process and are characterized by a mean frequency and depth. Infiltration and drainage are instantaneous, filling the root zone up to a maximum field capacity. Plant uptake is represented in one case as a step function of soil moisture; transpiration proceeds at a potential rate until the wilting-point saturation is reached when uptake drops to zero. Until that critical threshold, soil moisture has no effect on transpiration. In the second case, transpiration decreases linearly from its potential at field capacity to zero at the wilting point; soil moisture exerts a continuous and gradual influence on plant uptake throughout the drying cycle. With both the linear and step-function representations, the water-optimal root depth is more sensitive to changes in precipitation depth than frequency under dry conditions and more sensitive to precipitation frequency when the climate is wet. Under wet conditions, optimal root depths predicted with the step function show a greater sensitivity to climate than do those based on the linear model. Under dry conditions, the reverse is true; the water-optimal root depth is slightly more sensitive to changes in precipitation when the linear model is employed than when the step function is used. For all

  4. Improved growth, productivity and quality of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants through application of shikimic acid

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amri, Salem M.

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of seed presoaking of shikimic acid (30, 60 and 120 ppm) on growth parameters, fruit productivity and quality, transpiration rate, photosynthetic pigments and some mineral nutrition contents of tomato plants. Shikimic acid at all concentrations significantly increased fresh and dry weights, fruit number, average fresh and dry fruit yield, vitamin C, lycopene, carotenoid contents, total acidity and fruit total soluble sugars of tomato plants when compared to control plants. Seed pretreatment with shikimic acid at various doses induces a significant increase in total leaf conductivity, transpiration rate and photosynthetic pigments (Chl. a, chl. b and carotenoids) of tomato plants. Furthermore, shikimic acid at various doses applied significantly increased the concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in tomato leaves as compared to control non-treated tomato plants. Among all doses of shikimic acid treatment, it was found that 60 ppm treatment caused a marked increase in growth, fruit productivity and quality and most studied parameters of tomato plants when compared to other treatments. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in total photosynthetic pigments, concentrations of nitrogen and potassium in leaves of tomato plants treated with 30 ppm of shikimic acid and control plants. According to these results, it could be suggested that shikimic acid used for seed soaking could be used for increasing growth, fruit productivity and quality of tomato plants growing under field conditions. PMID:24235870

  5. Power plant performance monitoring and improvement. Volume 2. Incremental heat rate sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, H.G.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the interim findings of the Incremental Heat Rate Sensitivity Analysis task of EPRI Project RP1681-1/2153-1, Power Plant Performance Instrumentation System. Objectives of this task were to develop the models and methods for evaluation of unit performance uncertainty, and to determine the effects of modeling, input/output, and fuel cost uncertainty on production cost and dispatch. Analyses and simulations were made to determine the sensitivity of cost and economic dispatch to modeling errors and measurement errors within realistic system constraints. The results obtained are sufficient to provide the measures necessary to evaluate on-line updates of unit performance to develop incremental heat rate information for economic dispatch.

  6. Long-term impact of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi on leaf traits and transpiration of branches in the Dutch elm hybrid 'Dodoens'.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Roman; Urban, Josef; Gebauer, Roman; Dvořák, Miloň; Ďurkovič, Jaroslav

    2016-03-01

    To better understand the long-term impact of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi Brasier on leaf physiology in 'Dodoens', a Dutch elm disease-tolerant hybrid, measurements of leaf area, leaf dry mass, petiole anatomy, petiole hydraulic conductivity, leaf and branch water potential, and branch sap flow were performed 3 years following an initial artificial inoculation. Although fungal hyphae were detected in fully expanded leaves, neither anatomical nor morphological traits were affected, indicating that there was no impact from the fungal hyphae on the leaves during leaf expansion. In contrast, however, infected trees showed both a lower transpiration rate of branches and a lower sap flow density. The long-term persistence of fungal hyphae inside vessels decreased the xylem hydraulic conductivity, but stomatal regulation of transpiration appeared to be unaffected as the leaf water potential in both infected and non-infected trees was similarly driven by the transpirational demands. Regardless of the fungal infection, leaves with a higher leaf mass per area ratio tended to have a higher leaf area-specific conductivity. Smaller leaves had an increased number of conduits with smaller diameters and thicker cell walls. Such a pattern could increase tolerance towards hydraulic dysfunction. Measurements of water potential and theoretical xylem conductivity revealed that petiole anatomy could predict the maximal transpiration rate. Three years following fungal inoculation, phenotypic expressions for the majority of the examined traits revealed a constitutive nature for their possible role in Dutch elm disease tolerance of 'Dodoens' trees. PMID:26843210

  7. Characteristics of microbial volatile organic compound flux rates from soil and plant litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C. M.; Fierer, N.

    2013-12-01

    Our knowledge of microbial production and consumption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil and litter, as well as which microorganisms are involved, is relatively limited compared to what we know about VOC emissions from terrestrial plants. With climate change expecting to alter plant community composition, nitrogen (N) deposition rates, mean annual temperatures, precipitation patterns, and atmospheric VOC concentrations, it is unknown how microbial production and consumption of VOCs from litter and soil will respond. We have spent the last 5 years quantifying VOC flux rates in decaying plant litter, mineral soils and from a subalpine field site using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Microbial production, relative to abiotic sources, accounted for 78% to 99% of the total VOC emissions from decomposing litter, highlighting the importance of microbial metabolisms in these systems. Litter chemistry correlated with the types of VOCs emitted, of which, methanol was emitted at the highest rates from all studies. The net emissions of carbon as VOCs was found to be up to 88% of that emitted as CO2 suggesting that VOCs likely represent an important component of the carbon cycle in many terrestrial systems. Nitrogen additions drastically reduced VOC emissions from litter to near zero, though it is still not understood whether this was due to an increase in consumption or a decrease in production. In the field, the root system contributed to 53% of the carbon that was emitted as VOCs from the soil with increasing air temperatures correlating to an increase in VOC flux rates from the soil system. Finally, we are currently utilizing next generation sequencing techniques (Illumina MiSeq) along with varying concentrations of isoprene, the third most abundant VOC in the atmosphere behind methane and methanol, above soils in a laboratory incubation to determine consumption rates and the microorganisms (bacteria, archaea and fungi) associated with the

  8. Modeling productivity and transpiration of Pinus radiata: climatic effects.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, D. W.; Mattay, J. P.; McMurtrie, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Climatic effects on annual net carbon gain, stem biomass and annual transpiration were simulated for Pinus radiata D. Don at Canberra and Mt. Gambier. Simulations were conducted with an existing process-based forest growth model (BIOMASS, Model 1) and with a modified version of the BIOMASS model (Model 2) in which response functions for carbon assimilation and leaf conductance were replaced with those derived from field gas exchange data collected at Mt. Gambier. Simulated carbon gain was compared with a published report stating that mean annual stem volume increment (MAI) at Mt. Gambier was 1.8 times greater than at Canberra and that the difference could be the result solely of differences in climate. Regional differences in climate resulted in a 20% greater simulated annual transpiration at Canberra than at Mt. Gambier but only small differences in simulated productivity, indicating that climatic differences did not account for the reported differences in productivity. With Model 1, simulated annual net carbon gain and annual increase in stem biomass were greater at Canberra than at Mt. Gambier, whereas Model 2 indicated a similar annual net carbon gain and annual stem biomass increase in both regions. PMID:14871762

  9. Shock/shock interference on a transpiration cooled hemispherical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which show the effectiveness of transpiration cooling in reducing the peak heat flux caused by an impinging shock on a bow shock of a hemispherical model. The 12-inch diameter hemispherical transpiration model with helium coolant was tested in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach 12.1 and freestream unit Reynolds number of 0.33 x 10 to the 6th/ft. An incident shock wave, generated by a blunt flat-plate shock generator inclined at 10 deg to the freestream, intersected the bow shock of the model to produce shock/shock interference. The stagnation heat flux without coolant or shock/shock interference was about 1.6 times a smooth surface laminar prediction due to effective roughness of the coolant ejection slots. A coolant mass flux 31 percent of the freestream mass flux reduced the stagnation heat flux to zero without shock/shock interference. However, for the same coolant mass flux and with shock/shock interference the peak heat flux was only reduced 8.3 percent, even though the total integrated heat load was reduced.

  10. Transpiration cooling in the locality of a transverse fuel jet for supersonic combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton; Capriotti, Diego P.; Byington, Carl S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to determine the feasibility of transpiration cooling for the relief of the local heating rates in the region of a sonic, perpendicular, fuel jet of gaseous hydrogen. Experiments were conducted to determine the interaction between the cooling required and flameholding limits of a transverse jet in a high-enthalpy, Mach 3 flow in both open-jet and direct-connect test mode. Pulsed shadowgraphs were used to illustrate the flow field. Infrared thermal images indicated the surface temperatures, and the OH(-) emission of the flame was used to visualize the limits of combustion. Wall, static presures indicated the location of the combustion within the duct and were used to calculate the combustion efficiency. The results from both series of tests at facility total temperatures of 1700 K and 2000 K are presented.

  11. How do soil texture, plant community composition and earthworms affected the infiltration rate in a grassland plant diversity experiment depending on season?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Christine; Britta, Merkel; Nico, Eisenhauer; Christiane, Roscher; Sabine, Attinger; Stefan, Scheu; Anke, Hildebrandt

    2013-04-01

    Background and aims: In this study we analyzed the influences of plant community characteristics, soil texture and earthworm presence on infiltration rates on a managed grassland plant diversity experiment assessing the role of biotic and abiotic factors on soil hydrology. Methods: We measured infiltration using a hood infiltrometer in subplots with ambient and reduced earthworm density (earthworm extraction) nested in plots of different plant species richness (1, 4, and 16), plant functional group number and composition (1 to 4; legumes, grasses, small herbs, tall herbs) in early summer (June) and autumn (September, October) 2011. Results: The presence of certain plant functional groups such as grasses and legumes influenced infiltration rates and this effect enhanced during the growing season. Infiltration was significantly higher in plots containing legumes than in plots without, and it was significantly lower in the presence of grasses than in their absence. In early summer, earthworm presence and biomass increased the infiltration rates, independently of plant species richness. In October, plant species richness only affected infiltration rates in reduced earthworm plots. At the end of the growing season earthworm populations were negatively influenced by grasses and positively by legumes. In September, infiltration rates were positive related to the proportion of finer grains. The correlation disappears when removing all plots containing legumes from the sample. For all measurements the infiltration rates decreases from early summer to autumn at the matric potentials at pressure zero and -0.02 m, but not for smaller macropores at matric potentials -0.04 and -0.06m. Conclusions: Considering infiltration rates as ecosystem function, this function will largely depend on the ecosystem composition and season, not on biodiversity per se. Our results indicate that biotic factors are of overriding influence for shaping infiltration rates mainly for larger macropores

  12. Rapid plant species loss at high rates and at low frequency of N addition in temperate steppe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunhai; Lü, Xiaotao; Isbell, Forest; Stevens, Carly; Han, Xu; He, Nianpeng; Zhang, Guangming; Yu, Qiang; Huang, Jianhui; Han, Xingguo

    2014-11-01

    Humans are both intentionally (fertilization) and unintentionally (atmospheric nutrient deposition) adding nutrients worldwide. Increasing availability of biologically reactive nitrogen (N) is one of the major drivers of plant species loss. It remains unclear, however, whether plant diversity will be equally reduced by inputs of reactive N coming from either small and frequent N deposition events or large and infrequent N fertilization events. By independently manipulating the rate and frequency of reactive N inputs, our study teases apart these potentially contrasting effects. Plant species richness decreased more quickly at high rates and at low frequency of N addition, which suggests that previous fertilization studies have likely over-estimated the effects of N deposition on plant species loss. N-induced species loss resulted from both acidification and ammonium toxicity. Further study of small and frequent N additions will be necessary to project future rates of plant species loss under increasing aerial N deposition. PMID:24753127

  13. Testing the Growth Rate Hypothesis in Vascular Plants with Above- and Below-Ground Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiang; Wu, Honghui; He, Nianpeng; Lü, Xiaotao; Wang, Zhiping; Elser, James J.; Wu, Jianguo; Han, Xingguo

    2012-01-01

    The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) proposes that higher growth rate (the rate of change in biomass per unit biomass, μ) is associated with higher P concentration and lower C∶P and N∶P ratios. However, the applicability of the GRH to vascular plants is not well-studied and few studies have been done on belowground biomass. Here we showed that, for aboveground, belowground and total biomass of three study species, μ was positively correlated with N∶C under N limitation and positively correlated with P∶C under P limitation. However, the N∶P ratio was a unimodal function of μ, increasing for small values of μ, reaching a maximum, and then decreasing. The range of variations in μ was positively correlated with variation in C∶N∶P stoichiometry. Furthermore, μ and C∶N∶P ranges for aboveground biomass were negatively correlated with those for belowground. Our results confirm the well-known association of growth rate with tissue concentration of the limiting nutrient and provide empirical support for recent theoretical formulations. PMID:22427823

  14. Parental age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Bashir, Tufail; Sailer, Christian; Gurumoorthy, Viswanathan; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-05-01

    In humans, it is well known that the parental reproductive age has a strong influence on mutations transmitted to their progeny. Meiotic nondisjunction is known to increase in older mothers, and base substitutions tend to go up with paternal reproductive age. Hence, it is clear that the germinal mutation rates are a function of both maternal and paternal ages in humans. In contrast, it is unknown whether the parental reproductive age has an effect on somatic mutation rates in the progeny, because these are rare and difficult to detect. To address this question, we took advantage of the plant model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where mutation detector lines allow for an easy quantitation of somatic mutations, to test the effect of parental age on somatic mutation rates in the progeny. Although we found no significant effect of parental age on base substitutions, we found that frameshift mutations and transposition events increased in the progeny of older parents, an effect that is stronger through the maternal line. In contrast, intrachromosomal recombination events in the progeny decrease with the age of the parents in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. Our results clearly show that parental reproductive age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny and, thus, that some form of age-dependent information, which affects the frequency of double-strand breaks and possibly other processes involved in maintaining genome integrity, is transmitted through the gametes. PMID:25810093

  15. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate of soybean plants: effects of external nitrate concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolley-Henry, L.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Granato, T. C.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Net uptake of NO3- by non-nodulated soybean plants [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Ransom] growing in flowing hydroponic cultures containing 0.5, 1.0 and 10.0 mol m-3 NO3- was measured daily during a 24-d period of vegetative development to determine if amplitude of maximum and minimum rates of net NO3- uptake are responsive to external concentrations of NO3-. Removal of NO3- from the replenished solutions during each 24-h period was determined by ion chromatography. Neither dry matter accumulation nor the periodicity of oscillations in net uptake rate was altered by the external NO3- concentrations. The maxima of the oscillations in net uptake rate, however, increased nearly 3-fold in response to external NO3- concentrations. The maxima and minima, respectively, changed from 4.0 and 0.6 mmol NO3- per gram root dry weight per day at an external solution level of 0.5 mol m-3 NO3- to 15.2 and -2.7 mmol NO3- per gram root dry weight per day at an external solution level of 10.0 mol m-3 NO3-. The negative values for minimum net uptake rate from 10.0 mol m-3 NO3- solutions show that net efflux was occurring and indicate that the magnitude of the efflux component of net uptake was responsive to external concentration of NO3-.

  16. Parental Age Affects Somatic Mutation Rates in the Progeny of Flowering Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Bashir, Tufail; Sailer, Christian; Gurumoorthy, Viswanathan; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-01-01

    In humans, it is well known that the parental reproductive age has a strong influence on mutations transmitted to their progeny. Meiotic nondisjunction is known to increase in older mothers, and base substitutions tend to go up with paternal reproductive age. Hence, it is clear that the germinal mutation rates are a function of both maternal and paternal ages in humans. In contrast, it is unknown whether the parental reproductive age has an effect on somatic mutation rates in the progeny, because these are rare and difficult to detect. To address this question, we took advantage of the plant model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where mutation detector lines allow for an easy quantitation of somatic mutations, to test the effect of parental age on somatic mutation rates in the progeny. Although we found no significant effect of parental age on base substitutions, we found that frameshift mutations and transposition events increased in the progeny of older parents, an effect that is stronger through the maternal line. In contrast, intrachromosomal recombination events in the progeny decrease with the age of the parents in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. Our results clearly show that parental reproductive age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny and, thus, that some form of age-dependent information, which affects the frequency of double-strand breaks and possibly other processes involved in maintaining genome integrity, is transmitted through the gametes. PMID:25810093

  17. Linear Plasmids and the Rate of Sequence Evolution in Plant Mitochondrial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jessica M; Simmons, Mark P; Wu, Zhiqiang; Sloan, Daniel B

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants experience frequent insertions of foreign sequences, including linear plasmids that also exist in standalone forms within mitochondria, but the history and phylogenetic distribution of plasmid insertions is not well known. Taking advantage of the increased availability of plant mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and plasmid-derived insertions. Mitochondrial genomes from multiple land plant lineages (including liverworts, lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) include fragmented remnants from ancient plasmid insertions. Such insertions are much more recent and widespread in angiosperms, in which approximately 75% of sequenced mitochondrial genomes contain identifiable plasmid insertions. Although conflicts between plasmid and angiosperm phylogenies provide clear evidence of repeated horizontal transfers, we were still able to detect significant phylogenetic concordance, indicating that mitochondrial plasmids have also experienced sustained periods of (effectively) vertical transmission in angiosperms. The observed levels of sequence divergence in plasmid-derived genes suggest that nucleotide substitution rates in these plasmids, which often encode their own viral-like DNA polymerases, are orders of magnitude higher than in mitochondrial chromosomes. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the periodic incorporation of mitochondrial genes into plasmids contributes to the remarkable heterogeneity in substitution rates among genes that has recently been discovered in some angiosperm mitochondrial genomes. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the recently acquired ψtrnP-trnW gene region in a maize linear plasmid is evolving significantly faster than homologous sequences that have been retained in the mitochondrial chromosome in closely related grasses. PMID:26759362

  18. Linear Plasmids and the Rate of Sequence Evolution in Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jessica M.; Simmons, Mark P.; Wu, Zhiqiang; Sloan, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants experience frequent insertions of foreign sequences, including linear plasmids that also exist in standalone forms within mitochondria, but the history and phylogenetic distribution of plasmid insertions is not well known. Taking advantage of the increased availability of plant mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and plasmid-derived insertions. Mitochondrial genomes from multiple land plant lineages (including liverworts, lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) include fragmented remnants from ancient plasmid insertions. Such insertions are much more recent and widespread in angiosperms, in which approximately 75% of sequenced mitochondrial genomes contain identifiable plasmid insertions. Although conflicts between plasmid and angiosperm phylogenies provide clear evidence of repeated horizontal transfers, we were still able to detect significant phylogenetic concordance, indicating that mitochondrial plasmids have also experienced sustained periods of (effectively) vertical transmission in angiosperms. The observed levels of sequence divergence in plasmid-derived genes suggest that nucleotide substitution rates in these plasmids, which often encode their own viral-like DNA polymerases, are orders of magnitude higher than in mitochondrial chromosomes. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the periodic incorporation of mitochondrial genes into plasmids contributes to the remarkable heterogeneity in substitution rates among genes that has recently been discovered in some angiosperm mitochondrial genomes. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the recently acquired ψtrnP-trnW gene region in a maize linear plasmid is evolving significantly faster than homologous sequences that have been retained in the mitochondrial chromosome in closely related grasses. PMID:26759362

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis increases host plant acceptance and population growth rates of the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Daniela; Vierheilig, Horst; Riegler, Petra; Schausberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Most terrestrial plants live in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Studies on the direct interaction between plants and mycorrhizal fungi are numerous whereas studies on the indirect interaction between such fungi and herbivores feeding on aboveground plant parts are scarce. We studied the impact of AM symbiosis on host plant choice and life history of an acarine surface piercing-sucking herbivore, the polyphagous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Experiments were performed on detached leaflets taken from common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) colonized or not colonized by the AM fungus Glomus mosseae. T. urticae females were subjected to choice tests between leaves from mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. Juvenile survival and development, adult female survival, oviposition rate and offspring sex ratio were measured in order to estimate the population growth parameters of T. urticae on either substrate. Moreover, we analyzed the macro- and micronutrient concentration of the aboveground plant parts. Adult T. urticae females preferentially resided and oviposited on mycorrhizal versus non-mycorrhizal leaflets. AM symbiosis significantly decreased embryonic development time and increased the overall oviposition rate as well as the proportion of female offspring produced during peak oviposition. Altogether, the improved life history parameters resulted in significant changes in net reproductive rate, intrinsic rate of increase, doubling time and finite rate of increase. Aboveground parts of colonized plants showed higher concentrations of P and K whereas Mn and Zn were both found at lower levels. This is the first study documenting the effect of AM symbiosis on the population growth rates of a herbivore, tracking the changes in life history characteristics throughout the life cycle. We discuss the AM-plant-herbivore interaction in relation to plant quality, herbivore feeding type and site and the evolutionary implications in a multi

  20. Evaporation, transpiration, and ecosystem water use efficiency in a multi-annual sugarcane production system in Hawai'i, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. G.; Tirado-corbala, R.; Wang, D.; Ayars, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Food and biofuel production will require practices that increase water use efficiency in order to have future sustainability in a water-constrained environment. One possible practice is the use of food and energy crops with multi-annual growing periods, which could reduce bare soil evaporation. We integrated field water budgets, micrometeorology, and plant sampling to observe plant growth and evapotranspiration (ET) in two sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) fields in Hawai'i, USA in contrasting environments with unusually long (18-24 month) growing periods. We partitioned observed ET into evaporation and transpiration using a flux partitioning model and calculated ecosystem water use efficiency (EWUE=Net Ecosystem Productivity/ET) and harvest WUE (HWUE=Aboveground Net Ecosystem Productivity/ET) to assess sugarcane water use efficiency. After the start of the mid-period, our higher elevation, less windy field ('Lee') had a slightly higher mean EWUE (31.5 kg C ha-1 mm-1) than our lower elevation, windier ('Windy') field (mean EWUE of 30.7 kg C ha-1 mm-1). HWUE was also very high (HWUE >27 kg C ha-1 mm-1) in both fields due to aboveground biomass composing >87% of total biomass. Transpiration, as a fraction of total ET, increased rapidly with canopy cover in both fields; during the mid-period, transpiration was an average of 84% of total ET in Windy and 80% in Lee, with Lee showing greater variation than Windy. As expected, daily EWUE increased with canopy cover during the initial growing stages; more significantly, EWUE showed no substantial decrease during the 2nd year with an aging crop. The results illustrate the potential for longer-rotation crop cycles for increasing water use efficiency, particularly in tropical regions.

  1. Fruit calcium accumulation coupled and uncoupled from its transpiration in kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Giuseppe; Dichio, Bartolomeo; Lang, Alexander; Mininni, Alba N; Xiloyannis, Cristos

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of Ca in several fleshy fruit is often supposed to depend, among others, by climatic variables driving fruit transpiration. This study tests the whole causal chain hypothesis: VPD → fruit transpiration → Ca accumulation. Also there are evidences that relationship between fruit transpiration and Ca content is not always clear, hence the hypothesis that low VPD reduces the fraction of xylemic water destined to transpiration was tested by examining the water budget of fruit. Attached fruits of Actinidia deliciosa were subjected to Low (L) and High (H) VPD. Their transpiration was measured from early after fruit-set to day 157 after full bloom (DAFB). Fruits were picked at 70, 130 and 157 DAFB for Ca and K determinations and for water budget analysis. Cumulative transpired water was ∼ 70 g and ∼ 16 g H2O f(-1) in HVPD and LVPD, respectively. Calcium accumulated linearly (R(2) = 0.71) with cumulative transpiration when VPD was high, while correlation was weaker (R(2) = 0.24) under LVPD. Under low VPD the fraction of xylem stream destined to transpiration declined to 40-50%. Results suggest that Ca accumulation is coupled to cumulative transpiration under high VPD because under that condition cumulative transpiration equals xylem stream (which carry the nutrient). At LVPD, Ca gain by fruit is uncoupled from transpiration because ∼ 60% of the xylemic water is needed to sustain fruit growth. Results will apply to most fruits (apples, tomatoes, capsicum, grapes etc.) since most suffer Ca deficiency disorders and grow in changing environments with variable VPD, also they could be supportive for the implementation of fruit quality models accounting also for mineral compositions and for a reinterpretation of certain field practices aimed at naturally improve fruit Ca content. PMID:25982084

  2. Meta-analysis of the effects of plant roots in controlling concentrated flow erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoppen, Wouter; Poesen, Jean; Vanmaercke, Matthias; De Baets, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is often used in ecological restoration programs to control various soil erosion processes. During the last two decades several studies reported on the effects of plant roots in controlling concentrated flow erosion rates. However a global analysis of the now available data on root effects is still lacking. Yet, a meta-data analysis will contribute to a better understanding of the soil-root interactions as our capability to assess the effectiveness of roots in reducing soil erosion rates due to concentrated flow in different environments remains difficult. The objectives of this study are therefore i) to provide a state of the art on studies quantifying the effectiveness of roots in reducing soil erosion rates due to concentrated flow; and ii) to explore the overall trends in erosion reduction as a function of the root (length) density, root system architecture and soil texture, based on a global analysis of published research data. We therefore compiled a dataset of measured relative soil detachment rates (RSD) for the root density (RD; 822 observations) as well as the root length density (RLD; 274 observations). Non-linear regression analyses showed that decreases in RSD as a function of RD and RLD could be best described with the Hill curve model. However, a large proportion of the variability in RSD could not be attributed to RD or RLD, resulting in a relatively low predictive accuracy of the Hill curve model with model efficiencies of 0.11 and 0.17 for RD and RLD respectively. Considering root architecture and soil texture yielded a better predictive model especially for RLD with ME of 0.37 for fibrous roots in a non-sandy soil. The unexplained variance is to a large extent attributable to measuring errors and differences in experimental set ups that could not be explicitly accounted for (e.g. tested plant species, soil and flow characteristics). However, using a Monte Carlo simulation approach, we were able to establish relationships that allow

  3. Effects of drip irrigation configuration and rate on yield and fruit quality of young highbush blueberry plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 4-year study was conducted to determine the effects of drip configuration and irrigation rate on yield and fruit quality in a new planting of highbush blueberry in British Columbia, Canada. Plants were grown in a silt loam soil on raised beds and were non-irrigated or irrigated using one line of d...

  4. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  5. The Role of Detailed Land Cover Data on Modeling Transpiration in a Managed Forested Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. S.; Ahl, D. E.; Ewers, B. E.; Samanta, S.; Burrows, S. N.; Gower, S. T.

    2001-05-01

    Remotely sensed vegetation data is a primary data source for land surface hydrology models. For example, leaf area index (LAI), is widely seen as a key variable in modeling water, carbon, and energy at the land surface. On the other hand, species-specific knowledge of land cover types is often considered less important at the landscape scale. We hypothesize that this assumption might not hold in a managed forest with changing patterns of forest cover types. We tested the significance of site-specific remotely sensed land cover classification for making regional estimates of evapotranspiration in northern Wisconsin, USA. We developed a site-specific land cover classification at 15m resolution using NASA's Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS). A field campaign consisted of detailed ground control for image geometry correction and registration, and 324 permanent plots for vegetation cover types and leaf area index and other ecosystem parameters. We then identified four major forest cover types (forested wetland, aspen/fir, northern hardwoods, and conifers) that represent 85 percent of the 100 km2 landscape around our site. In representative stands for each cover type we made continuous sap flux and micrometeorological measurements, from which stand-type parameter sets were developed for use in a regional hydrologic model. Simulated transpiration flux with this detailed model was then compared with a less detailed parameterization based on limited cover type information and BIOME-BGC type parameter values. Disparity between the more aggregated parameter approach and the detailed approach was due to nonlinear mixing of different forest stomatal physiology. For instance, the aspen/fir stands transpire at a rate of 2 mm/day, but northern hardwoods transpire at 1 mm/day, for the same LAI. The results indicate that land cover classification may be as critical as LAI for land surface modeling at large scales. The detailed information could, for example, be

  6. Aftereffects of Low and High Temperature Pretreatment on Leaf Resistance, Transpiration, and Leaf Temperature in Xanthium1

    PubMed Central

    Drake, B. G.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Leaf resistance for water vapor (total diffusion resistance minus boundary layer resistance), transpiration, and leaf temperature were measured in attached leaves of greenhouse-grown Xanthium strumarium L. plants that had been pretreated for 72 hours with high (40 C day, 35 C night), or low (10 C day, 5 C night) air temperatures. Measurements were made in a wind tunnel at light intensity of 1.15 cal cm−2 min−1, air temperatures between 5 and 45 C, and wind speed of 65 cm sec−1. Leaf resistances in low temperature pretreated plants were higher (8 to 27 sec cm−1) than in controls or high temperature pretreated plants (0.5 to 3 sec cm−1) at leaf temperatures between 5 and 25 C. Thus, the pretreatment influenced stomatal aperture. PMID:16658219

  7. Application of a tree-level hydrodynamic model to simulate plot-level transpiration in the upland oak/pine forest in New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirfenderesgi, G.; Bohrer, G.; Matheny, A. M.; Fatichi, S.; Frasson, R. P. M.; Schafer, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Finite-Elements Tree-Crown Hydrodynamics model version 2 (FETCH2) simulates water flow through the tree using the porous media analogy. Empirical equations relate water potential within the stem to stomatal conductance at the leaf level. Leaves are connected to the stem at each height. While still simplified, this approach brings realism to the simulation of transpiration compared with models where stomatal conductance is directly linked to soil moisture. The FETCH2 model accounts for plant hydraulic traits such as xylem conductivity, area of hydro-active xylem, vertical distribution of leaf area, and maximal and minimal xylem water content, and their effect on the dynamics of water flow in the tree system. Such a modeling tool enhances our understanding of the role of hydraulic limitations and allows us to incorporate the effects of short-term water stresses on transpiration. Here, we use FETCH2 parameterized and evaluated with a large sap-flow observations data set, collected from 21 trees of two genera (oak/pine) at Silas Little Experimental Forest, NJ. The well-drained deep sandy soil leads to water stress during many days throughout the growing season. We conduct a set of tree-level transpiration simulations, and use the results to evaluate the effects of different hydraulic strategies on daily transpiration and water use efficiency. We define these "hydraulic strategies" through combinations of multiple sets of parameters in the model that describe the root, stem and leaf hydraulics. After evaluating the performance of the model, we use the results to shed light on the future trajectory of the forest in terms of species-specific transpiration responses. Application of the model on the two co-occurring oak species (Quercus prinus L. and Quercus velutina Lam) shows that the applied modeling approach was successfully captures the differences in water-use strategy through optimizing multiple physiological and hydraulic parameters.

  8. Leaf transpiration efficiency of sweet corn varieties from three eras of breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When measured under midday field conditions, modern varieties of corn often have sub-stomatal concentrations of carbon dioxide in excess of those required to saturate photosynthesis. This results in lower leaf transpiration efficiency, the ratio of photosynthesis to transpiration, than potentially ...

  9. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone.

    PubMed

    Bachand, P A M; Bachand, S; Fleck, J; Anderson, F; Windham-Myers, L

    2014-06-15

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flow rates and tracer concentrations at wetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactor model solutions, a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these non-ideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a flux model, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment-water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemical mechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition, our understanding of

  10. Emission rate modeling and risk assessment at an automobile plant from painting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Shrivastava, A.; Kulkarni, A.

    1999-07-01

    Pollution from automobile plants from painting operations has been addressed in the Clean Act Amendments (1990). The estimation of pollutant emissions from automobile painting operation were done mostly by approximate procedures than by actual calculations. The purpose of this study was to develop a methodology for calculating the emissions of the pollutants from painting operation in an automobile plant. Five scenarios involving an automobile painting operation, located in Columbus (Ohio), were studied for pollutant emission and concomitant risk associated with that. In the study of risk, a sensitivity analysis was done using Crystal Ball{reg{underscore}sign} on the parameters involved in risk. This software uses the Monte Carlo principle. The most sensitive factor in the risk analysis was the ground level concentration of the pollutants. All scenarios studied met the safety goal (a risk value of 1 x 10{sup {minus}6}) with different confidence levels. The highest level of confidence in meeting the safety goal was displayed by Scenario 1 (Alpha Industries). The results from the scenarios suggest that risk is associated with the quantity of released toxic pollutants. The sensitivity analysis of the various parameter shows that average spray rate of paint is the most important parameter in the estimation of pollutants from the painting operations. The entire study is a complete module that can be used by the environmental pollution control agencies for estimation of pollution levels and estimation of associated risk. The study can be further extended to other operations in an automobile industry or to different industries.

  11. Lineage-specific evolutionary rate in plants: Contributions of a screening for Cereus (Cactaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Romeiro-Brito, Monique; Moraes, Evandro M.; Taylor, Nigel P.; Zappi, Daniela C.; Franco, Fernando F.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Predictable chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequences have been listed for the shallowest taxonomic studies in plants. We investigated whether plastid regions that vary between closely allied species could be applied for intraspecific studies and compared the variation of these plastid segments with two nuclear regions. Methods: We screened 16 plastid and two nuclear intronic regions for species of the genus Cereus (Cactaceae) at three hierarchical levels (species from different clades, species of the same clade, and allopatric populations). Results: Ten plastid regions presented interspecific variation, and six of them showed variation at the intraspecific level. The two nuclear regions showed both inter- and intraspecific variation, and in general they showed higher levels of variability in almost all hierarchical levels than the plastid segments. Discussion: Our data suggest no correspondence between variation of plastid regions at the interspecific and intraspecific level, probably due to lineage-specific variation in cpDNA, which appears to have less effect in nuclear data. Despite the heterogeneity in evolutionary rates of cpDNA, we highlight three plastid segments that may be considered in initial screenings in plant phylogeographic studies. PMID:26819857

  12. Thermal simulation and economic assessment of unglazed transpired collector systems

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.N.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.

    1996-10-01

    Unglazed transpired collectors (UTCs) have recently emerged as a new solar air heating technology. They are relatively inexpensive, efficient, and particularly suited to applications in which a high outdoor air requirement must be met. A TRNSYS model has been created for UTC systems. Annual simulations are performed for several representative buildings. The statewide economic potential of UTC systems is assessed for Wisconsin. UTC systems on existing buildings are competitive with electric heating systems but not with gas or oil heating. Electric heating is not widely used in most buildings that are well-suited for UTC systems, with the exception of large apartment buildings. Therefore, there is no significant statewide economic potential for retrofit of UTC systems on existing buildings except in the residential sector. However, UTC systems are cost effective for new buildings because their low first cost allows them to compete with gas and oil heating.

  13. Estimates of deep drainage rates at the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Richmond, M.C.; Wigmosta, M.S.; Kelley, M.E.

    1998-04-01

    In FY 1996, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Battelle Columbus Operations (BCO) in their ongoing assessment of contaminant migration at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. The objective of this report is to calculate deep drainage rates at the Pantex Plant. These deep drainage rates may eventually be used to predict contaminant loading to the underlying unconfined aquifer for the Pantex Plant Baseline Risk Assessment. These rates will also be used to support analyses of remedial activities involving surface alterations or the subsurface injection withdrawal of liquids or gases. The scope of this report is to estimate deep drainage rates for the major surface features at the Pantex Plant, including ditches and playas, natural grassland, dryland crop rotation, unvegetated soil, and graveled surfaces. Areas such as Pantex Lake that are outside the main plant boundaries were not included in the analysis. All estimates were derived using existing data or best estimates; no new data were collected. The modeling framework used to estimate the rates is described to enable future correlations, improvements, and enhancements. The scope of this report includes only data gathered during FY 1996. However, a current review of the data gathered on weather, soil, plants, and other information in the time period since did not reveal anything that would significantly alter the results presented in this report.

  14. Convergent approaches to determine an ecosystem's transpiration fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkelhammer, M.; Noone, D. C.; Wong, T. E.; Burns, S. P.; Knowles, J. F.; Kaushik, A.; Blanken, P. D.; Williams, M. W.

    2016-06-01

    The transpiration (T) fraction of total terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET), T/ET, can vary across ecosystems between 20-95% with a global average of ˜60%. The wide range may either reflect true heterogeneity between ecosystems and/or uncertainties in the techniques used to derive this property. Here we compared independent approaches to estimate T/ET at two needleleaf forested sites with a factor of 3 difference in leaf area index (LAI). The first method utilized water vapor isotope profiles and the second derived transpiration through its functional relationship with gross primary production. We found strong agreement between T/ET values from these two independent approaches although we noted a discrepancy at low vapor pressure deficits (VPD). We hypothesize that this divergence arises because stomatal conductance is independent of humidity at low VPD. Overall, we document significant synoptic-scale T/ET variability but minimal growing season-scale variability. This result indicates a high sensitivity of T/ET to passing weather but convergence toward a stable mean state, which is set by LAI. While changes in T/ET could emerge from a myriad of processes, including aboveground (LAI) or belowground (rooting depth) changes, there was only minimal interannual variability and no secular trend in our analysis of T/ET from the 15 year eddy covariance time series at Niwot Ridge. If the lack of trend observed here is apparent elsewhere, it suggests that the processes controlling the T and E fluxes are coupled in a way to maintain a stable ratio.

  15. Plant response of onion cultivars developed from greenhouse-grown transplants to plant density and fertilizer rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onions (Allium cepa L.) can be established from seed or transplants. The latter planting material can be dormant or actively growing when transplanted to the field. Onion transplants can be produced in a greenhouse, but there are gaps in the knowledge of the cultural requirements for these plants ...

  16. Leaf aquaporin transcript abundance in peanut genotypes diverging in expression of the limited-transpiration trait when subjected to differing vapor pressure deficits and aquaporin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Devi, M Jyostna; Sinclair, Thomas R; Jain, Mukesh; Gallo, Maria

    2016-04-01

    A plant trait currently being exploited to decrease crop yield loss under water-deficit conditions is limited-transpiration rate (TRlim ) under high atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) conditions. Although limited genotype comparisons for the TRlim trait have been performed in peanut (Arachis hypogaea), no detailed study to describe the basis for this trait in peanut has been reported. Since it has been hypothesized that the TRlim trait may be a result of low leaf hydraulic conductance associated with aquaporins (AQPs), the first objective of this study was to examine a possible correlation of TRlim to leaf AQP transcriptional profiles in six peanut cultivars. Five of the studied cultivars were selected because they expressed TRlim while the cultivar York did not. Transcripts of six AQPs were measured. Under exposure to high vapor pressure deficit, cultivar C 76-16 had decreased AQP transcript abundance for four of the six AQPs but in York only one AQP had decreased abundance. The second objective was to explore the influence of AQP inhibitors mercury and silver on expression of TRlim and AQP transcription profiles. Quantitative RT-PCR data were compared in cultivars York and C 76-16, which had the extreme response in TR to VPD. Inhibitor treatment resulted in increased abundance of AQP transcripts in both. The results of these experiments indicate that AQP transcript abundance itself may not be useful in identifying genotypes expressing the TRlim trait under high VPD conditions. PMID:26303261

  17. Simultaneous monitoring of electrical capacitance and water uptake activity of plant root system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, Imre; Takács, Tünde; Füzy, Anna; Rajkai, Kálmán

    2014-10-01

    Pot experiments were designed to test the applicability of root electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of root water uptake activity by growing cucumber and bean cultivars in a growth chamber. Half of the plants were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, while the other half served as non-infected controls. Root electrical capacitance and daily transpiration were monitored during the whole plant ontogeny. Phenology-dependent changes of daily transpiration (related to root water uptake) and root electrical capacitance proved to be similar as they showed upward trends from seedling emergence to the beginning of flowering stage, and thereafter decreased continuously during fruit setting. A few days after arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-colonization, daily transpiration and root electrical capacitance of infected plants became significantly higher than those of non-infected counterparts, and the relative increment of the measured parameters was greater for the more highly mycorrhizal-dependent bean cultivar compared to that of cucumber. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization caused 29 and 69% relative increment in shoot dry mass for cucumbers and beans, respectively. Mycorrhization resulted in 37% increase in root dry mass for beans, but no significant difference was observed for cucumbers. Results indicate the potential of root electrical capacitance measurements for monitoring the changes and differences of root water uptake rate.

  18. Estimation of the rate of increase in nitrogen dioxide concentrations from power plant stacks using an imaging-DOAS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanlim; Kim, Young J; Lee, Chulkyu

    2009-05-01

    The emission of nitrogen compounds from power plants accounts for a significant proportion of the total emissions of nitrogen to the atmosphere. This study seeks to understand the nature of chemical reactions in the atmosphere involving nitrogen, which is important in undertaking quantitative assessments of the contribution of such reactions to local and regional air pollution. The slant column density (SCD) of power-plant-generated NO(2) was derived using imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy (I-DOAS) with scattered sunlight as a light source. The vertical structure of NO(2) SCD from power plant stacks was simultaneously probed using a pushbroom sensor. Measured SCDs were converted to mixing ratios in calculating the rate of NO(2) increase at the center of the plume. This study presents quantitative measurements of the rate of NO(2) increase in a rising plume. An understanding of the rate of NO(2) increase is important because SO(2) and NO(x) compete for the same oxidizing radicals, and the amount of NO(x) is related to the rates of SO(2) oxidation and sulfate formation. This study is the first to directly obtain the rate of NO(2) increase in power plant plumes using the I-DOAS technique. NO(2) increase rates of 60 and 70 ppb s(-1) were observed at distances of about 45 m from the two stacks of the Pyeongtaek Power Plant, northwest South Korea. PMID:18535919

  19. The oxygen isotopic compositions of silica phytoliths and plant water in grasses: implications for the study of paleoclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Elizabeth A.; Longstaffe, Frederick J.

    2000-03-01

    Information about climatic conditions during plant growth is preserved by the oxygen-isotope composition of biogenic silica (phytoliths) deposited in grasses. The oxygen-isotope composition of phytolith silica is dependent on soil-water δ 18O values, relative humidity and evapotranspiration, and temperature during plant growth. Phytolith and plant-water δ 18O values for C3 ( A. breviligulata) and C4 ( C. longifolia) grasses from natural and greenhouse sites in southwestern Ontario were used to compare the isotopic fractionation between biogenic silica and water in various parts of these living plants. For non or weakly transpiring tissues (rhizomes, stems, sheaths) in both grass species, the Δ 18O silica-plant water remained constant at ˜34‰, and the δ 18O and δD values of plant water collected from pre-dawn and mid-day samplings showed little variation. These plant waters were only slightly enriched in 18O and D relative to water provided to the grasses. Isotopic temperatures calculated from the silica and plant-water isotopic data matched measured growing temperatures for the region. By comparison, the upper leaf water was extremely enriched in oxygen-18 and deuterium at maximum rates of transpiration relative to water from non-transpiring tissues, as were the calculated, steady-state values for leaf-water δ 18O and δD. Silica produced in the transpiring tissues (leaf, inflorescence) has higher δ 18O values than silica from non-transpiring tissues, but the enrichment is modest compared to upper leaf water under mid-day conditions. Leaf phytoliths have formed from plant water typical of average conditions in the lower leaf, where the extreme 18O-enrichment is not encountered. C. longifolia was also collected from Alberta and Nebraska, where growing conditions are different from southwestern Ontario. Phytoliths at all three sites have a similar pattern of δ 18O values within the plants, but the isotopic separation between leaf and stem silica increases

  20. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate in soybean plants: uptake during reproductive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Henry, L. T.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Net uptake of NO3- by non-nodulated soybean plants [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Ransom] growing in flowing hydroponic culture was measured daily during a 63 d period of reproductive development between the first florally inductive photoperiod and [unknown word] seed growth. Removal of NO3- from a replenished solution containing 1.0 mol m-3 NO3- was determined by ion chromatography. Uptake of NO3- continued throughout reproductive development. The net uptake rate of NO3- cycled between maxima and minima with a periodicity of oscillation of 3 to 7 d during the floral stage and about 6 d during the fruiting stage. Coupled with increasing concentrations of carbon and C : N ratios in tissues, the oscillations in net uptake rates of NO3- are evidence that the demand for carbohydrate by reproductive organs is contingent on the availability of nitrogen in the shoot pool rather than that the demand for nitrogen follows the flux of carbohydrate into reproductive tissues.

  1. Removal rates of antibiotics in four sewage treatment plants in South India.

    PubMed

    Prabhasankar, Valiparambil Prabhakaranunni; Joshua, Derrick Ian; Balakrishna, Keshava; Siddiqui, Iyanee Faroza; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Akiba, Masato; Praveenkumarreddy, Yerabham; Guruge, Keerthi S

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence and removal of seven selected pharmaceutical compounds (PCs) in sewage treatment plants (STPs) in South India were investigated. The PCs selected for this study were sulfamethoxazole (SMX), trimethoprim (TMP), chloramphenicol (CAP), erythromycin (ERY), naproxen (NPX), bezafibrate (BZF), and ampicillin (AMP). Wastewater samples were collected from inlet and outlet of the STPs during pre-monsoon, monsoon, and post-monsoon seasons to investigate the seasonal influences in occurrence and removal rates. The analytical method was based on simultaneous extraction of all target compounds by solid phase extraction (SPE), using a hydrophilic-lipophilic-balanced (HLB) sorbent followed by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The STP that catered exclusively to domestic wastewater had lesser concentrations of PCs compared to the STPs serving the combined hospital and domestic effluents. SMX was the dominant compound in all effluents with the highest concentration at 3.2 μg/L in the outlet of an STP. TMP and ERY were the other PCs present at higher concentrations in STP outlets (1 μg/L and 0-0.13 μg/L, respectively). Removal rates varied from 100 % for BZF to 60-100 % for SMX, CTX, and AMP. PMID:26797959

  2. An engineering analysis of a closed cycle plant growth module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickford, G. H., Jr.; Jakob, F. E.; Landstrom, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The SOLGEM model is a numerical engineering model which solves the flow and energy balance equations for the air flowing through a growing environment, assuming quasi-steady state conditions within the system. SOLGEM provides a dynamic simulation of the controlled environment system in that the temperature and flow conditions of the growing environment are estimated on an hourly basis in response to the weather data and the plant growth parameters. The flow energy balance considers the incident solar flux; incoming air temperature, humidity, and flow rate; heat exchange with the roof and floor; and heat and moisture exchange with the plants. A plant transpiration subroutine was developed based plant growth research facility, intended for the study of bioregenerative life support theories. The results of a performance analysis of the plant growth module are given. The estimated energy requirements of the module components and the total energy are given.

  3. Differentiating transpiration from evaporation in seasonal agricultural wetlands and the link to advective fluxes in the root zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachand, P.A.M.; S. Bachand; Fleck, Jacob A.; Anderson, Frank E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2014-01-01

    The current state of science and engineering related to analyzing wetlands overlooks the importance of transpiration and risks data misinterpretation. In response, we developed hydrologic and mass budgets for agricultural wetlands using electrical conductivity (EC) as a natural conservative tracer. We developed simple differential equations that quantify evaporation and transpiration rates using flowrates and tracer concentrations atwetland inflows and outflows. We used two ideal reactormodel solutions, a continuous flowstirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR), to bracket real non-ideal systems. From those models, estimated transpiration ranged from 55% (CFSTR) to 74% (PFR) of total evapotranspiration (ET) rates, consistent with published values using standard methods and direct measurements. The PFR model more appropriately represents these nonideal agricultural wetlands in which check ponds are in series. Using a fluxmodel, we also developed an equation delineating the root zone depth at which diffusive dominated fluxes transition to advective dominated fluxes. This relationship is similar to the Peclet number that identifies the dominance of advective or diffusive fluxes in surface and groundwater transport. Using diffusion coefficients for inorganic mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) we calculated that during high ET periods typical of summer, advective fluxes dominate root zone transport except in the top millimeters below the sediment–water interface. The transition depth has diel and seasonal trends, tracking those of ET. Neglecting this pathway has profound implications: misallocating loads along different hydrologic pathways; misinterpreting seasonal and diel water quality trends; confounding Fick's First Law calculations when determining diffusion fluxes using pore water concentration data; and misinterpreting biogeochemicalmechanisms affecting dissolved constituent cycling in the root zone. In addition,our understanding of internal

  4. Stomatal and Aerodynamic Controls of Transpiration and Evaporation over Amazonian Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebs, I.; Mallick, K.; Boegh, E.; Giustarini, L.; Schlerf, M.; von Randow, C.; Kruijt, B.; De Araujo, A. C.; Hayek, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Munger, J. W.; Saleska, S. R.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Domingues, T. F.; Ometto, J. P. H. B.; Leal de Moraes, O. L.; Hoffmann, L.; Jarvis, A.

    2015-12-01

    The dominant physical and ecophysiological state variables regulating the terrestrial latent heat flux (λE) are the aerodynamic conductance exerted by the boundary layer (gB) and the stomatal conductance (gS) exerted by the vegetation, and the Penman-Monteith (PM) model is a physically based method to directly quantify λE. However, the large scale application of the PM model suffers from the unavailability of any physical approach that explains the behaviour of gB and gSwithin the soil-plant-atmosphere-continuum. Here, we present a novel method to directly estimate gB and gS, and quantify their control on canopy scale transpiration (λET) and evaporation (λEE) using a Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC) approach. STIC is driven with radiometric surface temperature (TR), air temperature (TA), relative humidity (RH), net radiation (RN), and ground heat flux (G). It physically integrates TR into the PM formulation to directly retrieve gB and gS and the conductances are physically constrained by near surface wetness, atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (DA) and radiative fluxes. Measurements from six ecohydrologically contrasting sites of the LBA (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer in Amazonia) eddy covariance network were used for estimating the conductances and quantifying their control on λET and λEE. The predicted λE from STIC based gB and gS retrievals revealed substantial correlation (R2 from 0.92 to 0.98), and mean absolute percent deviation (MAPD) of 14% to 20% with the observed fluxes. The 'decoupling coefficient' (Ω) indicated critical canopy control on λET and λEE for Tropical Moist Forest (TMF), Tropical Dry Forest (TDF) and pasture (PAS). On the contrary, for the Tropical Rain Forest (TRF) site, a non-significant relationship was found between Ω and λET (λEE) (p = 0.20 - 0.42), indicating no canopy control on λET (λEE) for this particular plant functional type. However, significant canopy control for the TRF was found in the

  5. Risk-taking plants: anisohydric behavior as a stress-resistance trait.

    PubMed

    Sade, Nir; Gebremedhin, Alem; Moshelion, Menachem

    2012-07-01

    Water scarcity is a critical limitation for agricultural systems. Two different water management strategies have evolved in plants: an isohydric strategy and an anisohydric strategy. Isohydric plants maintain a constant midday leaf water potential (Ψleaf) when water is abundant, as well as under drought conditions, by reducing stomatal conductance as necessary to limit transpiration. Anisohydric plants have more variable Ψleaf and keep their stomata open and photosynthetic rates high for longer periods, even in the presence of decreasing leaf water potential. This risk-taking behavior of anisohydric plants might be beneficial when water is abundant, as well as under moderately stressful conditions. However, under conditions of intense drought, this behavior might endanger the plant. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these two water-usage strategies and their effects on the plant's ability to tolerate abiotic and biotic stress. The involvement of plant tonoplast AQPs in this process will also be discussed. PMID:22751307

  6. Yield and gas exchange ability of sweetpotato plants cultured in a hydroponic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Hirai, H.; Saiful Islam, A. F. M.; Yamamoto, M.

    Life support of crews in space is greatly dependent on the amounts of food atmospheric O 2 and clean water produced by plants Therefore the space farming systems with scheduling of crop production obtaining high yields with a rapid turnover rate converting atmospheric CO 2 to O 2 and purifying water should be established with employing suitable plant species and varieties and precisely controlling environmental variables around plants grown at a high density in a limited space In this study three sweetpotato varieties were cultured in a newly developed hydroponic system and the yield the photosynthetic rate and the transpiration rate were compared on the earth as a fundamental study for establishing the space farming systems The varieties were Elegant summer Koukei 14 and Beniazuma The hydroponic system mainly consisted of water channels and rockwool boards A growing space for roots was made between the rockwool board and nutrient solution in the water channel Storage roots were developed on the lower surface of the rockwool plates Fresh weights of the storage roots were 1 6 1 2 and 0 6 kg plant for Koukei 14 Elegant summer and Beniazuma respectively grown for five months from June to October under the sun light in Osaka Japan Koukei 14 and Elegant summer produced greater total phytomass than Beniazuma There were positive correlations among the total phytomass the net photosynthetic rate and the transpiration rate Young stems and leaves as well as storage roots of Elegant summer are edible Therefore Elegant-summer

  7. A simple framework to analyze water constraints on seasonal transpiration in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations

    PubMed Central

    Sopharat, Jessada; Gay, Frederic; Thaler, Philippe; Sdoodee, Sayan; Isarangkool Na Ayutthaya, Supat; Tanavud, Charlchai; Hammecker, Claude; Do, Frederic C.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and fast extension in climatically suboptimal areas threaten the sustainability of rubber tree cultivation. A simple framework based on reduction factors of potential transpiration was tested to evaluate the water constraints on seasonal transpiration in tropical sub-humid climates, according pedoclimatic conditions. We selected a representative, mature stand in a drought-prone area. Tree transpiration, evaporative demand and soil water availability were measured every day over 15 months. The results showed that basic relationships with evaporative demand, leaf area index and soil water availability were globally supported. However, the implementation of a regulation of transpiration at high evaporative demand whatever soil water availability was necessary to avoid large overestimates of transpiration. The details of regulation were confirmed by the analysis of canopy conductance response to vapor pressure deficit. The final objective of providing hierarchy between the main regulation factors of seasonal and annual transpiration was achieved. In the tested environmental conditions, the impact of atmospheric drought appeared larger importance than soil drought contrary to expectations. Our results support the interest in simple models to provide a first diagnosis of water constraints on transpiration with limited data, and to help decision making toward more sustainable rubber plantations. PMID:25610443

  8. How to help woody plants to overcome drought stress?-a control study of four tree species in Northwest China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Shuoxin

    2010-05-01

    Water is essential for plants and involves most physical and chemical processes within their lifecycles. Drought stress is a crucial limiting factor for plant growth and production. 48% of the land in China is arid and semi-arid, and non-irrigated land occupies approximately 51.9% of the total cultivated areas. Therefore, studies on plant drought resistant mechanisms have great significance for improving water use efficiency and thus increasing productivity of economical plants. Prior research has shown that the application of nitrogenous fertilizer affects the drought-resistant characteristics of plants. This study aimed to reveal the effect of nitrogenous fertilizer on physiological aspects and its impact on the drought resistance of four tree species (Robinia pseudoacacia L., Ligustrum lucidum Ait., Acer truncatum Bge. and Ulmus pumila L. ) in northwest China. Three levels of nitrogen fertilization (46% N based of urea adjusted to: 5g/15g soil, 15g/15g soil and 25g/15g soil) and an additional control study were applied to 2-year-old well-grown seedlings under drought conditions (30% field moisture capacity). Stomatal conductance, transpiration rate and net photosynthetic rate were measured by a LI-6400 photosynthesis system, while water use efficiency was calculated from net photosynthesis rate and transpiration rate. The results revealed that as the amount of urea applied was raised, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate and net photosynthetic rate decreased significantly, and thus water use efficiency significantly increased. It is therefore concluded that the application of nitrogenous fertilizer regulated physiological parameters by reducing stomata conductance to improve water use efficiency. In addition, among the four tree species, U. pumila had the maximum value of water use efficiency under the same drought condition. The outcome of this study provides a guided option for forest management in arid and semi-arid areas of northwest China.

  9. Coupled soil respiration and transpiration dynamics from tree-scale to catchment scale in dry Rocky Mountain pine forests and the role of snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, E.; Barnard, H. R.; Brooks, P. D.; Adams, H.; Burns, M. A.; Wilson, W.; Stielstra, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    A current ecohydrological challenge is quantifying the exact nature of carbon (C) and water couplings across landscapes. An emerging framework of understanding places plant physiological processes as a central control over soil respiration, the largest source of CO2 to the atmosphere. In dry montane forests, spatial and temporal variability in forest physiological processes are governed by hydrological patterns. Critical feedbacks involving respiration, moisture supply and tree physiology are poorly understood and must be quantified at the landscape level to better predict carbon cycle implications of regional drought under future climate change. We present data from an experiment designed to capture landscape variability in key coupled hydrological and C processes in forests of Colorado's Front Range. Sites encompass three catchments within the Boulder Creek watershed, range from 1480 m to 3021 m above sea level and are co-located with the DOE Niwot Ridge Ameriflux site and the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory. Key hydrological measurements (soil moisture, transpiration) are coupled with soil respiration measurements within each catchment at different landscape positions. This three-dimensional study design also allows for the examination of the role of water subsidies from uplands to lowlands in controlling respiration. Initial findings from 2012 reveal a moisture threshold response of the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. This threshold may derive from tree physiological responses to variation in moisture availability, which in turn is controlled by the persistence of snowpack. Using data collected in 2013, first, we determine whether respiration moisture thresholds represent triggers for transpiration at the individual tree level. Next, using stable isotope ratios of soil respiration and xylem and soil water, we compare the depths of respiration to depths of water uptake to assign tree vs. understory sources of respiration. This will help

  10. The effect of transpiration on coupled heat and mass transfer in mixed convection over a vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1997-03-01

    Effect of transpiration velocity on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of mixed convection about a permeable vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion is numerically analyzed. The plate is maintained at a uniform temperature and species concentration with constant transpiration velocity. The transformed governing equations are solved by Keller box method. Numerical results for the local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are presented. In general, it has been found for thermally assisted flow that the local surface heat and mass transfer rates increase owing to suction of fluid. This trend reversed for blowing of fluid. It is apparent that the Lewis number has a pronounced effect on the local Sherwood number than it does on the local Nusselt number. Increasing the Lewis number decreases (increases) the local heat (mass) transfer rate.

  11. Heat pulse observations of Eucalyptus grandis transpiration in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, P.J.; Olbrich, B.W.

    1992-12-31

    Forest plantations in South Africa are currently limited to areas experiencing a minimum mean annual rainfall of 800 mm, and cover approximately 1.18 million ha. Of this total area, 37% is planted to Eucalyptus spp., of which 76% comprise E. grandis Hill ex Maiden. Micrometeorological methods of measuring evapotranspiration are impractical in many areas of South African forestry owing to the rugged topography and heterogeneous canopy and boundary layer conditions. The heat pulse velocity (HPV) technique shows great promise as a suitable method of measuring sap flow in even-aged forest plantations. This paper describes the method in detail, as well as the results of comparisons between HPV sap flow estimates and cut-tree uptake rates for two size classes of E. grandis.

  12. Developing a virtual reality application for training nuclear power plant operators: setting up a database containing dose rates in the refuelling plant.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Zarza, I; Burgos, M C; Felipe, A; Sánchez-Mayoral, M L

    2004-01-01

    Operators in Nuclear Power Plants can receive high doses during refuelling operations. A training programme for simulating refuelling operations will be useful in reducing the doses received by workers as well as minimising operation time. With this goal in mind, a virtual reality application is developed within the framework of the CIPRES project. The application requires doses, both instantaneous and accumulated, to be displayed at all times during operator training. Therefore, it is necessary to set up a database containing dose rates at every point in the refuelling plant. This database is based on radiological protection surveillance data measured in the plant during refuelling operations. Some interpolation routines have been used to estimate doses through the refuelling plant. Different assumptions have been adopted in order to perform the interpolation and obtain consistent data. In this paper, the procedures developed to set up the dose database for the virtual reality application are presented and analysed. PMID:15266073

  13. Diagnosing the Role of Transpiration in the Transition from Dry to Wet Season Over the Amazon Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. S.; Fu, R.; Yin, L.; Chae, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reanalysis data indicates that land surface evapotranspiration plays a key role in determining the timing of wet season onset over the Amazon. Here, we use satellite observations of water vapor and its stable isotopes, carbon dioxide, leaf area index, and precipitation together with reanalysis data to explore the importance of transpiration in initiating the transition from dry season to wet season over the Amazon. The growth of vegetation in this region is primarily limited by the availability of sunlight rather than the availability of soil moisture, so that the increase of solar radiation during the dry season coincides with dramatic increases in leaf area index within forested ecosystems. This period of plant growth is accompanied by uptake of carbon dioxide and enrichment of heavy isotopes in water vapor, particularly near the land surface. Reanalysis data indicate that this pre-wet season enrichment of HDO is accompanied by sharp increases in the surface latent heat flux, which eventually triggers sporadic moist convection. The transport of transpiration-enriched near-surface air by this convection causes a dramatic increase in free-tropospheric HDO in late August and September. September also marks transition points in the annual cycles of leaf area index (maximum) and carbon dioxide (minimum). The increase in convective activity during this period creates convergence, enhancing moisture transport into the region and initiating the wet season.

  14. A highly infective plant-associated bacterium influences reproductive rates in pea aphids

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Tory A.; Clark, Kelley J.; Baltrus, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, have the potential to increase reproduction as a defence against pathogens, though how frequently this occurs or how infection with live pathogens influences this response is not well understood. Here we determine the minimum infective dose of an environmentally common bacterium and possible aphid pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, to determine the likelihood of pathogenic effects to pea aphids. Additionally, we used P. syringae infection to investigate how live pathogens may alter reproductive rates. We found that oral bacterial exposure decreased subsequent survival of aphids in a dose-dependent manner and we estimate that ingestion of less than 10 bacterial cells is sufficient to increase aphid mortality. Pathogen dose was positively related to aphid reproduction. Aphids exposed to low bacterial doses showed decreased, although statistically indistinguishable, fecundity compared to controls. Aphids exposed to high doses reproduced significantly more than low dose treatments and also more, but not significantly so, than controls. These results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that pea aphids may use fecundity compensation as a response to pathogens. Consequently, even low levels of exposure to a common plant-associated bacterium may therefore have significant effects on pea aphid survival and reproduction. PMID:26998321

  15. Relative in vitro growth rates of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) - the most rapidly growing higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, P; Adelmann, K; Zimmer, S; Schmidt, C; Appenroth, K-J

    2015-01-01

    Relative growth rates (RGR), doubling times (DT) and relative weekly yields (RY) of 39 clones (ecotypes) from 13 species representing all five genera of duckweeds were determined under standardised cultivation conditions. RGR ranged overall from 0.153 to 0.519 day(-1) , DT from 1.34 to 4.54 days and RY from 2.9 to 37.8 week(-1) . The RGR and RY data can be compared directly to other published findings to only a limited extent on account of missing clonal designations for and limited accessibility to previously investigated clones, as well as the use of different data denominators. However, they are consistent with the published results of other comparative duckweed studies of similar scope in showing that RGR does not vary primarily at the level of the genus or species, but rather reflects the adaptation of individual clones to specific local conditions. The RGR data support the widely held assumption that duckweeds can grow faster than other higher plants and that they can thus surpass land-based agricultural crops in productivity. Duckweeds are highly promising for the production of biomass for nutrition and energy, but extensive clonal comparison will be required to identify the most suitable isolates for this purpose. PMID:24803032

  16. A highly infective plant-associated bacterium influences reproductive rates in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Tory A; Clark, Kelley J; Baltrus, David A

    2016-02-01

    Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, have the potential to increase reproduction as a defence against pathogens, though how frequently this occurs or how infection with live pathogens influences this response is not well understood. Here we determine the minimum infective dose of an environmentally common bacterium and possible aphid pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, to determine the likelihood of pathogenic effects to pea aphids. Additionally, we used P. syringae infection to investigate how live pathogens may alter reproductive rates. We found that oral bacterial exposure decreased subsequent survival of aphids in a dose-dependent manner and we estimate that ingestion of less than 10 bacterial cells is sufficient to increase aphid mortality. Pathogen dose was positively related to aphid reproduction. Aphids exposed to low bacterial doses showed decreased, although statistically indistinguishable, fecundity compared to controls. Aphids exposed to high doses reproduced significantly more than low dose treatments and also more, but not significantly so, than controls. These results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that pea aphids may use fecundity compensation as a response to pathogens. Consequently, even low levels of exposure to a common plant-associated bacterium may therefore have significant effects on pea aphid survival and reproduction. PMID:26998321

  17. Water balance measurements and simulations of maize plants on lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinlein, Florian; Biernath, Christian; Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Priesack, Eckart

    2016-04-01

    In Central Europe expected major aspects of climate change are a shift of precipitation events and amounts towards winter months, and the general increase of extreme weather events like heat waves or summer droughts. This will lead to strongly changing regional water availability and will have an impact on future crop growth, water use efficiency and yields. Therefore, to estimate future crop yields by growth models accurate descriptions of transpiration as part of the water balance is important. In this study, maize was grown on weighing lysimeters (sowdate: 24 April 2013). Transpiration was determined by sap flow measurement devices (ICT International Pty Ltd, Australia) using the Heat-Ratio-Method: two temperature probes, 0.5 cm above and below a heater, detect a heat pulse and its speed which allows the calculation of sap flow. Water balance simulations were executed with different applications of the model framework Expert-N. The same pedotransfer and hydraulic functions and the same modules to simulate soil water flow, soil heat and nitrogen transport, nitrification, denitrification and mineralization were used. Differences occur in the chosen potential evapotranspiration ETpot (Penman-Monteith ASCE, Penman-Monteith FAO, Haude) and plant modules (SPASS, CERES). In all simulations ETpot is separated into a soil and a plant part using the leaf are index (LAI). In a next step, these parts are reduced by soil water availability. The sum of these parts is the actual evapotranspiration ETact which is compared to the lysimeter measurements. The results were analyzed from Mid-August to Mid-September 2013. The measured sap flow rates show clear diurnal cycles except on rainy days. The SPASS model is able to simulate these diurnal cycles, overestimates the measurements on rainy days and at the beginning of the analyzed period, and underestimates transpiration on the other days. The main reason is an overestimation of potential transpiration Tpot due to too high

  18. On the development of turbulent boundary layer with wall transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Marco; Downs, Robert S., III; Fallenius, Bengt E. G.; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of the development of the transpired boundary layer in zero pressure gradient is carried out on a 6.4 m long hydrodynamically smooth and perforated plate. The relatively longer development length of the present perforated plate compared to the ones used in previous studies allows us to investigate whether an asymptotic suction boundary layer with constant thickness is achieved for the turbulent state, analogously to what happens in the laminar state. Velocity profiles are obtained via hot-wire anemometry while the wall shear stress is measured at several streamwise locations with hot-film and wall-wire probes as well as with oil-film interferometry. The threshold suction coefficient above which relaminarization starts to occur is examined. The scaling of the mean velocity and of higher order velocity moments is discussed in light of the measured wall shear stress data. Support from the European Research Council of the Advanced Fluid Research On Drag reduction in Turbulence Experiments (AFRODITE) is acknowledged.

  19. MRI links stem water content to stem diameter variations in transpiring trees.

    PubMed

    De Schepper, Veerle; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Copini, Paul; Jahnke, Siegfried; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-04-01

    In trees, stem diameter variations are related to changes in stem water content, because internally stored water is depleted and replenished over a day. To confirm this relationship, non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was combined with point dendrometer measurements in three actively transpiring oak (Quercus robur L.) trees. Two of these oak trees were girdled to study the stem increment above the girdling zone. MRI images and micrographs of stem cross-sections revealed a close link between the water distribution and the anatomical features of the stem. Stem tissues with the highest amount of water were physiologically the most active ones, being the youngest differentiating xylem cells, the cambium and the youngest differentiating and conductive phloem cells. Daily changes in stem diameter corresponded well with the simultaneously MRI-measured amount of water, confirming their strong interdependence. MRI images also revealed that the amount of water in the elastic bark tissues, excluding cambium and the youngest phloem, contributed most to the daily stem diameter changes. After bark removal, an additional increase in stem diameter was measured above the girdle. This increase was attributed not only to the cambial production of new cells, but also to swelling of existing bark cells. In conclusion, the comparison of MRI and dendrometer measurements confirmed previous interpretations and applications of dendrometers and illustrates the additional and complementary information MRI can reveal regarding water relations in plants. PMID:22268159

  20. Genetic Variation of Morphological Traits and Transpiration in an Apple Core Collection under Well-Watered Conditions: Towards the Identification of Morphotypes with High Water Use Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Gerardo; Pallas, Benoît; Martinez, Sébastien; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Regnard, Jean-Luc; Durel, Charles-Éric; Costes, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE) is a quantitative measurement which improvement is a major issue in the context of global warming and restrictions in water availability for agriculture. In this study, we aimed at studying the variation and genetic control of WUE and the respective role of its components (plant biomass and transpiration) in a perennial fruit crop. We explored an INRA apple core collection grown in a phenotyping platform to screen one-year-old scions for their accumulated biomass, transpiration and WUE under optimal growing conditions. Plant biomass was decompose into morphological components related to either growth or organ expansion. For each trait, nine mixed models were evaluated to account for the genetic effect and spatial heterogeneity inside the platform. The Best Linear Unbiased Predictors of genetic values were estimated after model selection. Mean broad-sense heritabilities were calculated from variance estimates. Heritability values indicated that biomass (0.76) and WUE (0.73) were under genetic control. This genetic control was lower in plant transpiration with an heritability of 0.54. Across the collection, biomass accounted for 70% of the WUE variability. A Hierarchical Ascendant Classification of the core collection indicated the existence of six groups of genotypes with contrasting morphology and WUE. Differences between morphotypes were interpreted as resulting from differences in the main processes responsible for plant growth: cell division leading to the generation of new organs and cell elongation leading to organ dimension. Although further studies will be necessary on mature trees with more complex architecture and multiple sinks such as fruits, this study is a first step for improving apple plant material for the use of water. PMID:26717192

  1. Transpirational water use and its regulation in the mountainous terrain of S. Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otieno Dennis, O.; Eunyoung, J.; Sinkyu, K.; Tenhunen, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Quantifying water use by forests growing on complex mountainous terrain is difficult and understanding of controls on water use by these forests a challenge. Yet mountains are crucial as water towers and better understanding of their hydrology and ecology is critical for sustainable management. Consequently, there is a growing need for new research approaches designed with attention to the particular needs and constraints of large-scale studies and that have the potential to generate reliable and accurate data. The use of a combination of different sapflow-measurement techniques provides a unique opportunity to monitor water use by the understory and canopy forest tree species at micro-scale, allowing for accurate estimation of total forest water use. The obtained data, in conjunction with intensively measured climatic variables, allow for better understanding and interpretation of transpiration results. A research initiative under the International Training Group: Complex Terrain and Ecological Heterogeneity (TERRECO) seeks to address pertinent issues related to forest water use and production in complex terrain. Stem Heat balance (SHB) and Heat Dissipation techniques have been employed to measure sapflow in the understory woody plants and tree branches and on stems of canopy trees respectively. Measurements have been stratified to account for differences in tree sizes and species diversity. To better understand the data, we are intensively monitoring soil moisture at 5, 10 and 30 cm depths, in addition to a range of micrometeorology sensors that have been set up below, within and above the canopy. These measurements have been planned, taking into account altitudinal/elevation gradient, aspect and within site differences in species composition and tree sizes and to generate data for large-scale modeling of the entire catchment. A total of 70 trees from 9 species growing in six different locations at varying elevations and aspects are being monitored. Peak daily

  2. Transport of root-derived CO2 via the transpiration stream affects aboveground tree physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, J.; McGuire, M. A.; Aubrey, D. P.; Teskey, R. O.; Steppe, K.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research on soil CO2 efflux has shown that belowground autotrophic respiration is largely underestimated using classical net CO2 flux measurements. Aubrey & Teskey (2009) found that in forest ecosystems a substantial portion of the CO2 released from root respiration remained within the root system and was transported aboveground in the stem via the transpiration stream. The magnitude of this upward movement of CO2 from belowground tissues suggested important implications for how we measure above- and belowground respiration. If a considerable fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported aboveground, where it might be fixed in woody and leaf tissues, then we are routinely underestimating the amount of C needed to sustain belowground tissues. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the base of field-grown poplar trees as a surrogate for root-respired CO2 to investigate the possible role of root-derived CO2 as substrate for carbon fixation. The label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and fixed by chlorophyll-containing woody (young bark and xylem) and leaf (petiole) tissues. Moreover, based on 13C analysis of gas samples, we observed that up to 88 ± 0.10 % of the label applied was lost to the atmosphere by stem and branch efflux higher in the trees. Given that one-half of root-respired CO2 may follow this internal flux pathway (Aubrey & Teskey, 2009), we calculated that up to 44% of the root-respired CO2 could diffuse to the atmosphere once transported to the stem and branches. Thus, a large portion of CO2 that diffuses out of aboveground tissues may actually result from root respiration. Our results show that CO2 originating belowground can be transported internally to aboveground parts of trees, where it will have an important impact on tree physiology. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the gas exchange approach to estimating above- and

  3. Comparative estimates of transpiration of ash and beech forest at a chalk site in southern Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John; Rosier, Paul T. W.

    1994-11-01

    (1) During the dry summer of 1989 stomatal conductance ( gs), boundary-layer conductance ( ga), leaf water and osmotic potentials ( ψ1, ψπ) and leaf area index ( L∗) measurements were made in mature ash and beech stands growing on shallow soil over chalk near Winchester, Hampshire, UK. In addition measurements of gs and L∗ were made in the understorey layer in the ash stand, comprised mainly of dog's mercury, hazel and bramble. Automatic weather stations located (i) above the beech stand and (ii) at the understorey level (within the ash stand) provided hourly averages of weather variables. Changes in soil moisture deficit in both stands were determined from regular measurements made with a neutron probe. (2) Maximum values of gs (up to 0.3 mol m -2 s -1) were found at the top of the ash and beech canopies at the start of the day, while at the canopy base gs was about half of these values. At all canopy levels the value of gs was more closely associated with specific humidity deficit (at the time of measurement) than with any other weather variable, and there was no relationship between gs and soil mositure deficit or leaf water status, described by ψ1 and ψπ on the day of measurement. (3) Values of gs of the understorey plants were only half those of the tree species and changed less during the day. However, seasonal changes in gs of dog's mercury did seem to be associated with increased soil moisture deficit. (4) Estimates of L∗ in the ash and beech stands were made from leaf litter collections and partitioned into canopy layers using ratios determined by destructive sampling. L∗ of the beech stand was 5.3 and for the ash stand 2.7. L∗ of the understorey varied seasonally and rose to a peak of 3 in June falling gradually for the remainder of the summer period. (5) Hourly values of gs and ga in each stand for each canopy layer were scaled up to the canopy by using L∗ of the individual canopy layers (including the understorey level in the ash stand

  4. Effect of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and open-top chambers on transpiration in a tallgrass prairie

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, D.J.; Ham, J.M.; Owensby, C.E.

    1996-07-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may influence plant-water relations in natural and agricultural ecosystems. A tallgrass prairie near Manhattan, KS, was exposed to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} using open-top chambers (OTCs). Heat balance sap flow gauges were used to measure transpiration in ironweed [Vernonia baldwini var. interior (Small) Schub.], aC{sub 3}forb, and on individual grass culms of big bluestem (Andropogan geradii Vitman) and indiangrass [Sorghastrum nutans (L>) Nash], both C{sub 4} grasses, in each of three treatments: (1) CE (chamber enriched, 2x ambient CO{sub 2}); (2) CA (chamber ambient, no CO{sub 2} enrichment); and (3) NC (no chamber, no CO{sub 2} enrichment). Sap flow data were coupled with measurements of stomatal conductance, plant/canopy resistance, and whole-chamber evapotranspiration (ET) to determine the effect of elevated CO{sub 2} on water use at different scales. Because of frequent rainfall during the study, all data were collected under well-watered conditions. Comparisons of CE and CA showed that sap flow was reduced by 33% in ironweed, 18% in big bluestem, and 22% in indiangrass under CO{sub 2} enrichment. Whole-chamber ET was reduced by 23 to 27% under CO{sub 2} enrichment. Comparisons of CA and NC showed that the environmental effect of the OTCs caused a 21 to 24% reduction in transpiration. Stomatal conductance decreased from 7.9 to 3.6 mm s{sup {minus}1} in big bluestem and from 5.3 to 3.2 mm s{sup {minus}1} in indiangrass under CO{sub 2} enrichment. Soil water was consistently highest under elevated CO{sub 2}, reflecting the large reductions in transpiration. During sap flow measurements, whole-plant stomatal resistance to water vapor flux in big bluestem increased from 103 to 194 s m{sup {minus}1} under elevated CO{sub 2}. 23 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Evaluating the Performance and Economics of Transpired Solar Collectors for Commercial Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.; Deru, M.; Slayzak, S.; Norton, P.; Barker, G.; McClendon, J,

    2008-07-01

    Using transpired solar collectors to preheat ventilation air has recently become recognized as an economic alternative for integrating renewable energy into commercial buildings in heating climates. The collectors have relatively low installed costs and operate on simple principles. Theory and performance testing have shown that solar collection efficiency can exceed 70% of incident solar. However, implementation and current absorber designs have adversely affected the efficiency and associated economics from this initial analysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has actively studied this technology and monitored performance at several installations. A calibrated model that uses typical meteorological weather data to determine absorber plate efficiency resulted from this work. With this model, an economic analysis across heating climates was done to show the effects of collector size, tilt, azimuth, and absorptivity. The analysis relates the internal rate of return of a system based on the cost of the installed absorber area. In general, colder and higher latitude climates return a higher rate of return because the heating season extends into months with good solar resource.

  6. Estimating site occupancy rates for aquatic plants using spatial sub-sampling designs when detection probabilities are less than one

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielson, Ryan M.; Gray, Brian R.; McDonald, Lyman L.; Heglund, Patricia J.

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of site occupancy rates when detection probabilities are <1 is well established in wildlife science. Data from multiple visits to a sample of sites are used to estimate detection probabilities and the proportion of sites occupied by focal species. In this article we describe how site occupancy methods can be applied to estimate occupancy rates of plants and other sessile organisms. We illustrate this approach and the pitfalls of ignoring incomplete detection using spatial data for 2 aquatic vascular plants collected under the Upper Mississippi River's Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP). Site occupancy models considered include: a naïve model that ignores incomplete detection, a simple site occupancy model assuming a constant occupancy rate and a constant probability of detection across sites, several models that allow site occupancy rates and probabilities of detection to vary with habitat characteristics, and mixture models that allow for unexplained variation in detection probabilities. We used information theoretic methods to rank competing models and bootstrapping to evaluate the goodness-of-fit of the final models. Results of our analysis confirm that ignoring incomplete detection can result in biased estimates of occupancy rates. Estimates of site occupancy rates for 2 aquatic plant species were 19–36% higher compared to naive estimates that ignored probabilities of detection <1. Simulations indicate that final models have little bias when 50 or more sites are sampled, and little gains in precision could be expected for sample sizes >300. We recommend applying site occupancy methods for monitoring presence of aquatic species.

  7. An examination of heat rate improvements due to waste heat integration in an oxycombustion pulverized coal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Joshua M.

    Oxyfuel, or oxycombustion, technology has been proposed as one carbon capture technology for coal-fired power plants. An oxycombustion plant would fire coal in an oxidizer consisting primarily of CO2, oxygen, and water vapor. Flue gas with high CO2 concentrations is produced and can be compressed for sequestration. Since this compression generates large amounts of heat, it was theorized that this heat could be utilized elsewhere in the plant. Process models of the oxycombustion boiler, steam cycle, and compressors were created in ASPEN Plus and Excel to test this hypothesis. Using these models, heat from compression stages was integrated to the flue gas recirculation heater, feedwater heaters, and to a fluidized bed coal dryer. All possible combinations of these heat sinks were examined, with improvements in coal flow rate, Qcoal, net power, and unit heat rate being noted. These improvements would help offset the large efficiency impacts inherent to oxycombustion technology.

  8. On the spatial distribution of the transpiration and soil moisture of a Mediterranean heterogeneous ecosystem in water-limited conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Matteo; Corona, Roberto; Montaldo, Nicola; Albertson, John D.; Oren, Ram

    2014-05-01

    trees to obtain a generalized estimates of sapwood depth. The known of allometric relationships between sapwood area, diameter and canopy cover area within the eddy covariance footprint helped for the application of a reliable scaling procedure of the local sap flow estimates which are in a good agreement with the estimates of ET eddy cov