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Sample records for plant-pathogenic bacterium erwinia

  1. Differential Role of Ferritins in Iron Metabolism and Virulence of the Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937▿

    PubMed Central

    Boughammoura, Aïda; Matzanke, Berthold F.; Böttger, Lars; Reverchon, Sylvie; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Expert, Dominique; Franza, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    During infection, the phytopathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi has to cope with iron-limiting conditions and the production of reactive oxygen species by plant cells. Previous studies have shown that a tight control of the bacterial intracellular iron content is necessary for full virulence. The E. chrysanthemi genome possesses two loci that could be devoted to iron storage: the bfr gene, encoding a heme-containing bacterioferritin, and the ftnA gene, coding for a paradigmatic ferritin. To assess the role of these proteins in the physiology of this pathogen, we constructed ferritin-deficient mutants by reverse genetics. Unlike the bfr mutant, the ftnA mutant had increased sensitivity to iron deficiency and to redox stress conditions. Interestingly, the bfr ftnA mutant displayed an intermediate phenotype for sensitivity to these stresses. Whole-cell analysis by Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the main iron storage protein is FtnA and that there is an increase in the ferrous iron/ferric iron ratio in the ftnA and bfr ftnA mutants. We found that ftnA gene expression is positively controlled by iron and the transcriptional repressor Fur via the small antisense RNA RyhB. bfr gene expression is induced at the stationary phase of growth. The σS transcriptional factor is necessary for this control. Pathogenicity tests showed that FtnA and the Bfr contribute differentially to the virulence of E. chrysanthemi depending on the host, indicating the importance of a perfect control of iron homeostasis in this bacterial species during infection. PMID:18165304

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni” Strain CX, a Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Shao, J.; Bottner-Parker, K. D.; Gundersen-Rindal, D. E.; Zhao, Y.; Davis, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    “Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni” strain CX, belonging to subgroup 16SrIII-A, is a plant-pathogenic bacterium causing economically important diseases in many fruit crops. Here, we report the draft genome sequence, which consists of 598,508 bases, with a G+C content of 27.21 mol%. PMID:26472824

  3. Evolutionary History of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis

    PubMed Central

    Mhedbi-Hajri, Nadia; Hajri, Ahmed; Boureau, Tristan; Darrasse, Armelle; Durand, Karine; Brin, Chrystelle; Saux, Marion Fischer-Le; Manceau, Charles; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering mechanisms shaping bacterial diversity should help to build tools to predict the emergence of infectious diseases. Xanthomonads are plant pathogenic bacteria found worldwide. Xanthomonas axonopodis is a genetically heterogeneous species clustering, into six groups, strains that are collectively pathogenic on a large number of plants. However, each strain displays a narrow host range. We address the question of the nature of the evolutionary processes – geographical and ecological speciation – that shaped this diversity. We assembled a large collection of X. axonopodis strains that were isolated over a long period, over continents, and from various hosts. Based on the sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes, we found that recombination occurred as frequently as point mutation in the evolutionary history of X. axonopodis. However, the impact of recombination was about three times greater than the impact of mutation on the diversity observed in the whole dataset. We then reconstructed the clonal genealogy of the strains using coalescent and genealogy approaches and we studied the diversification of the pathogen using a model of divergence with migration. The suggested scenario involves a first step of generalist diversification that spanned over the last 25 000 years. A second step of ecology-driven specialization occurred during the past two centuries. Eventually, secondary contacts between host-specialized strains probably occurred as a result of agricultural development and intensification, allowing genetic exchanges of virulence-associated genes. These transfers may have favored the emergence of novel pathotypes. Finally, we argue that the largest ecological entity within X. axonopodis is the pathovar. PMID:23505513

  4. Evolutionary history of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis.

    PubMed

    Mhedbi-Hajri, Nadia; Hajri, Ahmed; Boureau, Tristan; Darrasse, Armelle; Durand, Karine; Brin, Chrystelle; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Manceau, Charles; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier; Lemaire, Christophe; Jacques, Marie-Agnès

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering mechanisms shaping bacterial diversity should help to build tools to predict the emergence of infectious diseases. Xanthomonads are plant pathogenic bacteria found worldwide. Xanthomonas axonopodis is a genetically heterogeneous species clustering, into six groups, strains that are collectively pathogenic on a large number of plants. However, each strain displays a narrow host range. We address the question of the nature of the evolutionary processes--geographical and ecological speciation--that shaped this diversity. We assembled a large collection of X. axonopodis strains that were isolated over a long period, over continents, and from various hosts. Based on the sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes, we found that recombination occurred as frequently as point mutation in the evolutionary history of X. axonopodis. However, the impact of recombination was about three times greater than the impact of mutation on the diversity observed in the whole dataset. We then reconstructed the clonal genealogy of the strains using coalescent and genealogy approaches and we studied the diversification of the pathogen using a model of divergence with migration. The suggested scenario involves a first step of generalist diversification that spanned over the last 25,000 years. A second step of ecology-driven specialization occurred during the past two centuries. Eventually, secondary contacts between host-specialized strains probably occurred as a result of agricultural development and intensification, allowing genetic exchanges of virulence-associated genes. These transfers may have favored the emergence of novel pathotypes. Finally, we argue that the largest ecological entity within X. axonopodis is the pathovar. PMID:23505513

  5. Quorum sensing in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora: the role of expR(Ecc).

    PubMed

    Andersson, R A; Eriksson, A R; Heikinheimo, R; Mäe, A; Pirhonen, M; Kõiv, V; Hyytiäinen, H; Tuikkala, A; Palva, E T

    2000-04-01

    The production of the main virulence determinants of the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, the extracellular cell wall-degrading enzymes, is partly controlled by the diffusible signal molecule N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL). OHHL is synthesized by the product of the expI/carI gene. Linked to expI we found a gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator of the LuxR-family. This gene, expR(Ecc), is transcribed convergently to the expI gene and the two open reading frames are partially overlapping. The ExpR(Ecc) protein showed extensive amino acid sequence similarity to the repressor EsaR from Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (formerly Erwinia stewartii subsp. stewartii) and to the ExpR(Ech) protein of Erwinia chrysanthemi. Inactivation of the E. carotovora subsp. carotovora expR(Ecc) gene caused no decrease in virulence or production of virulence determinants in vitro. In contrast, there was a slight increase in the maceration capacity of the mutant strain. The effects of ExpR(Ecc) were probably mediated by changes in OHHL levels. Inactivation of expR(Ecc) resulted in increased OHHL levels during early logarithmic growth. In addition, overexpression of expR(Ecc) caused a clear decrease in the production of virulence determinants and part of this effect was likely to be caused by OHHL binding to ExpR(Ecc). ExpR(Ecc) did not appear to exhibit transcriptional regulation of expI, but the effect on OHHL was apparently due to other mechanisms. PMID:10755301

  6. Sexual Transmission of a Plant Pathogenic Bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between Conspecific Insect Vectors during Mating

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Rajinder S.; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten; Hermann, Sara L.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2011-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4%) during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees. PMID:22216209

  7. The cost of phage resistance in a plant pathogenic bacterium is context‐dependent

    PubMed Central

    Meaden, Sean; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Koskella, Britt

    2015-01-01

    Parasites are ubiquitous features of living systems and many parasites severely reduce the fecundity or longevity of their hosts. This parasite‐imposed selection on host populations should strongly favor the evolution of host resistance, but hosts typically face a trade‐off between investment in reproductive fitness and investment in defense against parasites. The magnitude of such a trade‐off is likely to be context‐dependent, and accordingly costs that are key in shaping evolution in nature may not be easily observable in an artificial environment. We set out to assess the costs of phage resistance for a plant pathogenic bacterium in its natural plant host versus in a nutrient‐rich, artificial medium. We demonstrate that mutants of Pseudomonas syringae that have evolved resistance via a single mutational step pay a substantial cost for this resistance when grown on their tomato plant hosts, but do not realize any measurable growth rate costs in nutrient‐rich media. This work demonstrates that resistance to phage can significantly alter bacterial growth within plant hosts, and therefore that phage‐mediated selection in nature is likely to be an important component of bacterial pathogenicity. PMID:25809535

  8. Blocking the Transmission of a Noncirculative Vector-Borne Plant Pathogenic Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Labroussaa, Fabien; Zeilinger, Adam R; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2016-07-01

    The successful control of insect-borne plant pathogens is often difficult to achieve due to the ecologically complex interactions among pathogens, vectors, and host plants. Disease management often relies on pesticides and other approaches that have limited long-term sustainability. To add a new tool to control vector-borne diseases, we attempted to block the transmission of a bacterial insect-transmitted pathogen, the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, by disrupting bacteria-insect vector interactions. X. fastidiosa is known to attach to and colonize the cuticular surface of the mouthparts of vectors; a set of recombinant peptides was generated and the chemical affinities of these peptides to chitin and related carbohydrates was assayed in vitro. Two candidates, the X. fastidiosa hypothetical protein PD1764 and an N-terminal region of the hemagglutinin-like protein B (HxfB) showed affinity for these substrates. These proteins were provided to vectors via an artificial diet system in which insects acquire X. fastidiosa, followed by an inoculation access period on plants under greenhouse conditions. Both PD1764 and HxfAD1-3 significantly blocked transmission. Furthermore, bacterial populations within insects over a 10-day period demonstrated that these peptides inhibited cell adhesion to vectors but not bacterial multiplication, indicating that the mode of action of these peptides is restricted to limiting cell adhesion to insects, likely via competition for adhesion sites. These results open a new venue in the search for sustainable disease-control strategies that are pathogen specific and may have limited nontarget effects. PMID:27049684

  9. Horizontal Gene Acquisitions, Mobile Element Proliferation, and Genome Decay in the Host-Restricted Plant Pathogen Erwinia Tracheiphila.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Lori R; Scully, Erin D; Straub, Timothy J; Park, Jihye; Stephenson, Andrew G; Beattie, Gwyn A; Gleason, Mark L; Kolter, Roberto; Coelho, Miguel C; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Mescher, Mark C; Zhaxybayeva, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Modern industrial agriculture depends on high-density cultivation of genetically similar crop plants, creating favorable conditions for the emergence of novel pathogens with increased fitness in managed compared with ecologically intact settings. Here, we present the genome sequence of six strains of the cucurbit bacterial wilt pathogen Erwinia tracheiphila (Enterobacteriaceae) isolated from infected squash plants in New York, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and Michigan. These genomes exhibit a high proportion of recent horizontal gene acquisitions, invasion and remarkable amplification of mobile genetic elements, and pseudogenization of approximately 20% of the coding sequences. These genome attributes indicate that E. tracheiphila recently emerged as a host-restricted pathogen. Furthermore, chromosomal rearrangements associated with phage and transposable element proliferation contribute to substantial differences in gene content and genetic architecture between the six E. tracheiphila strains and other Erwinia species. Together, these data lead us to hypothesize that E. tracheiphila has undergone recent evolution through both genome decay (pseudogenization) and genome expansion (horizontal gene transfer and mobile element amplification). Despite evidence of dramatic genomic changes, the six strains are genetically monomorphic, suggesting a recent population bottleneck and emergence into E. tracheiphila's current ecological niche. PMID:26992913

  10. Horizontal Gene Acquisitions, Mobile Element Proliferation, and Genome Decay in the Host-Restricted Plant Pathogen Erwinia Tracheiphila

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lori R.; Scully, Erin D.; Straub, Timothy J.; Park, Jihye; Stephenson, Andrew G.; Beattie, Gwyn A.; Gleason, Mark L.; Kolter, Roberto; Coelho, Miguel C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.; Mescher, Mark C.; Zhaxybayeva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Modern industrial agriculture depends on high-density cultivation of genetically similar crop plants, creating favorable conditions for the emergence of novel pathogens with increased fitness in managed compared with ecologically intact settings. Here, we present the genome sequence of six strains of the cucurbit bacterial wilt pathogen Erwinia tracheiphila (Enterobacteriaceae) isolated from infected squash plants in New York, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and Michigan. These genomes exhibit a high proportion of recent horizontal gene acquisitions, invasion and remarkable amplification of mobile genetic elements, and pseudogenization of approximately 20% of the coding sequences. These genome attributes indicate that E. tracheiphila recently emerged as a host-restricted pathogen. Furthermore, chromosomal rearrangements associated with phage and transposable element proliferation contribute to substantial differences in gene content and genetic architecture between the six E. tracheiphila strains and other Erwinia species. Together, these data lead us to hypothesize that E. tracheiphila has undergone recent evolution through both genome decay (pseudogenization) and genome expansion (horizontal gene transfer and mobile element amplification). Despite evidence of dramatic genomic changes, the six strains are genetically monomorphic, suggesting a recent population bottleneck and emergence into E. tracheiphila’s current ecological niche. PMID:26992913

  11. The minimal gene set member msrA, encoding peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, is a virulence determinant of the plant pathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Hassouni, M E; Chambost, J P; Expert, D; Van Gijsegem, F; Barras, F

    1999-02-01

    Peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase (MsrA), which repairs oxidized proteins, is present in most living organisms, and the cognate structural gene belongs to the so-called minimum gene set [Mushegian, A. R. & Koonin, E. V., (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10268-10273]. In this work, we report that MsrA is required for full virulence of the plant pathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi. The following differences were observed between the wild-type and a MsrA- mutant: (i) the MsrA- mutant was more sensitive to oxidative stress; (ii) the MsrA- mutant was less motile on solid surface; (iii) the MsrA- mutant exhibited reduced virulence on chicory leaves; and (iv) no systemic invasion was observed when the MsrA- mutant was inoculated into whole Saintpaulia ionantha plants. These results suggest that plants respond to virulent pathogens by producing active oxygen species, and that enzymes repairing oxidative damage allow virulent pathogens to survive the host environment, thereby supporting the theory that active oxygen species play a key role in plant defense. PMID:9927663

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas brassicacearum LBUM300, a Disease-Suppressive Bacterium with Antagonistic Activity toward Fungal, Oomycete, and Bacterial Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Novinscak, Amy; Gadkar, Vijay J.; Joly, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas brassicacearum LBUM300, a plant rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium, produces 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and hydrogen cyanide and has shown antagonistic activity against the plant pathogens Verticillium dahliae, Phytophthora cactorum, and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. brassicacearum LBUM300. PMID:26823582

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of 16SrIII-J Phytoplasma, a Plant Pathogenic Bacterium with a Broad Spectrum of Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial plant pathogens that can affect different vegetal hosts. In South America, a phytoplasma belonging to ribosomal subgroup 16SrIII-J has been reported in many crops. Here we report its genomic draft sequence, showing a total length of 687,253 bp and a G+C content of 27.72%. PMID:27365349

  14. Characterisation of the stbD/E toxin-antitoxin system of pEP36, a plasmid of the plant pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae.

    PubMed

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Hailer, Barbara; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Rozhon, Wilfried

    2013-09-01

    pEP36 is a plasmid ubiquitously present in Erwinia pyrifoliae, a pathogen which causes black stem blight of Asian pear. pEP36 is highly stable in its host, even in the absence of selective pressure. The plasmid is closely related to pEA29, which is widespread in E. amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight of apple and pear trees. Here we report that pEP36 possesses a functional hybrid toxin-antitoxin module, stbD/E(pEP36), with the toxin showing homology to the RelE/ParE proteins and the antidote belonging to the Phd/YefM antitoxin family. Bacteria expressing the StbE(pEP36) toxin arrest cell growth and enter a viable but non-culturable stage. However, they maintain their typical cell length and do not show filamentation. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that StbE(pEP36) acts as a global inhibitor of protein synthesis while it does not interfere with DNA and RNA synthesis. The StbD(pEP36) antitoxin is capable of neutralising StbE(pEP36) toxicity. Additional experiments show that the stbD/E(pEP36) module can stabilise plasmids at least 20-fold. Thus the toxin-antitoxin system may contribute to the remarkable stability of pEP36. PMID:23632277

  15. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease. PMID:27336156

  16. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-01-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease. PMID:27336156

  17. Large-scale intersubspecific recombination in the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is associated with the host shift to mulberry.

    PubMed

    Nunney, Leonard; Schuenzel, Erin L; Scally, Mark; Bromley, Robin E; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Homologous recombination plays an important role in the structuring of genetic variation of many bacteria; however, its importance in adaptive evolution is not well established. We investigated the association of intersubspecific homologous recombination (IHR) with the shift to a novel host (mulberry) by the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. Mulberry leaf scorch was identified about 25 years ago in native red mulberry in the eastern United States and has spread to introduced white mulberry in California. Comparing a sequence of 8 genes (4,706 bp) from 21 mulberry-type isolates to published data (352 isolates representing all subspecies), we confirmed previous indications that the mulberry isolates define a group distinct from the 4 subspecies, and we propose naming the taxon X. fastidiosa subsp. morus. The ancestry of its gene sequences was mixed, with 4 derived from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (introduced from Central America), 3 from X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex (considered native to the United States), and 1 chimeric, demonstrating that this group originated by large-scale IHR. The very low within-type genetic variation (0.08% site polymorphism), plus the apparent inability of native X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex to infect mulberry, suggests that this host shift was achieved after strong selection acted on genetic variants created by IHR. Sequence data indicate that a single ancestral IHR event gave rise not only to X. fastidiosa subsp. morus but also to the X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex recombinant group which infects several hosts but is the only type naturally infecting blueberry, thus implicating this IHR in the invasion of at least two novel native hosts, mulberry and blueberry. PMID:24610840

  18. The vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum produces biofilms required for its virulence on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Inoue, Kanako; Ikeda, Kenichi; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Higashimoto, Chikaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of colonization of intercellular spaces by the soil-borne and vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum strain OE1-1 after invasion into host plants remains unclear. To analyse the behaviour of OE1-1 cells in intercellular spaces, tomato leaves with the lower epidermis layers excised after infiltration with OE1-1 were observed under a scanning electron microscope. OE1-1 cells formed microcolonies on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces, and then aggregated surrounded by an extracellular matrix, forming mature biofilm structures. Furthermore, OE1-1 cells produced mushroom-type biofilms when incubated in fluids of apoplasts including intercellular spaces, but not xylem fluids from tomato plants. This is the first report of biofilm formation by R. solanacearum on host plant cells after invasion into intercellular spaces and mushroom-type biofilms produced by R. solanacearum in vitro. Sugar application led to enhanced biofilm formation by OE1-1. Mutation of lecM encoding a lectin, RS-IIL, which reportedly exhibits affinity for these sugars, led to a significant decrease in biofilm formation. Colonization in intercellular spaces was significantly decreased in the lecM mutant, leading to a loss of virulence on tomato plants. Complementation of the lecM mutant with native lecM resulted in the recovery of mushroom-type biofilms and virulence on tomato plants. Together, our findings indicate that OE1-1 produces mature biofilms on the surfaces of tomato cells after invasion into intercellular spaces. RS-IIL may contribute to biofilm formation by OE1-1, which is required for OE1-1 virulence. PMID:26609568

  19. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, John; Genin, Stephane; Magori, Shimpei; Citovsky, Vitaly; Sriariyanum, Malinee; Ronald, Pamela; Dow, Max; Verdier, Valérie; Beer, Steven V; Machado, Marcos A; Toth, Ian; Salmond, George; Foster, Gary D

    2012-08-01

    Many plant bacteriologists, if not all, feel that their particular microbe should appear in any list of the most important bacterial plant pathogens. However, to our knowledge, no such list exists. The aim of this review was to survey all bacterial pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate the bacterial pathogens they would place in a 'Top 10' based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 458 votes from the international community, and allowed the construction of a Top 10 bacterial plant pathogen list. The list includes, in rank order: (1) Pseudomonas syringae pathovars; (2) Ralstonia solanacearum; (3) Agrobacterium tumefaciens; (4) Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae; (5) Xanthomonas campestris pathovars; (6) Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovars; (7) Erwinia amylovora; (8) Xylella fastidiosa; (9) Dickeya (dadantii and solani); (10) Pectobacterium carotovorum (and Pectobacterium atrosepticum). Bacteria garnering honourable mentions for just missing out on the Top 10 include Clavibacter michiganensis (michiganensis and sepedonicus), Pseudomonas savastanoi and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This review article presents a short section on each bacterium in the Top 10 list and its importance, with the intention of initiating discussion and debate amongst the plant bacteriology community, as well as laying down a benchmark. It will be interesting to see, in future years, how perceptions change and which bacterial pathogens enter and leave the Top 10. PMID:22672649

  20. Effect of clove oil on plant pathogenic bacteria and bacterial wilt of tomato and geranium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined the antibacterial activity of clove oil against seven different genera of plant pathogenic bacteria including Gram-negative Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia carotovora pv. carotovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii...

  1. Identification of Erwinia stewartii by a ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W J; Wiedmann, M; Dillard, H R; Batt, C A

    1994-01-01

    A PCR-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay was developed to distinguish the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia stewartii from other erwiniae. This new technique allows discrimination to the species level on the basis of a single-base-pair difference in the 16S rRNA gene which is unique to E. stewartii. Portions of the 16S rRNA genes of E. stewartii and the closely related Erwinia herbicola were sequenced. From comparison of the two 16S rRNA gene regions, two primer pairs were constructed such that only E. stewartii DNA gave a product in the LCR assay. The ligated product was separated from the radioactively labelled primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography. Twenty-four different Erwinia species and strains were tested by PCR-coupled LCR to verify the specificity of the assay, and only E. stewartii strains gave a positive reaction. In addition, infected and healthy plant material was also assayed. E. stewartii was detected in infected plant material, even when large populations of epiphytic bacteria were present. No enrichment was necessary for detection of the pathogen in corn leaves. This assay has potential as a diagnostic technique for the detection of E. stewartii in infected plant and vector material. Images PMID:7509585

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Sugar Cane Endophyte Pseudomonas aurantiaca PB-St2, a Disease-Suppressive Bacterium with Antifungal Activity toward the Plant Pathogen Colletotrichum falcatum

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    The endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas aurantiaca PB-St2 exhibits antifungal activity and represents a biocontrol agent to suppress red rot disease of sugar cane. Here, we report the completely sequenced 6.6-Mb genome of P. aurantiaca PB-St2. The sequence contains a repertoire of biosynthetic genes for secondary metabolites that putatively contribute to its antagonistic activity and its plant-microbe interactions. PMID:24459254

  3. Characterization and properties of intracellular proteins after cold acclimation of the ice-nucleating bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) IFO12686.

    PubMed

    Koda, N; Aoki, M; Kawahara, H; Yamade, K; Obata, H

    2000-11-01

    The ice-nucleating bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) IFO12686 (INA(+)) responds to a decrease in temperature by the induction of proteins. The pattern of protein bands from strain IFO12686 following a shift in temperature from 30 to 12 degrees C could be divided into four major groups: (1) increasing protein bands, (2) decreasing protein bands, (3) increasing--decreasing protein bands, and (4) almost constant protein bands. We identified a cryoprotective function in the increasing protein band found in strain IFO12686. The increasing protein bands that followed a reduction in temperature were considered to have an important role in cold acclimation or adaptation. We showed that these proteins possessed cryoprotective activity when tested against the freeze-labile enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. The strain IFO12686 had greater cryotolerance than Pa. agglomerans IAM1595 (INA(-)), and the degree of cryotolerance was increased by cold acclimation. PMID:11161552

  4. Cloning and heterologous overexpression of three gap genes encoding different glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases from the plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000.

    PubMed

    Elkhalfi, Bouchra; Araya-Garay, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Castro, Jorge; Rey-Méndez, Manuel; Soukri, Abdelaziz; Serrano Delgado, Aurelio

    2013-06-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is the causal agent of bacterial speck, a common disease of tomato. The mode of infection of this pathogen is not well understood, but according to molecular biological, genomic and proteomic data it produces a number of proteins that may promote infection and draw nutrients from the plant. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a major enzyme of carbon metabolism that was reported to be a surface antigen and virulence factor in other pathogenic microorganisms, but its possible role in the infection process of P. syringae has so far not been studied. Whole-genome sequence analyses revealed the occurrence in this phytopathogenic bacterium of three paralogous gap genes encoding distinct GAPDHs, namely two class I enzymes having different molecular mass subunits and one class III bifunctional D-erythrose-4-phosphate dehydrogenase/GAPDH enzyme. By using genome bioinformatics data, as well as alignments of both DNA and deduced protein sequences, the three gap genes of P. syringae were one-step cloned with a His-Tag in pET21a vector using a PCR-based strategy, and its expression optimized in Escherichia coli BL21 to achieve high yield of the heterologous proteins. In accordance with their distinct molecular phylogenies, these bacterial gap genes encode functional GAPDHs of diverse molecular masses and nicotinamide-coenzyme specificities, suggesting specific metabolic and/or cellular roles. PMID:23507306

  5. Autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Fei; Snyder, John Hugh; Shi, Huan-Bin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that degrades cytoplasmic constituents in vacuoles. Plant pathogenic fungi develop special infection structures and/or secrete a range of enzymes to invade their plant hosts. It has been demonstrated that monitoring autophagy processes can be extremely useful in visualizing the sequence of events leading to pathogenicity of plant pathogenic fungi. In this review, we introduce the molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy. In addition, we explore the relationship between autophagy and pathogenicity in plant pathogenic fungi. Finally, we discuss the various experimental strategies available for use in the study of autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:27072489

  6. PecS Is a Global Regulator of the Symptomatic Phase in the Phytopathogenic Bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hommais, Florence; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Van Gijsegem, Frédérique; Castang, Sandra; Ligori, Sandrine; Expert, Dominique; Nasser, William; Reverchon, Sylvie

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenicity of the enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi (Dickeya dadantii), the causative agent of soft-rot disease in many plants, is a complex process involving several factors whose production is subject to temporal regulation during infection. PecS is a transcriptional regulator that controls production of various virulence factors. Here, we used microarray analysis to define the PecS regulon and demonstrated that PecS notably regulates a wide range of genes that could be linked to pathogenicity and to a group of genes concerned with evading host defenses. Among the targets are the genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and secretion systems and the genes involved in flagellar biosynthesis, biosurfactant production, and the oxidative stress response, as well as genes encoding toxin-like factors such as NipE and hemolysin-coregulated proteins. In vitro experiments demonstrated that PecS interacts with the regulatory regions of five new targets: an oxidative stress response gene (ahpC), a biosurfactant synthesis gene (rhlA), and genes encoding exported proteins related to other plant-associated bacterial proteins (nipE, virK, and avrL). The pecS mutant provokes symptoms more rapidly and with more efficiency than the wild-type strain, indicating that PecS plays a critical role in the switch from the asymptomatic phase to the symptomatic phase. Based on this, we propose that the temporal regulation of the different groups of genes required for the asymptomatic phase and the symptomatic phase is, in part, the result of a gradual modulation of PecS activity triggered during infection in response to changes in environmental conditions emerging from the interaction between both partners. PMID:18790868

  7. [Population genetics of plant pathogens].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen; Zhan, Jia-Sui

    2012-02-01

    Comparing to natural ecosystems, the evolution of plant pathogens in agricultural ecosystems is generally faster due to high-density monocultures, large-scale application of agrochemicals, and international trade in agricultural products. Knowledge of the population genetics and evolutionary biology of plant pathogens is necessary to understand disease epidemiology, effectively breed and use resistant cultivars, and control plant diseases. In this article, we outlined the aims of population genetic studies in plant pathogens, discuss contributions of five evolutionary forces (i.e., mutation, gene flow, recombination, random genetic drift, and natural selection) to origin, maintenance, and distribution of genetic variation in time and space, and gave an overview of current research status in this field. PMID:22382057

  8. Multiplex Detection of Plant Pathogens Using a Microsphere Immunoassay Technology

    PubMed Central

    Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Kumpoosiri, Mallika; Warin, Nuchnard; Oplatowska, Michalina; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Grant, Irene R.; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Elliott, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens are a serious problem for seed export, plant disease control and plant quarantine. Rapid and accurate screening tests are urgently required to protect and prevent plant diseases spreading worldwide. A novel multiplex detection method was developed based on microsphere immunoassays to simultaneously detect four important plant pathogens: a fruit blotch bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), chilli vein-banding mottle virus (CVbMV, potyvirus), watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, tospovirus serogroup IV) and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV, tospovirus). An antibody for each plant pathogen was linked on a fluorescence-coded magnetic microsphere set which was used to capture corresponding pathogen. The presence of pathogens was detected by R-phycoerythrin (RPE)-labeled antibodies specific to the pathogens. The assay conditions were optimized by identifying appropriate antibody pairs, blocking buffer, concentration of RPE-labeled antibodies and assay time. Once conditions were optimized, the assay was able to detect all four plant pathogens precisely and accurately with substantially higher sensitivity than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) when spiked in buffer and in healthy watermelon leaf extract. The assay time of the microsphere immunoassay (1 hour) was much shorter than that of ELISA (4 hours). This system was also shown to be capable of detecting the pathogens in naturally infected plant samples and is a major advancement in plant pathogen detection. PMID:23638044

  9. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection. PMID:20589070

  10. Activity of Flavanones Isolated from Rhododendron hainanense against Plant Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Zhao, Jie; Gao, Kun

    2016-05-01

    In a search for naturally occurring antimicrobial compounds in medicinal plants and herbs, seven flavanones were isolated from the aerial parts of Rhododendron hainanense and were tested for their antimicrobial activities against six bacteria and six plant pathogenic fungi. Within the series of flavanones tested, farrerol (1) displayed moderate antibacterial activities against Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Erwinia carotovora, with MICs ranging from 15.6 to 125 μg/mL. Furthermore, farrerol (1) exhibited excellent inhibitory activities against six plant pathogenic fungi: Fusarium oxysporum f sp. niveum, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Penicillium italicum, Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum f sp. cubenserace and Phytophthora melonis, with EC50 values of 9, 18, 35, 39, 46 and 66 μg/mL, respectively. This is the first report on farrerol with anti-plant pathogenic fungal activities. PMID:27319130

  11. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission.

    PubMed

    Ordax, Mónica; Piquer-Salcedo, Jaime E; Santander, Ricardo D; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Biosca, Elena G; López, María M; Marco-Noales, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i) E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii) medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle. PMID:25978369

  12. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ordax, Mónica; Piquer-Salcedo, Jaime E.; Santander, Ricardo D.; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Biosca, Elena G.; López, María M.; Marco-Noales, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i) E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii) medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle. PMID:25978369

  13. Pathogenicity and infection strategies of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in Rosaceae: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, K; Holtappels, M; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Valcke, R

    2013-05-01

    Plants are host to a large amount of pathogenic bacteria. Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is an important disease in Rosaceae. Pathogenicity of E. amylovora is greatly influenced by the production of exopolysaccharides, such as amylovoran, and the use of the type III secretion system, which enables bacteria to penetrate host tissue and cause disease. When infection takes place, plants have to rely on the ability of each cell to recognize the pathogen and the signals emanating from the infection site in order to generate several defence mechanisms. These mechanisms consist of physical barriers and the production of antimicrobial components, both in a preformed and an inducible manner. Inducible defence responses are activated upon the recognition of elicitor molecules by plant cell receptors, either derived from invading micro-organisms or from pathogen-induced degradation of plant tissue. This recognition event triggers a signal transduction cascade, leading to a range of defence responses [reactive oxygen species (ROS), plant hormones, secondary metabolites, …] and redeployment of cellular energy in a fast, efficient and multiresponsive manner, which prevents further pathogen ingress. This review highlights the research that has been performed during recent years regarding this specific plant-pathogen interaction between Erwinia amylovora and Rosaceae, with a special emphasis on the pathogenicity and the infection strategy of E. amylovora and the possible defence mechanisms of the plant against this disease. PMID:23493063

  14. Erwinia amylovora Novel Plasmid pEI70: Complete Sequence, Biogeography, and Role in Aggressiveness in the Fire Blight Phytopathogen

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Pablo; Cabrefiga, Jordi; Smits, Theo H. M.; Dreo, Tanja; Barbé, Silvia; Pulawska, Joanna; Bultreys, Alain; Blom, Jochen; Duffy, Brion; Montesinos, Emilio; López, María M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomics of several strains of Erwinia amylovora, a plant pathogenic bacterium causal agent of fire blight disease, revealed that its diversity is primarily attributable to the flexible genome comprised of plasmids. We recently identified and sequenced in full a novel 65.8 kb plasmid, called pEI70. Annotation revealed a lack of known virulence-related genes, but found evidence for a unique integrative conjugative element related to that of other plant and human pathogens. Comparative analyses using BLASTN showed that pEI70 is almost entirely included in plasmid pEB102 from E. billingiae, an epiphytic Erwinia of pome fruits, with sequence identities superior to 98%. A duplex PCR assay was developed to survey the prevalence of plasmid pEI70 and also that of pEA29, which had previously been described in several E. amylovora strains. Plasmid pEI70 was found widely dispersed across Europe with frequencies of 5–92%, but it was absent in E. amylovora analyzed populations from outside of Europe. Restriction analysis and hybridization demonstrated that this plasmid was identical in at least 13 strains. Curing E. amylovora strains of pEI70 reduced their aggressiveness on pear, and introducing pEI70 into low-aggressiveness strains lacking this plasmid increased symptoms development in this host. Discovery of this novel plasmid offers new insights into the biogeography, evolution and virulence determinants in E. amylovora. PMID:22174857

  15. Control of plant defense mechanisms and fire blight pathogenesis through the regulation of 6-thioguanine biosynthesis in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sébastien; Litomska, Agnieszka; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of Rosaceae plants, such as apple and pear trees. It is characterized by necrosis of plant tissue, caused by the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. The plant pathogen produces the well-known antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG), which plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis. Here we report that YcfR, a member of the LTTR family, is a major regulator of 6TG biosynthesis in E. amylovora. Inactivation of the regulator gene (ycfR) led to dramatically decreased 6TG production. Infection assays with apple plants (Malus domestica cultivar Holsteiner Cox) and cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia (mountain ash, rowan) revealed abortive fire blight pathogenesis and reduced plant response (biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexin production). In the presence of the ΔycfR mutant, apple trees were capable of activating the abscission machinery to remove infected tissue. In addition to unveiling the regulation of 6TG biosynthesis in a major plant pathogen, we demonstrate for the first time that this antimetabolite plays a pivotal role in dysregulating the plant response to infection. PMID:24449489

  16. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in the Genus Erwinia: Physiology and Regulation of Efflux Pump Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Thekkiniath, J; Ravirala, R; San Francisco, M

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens belonging to the genus Erwinia cause diseases in several economically important plants. Plants respond to bacterial infection with a powerful chemical arsenal and signaling molecules to rid themselves of the microbes. Although our understanding of how Erwinia initiate infections in plants has become clear, a comprehensive understanding of how these bacteria rid themselves of noxious antimicrobial agents during the infection is important. Multidrug efflux pumps are key factors in bacterial resistance toward antibiotics by reducing the level of antimicrobial compounds in the bacterial cell. Erwinia induce the expression of efflux pump genes in response to plant-derived antimicrobials. The capability of Erwinia to co-opt plant defense signaling molecules such as salicylic acid to trigger multidrug efflux pumps might have developed to ensure bacterial survival in susceptible host plants. In this review, we discuss the developments in Erwinia efflux pumps, focusing in particular on efflux pump function and the regulation of efflux pump gene expression. PMID:27571694

  17. Transmission of bacterial plant pathogens by Hemipteran vectors: The intersection of genomics and classical vector biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects that are classified in the Order Hemiptera have become one of the most important plant-associated insect taxa, mainly because of their ability to transmit plant pathogens. The glassy-winged sharpshooter is the primary vector of the plant-infecting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, the causal age...

  18. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) in bacteria has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovo...

  19. Rapid Genome Response of Malus to Infection by Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease of apple, pear, and other plants in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rosaceae. The goal of this study was to use a global analysis of gene expression to characterize the temporal response of apple to infection by E. amyl...

  20. Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi

    MedlinePlus

    ... or pegaspargase [Oncaspar]). Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi is an enzyme that interferes with natural substances necessary for cancer cell growth. It works by killing or stopping the growth of cancer ...

  1. Phytophthora parasitica: a model oomycete plant pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yuling; Zhang, Qiang; Ding, Wei; Shan, Weixing

    2014-01-01

    Oomycetes are eukaryotic microorganisms morphologically similar to but phylogenetically distant from true fungi. Most species in the genus Phytophthora of oomycetes are devastating plant pathogens, causing damages to both agricultural production and natural ecosystems. Tremendous progress has been achieved in recent years in diversity, evolution and lifestyles of oomycete plant pathogens, as well as on the understanding of genetic and molecular basis of oomycete-plant interactions. Phytophthora parasitica is a soilborne pathogen with a wide range of host plants and represents most species in the genus Phytophthora. In this review, we present some recent progress of P. parasitica research by highlighting important features that make it emerge as a model species of oomycete pathogens. The emerged model pathogen will facilitate improved understanding of oomycete biology and pathology that are crucial to the development of novel disease-control strategies and improved disease-control measures. PMID:24999436

  2. Plant Pathogen Forensics: Capabilities, Needs, and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, J.; Bender, C.; Budowle, B.; Cobb, W. T.; Gold, S. E.; Ishimaru, C. A.; Luster, D.; Melcher, U.; Murch, R.; Scherm, H.; Seem, R. C.; Sherwood, J. L.; Sobral, B. W.; Tolin, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    A biological attack on U.S. crops, rangelands, or forests could reduce yield and quality, erode consumer confidence, affect economic health and the environment, and possibly impact human nutrition and international relations. Preparedness for a crop bioterror event requires a strong national security plan that includes steps for microbial forensics and criminal attribution. However, U.S. crop producers, consultants, and agricultural scientists have traditionally focused primarily on strategies for prevention and management of diseases introduced naturally or unintentionally rather than on responding appropriately to an intentional pathogen introduction. We assess currently available information, technologies, and resources that were developed originally to ensure plant health but also could be utilized for postintroduction plant pathogen forensics. Recommendations for prioritization of efforts and resource expenditures needed to enhance our plant pathogen forensics capabilities are presented. PMID:16760310

  3. Plant pathogen forensics: capabilities, needs, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J; Bender, C; Budowle, B; Cobb, W T; Gold, S E; Ishimaru, C A; Luster, D; Melcher, U; Murch, R; Scherm, H; Seem, R C; Sherwood, J L; Sobral, B W; Tolin, S A

    2006-06-01

    A biological attack on U.S. crops, rangelands, or forests could reduce yield and quality, erode consumer confidence, affect economic health and the environment, and possibly impact human nutrition and international relations. Preparedness for a crop bioterror event requires a strong national security plan that includes steps for microbial forensics and criminal attribution. However, U.S. crop producers, consultants, and agricultural scientists have traditionally focused primarily on strategies for prevention and management of diseases introduced naturally or unintentionally rather than on responding appropriately to an intentional pathogen introduction. We assess currently available information, technologies, and resources that were developed originally to ensure plant health but also could be utilized for postintroduction plant pathogen forensics. Recommendations for prioritization of efforts and resource expenditures needed to enhance our plant pathogen forensics capabilities are presented. PMID:16760310

  4. [RAPD analysis of plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan-Ni; Chen, Yong-Fang; Li, Shi-Mo; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2005-12-01

    RAPD analysis was used for the taxonomy of plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria, especially for the classification of two new pathogens (Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. basellae pv. nov. and Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. beticola pv. nov.). 20 random primers were screened from 50 ones to detect polymorphism among the total strains used. 80.4% were polymorphic bands among the 225 ones produced. The results of pairwise similarity and UPGMA cluster analysis suggest that the two new pathovars of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris var. saccharifera) and malabar spinach (Basella rubra) are genetically close related with Curtobacterium flacumfaciens, and the minimal similarity coefficient is 0.6511. According to the RAPD analysis and previous research, some newly made taxonomic changes of the plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria are discussed. PMID:16496687

  5. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  6. Plant pathogen nanodiagnostic techniques: forthcoming changes?

    PubMed Central

    Khiyami, Mohammad A.; Almoammar, Hassan; Awad, Yasser M.; Alghuthaymi, Mousa A.; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.

    2014-01-01

    Plant diseases are among the major factors limiting crop productivity. A first step towards managing a plant disease under greenhouse and field conditions is to correctly identify the pathogen. Current technologies, such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR), require a relatively large amount of target tissue and rely on multiple assays to accurately identify distinct plant pathogens. The common disadvantage of the traditional diagnostic methods is that they are time consuming and lack high sensitivity. Consequently, developing low-cost methods to improve the accuracy and rapidity of plant pathogens diagnosis is needed. Nanotechnology, nano particles and quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as essential tools for fast detection of a particular biological marker with extreme accuracy. Biosensor, QDs, nanostructured platforms, nanoimaging and nanopore DNA sequencing tools have the potential to raise sensitivity, specificity and speed of the pathogen detection, facilitate high-throughput analysis, and to be used for high-quality monitoring and crop protection. Furthermore, nanodiagnostic kit equipment can easily and quickly detect potential serious plant pathogens, allowing experts to help farmers in the prevention of epidemic diseases. The current review deals with the application of nanotechnology for quicker, more cost-effective and precise diagnostic procedures of plant diseases. Such an accurate technology may help to design a proper integrated disease management system which may modify crop environments to adversely affect crop pathogens. PMID:26740775

  7. The Antibacterial Activity of Chitosan Products Blended with Monoterpenes and Their Biofilms against Plant Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed E I; Rabea, Entsar I; Taktak, Nehad E M; El-Nouby, Mahmoud A M

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the biological activities of eleven chitosan products with a viscosity-average molecular weight ranging from 22 to 846 kDa in combination with the most active monoterpenes (geraniol and thymol), out of 10 tested, against four plant pathogenic bacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia carotovora, Corynebacterium fascians, and Pseudomonas solanacearum. The antibacterial activity was evaluated in vitro by the agar dilution technique as a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) that was found to be dependent on the type of the microorganism tested. The most active product of chitosan was used for biofilm production enriched with geraniol and thymol (0.1 and 0.5%) and the films were also evaluated against the tested bacteria. The biological bioactivities summarized here may provide novel insights into the functions of chitosan and some monoterpenes and potentially allow their use for food protection from microbial attack. PMID:27127676

  8. The Antibacterial Activity of Chitosan Products Blended with Monoterpenes and Their Biofilms against Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Mohamed E. I.; Rabea, Entsar I.; Taktak, Nehad E. M.; El-Nouby, Mahmoud A. M.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the biological activities of eleven chitosan products with a viscosity-average molecular weight ranging from 22 to 846 kDa in combination with the most active monoterpenes (geraniol and thymol), out of 10 tested, against four plant pathogenic bacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia carotovora, Corynebacterium fascians, and Pseudomonas solanacearum. The antibacterial activity was evaluated in vitro by the agar dilution technique as a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) that was found to be dependent on the type of the microorganism tested. The most active product of chitosan was used for biofilm production enriched with geraniol and thymol (0.1 and 0.5%) and the films were also evaluated against the tested bacteria. The biological bioactivities summarized here may provide novel insights into the functions of chitosan and some monoterpenes and potentially allow their use for food protection from microbial attack. PMID:27127676

  9. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  10. Phytotoxins produced by plant pathogenic Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Bignell, D R D; Fyans, J K; Cheng, Z

    2014-02-01

    Streptomyces is a large genus consisting of soil-dwelling, filamentous bacteria that are best known for their capability of producing a vast array of medically and agriculturally useful secondary metabolites. In addition, a small number of Streptomyces spp. are capable of colonizing and infecting the underground portions of living plants and causing economically important crop diseases such as potato common scab (CS). Research into the mechanisms of Streptomyces plant pathogenicity has led to the identification and characterization of several phytotoxic secondary metabolites that are known or suspected of contributing to diseases in various plants. The best characterized are the thaxtomin phytotoxins, which play a critical role in the development of CS, acid scab and soil rot of sweet potato. In addition, the best-characterized CS-causing pathogen, Streptomyces scabies, produces a molecule that is predicted to resemble the Pseudomonas syringae coronatine phytotoxin and which contributes to seedling disease symptom development. Other Streptomyces phytotoxic secondary metabolites that have been identified include concanamycins, FD-891 and borrelidin. Furthermore, there is evidence that additional, unknown metabolites may participate in Streptomyces plant pathogenicity. Such revelations have implications for the rational development of better management procedures for controlling CS and other Streptomyces plant diseases. PMID:24131731

  11. Disrupting the Transmission of a Vector-Borne Plant Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Arash; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Approaches to control vector-borne diseases rarely focus on the interface between vector and microbial pathogen, but strategies aimed at disrupting the interactions required for transmission may lead to reductions in disease spread. We tested if the vector transmission of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was affected by three groups of molecules: lectins, carbohydrates, and antibodies. Although not comprehensively characterized, it is known that X. fastidiosa adhesins bind to carbohydrates, and that these interactions are important for initial cell attachment to vectors, which is required for bacterial transmission from host to host. Lectins with affinity to substrates expected to occur on the cuticular surface of vectors colonized by X. fastidiosa, such as wheat germ agglutinin, resulted in statistically significant reductions in transmission rate, as did carbohydrates with N-acetylglucosamine residues. Presumably, lectins bound to receptors on the vector required for cell adhesion/colonization, while carbohydrate-saturated adhesins on X. fastidiosa's cell surface. Furthermore, antibodies against X. fastidiosa whole cells, gum, and afimbrial adhesins also resulted in transmission blockage. However, no treatment resulted in the complete abolishment of transmission, suggesting that this is a complex biological process. This work illustrates the potential to block the transmission of vector-borne pathogens without directly affecting either organism. PMID:22101059

  12. Disrupting the transmission of a vector-borne plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Rashed, Arash; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2012-02-01

    Approaches to control vector-borne diseases rarely focus on the interface between vector and microbial pathogen, but strategies aimed at disrupting the interactions required for transmission may lead to reductions in disease spread. We tested if the vector transmission of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was affected by three groups of molecules: lectins, carbohydrates, and antibodies. Although not comprehensively characterized, it is known that X. fastidiosa adhesins bind to carbohydrates, and that these interactions are important for initial cell attachment to vectors, which is required for bacterial transmission from host to host. Lectins with affinity to substrates expected to occur on the cuticular surface of vectors colonized by X. fastidiosa, such as wheat germ agglutinin, resulted in statistically significant reductions in transmission rate, as did carbohydrates with N-acetylglucosamine residues. Presumably, lectins bound to receptors on the vector required for cell adhesion/colonization, while carbohydrate-saturated adhesins on X. fastidiosa's cell surface. Furthermore, antibodies against X. fastidiosa whole cells, gum, and afimbrial adhesins also resulted in transmission blockage. However, no treatment resulted in the complete abolishment of transmission, suggesting that this is a complex biological process. This work illustrates the potential to block the transmission of vector-borne pathogens without directly affecting either organism. PMID:22101059

  13. Quorum sensing in plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Von Bodman, Susanne B; Bauer, W Dietz; Coplin, David L

    2003-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) allows bacteria to assess their local population density and/or physical confinement via the secretion and detection of small, diffusible signal molecules. This review describes how phytopathogenic bacteria have incorporated QS mechanisms into complex regulatory cascades that control genes for pathogenicity and colonization of host surfaces. Traits regulated by QS include the production of extracellular polysaccharides, degradative enzymes, antibiotics, siderophores, and pigments, as well as Hrp protein secretion, Ti plasmid transfer, motility, biofilm formation, and epiphytic fitness. Since QS regulatory systems are often required for pathogenesis, interference with QS signaling may offer a means of controlling bacterial diseases of plants. Several bacterial pathogens of plants that have been intensively studied and have revealed information of both fundamental and practical importance are reviewed here: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pantoea stewartii, Erwinia carotovora, Ralstonia solanacearum, Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Xanthomonas campestris. PMID:12730390

  14. RNA-Seq for Plant Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A; Di, Yanming; Cumbie, Jason S; Chang, Jeff H

    2011-01-01

    The throughput and single-base resolution of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have contributed to a dramatic change in transcriptomic-based inquiries and resulted in many new insights into the complexities of bacterial transcriptomes. RNA-Seq could contribute to similar advances in our understanding of plant pathogenic bacteria but it is still a technology under development with limitations and unknowns that need to be considered. Here, we review some new developments for RNA-Seq and highlight recent findings for host-associated bacteria. We also discuss the technical and statistical challenges in the practical application of RNA-Seq for studying bacterial transcriptomes and describe some of the currently available solutions. PMID:24710287

  15. RNA-Seq for Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A.; Di, Yanming; Cumbie, Jason S.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    The throughput and single-base resolution of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have contributed to a dramatic change in transcriptomic-based inquiries and resulted in many new insights into the complexities of bacterial transcriptomes. RNA-Seq could contribute to similar advances in our understanding of plant pathogenic bacteria but it is still a technology under development with limitations and unknowns that need to be considered. Here, we review some new developments for RNA-Seq and highlight recent findings for host-associated bacteria. We also discuss the technical and statistical challenges in the practical application of RNA-Seq for studying bacterial transcriptomes and describe some of the currently available solutions. PMID:24710287

  16. Plant pathogenic RNAs and RNA catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Symons, R H

    1997-01-01

    The rolling circle replication of small circular plant pathogenic RNAs requires a processing step to convert multimeric intermediates to monomers which are then circularized. Eleven such RNAs are known so far, two are viroids, one is viroid-like and the remainder are satellite RNAs dependent on a helper virus for replication. The processing step is RNA-catalysed in all cases, at least in vitro. All plus forms of these RNAs self-cleave via the hammerhead structure whereas only eight of the minus RNAs self-cleave, five via the hammerhead structure and three via the hairpin structure. There are about 20 other viroids where the processing mechanism has yet to be determined but they are likely candidates for a new type of self-cleavage reaction which is predicted to be conserved in all these viroids. Hepatitis delta RNA is the only circular pathogenic RNA known to self-cleave in the animal kingdom. It is feasible that more single-stranded circular pathogenic RNAs are waiting to be discovered and these could be prospective for new types of self-cleavage reactions. PMID:9207012

  17. Identification of an RcsA/RcsB recognition motif in the promoters of exopolysaccharide biosynthetic operons from Erwinia amylovora and Pantoea stewartii subspecies stewartii.

    PubMed

    Wehland, M; Kiecker, C; Coplin, D L; Kelm, O; Saenger, W; Bernhard, F

    1999-02-01

    The regulation of capsule synthesis (Rcs) regulatory network is responsible for the induction of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in many enterobacterial species. We have previously shown that two transcriptional regulators, RcsA and RcsB, do bind as a heterodimer to the promoter of amsG, the first reading frame in the operon for amylovoran biosynthesis in the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. We now identified a 23-base pair fragment from position -555 to -533 upstream of the translational start site of amsG as sufficient for the specific binding of the Rcs proteins. In addition, we could detect an RcsA/RcsB-binding site in a corresponding region of the promoter of cpsA, the homologous counterpart to the E. amylovora amsG gene in the operon for stewartan biosynthesis of Pantoea stewartii. The specificity and characteristic parameters of the protein-DNA interaction were analyzed by DNA retardation, protein-DNA cross-linking, and directed mutagenesis. The central core motif TRVGAAWAWTSYG of the amsG promoter was found to be most important for the specific interaction with RcsA/RcsB, as evaluated by mutational analysis and an in vitro selection approach. The wild type P. stewartii Rcs binding motif is degenerated in two positions and an up-mutation according to our consensus motif resulted in about a 5-fold increased affinity of the RcsA/RcsB proteins. PMID:9920870

  18. Relatedness of Chromosomal and Plasmid DNAs of Erwinia pyrifoliae and Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    McGhee, Gayle C.; Schnabel, Elise L.; Maxson-Stein, Kimberly; Jones, Beatrix; Stromberg, Verlyn K.; Lacy, George H.; Jones, Alan L.

    2002-01-01

    The plant pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae has been classified as a separate species from Erwinia amylovora based in part on differences in molecular properties. In this study, these and other molecular properties were examined for E. pyrifoliae and for additional strains of E. amylovora, including strains from brambles (Rubus spp.). The nucleotide composition of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was determined for six of the seven 16S-23S rRNA operons detected in these species with a 16S rRNA gene probe. Each species contained four operons with a tRNAGlu gene and two with tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes, and analysis of the operons from five strains of E. amylovora indicated a high degree of ITS variability among them. One tRNAGlu-containing operon from E. pyrifoliae Ep1/96 was identical to one in E. amylovora Ea110, but three tRNAGlu operons and two tRNAIle and tRNAAla operons from E. pyrifoliae contained unique nucleotide changes. When groEL sequences were used for species-specific identification, E. pyrifoliae and E. amylovora were the closest phylogenetic relatives among a set of 12 bacterial species. The placement of E. pyrifoliae distinct from E. amylovora corroborated molecular hybridization data indicating low DNA-DNA similarity between them. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of plasmid pEP36 from E. pyrifoliae Ep1/96 revealed a number of presumptive genes that matched genes previously found in pEA29 from E. amylovora and similar organization for the genes and origins of replication. Also, pEP36 and pEA29 were incompatible with clones containing the reciprocal origin regions. Finally, the ColE1-like plasmid pEP2.6 from strain Ep1/96 contained sequences found in small plasmids in E. amylovora strains IL-5 and IH3-1. PMID:12450843

  19. Genomic Basis of Plant Pathogen Suppression by Biocontrol Pseudomonas Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various plant commensal bacterial species, which naturally colonize the plant rhizosphere, are able to suppress fungal, bacterial, viral and even insect plant pathogens. These biocontrol activities are elicited primarily through the production of secreted exoenzymes and secondary metabolites that ma...

  20. Examining phylogenetic relationships of Erwinia and Pantoea species using whole genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yucheng; Qiu, Sai

    2015-11-01

    The genera Erwinia and Pantoea contain species that are devastating plant pathogens, non-pathogen epiphytes, and opportunistic human pathogens. However, some controversies persist in the taxonomic classification of these two closely related genera. The phylogenomic analysis of these two genera was investigated via a comprehensive analysis of 25 Erwinia genomes and 23 Pantoea genomes. Single-copy orthologs could be extracted from the Erwinia/Pantoea core-genome to reconstruct the Erwinia/Pantoea phylogeny. This tree has strong bootstrap support for almost all branches. We also estimated the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (isDDH) and the average nucleotide identity (ANI) values between each genome; strains from the same species showed ANI values ≥96% and isDDH values >70%. These data confirm that whole genome sequence data provides a powerful tool to resolve the complex taxonomic questions of Erwinia/Pantoea, e.g. Pantoea agglomerans 299R was not clustered into a single group with other P. agglomerans strains, and the ANI values and isDDH values between them were <91% and around 43.8%, respectively. These data indicate P. agglomerans 299R should not be classified into the P. agglomerans species. In addition, another strain (Pantoea sp. At_9b) was identified that may represent a novel Pantoea species. We also evaluated the performance of six commonly used housekeeping genes (atpD, carA, gyrB, infB, recA, and rpoB) in phylogenetic inference. A single gene was not enough to obtain a reliable species tree, and it was necessary to use the multilocus sequence analysis of the six marker genes to recover the Erwinia/Pantoea phylogeny. PMID:26296376

  1. A Single-Step Purification of Cauliflower Lysozyme and Its Dual Role Against Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Muthu; Balasubramaniam, R; Chun, Se-Chul

    2015-09-01

    A novel lysozyme from cauliflower was purified in a single step, for the first time, using Sephadex G100 column chromatography. The purified lysozyme exhibited a homogenized single band in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and its molecular mass was calculated to be 22.0 kDa. The purified lysozyme showed activity between 30 to 60 °C with 40 °C as the optimum temperature for its maximal activity. Although the purified lysozyme was functional at pH ranges between 3.0 and 9.0, the optimum pH for the enzyme activity was 8.0. By Michaelis-Menten equation, the threshold substrate concentration for the optimal enzyme activity was calculated to be 133.0 μg. The purified lysozyme showed extraordinary activity against plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi. At 10-μg concentrations, it inhibited the growth of plant pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae, Xanthomonas campestris, and Erwinia carotovora exhibiting 4.28, 5.90, and 3.88-fold inhibition, respectively. Further, it also completely inhibited the conidial germination of Archemonium obclavatum and, to a very large extent, other fungal species such as Fusarium solani (79.3 %), Leptosphaeria maculans (88.6 %), Botrytis cinera (73.3 %), Curvularia lunata (68 %), Rhizoctonia solani (79.6 %), and Alternaria alternata (83.6 %). PMID:26208688

  2. Fe2+ chelator proferrorosamine A: a gene cluster of Erwinia rhapontici P45 involved in its synthesis and its impact on growth of Erwinia amylovora CFBP1430.

    PubMed

    Born, Yannick; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Bieri, Marco; Kamber, Tim; Piel, Jörn; Pelludat, Cosima

    2016-02-01

    Proferrorosamine A (proFRA) is an iron (Fe2+) chelator produced by the opportunistic plant pathogen Erwinia rhapontici P45. To identify genes involved in proFRA synthesis, transposon mutagenesis was performed. The identified 9.3 kb gene cluster, comprising seven genes, designated rosA-rosG, encodes proteins that are involved in proFRA synthesis. Based on gene homologies, a biosynthetic pathway model for proFRA is proposed. To obtain a better understanding of the effect of proFRA on non-proFRA producing bacteria, E. rhapontici P45 was co-cultured with Erwinia amylovora CFBP1430, a fire-blight-causing plant pathogen. E. rhapontici P45, but not corresponding proFRA-negative mutants, led to a pink coloration of E. amylovora CFBP1430 colonies on King's B agar, indicating accumulation of the proFRA-iron complex ferrorosamine, and growth inhibition in vitro. By saturating proFRA-containing extracts with Fe2+, the inhibitory effect was neutralized, suggesting that the iron-chelating capability of proFRA is responsible for the growth inhibition of E. amylovora CFBP1430. PMID:26732708

  3. Phylogenetic position and virulence apparatus of the pear flower necrosis pathogen Erwinia piriflorinigrans CFBP 5888T as assessed by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; López, María M; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Frey, Jürg E; Duffy, Brion

    2013-10-01

    Erwinia piriflorinigrans is a necrotrophic pathogen of pear reported from Spain that destroys flowers but does not progress further into the host. We sequenced the complete genome of the type strain CFBP 5888(T) clarifying its phylogenetic position within the genus Erwinia, and indicating a position between its closest relative, the epiphyte Erwinia tasmaniensis and other plant pathogenic Erwinia spp. (i.e., the fire blight pathogen E. amylovora and the Asian pear pathogen E. pyrifoliae). Common features are the type III and type VI secretion systems, amylovoran biosynthesis and desferrioxamine production. The E. piriflorinigrans genome also provided the first evidence for production of the siderophore chrysobactin within the genus Erwinia sensu stricto, which up to now was mostly associated with phytopathogenic, soft-rot Dickeya and Pectobacterium species. Plasmid pEPIR37, reported in this strain, is closely related to small plasmids found in the fire blight pathogen E. amylovora and E. pyrifoliae. The genome of E. piriflorinigrans also gives detailed insights in evolutionary genomics of pathoadapted Erwinia. PMID:23726521

  4. Positive Selection of the Hrp Pilin HrpE of the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ernst; Koebnik, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria possesses a type III secretion (TTS) system which is encoded by the 23-kb hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene cluster. The TTS system is necessary for pathogenicity in susceptible hosts and induction of the hypersensitive response in resistant plants. At the cell surface, the TTS system is associated with an extracellular filamentous structure, the Hrp pilus, which serves as a conduit for the transfer of bacterial proteins into the plant cell cytosol. The major pilus component, the HrpE pilin, is unique to xanthomonads. Previous work showed that HrpE contains two regions: a hypervariable surface-exposed domain, including the N-terminal secretion signal, and a C-terminal polymerization domain. In this study, the evolutionary rate of the hrpE gene was analyzed. Twenty-one alleles were cloned, sequenced, and compared with five known hrpE alleles. The ratio of synonymous (Ks) and nonsynonymous (Ka) substitution rates shows that parts of the HrpE N terminus are subjected to positive selection and the C terminus is subjected to purifying selection. The trade-off between positive and purifying selection at the very-N terminus allowed us to ascertain the amphipathic α-helical nature of the TTS signal. This is the first report of a surface structure from a plant-pathogenic bacterium that evolved under the constraint of positive selection and hints to the evolutionary adaptation of this extracellular appendage to avoid recognition by the plant defense surveillance system. PMID:16452423

  5. Erwinia persicinus, a new species isolated from plants.

    PubMed

    Hao, M V; Brenner, D J; Steigerwalt, A G; Kosako, Y; Komagata, K

    1990-10-01

    Five strains of a gram-negative, oxidase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, fermentative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium with the general characteristics of the family Enterobacteriaceae were isolated from tomatoes (three strains), a banana, and a cucumber. All of the strains produced a water-soluble pink pigment. As determined by DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite method) these five strains were 85 to 100% related in 60 and 75 degrees C reactions, and related sequences exhibited 1% or less base sequence divergence, indicating that the organisms are members of a single species. These bacteria were most closely related to Erwinia rhapontici (68 to 72% at 60 degrees C, 42 to 44% at 75 degrees C, 10.5% divergence) and to hybridization group VIII in the Enterobacter agglomerans (Pantoea agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola) complex (64% at 60 degrees C, 32% at 75 degrees C, 14.5% divergence). Phenotypic differentiation from Erwinia rhapontici, which also produces a water-soluble pink pigment, is based on negative reactions by the new species in tests for methyl red, N-acetylglucosamine, DL-tartrate assimilation, and acid production from amygdalin, dulcitol, D-fucose, beta-gentiobiose, alpha-methyl-D-glucoside, glycerol, D-lyxose, melezitose, D-turanose, xylitol, and D-xylose and a positive reaction for acetoin (Voges-Proskauer test). On the basis of these data, the name Erwinia persicinus is proposed for the new organism. The type strain is strain HK 204 (= AJ 2716 = CDC 9108-82 = IAM 12843 = JCM 3704 = ATCC 35998). PMID:2275853

  6. PhytoPath: an integrative resource for plant pathogen genomics.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Helder; Maheswari, Uma; Urban, Martin; Irvine, Alistair George; Cuzick, Alayne; McDowall, Mark D; Staines, Daniel M; Kulesha, Eugene; Hammond-Kosack, Kim Elizabeth; Kersey, Paul Julian

    2016-01-01

    PhytoPath (www.phytopathdb.org) is a resource for genomic and phenotypic data from plant pathogen species, that integrates phenotypic data for genes from PHI-base, an expertly curated catalog of genes with experimentally verified pathogenicity, with the Ensembl tools for data visualization and analysis. The resource is focused on fungi, protists (oomycetes) and bacterial plant pathogens that have genomes that have been sequenced and annotated. Genes with associated PHI-base data can be easily identified across all plant pathogen species using a BioMart-based query tool and visualized in their genomic context on the Ensembl genome browser. The PhytoPath resource contains data for 135 genomic sequences from 87 plant pathogen species, and 1364 genes curated for their role in pathogenicity and as targets for chemical intervention. Support for community annotation of gene models is provided using the WebApollo online gene editor, and we are working with interested communities to improve reference annotation for selected species. PMID:26476449

  7. PhytoPath: an integrative resource for plant pathogen genomics

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Helder; Maheswari, Uma; Urban, Martin; Irvine, Alistair George; Cuzick, Alayne; McDowall, Mark D.; Staines, Daniel M.; Kulesha, Eugene; Hammond-Kosack, Kim Elizabeth; Kersey, Paul Julian

    2016-01-01

    PhytoPath (www.phytopathdb.org) is a resource for genomic and phenotypic data from plant pathogen species, that integrates phenotypic data for genes from PHI-base, an expertly curated catalog of genes with experimentally verified pathogenicity, with the Ensembl tools for data visualization and analysis. The resource is focused on fungi, protists (oomycetes) and bacterial plant pathogens that have genomes that have been sequenced and annotated. Genes with associated PHI-base data can be easily identified across all plant pathogen species using a BioMart-based query tool and visualized in their genomic context on the Ensembl genome browser. The PhytoPath resource contains data for 135 genomic sequences from 87 plant pathogen species, and 1364 genes curated for their role in pathogenicity and as targets for chemical intervention. Support for community annotation of gene models is provided using the WebApollo online gene editor, and we are working with interested communities to improve reference annotation for selected species. PMID:26476449

  8. Fungal entomopathogens with activity against plant pathogens: ecology and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual biological control, of both insect pests and plant pathogens, has been reported for the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Lecanicillium spp. However, the primary mechanisms of plant disease suppression are different for these fungi. Beauveria produces an array of bioactive metabolit...

  9. Plants, Pathogens, and People: Extending the Classroom to the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Bertram C.; Dowd, Heather; Eastburn, Darin M.; D'arcy, Cleora J.

    2005-01-01

    Plants, Pathogens, and People is a Web site promoting agricultural awareness via multimedia lectures about plant diseases and online lab activities in which students investigate phenomena. The use of the site in large-enrollment classes for 6-plus years affords a well-documented case of Web-enhanced instruction. Qualitative and quantitative data…

  10. EFFECTS OF COMPOSTED MUNICIPAL SLUDGE ON SOILBORNE PLANT PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of composted municipal sludge (CMS) on soilborne plant pathogens was evaluated in three sets of experiments. Studies with soybeans over three growing seasons investigated the effect of CMS on root rot severity and yield in Phytophthora-infested soil, the effect of appl...

  11. Characterization of Indigoidine Biosynthetic Genes in Erwinia chrysanthemi and Role of This Blue Pigment in Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Reverchon, Sylvie; Rouanet, Carine; Expert, Dominique; Nasser, William

    2002-01-01

    In the plant-pathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi production of pectate lyases, the main virulence determinant, is modulated by a complex network involving several regulatory proteins. One of these regulators, PecS, also controls the synthesis of a blue pigment identified as indigoidine. Since production of this pigment is cryptic in the wild-type strain, E. chrysanthemi ind mutants deficient in indigoidine synthesis were isolated by screening a library of Tn5-B21 insertions in a pecS mutant. These ind mutations were localized close to the regulatory pecS-pecM locus, immediately downstream of pecM. Sequence analysis of this DNA region revealed three open reading frames, indA, indB, and indC, involved in indigoidine biosynthesis. No specific function could be assigned to IndA. In contrast, IndB displays similarity to various phosphatases involved in antibiotic synthesis and IndC reveals significant homology with many nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). The IndC product contains an adenylation domain showing the signature sequence DAWCFGLI for glutamine recognition and an oxidation domain similar to that found in various thiazole-forming NRPS. These data suggest that glutamine is the precursor of indigoidine. We assume that indigoidine results from the condensation of two glutamine molecules that have been previously cyclized by intramolecular amide bond formation and then dehydrogenated. Expression of ind genes is strongly derepressed in the pecS background, indicating that PecS is the main regulator of this secondary metabolite synthesis. DNA band shift assays support a model whereby the PecS protein represses indA and indC expression by binding to indA and indC promoter regions. The regulatory link, via pecS, between indigoidine and virulence factor production led us to explore a potential role of indigoidine in E. chrysanthemi pathogenicity. Mutants impaired in indigoidine production were unable to cause systemic invasion of potted Saintpaulia ionantha

  12. Characterization of indigoidine biosynthetic genes in Erwinia chrysanthemi and role of this blue pigment in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Reverchon, Sylvie; Rouanet, Carine; Expert, Dominique; Nasser, William

    2002-02-01

    In the plant-pathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi production of pectate lyases, the main virulence determinant, is modulated by a complex network involving several regulatory proteins. One of these regulators, PecS, also controls the synthesis of a blue pigment identified as indigoidine. Since production of this pigment is cryptic in the wild-type strain, E. chrysanthemi ind mutants deficient in indigoidine synthesis were isolated by screening a library of Tn5-B21 insertions in a pecS mutant. These ind mutations were localized close to the regulatory pecS-pecM locus, immediately downstream of pecM. Sequence analysis of this DNA region revealed three open reading frames, indA, indB, and indC, involved in indigoidine biosynthesis. No specific function could be assigned to IndA. In contrast, IndB displays similarity to various phosphatases involved in antibiotic synthesis and IndC reveals significant homology with many nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). The IndC product contains an adenylation domain showing the signature sequence DAWCFGLI for glutamine recognition and an oxidation domain similar to that found in various thiazole-forming NRPS. These data suggest that glutamine is the precursor of indigoidine. We assume that indigoidine results from the condensation of two glutamine molecules that have been previously cyclized by intramolecular amide bond formation and then dehydrogenated. Expression of ind genes is strongly derepressed in the pecS background, indicating that PecS is the main regulator of this secondary metabolite synthesis. DNA band shift assays support a model whereby the PecS protein represses indA and indC expression by binding to indA and indC promoter regions. The regulatory link, via pecS, between indigoidine and virulence factor production led us to explore a potential role of indigoidine in E. chrysanthemi pathogenicity. Mutants impaired in indigoidine production were unable to cause systemic invasion of potted Saintpaulia ionantha

  13. Relatedness of chromosomal and plasmid DNAs of Erwinia pyrifoliae and Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    McGhee, Gayle C; Schnabel, Elise L; Maxson-Stein, Kimberly; Jones, Beatrix; Stromberg, Verlyn K; Lacy, George H; Jones, Alan L

    2002-12-01

    The plant pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae has been classified as a separate species from Erwinia amylovora based in part on differences in molecular properties. In this study, these and other molecular properties were examined for E. pyrifoliae and for additional strains of E. amylovora, including strains from brambles (Rubus spp.). The nucleotide composition of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was determined for six of the seven 16S-23S rRNA operons detected in these species with a 16S rRNA gene probe. Each species contained four operons with a tRNA(Glu) gene and two with tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) genes, and analysis of the operons from five strains of E. amylovora indicated a high degree of ITS variability among them. One tRNA(Glu)-containing operon from E. pyrifoliae Ep1/96 was identical to one in E. amylovora Ea110, but three tRNA(Glu) operons and two tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) operons from E. pyrifoliae contained unique nucleotide changes. When groEL sequences were used for species-specific identification, E. pyrifoliae and E. amylovora were the closest phylogenetic relatives among a set of 12 bacterial species. The placement of E. pyrifoliae distinct from E. amylovora corroborated molecular hybridization data indicating low DNA-DNA similarity between them. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of plasmid pEP36 from E. pyrifoliae Ep1/96 revealed a number of presumptive genes that matched genes previously found in pEA29 from E. amylovora and similar organization for the genes and origins of replication. Also, pEP36 and pEA29 were incompatible with clones containing the reciprocal origin regions. Finally, the ColE1-like plasmid pEP2.6 from strain Ep1/96 contained sequences found in small plasmids in E. amylovora strains IL-5 and IH3-1. PMID:12450843

  14. High quality permanent draft genome sequence of Phaseolibacter flectens ATCC 12775T, a plant pathogen of French bean pods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aizenberg-Gershtein, Yana; Izhaki, Ido; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, TBK; Huntemann, Marcel; Pillay, Manoj; Markowitz, Victor; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; et al

    2016-01-13

    We report that the Phaseolibacter flectens strain ATCC 12775T (Halpern et al., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 63:268–273, 2013) is a Gram-negative, rod shaped, motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. Ph. flectens is as a plant-pathogenic bacterium on pods of French bean and was first identified by Johnson (1956) as Pseudomonas flectens. After its phylogenetic position was reexamined, Pseudomonas flectens was transferred to the family Enterobacteriaceae as Phaseolibacter flectens gen. nov., comb. nov. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence and annotation. The DNA GC content is 44.34 mol%. The chromosome length is 2,748,442 bp.more » It encodes 2,437 proteins and 89 RNA genes. Ph. flectens genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes study.« less

  15. High quality permanent draft genome sequence of Phaseolibacter flectens ATCC 12775(T), a plant pathogen of French bean pods.

    PubMed

    Aizenberg-Gershtein, Yana; Izhaki, Ido; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, Tbk; Huntemann, Marcel; Pillay, Manoj; Markowitz, Victor; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Halpern, Malka

    2016-01-01

    Phaseolibacter flectens strain ATCC 12775(T) (Halpern et al., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 63:268-273, 2013) is a Gram-negative, rod shaped, motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. Ph. flectens is as a plant-pathogenic bacterium on pods of French bean and was first identified by Johnson (1956) as Pseudomonas flectens. After its phylogenetic position was reexamined, Pseudomonas flectens was transferred to the family Enterobacteriaceae as Phaseolibacter flectens gen. nov., comb. nov. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence and annotation. The DNA GC content is 44.34 mol%. The chromosome length is 2,748,442 bp. It encodes 2,437 proteins and 89 RNA genes. Ph. flectens genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes study. PMID:26767091

  16. Reactive oxygen species, essential molecules, during plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Daymi; Guzmán-Cedeño, Ángel; Moreno, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continually generated as a consequence of the normal metabolism in aerobic organisms. Accumulation and release of ROS into cell take place in response to a wide variety of adverse environmental conditions including salt, temperature, cold stresses and pathogen attack, among others. In plants, peroxidases class III, NADPH oxidase (NOX) locates in cell wall and plasma membrane, respectively, may be mainly enzymatic systems involving ROS generation. It is well documented that ROS play a dual role into cells, acting as important signal transduction molecules and as toxic molecules with strong oxidant power, however some aspects related to its function during plant-pathogen interactions remain unclear. This review focuses on the principal enzymatic systems involving ROS generation addressing the role of ROS as signal molecules during plant-pathogen interactions. We described how the chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes perceive the external stimuli as pathogen invasion, and trigger resistance response using ROS as signal molecule. PMID:26950921

  17. Screening of endophytic bacteria against fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ohike, Tatsuya; Makuni, Kohei; Okanami, Masahiro; Ano, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial endophytes were found from 6 plant leaves among 35 plant leaves screened. Two of the isolated bacteria showed antagonistic activity against fungal plant pathogens. An isolate named KL1 showed the clear inihibition against plant pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani, on PDA as well as TSA plate. Supernatant of the bacterial culture also showed the clear inhibition against the fungal growth on the plate and the antibiotic substance was identified as iturin A by HPLC analysis. KL1 was identified as Bacillus sp. from the 16S rRNA gene analysis. Very thin hyphae of R. solani was miccroscopically observed when the fungus was co-cultivated with KL1. PMID:25078813

  18. Exploring laccase genes from plant pathogen genomes: a bioinformatic approach.

    PubMed

    Feng, B Z; Li, P Q; Fu, L; Yu, X M

    2015-01-01

    To date, research on laccases has mostly been focused on plant and fungal laccases and their current use in biotechnological applications. In contrast, little is known about laccases from plant pathogens, although recent rapid progress in whole genome sequencing of an increasing number of organisms has facilitated their identification and ascertainment of their origins. In this study, a comparative analysis was performed to elucidate the distribution of laccases among bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes, and, through comparison of their amino acids, to determine the relationships between them. We retrieved the laccase genes for the 20 publicly available plant pathogen genomes. From these, 125 laccase genes were identified in total, including seven in bacterial genomes, 101 in fungal genomes, and 17 in oomycete genomes. Most of the predicted protein models of these genes shared typical fungal laccase characteristics, possessing four conserved domains with one cysteine and ten histidine residues at these domains. Phylogenetic analysis illustrated that laccases from bacteria and oomycetes were grouped into two distinct clades, whereas fungal laccases clustered in three main clades. These results provide the theoretical groundwork regarding the role of laccases in plant pathogens and might be used to guide future research into these enzymes. PMID:26535716

  19. Antibacterial activity of caffeine against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sledz, Wojciech; Los, Emilia; Paczek, Agnieszka; Rischka, Jacek; Motyka, Agata; Zoledowska, Sabina; Piosik, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a plant secondary metabolite - caffeine. Caffeine is present in over 100 plant species. Antibacterial activity of caffeine was examined against the following plant-pathogenic bacteria: Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), Dickeya solani (Dsol), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and Xanthomonas campestris subsp. campestris (Xcc). MIC and MBC values ranged from 5 to 20 mM and from 43 to 100 mM, respectively. Caffeine increased the bacterial generation time of all tested species and caused changes in cell morphology. The influence of caffeine on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins was investigated in cultures of plant pathogenic bacteria with labelled precursors: [(3)H]thymidine, [(3)H]uridine or (14)C leucine, respectively. RNA biosynthesis was more affected than DNA or protein biosynthesis in bacterial cells treated with caffeine. Treatment of Pba with caffeine for 336 h did not induce resistance to this compound. Caffeine application reduced disease symptoms caused by Dsol on chicory leaves, potato slices, and whole potato tubers. The data presented indicate caffeine as a potential tool for the control of diseases caused by plant-pathogenic bacteria, especially under storage conditions. PMID:26307771

  20. Uncovering plant-pathogen crosstalk through apoplastic proteomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Delaunois, Bertrand; Jeandet, Philippe; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dorey, Stéphan; Cordelier, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens have evolved by developing different strategies to infect their host, which in turn have elaborated immune responses to counter the pathogen invasion. The apoplast, including the cell wall and extracellular space outside the plasma membrane, is one of the first compartments where pathogen-host interaction occurs. The plant cell wall is composed of a complex network of polysaccharides polymers and glycoproteins and serves as a natural physical barrier against pathogen invasion. The apoplastic fluid, circulating through the cell wall and intercellular spaces, provides a means for delivering molecules and facilitating intercellular communications. Some plant-pathogen interactions lead to plant cell wall degradation allowing pathogens to penetrate into the cells. In turn, the plant immune system recognizes microbial- or damage-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or DAMPs) and initiates a set of basal immune responses, including the strengthening of the plant cell wall. The establishment of defense requires the regulation of a wide variety of proteins that are involved at different levels, from receptor perception of the pathogen via signaling mechanisms to the strengthening of the cell wall or degradation of the pathogen itself. A fine regulation of apoplastic proteins is therefore essential for rapid and effective pathogen perception and for maintaining cell wall integrity. This review aims to provide insight into analyses using proteomic approaches of the apoplast to highlight the modulation of the apoplastic protein patterns during pathogen infection and to unravel the key players involved in plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:24917874

  1. Surface survival and internalization of salmonella through natural cracks on developing cantaloupe fruits, alone or in the presence of the melon wilt pathogen Erwinia tracheiphila.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Dhiraj; Dobhal, Shefali; Payton, Mark E; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Ma, Li Maria

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of foodborne illness attributed to the consumption of Salmonella-tainted cantaloupe have occurred repeatedly, but understanding of the ecology of Salmonella on cantaloupe fruit surfaces is limited. We investigated the interactions between Salmonella enterica Poona, the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia tracheiphila, and cantaloupe fruit. Fruit surfaces were inoculated at the natural cracking stage by spreading S. enterica and E. tracheiphila, 20 µl at 107 cfu/ml, independently or together, over a 2×2 cm rind area containing a crack. Microbial and microscopic analyses were performed at 0, 9 and 24 days post inoculation (DPI). Even at 24 DPI (fruit maturity) S. enterica was detected on 14% and 40% of the fruit inoculated with S. enterica alone and the two-pathogen mixture, respectively. However, the population of S. enterica declined gradually after initial inoculation. E. tracheiphila, inoculated alone or together with Salmonella, caused watersoaked lesions on cantaloupe fruit; but we could not conclude in this study that S. enterica survival on the fruit surface was enhanced by the presence of those lesions. Of fruit inoculated with E. tracheiphila alone and sampled at 24 DPI, 61% had watersoaked lesions on the surface. In nearly half of those symptomatic fruits the watersoaking extended into the sub-rind mesocarp, and E. tracheiphila was recovered from that tissue in 50% of the symptomatic fruit. In this work, E. tracheiphila internalized through natural cracks on developing fruits. S. enterica was never detected in the fruit interior (ca. 2-3 mm below rind surface) under the limited conditions of our experiments, but the possibility that it, or other human pathogens that contaminate fresh produce, might also do so should be investigated under a wider range of conditions and produce types. PMID:25147942

  2. Surface Survival and Internalization of Salmonella through Natural Cracks on Developing Cantaloupe Fruits, Alone or in the Presence of the Melon Wilt Pathogen Erwinia tracheiphila

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Dhiraj; Dobhal, Shefali; Payton, Mark E.; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Ma, Li Maria

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of foodborne illness attributed to the consumption of Salmonella-tainted cantaloupe have occurred repeatedly, but understanding of the ecology of Salmonella on cantaloupe fruit surfaces is limited. We investigated the interactions between Salmonella enterica Poona, the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia tracheiphila, and cantaloupe fruit. Fruit surfaces were inoculated at the natural cracking stage by spreading S. enterica and E. tracheiphila, 20 µl at 107 cfu/ml, independently or together, over a 2×2 cm rind area containing a crack. Microbial and microscopic analyses were performed at 0, 9 and 24 days post inoculation (DPI). Even at 24 DPI (fruit maturity) S. enterica was detected on 14% and 40% of the fruit inoculated with S. enterica alone and the two-pathogen mixture, respectively. However, the population of S. enterica declined gradually after initial inoculation. E. tracheiphila, inoculated alone or together with Salmonella, caused watersoaked lesions on cantaloupe fruit; but we could not conclude in this study that S. enterica survival on the fruit surface was enhanced by the presence of those lesions. Of fruit inoculated with E. tracheiphila alone and sampled at 24 DPI, 61% had watersoaked lesions on the surface. In nearly half of those symptomatic fruits the watersoaking extended into the sub-rind mesocarp, and E. tracheiphila was recovered from that tissue in 50% of the symptomatic fruit. In this work, E. tracheiphila internalized through natural cracks on developing fruits. S. enterica was never detected in the fruit interior (ca. 2–3 mm below rind surface) under the limited conditions of our experiments, but the possibility that it, or other human pathogens that contaminate fresh produce, might also do so should be investigated under a wider range of conditions and produce types. PMID:25147942

  3. List of New Names of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria (2008-2010)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2010 the International Society of Plant Pathology Committee on the Taxonomy of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria published the Comprehensive List of Names of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria, 1980-2007 to provide an authoritative register of names of plant pathogens. In this manuscript we up-date the list of na...

  4. Horizontal gene acquisitions, mobile element proliferation, and genome decay in the host-restricted plant pathogen erwinia tracheiphila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern industrial agriculture depends on high-density cultivation of genetically similar crop plants, creating favorable conditions for the emergence of novel pathogens with increased fitness in managed compared with ecologically intact settings. Here, we present the genome sequence of six strains o...

  5. The life history of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae is linked to the water cycle.

    PubMed

    Morris, Cindy E; Sands, David C; Vinatzer, Boris A; Glaux, Catherine; Guilbaud, Caroline; Buffière, Alain; Yan, Shuangchun; Dominguez, Hélène; Thompson, Brian M

    2008-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a plant pathogen well known for its capacity to grow epiphytically on diverse plants and for its ice-nucleation activity. The ensemble of its known biology and ecology led us to postulate that this bacterium is also present in non-agricultural habitats, particularly those associated with water. Here, we report the abundance of P. syringae in rain, snow, alpine streams and lakes and in wild plants, in addition to the previously reported abundance in epilithic biofilms. Each of these substrates harbored strains that corresponded to P. syringae in terms of biochemical traits, pathogenicity and pathogenicity-related factors and that were ice-nucleation active. Phylogenetic comparisons of sequences of four housekeeping genes of the non-agricultural strains with strains of P. syringae from disease epidemics confirmed their identity as P. syringae. Moreover, strains belonging to the same clonal lineage were isolated from snow, irrigation water and a diseased crop plant. Our data suggest that the different substrates harboring P. syringae modify the structure of the associated populations. Here, we propose a comprehensive life cycle for P. syringae--in agricultural and non-agricultural habitats--driven by the environmental cycle of water. This cycle opens the opportunity to evaluate the importance of non-agricultural habitats in the evolution of a plant pathogen and the emergence of virulence. The ice-nucleation activity of all strains from snow, unlike from other substrates, strongly suggests that P. syringae plays an active role in the water cycle as an ice nucleus in clouds. PMID:18185595

  6. Assessment of the relevance of the antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine from Pantoea agglomerans biological control strains against bacterial plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Ulrike F; Reiher, Katharina; Spiteller, Dieter; Wensing, Annette; Völksch, Beate

    2012-12-01

    The epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans 48b/90 (Pa48b) is a promising biocontrol strain against economically important bacterial pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora. Strain Pa48b produces the broad-spectrum antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine (APV) in a temperature-dependent manner. An APV-negative mutant still suppressed the E. amylovora population and fire blight disease symptoms in apple blossom experiments under greenhouse conditions, but was inferior to the Pa48b wild-type indicating the influence of APV in the antagonism. In plant experiments with the soybean pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea both, Pa48b and the APV-negative mutant, successfully suppressed the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the P. agglomerans strain Pa48b is an efficient biocontrol organism against plant pathogens, and we prove its ability for fast colonization of plant surfaces over a wide temperature range. PMID:23233458

  7. Stimulation by Erwinia carotovora of the synthesis of ethylene in cauliflower tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Barbara M.; Mapson, L. W.

    1970-01-01

    The synthesis of ethylene by cauliflower floret tissue was increased when the tissue was inoculated with the soft-rot bacterium Erwinia carotovora. This effect was clearly associated with the production of pectic enzymes by the micro-organism. These enzymes, acting together with the plant enzymes, stimulated the production of ethylene from methionine. The increased synthetic activity was due to the release and increased activity of a glucose oxidase enzyme apparently attached to plant cell-wall material and liberated by the action of pectic enzymes of the bacterium. ImagesPLATE 1 PMID:5488914

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Lysobacter capsici AZ78, a Bacterium Antagonistic to Plant-Pathogenic Oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Puopolo, Gerardo; Sonego, Paolo; Engelen, Kristof; Pertot, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    Lysobacter capsici AZ78, isolated from tobacco rhizosphere, effectively controls Phytophthora infestans and Plasmopara viticola on tomato and grapevine plants, respectively. We report the first draft genome sequence of the L. capsici species. PMID:24762937

  9. Dickeyafangzhongdai sp. nov., a plant-pathogenic bacterium isolated from pear trees (Pyrus pyrifolia).

    PubMed

    Tian, Yanli; Zhao, Yuqiang; Yuan, Xiaoli; Yi, Jianping; Fan, Jiaqin; Xu, Zhigang; Hu, Baishi; De Boer, Solke H; Li, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Gram-stain-negative, pectinolytic bacteria were repeatedly isolated from pear trees displaying symptoms of bleeding canker in China. Three strains, JS5T, LN1 and QZH3, had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences that shared 99 % similarity to the type strain of Dickeya dadantii. Phylogenetic analysis of strains JS5T, LN1 and QZH3 with isolates representing all species of the genus Dickeya and related Pectobacterium species supported their affiliation to Dickeya. Multi-locus sequence typing employing concatenated sequences encoding recA, fusA, gapA, purA, rplB, dnaX and the intergenic spacer illustrated a phylogeny which placed strains JS5T, LN1 and QZH3 as a distinct clade, separate from all other species of the genus Dickeya. Average nucleotide identity values obtained in comparison with all species of the genus Dickeya supported the distinctiveness of strain JS5T within the genus Dickeya. Additionally, all three strains were phenotypically distinguished from other species of the genus Dickeya by failing to hydrolyse casein, and by producing acids from (-)-d-arabinose, (+)melibiose, (+)raffinose, mannitol and myo-inositol, but not from 5-keto-d-gluconate or β-gentiobiose. The name Dickeya fangzhongdai sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains; the type strain is JS5T (=CGMCC 1.15464T=DSM 101947T). PMID:27045848

  10. Reclassification of non-pigmented Erwinia herbicola strains from trees as Erwinia billingiae sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Mergaert, J; Hauben, L; Cnockaert, M C; Swings, J

    1999-04-01

    Twenty-two Erwinia-like strains, isolated from trees since the late fifties and belonging to a distinct phenotypic group with resemblance to Pantoea agglomerans, were further characterized by conventional biochemical tests, the BIOLOG metabolic fingerprinting system and fatty acid analysis. Their phylogenetic positions were determined by comparing the 16S rRNA gene sequence of a representative strain to available sequences of Erwinia, Pantoea, Pectobacterium and Brenneria species. The strains were shown to belong to the genus Erwinia, with Erwinia rhapontici and Erwinia persicina as the closest phylogenetic relatives. The name Erwinia billingiae sp. nov. is proposed (type strain LMG 2613T) and a description of the species is given. PMID:10319458

  11. Lactoferrin-derived resistance against plant pathogens in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Natarajan, Savithiry; Mandal, Sudhamoy; Mitra, Amitava

    2013-12-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a ubiquitous cationic iron-binding milk glycoprotein that contributes to nutrition and exerts a broad-spectrum primary defense against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses in mammals. These qualities make lactoferrin protein and its antimicrobial motifs highly desirable candidates to be incorporated in plants to impart broad-based resistance against plant pathogens or to economically produce them in bulk quantities for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes. This study introduced bovine LF (BLF) gene into tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi), Arabidopsis ( A. thaliana ) and wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) via Agrobacterium -mediated plant transformation. Transgenic plants or detached leaves exhibited high levels of resistance against the damping-off causing fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and the head blight causing fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum . LF also imparted resistance to tomato plants against a bacterial pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum . Similarly, other researchers demonstrated expression of LF and LF-mediated high-quality resistance to several other aggressive fungal and bacterial plant pathogens in transgenic plants and against viral pathogens by foliar applications of LF or its derivatives. Taken together, these studies demonstrated the effectiveness of LF for improving crop quality and its biopharming potentials for pharmaceautical and nutritional applications. PMID:23889215

  12. Phytohormone mediation of interactions between herbivores and plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, Jenny; Frago, Enric; Dicke, Marcel; van Loon, Joop J A

    2014-07-01

    Induced plant defenses against either pathogens or herbivore attackers are regulated by phytohormones. These phytohormones are increasingly recognized as important mediators of interactions between organisms associated with plants. In this review, we discuss the role of plant defense hormones in sequential tri-partite interactions among plants, pathogenic microbes, and herbivorous insects, based on the most recent literature. We discuss the importance of pathogen trophic strategy in the interaction with herbivores that exhibit different feeding modes. Plant resistance mechanisms also affect plant quality in future interactions with attackers. We discuss exemplary evidence for the hypotheses that (i) biotrophic pathogens can facilitate chewing herbivores, unless plants exhibit effector-triggered immunity, but (ii) facilitate or inhibit phloem feeders. (iii) Necrotrophic pathogens, on the other hand, can inhibit both phloem feeders and chewers. We also propose herbivore feeding mode as predictor of effects on pathogens of different trophic strategies, providing evidence for the hypotheses that (iv) phloem feeders inhibit pathogen attack by increasing SA induction, whereas (v) chewing herbivores tend not to affect necrotrophic pathogens, while they may either inhibit or facilitate biotrophic pathogens. Putting these hypotheses to the test will increase our understanding of phytohormonal regulation of plant defense to sequential attack by plant pathogens and insect herbivores. This will provide valuable insight into plant-mediated ecological interactions among members of the plant-associated community. PMID:25059974

  13. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells. PMID:25760034

  14. PathoPlant: a database on plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Schindler, Martin; Choi, Claudia; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    Pathogen recognition and signal transduction during plant pathogenesis is essential for the activation of plant defense mechanisms. To facilitate easy access to published data and to permit comparative studies of different pathogen response pathways, a database is indispensable to give a broad overview of the components and reactions so far known. PathoPlant has been developed as a relational database to display relevant components and reactions involved in signal transduction related to plant-pathogen interactions. On the organism level, the tables 'plant', 'pathogen' and 'interaction' are used to describe incompatible interactions between plants and pathogens or diseases. On the molecular level, plant pathogenesis related information is organized in PathoPlant's main tables 'molecule', 'reaction' and 'location'. Signal transduction pathways are modeled as consecutive sequences of known molecules and corresponding reactions. PathoPlant entries are linked to associated internal records as well as to entries in external databases such as SWISS-PROT, GenBank, PubMed, and TRANSFAC. PathoPlant is available as a web-based service at http://www.pathoplant.de. PMID:15752070

  15. Erwinia amylovora Expresses Fast and Simultaneously hrp/dsp Virulence Genes during Flower Infection on Apple Trees

    PubMed Central

    Pester, Doris; Milčevičová, Renáta; Schaffer, Johann; Wilhelm, Eva; Blümel, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Background Pathogen entry through host blossoms is the predominant infection pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora leading to manifestation of the disease fire blight. Like in other economically important plant pathogens, E. amylovora pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system encoded by hrp genes. However, timing and transcriptional order of hrp gene expression during flower infections are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using quantitative real-time PCR analyses, we addressed the questions of how fast, strong and uniform key hrp virulence genes and the effector dspA/E are expressed when bacteria enter flowers provided with the full defense mechanism of the apple plant. In non-invasive bacterial inoculations of apple flowers still attached to the tree, E. amylovora activated expression of key type III secretion genes in a narrow time window, mounting in a single expression peak of all investigated hrp/dspA/E genes around 24–48 h post inoculation (hpi). This single expression peak coincided with a single depression in the plant PR-1 expression at 24 hpi indicating transient manipulation of the salicylic acid pathway as one target of E. amylovora type III effectors. Expression of hrp/dspA/E genes was highly correlated to expression of the regulator hrpL and relative transcript abundances followed the ratio: hrpA>hrpN>hrpL>dspA/E. Acidic conditions (pH 4) in flower infections led to reduced virulence/effector gene expression without the typical expression peak observed under natural conditions (pH 7). Conclusion/Significance The simultaneous expression of hrpL, hrpA, hrpN, and the effector dspA/E during early floral infection indicates that speed and immediate effector transmission is important for successful plant invasion. When this delicate balance is disturbed, e.g., by acidic pH during infection, virulence gene expression is reduced, thus partly explaining the efficacy of acidification in fire blight control on a molecular

  16. Antibody array in a multiwell plate format for the sensitive and multiplexed detection of important plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Kumpoosiri, Mallika; Warin, Nuchnard; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Elliott, Christopher T; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2014-07-15

    The global seed market is considered to be an important industry with a total value of $10,543 million US dollars in 2012. Because plant pathogens such as bacteria and viruses cause a significant economic loss to both producers and exporters, the seed export industry urgently requires rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive testing for the pathogens to prevent disease spreading worldwide. This study developed an antibody array in a multiwell plate format to simultaneously detect four crucial plant pathogens, namely, a bacterial fruit blotch bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), Chilli veinal mottle virus (ChiVMV, potyvirus), Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, tospovirus serogroup IV), and Melon yellow spot virus (MYSV, tospovirus). The capture antibodies specific to the pathogens were immobilized on each well at preassigned positions by an automatic microarrayer. The antibodies on the arrays specifically captured the corresponding pathogens present in the sample extracts. The presence of pathogens bound on the capture antibodies was subsequently detected by a cocktail of fluorescently conjugated secondary antibodies. The limits of detection of the developed antibody array for the detection of Aac, ChiVMV, WSMoV, and MYSV were 5 × 10(5) CFU/mL, 30 ng/mL, 1000 ng/mL, and 160 ng/mL, respectively, which were very similar to those of the conventional ELISA method. The antibody array in a multiwell plate format accurately detected plant pathogens in single and multiple detections. Moreover, this format enables easy handling of the assay at a higher speed of operation. PMID:24945525

  17. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces acidiscabies 84-104, an emergent plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Huguet-Tapia, José C; Loria, Rosemary

    2012-04-01

    A draft genome sequence of the plant pathogen Streptomyces acidiscabies 84-104, an emergent plant pathogen, is presented here. The genome is among the largest of streptomycetes, at more than 11 Mb, and encodes a 100-kb pathogenicity island (PAI) shared with other plant-pathogenic streptomycetes. The presence of this conserved PAI, and the remnants of a conserved integrase/recombinase at its 3' end, supports the hypothesis that S. acidiscabies emerged as a plant pathogen as a result of this acquisition. PMID:22408247

  18. Changing fitness of a necrotrophic plant pathogen under increasing temperature.

    PubMed

    Sabburg, Rosalie; Obanor, Friday; Aitken, Elizabeth; Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2015-08-01

    Warmer temperatures associated with climate change are expected to have a direct impact on plant pathogens, challenging crops and altering plant disease profiles in the future. In this study, we have investigated the effect of increasing temperature on the pathogenic fitness of Fusarium pseudograminearum, an important necrotrophic plant pathogen associated with crown rot disease of wheat in Australia. Eleven wheat lines with different levels of crown rot resistance were artificially inoculated with F. pseudograminearum and maintained at four diurnal temperatures 15/15°C, 20/15°C, 25/15°C and 28/15°C in a controlled glasshouse. To quantify the success of F. pseudograminearum three fitness measures, these being disease severity, pathogen biomass in stem base and flag leaf node, and deoxynivalenol (DON) in stem base and flag leaf node of mature plants were used. F. pseudograminearum showed superior overall fitness at 15/15°C, and this was reduced with increasing temperature. Pathogen fitness was significantly influenced by the level of crown rot resistance of wheat lines, but the influence of line declined with increasing temperature. Lines that exhibited superior crown rot resistance in the field were generally associated with reduced overall pathogen fitness. However, the relative performance of the wheat lines was dependent on the measure of pathogen fitness, and lines that were associated with one reduced measure of pathogen fitness did not always reduce another. There was a strong correlation between DON in stem base tissue and disease severity, but length of browning was not a good predictor of Fusarium biomass in the stem base. We report that a combination of host resistance and rising temperature will reduce pathogen fitness under increasing temperature, but further studies combining the effect of rising CO2 are essential for more realistic assessments. PMID:25767051

  19. Plant pathogens as a source of diverse enzymes for lignocellulose digestion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant cell wall is a major barrier that many plant pathogens must surmount for successful invasion of their plant hosts. Full genome sequencing of a number of plant pathogens has revealed often large, complex, and redundant enzyme systems for degradation of plant cell walls. Recent surveys have ...

  20. Peptidotriazoles with antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Güell, Imma; Micaló, Lluís; Cano, Laura; Badosa, Esther; Ferre, Rafael; Montesinos, Emilio; Bardají, Eduard; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta

    2012-01-01

    We designed and prepared peptidotriazoles based on the antimicrobial peptide BP100 (LysLysLeuPheLysLysIleLeuLysTyrLeu-NH(2)) by introducing a triazole ring in the peptide backbone or onto the side chain of a selected residue. These compounds were screened for their in vitro growth inhibition of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and for their cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells and tobacco leaves. Their proteolytic susceptibility was also analyzed. The antibacterial activity and the hemolysis were influenced by the amino acid that was modified with the triazole as well as by the absence of presence of a substituent in this heterocyclic ring. We identified sequences active against the bacteria Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (MIC of 1.6-12.5 μM), and against the fungi Fusarium oxysporum (MIC<6.2-12.5 μM) with low hemolytic activity (0-23% at 50 μM), high stability to protease digestion and no phytotoxicity. These peptidotriazoles constitute good candidates to design new antimicrobial agents. PMID:22198367

  1. Insights into Cross-Kingdom Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kirzinger, Morgan W.B.; Nadarasah, Geetanchaly; Stavrinides, John

    2011-01-01

    Plant and human pathogens have evolved disease factors to successfully exploit their respective hosts. Phytopathogens utilize specific determinants that help to breach reinforced cell walls and manipulate plant physiology to facilitate the disease process, while human pathogens use determinants for exploiting mammalian physiology and overcoming highly developed adaptive immune responses. Emerging research, however, has highlighted the ability of seemingly dedicated human pathogens to cause plant disease, and specialized plant pathogens to cause human disease. Such microbes represent interesting systems for studying the evolution of cross-kingdom pathogenicity, and the benefits and tradeoffs of exploiting multiple hosts with drastically different morphologies and physiologies. This review will explore cross-kingdom pathogenicity, where plants and humans are common hosts. We illustrate that while cross-kingdom pathogenicity appears to be maintained, the directionality of host association (plant to human, or human to plant) is difficult to determine. Cross-kingdom human pathogens, and their potential plant reservoirs, have important implications for the emergence of infectious diseases. PMID:24710301

  2. Plants, plant pathogens, and microgravity--a deadly trio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J. E.; Ryba-White, M.; Sun, Q.; Wu, C. J.; Hilaire, E.; Gartner, C.; Nedukha, O.; Kordyum, E.; Keck, M.; Leung, H.; Guikema, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Plants grown in spaceflight conditions are more susceptible to colonization by plant pathogens. The underlying causes for this enhanced susceptibility are not known. Possibly the formation of structural barriers and the activation of plant defense response components are impaired in spaceflight conditions. Either condition would result from altered gene expression of the plant. Because of the tools available, past studies focused on a few physiological responses or biochemical pathways. With recent advances in genomics research, new tools, including microarray technologies, are available to examine the global impact of growth in the spacecraft on the plant's gene expression profile. In ground-based studies, we have developed cDNA subtraction libraries of rice that are enriched for genes induced during pathogen infection and the defense response. Arrays of these genes are being used to dissect plant defense response pathways in a model system involving wild-type rice plants and lesion mimic mutants. The lesion mimic mutants are ideal experimental tools because they erratically develop defense response-like lesions in the absence of pathogens. The gene expression profiles from these ground-based studies will provide the molecular basis for understanding the biochemical and physiological impacts of spaceflight on plant growth, development and disease defense responses. This, in turn, will allow the development of strategies to manage plant disease for life in the space environment.

  3. Surface sensing and signaling networks in plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Kou, Yanjun; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2016-09-01

    Pathogenic fungi have evolved highly varied and remarkable strategies to invade and infect their plant hosts. Typically, such fungal pathogens utilize highly specialized infection structures, morphologies or cell types produced from conidia or ascospores on the cognate host surfaces to gain entry therein. Such diverse infection strategies require intricate coordination in cell signaling and differentiation in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, we present an overview of our current understanding of cell signaling and infection-associated development that primes host penetration in the top ten plant pathogenic fungi, which utilize specific receptors to sense and respond to different surface cues, such as topographic features, hydrophobicity, hardness, plant lipids, phytohormones, and/or secreted enzymes. Subsequently, diverse signaling components such as G proteins, cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A and MAP kinases are activated to enable the differentiation of infection structures. Recent studies have also provided fascinating insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics and specialized sequestration and trafficking of signaling moieties required for proper development of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Molecular insight in such infection-related morphogenesis and cell signaling holds promise for identifying novel strategies for intervention of fungal diseases in plants. PMID:27133541

  4. Contribution of proteomics to the study of plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Raquel; Jorrin-Novo, Jesus V

    2012-01-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi are one of the most damaging plant parasitic organisms, and can cause serious diseases and important yield losses in crops. The study of the biology of these microorganisms and the interaction with their hosts has experienced great advances in recent years due to the development of moderm, holistic and high-throughput -omic techniques, together with the increasing number of genome sequencing projects and the development of mutants and reverse genetics tools. We highlight among these -omic techniques the importance of proteomics, which has become a relevant tool in plant-fungus pathosystem research. Proteomics intends to identify gene products with a key role in pathogenicity and virulence. These studies would help in the search of key protein targets and in the development of agrochemicals, which may open new ways for crop disease diagnosis and protection. In this review, we made an overview on the contribution of proteomics to the knowledge of life cycle, infection mechanisms, and virulence of the plant pathogenic fungi. Data from current, innovative literature, according to both methodological and experimental systems, were summarized and discussed. Specific sections were devoted to the most studied fungal phytopathogens: Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Fusarium graminearum. PMID:22085090

  5. Bacteriocin Serratine-P as a biological tool in the control of fire blight Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Schoofs, H; Vandebroek, K; Pierrard, A; Thonart, P; Lepoivre, P; Beaudry, T; Deckers, T

    2002-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Burill Winslow et al.), is the most important bacterial disease in European pear growing. It can cause a lot of damage in some countries on apple and on pear trees in orchards and also in the fruit tree nurseries. In Belgium, the disease is present since 1972. Control of fire blight in Belgian fruit orchards is made on a broad basis of measurements in and around the fruit trees. The use of an antibiotic is allowed for application only during the primary blossom period under strict controlled regulations. The use of antobiotics in agriculture is strongly discussed on the European level today and will probably disappear in the near future. Therefore, the research on fire blight control concentrates on the possibilities of biological control with antagonistic bacteria such as Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola), Bacillus subtilis or Pseudomonas syringae strain A 506. The use of Serratine-P, a phage tail-like bacteriocin, produced by Serratia plymiticum, shows an interesting antibacterial activity against Erwinia amylovora. Its mode of action consists in the perforation of the cytoplasmic membrane of the target cell, inducing perturbations in cellular exchanges and a final lysis of the bacterial cell. In this paper some trials are discussed on the use of Serratine-P at different doses and on different infection types on pear trees. The results indicate interesting protection possibilities on blossom- and fruit infections. PMID:12701444

  6. Isolation and Identification of Antifungal Compounds from Bacillus subtilis C9 Inhibiting the Growth of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Rezuanul; Jeong, Yong Tae; Lee, Yong Se

    2012-01-01

    Antagonistic microorganisms against Rhizoctonia solani were isolated and their antifungal activities were investigated. Two hundred sixteen bacterial isolates were isolated from various soil samples and 19 isolates were found to antagonize the selected plant pathogenic fungi with varying degrees. Among them, isolate C9 was selected as an antagonistic microorganism with potential for use in further studies. Treatment with the selected isolate C9 resulted in significantly reduced incidence of stem-segment colonization by R. solani AG2-2(IV) in Zoysia grass and enhanced growth of grass. Through its biochemical, physiological, and 16S rDNA characteristics, the selected bacterium was identified as Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis. Mannitol (1%) and soytone (1%) were found to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, for use in antibiotic production. An antibiotic compound, designated as DG4, was separated and purified from ethyl acetate extract of the culture broth of isolate C9. On the basis of spectral data, including proton nuclear magneric resonance (1H NMR), carbon nuclear magneric resonance (13C NMR), and mass analyses, its chemical structure was established as a stereoisomer of acetylbutanediol. Application of the ethyl acetate extract of isolate C9 to several plant pathogens resulted in dose-dependent inhibition. Treatment with the purified compound (an isomer of acetylbuanediol) resulted in significantly inhibited growth of tested pathogens. The cell free culture supernatant of isolate C9 showed a chitinase effect on chitin medium. Results from the present study demonstrated the significant potential of the purified compound from isolate C9 for use as a biocontrol agent as well as a plant growth promoter with the ability to trigger induced systemic resistance of plants. PMID:22783136

  7. Antifungal Effects of Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs) against Various Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Woo; Jung, Jin Hee; Lamsal, Kabir; Kim, Yun Seok; Min, Ji Seon

    2012-01-01

    This research is concerned with the fungicidal properties of nano-size silver colloidal solution used as an agent for antifungal treatment of various plant pathogens. We used WA-CV-WA13B, WA-AT-WB13R, and WA-PR-WB13R silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at concentrations of 10, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. Eighteen different plant pathogenic fungi were treated with these AgNPs on potato dextrose agar (PDA), malt extract agar, and corn meal agar plates. We calculated fungal inhibition in order to evaluate the antifungal efficacy of silver nanoparticles against pathogens. The results indicated that AgNPs possess antifungal properties against these plant pathogens at various levels. Treatment with WA-CV-WB13R AgNPs resulted in maximum inhibition of most fungi. Results also showed that the most significant inhibition of plant pathogenic fungi was observed on PDA and 100 ppm of AgNPs. PMID:22783135

  8. Lifestyles of the effector-rich: genome-enabled characterization of bacterial plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome sequencing of bacterial plant pathogens is providing transformative insights into the complex network of molecular plant-microbe interactions mediated by extracellular effectors during pathogenesis. Bacterial pathogens sequenced to completion are phylogenetically diverse and vary significant...

  9. N-acetylcysteine in agriculture, a novel use for an old molecule: focus on controlling the plant-pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Lígia S; Giorgiano, Thais E; Takita, Marco A; Forim, Moacir R; Silva, Luis F C; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Machado, Marcos A; de Souza, Alessandra A

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen bacterium that causes diseases in many different crops. In citrus, it causes Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC). The mechanism of pathogenicity of this bacterium is associated with its capacity to colonize and form a biofilm in the xylem vessels of host plants, and there is not yet any method to directly reduce populations of this pathogen in the field. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), a cysteine analogue used mainly to treat human diseases, on X. fastidiosa in different experimental conditions. Concentrations of NAC over 1 mg/mL reduced bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces, biofilm formation and the amount of exopolysaccharides (EPS). The minimal inhibitory concentration of NAC was 6 mg/mL. NAC was supplied to X. fastidiosa-infected plants in hydroponics, fertigation, and adsorbed to organic fertilizer (NAC-Fertilizer). HPLC analysis indicated that plants absorbed NAC at concentrations of 0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL but not at 6 mg/mL. Sweet orange plants with CVC symptoms treated with NAC (0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL) in hydroponics showed clear symptom remission and reduction in bacterial population, as analyzed by quantitative PCR and bacterial isolation. Experiments using fertigation and NAC-Fertilizer were done to simulate a condition closer to that normally is used in the field. For both, significant symptom remission and a reduced bacterial growth rate were observed. Using NAC-Fertilizer the lag for resurgence of symptoms on leaves after interruption of the treatment increased to around eight months. This is the first report of the anti-bacterial effect of NAC against a phytopathogenic bacterium. The results obtained in this work together with the characteristics of this molecule indicate that the use of NAC in agriculture might be a new and sustainable strategy for controlling plant pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24009716

  10. Cyclic Di-GMP modulates the disease progression of Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Adam C; Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W; Waters, Christopher M

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a nearly ubiquitous intracellular signal molecule known to regulate various cellular processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is inversely governed by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, which synthesize and degrade c-di-GMP, respectively. The role of c-di-GMP in the plant pathogen and causal agent of fire blight disease Erwinia amylovora has not been studied previously. Here we demonstrate that three of the five predicted DGC genes in E. amylovora (edc genes, for Erwinia diguanylate cyclase), edcA, edcC, and edcE, are active diguanylate cyclases. We show that c-di-GMP positively regulates the secretion of the main exopolysaccharide in E. amylovora, amylovoran, leading to increased biofilm formation, and negatively regulates flagellar swimming motility. Although amylovoran secretion and biofilm formation are important for the colonization of plant xylem tissues and the development of systemic infections, deletion of the two biofilm-promoting DGCs increased tissue necrosis in an immature-pear infection assay and an apple shoot infection model, suggesting that c-di-GMP negatively regulates virulence. In addition, c-di-GMP inhibited the expression of hrpA, a gene encoding the major structural component of the type III secretion pilus. Our results are the first to describe a role for c-di-GMP in E. amylovora and suggest that downregulation of motility and type III secretion by c-di-GMP during infection plays a key role in the coordination of pathogenesis. PMID:23475975

  11. Cyclic Di-GMP Modulates the Disease Progression of Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Adam C.; Castiblanco, Luisa F.; Sundin, George W.

    2013-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a nearly ubiquitous intracellular signal molecule known to regulate various cellular processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is inversely governed by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, which synthesize and degrade c-di-GMP, respectively. The role of c-di-GMP in the plant pathogen and causal agent of fire blight disease Erwinia amylovora has not been studied previously. Here we demonstrate that three of the five predicted DGC genes in E. amylovora (edc genes, for Erwinia diguanylate cyclase), edcA, edcC, and edcE, are active diguanylate cyclases. We show that c-di-GMP positively regulates the secretion of the main exopolysaccharide in E. amylovora, amylovoran, leading to increased biofilm formation, and negatively regulates flagellar swimming motility. Although amylovoran secretion and biofilm formation are important for the colonization of plant xylem tissues and the development of systemic infections, deletion of the two biofilm-promoting DGCs increased tissue necrosis in an immature-pear infection assay and an apple shoot infection model, suggesting that c-di-GMP negatively regulates virulence. In addition, c-di-GMP inhibited the expression of hrpA, a gene encoding the major structural component of the type III secretion pilus. Our results are the first to describe a role for c-di-GMP in E. amylovora and suggest that downregulation of motility and type III secretion by c-di-GMP during infection plays a key role in the coordination of pathogenesis. PMID:23475975

  12. Highways in the sky: scales of atmospheric transport of plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schmale, David G; Ross, Shane D

    2015-01-01

    Many high-risk plant pathogens are transported over long distances (hundreds of meters to thousands of kilometers) in the atmosphere. The ability to track the movement of these pathogens in the atmosphere is essential for forecasting disease spread and establishing effective quarantine measures. Here, we discuss the scales of atmospheric dispersal of plant pathogens along a transport continuum (pathogen scale, farm scale, regional scale, and continental scale). Growers can use risk information at each of these dispersal scales to assist in making plant disease management decisions, such as the timely application of appropriate pesticides. Regional- and continental-scale atmospheric features known as Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) may shuffle plant pathogens along highways in the sky. A promising new method relying on overlapping turbulent back-trajectories of pathogen-laden parcels of air may assist in localizing potential inoculum sources, informing local and/or regional management efforts such as conservation tillage. The emergence of unmanned aircraft systems (UASs, or drones) to sample plant pathogens in the lower atmosphere, coupled with source localization efforts, could aid in mitigating the spread of high-risk plant pathogens. PMID:26047561

  13. Emigration of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae from leaf litter contributes to its population dynamics in alpine snowpack.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Guilbaud, Caroline; Glaux, Catherine; Lafolie, François; Soubeyrand, Samuel; Morris, Cindy E

    2012-08-01

    The recently discovered ubiquity of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in headwaters and alpine ecosystems worldwide elicits new questions about the ecology of this bacterium and subsequent consequences for disease epidemiology. Because of the major contribution of snow to river run-off during crop growth, we evaluated the population dynamics of P.syringae in snowpack and the underlying leaf litter during two years in the Southern French Alps. High population densities of P.syringae were found on alpine grasses, and leaf litter was identified as the main source of populations of P.syringae in snowpack, contributing more than the populations arriving with the snowfall. The insulating properties of snow foster survival of P.syringae throughout the winter in the 10 cm layer of snow closest to the soil. Litter and snowpack harboured populations of P.syringae that were very diverse in terms of phenotypes and genotypes. Neither substrate nor sampling site had a marked effect on the structure of P.syringae populations, and snow and litter had genotypes in common with other non-agricultural habitats and with crops. These results contribute to the mounting evidence that a highly diverse P.syringae metapopulation is disseminated throughout drainage basins between cultivated and non-cultivated zones. PMID:22188069

  14. [Antimicrobial activities of ant Ponericin W1 against plant pathogens in vitro and the disease resistance in its transgenic Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Fang; Sun, Peng-Wei; Tang, Ding-Zhong

    2013-08-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit a broad antimicrobial spectrum. The application of AMPs from non-plant organisms attracts considerable attention in plant disease resistance engineering. Ponericin W1, isolated from the venom of ant (Pachycondyla goeldii), shows antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae); however, it is not clear whether Ponericin W1 is effective against plant pathogens. The results of this study indicated synthesized Ponericin W1 inhibited mycelial growth of Magnaporthe oryzae and Botrytis cinerea, as well as hyphal growth and spore production of Fusarium graminearum. Besides, Ponericin W1 exhibited antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. After codon optimization, Ponericin W1 gene was constructed into plant expression vector, and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana by floral dip method. The Ponericin W1 was located in intercellular space of the transgenic plants as expected. Compared with the wild-type plants, there were ungerminated spores and less hyphal, conidia on the leaves of transgenic plants after innoculation with the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum. After innoculation with the pathogenic bac-terium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the baceria in the leaves of transgenic plants was significantly less than the wild-type plants, indicating that the transgenic plants displayed enhanced disease resistance to pathogens. These results demonstrate a potential use of Ponericin W1 in genetic engineering for broad-spectrum plant disease resistance. PMID:23956091

  15. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    PubMed

    Nunney, Leonard; Ortiz, Beatriz; Russell, Stephanie A; Ruiz Sánchez, Rebeca; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee) defined a new sequence type (ST53) that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci) diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee) showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa. PMID:25379725

  16. Validation of real-time PCR assays for bioforensic detection of model plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    James, Mindy; Blagden, Trenna; Moncrief, Ian; Burans, James P; Schneider, Katherine; Fletcher, Jacqueline

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. agricultural sector is vulnerable to intentionally introduced microbial threats because of its wide and open distribution and economic importance. To investigate such events, forensically valid assays for plant pathogen detection are needed. In this work, real-time PCR assays were developed for three model plant pathogens: Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato, Xylella fastidiosa, and Wheat streak mosaic virus. Validation included determination of the linearity and range, limit of detection, sensitivity, specificity, and exclusivity of each assay. Additionally, positive control plasmids, distinguishable from native signature by restriction enzyme digestion, were developed to support forensic application of the assays. Each assay displayed linear amplification of target nucleic acid, detected 100 fg or less of target nucleic acid, and was specific to its target pathogen. Results obtained with these model pathogens provide the framework for development and validation of similar assays for other plant pathogens of high consequence. PMID:24261870

  17. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens - focus on cotton dust.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola) is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor) that cause

  18. Plant pathogenic anaerobic bacteria use aromatic polyketides to access aerobic territory.

    PubMed

    Shabuer, Gulimila; Ishida, Keishi; Pidot, Sacha J; Roth, Martin; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Around 25% of vegetable food is lost worldwide because of infectious plant diseases, including microbe-induced decay of harvested crops. In wet seasons and under humid storage conditions, potato tubers are readily infected and decomposed by anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium puniceum). We found that these anaerobic plant pathogens harbor a gene locus (type II polyketide synthase) to produce unusual polyketide metabolites (clostrubins) with dual functions. The clostrubins, which act as antibiotics against other microbial plant pathogens, enable the anaerobic bacteria to survive an oxygen-rich plant environment. PMID:26542569

  19. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Wang, Dongping; Zamdborg, Leonid; Kelleher, Neil L; Huber, Steven C; Zhao, Youfu

    2013-02-21

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella, and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we first report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovora, an enterobacterium causing serious fire blight disease of apples and pears. Immunoblots using generic anti-lysine acetylation antibodies demonstrated that growth conditions strongly affected the LysAc profiles in E. amylovora. Differential LysAc profiles were also observed for two E. amylovora strains, known to have differential virulence in plants, indicating translational modification of proteins may be important in determining virulence of bacterial strains. Proteomic analysis of LysAc in two E. amylovora strains identified 141 LysAc sites in 96 proteins that function in a wide range of biological pathways. Consistent with previous reports, 44% of the proteins are involved in metabolic processes, including central metabolism, lipopolysaccharide, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, several proteins involved in E. amylovora virulence, including exopolysaccharide amylovoran biosynthesis- and type III secretion-associated proteins, were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that LysAc may play a major role in bacterial virulence. Comparative analysis of LysAc sites in E. amylovora and E. coli further revealed the sequence and structural commonality for LysAc in the two organisms. Collectively, these results reinforce the notion that LysAc of proteins is widespread in bacterial metabolism and virulence. PMID:23234799

  20. Characterization of a new ViI-like Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage phiEa2809.

    PubMed

    Lagonenko, Alexander L; Sadovskaya, Olga; Valentovich, Leonid N; Evtushenkov, Anatoly N

    2015-04-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria causing fire blight disease in many Rosaceae species. A novel E. amylovora bacteriophage, phiEa2809, was isolated from symptomless apple leaf sample collected in Belarus. This phage was also able to infect Pantoea agglomerans strains. The genome of phiEa2809 is a double-stranded linear DNA 162,160 bp in length, including 145 ORFs and one tRNA gene. The phiEa2809 genomic sequence is similar to the genomes of the Serratia plymutica phage MAM1, Shigella phage AG-3, Dickeya phage vB DsoM LIMEstone1 and Salmonella phage ViI and lacks similarity to described E. amylovora phage genomes. Based on virion morphology (an icosahedral head, long contractile tail) and genome structure, phiEa2809 was classified as a member of Myoviridae, ViI-like bacteriophages group. PhiEa2809 is the firstly characterized ViI-like bacteriophage able to lyse E. amylovora. PMID:25714551

  1. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Wang, Dongping; Zamdborg, Leonid; Kelleher, Neil L.; Huber, Steven C.; Zhao, Youfu

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella, and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we first report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovora, an enterobacterium causing serious fire blight disease of apples and pears. Immunoblots using generic anti-lysine acetylation antibodies demonstrated that growth conditions strongly affected the LysAc profiles in E. amylovora. Differential LysAc profiles were also observed for two E. amylovora strains, known to have differential virulence in plants, indicating translational modification of proteins may be important in determining virulence of bacterial strains. Proteomic analysis of LysAc in two E. amylovora strains identified 141 LysAc sites in 96 proteins that function in a wide range of biological pathways. Consistent with previous reports, 44% of the proteins are involved in metabolic processes, including central metabolism, lipopolysaccharide, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, several proteins involved in E. amylovora virulence, including exopolysaccharide amylovoran biosynthesis- and type III secretion-associated proteins, were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that LysAc may play a major role in bacterial virulence. Comparative analysis of LysAc sites in E. amylovora and E. coli further revealed the sequence and structural commonality for LysAc in the two organisms. Collectively, these results reinforce the notion that LysAc of proteins is widespread in bacterial metabolism and virulence. PMID:23234799

  2. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi Gan locus, involved in galactan catabolism.

    PubMed

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-10-01

    beta-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK(2). Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-beta-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-beta-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny. PMID:17644603

  3. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi gan Locus, Involved in Galactan Catabolism▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-01-01

    β-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK2. Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-β-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-β-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny. PMID:17644603

  4. Thaxtomin biosynthesis: The path to plant pathogenicity in the genus Streptomyces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptomyces species are best known for their ability to produce a wide array of medically- and agriculturally-important secondary metabolites. However, there is a growing number of species which, like Streptomyces scabies, can function as plant pathogens and cause scab disease on economically-impor...

  5. Commonalities and differences of T3SSs in rhizobia and plant pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tampakaki, Anastasia P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria and rhizobia infect higher plants albeit the interactions with their hosts are principally distinct and lead to completely different phenotypic outcomes, either pathogenic or mutualistic, respectively. Bacterial protein delivery to plant host plays an essential role in determining the phenotypic outcome of plant-bacteria interactions. The involvement of type III secretion systems (T3SSs) in mediating animal- and plant-pathogen interactions was discovered in the mid-80's and is now recognized as a multiprotein nanomachine dedicated to trans-kingdom movement of effector proteins. The discovery of T3SS in bacteria with symbiotic lifestyles broadened its role beyond virulence. In most T3SS-positive bacterial pathogens, virulence is largely dependent on functional T3SSs, while in rhizobia the system is dispensable for nodulation and can affect positively or negatively the mutualistic associations with their hosts. This review focuses on recent comparative genome analyses in plant pathogens and rhizobia that uncovered similarities and variations among T3SSs in their genetic organization, regulatory networks and type III secreted proteins and discusses the evolutionary adaptations of T3SSs and type III secreted proteins that might account for the distinguishable phenotypes and host range characteristics of plant pathogens and symbionts. PMID:24723933

  6. Functional analysis of Pcipg2 from the straminopilous plant Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici is an oomycete plant pathogen that causes severe diseases in a wide variety of crops. Polygalacturonases (PGs) play a major role in the degradation pectin in plant cell walls. A genomic library was made from a highly virulent strain of P. capsici with high PGs activity. Seven pg...

  7. The Role of Hybridization in the Evolution and Emergence of New Fungal Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stukenbrock, Eva H

    2016-02-01

    Hybridization in fungi has recently been recognized as a major force in the generation of new fungal plant pathogens. These include the grass pathogen Zymoseptoria pseudotritici and the powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis triticale of triticale. Hybridization also plays an important role in the transfer of genetic material between species. This process is termed introgressive hybridization and involves extensive backcrossing between hybrid and the parental species. Introgressive hybridization has contributed substantially to the successful spread of plant pathogens such as Ophiostoma ulmi and O. novo-ulmi, the causal agents of Dutch elm disease, and other tree pathogens such as the rust pathogen Melampsora. Hybridization occurs more readily between species that have previously not coexisted, so-called allopatric species. Reproductive barriers between allopatric species are likely to be more permissive allowing interspecific mating to occur. The bringing together of allopatric species of plant pathogens by global agricultural trade consequently increases the potential for hybridization between pathogen species. In light of global environmental changes, agricultural development, and the facilitated long-distance spread of fungal plant pathogens, hybridization should be considered an important mechanism whereby new pathogens may emerge. Recent studies have gained insight into the genetics and biology of fungal hybrids. Here I summarize current knowledge about hybrid speciation and introgressive hybridization. I propose that future studies will benefit greatly from the availability of large genome data sets and that genome data provide a powerful resource in combination with experimental approaches for analyses of hybrid species. PMID:26824768

  8. Disentangling effects of vector birth rate, mortality rate, and abundance on spread of a plant pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For insect-transmitted plant pathogens, rates of pathogen spread are a function of vector abundance. While vector abundance is recognized to be important, parameters that govern vector population size receive little attention. For example, epidemiological models often fix vector population size by a...

  9. The Ascomycete Verticillium longisporum Is a Hybrid and a Plant Pathogen with an Expanded Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Inderbitzin, Patrik; Davis, R. Michael; Bostock, Richard M.; Subbarao, Krishna V.

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization plays a central role in plant evolution, but its overall importance in fungi is unknown. New plant pathogens are thought to arise by hybridization between formerly separated fungal species. Evolution of hybrid plant pathogens from non-pathogenic ancestors in the fungal-like protist Phytophthora has been demonstrated, but in fungi, the most important group of plant pathogens, there are few well-characterized examples of hybrids. We focused our attention on the hybrid and plant pathogen Verticillium longisporum, the causal agent of the Verticillium wilt disease in crucifer crops. In order to address questions related to the evolutionary origin of V. longisporum, we used phylogenetic analyses of seven nuclear loci and a dataset of 203 isolates of V. longisporum, V. dahliae and related species. We confirmed that V. longisporum was diploid, and originated three different times, involving four different lineages and three different parental species. All hybrids shared a common parent, species A1, that hybridized respectively with species D1, V. dahliae lineage D2 and V. dahliae lineage D3, to give rise to three different lineages of V. longisporum. Species A1 and species D1 constituted as yet unknown taxa. Verticillium longisporum likely originated recently, as each V. longisporum lineage was genetically homogenous, and comprised species A1 alleles that were identical across lineages. PMID:21455321

  10. Fun Microbiology: Using a Plant Pathogenic Fungus To Demonstrate Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; Orsted, Kathy M.; Warnes, Carl E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a plant pathogenic fungus in which students learn to follow aseptic techniques, grow and produce spores of a fungus, use a hemacytometer for enumerating spores, prepare serial dilutions, grow and inoculate plants, isolate a pure culture using agar streak plates, and demonstrate the four steps of Koch's postulates.…

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Dactylonectria macrodidyma, a Plant-Pathogenic Fungus in the Nectriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Demers, Jill; Veltri, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Dactylonectria macrodidyma is part of the Nectriaceae, a family containing important plant pathogens. This species possesses the ability to induce disease on grapevine, avocado, and olive. Here, we report the first draft genome of D. macrodidyma isolate JAC15-245. The assembled genome was 58 Mbp and contained an estimated 16,454 genes. PMID:25883288

  12. Draft genome sequence of Dactylonectria macrodydima, a plant pathogenic fungus in the Nectriaceae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dactylonectria macrodidyma is part of the Nectriaceae, a family containing important plant pathogens. This species possesses the ability to induce disease on grapevine, avocado and olive. Here, we report the first draft genome of D. macrodidyma isolate JAC15-08. The assembled genome was 58 Mbp and c...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Dactylonectria macrodidyma, a Plant-Pathogenic Fungus in the Nectriaceae.

    PubMed

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Demers, Jill; Veltri, Daniel; Crouch, Jo Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dactylonectria macrodidyma is part of the Nectriaceae, a family containing important plant pathogens. This species possesses the ability to induce disease on grapevine, avocado, and olive. Here, we report the first draft genome of D. macrodidyma isolate JAC15-245. The assembled genome was 58 Mbp and contained an estimated 16,454 genes. PMID:25883288

  14. Comprehensive list of names of plant pathogenic bacteria, 1980-2007.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This list contains the names of all plant pathogenic bacteria which have been effectively and validly published in terms of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria and the Standards for Naming Pathovars and their revisions. Included are species names from the Approved Lists of Bacterial N...

  15. Antifungal compounds from turmeric and nutmeg with activity against plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antifungal activity of twenty-two common spices was evaluated against plant pathogens using direct-bioautography coupled Colletotrichum bioassays. Turmeric, nutmeg, ginger, clove, oregano, cinnamon, anise, fennel, basil, black cumin, and black pepper showed antifungal activity against the plant ...

  16. Meiosis Drives Extraordinary Genome Plasticity in the Haploid Fungal Plant Pathogen Mycosphaerella Graminicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiosis in the plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola results in eight ascospores due to a mitotic division following the two meiotic divisions. The transient diploid phase allows for recombination among homologous chromosomes. However, some chromosomes of M. graminicola lack homologs an...

  17. COLONIZATION OF SUBTERRANEAN PLANT SURFACES AND SUPPRESSION OF SOILBORNE PLANT PATHOGENS: STUDIES WITH ENTEROBACTER CLOACAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is generally assumed that biocontrol organisms must colonize subterranean plant parts for effective suppression of soilborne plant pathogens in many biocontrol interactions. Unfortunately our knowledge of the processes that lead to effective colonization is unclear. Also unclear is our knowledg...

  18. Mycosphaerella graminicola sequencing heads towards the first finished genome of a filamentous plant pathogenic fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella is one of the largest genera of plant pathogenic fungi with more than 1,000 named species, a few of which cause disease in humans and other vertebrates. The genomes of M. graminicola and M. fijiensis, two of the most economically important pathogens of wheat and banana, respectively, ...

  19. Plant Pathogens at Work: Progress and Possibilities for Weed Biocontrol Part 2. Improving Weed Control Efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of plant pathogenic weed biological control agents can be approached using two strategies, termed the classical and biological approaches. The classical involves the search for pathogens in the native range of an invasive weed and its importation and release into the area of introdu...

  20. A generic risk-based surveying method for invading plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive plant pathogens are increasing with international trade and travel with damaging environmental and economic consequences. Recent examples include tree diseases such as Sudden Oak Death in the Western US and Ash Dieback in Europe. To control an invading pathogen it is crucial that newly in...

  1. Modeling the spread of insect transmitted plant pathogens: roguing in perennial crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roguing (the removal of infected plants) is commonly used to manage the spread of insect-transmitted plant pathogens. In the case of perennial crops, rogued plants are often replaced with healthy plants. Replacement of infected plants has two potential benefits. First, removing an infected plant e...

  2. A Theoretical Assessment of Methods to Reduce the Spread of Insect Vectored Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many insect vectored plant pathogen systems share several common features. Specifically, insect vectors often prefer habitats outside the affected crop and acquire the pathogen from a non-crop plant host. Inoculative vectors then move into the crop, causing primary pathogen spread. This may or ma...

  3. List of new names of plant pathogenic bacteria (2011-2012)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Society of Plant Pathology Committee on the Taxonomy of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria has responsibility to evaluate the names of newly proposed pathovars for adherence to the International Standards for Naming Pathovars of Phytopathogenic Bacteria. Currently, the Comprehensive List of...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa Strain Sb3-1, a Soilborne Bacterium with Antagonistic Activity toward Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wetzlinger, Ute; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Paenibacillus polymyxa Sb3-1, a strain that shows antagonistic activities against pathogenic fungi and bacteria, consists of one 5.6-Mb circular chromosome and two plasmids of 223 kb and 8 kb. The genome reveals several genes that potentially contribute to its antagonistic and plant growth promotion activity. PMID:25767224

  5. Single-channel analysis of the anion channel-forming protein from the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganense ssp. nebraskense

    PubMed Central

    Schürholz, Theo; Dloczik, Larissa; Neumann, Eberhard

    1993-01-01

    The anion channel protein from Clavibacter michiganense ssp. nebraskense (Schürholz, Th. et al. 1991, J. Membrane Biol. 123: 1-8) was analyzed at different concentrations of KCl and KF. At 0.8 M KCl the conductance G(Vm) increases exponentially from 21 pS at 50 mV up to 53 pS at Vm = 200 mV, 20°C. The concentration dependence of G(Vm) corresponds to a Michaelis-Menten type saturation function at all membrane voltage values applied (0-200 mV). The anion concentration K0.5, where G(Vm) has its half-maximum value, increases from 0.12 M at 50 mV to 0.24 M at 175 mV for channels in a soybean phospholipid bilayer. The voltage dependence of the single channel conductance, which is different for charged and neutral lipid bilayers, can be described either by a two-state flicker (2SF) model and the Nernst-Planck continuum theory, or by a two barrier, one-site (2B1S) model with asymmetric barriers. The increase in the number of open channels after a voltage jump from 50 mV to 150 mV has a time constant of 0.8 s. The changes of the single-channel conductance are much faster (<1 ms). The electric part of the gating process is characterized by the (reversible) molar electrical work ΔGθel = ρZgFVm ≈ -1.3 RT, which corresponds to the movement of one charge of the gating charge number ǀZgǀ = 1 across the fraction ρ = ΔVm/Vm = 0.15 of the membrane voltage Vm = 200 mV. Unlike with chloride, the single channel conductance of fluoride has a maximum at about 150 mV in the presence of the buffer PIPES (≥5 mM, pH 6.8) with K0.5 ≈ 1 M. It is shown that the decrease in conductance is due to a blocking of the channel by the PIPES anion. In summary, the results indicate that the anion transport by the Clavibacter anion channel (CAC) does not require a voltage dependent conformation change of the CAC. PMID:19431871

  6. The plant pathogen Phytophthora andina emerged via hybridization of an unknown Phytophthora species and the Irish famine pathogen, P. infestans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global movement of plant pathogens threatens natural ecosystems, food security, and commercial interests. Introduction of a plant pathogen to new geographic regions has been the primary mechanism by which new pathogens have emerged. Another documented mechanism for the emergence of plant pathoge...

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana expresses multiple lines of defense to counterattack Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Fagard, Mathilde; Dellagi, Alia; Roux, Camille; Périno, Claude; Rigault, Martine; Boucher, Virginie; Shevchik, Vladimir E; Expert, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    Many taxonomically diverse plant species are attacked by Erwinia chrysanthemi, a member of the causal agents of soft-rotting diseases. Symptom development is due to the collective action of pectin-degrading enzymes secreted by the bacterium through a type II secretion system (T2SS). Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a susceptible host, we show that plants respond to E. chrysanthemi 3937 by expressing cell-wall reactions, production of an oxidative burst, and activation of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) or ethylene (ET) signaling pathways. We found that the oxidative burst is mainly generated via the expression of the AtrbohD gene, constitutes a barrier of resistance to bacterial attack, and acts independently of the SA-mediated response. To determine the importance of T2SS-secreted proteins in elicitation of these defenses, we used a T2SS deficient mutant and purified enzymatic preparations of representative members of strain 3937 pectate lyase activity. The T2SS-secreted proteins were responsible only partially for the activation of SA and JA or ET signaling pathways observed after infection with the wild-type bacterium and were not involved in the expression of other identified defense reactions. Our study shows the differential role played by pectate lyases isoenzymes in this process and highlights the complexity of the host immune network, which is finely controlled by the bacterium. PMID:17601167

  8. Characterization of an ATP Translocase Identified in the Destructive Plant Pathogen “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”▿

    PubMed Central

    Vahling, Cheryl M.; Duan, Yongping; Lin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    ATP/ADP translocases transport ATP across a lipid bilayer, which is normally impermeable to this molecule due to its size and charge. These transport proteins appear to be unique to mitochondria, plant plastids, and obligate intracellular bacteria. All bacterial ATP/ADP translocases characterized thus far have been found in endosymbionts of protozoa or pathogens of higher-order animals, including humans. A putative ATP/ADP translocase was uncovered during the genomic sequencing of the intracellular plant pathogen “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,” the causal agent of citrus huanglongbing. Bioinformatic analysis of the protein revealed 12 transmembrane helices and predicted an isoelectric point of 9.4, both of which are characteristic of this family of proteins. The “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” gene (nttA) encoding the translocase was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to enable E. coli to import ATP directly into the cell. Competition assays with the heterologous E. coli system demonstrated that the translocase was highly specific for ATP and ADP but that other nucleotides, if present in high concentrations, could also be taken up and/or block the ability of the translocase to import ATP. In addition, a protein homologous to NttA was identified in “Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum,” the bacterium associated with potato zebra chip disease. This is the first reported characterization of an ATP translocase from “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,” indicating that some intracellular bacteria of plants also have the potential to import ATP directly from their environment. PMID:19948801

  9. RipAY, a Plant Pathogen Effector Protein, Exhibits Robust γ-Glutamyl Cyclotransferase Activity When Stimulated by Eukaryotic Thioredoxins.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shoko; Kawazoe, Tomoki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kitagawa, Takao; Popa, Crina; Valls, Marc; Genin, Stéphane; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Naotaka; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki

    2016-03-25

    The plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum injects more than 70 effector proteins (virulence factors) into the host plant cells via the needle-like structure of a type III secretion system. The type III secretion system effector proteins manipulate host regulatory networks to suppress defense responses with diverse molecular activities. Uncovering the molecular function of these effectors is essential for a mechanistic understanding of R. solanacearum pathogenicity. However, few of the effectors from R. solanacearum have been functionally characterized, and their plant targets remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the ChaC domain-containing effector RipAY/RSp1022 from R. solanacearum exhibits γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase (GGCT) activity to degrade the major intracellular redox buffer, glutathione. Heterologous expression of RipAY, but not other ChaC family proteins conserved in various organisms, caused growth inhibition of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the intracellular glutathione level was decreased to ∼30% of the normal level following expression of RipAY in yeast. Although active site mutants of GGCT activity were non-toxic, the addition of glutathione did not reverse the toxicity, suggesting that the toxicity might be a consequence of activity against other γ-glutamyl compounds. Intriguingly, RipAY protein purified from a bacterial expression system did not exhibit any GGCT activity, whereas it exhibited robust GGCT activity upon its interaction with eukaryotic thioredoxins, which are important for intracellular redox homeostasis during bacterial infection in plants. Our results suggest that RipAY has evolved to sense the host intracellular redox environment, which triggers its enzymatic activity to create a favorable environment for R. solanacearum infection. PMID:26823466

  10. Factors affecting the initial adhesion and retention of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa in the foregut of an insect vector.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2014-01-01

    Vector transmission of bacterial plant pathogens involves three steps: pathogen acquisition from an infected host, retention within the vector, and inoculation of cells into susceptible tissue of an uninfected plant. In this study, a combination of plant and artificial diet systems were used to determine the importance of several genes on the initial adhesion and retention of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa to an efficient insect vector. Mutant strains included fimbrial (fimA and pilB) and afimbrial (hxfA and hxfB) adhesins and three loci involved in regulatory systems (rpfF, rpfC, and cgsA). Transmission assays with variable retention time indicated that HxfA and HxfB were primarily important for early adhesion to vectors, while FimA was necessary for both adhesion and retention. The long pilus protein PilB was not deficient in initial adhesion but may be important for retention. Genes upregulated under the control of rpfF are important for both initial adhesion and retention, as transmission rates of this mutant strain were initially low and decreased over time, while disruption of rpfC and cgsA yielded trends similar to that shown by the wild-type control. Because induction of an X. fastidiosa transmissible state requires pectin, a series of experiments were used to test the roles of a polygalacturonase (pglA) and the pectin and galacturonic acid carbohydrates on the transmission of X. fastidiosa. Results show that galacturonic acid, or PglA activity breaking pectin into its major subunit (galacturonic acid), is required for X. fastidiosa vector transmission using an artificial diet system. This study shows that early adhesion and retention of X. fastidiosa are mediated by different factors. It also illustrates that the interpretation of results of vector transmission experiments, in the context of vector-pathogen interaction studies, is highly dependent on experimental design. PMID:24185853

  11. Antifungal Substances from Streptomyces sp. A3265 Antagonistic to Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Van Minh, Nguyen; Woo, E-Eum; Kim, Ji-Yul; Kim, Dae-Won; Hwang, Byung Soon; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we identified a Streptomyces sp., A3265, as exhibiting potent antifungal activity against various plant pathogenic fungi, including Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and Rhizoctonia solani. This strain also exhibited a biocontrolling effect against ginseng root rot and damping-off disease, common diseases of ginseng and other crops. In this study, we isolated two antifungal substances responsible for this biocontrolling effect via Diaion HP-20 and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, medium pressure liquid chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography. These compounds were identified as guanidylfungin A and methyl guanidylfungin A by spectroscopic methods. These compounds exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against various plant pathogenic fungi as well as against bacteria. PMID:26539051

  12. Computational models in plant-pathogen interactions: the case of Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phytophthora infestans is a devastating oomycete pathogen of potato production worldwide. This review explores the use of computational models for studying the molecular interactions between P. infestans and one of its hosts, Solanum tuberosum. Modeling and conclusion Deterministic logistics models have been widely used to study pathogenicity mechanisms since the early 1950s, and have focused on processes at higher biological resolution levels. In recent years, owing to the availability of high throughput biological data and computational resources, interest in stochastic modeling of plant-pathogen interactions has grown. Stochastic models better reflect the behavior of biological systems. Most modern approaches to plant pathology modeling require molecular kinetics information. Unfortunately, this information is not available for many plant pathogens, including P. infestans. Boolean formalism has compensated for the lack of kinetics; this is especially the case where comparative genomics, protein-protein interactions and differential gene expression are the most common data resources. PMID:19909526

  13. Isolation and characterization of soil Streptomyces species as potential biological control agents against fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed

    2014-05-01

    The use of antagonist microorganisms against fungal plant pathogens is an attractive and ecologically alternative to the use of chemical pesticides. Streptomyces are beneficial soil bacteria and potential candidates for biocontrol agents. This study reports the isolation, characterization and antagonist activity of soil streptomycetes from the Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve, a Natural protected area in Campeche, Mexico. The results showed morphological, physiological and biochemical characterization of six actinomycetes and their inhibitory activity against Curvularia sp., Aspergillus niger, Helminthosporium sp. and Fusarium sp. One isolate, identified as Streptomyces sp. CACIS-1.16CA showed the potential to inhibit additional pathogens as Alternaria sp., Phytophthora capsici, Colletotrichum sp. and Rhizoctonia sp. with percentages ranging from 47 to 90 %. This study identified a streptomycete strain with a broad antagonist activity that could be used for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:24310522

  14. Nitric Oxide in the Offensive Strategy of Fungal and Oomycete Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    In the course of evolutionary changes pathogens have developed many invasion strategies, to which the host organisms responded with a broad range of defense reactions involving endogenous signaling molecules, such as nitric oxide (NO). There is evidence that pathogenic microorganisms, including two most important groups of eukaryotic plant pathogens, also acquired the ability to synthesize NO via non-unequivocally defined oxidative and/or reductive routes. Although the both kingdoms Chromista and Fungi are remarkably diverse, the experimental data clearly indicate that pathogen-derived NO is an important regulatory molecule controlling not only developmental processes, but also pathogen virulence and its survival in the host. An active control of mitigation or aggravation of nitrosative stress within host cells seems to be a key determinant for the successful invasion of plant pathogens representing different lifestyles and an effective mode of dispersion in various environmental niches. PMID:26973690

  15. Antifungal Substances from Streptomyces sp. A3265 Antagonistic to Plant Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Van Minh, Nguyen; Woo, E-Eum; Kim, Ji-Yul; Kim, Dae-Won; Hwang, Byung Soon; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Lee, In-Kyoung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2015-09-01

    In a previous study, we identified a Streptomyces sp., A3265, as exhibiting potent antifungal activity against various plant pathogenic fungi, including Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and Rhizoctonia solani. This strain also exhibited a biocontrolling effect against ginseng root rot and damping-off disease, common diseases of ginseng and other crops. In this study, we isolated two antifungal substances responsible for this biocontrolling effect via Diaion HP-20 and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, medium pressure liquid chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography. These compounds were identified as guanidylfungin A and methyl guanidylfungin A by spectroscopic methods. These compounds exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against various plant pathogenic fungi as well as against bacteria. PMID:26539051

  16. Separating the inseparable: the metabolomic analysis of plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Allwood, J William; Heald, Jim; Lloyd, Amanda J; Goodacre, Royston; Mur, Luis A J

    2012-01-01

    Plant-microbe interactions-whether pathogenic or symbiotic-exert major influences on plant physiology and productivity. Analysis of such interactions represents a particular challenge to metabolomic approaches due to the intimate association between the interacting partners coupled with a general commonality of metabolites. We here describe an approach based on co-cultivation of Arabidopsis cell cultures and bacterial plant pathogens to assess the metabolomes of both interacting partners, which we refer to as dual metabolomics. PMID:22351169

  17. Comparative genomics reveals insight into virulence strategies of plant pathogenic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Bishwo N; Hamilton, John P; Zerillo, Marcelo M; Tisserat, Ned; Lévesque, C André; Buell, C Robin

    2013-01-01

    The kingdom Stramenopile includes diatoms, brown algae, and oomycetes. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, including Phytophthora, Pythium and downy mildew species, cause devastating diseases on a wide range of host species and have a significant impact on agriculture. Here, we report comparative analyses on the genomes of thirteen straminipilous species, including eleven plant pathogenic oomycetes, to explore common features linked to their pathogenic lifestyle. We report the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of six Pythium genomes and comparison with other stramenopiles including photosynthetic diatoms, and other plant pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora species, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, and Pythium ultimum var. ultimum. Novel features of the oomycete genomes include an expansion of genes encoding secreted effectors and plant cell wall degrading enzymes in Phytophthora species and an over-representation of genes involved in proteolytic degradation and signal transduction in Pythium species. A complete lack of classical RxLR effectors was observed in the seven surveyed Pythium genomes along with an overall reduction of pathogenesis-related gene families in H. arabidopsidis. Comparative analyses revealed fewer genes encoding enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism in Pythium species and H. arabidopsidis as compared to Phytophthora species, suggesting variation in virulence mechanisms within plant pathogenic oomycete species. Shared features between the oomycetes and diatoms revealed common mechanisms of intracellular signaling and transportation. Our analyses demonstrate the value of comparative genome analyses for exploring the evolution of pathogenesis and survival mechanisms in the oomycetes. The comparative analyses of seven Pythium species with the closely related oomycetes, Phytophthora species and H. arabidopsidis, and distantly related diatoms provide insight into genes that underlie virulence. PMID:24124466

  18. Genome Sequence of Phytophthora fragariae var. fragariae, a Quarantine Plant-Pathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ruifang; Cheng, Yinghui; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying; Guo, Liyun

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora fragariae var. fragariae is a serious plant-pathogenic fungus causing red core disease in strawberries, resulting in a larger number of fruit produced, and the fungus has been regulated as a quarantine pest of many countries and regions. Here, we announce the genome sequence of P. fragariae var. fragariae, and this information might provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenicity and host specificity of this pathogen, as well as help us further identify targets for fungicides. PMID:25814589

  19. Comparative Genomics Reveals Insight into Virulence Strategies of Plant Pathogenic Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Bishwo N.; Hamilton, John P.; Zerillo, Marcelo M.; Tisserat, Ned; Lévesque, C. André; Buell, C. Robin

    2013-01-01

    The kingdom Stramenopile includes diatoms, brown algae, and oomycetes. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, including Phytophthora, Pythium and downy mildew species, cause devastating diseases on a wide range of host species and have a significant impact on agriculture. Here, we report comparative analyses on the genomes of thirteen straminipilous species, including eleven plant pathogenic oomycetes, to explore common features linked to their pathogenic lifestyle. We report the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of six Pythium genomes and comparison with other stramenopiles including photosynthetic diatoms, and other plant pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora species, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, and Pythium ultimum var. ultimum. Novel features of the oomycete genomes include an expansion of genes encoding secreted effectors and plant cell wall degrading enzymes in Phytophthora species and an over-representation of genes involved in proteolytic degradation and signal transduction in Pythium species. A complete lack of classical RxLR effectors was observed in the seven surveyed Pythium genomes along with an overall reduction of pathogenesis-related gene families in H. arabidopsidis. Comparative analyses revealed fewer genes encoding enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism in Pythium species and H. arabidopsidis as compared to Phytophthora species, suggesting variation in virulence mechanisms within plant pathogenic oomycete species. Shared features between the oomycetes and diatoms revealed common mechanisms of intracellular signaling and transportation. Our analyses demonstrate the value of comparative genome analyses for exploring the evolution of pathogenesis and survival mechanisms in the oomycetes. The comparative analyses of seven Pythium species with the closely related oomycetes, Phytophthora species and H. arabidopsidis, and distantly related diatoms provide insight into genes that underlie virulence. PMID:24124466

  20. Antibiosis functions during interactions of Trichoderma afroharzianum and Trichoderma gamsii with plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia and Pythium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinjian; Harvey, Paul R; Stummer, Belinda E; Warren, Rosemary A; Zhang, Guangzhi; Guo, Kai; Li, Jishun; Yang, Hetong

    2015-09-01

    Trichoderma afroharzianum is one of the best characterized Trichoderma species, and strains have been utilized as plant disease suppressive inoculants. In contrast, Trichoderma gamsii has only recently been described, and there is limited knowledge of its disease suppressive efficacies. Comparative studies of changes in gene expression during interactions of these species with their target plant pathogens will provide fundamental information on pathogen antibiosis functions. In the present study, we used complementary DNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) analysis to investigate changes in transcript profiling of T. afroharzianum strain LTR-2 and T. gamsii strain Tk7a during in vitro interactions with plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium irregulare. Considerable differences were resolved in the overall expression profiles of strains LTR-2 and Tk7a when challenged with either plant pathogen. In strain LTR-2, previously reported mycoparasitism-related genes such as chitinase, polyketide synthase, and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase were found to be differentially expressed. This was not so for strain Tk7a, with the only previously reported antibiosis-associated genes being small secreted cysteine-rich proteins. Although only one differentially expressed gene was common to both strains LTR-2 and Tk7a, numerous genes reportedly associated with pathogen antibiosis processes were differentially expressed in both strains, including degradative enzymes and membrane transport proteins. A number of novel potential antibiosis-related transcripts were found from strains LTR-2 and Tk7a and remain to be identified. The expression kinetics of 20 Trichoderma (10 from strain LTR-2, 10 from strain Tk7a) transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) at pre- and post-mycelia contact stages of Trichoderma-prey interactions, thereby confirming differential gene expression. Collectively, this research

  1. Disentangling Effects of Vector Birth Rate, Mortality Rate, and Abundance on Spread of Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sisterson, Mark S; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-04-01

    Models on the spread of insect-transmitted plant pathogens often fix vector population size by assuming that deaths are offset by births. Although such mathematical simplifications are often justified, deemphasizing parameters that govern vector population size is problematic, as reproductive biology and mortality schedules of vectors of plant pathogens receive little empirical attention. Here, the importance of explicitly including parameters for vector birth and death rates was evaluated by comparing results from models with fixed vector population size with models with logistic vector population growth. In fixed vector population size models, increasing vector mortality decreased percentage of inoculative vectors, but had no effect on vector population size, as deaths were offset by births. In models with logistic vector population growth, increasing vector mortality decreased percentage of inoculative vectors and decreased vector population size. Consequently, vector mortality had a greater effect on pathogen spread in models with logistic vector population growth than in models with fixed vector population size. Further, in models with logistic vector population growth, magnitude of vector birth rate determined time required for vector populations to reach large size, thereby determining when pathogen spread occurred quickly. Assumptions regarding timing of vector mortality within a time step also affected model outcome. A greater emphasis of vector entomologists on studying reproductive biology and mortality schedules of insect species that transmit plant pathogens will facilitate identification of conditions associated with rapid growth of vector populations and could lead to development of novel control strategies. PMID:26637536

  2. Antifungal compounds from turmeric and nutmeg with activity against plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Mohamed M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Tarawneh, Amer H; Cutler, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    The antifungal activity of twenty-two common spices was evaluated against plant pathogens using direct-bioautography coupled Colletotrichum bioassays. Turmeric, nutmeg, ginger, clove, oregano, cinnamon, anise, fennel, basil, black cumin, and black pepper showed antifungal activity against the plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, Colletotrichum fragariae, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Among the active extracts, turmeric and nutmeg were the most active and were chosen for further investigation. The bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of three compounds from turmeric (1-3) and three compounds from nutmeg (4-6). Their chemical structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis including HR-MS, 1D, and 2D NMR as curcumin (1), demethoxycurcumin (2) and bisdemethoxy-curcumin (3), erythro-(7R,8R)-Δ(8')-4,7-dihydroxy-3,3',5'-trimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (4), erythro-(7R,8R)-Δ8'-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetra-methoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (5), and 5-hydroxy-eugenol (6). The isolated compounds were subsequently evaluated using a 96-well microbioassay against plant pathogens. At 30 μM, compounds 2 and 3 possessed the most antifungal activity against Phomopsis obscurans and Phomopsis viticola, respectively. PMID:25173461

  3. Punctuated changes in plant pathogen populations associated with passage of atmospheric Lagrangian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Shane; Tallapragada, Phanindra; Schmale, David

    2010-11-01

    The atmospheric transport of airborne microorganisms (e.g., plant pathogens) is poorly understood, yet necessary to assess their ecological roles in agricultural ecosystems and to evaluate risks posed by invasive species. The atmospheric transport of plant pathogens can be roughly divided into three phases: liberation of pathogen spores, drift (transport in the atmosphere) and deposition. If liberated spores escape into the planetary boundary layer, they could be transported over thousands of kilometers before being deposited. The drift phase is poorly understood, due to the complex nature of atmospheric transport and relative lack of observational data. In this talk, we present a framework of Lagrangian coherent structures to determine the important atmospheric transport barriers (ATBs) that partition the atmosphere and systematically organize the mesoscale transport problem. Using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles, we measure the concentration of spores of a plant pathogenic fungus (Fusarium) sampled in the atmosphere above Virginia Tech's Kentland Farm. We report correlations between concentrations of Fusarium with the local movement of ATBs determined from archived meteorological data.

  4. Erwinia amylovora modifies phenolic profiles of susceptible and resistant apple through its type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Pontais, Isabelle; Treutter, Dieter; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2008-03-01

    Fire blight is a disease affecting Maloideae caused by the necrogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora, which requires the type III protein secretion system (TTSS) for pathogenicity. Profiles of methanol-extractable leaf phenolics of two apple (Malus x domestica) genotypes with contrasting susceptibility to this disease were analyzed by HPLC after infection. Some qualitative differences were recorded between the constitutive compositions of the two genotypes but in both of them dihydrochalcones accounted for more than 90% of total phenolics. Principal component analysis separated leaves inoculated with a virulent wild-type strain from those inoculated with a non-pathogenic TTSS-defective mutant or with water. The changes in levels of the various groups of phenolics in response to the virulent bacterium were similar between the two genotypes, with a significant decrease of dihydrochalcones and a significant increase of hydroxycinnamate derivatives. Differences between genotypes were, however, recorded in amplitude and kinetic of variation in these groups. Occurrence of oxidation and polymerization reactions is proposed, based on the browning process of infected tissues, but whether some by-products act in defense as toxic compounds remain to be tested. Among direct antibacterial constitutive compounds present in apple leaves, the dihydrochalcone phloretin only was found at levels close to lethal concentrations in both genotypes. However, E. amylovora exhibited the ability to stabilize this compound at sublethal levels even in the resistant apple, rejecting the hypothesis of its involvement in the resistance of this genotype. PMID:18275458

  5. Genotyping of bacteria belonging to the former Erwinia genus by PCR-RFLP analysis of a recA gene fragment.

    PubMed

    Waleron, Małgorzata; Waleron, Krzysztof; Podhajska, Anna J; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2002-02-01

    Genotypic characterization, based on the analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of the recA gene fragment PCR product (recA PCR-RFLP), was performed on members of the former Erwinia genus. PCR primers deduced from published recA gene sequences of Erwinia carotovora allowed the amplification of an approximately 730 bp DNA fragment from each of the 19 Erwinia species tested. Amplified recA fragments were compared using RFLP analysis with four endonucleases (AluI, HinfI, TasI and Tru1I), allowing the detection of characteristic patterns of RFLP products for most of the Erwinia species. Between one and three specific RFLP groups were identified among most of the species tested (Erwinia amylovora, Erwinia ananas, Erwinia cacticida, Erwinia cypripedii, Erwinia herbicola, Erwinia mallotivora, Erwinia milletiae, Erwinia nigrifluens, Erwinia persicina, Erwinia psidii, Erwinia quercina, Erwinia rhapontici, Erwinia rubrifaciens, Erwinia salicis, Erwinia stewartii, Erwinia tracheiphila, Erwinia uredovora, Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, Erwinia carotovora subsp. betavasculorum, Erwinia carotovora subsp. odorifera and Erwinia carotovora subsp. wasabiae). However, in two cases, Erwinia chrysanthemi and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, 15 and 18 specific RFLP groups were detected, respectively. The variability of genetic patterns within these bacteria could be explained in terms of their geographic origin and/or wide host-range. The results indicated that PCR-RFLP analysis of the recA gene fragment is a useful tool for identification of species and subspecies belonging to the former Erwinia genus, as well as for differentiation of strains within E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and E. chrysanthemi. PMID:11832521

  6. Plant Pathogen-Induced Water-Soaking Promotes Salmonella enterica Growth on Tomato Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Potnis, Neha; Colee, James; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogen infection is a critical factor for the persistence of Salmonella enterica on plants. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of S. enterica on diseased tomato plants by using four diverse bacterial spot Xanthomonas species that differ in disease severities. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and X. gardneri infection fostered S. enterica growth, while X. perforans infection did not induce growth but supported the persistence of S. enterica. X. vesicatoria-infected leaves harbored S. enterica populations similar to those on healthy leaves. Growth of S. enterica was associated with extensive water-soaking and necrosis in X. euvesicatoria- and X. gardneri-infected plants. The contribution of water-soaking to the growth of S. enterica was corroborated by an increased growth of populations on water-saturated leaves in the absence of a plant pathogen. S. enterica aggregates were observed with bacterial spot lesions caused by either X. euvesicatoria or X. vesicatoria; however, more S. enterica aggregates formed on X. euvesicatoria-infected leaves as a result of larger lesion sizes per leaf area and extensive water-soaking. Sparsely distributed lesions caused by X. vesicatoria infection do not support the overall growth of S. enterica or aggregates in areas without lesions or water-soaking; S. enterica was observed as single cells and not aggregates. Thus, pathogen-induced water-soaking and necrosis allow S. enterica to replicate and proliferate on tomato leaves. The finding that the pathogen-induced virulence phenotype affects the fate of S. enterica populations in diseased plants suggests that targeting of plant pathogen disease is important in controlling S. enterica populations on plants. PMID:26386057

  7. Infection of an Insect Vector with a Bacterial Plant Pathogen Increases Its Propensity for Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Martini, Xavier; Hoffmann, Mark; Coy, Monique R; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S

    2015-01-01

    The spread of vector-transmitted pathogens relies on complex interactions between host, vector and pathogen. In sessile plant pathosystems, the spread of a pathogen highly depends on the movement and mobility of the vector. However, questions remain as to whether and how pathogen-induced vector manipulations may affect the spread of a plant pathogen. Here we report for the first time that infection with a bacterial plant pathogen increases the probability of vector dispersal, and that such movement of vectors is likely manipulated by a bacterial plant pathogen. We investigated how Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) affects dispersal behavior, flight capacity, and the sexual attraction of its vector, the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama). CLas is the putative causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), which is a disease that threatens the viability of commercial citrus production worldwide. When D. citri developed on CLas-infected plants, short distance dispersal of male D. citri was greater compared to counterparts reared on uninfected plants. Flight by CLas-infected D. citri was initiated earlier and long flight events were more common than by uninfected psyllids, as measured by a flight mill apparatus. Additionally, CLas titers were higher among psyllids that performed long flights than psyllid that performed short flights. Finally, attractiveness of female D. citri that developed on infected plants to male conspecifics increased proportionally with increasing CLas bacterial titers measured within female psyllids. Our study indicates that the phytopathogen, CLas, may manipulate movement and mate selection behavior of their vectors, which is a possible evolved mechanism to promote their own spread. These results have global implications for both current HLB models of disease spread and control strategies. PMID:26083763

  8. Infection of an Insect Vector with a Bacterial Plant Pathogen Increases Its Propensity for Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Monique R.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of vector-transmitted pathogens relies on complex interactions between host, vector and pathogen. In sessile plant pathosystems, the spread of a pathogen highly depends on the movement and mobility of the vector. However, questions remain as to whether and how pathogen-induced vector manipulations may affect the spread of a plant pathogen. Here we report for the first time that infection with a bacterial plant pathogen increases the probability of vector dispersal, and that such movement of vectors is likely manipulated by a bacterial plant pathogen. We investigated how Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) affects dispersal behavior, flight capacity, and the sexual attraction of its vector, the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama). CLas is the putative causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), which is a disease that threatens the viability of commercial citrus production worldwide. When D. citri developed on CLas-infected plants, short distance dispersal of male D. citri was greater compared to counterparts reared on uninfected plants. Flight by CLas-infected D. citri was initiated earlier and long flight events were more common than by uninfected psyllids, as measured by a flight mill apparatus. Additionally, CLas titers were higher among psyllids that performed long flights than psyllid that performed short flights. Finally, attractiveness of female D. citri that developed on infected plants to male conspecifics increased proportionally with increasing CLas bacterial titers measured within female psyllids. Our study indicates that the phytopathogen, CLas, may manipulate movement and mate selection behavior of their vectors, which is a possible evolved mechanism to promote their own spread. These results have global implications for both current HLB models of disease spread and control strategies. PMID:26083763

  9. The fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora requires the rpoN gene for pathogenicity in apple.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laura S; Lehman, Brian L; Sinn, Judith P; Pfeufer, Emily E; Halbrendt, Noemi O; McNellis, Timothy W

    2013-10-01

    RpoN is a σ(54) factor regulating essential virulence gene expression in several plant pathogenic bacteria, including Pseudomonas syringae and Pectobacterium carotovorum. In this study, we found that mutation of rpoN in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora caused a nonpathogenic phenotype. The E. amylovora rpoN Tn5 transposon mutant rpoN1250::Tn5 did not cause fire blight disease symptoms on shoots of mature apple trees. In detached immature apple fruits, the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant failed to cause fire blight disease symptoms and grew to population levels 12 orders of magnitude lower than the wild-type. In addition, the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant failed to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into nonhost tobacco plant leaves, and rpoN1250::Tn5 cells failed to express HrpN protein when grown in hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing liquid medium. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type rpoN gene complemented all the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant phenotypes tested. The rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant was prototrophic on minimal solid and liquid media, indicating that the rpoN1250::Tn5 nonpathogenic phenotype was not caused by a defect in basic metabolism or growth. This study provides clear genetic evidence that rpoN is an essential virulence gene of E. amylovora, suggesting that rpoN has the same function in E. amylovora as in P. syringae and Pe. carotovorum. PMID:23721085

  10. Penicillin-binding proteins from Erwinia amylovora: mutants lacking PBP2 are avirulent.

    PubMed Central

    Milner, J S; Dymock, D; Cooper, R M; Roberts, I S

    1993-01-01

    Radiolabelled penicillin G was used to examine penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) from Erwinia amylovora (OT1). This procedure identified seven PBPs with molecular masses ranging from 22 to 83 kDa. E. amylovora PBPs were compared with those from Escherichia coli (JM101) and from two spherical, avirulent TnphoA mutants derived from OT1. Radiolabelled penicillin G bound to only six proteins from the spherical mutants which lacked a 69-kDa PBP. The spherical mutants could be complemented by the cloned E. coli pbpA-rodA operon, which restored both cell shape and virulence to apple seedlings. This suggested that the E. amylovora 69-kDa PBP is probably the functional equivalent of the E. coli PBP2 protein. Southern blot analysis using the E. coli rodA and pbpA genes as radiolabelled probes showed that TnphoA had inserted into the E. amylovora equivalent of the E. coli rodA-pbpA operon. Southern blots to chromosomal DNAs of the two spherical mutants, using the cloned hrp and dsp genes from E. amylovora as radiolabelled probes, confirmed that the TnphoA insertions were not located in the region of the E. amylovora chromosome postulated to encode known virulence factors. Both of the spherical TnphoA mutants synthesized amounts of extracellular polysaccharide equivalent to those synthesized by the wild-type strain (OT1), were resistant to lysis in distilled water and to lysozyme, and elicited the hypersensitive response on nonhost plants. These results indicate a possible role for cell shape in the virulence of this plant pathogen. Images PMID:8407779

  11. Erwinia amylovora CRISPR elements provide new tools for evaluating strain diversity and for microbial source tracking.

    PubMed

    McGhee, Gayle C; Sundin, George W

    2012-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) comprise a family of short DNA repeat sequences that are separated by non repetitive spacer sequences and, in combination with a suite of Cas proteins, are thought to function as an adaptive immune system against invading DNA. The number of CRISPR arrays in a bacterial chromosome is variable, and the content of each array can differ in both repeat number and in the presence or absence of specific spacers. We utilized a comparative sequence analysis of CRISPR arrays of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora to uncover previously unknown genetic diversity in this species. A total of 85 E. amylovora strains varying in geographic isolation (North America, Europe, New Zealand, and the Middle East), host range, plasmid content, and streptomycin sensitivity/resistance were evaluated for CRISPR array number and spacer variability. From these strains, 588 unique spacers were identified in the three CRISPR arrays present in E. amylovora, and these arrays could be categorized into 20, 17, and 2 patterns types, respectively. Analysis of the relatedness of spacer content differentiated most apple and pear strains isolated in the eastern U.S. from western U.S. strains. In addition, we identified North American strains that shared CRISPR genotypes with strains isolated on other continents. E. amylovora strains from Rubus and Indian hawthorn contained mostly unique spacers compared to apple and pear strains, while strains from loquat shared 79% of spacers with apple and pear strains. Approximately 23% of the spacers matched known sequences, with 16% targeting plasmids and 5% targeting bacteriophage. The plasmid pEU30, isolated in E. amylovora strains from the western U.S., was targeted by 55 spacers. Lastly, we used spacer patterns and content to determine that streptomycin-resistant strains of E. amylovora from Michigan were low in diversity and matched corresponding streptomycin-sensitive strains from the

  12. Effects of Erwinia-asparaginase on the coagulation system.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, H; Stockelberg, D; Tengborn, L; Braide, I; Carneskog, J; Kutti, J

    1995-11-01

    L-Asparaginase treatment during induction therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is known to be frequently complicated by thromboembolic events. It was recently suggested that L-asparaginase derived from Erwinia chrysanthemi alters the coagulation system less severely than does Escherichia coli asparaginase. In a series of 11 adult patients with ALL, we investigated some parameters of the coagulation system during treatment with Erwinia asparaginase. The doses employed were rather high; all patients below the age of 60 years received 15,000 U/m2 daily over 14 days. In accordance with what is known from treatment with E. coli asparaginase, we observed significant lowering of antithrombin as well as of fibrinogen. However, as to fibrinogen indeed a significant decrease had occurred prior to the institution of Erwinia asparaginase treatment. The most striking observation in the present study was that the levels of prothrombin complex, reflecting the function of K-vitamin dependent coagulation factors II, VII and X, remained within normal ranges during treatment. This indicates that these coagulation factors were not affected by Erwinia asparaginase, an observation at variance with several reports where E. coli asparaginase was investigated. This latter observation was the only finding which could lend support to the view that Erwinia asparaginase affects the coagulation system less than E. coli asparaginase. Finally, one of our patients developed a sinus thrombosis, a severe thrombotic complication. PMID:7493674

  13. The cyclic AMP receptor protein is the main activator of pectinolysis genes in Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Reverchon, S; Expert, D; Robert-Baudouy, J; Nasser, W

    1997-06-01

    The main virulence factors of the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi are pectinases that cleave pectin, a major constituent of the plant cell wall. Although physiological studies suggested that pectinase production in Erwinia species is subjected to catabolite repression, the direct implication of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) in this regulation has never been demonstrated. To investigate the role of CRP in pectin catabolism, we cloned the E. chrysanthemi crp gene by complementation of an Escherichia coli crp mutation and then constructed E. chrysanthemi crp mutants by reverse genetics. The carbohydrate fermentation phenotype of the E. chrysanthemi crp mutants is similar to that of an E. coli crp mutant. Furthermore, these mutants are unable to grow on pectin or polygalacturonate as the sole carbon source. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the E. chrysanthemi crp gene revealed the presence of a 630-bp open reading frame (ORF) that codes for a protein highly similar to the CRP of E. coli. Using a crp::uidA transcriptional fusion, we demonstrated that the E. chrysanthemi CRP represses its own expression, probably via a mechanism similar to that described for the E. coli crp gene. Moreover, in the E. chrysanthemi crp mutants, expression of pectinase genes (pemA, pelB, pelC, pelD, and pelE) and of genes of the intracellular part of the pectin degradation pathway (ogl, kduI, and kdgT), which are important for inducer formation and transport, is dramatically reduced in induced conditions. In contrast, expression of pelA, which encodes a pectate lyase important for E. chrysanthemi pathogenicity, seems to be negatively regulated by CRP. The E. chrysanthemi crp mutants have greatly decreased maceration capacity in potato tubers, chicory leaves, and celery petioles as well as highly diminished virulence on saintpaulia plants. These findings demonstrate that CRP plays a crucial role in expression of the pectinolysis genes and in the pathogenicity of E

  14. Extracellular polysaccharide of Erwinia chrysanthemi A350 and ribotyping of Erwinia chrysanthemi spp.

    PubMed

    Gray, J S; Yang, B Y; Montgomery, R

    2000-03-10

    Erwinia chrysanthemi spp. are gram-negative bacterial phytopathogens causing soft rots in a number of plants. The structure of the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) produced by the E. chrysanthemi strain A350, which is a lacZ- mutant of the wild type strain 3937, pathogenic to Saintpaulia, has been determined using a combination of chemical and physical techniques including methylation analysis, low-pressure gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography, high-pH anion-exchange chromatography, partial acid hydrolysis, mass spectrometry and 1- and 2D NMR spectroscopy. In contrast to the structures of the EPS reported for other strains of E. chrysanthemi, the EPS from strain A350 contains D-GalA, together with L-Rhap and D-Galp in a 1:4:1 ratio. Evidence is presented for the following hexasaccharide repeat unit: [structure: see text] All the Erwinia chrysanthemi spp. studied to date have been analyzed by ribotyping and collated into families, which are consistent with the related structures of their EPS. PMID:10744334

  15. Three-dimensional structure of Erwinia carotovora L-asparaginase

    SciTech Connect

    Kislitsyn, Yu. A. Kravchenko, O. V.; Nikonov, S. V. Kuranova, I. P.

    2006-10-15

    Three-dimensional structure of Erwinia carotovora L-asparaginase, which has antitumor activity and is used for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, was solved at 3 A resolution and refined to R{sub cryst} = 20% and R{sub free} = 28%. Crystals of recombinant Erwinia carotovora L-asparaginase were grown by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method from protein solutions in a HEPES buffer (pH 6.5) and PEG MME 5000 solutions in a cacodylate buffer (pH 6.5) as the precipitant. Three-dimensional X-ray diffraction data were collected up to 3 A resolution from one crystal at room temperature. The structure was solved by the molecular replacement method using the coordinates of Erwinia chrysanthemi L-asparaginase as the starting model. The coordinates refined with the use of the CNS program package were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB code 1ZCF)

  16. Trehalose is required for stress resistance and virulence of the Basidiomycota plant pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Chávez, José Antonio; Valdés-Santiago, Laura; Bakkeren, Guus; Hurtado-Santiago, Edda; León-Ramírez, Claudia Geraldine; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo Ulises; Landeros-Jaime, Fidel; Rodríguez-Aza, Yolanda; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2016-06-01

    Trehalose is an important disaccharide that can be found in bacteria, fungi, invertebrates and plants. In some Ascomycota fungal plant pathogens, the role of trehalose was recently studied and shown to be important for conferring protection against several environmental stresses and for virulence. In most of the fungi studied, two enzymes are involved in the synthesis of trehalose: trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (Tps1) and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (Tps2). To study the role of trehalose in virulence and stress response in the Basidiomycota maize pathogen Ustilago maydis, Δtps2 deletion mutants were constructed. These mutants did not produce trehalose as confirmed by HPLC analysis, showing that the single gene disruption impaired its biosynthesis. The mutants displayed increased sensitivity to oxidative, heat, acid, ionic and osmotic stresses as compared to the wild-type strains. Virulence of Δtps2 mutants to maize plants was extremely reduced compared to wild-type strains, possibly due to reduced capability to deal with the hostile host environment. The phenotypic traits displayed by Δtps2 strains were fully restored to wild-type levels when complemented with the endogenous UmTPS2 gene, or a chimeric construct having the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TPS2 ORF. This report demonstrates the presence of a single biosynthetic pathway for trehalose, and its importance for virulence in this model Basidiomycota plant pathogen. PMID:27027300

  17. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation in the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Lv, Binna; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Delong; Liang, Wenxing; Song, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification that plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. Botrytis cinerea is the most thoroughly studied necrotrophic species due to its broad host range and huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. In this study, we determined the lysine acetylome of B. cinerea through the combination of affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. Overall, 1582 lysine acetylation sites in 954 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the acetylated proteins are involved in diverse biological functions and show multiple cellular localizations. Several particular amino acids preferred near acetylation sites, including K(ac)Y, K(ac)H, K(ac)***R, K(ac)F, FK(ac) and K(ac)***K, were identified in this organism. Protein interaction network analysis demonstrates that a variety of interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. Interestingly, 6 proteins involved in virulence of B. cinerea, including 3 key components of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, were found to be acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation plays regulatory roles in pathogenesis. These data provides the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of B. cinerea and serves as a rich resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. PMID:27381557

  18. Temporal and spatial scaling of the genetic structure of a vector-borne plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Francisco, Carolina S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2014-02-01

    The ecology of plant pathogens of perennial crops is affected by the long-lived nature of their immobile hosts. In addition, changes to the genetic structure of pathogen populations may affect disease epidemiology and management practices; examples include local adaptation of more fit genotypes or introduction of novel genotypes from geographically distant areas via human movement of infected plant material or insect vectors. We studied the genetic structure of Xylella fastidiosa populations causing disease in sweet orange plants in Brazil at multiple scales using fast-evolving molecular markers (simple-sequence DNA repeats). Results show that populations of X. fastidiosa were regionally isolated, and that isolation was maintained for populations analyzed a decade apart from each other. However, despite such geographic isolation, local populations present in year 2000 were largely replaced by novel genotypes in 2009 but not as a result of migration. At a smaller spatial scale (individual trees), results suggest that isolates within plants originated from a shared common ancestor. In summary, new insights on the ecology of this economically important plant pathogen were obtained by sampling populations at different spatial scales and two different time points. PMID:24397266

  19. Antifungal activity of diketopiperazines and stilbenes against plant pathogenic fungi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Nishanth; Nambisan, Bala

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate antifungal activity of a stilbene and diketopiperazine compounds against plant pathogenic fungi, including Phytophthora capsici, P. colocasiae, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Minimal inhibition concentrations (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) of stilbenes and diketopiperazines for each fungus were determined using microplate method. Best activity was recorded by stilbenes against P. capsici and P. colocasiae. All four test compounds were effective in inhibiting different stages of the life cycle of test fungi. Stilbenes were more effective than diketopiperazines in inhibiting mycelial growth and inhibiting different stages of the life cycle of P. capsici and P. colocasiae. Rupture of released zoospores induced by stilbenes was reduced by addition of 100 mM glucose. The effects of stilbenes on mycelial growth and zoospore release, but not zoospore rupture, were reduced largely when pH value was above 7. In addition, stilbenes were investigated for its antifungal stability against Phytophthora sp. The results showed that stilbenes maintained strong fungistatic activity over a wide pH range (pH 4–9) and temperature range (70–120 °C). The compound stilbenes exhibited strong and stable broad-spectrum antifungal activity, and had a significant fungicidal effect on fungal cells. Results from prebiocontrol evaluations performed to date are probably useful in the search for alternative approaches to controlling serious plant pathogens. PMID:24122628

  20. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation in the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Binna; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Delong; Liang, Wenxing; Song, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification that plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. Botrytis cinerea is the most thoroughly studied necrotrophic species due to its broad host range and huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. In this study, we determined the lysine acetylome of B. cinerea through the combination of affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. Overall, 1582 lysine acetylation sites in 954 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the acetylated proteins are involved in diverse biological functions and show multiple cellular localizations. Several particular amino acids preferred near acetylation sites, including KacY, KacH, Kac***R, KacF, FKac and Kac***K, were identified in this organism. Protein interaction network analysis demonstrates that a variety of interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. Interestingly, 6 proteins involved in virulence of B. cinerea, including 3 key components of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, were found to be acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation plays regulatory roles in pathogenesis. These data provides the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of B. cinerea and serves as a rich resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. PMID:27381557

  1. Field Demonstration of a Multiplexed Point-of-Care Diagnostic Platform for Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lau, Han Yih; Wang, Yuling; Wee, Eugene J H; Botella, Jose R; Trau, Matt

    2016-08-16

    Effective disease management strategies to prevent catastrophic crop losses require rapid, sensitive, and multiplexed detection methods for timely decision making. To address this need, a rapid, highly specific and sensitive point-of-care method for multiplex detection of plant pathogens was developed by taking advantage of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) labeled nanotags and recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), which is a rapid isothermal amplification method with high specificity. In this study, three agriculturally important plant pathogens (Botrytis cinerea, Pseudomonas syringae, and Fusarium oxysporum) were used to demonstrate potential translation into the field. The RPA-SERS method was faster, more sensitive than polymerase chain reaction, and could detect as little as 2 copies of B. cinerea DNA. Furthermore, multiplex detection of the three pathogens was demonstrated for complex systems such as the Arabidopsis thaliana plant and commercial tomato crops. To demonstrate the potential for on-site field applications, a rapid single-tube RPA/SERS assay was further developed and successfully performed for a specific target outside of a laboratory setting. PMID:27403651

  2. Mutational analysis of a predicted double β-propeller domain of the DspA/E effector of Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Siamer, Sabrina; Gaubert, Stéphane; Boureau, Tristan; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle; Barny, Marie-Anne

    2013-05-01

    The bacterium Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, an invasive disease that threatens apple trees, pear trees and other plants of the Rosaceae family. Erwinia amylovora pathogenicity relies on a type III secretion system and on a single effector DspA/E. This effector belongs to the widespread AvrE family of effectors whose biological function is unknown. In this manuscript, we performed a bioinformatic analysis of DspA/E- and AvrE-related effectors. Motif search identified nuclear localization signals, peroxisome targeting signals, endoplasmic reticulum membrane retention signals and leucine zipper motifs, but none of these motifs were present in all the AvrE-related effectors analysed. Protein threading analysis, however, predicted a conserved double β-propeller domain in the N-terminal part of all the analysed effector sequences. We then performed a random pentapeptide mutagenesis of DspA/E, which led to the characterization of 13 new altered proteins with a five amino acids insertion. Eight harboured the insertion inside the predicted β-propeller domain and six of these eight insertions impaired DspA/E stability or function. Conversely, the two remaining insertions generated proteins that were functional and abundantly secreted in the supernatant suggesting that these two insertions stabilized the protein. PMID:23421848

  3. The plant pathogen Streptomyces scabies 87-22 has a functional pyochelin biosynthetic pathway that is regulated by TetR- and AfsR-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Seipke, Ryan F; Song, Lijiang; Bicz, Joanna; Laskaris, Paris; Yaxley, Alice M; Challis, Gregory L; Loria, Rosemary

    2011-09-01

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron-chelating compounds produced by bacteria for iron uptake that can act as important virulence determinants for both plant and animal pathogens. Genome sequencing of the plant pathogen Streptomyces scabies 87-22 revealed the presence of a putative pyochelin biosynthetic gene cluster (PBGC). Liquid chromatography (LC)-MS analyses of culture supernatants of S. scabies mutants, in which expression of the cluster is upregulated and which lack a key biosynthetic gene from the cluster, indicated that pyochelin is a product of the PBGC. LC-MS comparisons with authentic standards on a homochiral stationary phase confirmed that pyochelin and not enantio-pyochelin (ent-pyochelin) is produced by S. scabies. Transcription of the S. scabies PBGC occurs via ~19 kb and ~3 kb operons and transcription of the ~19 kb operon is regulated by TetR- and AfsR-family proteins encoded by the cluster. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of pyochelin production by a Gram-positive bacterium; interestingly regulation of pyochelin production is distinct from characterized PBGCs in Gram-negative bacteria. Though pyochelin-mediated iron acquisition by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is important for virulence, in planta bioassays failed to demonstrate that pyochelin production by S. scabies is required for development of disease symptoms on excised potato tuber tissue or radish seedlings. PMID:21757492

  4. Virulence Factors of Erwinia amylovora: A Review.

    PubMed

    Piqué, Núria; Miñana-Galbis, David; Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora, a Gram negative bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is the causal agent of fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of host species within Rosaceae and a major global threat to commercial apple and pear production. Among the limited number of control options currently available, prophylactic application of antibiotics during the bloom period appears the most effective. Pathogen cells enter plants through the nectarthodes of flowers and other natural openings, such as wounds, and are capable of rapid movement within plants and the establishment of systemic infections. Many virulence determinants of E. amylovora have been characterized, including the Type III secretion system (T3SS), the exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran, biofilm formation, and motility. To successfully establish an infection, E. amylovora uses a complex regulatory network to sense the relevant environmental signals and coordinate the expression of early and late stage virulence factors involving two component signal transduction systems, bis-(3'-5')-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and quorum sensing. The LPS biosynthetic gene cluster is one of the relatively few genetic differences observed between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting genotypes of E. amylovora. Other differential factors, such as the presence and composition of an integrative conjugative element associated with the Hrp T3SS (hrp genes encoding the T3SS apparatus), have been recently described. In the present review, we present the recent findings on virulence factors research, focusing on their role in bacterial pathogenesis and indicating other virulence factors that deserve future research to characterize them. PMID:26057748

  5. Virulence Factors of Erwinia amylovora: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Piqué, Núria; Miñana-Galbis, David; Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora, a Gram negative bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is the causal agent of fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of host species within Rosaceae and a major global threat to commercial apple and pear production. Among the limited number of control options currently available, prophylactic application of antibiotics during the bloom period appears the most effective. Pathogen cells enter plants through the nectarthodes of flowers and other natural openings, such as wounds, and are capable of rapid movement within plants and the establishment of systemic infections. Many virulence determinants of E. amylovora have been characterized, including the Type III secretion system (T3SS), the exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran, biofilm formation, and motility. To successfully establish an infection, E. amylovora uses a complex regulatory network to sense the relevant environmental signals and coordinate the expression of early and late stage virulence factors involving two component signal transduction systems, bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and quorum sensing. The LPS biosynthetic gene cluster is one of the relatively few genetic differences observed between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting genotypes of E. amylovora. Other differential factors, such as the presence and composition of an integrative conjugative element associated with the Hrp T3SS (hrp genes encoding the T3SS apparatus), have been recently described. In the present review, we present the recent findings on virulence factors research, focusing on their role in bacterial pathogenesis and indicating other virulence factors that deserve future research to characterize them. PMID:26057748

  6. Antimicrobial activity of olive solutions from stored Alpeorujo against plant pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Medina, Eduardo; Romero, Concepcion; de Los Santos, Berta; de Castro, Antonio; Garcia, Aranzazu; Romero, Fernando; Brenes, Manuel

    2011-07-13

    The aim of this work was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial effects that wastewaters from alpeorujo oil extraction have against phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. Alpeorujo was stored for 6 months and then processed to extract its oil, pomace, and a new liquid waste (OWSA), which was characterized by its content in phenolic compounds. OWSA at 20% decreased bu >4 log the population of Erwinia spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Clavibacter spp. viable cells in test tubes, whereas OWSA at 50% in agar medium was necessary to inhibit mycelial growth of most fungi. It was found that the bactericidal effect was due to the joint action of low molecular mass phenolic compounds, although neither hydroxytyrosol, its glucosides, hydroxytyrosol glycol, nor a glutaraldehyde-like compound individually explained this bioactivity. Hence, OWSA constitutes a promising natural solution to fight plant phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. PMID:21630653

  7. Rapid transcriptional response of Malus to Erwinia amylovora infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization (SSH) was used to identify genes that are differentially up- and down-regulated in apple (Malus X domestica) in response to challenge with Erwinia amylovora (Ea). cDNA libraries were constructed from Ea- and mock-challenged 'Gale Gala' apple leaf tissue at...

  8. Harpin Mediates Cell Aggregation in Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Mee-Ngan; Rojas, Clemencia M.; Yang, Ching-Hong; Charkowski, Amy O.

    2006-01-01

    The hypersensitive response elicitor harpin (HrpN) of soft rot pathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi strains 3937 and EC16 is secreted via the type III secretion system and remains cell surface bound. Strain 3937 HrpN is essential for cell aggregation, but the C-terminal one-third of the protein is not required for aggregative activity. PMID:16513758

  9. Erwinia tracheiphila colonization of cantaloupe fruits through flower inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cantaloupe (Cucumis melo var. cantalupensis) is a nutritious fresh fruit. Bacterial wilt, caused by Erwinia tracheiphila, is the most devastating cantaloupe disease globally. The pathogen is transmitted in nature by xylem-feeding spotted and striped cucumber beetles; other modes of infection have ...

  10. Dual metabolomics: a novel approach to understanding plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Allwood, J William; Clarke, Andrew; Goodacre, Royston; Mur, Luis A J

    2010-04-01

    One of the most well-characterised plant pathogenic interactions involves Arabidopsis thaliana and the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst). The standard Pst inoculation procedure involves infiltration of large populations of bacteria into plant leaves which means that metabolite changes cannot be readily assigned to the host or pathogen. A plant cell-pathogen co-culture based approach has been developed where the plant and pathogen cells are separated after 12h of co-culture via differential filtering and centrifugation. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was employed to assess the intracellular metabolomes (metabolic fingerprints) of both host and pathogen and their extruded (extracellular) metabolites (metabolic footprints) under conditions relevant to disease and resistance. We propose that this system will enable the metabolomic profiling of the separated host and pathogen (i.e. 'dual metabolomics') and will facilitate the modelling of reciprocal responses. PMID:20138320

  11. Forest species diversity reduces disease risk in a generalist plant pathogen invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, Sarah E.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Rizzo, David M.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that biodiversity loss can increase disease transmission, yet our understanding of the 'diversity-disease hypothesis' for generalist pathogens in natural ecosystems is limited. We used a landscape epidemiological approach to examine two scenarios regarding diversity effects on the emerging plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum across a broad, heterogeneous ecoregion: (1) an amplification effect exists where disease risk is greater in areas with higher plant diversity due to the pathogen's wide host range, or (2) a dilution effect where risk is reduced with increasing diversity due to lower competency of alternative hosts. We found evidence for pathogen dilution, whereby disease risk was lower in sites with higher species diversity, after accounting for potentially confounding effects of host density and landscape heterogeneity. Our results suggest that although nearly all plants in the ecosystem are hosts, alternative hosts may dilute disease transmission by competent hosts, thereby buffering forest health from infectious disease.

  12. Bacteria Murmur: Application of an Acoustic Biosensor for Plant Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Glynos, Paraskevas; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-01-01

    A multi-targeting protocol for the detection of three of the most important bacterial phytopathogens, based on their scientific and economic importance, was developed using an acoustic biosensor (the Quartz Crystal Microbalance) for DNA detection. Acoustic detection was based on a novel approach where DNA amplicons were monitored and discriminated based on their length rather than mass. Experiments were performed during real time monitoring of analyte binding and in a direct manner, i.e. without the use of labels for enhancing signal transduction. The proposed protocol improves time processing by circumventing gel electrophoresis and can be incorporated as a routine detection method in a diagnostic lab or an automated lab-on-a-chip system for plant pathogen diagnostics. PMID:26177507

  13. Identifying and naming plant-pathogenic fungi: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Crous, Pedro W; Hawksworth, David L; Wingfield, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Scientific names are crucial in communicating knowledge about fungi. In plant pathology, they link information regarding the biology, host range, distribution, and potential risk. Our understanding of fungal biodiversity and fungal systematics has undergone an exponential leap, incorporating genomics, web-based systems, and DNA data for rapid identification to link species to metadata. The impact of our ability to recognize hitherto unknown organisms on plant pathology and trade is enormous and continues to grow. Major challenges for phytomycology are intertwined with the Genera of Fungi project, which adds DNA barcodes to known biodiversity and corrects the application of old, established names via epi- or neotypification. Implementing the one fungus-one name system and linking names to validated type specimens, cultures, and reference sequences will provide the foundation on which the future of plant pathology and the communication of names of plant pathogens will rest. PMID:26047568

  14. Exogenous RNA interference exposes contrasting roles for sugar exudation in host-finding by plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Neil D; Wilson, Leonie; Canet-Perez, Juan V; Fleming, Thomas; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G; Dalzell, Johnathan J

    2016-07-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPN) locate host plants by following concentration gradients of root exudate chemicals in the soil. We present a simple method for RNA interference (RNAi)-induced knockdown of genes in tomato seedling roots, facilitating the study of root exudate composition, and PPN responses. Knockdown of sugar transporter genes, STP1 and STP2, in tomato seedlings triggered corresponding reductions of glucose and fructose, but not xylose, in collected root exudate. This corresponded directly with reduced infectivity and stylet thrusting of the promiscuous PPN Meloidogyne incognita, however we observed no impact on the infectivity or stylet thrusting of the selective Solanaceae PPN Globodera pallida. This approach can underpin future efforts to understand the early stages of plant-pathogen interactions in tomato and potentially other crop plants. PMID:27033013

  15. Physiological and biochemical characterization of Trichoderma harzianum, a biological control agent against soilborne fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Grondona, I; Hermosa, R; Tejada, M; Gomis, M D; Mateos, P F; Bridge, P D; Monte, E; Garcia-Acha, I

    1997-01-01

    Monoconidial cultures of 15 isolates of Trichoderma harzianum were characterized on the basis of 82 morphological, physiological, and biochemical features and 99 isoenzyme bands from seven enzyme systems. The results were subjected to numerical analysis which revealed four distinct groups. Representative sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS 1)-ITS 2 region in the ribosomal DNA gene cluster were compared between groups confirming this distribution. The utility of the groupings generated from the morphological, physiological, and biochemical data was assessed by including an additional environmental isolate in the electrophoretic analysis. The in vitro antibiotic activity of the T. harzianum isolates was assayed against 10 isolates of five different soilborne fungal plant pathogens: Aphanomyces cochlioides, Rhizoctonia solani, Phoma betae, Acremonium cucurbitacearum, and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis lycopersici. Similarities between levels and specificities of biological activity and the numerical characterization groupings are both discussed in relation to antagonist-specific populations in known and potential biocontrol species. PMID:9251205

  16. Effect of neem (Azardirachta indica A. Juss) seeds and leaves extract on some plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Moslem, M A; El-Kholie, E M

    2009-07-15

    In this study plant pathogenic fungi Alternaria solani, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were chosen to study the effect of ethanolic, hexane and methanolic extracts of neem seeds and leaves. Antifungal effects of neem leave and seed extracts obtained by ethanol, hexane and ptrolium ether were examined separately in vitro against Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Alternaria solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Results indicated that seeds and leaves extracts could cause growth inhibition of tested fungi, although the rate of inhibition of tested fungi varied with different extracts and concentrations. But all these extracts and concentrations of extract inhibited the growth of pathogenic fungi at a significant level. Azadirachtin, nimonol and expoxyazdirodione were detected from neem extract by using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). We can conclude that neem leave and seed extracts were effective as antifungal against all tested fungi but F. oxysporum and R. solani were the most sensitive fungi. PMID:19947185

  17. The infrared microspectroscopy beamline at CAMD and its application in plant pathogen interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkaya, O.; Prange, A.; Steiner, U.; Oerke, E.-C.; Scott, J. D.; Morikawa, E.; Hormes, J.

    2007-11-01

    At the beginning of 2006, the first infrared microspectroscopy beamline at the Louisiana State University, Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) storage ring came into operation. The infrared microscope has recently been upgraded with a new liquid nitrogen-cooled mercury-cadmium-telluride detector, MCT-A, and a new dipole chamber to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and extend the beamline capability to far-IR region. In this contribution, we report first results, by using the microspectroscopy beamline, in the investigation of plant-pathogen interactions: apple- Venturia inaequalis causing scab. The infrared spectra of the healthy plant leaves were compared to those obtained from the infected ones. These spatially resolved data are used to understand the dynamics of physiological modifications, which occur during pathogenesis.

  18. Plant pathogenic bacteria target the actin microfilament network involved in the trafficking of disease defense components

    PubMed Central

    Jelenska, Joanna; Kang, Yongsung; Greenberg, Jean T

    2014-01-01

    Cells of infected organisms transport disease defense-related molecules along actin filaments to deliver them to their sites of action to combat the pathogen. To accommodate higher demand for intracellular traffic, plant F-actin density increases transiently during infection or treatment of Arabidopsis with pathogen-associated molecules. Many animal and plant pathogens interfere with actin polymerization and depolymerization to avoid immune responses. Pseudomonas syringae, a plant extracellular pathogen, injects HopW1 effector into host cells to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton and reduce vesicle movement in order to elude defense responses. In some Arabidopsis accessions, however, HopW1 is recognized and causes resistance via an actin-independent mechanism. HopW1 targets isoform 7 of vegetative actin (ACT7) that is regulated by phytohormones and environmental factors. We hypothesize that dynamic changes of ACT7 filaments are involved in plant immunity. PMID:25551177

  19. A generic risk-based surveying method for invading plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Parnell, S; Gottwald, T R; Riley, T; van den Bosch, F

    2014-06-01

    Invasive plant pathogens are increasing with international trade and travel, with damaging environmental and economic consequences. Recent examples include tree diseases such as sudden oak death in the Western United States and ash dieback in Europe. To control an invading pathogen it is crucial that newly infected sites are quickly detected so that measures can be implemented to control the epidemic. However, since sampling resources are often limited, not all locations can be inspected and locations must be prioritized for surveying. Existing approaches to achieve this are often species specific and rely on detailed data collection and parameterization, which is difficult, especially when new arrivals are unanticipated. Consequently regulatory sampling responses are often ad hoc and developed without due consideration of epidemiology, leading to the suboptimal deployment of expensive sampling resources. We introduce a flexible risk-based sampling method that is pathogen generic and enables available information to be utilized to develop epidemiologically informed sampling programs for virtually any biologically relevant plant pathogen. By targeting risk we aim to inform sampling schemes that identify high-impact locations that can be subsequently treated in order to reduce inoculum in the landscape. This "damage limitation" is often the initial management objective following the first discovery of a new invader. Risk at each location is determined by the product of the basic reproductive number (R0), as a measure of local epidemic size, and the probability of infection. We illustrate how the risk estimates can be used to prioritize a survey by weighting a random sample so that the highest-risk locations have the highest probability of selection. We demonstrate and test the method using a high-quality spatially and temporally resolved data set on Huanglongbing disease (HLB) in Florida, USA. We show that even when available epidemiological information is relatively

  20. Proximal Sensing of Plant-Pathogen Interactions in Spring Barley with Three Fluorescence Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Leufen, Georg; Noga, Georg; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    In the last years fluorescence spectroscopy has come to be viewed as an essential approach in key research fields of applied plant sciences. However, the quantity and particularly the quality of information produced by different equipment might vary considerably. In this study we investigate the potential of three optical devices for the proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in four genotypes of spring barley. For this purpose, the fluorescence lifetime, the image-resolved multispectral fluorescence and selected indices of a portable multiparametric fluorescence device were recorded at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation (dai) from healthy leaves as well as from leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) or leaf rust (Puccinia hordei). Genotype-specific responses to pathogen infections were revealed already at 3 dai by higher fluorescence mean lifetimes in the spectral range from 410 to 560 nm in the less susceptible varieties. Noticeable pathogen-induced modifications were also revealed by the ‘Blue-to-Far-Red Fluorescence Ratio’ and the ‘Simple Fluorescence Ratio’. Particularly in the susceptible varieties the differences became more evident in the time-course of the experiment i.e., following the pathogen development. The relevance of the blue and green fluorescence to exploit the plant-pathogen interaction was demonstrated by the multispectral fluorescence imaging system. As shown, mildewed leaves were characterized by exceptionally high blue fluorescence, contrasting the values observed in rust inoculated leaves. Further, we confirm that the intensity of green fluorescence depends on the pathogen infection and the stage of disease development; this information might allow a differentiation of both diseases. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the detection area might influence the quality of the information, although it had a minor impact only in the current study. Finally, we highlight the relevance of different excitation

  1. O antigen modulates insect vector acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M; Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Walker, Sharon; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  2. Plant Pathogenic Microbial Communication Affected by Elevated Temperature in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.

    PubMed

    Saha, N D; Chaudhary, A; Singh, S D; Singh, D; Walia, S; Das, T K

    2015-11-01

    Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria regulate specific gene expression in a population density-dependent manner by sensing level of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone (HSL) molecules which they produce and liberate to the environment, called Quorum Sensing (QS). The production of virulence factors (extracellular enzyme viz. cellulase, pectinase, etc.) in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc) is under strong regulation of QS. The QS signal molecule, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-Homoserine Lactone (OHHL) was found as the central regulatory system for the virulence factor production in Pcc and is also under strict regulation of external environmental temperature. Under seven different incubation temperatures (24, 26, 28, 30, 33, 35, and 37 °C) in laboratory condition, highest amount of OHHL (804 violacein unit) and highest (79 %) Disease Severity Index (DSI) were measured at 33 °C. The OHHL production kinetics showed accumulation of highest concentration of OHHL at late log phase of the growth but diminution in the concentration occurred during stationary phase onwards to death phase. At higher temperature (35 and 37 °C) exposure, OHHL was not at detectable range. The effect of temperature on virulence factor production is the concomitant effect of HSL production and degradation which justifies less disease severity index in cross-inoculated tomato fruits incubated at 35 and 37 °C. The nondetection of the OHHL in the elevated temperature may because of degradation as these signal molecules are quite sensitive and prone to get degraded under different physical factors. This result provides the rationale behind the highest disease severity up to certain elevated temperature and leaves opportunities for investigation on mutation, co-evolution of superior plant pathogen with more stable HSL signals-mediated pathogenesis under global warming context. PMID:26271295

  3. Sensing and adhesion are adaptive functions in the plant pathogenic xanthomonads

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial plant pathogens belonging to the Xanthomonas genus are tightly adapted to their host plants and are not known to colonise other environments. The host range of each strain is usually restricted to a few host plant species. Bacterial strains responsible for the same type of symptoms on the same host range cluster in a pathovar. The phyllosphere is a highly stressful environment, but it provides a selective habitat and a source of substrates for these bacteria. Xanthomonads colonise host phylloplane before entering leaf tissues and engaging in an invasive pathogenic phase. Hence, these bacteria are likely to have evolved strategies to adapt to life in this environment. We hypothesised that determinants responsible for bacterial host adaptation are expressed starting from the establishment of chemotactic attraction and adhesion on host tissue. Results We established the distribution of 70 genes coding sensors and adhesins in a large collection of xanthomonad strains. These 173 strains belong to different pathovars of Xanthomonas spp and display different host ranges. Candidate genes are involved in chemotactic attraction (25 genes), chemical environment sensing (35 genes), and adhesion (10 genes). Our study revealed that candidate gene repertoires comprised core and variable gene suites that likely have distinct roles in host adaptation. Most pathovars were characterized by unique repertoires of candidate genes, highlighting a correspondence between pathovar clustering and repertoires of sensors and adhesins. To further challenge our hypothesis, we tested for molecular signatures of selection on candidate genes extracted from sequenced genomes of strains belonging to different pathovars. We found strong evidence of adaptive divergence acting on most candidate genes. Conclusions These data provide insight into the potential role played by sensors and adhesins in the adaptation of xanthomonads to their host plants. The correspondence between

  4. Genome sequence of the necrotrophic plant pathogen Pythium ultimum reveals original pathogenicity mechanisms and effector repertoire

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pythium ultimum is a ubiquitous oomycete plant pathogen responsible for a variety of diseases on a broad range of crop and ornamental species. Results The P. ultimum genome (42.8 Mb) encodes 15,290 genes and has extensive sequence similarity and synteny with related Phytophthora species, including the potato blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Whole transcriptome sequencing revealed expression of 86% of genes, with detectable differential expression of suites of genes under abiotic stress and in the presence of a host. The predicted proteome includes a large repertoire of proteins involved in plant pathogen interactions, although, surprisingly, the P. ultimum genome does not encode any classical RXLR effectors and relatively few Crinkler genes in comparison to related phytopathogenic oomycetes. A lower number of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism were present compared to Phytophthora species, with the notable absence of cutinases, suggesting a significant difference in virulence mechanisms between P. ultimum and more host-specific oomycete species. Although we observed a high degree of orthology with Phytophthora genomes, there were novel features of the P. ultimum proteome, including an expansion of genes involved in proteolysis and genes unique to Pythium. We identified a small gene family of cadherins, proteins involved in cell adhesion, the first report of these in a genome outside the metazoans. Conclusions Access to the P. ultimum genome has revealed not only core pathogenic mechanisms within the oomycetes but also lineage-specific genes associated with the alternative virulence and lifestyles found within the pythiaceous lineages compared to the Peronosporaceae. PMID:20626842

  5. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  6. Proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in spring barley with three fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Leufen, Georg; Noga, Georg; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    In the last years fluorescence spectroscopy has come to be viewed as an essential approach in key research fields of applied plant sciences. However, the quantity and particularly the quality of information produced by different equipment might vary considerably. In this study we investigate the potential of three optical devices for the proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in four genotypes of spring barley. For this purpose, the fluorescence lifetime, the image-resolved multispectral fluorescence and selected indices of a portable multiparametric fluorescence device were recorded at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation (dai) from healthy leaves as well as from leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) or leaf rust (Puccinia hordei). Genotype-specific responses to pathogen infections were revealed already at 3 dai by higher fluorescence mean lifetimes in the spectral range from 410 to 560 nm in the less susceptible varieties. Noticeable pathogen-induced modifications were also revealed by the 'Blue-to-Far-Red Fluorescence Ratio' and the 'Simple Fluorescence Ratio'. Particularly in the susceptible varieties the differences became more evident in the time-course of the experiment i.e., following the pathogen development. The relevance of the blue and green fluorescence to exploit the plant-pathogen interaction was demonstrated by the multispectral fluorescence imaging system. As shown, mildewed leaves were characterized by exceptionally high blue fluorescence, contrasting the values observed in rust inoculated leaves. Further, we confirm that the intensity of green fluorescence depends on the pathogen infection and the stage of disease development; this information might allow a differentiation of both diseases. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the detection area might influence the quality of the information, although it had a minor impact only in the current study. Finally, we highlight the relevance of different excitation

  7. O Antigen Modulates Insect Vector Acquisition of the Bacterial Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N.; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M.; Backus, Elaine A.; Shugart, Holly J.; Walker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  8. Conditional Facilitation of an Aphid Vector, Acyrthosiphon pisum, by the Plant Pathogen, Pea Enation Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Simon; Powell, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogens can induce symptoms that affect the performance of insect herbivores utilizing the same host plant. Previous studies examining the effects of infection of tic bean, Vicia faba L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), by pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV), an important disease of legume crops, indicated there were no changes in the growth and reproductive rate of its primary vector the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Here, we report the results of laboratory experiments investigating how A. pisum responded to PEMV infection of a different host plant, Pisum sativum L., at different stages of symptom development. Aphid growth rate was negatively related to the age of the host plant, but when they were introduced onto older plants with well-developed PEMV symptoms they exhibited a higher growth rate compared to those developing on uninfected plants of the same age. In choice tests using leaf discs A. pisum showed a strong preference for discs from PEMV-infected peas, probably in response to visual cues from the yellowed and mottled infected leaves. When adults were crowded onto leaves using clip-cages they produced more winged progeny on PEMV-infected plants. The results indicate that PEMV produces symptoms in the host plant that can enhance the performance of A. pisum as a vector, modify the production of winged progeny and affect their spatial distribution. The findings provide further evidence that some insect vector/plant pathogen interactions could be regarded as mutualistic rather than commensal when certain conditions regarding the age, stage of infection and species of host plant are met. PMID:21067425

  9. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, Mark T

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, an d analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: (1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, (2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and (3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  10. Antifungal activity of a synthetic cationic peptide against the plant pathogens Colletotrichum graminicola and three Fusarium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A small cationic peptide (JH8944) was tested for activity against a number of pathogens of agricultural crops. JH8944 inhibited conidium growth in most of the tested plant pathogens with a dose of 50 µg ml 1, although one isolate of Fusarium oxysporum was inhibited at 5 µg ml 1. Most conidia of Fusa...

  11. A Reliable and Inexpensive Method of Nucleic Acid Extraction for the PCR-Based Detection of Diverse Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reliable extraction method is described for the preparation of total nucleic acids from several plant genera for subsequent detection of plant pathogens by PCR-based techniques. By the combined use of a modified CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) extraction protocol and a semi-automatic homogen...

  12. Intraspecific comparison and annotation of two complete mitochondrial genome sequences from the plant pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the plant pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola is a circular molecule of 43,961 bp containing the typical genes coding for 14 proteins related to oxidative phosphorylation, one RNA polymerase, two rRNA genes and a set of 27 tRNAs. Most of the tRNA genes w...

  13. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacter...

  14. PUTTING PLANT PATHOGENS TO WORK: PROGRESS AND POSSIBILITIES IN WEED BIOCONTROL PART 2. IMPROVING WEED CONTROL EFFICACY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of plant pathogenic weed biological control agents can be approached using two strategies, termed the classical and biological approaches. The classical involves the search for pathogens in the native range of an invasive weed and its importation and release into the area of introdu...

  15. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Fungi and the Effects of Database Composition on Protein Inferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass spectrometry has shown potential for identifying and detecting plant pathogens. Unlike antibody-based assays like ELISA, mass spectrometry does not require the use of pathogen-specific reagents for the detection of pathogen-specific proteins and peptides. However, the mass spectrometry appro...

  16. Genome-wide identification of transcriptional start sites in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA-Seq has provided valuable insights into global gene expression in a number of organisms. Using a modified RNA-Seq approach and Illumina’s high-throughput sequencing technology, we globally identified 5’-ends of transcripts for the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000. A sub...

  17. Genotype-by-sequencing of the plant-pathogenic fungi Pyrenophora teres and Sphaerulina musiva utilizing Ion Torrent sequence technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The characterization of genes determining compatibility or incompatibility between plant pathogenic fungi and their hosts is important for the management of crop disease. The major focus of these interactions has typically been the identification and characterization of host genes, but it is equally...

  18. Management of insect-transmitted plant pathogens: defining conditions for successful roguing with a spatially-explicit simulation model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roguing (the replacement of infected plants with healthy plants) is commonly used to manage the spread of insect-transmitted plant pathogens. Roguing has two potential benefits. First, removing an infected plant eliminates a source of inoculum, potentially slowing pathogen spread. Second, as infe...

  19. The Comprehensive Phytopathogen Genomics Resource: a web-based resource for data-mining plant pathogen genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, John P.; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric C.; Adhikari, Bishwo N.; Perna, Nicole T.; Tisserat, Ned; Leach, Jan E.; Lévesque, C. André; Buell, C. Robin

    2011-01-01

    The Comprehensive Phytopathogen Genomics Resource (CPGR) provides a web-based portal for plant pathologists and diagnosticians to view the genome and trancriptome sequence status of 806 bacterial, fungal, oomycete, nematode, viral and viroid plant pathogens. Tools are available to search and analyze annotated genome sequences of 74 bacterial, fungal and oomycete pathogens. Oomycete and fungal genomes are obtained directly from GenBank, whereas bacterial genome sequences are downloaded from the A Systematic Annotation Package (ASAP) database that provides curation of genomes using comparative approaches. Curated lists of bacterial genes relevant to pathogenicity and avirulence are also provided. The Plant Pathogen Transcript Assemblies Database provides annotated assemblies of the transcribed regions of 82 eukaryotic genomes from publicly available single pass Expressed Sequence Tags. Data-mining tools are provided along with tools to create candidate diagnostic markers, an emerging use for genomic sequence data in plant pathology. The Plant Pathogen Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) database is a resource for pathogens that lack genome or transcriptome data sets and contains 131 755 rDNA sequences from GenBank for 17 613 species identified as plant pathogens and related genera. Database URL: http://cpgr.plantbiology.msu.edu. PMID:22120664

  20. Early-detection surveillance for an emerging plant pathogen: a rule of thumb to predict prevalence at first discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging plant pathogens are a significant problem in conservation, forestry and food security. Surveillance is often instigated in an attempt to detect an invading epidemic before it gets out of control. Yet in practice many epidemics are not discovered until already at a high incidence. This is ...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Erwinia billingiae OSU19-1, Isolated from a Pear Tree Canker

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Jeannie M.; Bennett, Rhett W.; MacFarland, Logan; Abranches Da Silva, Megan E.; Meza-Turner, Britney M.; Dark, Phillip M.; Frey, Mackenzie E.; Wellappili, Dulani P.; Beugli, Aron D.; Jue, Holman J.; Mellander, Joshua M.; Wei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Plant-associated Erwinia include pathogenic and nonpathogenic species. We report the 5.6-Mb genome sequence of Erwinia billingiae OSU19-1, isolated from a canker on a pear tree inoculated with Erwinia amylovora. OSU19-1 and a closely related European isolate, E. billingiae Eb661T, share many similarities including 40 kb of plasmid sequence. PMID:26430039

  2. Cellular, physiological, and molecular adaptive responses of Erwinia amylovora to starvation.

    PubMed

    Santander, Ricardo D; Oliver, James D; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants distributed worldwide. This bacterium is a nonobligate pathogen able to survive outside the host under starvation conditions, allowing its spread by various means such as rainwater. We studied E. amylovora responses to starvation using water microcosms to mimic natural oligotrophy. Initially, survivability under optimal (28 °C) and suboptimal (20 °C) growth temperatures was compared. Starvation induced a loss of culturability much more pronounced at 28 °C than at 20 °C. Natural water microcosms at 20 °C were then used to characterize cellular, physiological, and molecular starvation responses of E. amylovora. Challenged cells developed starvation-survival and viable but nonculturable responses, reduced their size, acquired rounded shapes and developed surface vesicles. Starved cells lost motility in a few days, but a fraction retained flagella. The expression of genes related to starvation, oxidative stress, motility, pathogenicity, and virulence was detected during the entire experimental period with different regulation patterns observed during the first 24 h. Further, starved cells remained as virulent as nonstressed cells. Overall, these results provide new knowledge on the biology of E. amylovora under conditions prevailing in nature, which could contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:24476337

  3. [Multiple change of phenotype, conjugated with the loss of yellow pigmentation of Erwinia herbicola].

    PubMed

    Tovkach, F I; Tovkach, A F

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that the loss of yellow pigmentation (phenotype Crt) of nonphotosynthesizing epiphyte bacterium Erwinia herbicola is accompanied by the loss of prototrophicity (phenotype Thi). Most Crt Thi-variants change the character of sensitivity to temperate erwiniophage E105 and bacteriocins (phenotype Ph/Bn). Some of them become sensitive to the killer effect of their own bacteriocins--autocins (phenotype Au). Multiple change of the phenotype in E. herbicola occurs so spontaneously as under variable growing of bacteria at the optimal and supraoptimal growth temperature. It is also established that the cells of one of the strains stop synthesizing the additional carotenoid or synthesize the changed products. It is shown that carotenoid synthesis in the cells of E. herbicola g157/5k may be reduced by means of transduction of the Crt phenotype by lipid-containing bacteriophage UA1. Multiple change of the phenotype connected with the loss of yellow pigmentation by E. herbicola was referred to the phenomenon of the population dissociation which is similar to that in E. carotovora. PMID:15456215

  4. Indirect effects of one plant pathogen on the transmission of a second pathogen and the behavior of its potato psyllid vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogens can influence the behavior and performance of insect herbivore vectors. Studies of these associations typically focus on tripartite interactions between a plant host, a plant pathogen, and its insect vector. However, an unrelated herbivore or pathogen also could influence host-pathog...

  5. Taxonomy and pathogenicity of Erwinia cacticida sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, S M; Orum, T V; Steigerwalt, A G; Foster, J L; Fogleman, J C; Brenner, D J

    1991-04-01

    A total of 108 pectolytic, soft-rotting Erwinia strains were collected from 11 types of cacti growing in Arizona, Texas, northern Mexico, and Australia between 1958 and 1989. Four strains were collected from soils beneath or close to naturally rotting saguaro cacti. Collectively, these strains caused soft rots of saguaro, organ pipe, and senita cacti, Opuntia (cactus) fruits and pads, tomato fruits, and potato slices, but only occasionally caused soft rots of slices of carrot roots. A numerical cluster analysis showed that 98 of the 112 strains formed a uniform group (cluster 1A) that was distinguished from other pectolytic erwinias by an API 20E code of 1205131, by negative reactions in API 50CHE tests for L-arabinose, myo-inositol, D-cellobiose, melibiose, and D-raffinose, and, in supplemental tests, by positive reactions for malonate and growth at 43 degrees C. The average levels of DNA relatedness of 22 cluster 1A strains to the proposed type strain (strain 1-12) as determined by the hydroxyapatite method were 88% in 60 degrees C reactions (with 1% divergence within related sequences) and 87% in 75 degrees C reactions. The levels of relatedness to the type strains of other Erwinia spp. were less than or equal to 38% in 75 degrees C reactions. Cluster 1A strains also had a characteristic cellular fatty acid profile containing cyclo-(11,12)-nonadecanoic acid (C19:0 Cyclo C11-12) and missing tridecanoic acid (C13:0), heptadecanoic acid (C17:0), and cis-9-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1 CIS 9), which separated them from other pectolytic erwinias. Collectively, these data indicate that the members of cluster 1A are members of a new species, which we name Erwinia cacticida. Three cactus strains in cluster 1B appear to represent a second new species that is closely related to E. cacticida; these strains are designated E. cacticida-like pending the availability of additional strains for testing. The remaining cactus strains (in cluster 4) have the physiological, DNA, and

  6. Growth inhibition of Erwinia amylovora and related Erwinia species by neutralized short‑chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Konecki, Katrin; Gernold, Marina; Wensing, Annette; Geider, Klaus

    2013-11-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are used to preserve food and could be a tool for control of fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora on apple, pear and related rosaceous plants. Neutralized acids were added to buffered growth media at 0.5–75 mM and tested at pHs ranging from 6.8 to 5.5. Particularly at low pH, SCFAs with a chain length exceeding that of acetic acid such as propionic acid were effective growth inhibitors of E. amylovora possibly due to uptake of free acid and its intracellular accumulation. We also observed high inhibition with monochloroacetic acid. An E. billingiae strain was as sensitive to the acids as E. amylovora or E. tasmaniensis. Fire blight symptoms on pear slices were reduced when the slices were pretreated with neutralized propionic acid. Propionic acid is well water soluble and could be applied in orchards as a control agent for fire blight. PMID:24077735

  7. The rising threat of fungicide resistance in plant pathogenic fungi: Botrytis as a case study.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of site-specific fungicides almost 50 years ago has revolutionized chemical plant protection, providing highly efficient, low toxicity compounds for control of fungal diseases. However, it was soon discovered that plant pathogenic fungi can adapt to fungicide treatments by mutations leading to resistance and loss of fungicide efficacy. The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea, a major cause of pre- and post-harvest losses in fruit and vegetable production, is notorious as a 'high risk' organism for rapid resistance development. In this review, the mechanisms and the history of fungicide resistance in Botrytis are outlined. The introduction of new fungicide classes for grey mould control was always followed by the appearance of resistance in field populations. In addition to target site resistance, B. cinerea has also developed a resistance mechanism based on drug efflux transport. Excessive spraying programmes have resulted in the selection of multiresistant strains in several countries, in particular in strawberry fields. The rapid erosion of fungicide activity against these strains represents a major challenge for the future of fungicides against Botrytis. To maintain adequate protection of intensive cultures against grey mould, strict implementation of resistance management measures are required as well as alternative strategies with non-chemical products. PMID:25320647

  8. Hfq Influences Multiple Transport Systems and Virulence in the Plant Pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wilms, Ina; Möller, Philip; Stock, Anna-Maria; Gurski, Rosemarie; Lai, Erh-Min

    2012-01-01

    The Hfq protein mediates gene regulation by small RNAs (sRNAs) in about 50% of all bacteria. Depending on the species, phenotypic defects of an hfq mutant range from mild to severe. Here, we document that the purified Hfq protein of the plant pathogen and natural genetic engineer Agrobacterium tumefaciens binds to the previously described sRNA AbcR1 and its target mRNA atu2422, which codes for the substrate binding protein of an ABC transporter taking up proline and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Several other ABC transporter components were overproduced in an hfq mutant compared to their levels in the parental strain, suggesting that Hfq plays a major role in controlling the uptake systems and metabolic versatility of A. tumefaciens. The hfq mutant showed delayed growth, altered cell morphology, and reduced motility. Although the DNA-transferring type IV secretion system was produced, tumor formation by the mutant strain was attenuated, demonstrating an important contribution of Hfq to plant transformation by A. tumefaciens. PMID:22821981

  9. In vitro control of plant pathogenic Xanthomonas spp. using Poncirus trifoliata Rafin

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Atiqur; Islam, Rafiquel; Al-Reza, Sharif M.; Kang, Sun Chul

    2014-01-01

    The secondary metabolites such as essential oil and pure compounds (limonin and imperatorin) from Poncirus trifoliata Rafin were tested for in vitro control of phytopathogenic bacteria of Xanthomonas spp. In vitro studies showed that the oil had inhibitory effect on Xanthomonas campestris pv. compestris KC94-17-XCC, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria YK93-4-XCV, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae KX019-XCO and Xanthomonas sp. SK12 with their inhibition zones and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 13.1~22.1 mm and 62.5~125 μg/ml, respectively. Limonin and imperatorin also had in vitro antibacterial potential (MIC: 15.62~62.5 μg/ml) against all the tested Xanthomonas spp. Furthermore, the SEM studies demonstrated that limonin and imperatorin caused morphological changes of Xanthomonas sp. SK12 at the minimum inhibitory concentration (15.62 μg/ml). These results of this study support the possible use of essential oil and natural compounds from P. Trifoliata in agriculture and agro-industries to control plant pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26417325

  10. Antifungal Activity Against Plant Pathogens of Metabolites from the Endophytic Fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Taráwneh, Amer H.; Gao, Jiangtao; Wedge, David E.; Rosa, Luiz H.; Cutler, Horace G.; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen.) de Vries extracts led to the isolation of four compounds, including cladosporin, 1, isocladosporin, 2, 5′-hydroxyasperentin, 3, and cladosporin-8-methyl ether, 4. An additional compound 5′,6-diacetyl cladosporin, 5, was synthesized by acetylation of compound 3. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for antifungal activity against plant pathogens. Phomopsis viticola was the most sensitive fungus to the tested compounds. At 30 μM, compound 1 exhibited 92.7%, 90.1%, 95.4% and 79.9% growth inhibition against Colletotrichum acutatum, Co. fragariae, Co. gloeosporioides and Phomopsis viticola, respectively. Compound 2 showed 50.4%, 60.2% and 83.0% growth inhibition at 30 μM against Co. fragariae, Co. gloeosporioides and P. viticola, respectively. Compounds 3 and 4 were isolated for the first time from Cladosporium cladosporioides. Moreover, the identification of essential structural features of the cladosporin nuclei has also been evaluated. These structures provide new templates for the potential treatment and management of plant diseases. PMID:23651409

  11. Profound Impact of Hfq on Nutrient Acquisition, Metabolism and Motility in the Plant Pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Philip; Overlöper, Aaron; Förstner, Konrad U.; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Lai, Erh-Min; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    As matchmaker between mRNA and sRNA interactions, the RNA chaperone Hfq plays a key role in riboregulation of many bacteria. Often, the global influence of Hfq on the transcriptome is reflected by substantially altered proteomes and pleiotropic phenotypes in hfq mutants. Using quantitative proteomics and co-immunoprecipitation combined with RNA-sequencing (RIP-seq) of Hfq-bound RNAs, we demonstrate the pervasive role of Hfq in nutrient acquisition, metabolism and motility of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. 136 of 2544 proteins identified by iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) were affected in the absence of Hfq. Most of them were associated with ABC transporters, general metabolism and motility. RIP-seq of chromosomally encoded Hfq3xFlag revealed 1697 mRNAs and 209 non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) associated with Hfq. 56 ncRNAs were previously undescribed. Interestingly, 55% of the Hfq-bound ncRNAs were encoded antisense (as) to a protein-coding sequence suggesting that A. tumefaciens Hfq plays an important role in asRNA-target interactions. The exclusive enrichment of 296 mRNAs and 31 ncRNAs under virulence conditions further indicates a role for post-transcriptional regulation in A. tumefaciens-mediated plant infection. On the basis of the iTRAQ and RIP-seq data, we assembled a comprehensive model of the Hfq core regulon in A. tumefaciens. PMID:25330313

  12. In vitro control of plant pathogenic Xanthomonas spp. using Poncirus trifoliata Rafin.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Atiqur; Islam, Rafiquel; Al-Reza, Sharif M; Kang, Sun Chul

    2014-01-01

    The secondary metabolites such as essential oil and pure compounds (limonin and imperatorin) from Poncirus trifoliata Rafin were tested for in vitro control of phytopathogenic bacteria of Xanthomonas spp. In vitro studies showed that the oil had inhibitory effect on Xanthomonas campestris pv. compestris KC94-17-XCC, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria YK93-4-XCV, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae KX019-XCO and Xanthomonas sp. SK12 with their inhibition zones and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 13.1~22.1 mm and 62.5~125 μg/ml, respectively. Limonin and imperatorin also had in vitro antibacterial potential (MIC: 15.62~62.5 μg/ml) against all the tested Xanthomonas spp. Furthermore, the SEM studies demonstrated that limonin and imperatorin caused morphological changes of Xanthomonas sp. SK12 at the minimum inhibitory concentration (15.62 μg/ml). These results of this study support the possible use of essential oil and natural compounds from P. Trifoliata in agriculture and agro-industries to control plant pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26417325

  13. Pesticidal activity of metal oxide nanoparticles on plant pathogenic isolates of Pythium.

    PubMed

    Zabrieski, Zac; Morrell, Elliot; Hortin, Joshua; Dimkpa, Christian; McLean, Joan; Britt, David; Anderson, Anne

    2015-08-01

    CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have antimicrobial effects that could lead to formulations as pesticides for agriculture or medicine. The responses of two soil-borne plant pathogenic Pythium isolates to the NPs were studied to determine the potential of these metal oxide NPs as pesticides. Growth of the P. ultimum isolate was more sensitive to CuO NPs than the P. aphanidermatum isolate. Growth in liquid medium with CuO NPs eliminated culturability whereas exposure to ZnO NPs resulted in stasis with growth resuming on transfer to medium lacking NPs. The citrate in the medium used for the growth assays was involved in enhanced release of the toxic metals from the NPs. Both CuO and ZnO NPs affected processes involved in Fe uptake. The NPs reduced levels of Fe-chelating siderophore-like metabolites produced by Pythium hyphae. CuO NPs inhibited, but ZnO NPs increased, ferric reductase activity detected at the mycelial surface. These findings illustrate that the toxicity of the metal oxide NPs towards Pythium was influenced by the medium, especially by the presence of a metal chelator. Environmental factors are likely to alter the pesticide potential of the metal oxide NPs when formulated for agricultural use in soils. PMID:26076749

  14. Activity of the novel fungicide SYP-Z048 against plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengping; Han, Ping; Liu, Pengfei; Si, Naiguo; Liu, Junli; Liu, Xili

    2014-01-01

    In in vitro tests with 18 plant pathogens, the fungicide 3-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,3-dimethyl-3-isoxazolidinyl] pyridine (SYP-Z048) was highly effective on inhibiting mycelial growth of various ascomycota and basidiomycota, with EC50 values ranging from 0.008 to 1.140 μg/ml. SYP-Z048 had much weaker activity against growth of oomycota with EC50 values > 100 μg/ml. In a second in vitro test with Monilinia fructicola isolates, SYP-Z048 inhibited mycelial growth (EC50 = 0.013 μg/ml), germ tube elongation (EC50 = 0.007 μg/ml), and sporulation but did not affect spore germination. In a detached pear fruit assay inoculated with M. fructicola isolates, SYP-Z048 showed protective and curative activity. Field tests indicated that SYP-Z048 was an efficacious fungicide for control of brown rot disease in two peach orchards. When applied to a single spot on a tomato leaflet in a compound leaf, SYP-Z048 suppressed the growth of Botrytis cinerea isolates on the rest 4 leaflets, indicating that the fungicide has systemic movement in plant tissues. These results indicate that SYP-Z048 has potential for management of brown rot causing by M. fructicola and other diseases caused by ascomycota and basidiomycota. PMID:25253681

  15. UV Light Inactivation of Human and Plant Pathogens in Unfiltered Surface Irrigation Water

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lisa A.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2014-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 108 or 109 CFU/liter for bacteria or 104 or 105 zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively. PMID:24242253

  16. UV light inactivation of human and plant pathogens in unfiltered surface irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lisa A; Worobo, Randy W; Smart, Christine D

    2014-02-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 10(8) or 10(9) CFU/liter for bacteria or 10(4) or 10(5) zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively. PMID:24242253

  17. The need for culture collections to support plant pathogen diagnostic networks.

    PubMed

    Barba, Marina; Van den Bergh, Inge; Belisario, Alessandra; Beed, Fen

    2010-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic microorganisms, by virtue of their size, similarity in disease symptoms and closely related morphologies, are notoriously difficult to diagnose and detect. Diagnosis gives proof as to the causal agent of disease and is important for developing appropriate control measures. Detection shows the presence of a microorganism and is of importance for safeguarding national and international trade. Live reference collections are required to characterize the taxonomy and function of microorganisms as a prerequisite to development of tools for diagnosis and detection. Two case studies will be presented in this paper to demonstrate the importance of microorganism collections for facilitating knowledge sharing and the development of identification methods. Fusarium wilt of banana caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense and sharka disease of stone fruits caused by plum pox virus (PPV) are considered. Both diseases consist of different races/strains with different host specificities, but Fusarium wilt poses a threat to food security, while PPV poses a threat to trade due to its classification as a quarantine pest, since there is no anti-virus treatment available to control sharka disease in orchards. It is only through comprehensive collections of correctly identified and well-maintained strains representing the genetic diversity of a target organism that robust, specific, reliable and efficient diagnostic and detection tools can be developed. PMID:20457251

  18. The role of effectors in nonhost resistance to filamentous plant pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Remco; Mantelin, Sophie; McLellan, Hazel; Thilliez, Gaëtan

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most plants are resistant to a wide range of phytopathogens. However, mechanisms contributing to this so-called nonhost resistance (NHR) are poorly understood. Besides constitutive defenses, plants have developed two layers of inducible defense systems. Plant innate immunity relies on recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In compatible interactions, pathogenicity effector molecules secreted by the invader can suppress host defense responses and facilitate the infection process. Additionally, plants have evolved pathogen-specific resistance mechanisms based on recognition of these effectors, which causes secondary defense responses. The current effector-driven hypothesis is that NHR in plants that are distantly related to the host plant is triggered by PAMP recognition that cannot be efficiently suppressed by the pathogen, whereas in more closely related species, nonhost recognition of effectors would play a crucial role. In this review we give an overview of current knowledge of the role of effector molecules in host and NHR and place these findings in the context of the model. We focus on examples from filamentous pathogens (fungi and oomycetes), discuss their implications for the field of plant-pathogen interactions and relevance in plant breeding strategies for development of durable resistance in crops. PMID:25426123

  19. Integrated decoys and effector traps: how to catch a plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    Plant immune receptors involved in disease resistance and crop protection are related to the animal Nod-like receptor (NLR) class, and recognise the virulence effectors of plant pathogens, whereby they arm the plant's defensive response. Although plant NLRs mainly contain three protein domains, about 10% of these receptors identified by extensive cross-plant species data base searches have now been shown to include novel and highly variable integrated domains, some of which have been shown to detect pathogen effectors by direct interaction. Sarris et al. have identified a large number of integrated domains that can be used to detect effector targets in host plant proteomes and identify unknown pathogen effectors.Please see related Research article: Comparative analysis of plant immune receptor architectures uncovers host proteins likely targeted by pathogens, http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12915-016-0228-7 Since the time of writing, a closely related paper has been released: Kroj T, Chanclud E, Michel-Romiti C, Grand X, Morel J-B. Integration of decoy domains derived from protein targets of pathogen effectors into plant immune receptors is widespread. New Phytol. 2016 (ahead of print). PMID:26896088

  20. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic, and human pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo; Garbeva, Paolina; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2013-09-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protective microbial shield and to overcome the innate plant defense mechanisms in order to cause disease. A third group of microorganisms that can be found in the rhizosphere are the true and opportunistic human pathogenic bacteria, which can be carried on or in plant tissue and may cause disease when introduced into debilitated humans. Although the importance of the rhizosphere microbiome for plant growth has been widely recognized, for the vast majority of rhizosphere microorganisms no knowledge exists. To enhance plant growth and health, it is essential to know which microorganism is present in the rhizosphere microbiome and what they are doing. Here, we review the main functions of rhizosphere microorganisms and how they impact on health and disease. We discuss the mechanisms involved in the multitrophic interactions and chemical dialogues that occur in the rhizosphere. Finally, we highlight several strategies to redirect or reshape the rhizosphere microbiome in favor of microorganisms that are beneficial to plant growth and health. PMID:23790204

  1. Sentinel Trees as a Tool to Forecast Invasions of Alien Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Vettraino, AnnaMaria; Roques, Alain; Yart, Annie; Fan, Jian-ting; Sun, Jiang-hua; Vannini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Recent disease outbreaks caused by alien invasive pathogens into European forests posed a serious threat to forest sustainability with relevant environmental and economic effects. Many of the alien tree pathogens recently introduced into Europe were not previously included on any quarantine lists, thus they were not subject to phytosanitary inspections. The identification and description of alien fungi potentially pathogenic to native European flora before their introduction in Europe, is a paramount need in order to limit the risk of invasion and the impact to forest ecosystems. To determine the potential invasive fungi, a sentinel trees plot was established in Fuyang, China, using healthy seedlings of European tree species including Quercus petreae, Q. suber, and Q. ilex. The fungal assemblage associated with symptomatic specimens was studied using the tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS 1). Taxa with probable Asiatic origin were identified and included plant pathogenic genera. These results indicate that sentinel plants may be a strategic tool to improve the prevention of bioinvasions. PMID:25826684

  2. Biological and genetic factors regulating natural competence in a bacterial plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kung, Stephanie H; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2014-01-01

    For naturally competent bacteria, spatially structured growth can provide an environment for enhanced horizontal gene transfer through transformation and recombination. DNA is often present in the extracellular environment, such as in the extracellular matrix of biofilms, and the lysis of a single cell can result in high local DNA concentrations. Xylella fastidiosa is a naturally competent plant pathogen that typically lives in a surface-attached state, yet previous work characterizing the competence of this organism was conducted with planktonic cells in liquid environments. Here, we show that transformation and recombination efficiencies are two to three orders of magnitude higher for cells grown on solid compared with liquid media, with maximum recombination efficiencies of about 10(-3). Cells were highly competent throughout their exponential growth phase, with no significant change in recombination efficiencies until population growth rates began to slow. Mutations in type IV pili, competency-related, and cell-cell signalling genes significantly impacted the ability of X. fastidiosa to acquire and incorporate DNA. Because X. fastidiosa is highly competent when growing in a surface-attached state, as it does within its insect vectors and host plants, recombination of naturally transformed DNA could be a significant route by which horizontal gene transfer occurs in natural environments. PMID:24149707

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis between the Fungal Plant Pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum Using RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Dan; Xu, Liangsheng; Vandemark, George; Chen, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    The fungal plant pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum are morphologically similar, but differ considerably in host range. In an effort to elucidate mechanisms of the host range difference, transcriptomes of the 2 species at vegetative growth stage were compared to gain further insight into commonality and uniqueness in gene expression and pathogenic mechanisms of the 2 closely related pathogens. A total of 23133 and 21043 unique transcripts were obtained from S. sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum, respectively. Approximately 43% of the transcripts were genes with known functions for both species. Among 1411 orthologous contigs, about 10% (147) were more highly (>3-fold) expressed in S. trifoliorum than in S. sclerotiorum, and about 12% (173) of the orthologs were more highly (>3-fold) expressed in S. sclerotiorum than in S. trifoliorum. The expression levels of genes on the supercontig 30 have the highest correlation coefficient value between the 2 species. Twenty-seven contigs were found to be new and unique for S. trifoliorum. Additionally, differences in expressed genes involved in pathogenesis like oxalate biosynthesis and endopolygalacturonases were detected between the 2 species. The analyses of the transcriptomes not only discovered similarities and uniqueness in gene expression between the 2 closely related species, providing additional information for annotation the S. sclerotiorum genome, but also provided foundation for comparing the transcriptomes with host-infecting transcriptomes. PMID:26615185

  4. Population History and Pathways of Spread of the Plant Pathogen Phytophthora plurivora

    PubMed Central

    Schoebel, Corine N.; Stewart, Jane; Gruenwald, Niklaus J.; Rigling, Daniel; Prospero, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Human activity has been shown to considerably affect the spread of dangerous pests and pathogens worldwide. Therefore, strict regulations of international trade exist for particularly harmful pathogenic organisms. Phytophthora plurivora, which is not subject to regulations, is a plant pathogen frequently found on a broad range of host species, both in natural and artificial environments. It is supposed to be native to Europe while resident populations are also present in the US. We characterized a hierarchical sample of isolates from Europe and the US and conducted coalescent-, migration, and population genetic analysis of sequence and microsatellite data, to determine the pathways of spread and the demographic history of this pathogen. We found P. plurivora populations to be moderately diverse but not geographically structured. High levels of gene flow were observed within Europe and unidirectional from Europe to the US. Coalescent analyses revealed a signal of a recent expansion of the global P. plurivora population. Our study shows that P. plurivora has most likely been spread around the world by nursery trade of diseased plant material. In particular, P. plurivora was introduced into the US from Europe. International trade has allowed the pathogen to colonize new environments and/or hosts, resulting in population growth. PMID:24427303

  5. Control of soilborne plant pathogens by incorporating fresh organic amendments followed by tarping.

    PubMed

    Blok, W J; Lamers, J G; Termorshuizen, A J; Bollen, G J

    2000-03-01

    ABSTRACT A new method for the control of soilborne plant pathogens was tested for its efficacy in two field experiments during two years. Plots were amended with fresh broccoli or grass (3.4 to 4.0 kg fresh weight m(-2)) or left nonamended, and covered with an airtight plastic cover (0.135 mm thick) or left noncovered. In plots amended with broccoli or grass and covered with plastic sheeting, anaerobic and strongly reducing soil conditions developed quickly, as indicated by rapid depletion of oxygen and a decrease in redox potential values to as low as -200 mV. After 15 weeks, survival of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi, Rhizoctonia solani, and Verticillium dahliae in inoculum samples buried 15 cm deep was strongly reduced in amended, covered plots in both experiments. The pathogens were not or hardly inactivated in amended, noncovered soil or nonamended, covered soil. The latter indicates that thermal inactivation due to increased soil temperatures under the plastic cover was not involved in pathogen inactivation. The results show the potential for this approach to control various soilborne pathogens and that it may serve as an alternative to chemical soil disinfestation for high-value crops under conditions where other alternatives, such as solarization or soil flooding, are not effective or not feasible. PMID:18944617

  6. Modulating host homeostasis as a strategy in the plant-pathogen arms race.

    PubMed

    Gottig, Natalia; Garavaglia, Betiana S; Daurelio, Lucas D; Valentine, Alex; Gehring, Chris; Orellano, Elena G; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2009-01-01

    In plant-pathogen interactions, pathogens aim to overcome host defense responses while plants employ a battery of responses to limit pathogen growth and thus disease. In this "arms race" between hosts and pathogens, horizontal gene transfer is a potent source of 'pathogenic innovation' for viruses and bacteria. However, bacteria rarely acquire 'eukaryotic-like' genes from their hosts, and where they appear to, evidence for a role of the acquired genes remains outstanding. We have recently reported experimental evidence that the citrus canker causing pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri contains a plant natriuretic peptide-like gene (XacPNP) that encodes a protein that modulates host homeostasis to its advantage. We argue that Xanthomonas PNP has been acquired in an ancient horizontal gene transfer, and given that plant and bacterial PNPs trigger a number of similar physiological responses, we make a case of molecular mimicry. Released XacPNP mimics host PNP and results in a suppressed host response, "improved" host tissue health and consequently better pathogen survival in the lesions. Finally, we propose that Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri host interactions can serve as model system to study the role of host homeostasis in plant defense against biotrophic pathogens. PMID:19704897

  7. Regulation of primary plant metabolism during plant-pathogen interactions and its contribution to plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Clemencia M.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Tzin, Vered; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to microorganisms in the environment and, as a result, have evolved intricate mechanisms to recognize and defend themselves against potential pathogens. One of these responses is the downregulation of photosynthesis and other processes associated with primary metabolism that are essential for plant growth. It has been suggested that the energy saved by downregulation of primary metabolism is diverted and used for defense responses. However, several studies have shown that upregulation of primary metabolism also occurs during plant-pathogen interactions. We propose that upregulation of primary metabolism modulates signal transduction cascades that lead to plant defense responses. In support of this thought, we here compile evidence from the literature to show that upon exposure to pathogens or elicitors, plants induce several genes associated with primary metabolic pathways, such as those involved in the synthesis or degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids. In addition, genetic studies have confirmed the involvement of these metabolic pathways in plant defense responses. This review provides a new perspective highlighting the relevance of primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against pathogens with the hope to stimulate further research in this area. PMID:24575102

  8. Contributions of host cellular trafficking and organization to the outcomes of plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Underwood, William

    2016-08-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that dynamic changes in protein localization, membrane trafficking pathways, and cellular organization play a major role in determining the outcome of interactions between plants and pathogenic microorganisms. Plants have evolved sophisticated perception systems to recognize the presence of potentially pathogenic microorganisms via the detection of non-self or modified-self elicitor molecules, pathogen virulence factors, or the activities of such virulence factors. Dynamic changes to host cellular organization and membrane trafficking pathways play pivotal roles in detection and signaling by plant immune receptors and are vital for the execution of spatially targeted defense responses to thwart invasion by potential pathogens. Conversely, from the perspective of the pathogen, the ability to manipulate plant cellular organization and trafficking processes to establish infection structures and deliver virulence factors is a major determinant of pathogen success. This review summarizes selected topics that illustrate how dynamic changes in host cellular trafficking and organization shape the outcomes of diverse plant-pathogen interactions and addresses ways in which our rapidly expanding knowledge of the cell biological processes that contribute to immunity or infection may influence efforts to improve plant disease resistance. PMID:27216829

  9. The Bacterial Alarmone (p)ppGpp Activates the Type III Secretion System in Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Ancona, Veronica; Lee, Jae Hoon; Chatnaparat, Tiyakhon; Oh, Jinrok; Hong, Jong-In

    2015-01-01

    the regulation of the T3SS and virulence in plant-pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, the recovery of an spoT null mutant, which displayed very unique phenotypes, suggested that small proteins containing a single ppGpp hydrolase domain are functional. PMID:25666138

  10. Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuxin; Letsimo, Elizabeth Mpholoseng; Parvez, Mohammad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence). Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea), Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis) and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala), revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea) to 14 (M. osmundae). Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host

  11. Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Matowane, Godfrey; Chen, Wanping; Sun, Yuxin; Letsimo, Elizabeth Mpholoseng; Parvez, Mohammad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence). Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea), Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis) and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala), revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea) to 14 (M. osmundae). Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host

  12. Characterization of the RcsC sensor kinase from Erwinia amylovora and other Enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongping; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Zhao, Youfu

    2011-06-01

    RcsC is a hybrid sensor kinase which contains a sensor domain, a histidine kinase domain, and a receiver domain. We have previously demonstrated that, although the Erwinia amylovora rcsC mutant produces more amylovoran than the wild-type (WT) strain in vitro, the mutant remains nonpathogenic on both immature pear fruit and apple plants. In this study, we have comparatively characterized the Erwinia RcsC and its homologs from various enterobacteria. Results demonstrate that expression of the Erwinia rcsC gene suppresses amylovoran production in various amylovoran overproducing WT and mutant strains, thus suggesting the presence of a net phosphatase activity of Erwinia RcsC. Findings have also demonstrated that rcsC homologs from other enterobacteria could not rescue amylovoran production of the Erwinia rcsC mutant in vitro. However, virulence of the Erwinia rcsC mutant is partially restored by rcsC homologs from Pantoea stewartii, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica but not from Escherichia coli on apple shoots. Domain-swapping experiments have indicated that replacement of the E. coli RcsC sensor domain by those of Erwinia and Yersinia spp. partially restores virulence of the Erwinia rcsC mutant, whereas chimeric constructs containing the sensor domain of E. coli RcsC could not rescue virulence of the Erwinia rcsC mutant on apple. Interestingly, only chimeric constructs containing the histidine kinase and receiver domains of Erwinia RcsC are fully capable of rescuing amylovoran production. These results suggest that the sensor domain of RcsC may be important in regulating bacterial virulence, whereas the activity of the histidine kinase and receiver domains of Erwinia RcsC may be essential for amylovoran production in vitro. PMID:21261468

  13. Genome plasticity in filamentous plant pathogens contributes to the emergence of novel effectors and their cellular processes in the host.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanhan; Li, Ying; Qi, Zhongqiang; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-02-01

    Plant diseases cause extensive yield loss of crops worldwide, and secretory 'warfare' occurs between plants and pathogenic organisms all the time. Filamentous plant pathogens have evolved the ability to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization through secreting effectors inside plant cells. The stresses from hosts and environment can drive the genome dynamics of plant pathogens. Remarkable advances in plant pathology have been made owing to these adaptable genome regions of several lineages of filamentous phytopathogens. Characterization new effectors and interaction analyses between pathogens and plants have provided molecular insights into the plant pathways perturbed during the infection process. In this mini-review, we highlight promising approaches of identifying novel effectors based on the genome plasticity. We also discuss the interaction mechanisms between plants and their filamentous pathogens and outline the possibilities of effector gene expression under epigenetic control that will be future directions for research. PMID:26228744

  14. Inhibitory effect of Xenorhabdus nematophila TB on plant pathogens Phytophthora capsici and Botrytis cinerea in vitro and in planta

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiangling; Zhang, Manrang; Tang, Qian; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Entomopathogenic bacteria Xenorhabdus spp. produce secondary metabolites with potential antimicrobial activity for use in agricultural productions. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of X. nematophila TB culture on plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora capsici. The cell-free filtrate of TB culture showed strong inhibitory effects (>90%) on mycelial growth of both pathogens. The methanol-extracted bioactive compounds (methanol extract) of TB culture also had strong inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and spore germinations of both pathogens. The methanol extract (1000 μg/mL) and cell-free filtrate both showed strong therapeutic and protective effects (>70%) on grey mold both in detached tomato fruits and plants, and leaf scorch in pepper plants. This study demonstrates X. nematophila TB produces antimicrobial metabolites of strong activity on plant pathogens, with great potential for controlling tomato grey mold and pepper leaf scorch and being used in integrated disease control to reduce chemical application. PMID:24599183

  15. Inhibitory effect of Xenorhabdus nematophila TB on plant pathogens Phytophthora capsici and Botrytis cinerea in vitro and in planta.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiangling; Zhang, Manrang; Tang, Qian; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Entomopathogenic bacteria Xenorhabdus spp. produce secondary metabolites with potential antimicrobial activity for use in agricultural productions. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of X. nematophila TB culture on plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora capsici. The cell-free filtrate of TB culture showed strong inhibitory effects (>90%) on mycelial growth of both pathogens. The methanol-extracted bioactive compounds (methanol extract) of TB culture also had strong inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and spore germinations of both pathogens. The methanol extract (1000 μg/mL) and cell-free filtrate both showed strong therapeutic and protective effects (>70%) on grey mold both in detached tomato fruits and plants, and leaf scorch in pepper plants. This study demonstrates X. nematophila TB produces antimicrobial metabolites of strong activity on plant pathogens, with great potential for controlling tomato grey mold and pepper leaf scorch and being used in integrated disease control to reduce chemical application. PMID:24599183

  16. Endohyphal Bacterium Enhances Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by a Foliar Fungal Endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michele T.; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions. PMID:24086270

  17. flp-32 Ligand/receptor silencing phenocopy faster plant pathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Louise E; Stevenson, Michael; McCoy, Ciaran J; Marks, Nikki J; Fleming, Colin; Zamanian, Mostafa; Day, Tim A; Kimber, Michael J; Maule, Aaron G; Mousley, Angela

    2013-02-01

    Restrictions on nematicide usage underscore the need for novel control strategies for plant pathogenic nematodes such as Globodera pallida (potato cyst nematode) that impose a significant economic burden on plant cultivation activities. The nematode neuropeptide signalling system is an attractive resource for novel control targets as it plays a critical role in sensory and motor functions. The FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) form the largest and most diverse family of neuropeptides in invertebrates, and are structurally conserved across nematode species, highlighting the utility of the FLPergic system as a broad-spectrum control target. flp-32 is expressed widely across nematode species. This study investigates the role of flp-32 in G. pallida and shows that: (i) Gp-flp-32 encodes the peptide AMRNALVRFamide; (ii) Gp-flp-32 is expressed in the brain and ventral nerve cord of G. pallida; (iii) migration rate increases in Gp-flp-32-silenced worms; (iv) the ability of G. pallida to infect potato plant root systems is enhanced in Gp-flp-32-silenced worms; (v) a novel putative Gp-flp-32 receptor (Gp-flp-32R) is expressed in G. pallida; and, (vi) Gp-flp-32R-silenced worms also display an increase in migration rate. This work demonstrates that Gp-flp-32 plays an intrinsic role in the modulation of locomotory behaviour in G. pallida and putatively interacts with at least one novel G-protein coupled receptor (Gp-flp-32R). This is the first functional characterisation of a parasitic nematode FLP-GPCR. PMID:23468621

  18. Rapid in vivo analysis of synthetic promoters for plant pathogen phytosensing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to engineer transgenic plants for the purpose of early detection of plant pathogen infection, which was accomplished by employing synthetic pathogen inducible promoters fused to reporter genes for altered phenotypes in response to the pathogen infection. Toward this end, a number of synthetic promoters consisting of inducible regulatory elements fused to a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter were constructed for use in phytosensing. Results For rapid analysis, an Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assay was evaluated, then utilized to assess the inducibility of each synthetic promoter construct in vivo. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) leaves were infiltrated with Agrobacterium harboring the individual synthetic promoter-reporter constructs. The infiltrated tobacco leaves were re-infiltrated with biotic (bacterial pathogens) or abiotic (plant defense signal molecules salicylic acid, ethylene and methyl jasmonate) agents 24 and 48 hours after initial agroinfiltration, followed by RFP measurements at relevant time points after treatment. These analyses indicated that the synthetic promoter constructs were capable of conferring the inducibility of the RFP reporter in response to appropriate phytohormones and bacterial pathogens, accordingly. Conclusions These observations demonstrate that the Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression is an efficient method for in vivo assays of promoter constructs in less than one week. Our results provide the opportunity to gain further insights into the versatility of the expression system as a potential tool for high-throughput in planta expression screening prior to generating stably transgenic plants for pathogen phytosensing. This system could also be utilized for temporary phytosensing; e.g., not requiring stably transgenic plants. PMID:22093754

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Verticillium-wilt causing plant pathogen Verticillium nonalfalfae

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Vid; de Jonge, Ronnie; Van de Peer, Yves; Javornik, Branka; Jakše, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium nonalfalfae is a fungal plant pathogen that causes wilt disease by colonizing the vascular tissues of host plants. The disease induced by hop isolates of V. nonalfalfae manifests in two different forms, ranging from mild symptoms to complete plant dieback, caused by mild and lethal pathotypes, respectively. Pathogenicity variations between the causal strains have been attributed to differences in genomic sequences and perhaps also to differences in their mitochondrial genomes. We used data from our recent Illumina NGS-based project of genome sequencing V. nonalfalfae to study the mitochondrial genomes of its different strains. The aim of the research was to prepare a V. nonalfalfae reference mitochondrial genome and to determine its phylogenetic placement in the fungal kingdom. The resulting 26,139 bp circular DNA molecule contains a full complement of the 14 "standard" fungal mitochondrial protein-coding genes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase subunits, together with a small rRNA subunit, a large rRNA subunit, which contains ribosomal protein S3 encoded within a type IA-intron and 26 tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of this mitochondrial genome placed it in the Verticillium spp. lineage in the Glomerellales group, which is also supported by previous phylogenetic studies based on nuclear markers. The clustering with the closely related Verticillium dahliae mitochondrial genome showed a very conserved synteny and a high sequence similarity. Two distinguishing mitochondrial genome features were also found—a potential long non-coding RNA (orf414) contained only in the Verticillium spp. of the fungal kingdom, and a specific fragment length polymorphism observed only in V. dahliae and V. nubilum of all the Verticillium spp., thus showing potential as a species specific biomarker. PMID:26839950

  20. Implementation of microfluidic sandwich ELISA for superior detection of plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thaitrong, Numrin; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and economical screening of plant pathogens is a high-priority need in the seed industry. Crop quality control and disease surveillance demand early and accurate detection in addition to robustness, scalability, and cost efficiency typically required for selective breeding and certification programs. Compared to conventional bench-top detection techniques routinely employed, a microfluidic-based approach offers unique benefits to address these needs simultaneously. To our knowledge, this work reports the first attempt to perform microfluidic sandwich ELISA for Acidovorax citrulli (Ac), watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV) screening. The immunoassay occurs on the surface of a reaction chamber represented by a microfluidic channel. The capillary force within the microchannel draws a reagent into the reaction chamber as well as facilitates assay incubation. Because the underlying pad automatically absorbs excess fluid, the only operation required is sequential loading of buffers/reagents. Buffer selection, antibody concentrations, and sample loading scheme were optimized for each pathogen. Assay optimization reveals that the 20-folds lower sample volume demanded by the microchannel structure outweighs the 2- to 4-folds higher antibody concentrations required, resulting in overall 5-10 folds of reagent savings. In addition to cutting the assay time by more than 50%, the new platform offers 65% cost savings from less reagent consumption and labor cost. Our study also shows 12.5-, 2-, and 4-fold improvement in assay sensitivity for Ac, WSMoV, and MYSV, respectively. Practical feasibility is demonstrated using 19 real plant samples. Given a standard 96-well plate format, the developed assay is compatible with commercial fluorescent plate readers and readily amendable to robotic liquid handling systems for completely hand-free assay automation. PMID:24376668

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Verticillium-wilt causing plant pathogen Verticillium nonalfalfae.

    PubMed

    Jelen, Vid; de Jonge, Ronnie; Van de Peer, Yves; Javornik, Branka; Jakše, Jernej

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium nonalfalfae is a fungal plant pathogen that causes wilt disease by colonizing the vascular tissues of host plants. The disease induced by hop isolates of V. nonalfalfae manifests in two different forms, ranging from mild symptoms to complete plant dieback, caused by mild and lethal pathotypes, respectively. Pathogenicity variations between the causal strains have been attributed to differences in genomic sequences and perhaps also to differences in their mitochondrial genomes. We used data from our recent Illumina NGS-based project of genome sequencing V. nonalfalfae to study the mitochondrial genomes of its different strains. The aim of the research was to prepare a V. nonalfalfae reference mitochondrial genome and to determine its phylogenetic placement in the fungal kingdom. The resulting 26,139 bp circular DNA molecule contains a full complement of the 14 "standard" fungal mitochondrial protein-coding genes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase subunits, together with a small rRNA subunit, a large rRNA subunit, which contains ribosomal protein S3 encoded within a type IA-intron and 26 tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of this mitochondrial genome placed it in the Verticillium spp. lineage in the Glomerellales group, which is also supported by previous phylogenetic studies based on nuclear markers. The clustering with the closely related Verticillium dahliae mitochondrial genome showed a very conserved synteny and a high sequence similarity. Two distinguishing mitochondrial genome features were also found-a potential long non-coding RNA (orf414) contained only in the Verticillium spp. of the fungal kingdom, and a specific fragment length polymorphism observed only in V. dahliae and V. nubilum of all the Verticillium spp., thus showing potential as a species specific biomarker. PMID:26839950

  2. Systemic Spread and Propagation of a Plant-Pathogenic Virus in European Honeybees, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji Lian; Cornman, R. Scott; Evans, Jay D.; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Zhao, Yan; Murphy, Charles; Peng, Wen Jun; Wu, Jie; Hamilton, Michele; Boncristiani, Humberto F.; Zhou, Liang; Hammond, John; Chen, Yan Ping

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Emerging and reemerging diseases that result from pathogen host shifts are a threat to the health of humans and their domesticates. RNA viruses have extremely high mutation rates and thus represent a significant source of these infectious diseases. In the present study, we showed that a plant-pathogenic RNA virus, tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), could replicate and produce virions in honeybees, Apis mellifera, resulting in infections that were found throughout the entire body. Additionally, we showed that TRSV-infected individuals were continually present in some monitored colonies. While intracellular life cycle, species-level genetic variation, and pathogenesis of the virus in honeybee hosts remain to be determined, the increasing prevalence of TRSV in conjunction with other bee viruses from spring toward winter in infected colonies was associated with gradual decline of host populations and winter colony collapse, suggesting the negative impact of the virus on colony survival. Furthermore, we showed that TRSV was also found in ectoparasitic Varroa mites that feed on bee hemolymph, but in those instances the virus was restricted to the gastric cecum of Varroa mites, suggesting that Varroa mites may facilitate the spread of TRSV in bees but do not experience systemic invasion. Finally, our phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRSV isolates from bees, bee pollen, and Varroa mites clustered together, forming a monophyletic clade. The tree topology indicated that the TRSVs from arthropod hosts shared a common ancestor with those from plant hosts and subsequently evolved as a distinct lineage after transkingdom host alteration. This study represents a unique example of viruses with host ranges spanning both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:24449751

  3. Cytochrome b gene structure and consequences for resistance to Qo inhibitor fungicides in plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Valeria; Palermo, Simona; Sierotzki, Helge; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gisi, Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    The cytochrome b (cyt b) gene structure was characterized for different agronomically important plant pathogens, such as Puccinia recondita f sp tritici (Erikss) CO Johnston, P graminis f sp tritici Erikss and Hennings, P striiformis f sp tritici Erikss, P coronata f sp avenae P Syd & Syd, P hordei GH Otth, P recondita f sp secalis Roberge, P sorghi Schwein, P horiana Henn, Uromyces appendiculatus (Pers) Unger, Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd & P Syd, Hemileia vastatrix Berk & Broome, Alternaria solani Sorauer, A alternata (Fr) Keissl and Plasmopara viticola (Berk & Curt) Berlese & de Toni. The sequenced fragment included the two hot spot regions in which mutations conferring resistance to QoI fungicides may occur. The cyt b gene structure of these pathogens was compared with that of other species from public databases, including the strobilurin-producing fungus Mycena galopoda (Pers) P Kumm, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meyer ex Hansen, Venturia inaequalis (Cooke) Winter and Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet. In all rust species, as well as in A solani, resistance to QoI fungicides caused by the mutation G143A has never been reported. A type I intron was observed directly after the codon for glycine at position 143 in these species. This intron was absent in pathogens such as A alternata, Blumeria graminis (DC) Speer, Pyricularia grisea Sacc, Mycosphaerella graminicola (Fuckel) J Schröt, M fijiensis, V inaequalis and P viticola, in which resistance to QoI fungicides has occurred and the glycine is replaced by alanine at position 143 in the resistant genotype. The present authors predict that a nucleotide substitution in codon 143 would prevent splicing of the intron, leading to a deficient cytochrome b, which is lethal. As a consequence, the evolution of resistance to QoI fungicides based on G143A is not likely to evolve in pathogens carrying an intron directly after this codon. PMID:16688790

  4. Characterization of RNA silencing components in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Gao, Qixun; Huang, Mengmeng; Liu, Ye; Liu, Zunyong; Liu, Xin; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) plays a critical role in gene regulation in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. However, the role of RNAi remains largely unclear in plant pathogenic fungi. In this study, we explored the roles of core components of the RNAi pathway in Fusarium graminearum, the major causal agent of wheat head blight. Our results demonstrated that the hairpin RNA (hpRNA) can efficiently silence the expression level of target gene, and the argonaute protein FgAgo1 and dicer protein FgDicer2 are important in this silencing process. RNAi machinery was not involved in growth, abiotic stress and pathogenesis in F. graminearum under tested conditions. We firstly applied high-throughput sequencing technology to elucidate small RNA (17–40 nucleotides) (sRNA) transcriptome in F. graminearum, and found that a total of forty-nine micro-like-RNA (milRNA) candidates were identified in the wild-type and ∆FgDICER2, and twenty-four of them were FgDicer2-dependent. Fg-milRNA-4 negatively regulated expression of its target gene. Taken together, our results indicated that the hpRNA-induced gene silencing was a valuable genetic tool for exploring gene function in F. graminearum. FgAgo1 and FgDicer2 proteins played a critical role in the hpRNA mediated gene silencing process. In addition, FgDicer2 was involved in sRNA transcription and milRNA generation in this fungus. PMID:26212591

  5. Characterization of RNA silencing components in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Gao, Qixun; Huang, Mengmeng; Liu, Ye; Liu, Zunyong; Liu, Xin; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) plays a critical role in gene regulation in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. However, the role of RNAi remains largely unclear in plant pathogenic fungi. In this study, we explored the roles of core components of the RNAi pathway in Fusarium graminearum, the major causal agent of wheat head blight. Our results demonstrated that the hairpin RNA (hpRNA) can efficiently silence the expression level of target gene, and the argonaute protein FgAgo1 and dicer protein FgDicer2 are important in this silencing process. RNAi machinery was not involved in growth, abiotic stress and pathogenesis in F. graminearum under tested conditions. We firstly applied high-throughput sequencing technology to elucidate small RNA (17-40 nucleotides) (sRNA) transcriptome in F. graminearum, and found that a total of forty-nine micro-like-RNA (milRNA) candidates were identified in the wild-type and ∆FgDICER2, and twenty-four of them were FgDicer2-dependent. Fg-milRNA-4 negatively regulated expression of its target gene. Taken together, our results indicated that the hpRNA-induced gene silencing was a valuable genetic tool for exploring gene function in F. graminearum. FgAgo1 and FgDicer2 proteins played a critical role in the hpRNA mediated gene silencing process. In addition, FgDicer2 was involved in sRNA transcription and milRNA generation in this fungus. PMID:26212591

  6. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Trantas, Emmanouil A.; Licciardello, Grazia; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Witek, Kamil; Strano, Cinzia P.; Duxbury, Zane; Ververidis, Filippos; Goumas, Dimitrios E.; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Guttman, David S.; Catara, Vittoria; Sarris, Panagiotis F.

    2015-01-01

    The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor) and P. mediterranea (Pmed), are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for genes that encode proteins involved in commercially important chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of type III secretion system and known type III effector-encoding genes from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes. Genome-mining also revealed the presence of gene clusters for biosynthesis of siderophores, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and hydrogen cyanide. A highly conserved quorum sensing system was detected in all strains, although species specific differences were observed. Our study provides the basis for in-depth investigations regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence strategies in the battle between plants and microbes. PMID:26300874

  7. Meiosis Drives Extraordinary Genome Plasticity in the Haploid Fungal Plant Pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Sarah B.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Kilian, Andrzej; Visser, Richard G. F.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Schouten, Henk J.

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis in the haploid plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola results in eight ascospores due to a mitotic division following the two meiotic divisions. The transient diploid phase allows for recombination among homologous chromosomes. However, some chromosomes of M. graminicola lack homologs and do not pair during meiosis. Because these chromosomes are not present universally in the genome of the organism they can be considered to be dispensable. To analyze the meiotic transmission of unequal chromosome numbers, two segregating populations were generated by crossing genetically unrelated parent isolates originating from Algeria and The Netherlands that had pathogenicity towards durum or bread wheat, respectively. Detailed genetic analyses of these progenies using high-density mapping (1793 DArT, 258 AFLP and 25 SSR markers) and graphical genotyping revealed that M. graminicola has up to eight dispensable chromosomes, the highest number reported in filamentous fungi. These chromosomes vary from 0.39 to 0.77 Mb in size, and represent up to 38% of the chromosomal complement. Chromosome numbers among progeny isolates varied widely, with some progeny missing up to three chromosomes, while other strains were disomic for one or more chromosomes. Between 15–20% of the progeny isolates lacked one or more chromosomes that were present in both parents. The two high-density maps showed no recombination of dispensable chromosomes and hence, their meiotic processing may require distributive disjunction, a phenomenon that is rarely observed in fungi. The maps also enabled the identification of individual twin isolates from a single ascus that shared the same missing or doubled chromosomes indicating that the chromosomal polymorphisms were mitotically stable and originated from nondisjunction during the second division and, less frequently, during the first division of fungal meiosis. High genome plasticity could be among the strategies enabling this versatile

  8. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    PubMed

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments. PMID:27457245

  9. The Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris Exploits N-Acetylglucosamine during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Alice; Zischek, Claudine; Lautier, Martine; Jamet, Stevie; Rival, Pauline; Carrère, Sébastien; Arlat, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), the main component of chitin and a major constituent of bacterial peptidoglycan, is present only in trace amounts in plants, in contrast to the huge amount of various sugars that compose the polysaccharides of the plant cell wall. Thus, GlcNAc has not previously been considered a substrate exploited by phytopathogenic bacteria during plant infection. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of Brassica plants, expresses a carbohydrate utilization system devoted to GlcNAc exploitation. In addition to genes involved in GlcNAc catabolism, this system codes for four TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs) and eight glycoside hydrolases. Expression of all these genes is under the control of GlcNAc. In vitro experiments showed that X. campestris pv. campestris exploits chitooligosaccharides, and there is indirect evidence that during the early stationary phase, X. campestris pv. campestris recycles bacterium-derived peptidoglycan/muropeptides. Results obtained also suggest that during plant infection and during growth in cabbage xylem sap, X. campestris pv. campestris encounters and metabolizes plant-derived GlcNAc-containing molecules. Specific TBDTs seem to be preferentially involved in the consumption of all these plant-, fungus- and bacterium-derived GlcNAc-containing molecules. This is the first evidence of GlcNAc consumption during infection by a phytopathogenic bacterium. Interestingly, N-glycans from plant N-glycosylated proteins are proposed to be substrates for glycoside hydrolases belonging to the X. campestris pv. campestris GlcNAc exploitation system. This observation extends the range of sources of GlcNAc metabolized by phytopathogenic bacteria during their life cycle. PMID:25205095

  10. Flavohaemoglobin HmpX from Erwinia chrysanthemi confers nitrosative stress tolerance and affects the plant hypersensitive reaction by intercepting nitric oxide produced by the host.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Martine; Mills, Catherine E; Zeier, Jürgen; Anzi, Chiara; Lamb, Chris; Poole, Robert K; Delledonne, Massimo

    2005-07-01

    Host cells respond to infection by generating nitric oxide (NO) as a cytotoxic weapon to facilitate killing of invading microbes. Bacterial flavohaemoglobins are well-known scavengers of NO and play a crucial role in protecting animal pathogens from nitrosative stress during infection. Erwinia chrysanthemi, which causes macerating diseases in a wide variety of plants, possesses a flavohaemoglobin (HmpX) whose function in plant pathogens has remained unclear. Here we show that HmpX consumes NO and prevents inhibition by NO of cell respiration, indicating a role in protection from nitrosative stress. Furthermore, infection of Saintpaulia ionantha plants with an HmpX-deficient mutant of E. chrysanthemi revealed that the lack of NO scavenging activity causes the accumulation of unusually high levels of NO in host tissue and triggers hypersensitive cell death. Introduction of the wild-type hmpX gene in an incompatible strain of Pseudomonas syringae had a dramatic effect on the hypersensitive cell death in soya bean cell suspensions, and markedly reduced the development of macroscopic symptoms in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. These observations indicate that HmpX not only protects against nitrosative stress but also attenuates host hypersensitive reaction during infection by intercepting NO produced by the plant for the execution of the hypersensitive cell death programme. PMID:15998309

  11. Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and Comparison of Serological Methods for Its Sensitive Detection on Potato Tubers.

    PubMed

    Gorris, M T; Alarcon, B; Lopez, M M; Cambra, M

    1994-06-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica have been produced. One, called 4G4, reacted with high specificity for serogroup I of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, the most common serogroup on potato tubers in different serological assays. Eighty-six strains belonging to different E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica serogroups were assayed. Some strains of serogroup XXII also reacted positively. No cross-reactions were observed against other species of plant pathogenic bacteria or 162 saprophytic bacteria from potato tubers. Only one strain of E. chrysanthemi from potato cross-reacted. A comparison of several serological techniques to detect E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica on potato tubers was performed with MAb 4G4 or polyclonal antibodies. The organism was extracted directly from potato peels of artificially inoculated tubers by soaking or selective enrichment under anaerobiosis in a medium with polypectate. MAb 4G4 was able to detect specifically 240 E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica cells per ml by indirect immunofluorescence and immunofluorescence colony staining and after soaking by ELISA-DAS (double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) after enrichment. The same amount of cells was detected by using immunolectrotransfer with polyclonal antibodies, and E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. carotovora were distinguished by the latter technique. ELISA-DAS using MAb 4G4 with an enrichment step also efficiently detected E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica in naturally infected tubers and plants. PMID:16349293

  12. Development and application of a quantitative assay amenable for high-throughput screening to target the type II secretion system for new treatments against plant-pathogenic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-pathogenic bacteria are the causative agents of diseases in important agricultural crops and ornamental plants. The severe economic burden of these diseases requires seeking new approaches, particularly because phytopathogenic bacteria are often resistant to currently available treatments. The...

  13. Epigenetic Control of Effector Gene Expression in the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Leptosphaeria maculans

    PubMed Central

    Soyer, Jessica L.; El Ghalid, Mennat; Glaser, Nicolas; Ollivier, Bénédicte; Linglin, Juliette; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Freitag, Michael; Rouxel, Thierry; Fudal, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of small secreted proteins (SSPs) acting as effectors that modulate host immunity to facilitate infection. SSP-encoding genes are often located in particular genomic environments and show waves of concerted expression at diverse stages of plant infection. To date, little is known about the regulation of their expression. The genome of the Ascomycete Leptosphaeria maculans comprises alternating gene-rich GC-isochores and gene-poor AT-isochores. The AT-isochores harbor mosaics of transposable elements, encompassing one-third of the genome, and are enriched in putative effector genes that present similar expression patterns, namely no expression or low-level expression during axenic cultures compared to strong induction of expression during primary infection of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Here, we investigated the involvement of one specific histone modification, histone H3 lysine 9 methylation (H3K9me3), in epigenetic regulation of concerted effector gene expression in L. maculans. For this purpose, we silenced the expression of two key players in heterochromatin assembly and maintenance, HP1 and DIM-5 by RNAi. By using HP1-GFP as a heterochromatin marker, we observed that almost no chromatin condensation is visible in strains in which LmDIM5 was silenced by RNAi. By whole genome oligoarrays we observed overexpression of 369 or 390 genes, respectively, in the silenced-LmHP1 and -LmDIM5 transformants during growth in axenic culture, clearly favouring expression of SSP-encoding genes within AT-isochores. The ectopic integration of four effector genes in GC-isochores led to their overexpression during growth in axenic culture. These data strongly suggest that epigenetic control, mediated by HP1 and DIM-5, represses the expression of at least part of the effector genes located in AT-isochores during growth in axenic culture. Our hypothesis is that changes of lifestyle and a switch toward pathogenesis lift chromatin

  14. Epigenetic control of effector gene expression in the plant pathogenic fungus Leptosphaeria maculans.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Jessica L; El Ghalid, Mennat; Glaser, Nicolas; Ollivier, Bénédicte; Linglin, Juliette; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène; Connolly, Lanelle R; Freitag, Michael; Rouxel, Thierry; Fudal, Isabelle

    2014-03-01

    Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of small secreted proteins (SSPs) acting as effectors that modulate host immunity to facilitate infection. SSP-encoding genes are often located in particular genomic environments and show waves of concerted expression at diverse stages of plant infection. To date, little is known about the regulation of their expression. The genome of the Ascomycete Leptosphaeria maculans comprises alternating gene-rich GC-isochores and gene-poor AT-isochores. The AT-isochores harbor mosaics of transposable elements, encompassing one-third of the genome, and are enriched in putative effector genes that present similar expression patterns, namely no expression or low-level expression during axenic cultures compared to strong induction of expression during primary infection of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Here, we investigated the involvement of one specific histone modification, histone H3 lysine 9 methylation (H3K9me3), in epigenetic regulation of concerted effector gene expression in L. maculans. For this purpose, we silenced the expression of two key players in heterochromatin assembly and maintenance, HP1 and DIM-5 by RNAi. By using HP1-GFP as a heterochromatin marker, we observed that almost no chromatin condensation is visible in strains in which LmDIM5 was silenced by RNAi. By whole genome oligoarrays we observed overexpression of 369 or 390 genes, respectively, in the silenced-LmHP1 and -LmDIM5 transformants during growth in axenic culture, clearly favouring expression of SSP-encoding genes within AT-isochores. The ectopic integration of four effector genes in GC-isochores led to their overexpression during growth in axenic culture. These data strongly suggest that epigenetic control, mediated by HP1 and DIM-5, represses the expression of at least part of the effector genes located in AT-isochores during growth in axenic culture. Our hypothesis is that changes of lifestyle and a switch toward pathogenesis lift chromatin

  15. Genome analysis of medicinal Ganoderma spp. with plant-pathogenic and saprotrophic life-styles.

    PubMed

    Kües, Ursula; Nelson, David R; Liu, Chang; Yu, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Jianhui; Li, Jianqin; Wang, Xin-Cun; Sun, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a fungal genus belonging to the Ganodermataceae family and Polyporales order. Plant-pathogenic species in this genus can cause severe diseases (stem, butt, and root rot) in economically important trees and perennial crops, especially in tropical countries. Ganoderma species are white rot fungi and have ecological importance in the breakdown of woody plants for nutrient mobilization. They possess effective machineries of lignocellulose-decomposing enzymes useful for bioenergy production and bioremediation. In addition, the genus contains many important species that produce pharmacologically active compounds used in health food and medicine. With the rapid adoption of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, whole genome sequencing and systematic transcriptome analyses become affordable approaches to identify an organism's genes. In the last few years, numerous projects have been initiated to identify the genetic contents of several Ganoderma species, particularly in different strains of Ganoderma lucidum. In November 2013, eleven whole genome sequencing projects for Ganoderma species were registered in international databases, three of which were already completed with genomes being assembled to high quality. In addition to the nuclear genome, two mitochondrial genomes for Ganoderma species have also been reported. Complementing genome analysis, four transcriptome studies on various developmental stages of Ganoderma species have been performed. Information obtained from these studies has laid the foundation for the identification of genes involved in biological pathways that are critical for understanding the biology of Ganoderma, such as the mechanism of pathogenesis, the biosynthesis of active components, life cycle and cellular development, etc. With abundant genetic information becoming available, a few centralized resources have been established to disseminate the knowledge and integrate relevant data to support comparative genomic analyses of

  16. Phylogenomics and Molecular Signatures for Species from the Plant Pathogen-Containing Order Xanthomonadales

    PubMed Central

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2013-01-01

    The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD) are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1–3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as potential

  17. Studies of the antifungal compounds produced by Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed

    Adetuyi, F C

    1990-01-01

    The organic phase of a wide spectrum, antimycotic and diffusable toxin from Erwinia herbicola showed a highly significant inhibitory activity against Pyricularia oryzae spores in spore well bioassay. Germ tube lengths were inhibited more in wells containing 5 microliters equivalent of bacterial toxin than 1 microliter. No significant difference between the germ tube in an equal mixture of Dimethyl sulphoxide: ethanol and controls. Thin layer chromatography using the chloroform extraction of the organic phase showed a significant antagonism on Cladosporium cucumerinum. The retardation factor values for inhibitory zones in solvent 1 were 0.07 for lower spot and 0.26 for upper spot. PMID:2394476

  18. The dual function in virulence and host range restriction of a gene isolated from the pPATH (Ehg) plasmid of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Ezra, D; Barash, I; Valinsky, L; Manulis, S

    2000-06-01

    The host range of the gall-forming bacterium Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg) is restricted to gypsophila whereas Erwinia herbicola pv. betae (Ehb) attacks beet as well as gypsophila. Both pathovars contain an indigenous plasmid (pPATH(Ehg or pPATH(Ehb)) that harbors pathogenicity genes, including the hrp gene cluster. A cosmid library of Ehg824-1 plasmid DNA was mobilized into Ehb4188 and the transconjugants were screened for pathogenicity on beet. One Ehb transconjugant harboring the cosmid pLA173 of pPATHEb induced a hypersensitive-like response and abolished pathogenicity on beet. Transposon mutagenesis of an open reading frame (ORF) located on this cosmid eliminated its affect on pathogenicity. Marker exchange of this mutation into Ehg824-1 caused a substantial reduction in gall size on gypsophila and caused Ehg824-1 to extend its host range and incite galls on beet. The ORF (1.5 kb) was designated as pthG (pathogenicity gene on gypsophila). DNA sequence analysis of pthG revealed no significant homology to known genes in the data bank. Only remnants of the pthG sequences were identified on the pPATH of Ehb4188. The deduced protein lacked an N-terminal signal peptide but contained a short trans-membrane helix in its C terminus. The gene product, as determined by expression in Escherichia coli and Western blots (immunoblots), was a 56-kDa protein. PMID:10830268

  19. Role of motility and chemotaxis in the pathogenesis of Dickeya dadantii 3937 (ex Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937).

    PubMed

    Antúnez-Lamas, María; Cabrera-Ordóñez, Ezequiel; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Raposo, Rosa; Trelles-Salazar, Oswaldo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Andrés; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2009-02-01

    Dickeya dadantii 3937 (ex Erwinia chrysanthemi), a member of the Enterobacteriaceae, causes soft rot in many economically important crops. A successful pathogen has to reach the interior of the plant in order to cause disease. To study the role of motility and chemotaxis in the pathogenicity of D. dadantii 3937, genes involved in the chemotactic signal transduction system (cheW, cheB, cheY and cheZ) and in the structure of the flagellar motor (motA) were mutagenized. All the mutant strains grew like the wild-type in culture media, and the production and secretion of pectolytic enzymes was not affected. As expected, the swimming ability of the mutant strains was reduced with respect to the wild-type: motA (94%), cheY (80%), cheW (74%), cheB (54%) and cheZ (48%). The virulence of the mutant strains was analysed in chicory, Saintpaulia and potato. The mutant strains were also tested for their capability to enter into Arabidopsis leaves. All the mutants showed a significant decrease of virulence in certain hosts; however, the degree of virulence reduction varied depending on the virulence assay. The ability to penetrate Arabidopsis leaves was impaired in all the mutants, whereas the capacity to colonize potato tubers after artificial inoculation was affected in only two mutant strains. In general, the virulence of the mutants could be ranked as motAbacterium. PMID:19202091

  20. Regulation of pel genes, major virulence factors in the plant pathogen bacterium Dickeya dadantii, is mediated by cooperative binding of the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS.

    PubMed

    Zghidi-Abouzid, Ouafa; Hérault, Elodie; Rimsky, Sylvie; Reverchon, Sylvie; Nasser, William; Buckle, Malcolm

    2016-05-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a pathogen infecting a wide range of plant species. Soft rot, the visible symptom, is mainly due to production of pectate lyases (Pels) that can destroy plant cell walls. Previously, we found that nucleoid-associated protein (NAP) H-NS is a key regulator of pel gene expression. The primary binding sites of this NAP have been determined here by footprinting experiments on the pelD gene, encoding an essential virulence factor. Quantitative analysis of DNAse I footprints and surface plasmon resonance imagery experiments further revealed that high-affinity binding sites initiate cooperative binding to establish the nucleoprotein structure required for gene expression silencing. Mutations in the primary binding sites resulted in reduction or loss of repression by H-NS. Overall, these data suggest that H-NS represses pelD, and by inference, other pel genes, by a cooperative binding mechanism, through oligomerization of H-NS molecules. PMID:26912324

  1. Bridgehead invasion of a monomorphic plant pathogenic bacterium: Xanthomonas citri pv. citri, an emerging citrus pathogen in Mali and Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Leduc, A; Traoré, Y N; Boyer, K; Magne, M; Grygiel, P; Juhasz, C C; Boyer, C; Guerin, F; Wonni, I; Ouedraogo, L; Vernière, C; Ravigné, V; Pruvost, O

    2015-11-01

    Molecular epidemiology studies further our understanding of migrations of phytopathogenic bacteria, the major determining factor in their emergence. Asiatic citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri pv. citri, was recently reported in Mali and Burkina Faso, a region remote from other contaminated areas. To identify the origin and pathways of these emergences, we used two sets of markers, minisatellites and microsatellites, for investigating different evolutionary scales. Minisatellite typing suggested the introduction of two groups of strains in Mali (DAPC 1 and DAPC 2), consistent with microsatellite typing. DAPC 2 was restricted to Bamako district, whereas DAPC 1 strains were found much more invasive. The latter strains formed a major clonal complex based on microsatellite data with the primary and secondary founders detected in commercial citrus nurseries and orchards. This suggests that human activities played a major role in the spread of DAPC 1 strains via the movement of contaminated propagative material, further supported by the frequent lack of differentiation between populations from geographically distant nurseries and orchards. Approximate Bayesian Computation analyses supported the hypothesis that strains from Burkina Faso resulted from a bridgehead invasion from Mali. Multi-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis and Approximate Bayesian Computation are useful for understanding invasion routes and pathways of monomorphic bacterial pathogens. PMID:25866121

  2. Erwinia teleogrylli sp. nov., a Bacterial Isolate Associated with a Chinese Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Luo, Jin; Li, Wei; Long, Xiu-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Zeng, Zhi-Gang; Tian, Yong-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial isolate (SCU-B244T) was obtained in China from crickets (Teleogryllus occipitalis) living in cropland deserted for approximately 10 years. The isolated bacteria were Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, oxidase-negative rods. A preliminary analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain belongs to either the genus Erwinia or Pantoea. Analysis of multilocus sequence typing based on concatenated partial atpD, gyrB and infB gene sequences and physiological and biochemical characteristics indicated that the strain belonged to the genus Erwinia, as member of a new species as it was distinct from other known Erwinia species. Further analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed SCU-B244T to have 94.71% identity to the closest species of that genus, Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T), which is below the threshold of 97% used to discriminate bacterial species. DNA-DNA hybridization results (5.78±2.52%) between SCU-B244T and Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T) confirmed that SCU-B244T and Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T) represent different species combined with average nucleotide identity values which range from 72.42% to 74.41. The DNA G+C content of SCU-B244T was 55.32 mol%, which also differs from that of Erwinia oleae (54.7 to 54.9 mol%). The polyphasic taxonomic approach used here confirmed that the strain belongs to the Erwinia group and represents a novel species. The name Erwinia teleogrylli sp. nov. is proposed for this novel taxon, for which the type strain is SCU-B244T (= CGMCC 1.12772T = DSM 28222T = KCTC 42022T). PMID:26800121

  3. High-quality complete genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. SUBG005, a plant pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Rakhashiya, Purvi M.; Patel, Pooja P.; Thaker, Vrinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbacterium sp. SUBG005 is a Gram positive bacterium, isolated from infected leaf of Mangifera indica L. in Rajkot (22.30°N, 70.78°E), Gujarat, India. The genome sequencing of Microbacterium sp. SUBG005 is having type I secretion system genes of pathogenicity as well as heavy metal resistance unique genes. The genome size is 7.01 Mb with G + C content of 64.80% and contains rRNA sequences. Genome sequencing analysis provides information about the microbe role in host–pathogen interaction. The whole genome sequencing has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number JNNT00000000. PMID:26484276

  4. First Report of a Human Isolate of Erwinia persicinus

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Caroline M.; Steigerwalt, Arnold G.; Hill, Bertha C.; Miller, J. Michael; Brenner, Don J.

    1998-01-01

    Erwinia persicinus was first described in 1990 after being isolated from a variety of fruits and vegetables, including bananas, cucumbers, and tomatoes. In 1994, it was shown to be the causative agent of necrosis of bean pods. We now report the first human isolate of E. persicinus. The strain was isolated from the urine of an 88-year-old woman who presented with a urinary tract infection. By the hydroxyapatite method, DNA from this strain was shown to be 94.5% related at 60°C and 86% related at 75°C to the type strain of E. persicinus. The biochemical profile of E. persicinus is most similar to those of Erwinia rhapontici, Pantoea agglomerans, and Enterobacter species. It is negative in tests for lysine, arginine, ornithine, dulcitol, and urea. It is motile and positive in tests for d-sorbitol and sucrose. It is susceptible to the expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones, but it is resistant to ampicillin, ticarcillin, and cefazolin. PMID:9431957

  5. The structure of O-polysaccharides isolated from plant pathogenic bacteria Pectobacterium wasabiae IFB5408 and IFB5427.

    PubMed

    Ossowska, Karolina; Czerwicka, Małgorzata; Sledz, Wojciech; Zoledowska, Sabina; Motyka, Agata; Szulta, Sylwia; Lojkowska, Ewa; Kaczyński, Zbigniew

    2016-05-13

    O-Polysaccharides were isolated from the lipopolysaccharides of two strains of plant pathogenic bacteria Pectobacterium wasabiae isolated in Poland in 2013 (IFB5408 and IFB5427). The purified polysaccharides were analyzed using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, DQF-COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY, and HMBC) and the chemical methods. Sugar and methylation analyses of native polysaccharides, absolute configuration assignment of constituent monosaccharides together with NMR spectroscopy data revealed that the chemical structures of both O-polysaccharides are the same. PMID:27058296

  6. Differentiation of Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae strains with single nucleotide polymorphisms and by synthesis of dihydrophenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Gehring, I; Geider, K

    2012-07-01

    Fire blight has spread from North America to New Zealand, Europe, and the Mediterranean region. We were able to differentiate strains from various origins with a novel PCR method. Three Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Erwinia amylovora genome were characteristic of isolates from North America and could distinguish them from isolates from other parts of the world. They were derived from the galE, acrB, and hrpA genes of strains Ea273 and Ea1/79. These genes were analyzed by conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) with differential primer annealing temperatures. North-American E. amylovora strains were further differentiated according to their production of L: -2,5-dihydrophenylalanine (DHP) as tested by growth inhibition of the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis. E. amylovora fruit tree (Maloideae) and raspberry (rubus) strains were also differentiated by Single Strand Conformational Polymorphism analysis. Strains from the related species Erwinia pyrifoliae isolated in Korea and Japan were all DHP positive, but were differentiated from each other by SNPs in the galE gene. Differential PCR is a rapid and simple method to distinguish E. amylovora as well as E. pyrifoliae strains according to their geographical origin. PMID:22538467

  7. Insights into the adaptive response of the plant-pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora capsici to the fungicide flumorph

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Zhili; Chen, Lei; Mu, Wenjun; Liu, Li; Liu, Xili

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is an important oomycete plant pathogen that causes significant losses worldwide. The carboxylic acid amide fungicide flumorph has shown excellent activity against oomycete plant pathogens. Despite its potential, there remains concern that the sexual reproduction of oomycete pathogens, which results in genetic recombination, could result in the rapid development of resistance to flumorph. The current study utilized an iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) based method to compare differences between the proteome of the parental P. capsici isolate PCAS1 and its sexual progeny S2-838, which exhibits significant resistance to flumorph. A total of 2396 individual proteins were identified, of these, 181 were considered to be associated with the adaptive response of P. capsici to flumorph. The subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that the adaptive response of P. capsici to flumorph was complex and regulated by multiple mechanisms, including utilising carbohydrate from the host environment to compensate for the cell wall stress induced by flumorph, a shift in energy generation, decreased amino acids biosynthesis, and elevated levels of proteins associated with the pathogen’s response to stimulus and transmembrane transport. Moreover, the results of the study provided crucial data that could provide the basis for early monitoring of flumorph resistance in field populations of P. capsici. PMID:27050922

  8. Evaluation of reference genes for real-time RT-PCR expression studies in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum

    PubMed Central

    Takle, Gunnhild W; Toth, Ian K; Brurberg, May B

    2007-01-01

    Background Real-time RT-PCR has become a powerful technique to monitor low-abundance mRNA expression and is a useful tool when examining bacterial gene expression inside infected host tissues. However, correct evaluation of data requires accurate and reliable normalisation against internal standards. Thus, the identification of reference genes whose expression does not change during the course of the experiment is of paramount importance. Here, we present a study where manipulation of cultural growth conditions and in planta experiments have been used to validate the expression stability of reference gene candidates for the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Results Of twelve reference gene candidates tested, four proved to be stably expressed both in six different cultural growth conditions and in planta. Two of these genes (recA and ffh), encoding recombinase A and signal recognition particle protein, respectively, proved to be the most stable set of reference genes under the experimental conditions used. In addition, genes proC and gyrA, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase and DNA gyrase, respectively, also displayed relatively stable mRNA expression levels. Conclusion Based on these results, we suggest recA and ffh as suitable candidates for accurate normalisation of real-time RT-PCR data for experiments investigating the plant pathogen P. atrosepticum and potentially other related pathogens. PMID:17888160

  9. Natural Selection on Coding and Noncoding DNA Sequences Is Associated with Virulence Genes in a Plant Pathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Gabriel E.; Sanz-Martín, José M.; Anisimova, Maria; Sukno, Serenella A.; Thon, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection leaves imprints on DNA, offering the opportunity to identify functionally important regions of the genome. Identifying the genomic regions affected by natural selection within pathogens can aid in the pursuit of effective strategies to control diseases. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide patterns of selection acting on different classes of sequences in a worldwide sample of eight strains of the model plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We found evidence of selective sweeps, balancing selection, and positive selection affecting both protein-coding and noncoding DNA of pathogenicity-related sequences. Genes encoding putative effector proteins and secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes show evidence of positive selection acting on the coding sequence, consistent with an Arms Race model of evolution. The 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes coding for effector proteins and genes upregulated during infection show an excess of high-frequency polymorphisms likely the consequence of balancing selection and consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis of evolution acting on these putative regulatory sequences. Based on the findings of this work, we propose that even though adaptive substitutions on coding sequences are important for proteins that interact directly with the host, polymorphisms in the regulatory sequences may confer flexibility of gene expression in the virulence processes of this important plant pathogen. PMID:25193312

  10. Lutein, a Natural Carotenoid, Induces α-1,3-Glucan Accumulation on the Cell Wall Surface of Fungal Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Otaka, Junnosuke; Seo, Shigemi; Nishimura, Marie

    2016-01-01

    α-1,3-Glucan, a component of the fungal cell wall, is a refractory polysaccharide for most plants. Previously, we showed that various fungal plant pathogens masked their cell wall surfaces with α-1,3-glucan to evade plant immunity. This surface accumulation of α-1,3-glucan was infection specific, suggesting that plant factors might induce its production in fungi. Through immunofluorescence observations of fungal cell walls, we found that carrot (Daucus carota) extract induced the accumulation of α-1,3-glucan on germlings in Colletotrichum fioriniae, a polyphagous fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in various dicot plants. Bioassay-guided fractionation of carrot leaf extract successfully identified two active substances that caused α-1,3-glucan accumulation in this fungus: lutein, a carotenoid widely distributed in plants, and stigmasterol, a plant-specific membrane component. Lutein, which had a greater effect on C. fioriniae, also induced α-1,3-glucan accumulation in other Colletotrichum species and in the phylogenetically distant rice pathogen Cochliobolus miyabeanus, but not in the rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae belonging to the same phylogenetic subclass as Colletotrichum. Our results suggested that fungal plant pathogens reorganize their cell wall components in response to specific plant-derived compounds, which these pathogens may encounter during infection. PMID:27483218

  11. Horizontal Gene Acquisition of Liberibacter Plant Pathogens from a Bacteriome-Confined Endosymbiont of Their Psyllid Vector

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Inoue, Hiromitsu; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hongoh, Yuichi; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Hattori, Masahira; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-01-01

    he Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri is a notorious agricultural pest that transmits the phloem-inhabiting alphaproteobacterial ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and allied plant pathogens, which cause the devastating citrus disease called Huanglongbing or greening disease. D. citri harbors two distinct bacterial mutualists in the symbiotic organ called bacteriome: the betaproteobacterium ‘Candidatus Profftella armatura’ in the syncytial cytoplasm at the center of the bacteriome, and the gammaproteobacterium ‘Candidatus Carsonella ruddii’ in uninucleate bacteriocytes. Here we report that a putative amino acid transporter LysE of Profftella forms a highly supported clade with proteins of L. asiaticus, L. americanus, and L. solanacearum. L. crescens, the most basal Liberibacter lineage currently known, lacked the corresponding gene. The Profftella-Liberibacter subclade of LysE formed a clade with proteins from betaproteobacteria of the order Burkholderiales, to which Profftella belongs. This phylogenetic pattern favors the hypothesis that the Liberibacter lineage acquired the gene from the Profftella lineage via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) after L. crescens diverged from other Liberibacter lineages. KA/KS analyses further supported the hypothesis that the genes encoded in the Liberibacter genomes are functional. These findings highlight the possible evolutionary importance of HGT between plant pathogens and their insect vector’s symbionts that are confined in the symbiotic organ and seemingly sequestered from external microbial populations. PMID:24349319

  12. Disruption of Vector Host Preference with Plant Volatiles May Reduce Spread of Insect-Transmitted Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Martini, Xavier; Willett, Denis S; Kuhns, Emily H; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2016-05-01

    Plant pathogens can manipulate the odor of their host; the odor of an infected plant is often attractive to the plant pathogen vector. It has been suggested that this odor-mediated manipulation attracts vectors and may contribute to spread of disease; however, this requires further broad demonstration among vector-pathogen systems. In addition, disruption of this indirect chemical communication between the pathogen and the vector has not been attempted. We present a model that demonstrates how a phytophathogen (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus) can increase its spread by indirectly manipulating the behavior of its vector (Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama). The model indicates that when vectors are attracted to pathogen-infected hosts, the proportion of infected vectors increases, as well as, the proportion of infected hosts. Additionally, the peak of infected host populations occurs earlier as compared with controls. These changes in disease dynamics were more important during scenarios with higher vector mortality. Subsequently, we conducted a series of experiments to disrupt the behavior of the Asian citrus psyllid. To do so, we exposed the vector to methyl salicylate, the major compound released following host infection with the pathogen. We observed that during exposure or after pre-exposure to methyl salicylate, the host preference can be altered; indeed, the Asian citrus psyllids were unable to select infected hosts over uninfected counterparts. We suggest mechanisms to explain these interactions and potential applications of disrupting herbivore host preference with plant volatiles for sustainable management of insect vectors. PMID:27193763

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Plant-Pathogenic Streptomyces Species Associated with Common Scab-Infected Potato Tubers in Newfoundland.

    PubMed

    Fyans, Joanna K; Bown, Luke; Bignell, Dawn R D

    2016-02-01

    Potato common scab (CS) is an economically important crop disease that is caused by several members of the genus Streptomyces. In this study, we characterized the plant-pathogenic Streptomyces spp. associated with CS-infected potato tubers harvested in Newfoundland, Canada. A total of 17 pathogenic Streptomyces isolates were recovered from potato scab lesions, of which eight were determined to be most similar to the known CS pathogen S. europaeiscabiei. All eight S. europaeiscabiei isolates were found to produce the thaxtomin A phytotoxin and to harbor the nec1 virulence gene, and most also carry the putative virulence gene tomA. The remaining isolates appear to be novel pathogenic species that do not produce thaxtomin A, and only two of these isolates were determined to harbor the nec1 or tomA genes. Of the non-thaxtomin-producing isolates, strain 11-1-2 was shown to exhibit a severe pathogenic phenotype against different plant hosts and to produce a novel, secreted phytotoxic substance. This is the first report documenting the plant-pathogenic Streptomyces spp. associated with CS disease in Newfoundland. Furthermore, our findings provide further evidence that phytotoxins other than thaxtomin A may also contribute to the development of CS by Streptomyces spp. PMID:26524546

  14. Insights into the adaptive response of the plant-pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora capsici to the fungicide flumorph.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhili; Chen, Lei; Mu, Wenjun; Liu, Li; Liu, Xili

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is an important oomycete plant pathogen that causes significant losses worldwide. The carboxylic acid amide fungicide flumorph has shown excellent activity against oomycete plant pathogens. Despite its potential, there remains concern that the sexual reproduction of oomycete pathogens, which results in genetic recombination, could result in the rapid development of resistance to flumorph. The current study utilized an iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) based method to compare differences between the proteome of the parental P. capsici isolate PCAS1 and its sexual progeny S2-838, which exhibits significant resistance to flumorph. A total of 2396 individual proteins were identified, of these, 181 were considered to be associated with the adaptive response of P. capsici to flumorph. The subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that the adaptive response of P. capsici to flumorph was complex and regulated by multiple mechanisms, including utilising carbohydrate from the host environment to compensate for the cell wall stress induced by flumorph, a shift in energy generation, decreased amino acids biosynthesis, and elevated levels of proteins associated with the pathogen's response to stimulus and transmembrane transport. Moreover, the results of the study provided crucial data that could provide the basis for early monitoring of flumorph resistance in field populations of P. capsici. PMID:27050922

  15. Intercellular and intracellular signalling systems that globally control the expression of virulence genes in plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jong Hyun

    2013-04-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize complex signalling systems to control the expression of virulence genes at the cellular level and within populations. Quorum sensing (QS), an important intercellular communication mechanism, is mediated by different types of small molecules, including N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), fatty acids and small proteins. AHL-mediated signalling systems dependent on the LuxI and LuxR family proteins play critical roles in the virulence of a wide range of Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Xanthomonas spp. and Xylella fastidiosa, members of the Gammaproteobacteria, however, possess QS systems that are mediated by fatty acid-type diffusible signal factors (DSFs). Recent studies have demonstrated that Ax21, a 194-amino-acid protein in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, plays dual functions in activating a rice innate immune pathway through binding to the rice XA21 pattern recognition receptor and in regulating bacterial virulence and biofilm formation as a QS signal molecule. In xanthomonads, DSF-mediated QS systems are connected with the signalling pathways mediated by cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which functions as a second messenger for the control of virulence gene expression in these bacterial pathogens. PMID:23186372

  16. Antifungal activity of essential oil and its constituents from Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana Florin leaf against plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ting; Cheng, Ying-Hung; Wu, Chi-Lin; Chang, Shang-Tzen; Chang, Tun-Tschu; Su, Yu-Chang

    2008-09-01

    Resistance to conventional fungicides causes the poor disease control of agriculture. Natural products from plants have great potential as novel fungicide sources for controlling pathogenic fungi. In this study antipathogenic activity of the leaf essential oil and its constituents from Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana Florin were evaluated in vitro against six plant pathogenic fungi. Chemical analysis of leaf oil by GC/MS allowed identification of alpha-pinene (44.2%), limonene (21.6%), beta-myrcene (8.9%), beta-caryophyllene (8.2%), caryophyllene oxide (2.4%), alpha-cadinol (1.6%), beta-pinene (1.2%), and T-muurolol (1.1%) as main components. Sesquiterpenoid components of the oil were more effective than monoterpenoid components of the oil. In particular, T-muurolol and alpha-cadinol strongly inhibited the growth of Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum, with the IC(50) values < 50 microg ml(-1). These compounds also efficiently inhibited the mycelial growths of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, P. funerea, Ganoderma australe and F. solani. These results showed that T-muurolol and alpha-cadinol possess antifungal activities against a broad spectrum of tested plant pathogenic fungi and could be used as potential antifungal agents for the control of fungal diseases in plants. PMID:18206367

  17. Inactivation of plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum with natural plant-produced photosensitizers under solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Fracarolli, Letícia; Rodrigues, Gabriela B; Pereira, Ana C; Massola Júnior, Nelson S; Silva-Junior, Geraldo José; Bachmann, Luciano; Wainwright, Mark; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Braga, Gilberto U L

    2016-09-01

    The increasing tolerance to currently used fungicides and the need for environmentally friendly antimicrobial approaches have stimulated the development of novel strategies to control plant-pathogenic fungi such as antimicrobial phototreatment (APT). We investigated the in vitro APT of the plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum with furocoumarins and coumarins and solar radiation. The compounds used were: furocoumarins 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and 5,8-dimethoxypsoralen (isopimpinellin), coumarins 2H-chromen-2-one (coumarin), 7-hydroxycoumarin, 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (citropten) and a mixture (3:1) of 7-methoxycoumarin and 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin. APT of conidia with crude extracts from 'Tahiti' acid lime, red and white grapefruit were also performed. Pure compounds were tested at 50μM concentration and mixtures and extracts at 12.5mgL(-1). The C. acutatum conidia suspension with or without the compounds was exposed to solar radiation for 1h. In addition, the effects of APT on the leaves of the plant host Citrus sinensis were determined. APT with 8-MOP was the most effective treatment, killing 100% of the conidia followed by the mixture of two coumarins and isopimpinellin that killed 99% and 64% of the conidia, respectively. APT with the extracts killed from 20% to 70% of the conidia, and the extract from 'Tahiti' lime was the most effective. No damage to sweet orange leaves was observed after APT with any of the compounds or extracts. PMID:27434699

  18. Volatiles produced by soil-borne endophytic bacteria increase plant pathogen resistance and affect tritrophic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ton, Jurriaan; Brandenburg, Anna; Karlen, Danielle; Zopfi, Jakob; Turlings, Ted C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by soil microorganisms influence plant growth and pathogen resistance. Yet, very little is known about their influence on herbivores and higher trophic levels. We studied the origin and role of a major bacterial VOC, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), on plant growth, pathogen and herbivore resistance, and the attraction of natural enemies in maize. One of the major contributors to 2,3-BD in the headspace of soil-grown maize seedlings was identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, an endophytic bacterium that colonizes the plants. The production of 2,3-BD by E. aerogenes rendered maize plants more resistant against the Northern corn leaf blight fungus Setosphaeria turcica. On the contrary, E. aerogenes-inoculated plants were less resistant against the caterpillar Spodoptera littoralis. The effect of 2,3-BD on the attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris was more variable: 2,3-BD application to the headspace of the plants had no effect on the parasitoids, but application to the soil increased parasitoid attraction. Furthermore, inoculation of seeds with E. aerogenes decreased plant attractiveness, whereas inoculation of soil with a total extract of soil microbes increased parasitoid attraction, suggesting that the effect of 2,3-BD on the parasitoid is indirect and depends on the composition of the microbial community. PMID:24127750

  19. Identification of the bona fide DHDPS from a common plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sarah C; Hor, Lilian; Dogovski, Con; Dobson, Renwick C J; Perugini, Matthew A

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a Gram-negative soil-borne bacterium that causes Crown Gall disease in many economically important crops. The absence of a suitable chemical treatment means there is a need to discover new anti-Crown Gall agents and also characterize bona fide drug targets. One such target is dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), a homo-tetrameric enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in the metabolic pathway yielding meso-diaminopimelate and lysine. Interestingly, there are 10 putative DHDPS genes annotated in the A. tumefaciens genome, including three whose structures have recently been determined (PDB IDs: 3B4U, 2HMC, and 2R8W). However, we show using quantitative enzyme kinetic assays that nine of the 10 dapA gene products, including 3B4U, 2HMC, and 2R8W, lack DHDPS function in vitro. A sequence alignment showed that the product of the dapA7 gene contains all of the conserved residues known to be important for DHDPS catalysis and allostery. This gene was cloned and the recombinant product expressed and purified. Our studies show that the purified enzyme (i) possesses DHDPS enzyme activity, (ii) is allosterically inhibited by lysine, and (iii) adopts the canonical homo-tetrameric structure in both solution and the crystal state. This study describes for the first time the structure, function and allostery of the bona fide DHDPS from A. tumefaciens, which offers insight into the rational design of pesticide agents for combating Crown Gall disease. PMID:24677246

  20. Volatiles produced by soil-borne endophytic bacteria increase plant pathogen resistance and affect tritrophic interactions.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Marco; Erb, Matthias; Ton, Jurriaan; Brandenburg, Anna; Karlen, Danielle; Zopfi, Jakob; Turlings, Ted C J

    2014-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by soil microorganisms influence plant growth and pathogen resistance. Yet, very little is known about their influence on herbivores and higher trophic levels. We studied the origin and role of a major bacterial VOC, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), on plant growth, pathogen and herbivore resistance, and the attraction of natural enemies in maize. One of the major contributors to 2,3-BD in the headspace of soil-grown maize seedlings was identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, an endophytic bacterium that colonizes the plants. The production of 2,3-BD by E. aerogenes rendered maize plants more resistant against the Northern corn leaf blight fungus Setosphaeria turcica. On the contrary, E. aerogenes-inoculated plants were less resistant against the caterpillar Spodoptera littoralis. The effect of 2,3-BD on the attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris was more variable: 2,3-BD application to the headspace of the plants had no effect on the parasitoids, but application to the soil increased parasitoid attraction. Furthermore, inoculation of seeds with E. aerogenes decreased plant attractiveness, whereas inoculation of soil with a total extract of soil microbes increased parasitoid attraction, suggesting that the effect of 2,3-BD on the parasitoid is indirect and depends on the composition of the microbial community. PMID:24127750

  1. Autoinducer-2 of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora and other plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Geider, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Autoinducers are important for cellular communication of bacteria. The luxS gene has a central role in the synthesis of autoinducer-2 (AI-2). The gene was identified in a shotgun library of Erwinia amylovora and primers designed for PCR amplification from bacterial DNA. Supernatants of several Erwinia amylovora strains were assayed for AI-2 activity with a Vibrio harveyi mutant and were positive. Many other plant-associated bacteria also showed AI-2 activity such as Erwinia pyrifoliae and Erwinia tasmaniensis. The luxS genes of several bacteria were cloned, sequenced, and complemented Escherichia coli strain DH5alpha and a Salmonella typhimurium mutant, both defective in luxS, for synthesis of AI-2. Assays to detect AI-2 activity in culture supernatants of several Pseudomonas syringae pathovars failed, which may indicate the absence of AI-2 or synthesis of another type. Several reporter strains did not detect synthesis of an acyl homoserine lactone (AHL, AI-1) by Erwinia amylovora, but confirmed AHL-synthesis for Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica and Pantoea stewartii. PMID:17092294

  2. Erwinia pyrifoliae sp. nov., a novel pathogen that affects Asian pear trees (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai)

    PubMed

    Kim, W S; Gardan, L; Rhim, S L; Geider, K

    1999-04-01

    A novel pathogen from Asian pears (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) was analysed by sequencing the 16S rDNA and the adjacent intergenic region, and the data were compared to related Enterobacteriaceae. The 16S rDNA of the Asian pear pathogen was almost identical with the sequence of Erwinia amylovora, in contrast to the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region of both species. A dendrogram was deduced from determined sequences of the spacer regions including those of several related species such as Erwinia amylovora, Enterobacter pyrinus, Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii and Escherichia coli. Dendrograms derived from 121 biochemical characteristics including Biotype 100 data placed the Asian pear pathogen close to Erwinia amylovora and more distantly to other members of the species Erwinia and to the species Pantoea and Enterobacter. Another DNA relatedness study was performed by DNA hybridizations and estimation of delta Tm values. The Asian pear strains constituted a tight DNA hybridization group (89-100%) and were barely related to strains of Erwinia amylovora (40-50%) with a delta Tm in the range of 5.2-6.8. The G + C content of DNA from the novel pathogen is 52 mol%. Therefore, it is proposed that strains isolated from Asian pears constitute a new species and the name Erwinia pyrifoliae is suggested; the type strain is strain Ep 16/96T (= CFBP 4172T = DSM 12163T). PMID:10319516

  3. Erwinia iniecta sp. nov., isolated from Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia).

    PubMed

    Campillo, Tony; Luna, Emily; Portier, Perrine; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Lapitan, Nora; Tisserat, Ned A; Leach, Jan E

    2015-10-01

    Short, Gram-negative-staining, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from crushed bodies of Russian wheat aphid [Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov)] and artificial diets after Russian wheat aphid feeding. Based on multilocus sequence analysis involving the 16S rRNA, atpD, infB, gyrB and rpoB genes, these bacterial isolates constitute a novel clade in the genus Erwinia, and were most closely related to Erwinia toletana. Representative distinct strains within this clade were used for comparisons with related species of Erwinia. Phenotypic comparisons using four distinct strains and average nucleotide identity (ANI) measurements using two distinct draft genomes revealed that these strains form a novel species within the genus Erwinia. The name Erwinia iniecta sp. nov. is proposed, and strain B120T ( = CFBP 8182T = NCCB 100485T) was designated the type strain. Erwinia iniecta sp. nov. was not pathogenic to plants. However, virulence to the Russian wheat aphid was observed. PMID:26198254

  4. The operon for cytokinin biosynthesis of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae contains two promoters and is plant induced.

    PubMed

    Guo, M; Manulis, S; Barash, I; Lichter, A

    2001-12-01

    The operon for cytokinin biosynthesis in the gall-forming bacterium Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg) has been previously shown to reside on an indigenous plasmid (pPATH(Ehg)) that is mandatory for pathogenicity. This operon consists of two genes: the first open reading frame (pre-etz) is of unknown function, whereas the second one (etz) encodes for isopentenyl transferase. Northern hybridization performed with the wild-type strain Ehg824-1 grown in Luria-Bertani broth demonstrated two transcripts of which an etz-specific transcript (1.0 kb) was predominant. Fusion of upstream DNA fragments of both pre-etz and etz to the ice nucleation reporter gene inaZ in pVSP61 showed high ice nucleation activity in both cultures, confirming the presence of two independent promoters. An increase of 1-1.5 orders in transcriptional activity of these promoters was observed following inoculation of gypsophila cuttings. Mutants of Ehg824-1 were generated by insertion of inaZ into pre-etz and etz using the transposon reporter Tn3-Spice. An increase of about two orders in transcriptional activity was recorded with both mutants following inoculation of gypsophila or bean cuttings. A similar induction was also observed when the bacteria were applied to the leaf surface of these plants. Unlike other virulence genes present on the pPATH(Ehg), neither pre-etz nor etz was regulated by the adjacent hrp gene cluster. PMID:11822839

  5. Role of electron transport chain of chloroplasts in oxidative burst of interaction between Erwinia amylovora and host cells.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Ghahremani, Zahra; Erfaninia, Kobra; Mehrabi, Rahim

    2015-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a necrogenic bacterium, causing the fire blight disease on many rosaceous plants. Triggering oxidative burst by E. amylovora is a key response by which host plants try to restrain pathogen spread. Electron transport chain (ETC) of chloroplasts is known as an inducible source of reactive oxygen species generation in various stresses. This research was performed to assess the role of this ETC in E. amylovora-host interaction using several inhibitors of this chain in susceptible and resistant apple and pear genotypes. All ETC inhibitors delayed appearance of disease necrosis, but the effects of methyl viologen, glutaraldehyde, and DCMU were more significant. In the absence of inhibitors, resistant genotypes showed an earlier and severe H2O2 generation and early suppression of redox dependent, psbA gene. The effects of inhibitors were corresponding to the redox potential of ETC inhibitory sites. In addition, delayed necrosis appearance was associated with the decreased disease severity and delayed H2O2 generation. These results provide evidences for the involvement of this ETC in host oxidative burst and suggest that chloroplast ETC has significant role in E. amylovora-host interaction. PMID:25820489

  6. Enhanced production of extracellular ice nucleators from Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingkun; Lee, Tung-Ching

    1998-12-01

    The effects of growth conditions and chemical or physical treatments on the production of extracellular ice nucleators (ECINs) by Erwinia herbicola cells were investigated. The spontaneous release of ECINs, active at temperatures higher than -4 degrees C, into the environment depended on culture conditions, with optimal production when cells were grown in yeast extract to an early stationary phase at temperatures below 22 degrees C. ECINs were vesicular, released from cell surfaces with sizes ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 &mgr;m as determined by ultrafiltration and transmission electron microscopy. Protein profiles of ECIN fractions during bacterial growth were examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and Ina proteins were detected by Western blotting. ECIN production was enhanced 5-fold when cells were treated with EDTA and 20- to 30-fold when subjected to sonication. These conditions provide a means for large-scale preparationage> ECINs by E. herbicola. PMID:12501408

  7. Molecular cloning of virulence genes from Erwinia stewartii.

    PubMed Central

    Coplin, D L; Frederick, R D; Majerczak, D R; Haas, E S

    1986-01-01

    A library of Erwinia stewartii DNA was constructed in cosmid pVK100 and used to complement spontaneous and Mu pf7701-induced (designated by the prefix MU) avirulent mutants. Plasmid pES4507 restored water-soaking ability and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) synthesis to mutants MU14110 and MU2B70 (group I); pES1044 restored water-soaking ability to MU43, MU51, MU136, MU141, and RDF6011 (group II); and pES2144 complemented four spontaneous EPS- mutants (group III). Hybridization of labeled plasmid DNA to Southern blots of genomic DNA from the mutants revealed that a Mu pf7701 insertion was associated with the respective cloned region in all mutants except MU2B70 and MU223. In these strains, the plasmid may be suppressing the avirulent phenotype rather than complementing the mutation. Images PMID:3782017

  8. HecA, a member of a class of adhesins produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria, contributes to the attachment, aggregation, epidermal cell killing, and virulence phenotypes of Erwinia chrysanthemi EC16 on Nicotiana clevelandii seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Clemencia M.; Ham, Jong Hyun; Deng, Wen-Ling; Doyle, Jeff J.; Collmer, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi is representative of a broad class of bacterial pathogens that are capable of inducing necrosis in plants. The E. chrysanthemi EC16 hecA gene predicts a 3,850-aa member of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin family of adhesins. A hecA∷Tn7 mutant was reduced in virulence on Nicotiana clevelandii seedlings after inoculation without wounding. Epifluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy observations of hecA and wild-type cells expressing the green fluorescent protein revealed that the mutant is reduced in its ability to attach and then form aggregates on leaves and to cause an aggregate-associated killing of epidermal cells. Cell killing also depended on production of the major pectate lyase isozymes and the type II, but not the type III, secretion pathway in E. chrysanthemi. HecA homologs were found in bacterial pathogens of plants and animals and appear to be unique to pathogens and universal in necrogenic plant pathogens. Phylogenetic comparison of the conserved two-partner secretion domains in the proteins and the 16S rRNA sequences in respective bacteria revealed the two datasets to be fundamentally incongruent, suggesting horizontal acquisition of these genes. Furthermore, hecA and its two homologs in Yersinia pestis had a G+C content that was 10% higher than that of their genomes and similar to that of plant pathogenic Ralstonia, Xylella, and Pseudomonas spp. Our data suggest that filamentous hemagglutinin-like adhesins are broadly important virulence factors in both plant and animal pathogens. PMID:12271135

  9. Antibacterial activity of a 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Hye-Ran; Bae, Jae-Han; Hou, Ching T; Kim, Hak-Ryul

    2013-08-15

    7,10-Dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid (DOD), one of hydroxy fatty acids, was successfully produced from oleic acid and natural vegetable oils containing oleic acid by a bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PR3). However, biological properties of DOD remained unknown so far. In this study, as a trial to determine the biological properties of DOD molecule, antibacterial activities of DOD against plant pathogenic bacteria were determined qualitatively and quantitatively. DOD presented strong antibacterial activities against all the bacterial strains tested with MIC value being in the range of 125-1000μg/ml and there was no sensitivity preference detected between Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. PMID:23830454

  10. Crystal structure of the FAD-containing ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros; Orellano, Elena G; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    We have solved the structure of ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase, FPR, from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, responsible for citrus canker, at a resolution of 1.5 Å. This structure reveals differences in the mobility of specific loops when compared to other FPRs, probably unrelated to the hydride transfer process, which contributes to explaining the structural and functional divergence between the subclass I FPRs. Interactions of the C-terminus of the enzyme with the phosphoadenosine of the cofactor FAD limit its mobility, thus affecting the entrance of nicotinamide into the active site. This structure opens the possibility of rationally designing drugs against the X. axonopodis pv. citri phytopathogen. PMID:23984418

  11. Humidity assay for studying plant-pathogen interactions in miniature controlled discrete humidity environments with good throughput.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Jiang, Huawei; Sahu, Binod Bihari; Kambakam, Sekhar; Singh, Prashant; Wang, Xinran; Wang, Qiugu; Bhattacharyya, Madan K; Dong, Liang

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a highly economical and accessible approach to generate different discrete relative humidity conditions in spatially separated wells of a modified multi-well plate for humidity assay of plant-pathogen interactions with good throughput. We demonstrated that a discrete humidity gradient could be formed within a few minutes and maintained over a period of a few days inside the device. The device consisted of a freeway channel in the top layer, multiple compartmented wells in the bottom layer, a water source, and a drying agent source. The combinational effects of evaporation, diffusion, and convection were synergized to establish the stable discrete humidity gradient. The device was employed to study visible and molecular disease phenotypes of soybean in responses to infection by Phytophthora sojae, an oomycete pathogen, under a set of humidity conditions, with two near-isogenic soybean lines, Williams and Williams 82, that differ for a Phytophthora resistance gene (Rps1-k). Our result showed that at 63% relative humidity, the transcript level of the defense gene GmPR1 was at minimum in the susceptible soybean line Williams and at maximal level in the resistant line Williams 82 following P. sojae CC5C infection. In addition, we investigated the effects of environmental temperature, dimensional and geometrical parameters, and other configurational factors on the ability of the device to generate miniature humidity environments. This work represents an exploratory effort to economically and efficiently manipulate humidity environments in a space-limited device and shows a great potential to facilitate humidity assay of plant seed germination and development, pathogen growth, and plant-pathogen interactions. Since the proposed device can be easily made, modified, and operated, it is believed that this present humidity manipulation technology will benefit many laboratories in the area of seed science, plant pathology, and plant-microbe biology, where

  12. Use of a passive bioreactor to reduce water-borne plant pathogens, nitrate, and sulfate in greenhouse effluent.

    PubMed

    Gruyer, Nicolas; Dorais, Martine; Alsanius, Beatrix W; Zagury, Gérald J

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of passive bioreactors to reduce water-borne plant pathogens (Pythium ultimum and Fusarium oxysporum) and nutrient load (NO(-) 3 and SO(2-) 4) in greenhouse effluent. Sterilized and unsterilized passive bioreactors filled with a reactive mixture of organic carbon material were used in three replicates. After a startup period of 2 (sterilized) or 5 (unsterilized) weeks, the bioreactor units received for 14 weeks a reconstituted commercial greenhouse effluent composed of 500 mg L(-1) SO(2-) 4 and 300 mg L(-1) NO(-) 3 and were inoculated three times with P. ultimum and F. oxysporum (10(6) CFU mL(-1)). Efficacy in removing water-borne plant pathogens and nitrate reached 99.9% for both the sterilized and unsterilized bioreactors. However, efficacy in reducing the SO(2-) 4 load sharply decreased from 89% to 29% after 2 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment for the unsterilized bioreactors. Although SO(2-) 4 removal efficacy for the sterilized bioreactors did not recover after 4 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment, the unsterilized bioreactor nearly reached a similar level of SO(2-) 4 removal after 4 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment compared with affluent loaded only with SO(2-) 4, where no competition for the carbohydrate source occurred between the denitrification process and sulfate-reducing bacteria activity. Performance differences between the sterilized and unsterilized bioreactors clearly show the predominant importance of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Consequently, when sulfate-reducing bacteria reach their optimal activity, passive bioreactors may constitute a cheap, low-maintenance method of treating greenhouse effluent to recycle wastewater and eliminate nutrient runoff, which has important environmental impacts. PMID:23947714

  13. Characterization of a tonB mutation in Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937: TonB(Ech) is a member of the enterobacterial TonB family.

    PubMed

    Enard, C; Expert, D

    2000-08-01

    The pectinolytic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 causes a systemic disease in its natural host, the African violet (Saintpaulia: ionantha). It produces two structurally unrelated siderophores, chrysobactin and achromobactin. Chrysobactin makes a large contribution to invasive growth of the bacterium in its host. Insertion mutants of a chrysobactin-defective strain were constructed and screened on the universal CAS-agar medium used for siderophore detection. A set of mutants affected in the production of achromobactin were identified. This paper describes a mutant affected in the transport of all the ferrisiderophores used by the bacterium as iron sources. Molecular analysis revealed that the insertion mutation disrupts the tonB gene. The predicted Er. chrysanthemi TonB protein has a molecular mass of 27600 Da and shares 20-58% identity with the TonB proteins from 20 other bacterial species. The pathogenicity of the tonB mutant was assessed by inoculation of African violets. The impairment in the spread of symptoms was similar in the tonB mutant to that in chrysobactin-defective mutants. However, the pectinolytic activity, the major pathogenicity determinant in Er. chrysanthemi, appeared to be stimulated twofold in the tonB mutant. PMID:10931909

  14. AraC/XylS family stress response regulators Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Daniel; Schweizer, Gabriel; Weingart, Helge

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional regulators of the AraC/XylS family have been associated with multidrug resistance, organic solvent tolerance, oxidative stress, and virulence in clinically relevant enterobacteria. In the present study, we identified four homologous AraC/XylS regulators, Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA, from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora Ea1189. Previous studies have shown that the regulators MarA, Rob, and SoxS from Escherichia coli mediate multiple-antibiotic resistance, primarily by upregulating the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. However, none of the four AraC/XylS regulators from E. amylovora was able to induce a multidrug resistance phenotype in the plant pathogen. Overexpression of rob led to a 2-fold increased expression of the acrA gene. However, the rob-overexpressing strain showed increased resistance to only a limited number of antibiotics. Furthermore, Rob was able to induce tolerance to organic solvents in E. amylovora by mechanisms other than efflux. We demonstrated that SoxS from E. amylovora is involved in superoxide resistance. A soxS-deficient mutant of Ea1189 was not able to grow on agar plates supplemented with the superoxide-generating agent paraquat. Furthermore, expression of soxS was induced by redox cycling agents. We identified two novel members of the AraC/XylS family in E. amylovora. PliA was highly upregulated during the early infection phase in apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. Multiple compounds were able to induce the expression of pliA, including apple leaf extracts, phenolic compounds, redox cycling agents, heavy metals, and decanoate. OpiA was shown to play a role in the regulation of osmotic and alkaline pH stress responses. PMID:24936054

  15. The tail-associated depolymerase of Erwinia amylovora phage L1 mediates host cell adsorption and enzymatic capsule removal, which can enhance infection by other phage.

    PubMed

    Born, Yannick; Fieseler, Lars; Klumpp, Jochen; Eugster, Marcel R; Zurfluh, Katrin; Duffy, Brion; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    The depolymerase enzyme (DpoL1) encoded by the T7-like phage L1 efficiently degrades amylovoran, an important virulence factor and major component of the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) of its host, the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Mass spectrometry analysis of hydrolysed EPS revealed that DpoL1 cleaves the galactose-containing backbone of amylovoran. The enzyme is most active at pH 6 and 50°C, and features a modular architecture. Removal of 180 N-terminal amino acids was shown not to affect enzyme activity. The C-terminus harbours the hydrolase activity, while the N-terminal domain links the enzyme to the phage particle. Electron microscopy demonstrated that DpoL1-specific antibodies cross-link phage particles at their tails, either lateral or frontal, and immunogold staining confirmed that DpoL1 is located at the tail spikes. Exposure of high-level EPS-producing Er. amylovora strain CFBP1430 to recombinant DpoL1 dramatically increased sensitivity to the Dpo-negative phage Y2, which was not the case for EPS-negative mutants or low-level EPS-producing Er. amylovora. Our findings indicate that enhanced phage susceptibility is based on enzymatic removal of the EPS capsule, normally a physical barrier to Y2 infection, and that use of DpoL1 together with the broad host range, virulent phage Y2 represents an attractive combination for biocontrol of fire blight. PMID:23944160

  16. Characterization of AcrD, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type multidrug efflux pump from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug efflux pumps are membrane translocases that have the ability to extrude a variety of structurally unrelated compounds from the cell. AcrD, a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) transporter, was shown to be involved in efflux of highly hydrophilic aminoglycosides and a limited number of amphiphilic compounds in E. coli. Here, a homologue of AcrD in the plant pathogen and causal agent of fire blight disease Erwinia amylovora was identified. Results The substrate specificity of AcrD was studied by overexpression of the corresponding gene from a high-copy plasmid in E. amylovora Ea1189-3, which is hypersensitive to many drugs due to a deficiency of the major multidrug pump AcrB. AcrD mediated resistance to several amphiphilic compounds including clotrimazole and luteolin, two compounds hitherto not described as substrates of AcrD in enterobacteria. However, AcrD was not able to expel aminoglycosides. An acrD mutant exhibited full virulence on apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. RT-PCR analysis revealed an induction of acrD expression in infected apple tissue but not on pear fruits. Moreover, a direct binding of BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component regulatory system BaeSR, to the acrD promoter was observed as has already been shown in other enterobacteria. Conclusions AcrD from E. amylovora is involved in resistance to a limited number of amphiphilic compounds, but in contrast to AcrD of E. coli, it is not involved in resistance to aminoglycosides. The expression of acrD was up-regulated by addition of the substrates deoxycholate, naringenin, tetracycline and zinc. AcrD appears to be regulated by the BaeSR two-component system, an envelope stress signal transduction pathway. PMID:24443882

  17. Identification of Erwinia species isolated from apples and pears by differential PCR.

    PubMed

    Gehring, I; Geider, K

    2012-04-01

    Many pathogenic and epiphytic bacteria isolated from apples and pears belong to the genus Erwinia; these include the species E. amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. billingiae, E. persicina, E. rhapontici and E. tasmaniensis. Identification and classification of freshly isolated bacterial species often requires tedious taxonomic procedures. To facilitate routine identification of Erwinia species, we have developed a PCR method based on species-specific oligonucleotides (SSOs) from the sequences of the housekeeping genes recA and gpd. Using species-specific primers that we report here, differentiation was done with conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) applying two consecutive primer annealing temperatures. The specificity of the primers depends on terminal Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that are characteristic for the target species. These PCR assays enabled us to distinguish eight Erwinia species, as well as to identify new Erwinia isolates from plant surfaces. When performed with mixed bacterial cultures, they only detected a single target species. This method is a novel approach to classify strains within the genus Erwinia by PCR and it can be used to confirm other diagnostic data, especially when specific PCR detection methods are not already available. The method may be applied to classify species within other bacterial genera. PMID:22330936

  18. Characterization of 22 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci in the cosmopolitan fungal plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Permanent Genetic Resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-two microsatellite loci were characterized in the soilborne plant pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae by analysis of the genome sequence. All loci were polymorphic in at least two of three populations of V. dahliae tested and collected from lettuce, spinach and tomato. These loci were us...

  19. Deep characterization of the microbiomes of Calophya spp. (Hemiptera: Calophyidae) gall-inducing psyllids reveals the absence of plant pathogenic bacteria and three dominant endosymbionts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria associated with sap-feeding insect herbivores include not only symbionts that may increase their hosts’ fitness, but also harmful plant pathogens. Calophya spp., gall-inducing psyllids (Hemiptera: Calophyidae), are being investigated for their potential as biological control agents of the n...

  20. Management of plant pathogens and pests using microbial biological control agents. In: Trigiano, R.N. and Ownley, B.H., editors. Plant Pathology Concepts and Laboratory Exercises

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All parts of plants face continual attack by plant pathogens and insects. Some insects are vectors of pathogens. Plant pests can be controlled by a variety of methods including application of pesticides but one of the most stainable and environmentally friendly approaches is biological control. Mic...

  1. Impact of anaerobic soil disinfestation combined with soil solarization on plant-parasitic nematodes and introduced inoculum of soilborne plant pathogens in raised-bed vegetable production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year field study was established in August 2008 at the USDA-ARS, U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory in Fort Pierce, FL to examine the effectiveness of anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) as an alternative to methyl bromide (MeBr) fumigation for control of plant pathogens and parasitic nema...

  2. Evaluation of a triplex real-time PCR system to detect the plant-pathogenic molds Alternaria spp., Fusarium spp. and C. purpurea.

    PubMed

    Grube, Sabrina; Schönling, Jutta; Prange, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the development of a triplex real-time PCR system for the simultaneous detection of three major plant-pathogenic mold genera (Alternaria spp., Fusarium spp. and the species Claviceps purpurea). The designed genus-specific primer-probe systems were validated for sensitivity, specificity and amplification in the presence of background DNA. PMID:26545945

  3. Practical benefits of knowing the enemy: Modern molecular tools for diagnosing the etiology of bacterial diseases and understanding the taxonomy and diversity of plant pathogenic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the identity of bacterial plant pathogens is essential to strategic and sustainable disease management. However, such identifications are linked to bacterial taxonomy, a complicated and changing discipline that depends on methods and information that often are not used by those who are diagn...

  4. Effect of different ecological conditions on secondary metabolite production and gene expression in two mycotoxigenic plant pathogen Fusarium species: F. verticillioides and F. equiseti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Fusarium includes many species that are plant pathogens and many produce harmful secondary metabolites including fumonisins and trichothecenes. These mycotoxins can cause disease in animals and have been associated with cancers and birth defects in humans. Many factors influence the produc...

  5. Spatiotemporal colonization of Xyllela fastidiosa in its vector supports two types of egestion in the inoculation mechanism of foregut-borne plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterial agent that causes Pierce’s disease of grapevine, Xylella fastidiosa, is the only known arthropod-transmitted prokaryotic plant pathogen that does not circulate in the vector’s hemolymph. Instead, bacteria are foregut-borne and semi-persistent, i.e. bacteria colonize cuticular surface...

  6. Genetic and phenotypic diversity and random association of DNA markers of the fungal plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from soil on a fine geographic scale.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotia of the soilborne plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were collected from 1 m2 area of the top 1.27 cm layer of soil in an alfalfa field. Out of 272 sclerotia collected, 40 were randomly selected and analyzed for genetic diversity in terms of microsatellite loci, mycelial compatibilit...

  7. ADDITIVE IMPACTS OF PLANT PATHOGEN-INSECT ENHANCES PEST-PLANT CONTROL EFFICACY: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FROM THE RUST-INSECT-MELALEUCA SYSTEM.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogen-insect integration is becoming popular in pest plant control programs. Herein, we tested the impacts of pathogen-herbivorous insect integration in the biological control of a pest tree, Melaleuca quinquenervia (melaleuca). Melaleuca trees were cut at 25-cm above ground, allowed to cop...

  8. Global analysis of the HrpL regulon in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 reveals new regulon members with diverse functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is required for virulence in the gram-negative plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The alternative sigma factor HrpL directly regulates expression of T3SS genes via a consensus promoter sequence, often designated as the “hrp promoter.” Although...

  9. Plant Pathogen Culture Collections: It Takes a Village to Preserve These Resources Vital to the Advancement of Agricultural Security and Plant Pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogen culture collections are essential resources in our fight against plant disease and for connecting discoveries of the present with established knowledge of the past. However, available infrastructure in support of culture collections is in serious need of improvement, and we continual...

  10. The genomes of the fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum reveal adaptation to different hosts and lifestyles but also signatures of common ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum that are related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and infect different hosts. C. fulvum is a biotroph that infects tomato, while D. septosporum is a hemibiotr...

  11. Emergence of a New Population of Rathayibacter toxicus: An Ecologically Complex, Geographically Isolated Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Busot, Grethel Y.; Mann, Rachel; Rodoni, Brendan; Liu, Sanzhen; Stack, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Rathayibacter toxicus is a gram-positive bacterium that infects the floral parts of several Poaceae species in Australia. Bacterial ooze is often produced on the surface of infected plants and bacterial galls are produced in place of seed. R. toxicus is a regulated plant pathogen in the U.S. yet reliable detection and diagnostic tools are lacking. To better understand this geographically-isolated plant pathogen, genetic variation as a function of geographic location, host species, and date of isolation was determined for isolates collected over a forty-year period. Discriminant analyses of recently collected and archived isolates using Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) identified three populations of R. toxicus; RT-I and RT-II from South Australia and RT-III from Western Australia. Population RT-I, detected in 2013 and 2014 from the Yorke Peninsula in South Australia, is a newly emerged population of R. toxicus not previously reported. Commonly used housekeeping genes failed to discriminate among the R. toxicus isolates. However, strategically selected and genome-dispersed MLST genes representing an array of cellular functions from chromosome replication, antibiotic resistance and biosynthetic pathways to bacterial acquired immunity were discriminative. Genetic variation among isolates within the RT-I population was less than the within-population variation for the previously reported RT-II and RT-III populations. The lower relative genetic variation within the RT-I population and its absence from sampling over the past 40 years suggest its recent emergence. RT-I was the dominant population on the Yorke Peninsula during the 2013–2014 sampling period perhaps indicating a competitive advantage over the previously detected RT-II population. The potential for introduction of this bacterial plant pathogen into new geographic areas provide a rationale for understanding the ecological and evolutionary trajectories of R. toxicus

  12. Emergence of a New Population of Rathayibacter toxicus: An Ecologically Complex, Geographically Isolated Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Busot, Grethel Y; Mann, Rachel; Rodoni, Brendan; Liu, Sanzhen; Stack, James P

    2016-01-01

    Rathayibacter toxicus is a gram-positive bacterium that infects the floral parts of several Poaceae species in Australia. Bacterial ooze is often produced on the surface of infected plants and bacterial galls are produced in place of seed. R. toxicus is a regulated plant pathogen in the U.S. yet reliable detection and diagnostic tools are lacking. To better understand this geographically-isolated plant pathogen, genetic variation as a function of geographic location, host species, and date of isolation was determined for isolates collected over a forty-year period. Discriminant analyses of recently collected and archived isolates using Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) identified three populations of R. toxicus; RT-I and RT-II from South Australia and RT-III from Western Australia. Population RT-I, detected in 2013 and 2014 from the Yorke Peninsula in South Australia, is a newly emerged population of R. toxicus not previously reported. Commonly used housekeeping genes failed to discriminate among the R. toxicus isolates. However, strategically selected and genome-dispersed MLST genes representing an array of cellular functions from chromosome replication, antibiotic resistance and biosynthetic pathways to bacterial acquired immunity were discriminative. Genetic variation among isolates within the RT-I population was less than the within-population variation for the previously reported RT-II and RT-III populations. The lower relative genetic variation within the RT-I population and its absence from sampling over the past 40 years suggest its recent emergence. RT-I was the dominant population on the Yorke Peninsula during the 2013-2014 sampling period perhaps indicating a competitive advantage over the previously detected RT-II population. The potential for introduction of this bacterial plant pathogen into new geographic areas provide a rationale for understanding the ecological and evolutionary trajectories of R. toxicus

  13. Molecular characterization of global regulatory RNA species that control pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Ma, W; Cui, Y; Liu, Y; Dumenyo, C K; Mukherjee, A; Chatterjee, A K

    2001-03-01

    rsmB(Ecc) specifies a nontranslatable RNA regulator that controls exoprotein production and pathogenicity in soft rot-causing Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. This effect of rsmB(Ecc) RNA is mediated mostly by neutralizing the function of RsmA(Ecc), an RNA-binding protein of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, which acts as a global negative regulator. To determine the occurrence of functional homologs of rsmB(Ecc) in non-soft-rot-causing Erwinia species, we cloned the rsmB genes of E. amylovora (rsmB(Ea)) and E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae (rsmB(Ehg)). We show that rsmB(Ea) in E. amylovora positively regulates extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production, motility, and pathogenicity. In E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae, rsmB(Ehg) elevates the levels of transcripts of a cytokinin (etz) gene and stimulates the production of EPS and yellow pigment as well as motility. RsmA(Ea) and RsmA(Ehg) have more than 93% identity to RsmA(Ecc) and, like the latter, function as negative regulators by affecting the transcript stability of the target gene. The rsmB genes reverse the negative effects of RsmA(Ea), RsmA(Ehg), and RsmA(Ecc), but the extent of reversal is highest with homologous combinations of rsm genes. These observations and findings that rsmB(Ea) and rsmB(Ehg) RNA bind RsmA(Ecc) indicate that the rsmB effect is channeled via RsmA. Additional support for this conclusion comes from the observation that the rsmB genes are much more effective as positive regulators in a RsmA(+) strain of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora than in its RsmA(-) derivative. E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae produces a 290-base rsmB transcript that is not subject to processing. By contrast, E. amylovora produces 430- and 300-base rsmB transcripts, the latter presumably derived by processing of the primary transcript as previously noted with the transcripts of rsmB(Ecc). Southern blot hybridizations revealed the presence of rsmB homologs in E. carotovora, E. chrysanthemi, E. amylovora, E. herbicola, E

  14. Differential Colonization Dynamics of Cucurbit Hosts by Erwinia tracheiphila.

    PubMed

    Vrisman, Cláudio M; Deblais, Loïc; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Miller, Sally A

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial wilt is one of the most destructive diseases of cucurbits in the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. Although the disease has been studied since 1900, host colonization dynamics remain unclear. Cucumis- and Cucurbita-derived strains exhibit host preference for the cucurbit genus from which they were isolated. We constructed a bioluminescent strain of Erwinia tracheiphila (TedCu10-BL#9) and colonization of different cucurbit hosts was monitored. At the second-true-leaf stage, Cucumis melo plants were inoculated with TedCu10-BL#9 via wounded leaves, stems, and roots. Daily monitoring of colonization showed bioluminescent bacteria in the inoculated leaf and petiole beginning 1 day postinoculation (DPI). The bacteria spread to roots via the stem by 2 DPI, reached the plant extremities 4 DPI, and the plant wilted 6 DPI. However, Cucurbita plants inoculated with TedCu10-BL#9 did not wilt, even at 35 DPI. Bioluminescent bacteria were detected 6 DPI in the main stem of squash and pumpkin plants, which harbored approximately 10(4) and 10(1) CFU/g, respectively, of TedCu10-BL#9 without symptoms. Although significantly less systemic plant colonization was observed in nonpreferred host Cucurbita plants compared with preferred hosts, the mechanism of tolerance of Cucurbita plants to E. tracheiphila strains from Cucumis remains unknown. PMID:26926487

  15. Structural Insight into Substrate Selectivity of Erwinia chrysanthemil-Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    l-Asparaginases of bacterial origin are a mainstay of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The mechanism of action of these enzyme drugs is associated with their capacity to deplete the amino acid l-asparagine from the blood. However, clinical use of bacterial l-asparaginases is complicated by their dual l-asparaginase and l-glutaminase activities. The latter, even though representing only ∼10% of the overall activity, is partially responsible for the observed toxic side effects. Hence, l-asparaginases devoid of l-glutaminase activity hold potential as safer drugs. Understanding the key determinants of l-asparaginase substrate specificity is a prerequisite step toward the development of enzyme variants with reduced toxicity. Here we present crystal structures of the Erwinia chrysanthemil-asparaginase in complex with l-aspartic acid and with l-glutamic acid. These structures reveal two enzyme conformations—open and closed—corresponding to the inactive and active states, respectively. The binding of ligands induces the positioning of the catalytic Thr15 into its active conformation, which in turn allows for the ordering and closure of the flexible N-terminal loop. Notably, l-aspartic acid is more efficient than l-glutamic acid in inducing the active positioning of Thr15. Structural elements explaining the preference of the enzyme for l-asparagine over l-glutamine are discussed with guidance to the future development of more specific l-asparaginases. PMID:26855287

  16. Tasmancin and lysogenic bacteriophages induced from Erwinia tasmaniensis strains.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ina; Lurz, Rudi; Geider, Klaus

    2012-07-25

    Mitomycin C treatment of Erwinia tasmaniensis strains from Australia induced prophages and the expression of bacteriocins. The bacteriocin named tasmancin inhibited E. tasmaniensis strains from South Africa and Germany. A gene cluster with a klebicin-related operon and an immunity protein was detected on plasmid pET46 from E. tasmaniensis strain Et1/99. PCR reactions using primers directed to this region produced signals for several strains originating from Australia, but not for strains isolated in South Africa and Germany. The latter isolates lacked plasmid pET46. Bacteriophages were induced from E. tasmaniensis strains Et88 and Et14/99, both isolates from South-Eastern Australia. These phages formed plaques on several other strains from this region, as well as on E. tasmaniensis strains from South Africa and Germany. Sequencing revealed similarity of phages ϕEt88 and ϕEt14, which shared the host range on E. tasmaniensis strains. Bacteriophages and tasmancin may interfere with the viability of several related E. tasmaniensis strains in the environment of carrier strains. PMID:22381912

  17. Efficacies of quorum sensing inhibitors, piericidin A and glucopiericidin A, produced by Streptomyces xanthocidicus KPP01532 for the control of potato soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Eun; Han, Jae Woo; Jeon, Byeong Jun; Kim, Beom Seok

    2016-03-01

    To discover potential inhibitors of the quorum sensing (QS) system, a library of microbial culture extracts was screened with Chromobacterium violaceumCV026 strain. The culture extract of Streptomyces xanthocidicus KPP01532 contained quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs) of the CV026 strain. The active constituents of the culture extract of strain KPP01532 were purified using a series of chromatographic procedures, and based on data from NMR and mass spectroscopy, piericidin A and glucopiericidin A were identified. Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) is a plant pathogen that causes blackleg and soft rot diseases on potato stems and tubers. The virulence factors of Eca are regulated by QS. The expression of virulence genes (pelC, pehA, celV and nip) under the control of QS was monitored using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The transcription levels of the four genes were significantly lower when Eca was exposed to piericidin A or glucopiericidin A. These two compounds displayed similar control efficacies against soft rot caused by Eca in potato slices as furanone C-30. Therefore, piericidin A and glucopiericidin A are potential QSIs that suppress the expression of the virulence genes of Eca, suggesting that they could have potential use as control agents of soft rot disease on potato tubers. PMID:26856451

  18. Dynamics of short- and long-term association between a bacterial plant pathogen and its arthropod vector

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, L. R.; Seidl-Adams, I.; De Moraes, C. M.; Stephenson, A. G.; Mescher, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of association between pathogens and vectors can strongly influence epidemiology. It has been proposed that wilt disease epidemics in cucurbit populations are sustained by persistent colonization of beetle vectors (Acalymma vittatum) by the bacterial phytopathogen Erwinia tracheiphila. We developed a qPCR method to quantify E. tracheiphila in whole beetles and frass and used it to assess pathogen acquisition and retention following variable exposure to infected plants. We found that (i) E. tracheiphila is present in frass in as little as three hours after feeding on infected plants and can be transmitted with no incubation period by vectors given brief exposure to infected plants, but also by persistently colonized vectors several weeks following exposure; (ii) duration of exposure influences rates of long-term colonization; (iii) frass infectivity (assessed via inoculation experiments) reflects bacterial levels in frass samples across time; and (iv) vectors rarely clear E. tracheiphila infections, but suffer no apparent loss of fitness. These results describe a pattern conducive to the effective maintenance of E. tracheiphila within cucurbit populations. PMID:24561664

  19. Dynamics of short- and long-term association between a bacterial plant pathogen and its arthropod vector.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L R; Seidl-Adams, I; De Moraes, C M; Stephenson, A G; Mescher, M C

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of association between pathogens and vectors can strongly influence epidemiology. It has been proposed that wilt disease epidemics in cucurbit populations are sustained by persistent colonization of beetle vectors (Acalymma vittatum) by the bacterial phytopathogen Erwinia tracheiphila. We developed a qPCR method to quantify E. tracheiphila in whole beetles and frass and used it to assess pathogen acquisition and retention following variable exposure to infected plants. We found that (i) E. tracheiphila is present in frass in as little as three hours after feeding on infected plants and can be transmitted with no incubation period by vectors given brief exposure to infected plants, but also by persistently colonized vectors several weeks following exposure; (ii) duration of exposure influences rates of long-term colonization; (iii) frass infectivity (assessed via inoculation experiments) reflects bacterial levels in frass samples across time; and (iv) vectors rarely clear E. tracheiphila infections, but suffer no apparent loss of fitness. These results describe a pattern conducive to the effective maintenance of E. tracheiphila within cucurbit populations. PMID:24561664

  20. A circular genetic map of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaichik, E.A.; Pesnyakevich, A.G.

    1995-08-01

    A circular genetic map of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2 was constructed on the basis of the R471a plasmid and Tn5 and Tn9 using Hfr-like donors. Forty-six genes, including phytopathogenicity genes, were located on the basis of interrupted mating experiment results and analysis of coinheritance of markers on a map of 183 min in length. The similarity and differences of chromosomal genetic maps of Erwinia genus bacteria are discussed. 23 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Early detection surveillance for an emerging plant pathogen: a rule of thumb to predict prevalence at first discovery.

    PubMed

    Parnell, S; Gottwald, T R; Cunniffe, N J; Alonso Chavez, V; van den Bosch, F

    2015-09-01

    Emerging plant pathogens are a significant problem for conservation and food security. Surveillance is often instigated in an attempt to detect an invading epidemic before it gets out of control. Yet in practice many epidemics are not discovered until already at a high prevalence, partly due to a lack of quantitative understanding of how surveillance effort and the dynamics of an invading epidemic relate. We test a simple rule of thumb to determine, for a surveillance programme taking a fixed number of samples at regular intervals, the distribution of the prevalence an epidemic will have reached on first discovery (discovery-prevalence) and its expectation E(q*). We show that E(q*) = r/(N/Δ), i.e. simply the rate of epidemic growth divided by the rate of sampling; where r is the epidemic growth rate, N is the sample size and Δ is the time between sampling rounds. We demonstrate the robustness of this rule of thumb using spatio-temporal epidemic models as well as data from real epidemics. Our work supports the view that, for the purposes of early detection surveillance, simple models can provide useful insights in apparently complex systems. The insight can inform decisions on surveillance resource allocation in plant health and has potential applicability to invasive species generally. PMID:26336177

  2. Genomic and Proteomic Dissection of the Ubiquitous Plant Pathogen, Armillaria mellea: Toward a New Infection Model System

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Armillaria mellea is a major plant pathogen. Yet, no large-scale “-omics” data are available to enable new studies, and limited experimental models are available to investigate basidiomycete pathogenicity. Here we reveal that the A. mellea genome comprises 58.35 Mb, contains 14473 gene models, of average length 1575 bp (4.72 introns/gene). Tandem mass spectrometry identified 921 mycelial (n = 629 unique) and secreted (n = 183 unique) proteins. Almost 100 mycelial proteins were either species-specific or previously unidentified at the protein level. A number of proteins (n = 111) was detected in both mycelia and culture supernatant extracts. Signal sequence occurrence was 4-fold greater for secreted (50.2%) compared to mycelial (12%) proteins. Analyses revealed a rich reservoir of carbohydrate degrading enzymes, laccases, and lignin peroxidases in the A. mellea proteome, reminiscent of both basidiomycete and ascomycete glycodegradative arsenals. We discovered that A. mellea exhibits a specific killing effect against Candida albicans during coculture. Proteomic investigation of this interaction revealed the unique expression of defensive and potentially offensive A. mellea proteins (n = 30). Overall, our data reveal new insights into the origin of basidiomycete virulence and we present a new model system for further studies aimed at deciphering fungal pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:23656496

  3. Interplay between Parasitism and Host Ontogenic Resistance in the Epidemiology of the Soil-Borne Plant Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Delarue, Patrick; Morlière, Stéphanie; Montfort, Françoise; Hervé, Maxime R.; Poggi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i) its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii) after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed. PMID:25127238

  4. Interplay between parasitism and host ontogenic resistance in the epidemiology of the soil-borne plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas E; Le Cointe, Ronan; Delarue, Patrick; Morlière, Stéphanie; Montfort, Françoise; Hervé, Maxime R; Poggi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i) its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii) after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed. PMID:25127238

  5. Combining Inferential and Deductive Approaches to Estimate the Potential Geographical Range of the Invasive Plant Pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Kylie B.; Hardy, Giles E. St. J.; Kriticos, Darren J.

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, an invasive plant pathogen of unknown origin, causes considerable and widespread damage in plant industries and natural ecosystems of the USA and Europe. Estimating the potential geographical range of P. ramorum has been complicated by a lack of biological and geographical data with which to calibrate climatic models. Previous attempts to do so, using either invaded range data or surrogate species approaches, have delivered varying results. A simulation model was developed using CLIMEX to estimate the global climate suitability patterns for establishment of P. ramorum. Growth requirements and stress response parameters were derived from ecophysiological laboratory observations and site-level transmission and disease factors related to climate data in the field. Geographical distribution data from the USA (California and Oregon) and Norway were reserved from model-fitting and used to validate the models. The model suggests that the invasion of P. ramorum in both North America and Europe is still in its infancy and that it is presently occupying a small fraction of its potential range. Phytophthora ramorum appears to be climatically suited to large areas of Africa, Australasia and South America, where it could cause biodiversity and economic losses in plant industries and natural ecosystems with susceptible hosts if introduced. PMID:23667628

  6. Quantitative real-time PCR normalization for gene expression studies in the plant pathogenic fungi Lasiodiplodia theobromae.

    PubMed

    Paolinelli-Alfonso, Marcos; Galindo-Sánchez, Clara Elizabeth; Hernandez-Martinez, Rufina

    2016-08-01

    Lasiodiplodia theobromae is a highly virulent plant pathogen. It has been suggested that heat stress increases its virulence. The aim of this work was to evaluate, compare, and recommend normalization strategies for gene expression analysis of the fungus growing with grapevine wood under heat stress. Using RT-qPCR-derived data, reference gene stability was evaluated through geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper applications. Based on the geometric mean using the ranking position obtained for each independent analysis, genes were ranked from least to most stable as follows: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), actin (ACT), β-tubulin (TUB) and elongation factor-1α (EF1α). Using RNAseq-derived data based on the calculated tagwise dispersion these genes were ordered by increasing stability as follows: GAPDH, ACT, TUB, and EF1α. The correlation between RNAseq and RTqPCR results was used as criteria to identify the best RT-qPCR normalization approach. The gene TUB is recommended as the best option for normalization among the commonly used reference genes, but alternative fungal reference genes are also suggested. PMID:27237774

  7. Plant-Pathogen Interaction, Circadian Rhythm, and Hormone-Related Gene Expression Provide Indicators of Phytoplasma Infection in Paulownia fortunei

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guoqiang; Dong, Yanpeng; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Niu, Suyan; Xu, Enkai

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are mycoplasma-like pathogens of witches’ broom disease, and are responsible for serious yield losses of Paulownia trees worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of disease development in Paulownia are of considerable interest, but still poorly understood. Here, we have applied transcriptome sequencing technology and a de novo assembly approach to analyze gene expression profiles in Paulownia fortunei infected by phytoplasmas. Our previous researches suggested that methyl methane sulfonated (MMS) could reverse the effects of the infection. In this study, leaf samples from healthy, infected, and both infected and methyl methane sulfonate treated plants were analyzed. The results showed that the gene expression profile of P. fortunei underwent dramatic changes after Paulownia witches’ broom (PaWB) phytoplasma infection. Genes that encoded key enzymes in plant-pathogen interaction processes were significantly up-regulated in the PaWB-infected Paulownia. Genes involved in circadian rhythm and hormone-related genes were also altered in Paulownia after PaWB infection. However, after the PaWB-infected plants were treated with MMS, the expression profiles of these genes returned to the levels in the healthy controls. The data will help identify potential PaWB disease-resistance genes that could be targeted to inhibit the growth and reproduction of the pathogen and to increase plant resistance. PMID:25514414

  8. Detection and Assessment of Chemical Hormesis on the Radial Growth In Vitro of Oomycetes and Fungal Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Francisco J.; Garzon, Carla D.

    2013-01-01

    Although plant diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, and protists, most are caused by fungi and fungus-like oomycetes. Intensive use of fungicides with the same mode of action can lead to selection of resistant strains increasing the risk of unmanageable epidemics. In spite of the integrated use of nonchemical plant disease management strategies, agricultural productivity relies heavily on the use of chemical pesticides and biocides for disease prevention and treatment and sanitation of tools and substrates. Despite the prominent use of fungi in early hormesis studies and the continuous use of yeast as a research model, the relevance of hormesis in agricultural systems has not been investigated by plant pathologists, until recently. A protocol was standardized for detection and assessment of chemical hormesis in fungi and oomycetes using radial growth as endpoint. Biphasic dose-responses were observed in Pythium aphanidermatum exposed to sub-inhibitory doses of ethanol, cyazofamid, and propamocarb, and in Rhizoctonia zeae exposed to ethanol. This report provides an update on chemical hormesis in fungal plant pathogens and a perspective on the potential risks it poses to crop productivity and global food supply. PMID:23983664

  9. A Blue Light Inducible Two-Component Signal Transduction System in the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato☆

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Z.; Buttani, V.; Losi, A.; Gärtner, W.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The open reading frame PSPTO2896 from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato encodes a protein of 534 amino acids showing all salient features of a blue light-driven two-component system. The N-terminal LOV (light, oxygen, voltage) domain, potentially binding a flavin chromophore, is followed by a histidine kinase (HK) motif and a response regulator (RR). The full-length protein (PST-LOV) and, separately, the RR and the LOV+HK part (PST-LOVΔRR) were heterologously expressed and functionally characterized. The two LOV proteins showed typical LOV-like spectra and photochemical reactions, with the blue light-driven, reversible formation of a covalent flavin-cysteine bond. The fluorescence changes in the lit state of full-length PST-LOV, but not in PST-LOVΔRR, indicating a direct interaction between the LOV core and the RR module. Experiments performed with radioactive ATP uncover the light-driven kinase activity. For both PST-LOV and PST-LOVΔRR, much more radioactivity is incorporated when the protein is in the lit state. Furthermore, addition of the RR domain to the fully phosphorylated PST-LOVΔRR leads to a very fast transfer of radioactivity, indicating a highly efficient HK activity and a tight interaction between PST-LOVΔRR and RR, possibly facilitated by the LOV core itself. PMID:17905842

  10. N-acyl homoserine lactones in diverse Pectobacterium and Dickeya plant pathogens: diversity, abundance, and involvement in virulence.

    PubMed

    Crépin, Alexandre; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Barbey, Corinne; Farmer, Christine; Hélias, Valérie; Burini, Jean-François; Faure, Denis; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Soft-rot bacteria Pectobacterium and Dickeya use N-acyl homoserine lactones (NAHSLs) as diffusible signals for coordinating quorum sensing communication. The production of NAHSLs was investigated in a set of reference strains and recently-collected isolates, which belong to six species and share the ability to infect the potato host plant. All the pathogens produced different NAHSLs, among which the 3-oxo-hexanoyl- and the 3-oxo-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactones represent at least 90% of total produced NAHSL-amounts. The level of NAHSLs varied from 0.6 to 2 pg/cfu. The involvement of NAHSLs in tuber maceration was investigated by electroporating a quorum quenching vector in each of the bacterial pathogen strains. All the NAHSL-lactonase expressing strains produced a lower amount of NAHSLs as compared to those harboring the empty vector. Moreover, all except Dickeya dadantii 3937 induced a lower level of symptoms in potato tuber assay. Noticeably, aggressiveness appeared to be independent of both nature and amount of produced signals. This work highlights that quorum sensing similarly contributed to virulence in most of the tested Pectobacterium and Dickeya, even the strains had been isolated recently or during the past decades. Thus, these key regulatory-molecules appear as credible targets for developing anti-virulence strategies against these plant pathogens. PMID:22737020

  11. Evolutionary relationships of a plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organism and Acholeplasma laidlawii deduced from two ribosomal protein gene sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, P O; Sears, B B

    1992-01-01

    The families within the class Mollicutes are distinguished by their morphologies, nutritional requirements, and abilities to metabolize certain compounds. Biosystematic classification of the plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) has been difficult because these organisms have not been cultured in vitro, and hence their nutritional requirements have not been determined nor have physiological characterizations been possible. To investigate the evolutionary relationship of the MLOs to other members of the class Mollicutes, a segment of a ribosomal protein operon was cloned and sequenced from an aster yellows-type MLO which is pathogenic for members of the genus Oenothera and from Acholeplasma laidlawii. The deduced amino acid sequence data from the rpl22 and rps3 genes indicate that the MLOs are more closely related to A. laidlawii than to animal mycoplasmas, confirming previous results from 16S rRNA sequence comparisons. This conclusion is also supported by the finding that the UGA codon is not read as a tryptophan codon in the MLO and A. laidlawii, in contrast to its usage in Mycoplasma capricolum. PMID:1556079

  12. Genome-Wide Identification of Transcriptional Start Sites in the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000

    PubMed Central

    Filiatrault, Melanie J.; Stodghill, Paul V.; Myers, Christopher R.; Bronstein, Philip A.; Butcher, Bronwyn G.; Lam, Hanh; Grills, George; Schweitzer, Peter; Wang, Wei; Schneider, David J.; Cartinhour, Samuel W.

    2011-01-01

    RNA-Seq has provided valuable insights into global gene expression in a wide variety of organisms. Using a modified RNA-Seq approach and Illumina's high-throughput sequencing technology, we globally identified 5′-ends of transcripts for the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000. A substantial fraction of 5′-ends obtained by this method were consistent with results obtained using global RNA-Seq and 5′RACE. As expected, many 5′-ends were positioned a short distance upstream of annotated genes. We also captured 5′-ends within intergenic regions, providing evidence for the expression of un-annotated genes and non-coding RNAs, and detected numerous examples of antisense transcription, suggesting additional levels of complexity in gene regulation in DC3000. Importantly, targeted searches for sequence patterns in the vicinity of 5′-ends revealed over 1200 putative promoters and other regulatory motifs, establishing a broad foundation for future investigations of regulation at the genomic and single gene levels. PMID:22216251

  13. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones in Diverse Pectobacterium and Dickeya Plant Pathogens: Diversity, Abundance, and Involvement in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Crépin, Alexandre; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Barbey, Corinne; Farmer, Christine; Hélias, Valérie; Burini, Jean-François; Faure, Denis; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Soft-rot bacteria Pectobacterium and Dickeya use N-acyl homoserine lactones (NAHSLs) as diffusible signals for coordinating quorum sensing communication. The production of NAHSLs was investigated in a set of reference strains and recently-collected isolates, which belong to six species and share the ability to infect the potato host plant. All the pathogens produced different NAHSLs, among which the 3-oxo-hexanoyl- and the 3-oxo-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactones represent at least 90% of total produced NAHSL-amounts. The level of NAHSLs varied from 0.6 to 2 pg/cfu. The involvement of NAHSLs in tuber maceration was investigated by electroporating a quorum quenching vector in each of the bacterial pathogen strains. All the NAHSL-lactonase expressing strains produced a lower amount of NAHSLs as compared to those harboring the empty vector. Moreover, all except Dickeya dadantii 3937 induced a lower level of symptoms in potato tuber assay. Noticeably, aggressiveness appeared to be independent of both nature and amount of produced signals. This work highlights that quorum sensing similarly contributed to virulence in most of the tested Pectobacterium and Dickeya, even the strains had been isolated recently or during the past decades. Thus, these key regulatory-molecules appear as credible targets for developing anti-virulence strategies against these plant pathogens. PMID:22737020

  14. Detection and assessment of chemical hormesis on the radial growth in vitro of oomycetes and fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Flores, Francisco J; Garzon, Carla D

    2012-01-01

    Although plant diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, and protists, most are caused by fungi and fungus-like oomycetes. Intensive use of fungicides with the same mode of action can lead to selection of resistant strains increasing the risk of unmanageable epidemics. In spite of the integrated use of nonchemical plant disease management strategies, agricultural productivity relies heavily on the use of chemical pesticides and biocides for disease prevention and treatment and sanitation of tools and substrates. Despite the prominent use of fungi in early hormesis studies and the continuous use of yeast as a research model, the relevance of hormesis in agricultural systems has not been investigated by plant pathologists, until recently. A protocol was standardized for detection and assessment of chemical hormesis in fungi and oomycetes using radial growth as endpoint. Biphasic dose-responses were observed in Pythium aphanidermatum exposed to sub-inhibitory doses of ethanol, cyazofamid, and propamocarb, and in Rhizoctonia zeae exposed to ethanol. This report provides an update on chemical hormesis in fungal plant pathogens and a perspective on the potential risks it poses to crop productivity and global food supply. PMID:23983664

  15. Ecological and evolutionary implications of spatial heterogeneity during the off-season for a wild plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Tack, Ayco J M; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2014-04-01

    While recent studies have elucidated many of the factors driving parasite dynamics during the growing season, the ecological and evolutionary dynamics during the off-season (i.e. the period between growing seasons) remain largely unexplored. We combined large-scale surveys and detailed experiments to investigate the overwintering success of the specialist plant pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis on its patchily distributed host plant Plantago lanceolata in the Åland Islands. Twelve years of epidemiological data establish the off-season as a crucial stage in pathogen metapopulation dynamics, with c. 40% of the populations going extinct during the off-season. At the end of the growing season, we observed environmentally mediated variation in the production of resting structures, with major consequences for spring infection at spatial scales ranging from single individuals to populations within a metapopulation. Reciprocal transplant experiments further demonstrated that pathogen population of origin and overwintering site jointly shaped infection intensity in spring, with a weak signal of parasite adaptation to the local off-season environment. We conclude that environmentally mediated changes in the distribution and evolution of parasites during the off-season are crucial for our understanding of host-parasite dynamics, with applied implications for combating parasites and diseases in agriculture, wildlife and human disease systems. PMID:24372358

  16. Understanding the recent colonization history of a plant pathogenic fungus using population genetic tools and Approximate Bayesian Computation.

    PubMed

    Barrès, B; Carlier, J; Seguin, M; Fenouillet, C; Cilas, C; Ravigné, V

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the processes by which new diseases are introduced in previously healthy areas is of major interest in elaborating prevention and management policies, as well as in understanding the dynamics of pathogen diversity at large spatial scale. In this study, we aimed to decipher the dispersal processes that have led to the emergence of the plant pathogenic fungus Microcyclus ulei, which is responsible for the South American Leaf Blight (SALB). This fungus has devastated rubber tree plantations across Latin America since the beginning of the twentieth century. As only imprecise historical information is available, the study of population evolutionary history based on population genetics appeared most appropriate. The distribution of genetic diversity in a continental sampling of four countries (Brazil, Ecuador, Guatemala and French Guiana) was studied using a set of 16 microsatellite markers developed specifically for this purpose. A very strong genetic structure was found (F(st)=0.70), demonstrating that there has been no regular gene flow between Latin American M. ulei populations. Strong bottlenecks probably occurred at the foundation of each population. The most likely scenario of colonization identified by the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) method implemented in DIYABC suggested two independent sources from the Amazonian endemic area. The Brazilian, Ecuadorian and Guatemalan populations might stem from serial introductions through human-mediated movement of infected plant material from an unsampled source population, whereas the French Guiana population seems to have arisen from an independent colonization event through spore dispersal. PMID:22828899

  17. Plant-pathogen interaction, circadian rhythm, and hormone-related gene expression provide indicators of phytoplasma infection in Paulownia fortunei.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guoqiang; Dong, Yanpeng; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Niu, Suyan; Xu, Enkai

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are mycoplasma-like pathogens of witches' broom disease, and are responsible for serious yield losses of Paulownia trees worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of disease development in Paulownia are of considerable interest, but still poorly understood. Here, we have applied transcriptome sequencing technology and a de novo assembly approach to analyze gene expression profiles in Paulownia fortunei infected by phytoplasmas. Our previous researches suggested that methyl methane sulfonated (MMS) could reverse the effects of the infection. In this study, leaf samples from healthy, infected, and both infected and methyl methane sulfonate treated plants were analyzed. The results showed that the gene expression profile of P. fortunei underwent dramatic changes after Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) phytoplasma infection. Genes that encoded key enzymes in plant-pathogen interaction processes were significantly up-regulated in the PaWB-infected Paulownia. Genes involved in circadian rhythm and hormone-related genes were also altered in Paulownia after PaWB infection. However, after the PaWB-infected plants were treated with MMS, the expression profiles of these genes returned to the levels in the healthy controls. The data will help identify potential PaWB disease-resistance genes that could be targeted to inhibit the growth and reproduction of the pathogen and to increase plant resistance. PMID:25514414

  18. Characterization of a novel NADP+-dependent D-arabitol dehydrogenase from the plant pathogen Uromyces fabae

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a novel NADP+-dependent D-arabitol dehydrogenase and the corresponding gene from the rust fungus Uromyces fabae, a biotrophic plant pathogen on broad bean (Vicia faba). The new enzyme was termed ARD1p (D-arabitol dehydrogenase 1). It recognizes D-arabitol and mannitol as substrates in the forward reaction, and D-xylulose, D-ribulose and D-fructose as substrates in the reverse reaction. Co-factor specificity was restricted to NADP(H). Kinetic data for the major substrates and co-factors are presented. A detailed analysis of the organization and expression pattern of the ARD1 gene are also given. Immunocytological data indicate a localization of the gene product predominantly in haustoria, the feeding structures of these fungi. Analyses of metabolite levels during pathogenesis indicate that the D-arabitol concentration rises dramatically as infection progresses, and D-arabitol was shown in an in vitro system to be capable of quenching reactive oxygen species involved in host plant defence reactions. ARD1p may therefore play an important role in carbohydrate metabolism and in establishing and/or maintaining the biotrophic interaction in U. fabae. PMID:15796718

  19. Chitin amendment increases soil suppressiveness toward plant pathogens and modulates the actinobacterial and oxalobacteraceal communities in an experimental agricultural field.

    PubMed

    Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Korthals, Gerard W; Visser, Johnny H M; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2013-09-01

    A long-term experiment on the effect of chitin addition to soil on the suppression of soilborne pathogens was set up and monitored for 8 years in an experimental field, Vredepeel, The Netherlands. Chitinous matter obtained from shrimps was added to soil top layers on two different occasions, and the suppressiveness of soil toward Verticillium dahliae, as well as plant-pathogenic nematodes, was assessed, in addition to analyses of the abundances and community structures of members of the soil microbiota. The data revealed that chitin amendment had raised the suppressiveness of soil, in particular toward Verticillium dahliae, 9 months after the (second) treatment, extending to 2 years following treatment. Moreover, major effects of the added chitin on the soil microbial communities were detected. First, shifts in both the abundances and structures of the chitin-treated soil microbial communities, both of total soil bacteria and fungi, were found. In addition, the abundances and structures of soil actinobacteria and the Oxalobacteraceae were affected by chitin. At the functional gene level, the abundance of specific (family-18 glycoside hydrolase) chitinase genes carried by the soil bacteria also revealed upshifts as a result of the added chitin. The effects of chitin noted for the Oxalobacteraceae were specifically related to significant upshifts in the abundances of the species Duganella violaceinigra and Massilia plicata. These effects of chitin persisted over the time of the experiment. PMID:23811512

  20. Antifungal Activity of a Synthetic Cationic Peptide against the Plant Pathogens Colletotrichum graminicola and Three Fusarium Species.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric T; Evans, Kervin O; Dowd, Patrick F

    2015-09-01

    A small cationic peptide (JH8944) was tested for activity against a number of pathogens of agricultural crops. JH8944 inhibited conidium growth in most of the tested plant pathogens with a dose of 50 μg/ml, although one isolate of Fusarium oxysporum was inhibited at 5 μg/ml of JH8944. Most conidia of Fusarium graminearum were killed within 6 hours of treatment with 50 μg/ml of JH8944. Germinating F. graminearum conidia required 238 μg/ml of JH8944 for 90% growth inhibition. The peptide did not cause any damage to tissues surrounding maize leaf punctures when tested at a higher concentration of 250 μg/ml even after 3 days. Liposomes consisting of phosphatidylglycerol were susceptible to leakage after treatment with 25 and 50 μg/ml of JH8944. These experiments suggest this peptide destroys fungal membrane integrity and could be utilized for control of crop fungal pathogens. PMID:26361481

  1. Antifungal Activity of a Synthetic Cationic Peptide against the Plant Pathogens Colletotrichum graminicola and Three Fusarium Species

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric T.; Evans, Kervin O.; Dowd, Patrick F.

    2015-01-01

    A small cationic peptide (JH8944) was tested for activity against a number of pathogens of agricultural crops. JH8944 inhibited conidium growth in most of the tested plant pathogens with a dose of 50 μg/ml, although one isolate of Fusarium oxysporum was inhibited at 5 μg/ml of JH8944. Most conidia of Fusarium graminearum were killed within 6 hours of treatment with 50 μg/ml of JH8944. Germinating F. graminearum conidia required 238 μg/ml of JH8944 for 90% growth inhibition. The peptide did not cause any damage to tissues surrounding maize leaf punctures when tested at a higher concentration of 250 μg/ml even after 3 days. Liposomes consisting of phosphatidylglycerol were susceptible to leakage after treatment with 25 and 50 μg/ml of JH8944. These experiments suggest this peptide destroys fungal membrane integrity and could be utilized for control of crop fungal pathogens. PMID:26361481

  2. Functional assembly of the foreign carotenoid lycopene into the photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, achieved by replacement of the native 3-step phytoene desaturase with its 4-step counterpart from Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Asua, Guillermo; Cogdell, Richard J; Hunter, C Neil

    2002-04-01

    Photosynthetic organisms synthesize a diverse range of carotenoids. These pigments are important for the assembly, function and stability of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, and they are used to quench harmful radicals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was used as a model system to explore the origin of carotenoid diversity. Replacing the native 3-step phytoene desaturase (CrtI) with the 4-step enzyme from Erwinia herbicola results in significant flux down the spirilloxanthin pathway for the first time in Rb. sphaeroides. In Rb. sphaeroides, the completion of four desaturations to lycopene by the Erwinia CrtI appears to require the absence of CrtC and, in a crtC background, even the native 3-step enzyme can synthesize a significant amount (13%) of lycopene, in addition to the expected neurosporene. We suggest that the CrtC hydroxylase can intervene in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by phytoene desaturase. We investigated the properties of the lycopene-synthesizing strain of Rb. sphaeroides. In the LH2 light-harvesting complex, lycopene transfers absorbed light energy to the bacteriochlorophylls with an efficiency of 54%, which compares favourably with other LH2 complexes that contain carotenoids with 11 conjugated double bonds. Thus, lycopene can join the assembly pathway for photosynthetic complexes in Rb. sphaeroides, and can perform its role as an energy donor to bacteriochlorophylls. PMID:11967082

  3. Conventional and real-time PCRs for detection of Erwinia piriflorinigrans allow its distinction from the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Barbé, Silvia; Bertolini, Edson; Roselló, Montserrat; Llop, Pablo; López, María M

    2014-04-01

    Erwinia piriflorinigrans is a new pathogenic species of the bacterial genus Erwinia that has been described recently in Spain. Accurate detection and identification of E. piriflorinigrans are challenging because its symptoms on pear blossoms are similar to those caused by Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Moreover, these two species share phenotypic and molecular characteristics. Two specific and sensitive conventional and real-time PCR protocols were developed to identify and detect E. piriflorinigrans and to differentiate it from E. amylovora and other species of this genus. These protocols were based on sequences from plasmid pEPIR37, which is present in all strains of E. piriflorinigrans analyzed. After the stability of the plasmid was demonstrated, the specificities of the protocols were confirmed by the amplification of all E. piriflorinigrans strains tested, whereas 304 closely related pathogenic and nonpathogenic Erwinia strains and microbiota from pear trees were not amplified. In sensitivity assays, 10(3) cells/ml extract were detected in spiked plant material by conventional or real-time PCR, and 10(2) cells/ml were detected in DNA extracted from spiked plant material by real-time PCR. The protocols developed here succeeded in detecting E. piriflorinigrans in 102 out of 564 symptomatic and asymptomatic naturally infected pear samples (flowers, cortex stem tissue, leaves, shoots, and fruitlets), in necrotic Pyracantha sp. blossoms, and in necrotic pear and apple tissues infected with both E. amylovora and E. piriflorinigrans. Therefore, these new tools can be used in epidemiological studies that will enhance our understanding of the life cycle of E. piriflorinigrans in different hosts and plant tissues and its interaction with E. amylovora. PMID:24509928

  4. Conventional and Real-Time PCRs for Detection of Erwinia piriflorinigrans Allow Its Distinction from the Fire Blight Pathogen, Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Barbé, Silvia; Bertolini, Edson; Roselló, Montserrat; Llop, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Erwinia piriflorinigrans is a new pathogenic species of the bacterial genus Erwinia that has been described recently in Spain. Accurate detection and identification of E. piriflorinigrans are challenging because its symptoms on pear blossoms are similar to those caused by Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Moreover, these two species share phenotypic and molecular characteristics. Two specific and sensitive conventional and real-time PCR protocols were developed to identify and detect E. piriflorinigrans and to differentiate it from E. amylovora and other species of this genus. These protocols were based on sequences from plasmid pEPIR37, which is present in all strains of E. piriflorinigrans analyzed. After the stability of the plasmid was demonstrated, the specificities of the protocols were confirmed by the amplification of all E. piriflorinigrans strains tested, whereas 304 closely related pathogenic and nonpathogenic Erwinia strains and microbiota from pear trees were not amplified. In sensitivity assays, 103 cells/ml extract were detected in spiked plant material by conventional or real-time PCR, and 102 cells/ml were detected in DNA extracted from spiked plant material by real-time PCR. The protocols developed here succeeded in detecting E. piriflorinigrans in 102 out of 564 symptomatic and asymptomatic naturally infected pear samples (flowers, cortex stem tissue, leaves, shoots, and fruitlets), in necrotic Pyracantha sp. blossoms, and in necrotic pear and apple tissues infected with both E. amylovora and E. piriflorinigrans. Therefore, these new tools can be used in epidemiological studies that will enhance our understanding of the life cycle of E. piriflorinigrans in different hosts and plant tissues and its interaction with E. amylovora. PMID:24509928

  5. Role of the PhoP-PhoQ System in the Virulence of Erwinia chrysanthemi Strain 3937: Involvement in Sensitivity to Plant Antimicrobial Peptides, Survival at Acid pH, and Regulation of Pectolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Llama-Palacios, Arancha; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes soft-rot diseases in a broad number of crops. The PhoP-PhoQ system is a key factor in pathogenicity of several bacteria and is involved in the bacterial resistance to different factors, including acid stress. Since E. chrysanthemi is confronted by acid pH during pathogenesis, we have studied the role of this system in the virulence of this bacterium. In this work, we have isolated and characterized the phoP and phoQ mutants of E. chrysanthemi strain 3937. It was found that: (i) they were not altered in their growth at acid pH; (ii) the phoQ mutant showed diminished ability to survive at acid pH; (iii) susceptibility to the antimicrobial peptide thionin was increased; (iv) the virulence of the phoQ mutant was diminished at low and high magnesium concentrations, whereas the virulence of the phoP was diminished only at low magnesium concentrations; (v) in planta Pel activity of both mutant strains was drastically reduced; and (vi) both mutants lagged behind the wild type in their capacity to change the apoplastic pH. These results suggest that the PhoP-PhoQ system plays a role in the virulence of this bacterium in plant tissues, although it does not contribute to bacterial growth at acid pH. PMID:15743964

  6. Draft genome sequence of Erwinia tracheiphila, an economically important bacterial pathogen of cucurbits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erwinia tracheiphila is one of the most economically important pathogen of cucumbers, melons, squashes, pumpkins, and gourds, in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States, yet the molecular pathology remains uninvestigated. Here we report the first draft genome sequence of an E. tracheiphila str...

  7. Characterization of the RcsC sensor kinase from Erwinia amylovora and other enterobacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RcsC is a hybrid sensor kinase which contains a sensor domain, a histidine kinase domain and a receiver domain. We have previously demonstrated that, while the Erwinia amylovora rcsC mutant produces more amylovoran than the wild type strain in vitro, the mutant remains avirulent on both immature pea...

  8. Complete genomic sequence of Erwinia amylovora phage PhiEaH2.

    PubMed

    Dömötör, Dóra; Becságh, Péter; Rákhely, Gábor; Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás

    2012-10-01

    Erwinia amylovora is the causative agent of fire blight, a serious disease of some Rosaceae plants. The newly isolated bacteriophage PhiEaH2 is able to lyse E. amylovora in the laboratory and has reduced the occurrence of fire blight cases in field experiments. This study presents the sequenced complete genome and analysis of phage PhiEaH2. PMID:22966191

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Erwinia mallotivora BT-MARDI, Causative Agent of Papaya Dieback Disease.

    PubMed

    Redzuan, R Ahmad; Abu Bakar, N; Rozano, L; Badrun, R; Mat Amin, N; Mohd Raih, M F

    2014-01-01

    Erwinia mallotivora was isolated from papaya trees infected with dieback disease, which were planted at the Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI), Malaysia. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of E. mallotivora BT-MARDI, which offers an important source of information for understanding pathogen and host interaction during papaya dieback development. PMID:24812220

  10. Using functional genomics to identify molecular markers for fire blight resistance (Erwinia amylovora) in apple (Malus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea), is a destructive disease of apple (Malus), pear (Pyrus) and some woody ornamentals in the rose family (Rosaceae). The goal of this project is to use a functional genomics approach to develop tools to breed fire blight resistant apples. Six hundred fifty...

  11. Antibiosis and acidification by Panoea agglomerans strain E325 may contribute to suppression of Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325, a commercially-available antagonist for fire blight of apple and pear, was originally selected through broad screening based on suppression of Erwinia amylovora on flower stigmas, but specific mechanisms were unknown. Bacterial modification of pH was evaluated as a p...

  12. Antibiosis by Pantoea agglomerans biocontrol strain E325 against Erwinia amylovora on apple blossom stigmas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans E325, the active ingredient in a commercial product for fire blight control, was previously shown in vitro to produce a unique alkaline- and phosphate-sensitive antibiotic specific to Erwinia amylovora. Antibiosis was evaluated as a mode of antagonism on blossom stigmas using two...

  13. Plasmid content of isolates of Erwinia amylovora from orchards in Washington and Oregon in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly all strains of Erwinia amylovora carry plasmid pEA29, which has not been found in other species of bacteria. Additional plasmids have been reported in the pathogen isolates from Western states, such as a plasmid in strain CA11 that carries streptomycin-resistance genes and the plasmid pEU30,...

  14. Plasmid Content of Isolates of Erwinia amylovora from Orchards in Washington and Oregon in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Washington (WA) and Oregon (OR) represent a major pome fruit production region of the United States, and streptomycin-resistant isolates of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora are common in orchards in this region. We examined the plasmid content of a collection of more than 200 isolates of ...

  15. Erwinia amylovora effector protein Eop1 suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity in Malus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) utilizes a type three secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Several Ea effectors have been identified based on their sequence similarity to plant and animal bacterial pathogen effectors; however, the function of the majority of Ea effecto...

  16. Plasmid content of Erwinia amylovora in orchards in Washington and Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the plasmid content of a collection of 305 isolates of Erwinia amylovora from Washington and Oregon in the Pacific Northwest of the United States with PCR assays and RFLP. Nearly all isolates of E. amylovora carried plasmid pEA29, which is not found in other species of bacteria, but 4% ...

  17. Relationship of apple flower age to infection of hypanthium by Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blossom susceptibility to infection by Erwinia amylovora in relation to flower age has not been established, but is relevant to fire blight risk assessment. Detached crab apple flowers were maintained with cut pedicels in 10% sucrose for various periods and at different temperatures before directly ...

  18. Transgenic expression of Erwinia amylovora effectors eopB1 and hopCEa in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea), the causal agent of fire blight, uses a type three secretion system (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Once inside the host cell, these effector proteins are thought to be involved with suppressing host defense responses, redirecting normal host metab...

  19. AmyR is a novel negative regulator of amylovoran production in Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously reported the characterization of an orphan gene ybjN from Escherichia coli. In this study, we attempted to understand the role of amyR in Erwinia amylovora, a functionally conserved homolog of E. coli ybjN. As reported earlier, amylovoran production in the amyR knockout mutant is ...

  20. Understanding the recent colonization history of a plant pathogenic fungus using population genetic tools and Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Barrès, B; Carlier, J; Seguin, M; Fenouillet, C; Cilas, C; Ravigné, V

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the processes by which new diseases are introduced in previously healthy areas is of major interest in elaborating prevention and management policies, as well as in understanding the dynamics of pathogen diversity at large spatial scale. In this study, we aimed to decipher the dispersal processes that have led to the emergence of the plant pathogenic fungus Microcyclus ulei, which is responsible for the South American Leaf Blight (SALB). This fungus has devastated rubber tree plantations across Latin America since the beginning of the twentieth century. As only imprecise historical information is available, the study of population evolutionary history based on population genetics appeared most appropriate. The distribution of genetic diversity in a continental sampling of four countries (Brazil, Ecuador, Guatemala and French Guiana) was studied using a set of 16 microsatellite markers developed specifically for this purpose. A very strong genetic structure was found (Fst=0.70), demonstrating that there has been no regular gene flow between Latin American M. ulei populations. Strong bottlenecks probably occurred at the foundation of each population. The most likely scenario of colonization identified by the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) method implemented in 𝒟ℐ𝒴𝒜ℬ𝒞 suggested two independent sources from the Amazonian endemic area. The Brazilian, Ecuadorian and Guatemalan populations might stem from serial introductions through human-mediated movement of infected plant material from an unsampled source population, whereas the French Guiana population seems to have arisen from an independent colonization event through spore dispersal. PMID:22828899

  1. Effect of essential oil of Origanum rotundifolium on some plant pathogenic bacteria, seed germination and plant growth of tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadaşoǧlu, Fatih; Kotan, Recep; Karagöz, Kenan; Dikbaş, Neslihan; Ćakmakçi, Ramazan; Ćakir, Ahmet; Kordali, Şaban; Özer, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine effect of Origanum rotundifolium's essential oil on some plant pathogenic bacterias, seed germination and plant growth of tomato. Xanthomonas axanopodis pv. vesicatoria strain (Xcv-761) and Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. michiganensis strain (Cmm) inoculated to tomato seed. The seeds were tested for germination in vitro and disease severity and some plant growth parameters in vivo. In vitro assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil treatment in seeds inoculated with Xcv-761 and at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil and streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. The least infected cotiledon number was observed at 500 µg/ml streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. In vivo assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 250 µl/ml essential oil teratment in tomato inoculated with Cmm. Lowest disease severity, is seen in the CMM infected seeds with 250 µl/ml essential oil application these results were statistically significant when compared with pathogen infected seeds. Similarly, in application conducted with XCV-761 infected seed, the lowest disease severity was observed for seeds as a result of 250 µl/ml essential oil application. Also according to the results obtained from essential oil application of CMM infected seeds conducted with 62,5 µl/ml dose; while disease severity was found statistically insignificant compared to 250 µl/ml to essential oil application, ıt was found statistically significant compared to pathogen infected seeds. The results showed that essential oil of O. rotundifolium has a potential for some suppressed plant disease when it is used in appropriate dose.

  2. A chloride tolerant laccase from the plant pathogen ascomycete Botrytis aclada expressed at high levels in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Kittl, Roman; Mueangtoom, Kitti; Gonaus, Christoph; Khazaneh, Shima Tahvilda; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Ludwig, Roland

    2012-01-20

    Fungal laccases from basidiomycetous fungi are thoroughly investigated in respect of catalytic mechanism and industrial applications, but the number of reported and well characterized ascomycetous laccases is much smaller although they exhibit interesting catalytic properties. We report on a highly chloride tolerant laccase produced by the plant pathogen ascomycete Botrytis aclada, which was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris with an extremely high yield and purified to homogeneity. In a fed-batch fermentation, 495 mg L(-1) of laccase was measured in the medium, which is the highest concentration obtained for a laccase by a yeast expression system. The recombinant B. aclada laccase has a typical molecular mass of 61,565 Da for the amino acid chain. The pI is approximately 2.4, a very low value for a laccase. Glycosyl residues attached to the recombinant protein make up for approximately 27% of the total protein mass. B. aclada laccase exhibits very low K(M) values and high substrate turnover numbers for phenolic and non-phenolic substrates at acidic and near neutral pH. The enzyme's stability increases in the presence of chloride ions and, even more important, its substrate turnover is only weakly inhibited by chloride ions (I(50)=1.4M), which is in sharp contrast to most other described laccases. This high chloride tolerance is mandatory for some applications such as implantable biofuel cells and laccase catalyzed reactions, which suffer from the presence of chloride ions. The high expression yield permits fast and easy production for further basic and applied research. PMID:22178779

  3. Regulation of Pathogenic Spore Germination by CgRac1 in the Fungal Plant Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Nesher, Iris; Minz, Anna; Kokkelink, Leonie; Tudzynski, Paul; Sharon, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is a facultative plant pathogen: it can live as a saprophyte on dead organic matter or as a pathogen on a host plant. Different patterns of conidial germination have been recognized under saprophytic and pathogenic conditions, which also determine later development. Here we describe the role of CgRac1 in regulating pathogenic germination. The hallmark of pathogenic germination is unilateral formation of a single germ tube following the first cell division. However, transgenic strains expressing a constitutively active CgRac1 (CA-CgRac1) displayed simultaneous formation of two germ tubes, with nuclei continuing to divide in both cells after the first cell division. CA-CgRac1 also caused various other abnormalities, including difficulties in establishing and maintaining cell polarity, reduced conidial and hyphal adhesion, and formation of immature appressoria. Consequently, CA-CgRac1 isolates were completely nonpathogenic. Localization studies with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-CgRac1 fusion protein showed that the CgRac1 protein is abundant in conidia and in hyphal tips. Although the CFP signal was equally distributed in both cells of a germinating conidium, reactive oxygen species accumulated only in the cell that produced a germ tube, indicating that CgRac1 was active only in the germinating cell. Collectively, our results show that CgRac1 is a major regulator of asymmetric development and that it is involved in the regulation of both morphogenesis and nuclear division. Modification of CgRac1 activity disrupts the morphogenetic program and prevents fungal infection. PMID:21460190

  4. Impact of transgenic Bt maize residues on the mycotoxigenic plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum and the biocontrol agent Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Naef, Andreas; Zesiger, Thierry; Défago, Geneviève

    2006-01-01

    Transformation of maize with genes encoding for insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) could have an impact on the saprophytic survival of plant pathogens and their antagonists on crop residues. We assessed potential effects on the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON)-producing wheat and maize pathogen Fusarium graminearum and on the biocontrol agent Trichoderma atroviride. Purified Cry1Ab protein caused no growth inhibition of these fungi on agar plates. Cry1Ab concentrations above levels common in Bt maize tissue stimulated the growth of F. graminearum. The fungi were also grown on gamma-radiation-sterilized leaf tissue of four Bt maize hybrids and their non transgenic isolines collected at maize maturity on a field trial in 2002 and 2003. Both fungi degraded the Cry1Ab protein in Bt maize tissue. Fungal biomass quantification with microsatellite-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays revealed differential fungal growth on leaf tissue of different maize varieties but no consistent difference between corresponding Bt and non-Bt hybrids. Generally, year of maize tissue collection had a greater impact on biomass production than cultivar or Bt transformation. The mycotoxin DON levels observed in maize tissue experiments corresponded with patterns in F. graminearum biomass, indicating that Bt transformation has no impact on DON production. In addition to bioassays, maize leaf tissue was analyzed with a mass spectrometer-based electronic nose, generating fingerprints of volatile organic compounds. Chemical fingerprints of corresponding Bt and non-Bt leaf tissues differed only for those hybrid pairs that caused differential fungal biomass production in the bioassays. Our results suggest that Cry1Ab protein in maize residues has no direct effect on F. graminearum and T. atroviride but some corresponding Bt/non-Bt maize hybrids differ more in composition than Cry protein content alone, which can affect the saprophytic growth of fungi on crop

  5. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOEpatents

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  6. Plant pathogen resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Jean T.; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2015-10-20

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  7. Multiple activities of the plant pathogen type III effector proteins WtsE and AvrE require WxxxE motifs.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jong Hyun; Majerczak, Doris R; Nomura, Kinya; Mecey, Christy; Uribe, Francisco; He, Sheng-Yang; Mackey, David; Coplin, David L

    2009-06-01

    The broadly conserved AvrE-family of type III effectors from gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria includes important virulence factors, yet little is known about the mechanisms by which these effectors function inside plant cells to promote disease. We have identified two conserved motifs in AvrE-family effectors: a WxxxE motif and a putative C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum membrane retention/retrieval signal (ERMRS). The WxxxE and ERMRS motifs are both required for the virulence activities of WtsE and AvrE, which are major virulence factors of the corn pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii and the tomato or Arabidopsis pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, respectively. The WxxxE and the predicted ERMRS motifs are also required for other biological activities of WtsE, including elicitation of the hypersensitive response in nonhost plants and suppression of defense responses in Arabidopsis. A family of type III effectors from mammalian bacterial pathogens requires WxxxE and subcellular targeting motifs for virulence functions that involve their ability to mimic activated G-proteins. The conservation of related motifs and their necessity for the function of type III effectors from plant pathogens indicates that disturbing host pathways by mimicking activated host G-proteins may be a virulence mechanism employed by plant pathogens as well. PMID:19445595

  8. Interaction of antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides from Bacillus subtilis influences their effect on spore germination and membrane permeability in fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajie; Hagberg, Ingrid; Novitsky, Laura; Hadj-Moussa, Hanane; Avis, Tyler J

    2014-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis cyclic lipopeptides are known to have various antimicrobial effects including different types of interactions with the cell membranes of plant pathogenic fungi. The various spectra of activities of the three main lipopeptide families (fengycins, iturins, and surfactins) seem to be linked to their respective mechanisms of action on the fungal biomembrane. Few studies have shown the combined effect of more than one family of lipopeptides on fungal plant pathogens. In an effort to understand the effect of producing multiple lipopeptide families, sensitivity and membrane permeability of spores from four fungal plant pathogens (Alternaria solani, Fusarium sambucinum, Rhizopus stolonifer, and Verticillium dahliae) were assayed in response to lipopeptides, both individually and as combined treatments. Results showed that inhibition of spores was highly variable depending on the tested fungus-lipopeptide treatment. Results also showed that inhibition of the spores was closely associated with SYTOX stain absorption suggesting effects of efficient treatments on membrane permeability. Combined lipopeptide treatments revealed additive, synergistic or sometimes mutual inhibition of beneficial effects. PMID:25442289

  9. A high-sensitivity optical device for the early monitoring of plant pathogen attack via the in vivo detection of ROS bursts

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lizhang; Zhou, Jun; Li, Bo; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    Biotic stressors, especially pathogenic microorganisms, are rather difficult to detect. In plants, one of the earliest cellular responses following pathogen infection is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, a novel optical device for the early monitoring of Pseudomonas attack was developed; this device measures the ROS level via oxidation-sensitive 2′, 7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA)-mediated fluorescence, which could provide early monitoring of attacks by a range of plant pathogen; ROS bursts were detected in vivo in Arabidopsis thaliana with higher sensitivity and accuracy than those of a commercial luminescence spectrophotometer. Additionally, the DCF fluorescence truly reflected early changes in the ROS level, as indicated by an evaluation of the H2O2 content and the tight association between the ROS and Pseudomonas concentration. Moreover, compared with traditional methods for detecting plant pathogen attacks based on physiological and biochemical measurements, our proposed technique also offers significant advantages, such as low cost, simplicity, convenient operation and quick turnaround. These results therefore suggest that the proposed optical device could be useful for the rapid monitoring of attacks by plant pathogen and yield results considerably earlier than the appearance of visual changes in plant morphology or growth. PMID:25767474

  10. Genetic islands in pome fruit pathogenic and non-pathogenic Erwinia species and related plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    New pathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Erwinia associated with pome fruit trees (Erwinia, E. piriflorinigrans, E. uzenensis) have been increasingly described in the last years, and comparative analyses have found that all these species share several genetic characteristics. Studies at different level (whole genome comparison, virulence genes, plasmid content, etc.) show a high intraspecies homogeneity (i.e., among E. amylovora strains) and also abundant similarities appear between the different Erwinia species: presence of plasmids of similar size in the pathogenic species; high similarity in several genes associated with exopolysaccharide production and hence, with virulence, as well as in some other genes, in the chromosomes. Many genetic similarities have been observed also among some of the plasmids (and genomes) from the pathogenic species and E. tasmaniensis or E. billingiae, two epiphytic species on the same hosts. The amount of genetic material shared in this genus varies from individual genes to clusters, genomic islands and genetic material that even may constitute a whole plasmid. Recent research on evolution of erwinias point out the horizontal transfer acquisition of some genomic islands that were subsequently lost in some species and several pathogenic traits that are still present. How this common material has been obtained and is efficiently maintained in different species belonging to the same genus sharing a common ecological niche provides an idea of the origin and evolution of the pathogenic Erwinia and the interaction with non-pathogenic species present in the same niche, and the role of the genes that are conserved in all of them. PMID:26379649

  11. The conserved upstream region of lscB/C determines expression of different levansucrase genes in plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180 is an opportunistic plant pathogen which causes bacterial blight of soybean plants. It produces the exopolysaccharide levan by the enzyme levansucrase. Levansucrase has three gene copies in PG4180, two of which, lscB and lscC, are expressed while the third, lscA, is cryptic. Previously, nucleotide sequence alignments of lscB/C variants in various P. syringae showed that a ~450-bp phage-associated promoter element (PAPE) including the first 48 nucleotides of the ORF is absent in lscA. Results Herein, we tested whether this upstream region is responsible for the expression of lscB/C and lscA. Initially, the transcriptional start site for lscB/C was determined. A fusion of the PAPE with the ORF of lscA (lscB UpN A) was generated and introduced to a levan-negative mutant of PG4180. Additionally, fusions comprising of the non-coding part of the upstream region of lscB with lscA (lscB Up A) or the upstream region of lscA with lscB (lscA Up B) were generated. Transformants harboring the lscB UpN A or the lscB Up A fusion, respectively, showed levan formation while the transformant carrying lscA Up B did not. qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that lscB UpN A had an expression similar to lscB while lscB Up A had a lower expression. Accuracy of protein fusions was confirmed by MALDI-TOF peptide fingerprinting. Conclusions Our data suggested that the upstream sequence of lscB is essential for expression of levansucrase while the N-terminus of LscB mediates an enhanced expression. In contrast, the upstream region of lscA does not lead to expression of lscB. We propose that lscA might be an ancestral levansucrase variant upstream of which the PAPE got inserted by potentially phage-mediated transposition events leading to expression of levansucrase in P. syringae. PMID:24670199

  12. HopX1 in Erwinia amylovora functions as an avirulence protein in apple and is regulated by HrpL.

    PubMed

    Bocsanczy, A M; Schneider, D J; DeClerck, G A; Cartinhour, S; Beer, S V

    2012-02-01

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of rosaceous plants caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora. This pathogen delivers virulence proteins into host cells utilizing the type III secretion system (T3SS). Expression of the T3SS and of translocated and secreted substrates is activated by the alternative sigma factor HrpL, which recognizes hrp box promoters upstream of regulated genes. A collection of hidden Markov model (HMM) profiles was used to identify putative hrp boxes in the genome sequence of Ea273, a highly virulent strain of E. amylovora. Among potential virulence factors preceded by putative hrp boxes, two genes previously known as Eop3 and Eop2 were characterized. The presence of functionally active hrp boxes upstream of these two genes was confirmed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) assays. Deletion mutants of the latter candidate genes, renamed hopX1(Ea) and hopAK1(Ea), respectively, did not differ in virulence from the wild-type strain when assayed in pear fruit and apple shoots. The hopX1(Ea) deletion mutant of Ea273, complemented with a plasmid overexpressing hopX1(E)(a), suppressed the development of the hypersensitivity response (HR) when inoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana; however, it contributed to HR in Nicotiana tabacum and significantly reduced the progress of disease in apple shoots, suggesting that HopX1(Ea) may act as an avirulence protein in apple shoots. PMID:22123252

  13. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  14. The crystal structure of Erwinia amylovora levansucrase provides a snapshot of the products of sucrose hydrolysis trapped into the active site.

    PubMed

    Wuerges, Jochen; Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele; Boivin, Stephane; Meijers, Rob; Benini, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Levansucrases are members of the glycoside hydrolase family and catalyse both the hydrolysis of the substrate sucrose and the transfer of fructosyl units to acceptor molecules. In the presence of sufficient sucrose, this may either lead to the production of fructooligosaccharides or fructose polymers. Aim of this study is to rationalise the differences in the polymerisation properties of bacterial levansucrases and in particular to identify structural features that determine different product spectrum in the levansucrase of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Ea Lsc, EC 2.4.1.10) as compared to Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis levansucrase. Ea is an enterobacterial pathogen responsible for the Fire Blight disease in rosaceous plants (e.g., apple and pear) with considerable interest for the agricultural industry. The crystal structure of Ea Lsc was solved at 2.77 Å resolution and compared to those of other fructosyltransferases from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We propose the structural features, determining the different reaction products, to reside in just a few loops at the rim of the active site funnel. Moreover we propose that loop 8 may have a role in product length determination in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus LsdA and Microbacterium saccharophilum FFase. The Ea Lsc structure shows for the first time the products of sucrose hydrolysis still bound in the active site. PMID:26208466

  15. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  16. A volatile relationship: profiling an inter-kingdom dialogue between two plant pathogens, Ralstonia Solanacearum and Aspergillus Flavus.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Joseph E; Jewell, Kelsea; Roze, Ludmila V; Scherf, Jacob; Ndagano, Dora; Beaudry, Randolph; Linz, John E; Allen, Caitilyn; Keller, Nancy P

    2014-05-01

    Microbes in the rhizosphere have a suite of extracellular compounds, both primary and secondary, that communicate with other organisms in their immediate environment. Here, we describe a two-way volatile interaction between two widespread and economically important soil-borne pathogens of peanut, Aspergillus flavus and Ralstonia solanacearum, a fungus and bacterium, respectively. In response to A. flavus volatiles, R. solanacearum reduced production of the major virulence factor extracellular polysaccharide (EPS). In parallel, A. flavus responded to R. solanacearum volatiles by reducing conidia production, both on plates and on peanut seeds and by increasing aflatoxin production on peanut. Volatile profiling of these organisms using solid-phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (SPME-GCMS) provided a first glimpse at the compounds that may drive these interactions. PMID:24801606

  17. Erwinia mallotivora sp., a new pathogen of papaya (Carica papaya) in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Noriha Mat; Bunawan, Hamidun; Redzuan, Rohaiza Ahmad; Jaganath, Indu Bala S

    2010-01-01

    Erwinia mallotivora was isolated from papaya infected with dieback disease showing the typical symptoms of greasy, water-soaked lesions and spots on leaves. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain belonged to the genus Erwinia and was united in a monophyletic group with E. mallotivora DSM 4565 (AJ233414). Earlier studies had indicated that the causal agent for this disease was E. papayae. However, our current studies, through Koch's postulate, have confirmed that papaya dieback disease is caused by E. mallotivora. To our knowledge, this is the first new discovery of E. mallotivora as a causal agent of papaya dieback disease in Peninsular Malaysia. Previous reports have suggested that E. mallotivora causes leaf spot in Mallotus japonicus. However, this research confirms it also to be pathogenic to Carica papaya. PMID:21339975

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Erwinia tracheiphila, an Economically Important Bacterial Pathogen of Cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Lori R; Scully, Erin D; Roberts, Dana; Straub, Timothy J; Geib, Scott M; Park, Jihye; Stephenson, Andrew G; Salaau Rojas, Erika; Liu, Quin; Beattie, Gwyn; Gleason, Mark; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Mescher, Mark C; Fleischer, Shelby G; Kolter, Roberto; Pierce, Naomi; Zhaxybayeva, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Erwinia tracheiphila is one of the most economically important pathogens of cucumbers, melons, squashes, pumpkins, and gourds in the northeastern and midwestern United States, yet its molecular pathology remains uninvestigated. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of an E. tracheiphila strain isolated from an infected wild gourd (Cucurbita pepo subsp. texana) plant. The genome assembly consists of 7 contigs and includes a putative plasmid and at least 20 phage and prophage elements. PMID:26044415

  19. [Erwinia amylovora--the fire blight pathogen of trees in Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, L M; Moroz, S N; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E; Gvozdiak, R I; Patyka, V F

    2014-01-01

    Niduses of fire blight of fruit and ornamental trees have been found in the Kyiv and Vinnitsa regions of Ukraine. Pathogen Erwinia amylovora was isolated between April and October. The pathogen was often accompanied by bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Artificial infection with a mixture of bacteria E. amylovora and P. syringae pv. syringae accelerates and enhances the disease process in the laboratory. PMID:25199342

  20. Functional analysis of the Erwinia herbicola tutB gene and its product.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Takane; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Koyanagi, Takashi; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2002-06-01

    The tutB gene, which lies just downstream of tpl, has been cloned from Erwinia herbicola, and its product was analyzed. Despite its high sequence similarity to tryptophan transporters, TutB was found to be a tyrosine-specific transporter. Tryptophan acted as a competitive inhibitor of tyrosine transport. Unlike the tryptophanase operon, the tpl and tutB genes do not constitute an operon. PMID:12003958

  1. Regulation and role in pathogenicity of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 pectin methylesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Boccara, M; Chatain, V

    1989-01-01

    The gene pem, encoding the pectin methylesterase (PME) of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937, was cloned and mutagenized by mini-Mu transposable elements. A second gene, pecY, which could act as a negative regulator of PME was found 5' to the pem gene. A PME-E. chrysanthemi derivative inoculate onto Saintpaulia plants was shown to be clearly noninvasive, demonstrating the important role of this enzyme in soft rot disease. PMID:2738029

  2. Regulation and role in pathogenicity of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 pectin methylesterase.

    PubMed

    Boccara, M; Chatain, V

    1989-07-01

    The gene pem, encoding the pectin methylesterase (PME) of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937, was cloned and mutagenized by mini-Mu transposable elements. A second gene, pecY, which could act as a negative regulator of PME was found 5' to the pem gene. A PME-E. chrysanthemi derivative inoculate onto Saintpaulia plants was shown to be clearly noninvasive, demonstrating the important role of this enzyme in soft rot disease. PMID:2738029

  3. Bacteriocin-resistant mutants of Erwinia chrysanthemi: possible involvement of iron acquisition in phytopathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Expert, D; Toussaint, A

    1985-07-01

    A series of bacteriocin-resistant mutants of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937JRH were unable to elicit soft-rot symptoms on saintpaulia plants. The loss of pathogenicity was correlated with the disappearance of one to three outer membrane polypeptides (molecular weights, about 80,000 to 90,000) whose production in wild-type strains was greatly enhanced under iron-limited growth conditions. The mutants did not exhibit altered extracellular pectinolytic or cellulolytic activities. PMID:4008442

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Erwinia tracheiphila, an Economically Important Bacterial Pathogen of Cucurbits

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Erin D.; Roberts, Dana; Straub, Timothy J.; Geib, Scott M.; Park, Jihye; Stephenson, Andrew G.; Salaau Rojas, Erika; Liu, Quin; Beattie, Gwyn; Gleason, Mark; De Moraes, Consuelo M.; Mescher, Mark C.; Fleischer, Shelby G.; Kolter, Roberto; Pierce, Naomi; Zhaxybayeva, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Erwinia tracheiphila is one of the most economically important pathogens of cucumbers, melons, squashes, pumpkins, and gourds in the northeastern and midwestern United States, yet its molecular pathology remains uninvestigated. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of an E. tracheiphila strain isolated from an infected wild gourd (Cucurbita pepo subsp. texana) plant. The genome assembly consists of 7 contigs and includes a putative plasmid and at least 20 phage and prophage elements. PMID:26044415

  5. Absence of lysogeny in wild populations of Erwinia amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Dwayne R; Sjaarda, David R; Sjaarda, Calvin P; Ayala, Carlos Juarez; Howcroft, Brittany; Castle, Alan J; Svircev, Antonet M

    2015-01-01

    Lytic bacteriophages are in development as biological control agents for the prevention of fire blight disease caused by Erwinia amylovora. Temperate phages should be excluded as biologicals since lysogeny produces the dual risks of host resistance to phage attack and the transduction of virulence determinants between bacteria. The extent of lysogeny was estimated in wild populations of E. amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans with real–time polymerase chain reaction primers developed to detect E. amylovora phages belonging to the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Pantoea agglomerans, an orchard epiphyte, is easily infected by Erwinia spp. phages, and it serves as a carrier in the development of the phage-mediated biological control agent. Screening of 161 E. amylovora isolates from 16 distinct geographical areas in North America, Europe, North Africa and New Zealand and 82 P. agglomerans isolates from southern Ontario, Canada showed that none possessed prophage. Unstable phage resistant clones or lysogens were produced under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a stable lysogen was recovered from infection of bacterial isolate Ea110R with Podoviridae phage ΦEa35-20. These laboratory observations suggested that while lysogeny is possible in E. amylovora, it is rare or absent in natural populations, and there is a minimal risk associated with lysogenic conversion and transduction by Erwinia spp. phages. PMID:25678125

  6. Absence of lysogeny in wild populations of Erwinia amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Roach, Dwayne R; Sjaarda, David R; Sjaarda, Calvin P; Ayala, Carlos Juarez; Howcroft, Brittany; Castle, Alan J; Svircev, Antonet M

    2015-05-01

    Lytic bacteriophages are in development as biological control agents for the prevention of fire blight disease caused by Erwinia amylovora. Temperate phages should be excluded as biologicals since lysogeny produces the dual risks of host resistance to phage attack and the transduction of virulence determinants between bacteria. The extent of lysogeny was estimated in wild populations of E. amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans with real-time polymerase chain reaction primers developed to detect E. amylovora phages belonging to the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Pantoea agglomerans, an orchard epiphyte, is easily infected by Erwinia spp. phages, and it serves as a carrier in the development of the phage-mediated biological control agent. Screening of 161 E. amylovora isolates from 16 distinct geographical areas in North America, Europe, North Africa and New Zealand and 82 P. agglomerans isolates from southern Ontario, Canada showed that none possessed prophage. Unstable phage resistant clones or lysogens were produced under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a stable lysogen was recovered from infection of bacterial isolate Ea110R with Podoviridae phage ΦEa35-20. These laboratory observations suggested that while lysogeny is possible in E. amylovora, it is rare or absent in natural populations, and there is a minimal risk associated with lysogenic conversion and transduction by Erwinia spp. phages. PMID:25678125

  7. The influence of antibiotic production and pre-emptive colonization on the population dynamics of Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) Eh1087 and Erwinia amylovora in planta.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Stephen R; Houliston, Gary J; Mahanty, H Khris

    2003-10-01

    Stigma colonization by Erwinia amylovora is the crucial first step in the development of most fire blight infections in apple and pear trees. Suppression at this point of the disease process by antagonists of E. amylovora, such as Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) strain Eh1087, is a rational approach to control fire blight. We tested the hypothesis that the ability of E. amylovora to compete with Eh1087 for colonization of a stigma is reduced by the potential for Eh1087 to produce the phenazine antibiotic, d-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA). In competition experiments on the stigmas of apple flowers, E. amylovora was significantly less successful against Eh1087 (AGA+) than against EhDeltaAGA (AGA-). Further experiments to test the importance of pre-emptive colonization of the stigma by either the pathogen or the antagonist suggested that AGA production significantly enhanced the competitiveness of Eh1087 when it was applied at the same time or 24 h before the pathogen. We also found that pre-emptive stigma colonization by either the pathogen or the antagonist resulted in a population that was resilient to subsequent invasion by a second species suggesting that niche exclusion has a dominant influence on the dynamics of bacterial populations on stigmas. PMID:14510856

  8. The genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis in Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae: characterization and role in gall formation.

    PubMed Central

    Lichter, A; Barash, I; Valinsky, L; Manulis, S

    1995-01-01

    A locus conferring cytokinin production was previously isolated from the gall-forming bacterium Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae. This locus resided in a cluster with the genes specifying indole-3-acetic acid production on the pathogenicity-associated plasmid pPATH (A. Lichter, S. Manulis, O. Sagee, Y. Gafni, J. Gray, R. Meilen, R. O. Morris, and I. Barash, Mol. Plant Microbe Interact., 8:114-121, 1995). Sequence analysis of this locus indicated the presence of a cytokinin biosynthesis gene (etz) homologous to other described cytokinin biosynthesis genes. A unique open reading frame (pre-etz) encoding 169 amino acids preceded etz and together with etz formed a region with a distinctive low G+C content. Northern (RNA) analysis indicated the presence of an etz-specific transcript of 1 kb and a common transcript for pre-etz and etz of 1.4 kb. The level of the 1-kb transcript was high in the late logarithmic phase and very low in the stationary phase. In contrast, the level of the 1.4-kb transcript was lower than that of the 1-kb transcript in the late logarithmic phase and predominant in the stationary phase. A marker exchange mutant of etz which did not produce cytokinins exhibited a reduction in gall size on Gypsophila cuttings and almost abolished disease symptoms in a whole-plant assay. Complementation of this marker exchange mutant with the intact etz gene on a multicopy plasmid resulted in overproduction of cytokinins and larger plant galls from which small shoots emerged. Insertional mutation in pre-etz resulted in a sharp decrease in both the level of the etz-specific transcript and cytokinin production. A frameshift mutation in pre-etz caused a similar reduction in the cytokinin level. A marker exchange mutation in pre-etz caused a reduction of symptoms but to lower degree than the etz mutation. In the former mutant, cytokinin production and pathogenicity could not be restored by complementation. Furthermore, attempts to complement the etz marker exchange

  9. PehN, a Polygalacturonase Homologue with a Low Hydrolase Activity, Is Coregulated with the Other Erwinia chrysanthemi Polygalacturonases

    PubMed Central

    Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, Nicole; Shevchik, Vladimir E.; Nasser, William

    2002-01-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 secretes an arsenal of pectinolytic enzymes, including at least eight endo-pectate lyases encoded by pel genes, which play a major role in the soft-rot disease caused by this bacterium on various plants. E. chrysanthemi also produces some hydrolases that cleave pectin. Three adjacent hydrolase genes, pehV, pehW, and pehX, encoding exo-poly-α-d-galacturonosidases, have been characterized. These enzymes liberate digalacturonides from the nonreducing end of pectin. We report the identification of a novel gene, named pehN, encoding a protein homologous to the glycosyl hydrolases of family 28, which includes mainly polygalacturonases. PehN has a low hydrolase activity on polygalacturonate and on various pectins. PehN action favors the activity of the secreted endo-pectate lyases, mainly PelB and PelC, and that of the periplasmic exo-pectate lyase PelX. However, removal of the pehN gene does not significantly alter the virulence of E. chrysanthemi. Regulation of pehN transcription was analyzed by using gene fusions. Like other pectinase genes, pehN transcription is dependent on several environmental conditions. It is induced by pectic catabolic products and is affected by growth phase, catabolite repression, osmolarity, anaerobiosis, nitrogen starvation, and the presence of calcium ions. The transcription of pehN is modulated by the repressor KdgR, which controls almost all the steps of pectin catabolism, and by cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), the global activator of sugar catabolism. The regulator PecS, which represses the transcription of the pel genes but activates that of pehV, pehW, and pehX, also activates transcription of pehN. The three regulators KdgR, PecS, and CRP act by direct interaction with the pehN promoter region. The sequences involved in the binding of these three regulators and of RNA polymerase have been precisely defined. Analysis of the simultaneous binding of these proteins indicates that CRP and RNA polymerase bind

  10. Characterization of Novel Di-, Tri-, and Tetranucleotide Microsatellite Primers Suitable for Genotyping Various Plant Pathogenic Fungi with Special Emphasis on Fusaria and Mycospherella graminicola

    PubMed Central

    Bahkali, Ali H.; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Guo, Jian-Rong; Khiyami, Mohamed A.; Verreet, Joseph-Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The goals of this investigation were to identify and evaluate the use of polymorphic microsatellite marker (PMM) analysis for molecular typing of seventeen plant pathogenic fungi. Primers for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide loci were designed directly from the recently published genomic sequence of Mycospherlla graminicola and Fusarium graminearum. A total of 20 new microsatellite primers as easy-to-score markers were developed. Microsatellite primer PCR (MP-PCR) yielded highly reproducible and complex genomic fingerprints, with several bands ranging in size from 200 to 3000 bp. Of the 20 primers tested, only (TAGG)4, (TCC)5 and (CA)7T produced a high number of polymorphic bands from either F. graminearum or F. culmorum. (ATG)5 led to successful amplifications in M. graminicola isolates collected from Germany. Percentage of polymorphic bands among Fusarium species ranged from 9 to 100%. Cluster analysis of banding patterns of the isolates corresponded well to the established species delineations based on morphology and other methods of phylogenetic analysis. The current research demonstrates that the newly designed microsatellite primers are reliable, sensitive and technically simple tools for assaying genetic variability in plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:22489135

  11. Polar Localizing Class V Myosin Chitin Synthases Are Essential during Early Plant Infection in the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Ustilago maydisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Isabella; Aßmann, Daniela; Thines, Eckhard; Steinberg, Gero

    2006-01-01

    Fungal chitin synthases (CHSs) form fibers of the cell wall and are crucial for substrate invasion and pathogenicity. Filamentous fungi contain up to 10 CHSs, which might reflect redundant functions or the complex biology of these fungi. Here, we investigate the complete repertoire of eight CHSs in the dimorphic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis. We demonstrate that all CHSs are expressed in yeast cells and hyphae. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to all CHSs localize to septa, whereas Chs5-GFP, Chs6-GFP, Chs7-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and Myosin chitin synthase1 (Mcs1)-YFP were found at growth regions of yeast-like cells and hyphae, indicating that they participate in tip growth. However, only the class IV CHS genes chs7 and chs5 are crucial for shaping yeast cells and hyphae ex planta. Although most CHS mutants were attenuated in plant pathogenicity, Δchs6, Δchs7, and Δmcs1 mutants were drastically reduced in virulence. Δmcs1 showed no morphological defects in hyphae, but Mcs1 became essential during invasion of the plant epidermis. Δmcs1 hyphae entered the plant but immediately lost growth polarity and formed large aggregates of spherical cells. Our data show that the polar class IV CHSs are essential for morphogenesis ex planta, whereas the class V myosin-CHS is essential during plant infection. PMID:16314447

  12. Functional analysis of endo-1,4-β-glucanases in response to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae reveals their involvement in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Finiti, I; Leyva, M O; López-Cruz, J; Calderan Rodrigues, B; Vicedo, B; Angulo, C; Bennett, A B; Grant, M; García-Agustín, P; González-Bosch, C

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell wall modification is a critical component in stress responses. Endo-1,4-β-glucanases (EGs) take part in cell wall editing processes, e.g. elongation, ripening and abscission. Here we studied the infection response of Solanum lycopersicum and Arabidopsis thaliana with impaired EGs. Transgenic TomCel1 and TomCel2 tomato antisense plants challenged with Pseudomonas syringae showed higher susceptibility, callose priming and increased jasmonic acid pathway marker gene expression. These two EGs could be resistance factors and may act as negative regulators of callose deposition, probably by interfering with the defence-signalling network. A study of a set of Arabidopsis EG T-DNA insertion mutants challenged with P. syringae and Botrytis cinerea revealed that the lack of other EGs interferes with infection phenotype, callose deposition, expression of signalling pathway marker genes and hormonal balance. We conclude that a lack of EGs could alter plant response to pathogens by modifying the properties of the cell wall and/or interfering with signalling pathways, contributing to generate the appropriate signalling outcomes. Analysis of microarray data demonstrates that EGs are differentially expressed upon many different plant-pathogen challenges, hormone treatments and many abiotic stresses. We found some Arabidopsis EG mutants with increased tolerance to osmotic and salt stress. Our results show that impairing EGs can alter plant-pathogen interactions and may contribute to appropriate signalling outcomes in many different biotic and abiotic plant stress responses. PMID:23528138

  13. An Overview of CRISPR-Based Tools and Their Improvements: New Opportunities in Understanding Plant-Pathogen Interactions for Better Crop Protection.

    PubMed

    Barakate, Abdellah; Stephens, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Modern omics platforms have made the determination of susceptible/resistance genes feasible in any species generating huge numbers of potential targets for crop protection. However, the efforts to validate these targets have been hampered by the lack of a fast, precise, and efficient gene targeting system in plants. Now, the repurposing of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has solved this problem. CRISPR/Cas9 is the latest synthetic endonuclease that has revolutionized basic research by allowing facile genome editing in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Gene knockout is now feasible at an unprecedented efficiency with the possibility of multiplexing several targets and even genome-wide mutagenesis screening. In a short time, this powerful tool has been engineered for an array of applications beyond gene editing. Here, we briefly describe the CRISPR/Cas9 system, its recent improvements and applications in gene manipulation and single DNA/RNA molecule analysis. We summarize a few recent tests targeting plant pathogens and discuss further potential applications in pest control and plant-pathogen interactions that will inform plant breeding for crop protection. PMID:27313592

  14. Indirect Effects of One Plant Pathogen on the Transmission of a Second Pathogen and the Behavior of its Potato Psyllid Vector.

    PubMed

    Prager, Sean M; Wallis, Christopher; Trumble, John T

    2015-08-01

    Plant pathogens can influence the behavior and performance of insect herbivores. Studies of these associations typically focus on tripartite interactions between a plant host, a plant pathogen, and its insect vector. An unrelated herbivore or pathogen might influence such interactions. This study used a model system consisting of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the psyllid Bactericera cockerelli Sulc, and tomatoes to investigate multipartite interactions among a pathogen, a nonvector, and a plant host, and determine whether shifts in host physiology were behind potential interactions. Additionally, the ability of TMV to affect the success of another pathogen, 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum,' which is transmitted by the psyllid, was studied. In choice trials, psyllids preferred nearly fourfold noninfected plants to TMV-infected plants. No-choice bioassays demonstrated that there was no difference in psyllid development between TMV-infected and control plants; oviposition was twice as high on control plants. Following inoculation by psyllids, 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' titers were lower in TMV-infected plants than control plants. TMV-infected plants had lower levels of amino acids and sugars but little differences in phenolics and terpenoids, relative to control plants. Possibly, these changes in sugars are associated with a reduction in psyllid attractiveness in TMV-infected tomatoes resulting in decreased infection of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum.' PMID:26314051

  15. Identification of the HrpS binding site in the hrpL promoter and effect of the RpoN binding site of HrpS on the regulation of the type III secretion system in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2016-06-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a key pathogenicity factor in Erwinia amylovora. Previous studies have demonstrated that the T3SS in E. amylovora is transcriptionally regulated by an RpoN-HrpL sigma factor cascade, which is activated by the bacterial alarmone (p)ppGpp. In this study, the binding site of HrpS, an enhancer binding protein, was identified for the first time in plant-pathogenic bacteria. Complementation of the hrpL mutant with promoter deletion constructs of the hrpL gene and promoter activity analyses using various lengths of the hrpL promoter fused to a promoter-less green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporter gene delineated the upstream region for HrpS binding. Sequence analysis revealed a dyad symmetry sequence between -138 and -125 nucleotides (TGCAA-N4-TTGCA) as the potential HrpS binding site, which is conserved in the promoter of the hrpL gene among plant enterobacterial pathogens. Results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and electrophoresis mobility shift assay coupled with site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) analysis showed that the intact dyad symmetry sequence was essential for HrpS binding, full activation of T3SS gene expression and virulence. In addition, the role of the GAYTGA motif (RpoN binding site) of HrpS in the regulation of T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora was characterized by complementation of the hrpS mutant using mutant variants generated by SDM. Results showed that a Y100F substitution of HrpS complemented the hrpS mutant, whereas Y100A and Y101A substitutions did not. These results suggest that tyrosine (Y) and phenylalanine (F) function interchangeably in the conserved GAYTGA motif of HrpS in E. amylovora. PMID:26440313

  16. A framework to gauge the epidemic potential of plant pathogens in environmental reservoirs: the example of kiwifruit canker.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Claudia; Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Berge, Odile; Guilbaud, Caroline; Varvaro, Leonardo; Balestra, Giorgio M; Vinatzer, Boris A; Morris, Cindy E

    2015-02-01

    New economically important diseases on crops and forest trees emerge recurrently. An understanding of where new pathogenic lines come from and how they evolve is fundamental for the deployment of accurate surveillance methods. We used kiwifruit bacterial canker as a model to assess the importance of potential reservoirs of new pathogenic lineages. The current kiwifruit canker epidemic is at least the fourth outbreak of the disease on kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae in the mere 50 years in which this crop has been cultivated worldwide, with each outbreak being caused by different genetic lines of the bacterium. Here, we ask whether strains in natural (non-agricultural) environments could cause future epidemics of canker on kiwifruit. To answer this question, we evaluated the pathogenicity, endophytic colonization capacity and competitiveness on kiwifruit of P. syringae strains genetically similar to epidemic strains and originally isolated from aquatic and subalpine habitats. All environmental strains possessing an operon involved in the degradation of aromatic compounds via the catechol pathway grew endophytically and caused symptoms in kiwifruit vascular tissue. Environmental and epidemic strains showed a wide host range, revealing their potential as future pathogens of a variety of hosts. Environmental strains co-existed endophytically with CFBP 7286, an epidemic strain, and shared about 20 virulence genes, but were missing six virulence genes found in all epidemic strains. By identifying the specific gene content in genetic backgrounds similar to known epidemic strains, we developed criteria to assess the epidemic potential and to survey for such strains as a means of forecasting and managing disease emergence. PMID:24986268

  17. Genetic Differences between Blight-Causing Erwinia Species with Differing Host Specificities, Identified by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization▿

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Lindsay R.; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W.

    2006-01-01

    PCR-based subtractive hybridization was used to isolate sequences from Erwinia amylovora strain Ea110, which is pathogenic on apples and pears, that were not present in three closely related strains with differing host specificities: E. amylovora MR1, which is pathogenic only on Rubus spp.; Erwinia pyrifoliae Ep1/96, the causal agent of shoot blight of Asian pears; and Erwinia sp. strain Ejp556, the causal agent of bacterial shoot blight of pear in Japan. In total, six subtractive libraries were constructed and analyzed. Recovered sequences included type III secretion components, hypothetical membrane proteins, and ATP-binding proteins. In addition, we identified an Ea110-specific sequence with homology to a type III secretion apparatus component of the insect endosymbiont Sodalis glossinidius, as well as an Ep1/96-specific sequence with homology to the Yersinia pestis effector protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH. PMID:16963554

  18. Minimal effects of E. coli and Erwinia asparaginase on the coagulation system in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Risseeuw-Appel, I M; Dekker, I; Hop, W C; Hählen, K

    1994-01-01

    A randomized study was done in twenty newly diagnosed children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ten children were treated with Escherichia coli L-asparaginase, and ten with Erwinia chrysanthemi L-asparaginase. L-asparaginase (ASP) treatment started halfway during ALL-induction treatment with vincristine, prednisone, daunorubicin and intrathecal methotrexate. The mean activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) level in all children demonstrated a significant fall (P < 0.001) from 28.25 sec at diagnosis to 23.0 sec at the start of ASP treatment. In this same time interval, the mean fibrinogen level declined markedly from 3 g/l to 1.2 g/l (P < 0.001), probably due to prednisone therapy. The APTT stayed shortened during ASP therapy, whereas the hypofibrinogenemia recovered significantly faster in the Erwinia group (P < or = 0.01). Factors (F) II, V, VII and X stayed within the normal range, while F VIII and F IX were elevated. During the entire period of induction therapy, the ATIII activity remained within the normal range in both treatment groups. The protein C values, however, demonstrated a steady decline from 140% at start of ASP treatment to a mean of 81% and 93%, respectively, at the end of the ASP therapy in the E. coli and Erwinia group. Five of the ten children treated with E. coli ASP demonstrated protein C levels below 70% at the end of ASP therapy, opposed to none of the Erwinia treated patients (P = 0.03). We suggest that the effect of ASP resulting in decreased coagulation factor synthesis is in part counterbalanced by the effect of prednisone on the coagulation system, when ASP is administered at the end of ALL induction treatment. The overall effect of ASP either of E. coli or of Erwinia on the hemorrhagic system reveals a slight imbalance towards thrombosis, mainly because of a gradual decrease in protein C activity. This imbalance is less pronounced in the Erwinia group. PMID:8058004

  19. Deep Characterization of the Microbiomes of Calophya spp. (Hemiptera: Calophyidae) Gall-Inducing Psyllids Reveals the Absence of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria and Three Dominant Endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria associated with sap-feeding insect herbivores include not only symbionts that may increase their hosts’ fitness but also harmful plant pathogens. Calophya spp. gall-inducing psyllids (Hemiptera: Calophyidae) are being investigated for their potential as biological control agents of the noxious weed, Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolia), in Florida. Although there are no examples of plant pathogen transmission by members of the family Calophyidae, several insects in the superfamily Psylloidea are known to transmit pathogenic bacteria in the genera Candidatus Liberibacter and Candidatus Phytoplasma. To determine whether Calophya spp. harbor potentially harmful plant pathogenic bacteria, we sequenced small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons generated from individuals from four Calophya spp. populations. All microbial SSU gene sequences fell into the bacterial domain, with 98-99% belonging to the Proteobacteria. The Calophya microbiomes contained a relatively simple community, with 49-79 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97%) detected, and only 5-8 OTUs with greater than 1% abundance. Candidatus Carsonella showed the highest relative abundance, with OTUs from this candidate genus representing between 51 – 65% of all recovered sequences. The next most abundant clade observed was an unclassified Enterobacteriacae group closely related to bacteria from the genera Buchnera and Blochmannia that ranged from 20-31% in relative abundance. Wolbachia populations were the third most abundant group and represented 7-27% of the diversity in microbial OTUs. No SSU rRNA gene sequences from putative pathogenic bacteria from the genera Ca. Liberibacter or Ca. Phytoplasma were detected in the microbiomes of the four Calophya populations. The probability that infected psyllids were present in our colonies, but were not sampled, was extremley low (1.39 x 10-10). As far as we are aware, our study is the first to characterize the microbiome of a

  20. Deep Characterization of the Microbiomes of Calophya spp. (Hemiptera: Calophyidae) Gall-Inducing Psyllids Reveals the Absence of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria and Three Dominant Endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Overholt, Will A; Diaz, Rodrigo; Rosskopf, Erin; Green, Stefan J; Overholt, William A

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria associated with sap-feeding insect herbivores include not only symbionts that may increase their hosts' fitness but also harmful plant pathogens. Calophya spp. gall-inducing psyllids (Hemiptera: Calophyidae) are being investigated for their potential as biological control agents of the noxious weed, Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolia), in Florida. Although there are no examples of plant pathogen transmission by members of the family Calophyidae, several insects in the superfamily Psylloidea are known to transmit pathogenic bacteria in the genera Candidatus Liberibacter and Candidatus Phytoplasma. To determine whether Calophya spp. harbor potentially harmful plant pathogenic bacteria, we sequenced small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons generated from individuals from four Calophya spp. populations: All microbial SSU gene sequences fell into the bacterial domain, with 98-99% belonging to the Proteobacteria. The Calophya microbiomes contained a relatively simple community, with 49-79 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97%) detected, and only 5-8 OTUs with greater than 1% abundance. Candidatus Carsonella showed the highest relative abundance, with OTUs from this candidate genus representing between 51-65% of all recovered sequences. The next most abundant clade observed was an unclassified Enterobacteriacae group closely related to bacteria from the genera Buchnera and Blochmannia that ranged from 20-31% in relative abundance. Wolbachia populations were the third most abundant group and represented 7-27% of the diversity in microbial OTUs. No SSU rRNA gene sequences from putative pathogenic bacteria from the genera Ca. Liberibacter or Ca. Phytoplasma were detected in the microbiomes of the four Calophya populations. The probability that infected psyllids were present in our colonies, but were not sampled, was extremley low (1.39 x 10(-10)). As far as we are aware, our study is the first to characterize the microbiome of a candidate

  1. PcExl1 a Novel Acid Expansin-Like Protein from the Plant Pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum, Binds Cell Walls Differently to BsEXLX1

    PubMed Central

    Olarte-Lozano, Miguel; Mendoza-Nuñez, Mario A.; Pastor, Nina; Segovia, Lorenzo; Folch-Mallol, Jorge; Martínez-Anaya, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Microbial expansins act on plant cell walls similarly to plant expansins, albeit their loosening activity levels are tenfold lesser compared to plant expansins. We report the characterization of an expansin-like gene from the plant pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum, named exl1. PcExl1 is an acidic protein that binds cellulose (Avicel), and weakens filter paper. The acidic nature of PcExl1 confers different binding properties when compared to Bacillus subtilis BsEXLX1, which is a basic protein. PcExl1 binding to wheat cell wall increased when acidic components were depleted, reaching a similar level to the binding to Avicel, indicating that cellulose is the target of PcExl1. PMID:24755657

  2. Effect of Pleurotus ostreatus and Erwinia carotovora on wheat straw digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, C.L.; Conway, K.E.; Horn, G.W.

    1981-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether growing Pleurotus ostreatus and Erwinia carotovora on wheat straw would synergistically improve the digestibility of straw and whether there was a necessity of sterilizing the straw by autoclaving prior to inoculation. Dry matter decomposition of autoclaved and non-autoclaved straw was similar when both organisms were used in the system after 28 days incubation. However, in vitro ruminal dry matter digestibility of straw was significantly improved (P less than 10) only when the straw was autoclaved prior to inoculation with both organisms. (Refs. 21).

  3. Molecular Profiling of the Phytophthora plurivora Secretome: A Step towards Understanding the Cross-Talk between Plant Pathogenic Oomycetes and Their Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Frank; Dalio, Ronaldo J. D.; Di Maro, Antimo; Scognamiglio, Monica; Fiorentino, Antonio; Parente, Augusto; Osswald, Wolfgang; Chambery, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying host–pathogen interactions in plant diseases is of crucial importance to gain insights on different virulence strategies of pathogens and unravel their role in plant immunity. Among plant pathogens, Phytophthora species are eliciting a growing interest for their considerable economical and environmental impact. Plant infection by Phytophthora phytopathogens is a complex process coordinated by a plethora of extracellular signals secreted by both host plants and pathogens. The characterization of the repertoire of effectors secreted by oomycetes has become an active area of research for deciphering molecular mechanisms responsible for host plants colonization and infection. Putative secreted proteins by Phytophthora species have been catalogued by applying high-throughput genome-based strategies and bioinformatic approaches. However, a comprehensive analysis of the effective secretome profile of Phytophthora is still lacking. Here, we report the first large-scale profiling of P. plurivora secretome using a shotgun LC-MS/MS strategy. To gain insight on the molecular signals underlying the cross-talk between plant pathogenic oomycetes and their host plants, we also investigate the quantitative changes of secreted protein following interaction of P. plurivora with the root exudate of Fagus sylvatica which is highly susceptible to the root pathogen. We show that besides known effectors, the expression and/or secretion levels of cell-wall-degrading enzymes were altered following the interaction with the host plant root exudate. In addition, a characterization of the F. sylvatica root exudate was performed by NMR and amino acid analysis, allowing the identification of the main released low-molecular weight components, including organic acids and free amino acids. This study provides important insights for deciphering the extracellular network involved in the highly susceptible P. plurivora-F. sylvatica interaction

  4. Cell cycle and cell death are not necessary for appressorium formation and plant infection in the fungal plant pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Nesher, Iris; Barhoom, Sima; Sharon, Amir

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to initiate plant infection, fungal spores must germinate and penetrate into the host plant. Many fungal species differentiate specialized infection structures called appressoria on the host surface, which are essential for successful pathogenic development. In the model plant pathogen Magnaporthe grisea completion of mitosis and autophagy cell death of the spore are necessary for appressoria-mediated plant infection; blocking of mitosis prevents appressoria formation, and prevention of autophagy cell death results in non-functional appressoria. Results We found that in the closely related plant pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, blocking of the cell cycle did not prevent spore germination and appressoria formation. The cell cycle always lagged behind the morphogenetic changes that follow spore germination, including germ tube and appressorium formation, differentiation of the penetrating hypha, and in planta formation of primary hyphae. Nuclear division was arrested following appressorium formation and was resumed in mature appressoria after plant penetration. Unlike in M. grisea, blocking of mitosis had only a marginal effect on appressoria formation; development in hydroxyurea-treated spores continued only for a limited number of cell divisions, but normal numbers of fully developed mature appressoria were formed under conditions that support appressoria formation. Similar results were also observed in other Colletotrichum species. Spores, germ tubes, and appressoria retained intact nuclei and remained viable for several days post plant infection. Conclusion We showed that in C. gloeosporioides the differentiation of infection structures including appressoria precedes mitosis and can occur without nuclear division. This phenomenon was also found to be common in other Colletotrichum species. Spore cell death did not occur during plant infection and the fungus primary infection structures remained viable throughout the infection cycle

  5. The Genomes of the Fungal Plant Pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum Reveal Adaptation to Different Hosts and Lifestyles But Also Signatures of Common Ancestry

    SciTech Connect

    de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; van der Burgt, Ate; Okmen, Bilal; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Beenen, Henriek G.; Chettri, Oranav; Cos, Murray P.; Datema, Erwin; de Vries, Ronald P.; DHillon, Braham; Ganley, Austen R.; Griffiths, Scott A.; Guo, Yanan; Gamelin, Richard C.; Henrissat, Bernard; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Kema, Gert; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lapidus, Alla; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ohm, Robin A.; Owen, Timothy J.; Salamov, Asaf; Schwelm, Arne; Schijlen, Elio; Sun, Hui; van den Burg, Harrold A.; van Burg, Roeland C. H. J.; Zhang, Shuguang; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Collemare, Jerome; Bradshaw, Rosie E.

    2012-05-04

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of the Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum (Cfu) (syn. Passalora fulva) and Dothistroma septosporum (Dse) that are closely related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and hosts. Although both fungi grow extracellularly in close contact with host mesophyll cells, Cfu is a biotroph infecting tomato, while Dse is a hemibiotroph infecting pine. The genomes of these fungi have a similar set of genes (70percent of gene content in both genomes are homologs), but differ significantly in size (Cfu >61.1-Mb; Dse 31.2-Mb), which is mainly due to the difference in repeat content (47.2percent in Cfu versus 3.2percent in Dse). Recent adaptation to different lifestyles and hosts is suggested by diverged sets of genes. Cfu contains an tomatinase gene that we predict might be required for detoxification of tomatine, while this gene is absent in Dse. Many genes encoding secreted proteins are unique to each species and the repeat-rich areas in Cfu are enriched for these species-specific genes. In contrast, conserved genes suggest common host ancestry. Homologs of Cfu effector genes, including Ecp2 and Avr4, are present in Dse and induce a Cf-Ecp2- and Cf-4-mediated hypersensitive response, respectively. Strikingly, genes involved in production of the toxin dothistromin, a likely virulence factor for Dse, are conserved in Cfu, but their expression differs markedly with essentially no expression by Cfu in planta. Likewise, Cfu has a carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalog that is more similar to that of necrotrophs or hemibiotrophs and a larger pectinolytic gene arsenal than Dse, but many of these genes are not expressed in planta or are pseudogenized. Overall, comparison of their genomes suggests that these closely related plant pathogens had a common ancestral host but since adapted to different hosts and lifestyles by a combination of differentiated gene content, pseudogenization, and gene regulation.

  6. The Genomes of the Fungal Plant Pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum Reveal Adaptation to Different Hosts and Lifestyles But Also Signatures of Common Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; van der Burgt, Ate; Ökmen, Bilal; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Beenen, Henriek G.; Chettri, Pranav; Cox, Murray P.; Datema, Erwin; de Vries, Ronald P.; Dhillon, Braham; Ganley, Austen R.; Griffiths, Scott A.; Guo, Yanan; Hamelin, Richard C.; Henrissat, Bernard; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Kema, Gert; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lapidus, Alla; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ohm, Robin A.; Owen, Timothy J.; Salamov, Asaf; Schwelm, Arne; Schijlen, Elio; Sun, Hui; van den Burg, Harrold A.; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Zhang, Shuguang; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Collemare, Jérôme; Bradshaw, Rosie E.

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of the Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum (Cfu) (syn. Passalora fulva) and Dothistroma septosporum (Dse) that are closely related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and hosts. Although both fungi grow extracellularly in close contact with host mesophyll cells, Cfu is a biotroph infecting tomato, while Dse is a hemibiotroph infecting pine. The genomes of these fungi have a similar set of genes (70% of gene content in both genomes are homologs), but differ significantly in size (Cfu >61.1-Mb; Dse 31.2-Mb), which is mainly due to the difference in repeat content (47.2% in Cfu versus 3.2% in Dse). Recent adaptation to different lifestyles and hosts is suggested by diverged sets of genes. Cfu contains an α-tomatinase gene that we predict might be required for detoxification of tomatine, while this gene is absent in Dse. Many genes encoding secreted proteins are unique to each species and the repeat-rich areas in Cfu are enriched for these species-specific genes. In contrast, conserved genes suggest common host ancestry. Homologs of Cfu effector genes, including Ecp2 and Avr4, are present in Dse and induce a Cf-Ecp2- and Cf-4-mediated hypersensitive response, respectively. Strikingly, genes involved in production of the toxin dothistromin, a likely virulence factor for Dse, are conserved in Cfu, but their expression differs markedly with essentially no expression by Cfu in planta. Likewise, Cfu has a carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalog that is more similar to that of necrotrophs or hemibiotrophs and a larger pectinolytic gene arsenal than Dse, but many of these genes are not expressed in planta or are pseudogenized. Overall, comparison of their genomes suggests that these closely related plant pathogens had a common ancestral host but since adapted to different hosts and lifestyles by a combination of differentiated gene content, pseudogenization, and gene regulation. PMID:23209441

  7. The genomes of the fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum reveal adaptation to different hosts and lifestyles but also signatures of common ancestry.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Pierre J G M; van der Burgt, Ate; Ökmen, Bilal; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A; Aerts, Andrea L; Bahkali, Ali H; Beenen, Henriek G; Chettri, Pranav; Cox, Murray P; Datema, Erwin; de Vries, Ronald P; Dhillon, Braham; Ganley, Austen R; Griffiths, Scott A; Guo, Yanan; Hamelin, Richard C; Henrissat, Bernard; Kabir, M Shahjahan; Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Kema, Gert; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lapidus, Alla; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ohm, Robin A; Owen, Timothy J; Salamov, Asaf; Schwelm, Arne; Schijlen, Elio; Sun, Hui; van den Burg, Harrold A; van Ham, Roeland C H J; Zhang, Shuguang; Goodwin, Stephen B; Grigoriev, Igor V; Collemare, Jérôme; Bradshaw, Rosie E

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of the Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum (Cfu) (syn. Passalora fulva) and Dothistroma septosporum (Dse) that are closely related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and hosts. Although both fungi grow extracellularly in close contact with host mesophyll cells, Cfu is a biotroph infecting tomato, while Dse is a hemibiotroph infecting pine. The genomes of these fungi have a similar set of genes (70% of gene content in both genomes are homologs), but differ significantly in size (Cfu >61.1-Mb; Dse 31.2-Mb), which is mainly due to the difference in repeat content (47.2% in Cfu versus 3.2% in Dse). Recent adaptation to different lifestyles and hosts is suggested by diverged sets of genes. Cfu contains an α-tomatinase gene that we predict might be required for detoxification of tomatine, while this gene is absent in Dse. Many genes encoding secreted proteins are unique to each species and the repeat-rich areas in Cfu are enriched for these species-specific genes. In contrast, conserved genes suggest common host ancestry. Homologs of Cfu effector genes, including Ecp2 and Avr4, are present in Dse and induce a Cf-Ecp2- and Cf-4-mediated hypersensitive response, respectively. Strikingly, genes involved in production of the toxin dothistromin, a likely virulence factor for Dse, are conserved in Cfu, but their expression differs markedly with essentially no expression by Cfu in planta. Likewise, Cfu has a carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalog that is more similar to that of necrotrophs or hemibiotrophs and a larger pectinolytic gene arsenal than Dse, but many of these genes are not expressed in planta or are pseudogenized. Overall, comparison of their genomes suggests that these closely related plant pathogens had a common ancestral host but since adapted to different hosts and lifestyles by a combination of differentiated gene content, pseudogenization, and gene regulation. PMID:23209441

  8. Inferring the Evolutionary History of the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae from Its Biogeography in Headwaters of Rivers in North America, Europe, and New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Vanneste, J. L.; Montarry, J.; Oakley, B.; Guilbaud, C.; Glaux, C.

    2010-01-01

    Nonhost environmental reservoirs of pathogens play key roles in their evolutionary ecology and in particular in the evolution of pathogenicity. In light of recent reports of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in pristine waters outside agricultural regions and its dissemination via the water cycle, we have examined the genetic and phenotypic diversity, population structure, and biogeography of P. syringae from headwaters of rivers on three continents and their phylogenetic relationship to strains from crops. A collection of 236 strains from 11 sites in the United States, in France, and in New Zealand was characterized for genetic diversity based on housekeeping gene sequences and for phenotypic diversity based on measures of pathogenicity and ice nucleation activity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed several new genetic clades from water. The genetic structure of P. syringae populations was not influenced by geographic location or water chemistry, whereas the phenotypic structure was affected by these parameters. Comparison with strains from crops revealed that the metapopulation of P. syringae is structured into three genetic ecotypes: a crop-specific type, a water-specific type, and an abundant ecotype found in both habitats. Aggressiveness of strains was significantly and positively correlated with ice nucleation activity. Furthermore, the ubiquitous genotypes were the most aggressive, on average. The abundance and diversity in water relative to crops suggest that adaptation to the freshwater habitat has played a nonnegligible role in the evolutionary history of P. syringae. We discuss how adaptation to the water cycle is linked to the epidemiological success of this plant pathogen. PMID:20802828

  9. Rapid and multiregional adaptation to host partial resistance in a plant pathogenic oomycete: evidence from European populations of Plasmopara viticola, the causal agent of grapevine downy mildew.

    PubMed

    Delmotte, François; Mestre, Pere; Schneider, Christophe; Kassemeyer, Hanns-Heinz; Kozma, Pál; Richart-Cervera, Sylvie; Rouxel, Mélanie; Delière, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Crop pathogens evolve rapidly to adapt to their hosts. The use of crops with quantitative disease resistance is expected to alter selection of pathogen life-history traits. This may result in differential adaptation of the pathogen to host cultivars and, sometimes, to the erosion of quantitative resistance. Here, we assessed the level of host adaptation in an oomycete plant pathogenic species. We analysed the phenotypic and genetic variability of 17 Plasmopara viticola isolates collected on Vitis vinifera and 35 isolates from partially resistant varieties (Regent and genotypes carrying the Rpv1 gene). Cross-inoculation experiments assessed two components of aggressiveness and a life-history trait of the pathogen: disease severity, sporangial production and sporangia size. The results contribute evidence to the emergence of P. viticola aggressive isolates presenting a high level of sporulation on the partially resistant Regent. By contrast, no adaptation to the Rpv1 gene was found in this study. The erosion of Regent resistance may have occurred in less than 5years and at least three times independently in three distant wine-producing areas. Populations from resistant varieties showed a significant increase in sporangia production capacity, indicating an absence of fitness costs for this adaptation. The increase in the number of sporangia was correlated with a reduction in sporangia size, a result which illustrates how partial plant disease resistance can impact selection of the pathogen's life-history traits. This case study on grapevine downy mildew shows how new plant pathogen populations emerge in agro-ecosystems by adapting to partial host resistance. This adaptive pattern highlights the need for wise management of plant partial disease resistance to ensure its sustainability over time. PMID:24184095

  10. Same ammo, different weapons: enzymatic extracts from two apple genotypes with contrasted susceptibilities to fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) differentially convert phloridzin and phloretin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Matthieu; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Guyot, Sylvain; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2013-11-01

    The necrogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora responsible for the fire blight disease causes cell death in apple tissues to enrich intercellular spaces with nutrients. Apple leaves contain large amounts of dihydrochalcones (DHCs), including phloridzin and its aglycone phloretin. Previous work showed an important decrease in the constitutive DHCs stock in infected leaves, probably caused by transformation reactions during the infection process. At least two flavonoid transformation pathways have been described so far: deglucosylation and oxidation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether DHCs are differentially converted in two apple genotypes displaying contrasted susceptibilities to the disease. Different analyses were performed: i) enzymatic activity assays in infected leaves, ii) identification/quantification of end-products obtained after in vitro enzymatic reactions with DHCs, iii) evaluation of the bactericidal activity of end-products. The results of the enzymatic assays showed that deglucosylation was dominant over oxidation in the susceptible genotype MM106 while the opposite was observed in the resistant genotype Evereste. These data were confirmed by LC-UV/Vis-MS analysis of in vitro reaction mixtures, especially because higher levels of o-quinoid oxidation products of phloretin were measured by using the enzymatic extracts of Evereste infected leaves. Their presence correlated well with a strong bactericidal activity of the reaction mixtures. Thus, our results suggest that a differential transformation of DHCs occur in apple genotypes with a potential involvement in the establishment of the susceptibility or the resistance to fire blight, through the release of glucose or of highly bactericidal compounds respectively. PMID:23561298

  11. Identification of a Bifunctional UDP-4-keto-pentose/UDP-xylose Synthase in the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum Strain GMI1000, a Distinct Member of the 4,6-Dehydratase and Decarboxylase Family*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaogang; Glushka, John; Yin, Yanbin; Xu, Ying; Denny, Timothy; Smith, James; Jiang, Yingnan; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2010-01-01

    The UDP-sugar interconverting enzymes involved in UDP-GlcA metabolism are well described in eukaryotes but less is known in prokaryotes. Here we identify and characterize a gene (RsU4kpxs) from Ralstonia solanacearum str. GMI1000, which encodes a dual function enzyme not previously described. One activity is to decarboxylate UDP-glucuronic acid to UDP-β-l-threo-pentopyranosyl-4″-ulose in the presence of NAD+. The second activity converts UDP-β-l-threo-pentopyranosyl-4″-ulose and NADH to UDP-xylose and NAD+, albeit at a lower rate. Our data also suggest that following decarboxylation, there is stereospecific protonation at the C5 pro-R position. The identification of the R. solanacearum enzyme enables us to propose that the ancestral enzyme of UDP-xylose synthase and UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase was diverged to two distinct enzymatic activities in early bacteria. This separation gave rise to the current UDP-xylose synthase in animal, fungus, and plant as well as to the plant Uaxs and bacterial ArnA and U4kpxs homologs. PMID:20118241

  12. Preliminary results on the ability of pentatomidae to transfer fire blight Erwinia amylovora under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Peusens, G; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Belien, T

    2013-01-01

    With their piercing-sucking mouthparts stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), a major pest in especially organic orchards, create wounds in fruit of pear trees. As Erwinia amylovora (Burrill, Winslow et al.), a wide spread bacterial disease affecting many rosaceous plants including pome fruit trees and hawthorn, enters through openings in flowers, leaves, shoots and fruit, feeding punctures caused by these bugs might be inoculated with Erwinia bacteria. In order to investigate the ability of the bugs Pentotoma rufipes L. and Polomena prasina L. to transmit fire blight, insects were caught in an organically managed orchard without fire blight, brought into contact with artificially inoculated immature pear fruit/slices and transferred to healthy, mechanically wounded pear fruit/slices. After an incubation period potential transmission of bacteria was examined by evaluation of symptom expression (necrosis, ooze production). To assess the presence of bacteria on the exoskeleton of the tested bugs, all bugs were forced to walk on a semiselective nutrient agar medium. In another experiment the viability of Ea on the exoskeleton was tested -after previous contact with ooze- through washing and plating of the wash water. All experiments were conducted under optimal climatological conditions and according to quarantine standards. Results demonstrated the ability of stink bugs to transfer E. amylovora to fruit and the viability of bacteria on stink bugs externally - both under lab conditions. PMID:25145257

  13. Pantoea agglomerans strain EH318 produces two antibiotics that inhibit Erwinia amylovora in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wright, S A; Zumoff, C H; Schneider, L; Beer, S V

    2001-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans (synonym: Erwinia herbicola) strain Eh318 produces through antibiosis a complex zone of inhibited growth in an overlay seeded with Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. This zone is caused by two antibiotics, named pantocin A and B. Using a genomic library of Eh318, two cosmids, pCPP702 and pCPP704, were identified that conferred on Escherichia coli the ability to inhibit growth of E. amylovora. The two cosmids conferred different antibiotic activities on E. coli DH5alpha and had distinct restriction enzyme profiles. A smaller, antibiotic-conferring DNA segment from each cosmid was cloned. Each subclone was characterized and mutagenized with transposons to generate clones that were deficient in conferring pantocin A and B production, respectively. Mutated subclones were introduced into Eh318 to create three antibiotic-defective marker exchange mutants: strain Eh421 (pantocin A deficient); strain Eh439 (pantocin B deficient), and Eh440 (deficient in both pantocins). Cross-hybridization results, restriction maps, and spectrum-of-activity data using the subclones and marker exchange mutants, supported the presence of two distinct antibiotics, pantocin A and pantocin B, whose biosynthetic genes were present in pCPP702 and pCPP704, respectively. The structure of pantocin A is unknown, whereas that of pantocin B has been determined as (R)-N-[((S)-2-amino-propanoylamino)-methyl]-2-methanesulfonyl-s uccina mic acid. The two pantocins mainly affect other enteric bacteria, based on limited testing. PMID:11133457

  14. Identification of genes differentially expressed during interaction of resistant and susceptible apple cultivars (Malus x domestica) with Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The necrogenic enterobacterium, Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the fire blight (FB) disease in many Rosaceae species, including apple and pear. During the infection process, the bacteria induce an oxidative stress response with kinetics similar to those induced in an incompatible bacteria-...

  15. TRANSGENIC EXPRESSION OF THE ERWINIA AMYLOVORA (FIRE BLIGHT) EFFECTOR PROTEIN EOP1 SUPRESSES HOST BASAL DEFENSE MECHANISMS IN MALUS (APPLE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) is the causative agent of fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear. Like many other plant and animal bacterial pathogens Ea utilizes a type three secretion system (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Once inside the host cell, effector protei...

  16. The chemically inducible expression of Erwinia amylovora bacterial effectors EopB1 and HopCEa in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease, utilizes a type three secretion system to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. To investigate the role of individual bacterial effector proteins, we have engineered an apple host that transgenically expresses the bacterial effe...

  17. Apple (Malus x domestica) transcriptome in response to the compatible pathogen Erwinia amylovora and the incompatible pathogen Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infiltration of Erwinia amylovora (Ea) into host leaves induces an oxidative burst similar to that observed during incompatible reactions associated with Hypersensitive Response (HR). However, the subsequent progressive development of necrosis in apple and other hosts is unlike an incompatible reac...

  18. Identification of volatile compounds produced by the bacterium Burkholderia tropica that inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    It has been documented that bacteria from the Burkholderia genera produce different kinds of compounds that inhibit plant pathogens, however in Burkholderia tropica, an endophytic diazotrophic and phosphate-solubilizing bacterium isolated from a wide diversity of plants, the capacity to produce antifungal compounds has not been evaluated. In order to expand our knowledge about Burkholderia tropica as a potential biological control agent, we analyzed 15 different strains of this bacterium to evaluate their capacities to inhibit the growth of four phytopathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolffsi. Diverse analytical techniques, including plant root protection and dish plate growth assays and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the fungal growth inhibition was intimately associated with the volatile compounds produced by B. tropica and, in particular, two bacterial strains (MTo293 and TTe203) exhibited the highest radial mycelial growth inhibition. Morphological changes associated with these compounds, such as disruption of fungal hyphae, were identified by using photomicrographic analysis. By using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique, 18 volatile compounds involved in the growth inhibition mechanism were identified, including α-pinene and limonene. In addition, we found a high proportion of bacterial strains that produced siderophores during growth with different carbon sources, such as alanine and glutamic acid; however, their roles in the antagonism mechanism remain unclear. PMID:23680857

  19. Dynamic regulation of GacA in type III secretion, pectinase gene expression, pellicle formation, and pathogenicity of Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937).

    PubMed

    Yang, Shihui; Peng, Quan; Zhang, Qiu; Yi, Xuan; Choi, Chang Jae; Reedy, Ralph M; Charkowski, Amy O; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937) secretes exoenzymes, including pectin-degrading enzymes, leading to the loss of structural integrity of plant cell walls. A type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for full virulence of this bacterium within plant hosts. The GacS/GacA two-component signal transduction system participates in important biological roles in several gram-negative bacteria. In this study, a gacA deletion mutant (Ech137) of D. dadantii was constructed to investigate the effect of this mutation on pathogenesis and other phenotypes. Compared with wild-type D. dadantii, Ech137 had a delayed biofilm-pellicle formation. The production of pectate lyase (Pel), protease, and cellulase was diminished in Ech137 compared with the wild-type cells. Reduced transcription of two endo-Pel genes, pelD and pelL, was found in Ech137 using a green fluorescence protein-based fluorescence-activated cell sorter promoter activity assay. In addition, the transcription of T3SS genes dspE (an effector), hrpA (a structural protein of the T3SS pilus), and hrpN (a T3SS harpin) was reduced in Ech137. A lower amount of rsmB regulatory RNA was found in gacA mutant Ech137 compared with the wild-type bacterium by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Compared with wild-type D. dadantii, a lower amount of hrpL mRNA was observed in Ech137 at 12 h grown in medium. Although the role of RsmA, rsmB, and RsmC in D. dadantii is not clear, from the regulatory pathway revealed in E. carotovora, the lower expression of dspE, hrpA, and hrpN in Ech137 may be due to a post-transcriptional regulation of hrpL through the Gac-Rsm regulatory pathway. Consequently, the reduced exoenzyme production and Pel gene expression in the mutant may be sue partially to the regulatory role of rsmB-RsmA on exoenzyme expression. Similar to in vitro results, a lower expression of T3SS and pectinase genes of Ech137 also was observed in bacterial cells inoculated into Saintpaulia

  20. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation provides insights into epigenetic regulation of fungal development in a plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Junhyun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Gir-Won; Park, Sook-Young; Huh, Aram; Dean, Ralph A.; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates development of plants and mammals. To investigate the roles of DNA methylation in fungal development, we profiled genome-wide methylation patterns at single-nucleotide resolution during vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, and infection-related morphogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. We found that DNA methylation occurs in and around genes as well as transposable elements and undergoes global reprogramming during fungal development. Such reprogramming of DNA methylation suggests that it may have acquired new roles other than controlling the proliferation of TEs. Genetic analysis of DNA methyltransferase deletion mutants also indicated that proper reprogramming in methylomes is required for asexual reproduction in the fungus. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis showed that DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional silencing of transposable elements and transcript abundance of genes in context-dependent manner, reinforcing the role of DNA methylation as a genome defense mechanism. This comprehensive approach suggests that DNA methylation in fungi can be a dynamic epigenetic entity contributing to fungal development and genome defense. Furthermore, our DNA methylomes provide a foundation for future studies exploring this key epigenetic modification in fungal development and pathogenesis. PMID:25708804

  1. Plant-Pathogen Interaction-Related MicroRNAs and Their Targets Provide Indicators of Phytoplasma Infection in Paulownia tomentosa × Paulownia fortunei.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guoqiang; Niu, Suyan; Xu, Tong; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Wang, Yuanlong; Cao, Lin; Wang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) caused by a phytoplasma, has caused extensive losses in the yields of paulownia timber and resulted in significant economic losses. However, the molecular mechanisms in Paulownia that underlie the phytoplasma stress are poorly characterized. In this study, we use an Illumina platform to sequence four small RNA libraries and four degradome sequencing libraries derived from healthy, PaWB-infected, and PaWB-infected 15 mg·L-1 and 30 mg·L-1 methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-treated plants. In total, 125 conserved and 118 novel microRNAs (miRNAs) were identified and 33 miRNAs responsive to PaWB disease were discovered. Furthermore, 166 target genes for 18 PaWB disease-related miRNAs were obtained, and found to be involved in plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormone signal transduction metabolic pathways. Eleven miRNAs and target genes responsive to PaWB disease were examined by a quantitative real-time PCR approach. Our findings will contribute to studies on miRNAs and their targets in Paulownia, and provide new insights to further understand plant-phytoplasma interactions. PMID:26484670

  2. Three genes for metabolism of the phytoalexin maackiain in the plant pathogen Nectria haematococca: Meiotic instability and relationship to a new gene for pisatin demethylase

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, V.P.W.; Vanetten, H.D. )

    1992-03-01

    Some isolates of the plant-pathogenic fungus Nectria haematococca mating population (MP) VI metabolize maackiain and medicarpin, two antimicrobial compounds (phytoalexins) synthesized by chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). The enzymatic modifications by the fungus convert the phytoalexins to less toxic derivatives, and this detoxification has been proposed to be important for pathogenesis on chickpea. In the present study, loci controlling maackiain metabolism (Mak genes) were identified by crosses among isolates of N. haematococca MP VI that differed in their ability to metabolize the phytoalexin. Strains carrying Mak1 or Mak2 converted maackiain to 1a-hydroxymaackiain, while those with Mak3 converted it to 6a-hydroxymaackiain. Mak1 and Mak2 were unusual in that they often failed to be inherited by progeny. Mak1 was closely linked to Pda6, a new member in a family of genes in N. haematococca MP VI that encode enzymes for detoxification of pisatin, the phytoalexin synthesized by garden pea. Like Mak1, Pda6 was also transmitted irregularly to progeny. Although the unusual meiotic behaviors of some Mak genes complicate genetic analysis, identification of these genes should afford a more thorough evaluation of the role of phytoalexin detoxification in the pathogenesis of N. haematococca MP VI on chickpea.

  3. Recent range expansion and agricultural landscape heterogeneity have only minimal effect on the spatial genetic structure of the plant pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    PubMed

    Rieux, A; De Lapeyre De Bellaire, L; Zapater, M-F; Ravigne, V; Carlier, J

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how geographical and environmental features affect genetic variation at both the population and individual levels is crucial in biology, especially in the case of pathogens. However, distinguishing between these factors and the effects of historical range expansion on spatial genetic structure remains challenging. In the present study, we investigated the case of Mycosphaerella fijiensis-a plant pathogenic fungus that has recently colonized an agricultural landscape characterized by the presence of potential barriers to gene flow, including several commercial plantations in which disease control practises such as the use of fungicides are applied frequently, and low host density areas. We first genotyped 300 isolates sampled at a global scale on untreated plants in two dimensions over a 50 × 80-km area. Using two different clustering algorithms, no genetic structure was detected in the studied area, suggesting expansion of large populations and/or no influence of potential barriers. Second, we investigated the potential effect of disease control practises on M. fijiensis diversity by comparing populations sampled in commercial vs food-crop plantations. At this local scale, we detected significantly higher allelic richness inside commercial plantations compared with the surrounding food-crop plantation populations. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that 99% of the total genetic variance occurred within populations. We discuss the suggestion that high population size and/or high migration rate between populations might be responsible for the absence of any effect of disease control practises on genetic diversity and differentiation. PMID:22990310

  4. Identification of Genetic Variation between Obligate Plant Pathogens Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli Using RNA Sequencing and Genotyping-By-Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Summers, Carly F; Gulliford, Colwyn M; Carlson, Craig H; Lillis, Jacquelyn A; Carlson, Maryn O; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Gent, David H; Smart, Christine D

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) were used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification from two economically important obligate plant pathogens, Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli. Twenty isolates of P. cubensis and 19 isolates of P. humuli were genotyped using RNA-seq and GBS. Principle components analysis (PCA) of each data set showed genetic separation between the two species. Additionally, results supported previous findings that P. cubensis isolates from squash are genetically distinct from cucumber and cantaloupe isolates. A PCA-based procedure was used to identify SNPs correlated with the separation of the two species, with 994 and 4,231 PCA-correlated SNPs found within the RNA-seq and GBS data, respectively. The corresponding unigenes (n = 800) containing these potential species-specific SNPs were then annotated and 135 putative pathogenicity genes, including 3 effectors, were identified. The characterization of genes containing SNPs differentiating these two closely related downy mildew species may contribute to the development of improved detection and diagnosis strategies and improve our understanding of host specificity pathways. PMID:26599440

  5. Piper nigrum Leaf and Stem Assisted Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles and Evaluation of Its Antibacterial Activity Against Agricultural Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Paulkumar, Kanniah; Gnanajobitha, Gnanadhas; Vanaja, Mahendran; Rajeshkumar, Shanmugam; Malarkodi, Chelladurai; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Annadurai, Gurusamy

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of biological materials in synthesis of nanoparticles is one of the hottest topics in modern nanoscience and nanotechnology. In the present investigation, the silver nanoparticles were synthesized by using the leaf and stem extract of Piper nigrum. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The observation of the peak at 460 nm in the UV-vis spectra for leaf- and stem-synthesized silver nanoparticles reveals the reduction of silver metal ions into silver nanoparticles. Further, XRD analysis has been carried out to confirm the crystalline nature of the synthesized silver nanoparticles. The TEM images show that the leaf- and stem-synthesized silver nanoparticles were within the size of about 7–50 nm and 9–30 nm, respectively. The FTIR analysis was performed to identify the possible functional groups involved in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Further, the antibacterial activity of the green-synthesized silver nanoparticles was examined against agricultural plant pathogens. The antibacterial property of silver nanoparticles is a beneficial application in the field of agricultural nanotechnology. PMID:24558336

  6. Identification of Genetic Variation between Obligate Plant Pathogens Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli Using RNA Sequencing and Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Carly F.; Gulliford, Colwyn M.; Carlson, Craig H.; Lillis, Jacquelyn A.; Carlson, Maryn O.; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Gent, David H.; Smart, Christine D.

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) were used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification from two economically important obligate plant pathogens, Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli. Twenty isolates of P. cubensis and 19 isolates of P. humuli were genotyped using RNA-seq and GBS. Principle components analysis (PCA) of each data set showed genetic separation between the two species. Additionally, results supported previous findings that P. cubensis isolates from squash are genetically distinct from cucumber and cantaloupe isolates. A PCA-based procedure was used to identify SNPs correlated with the separation of the two species, with 994 and 4,231 PCA-correlated SNPs found within the RNA-seq and GBS data, respectively. The corresponding unigenes (n = 800) containing these potential species-specific SNPs were then annotated and 135 putative pathogenicity genes, including 3 effectors, were identified. The characterization of genes containing SNPs differentiating these two closely related downy mildew species may contribute to the development of improved detection and diagnosis strategies and improve our understanding of host specificity pathways. PMID:26599440

  7. Expression of a mineral phosphate solubilizing gene from Erwinia herbicola in two rhizobacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, H; Gonzalez, T; Selman, G

    2001-11-30

    A genetic construction was carried out using the broad host range vector pKT230 and plasmid pMCG898, which encodes the Erwinia herbicola pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) synthase, a gene involved in mineral phosphate solubilization (mps). The final construction was transformed and expressed in Escherichia coli MC1061, and the recombinant plasmids were transferred to Burkholderia cepacia IS-16 and Pseudomonas sp. PSS recipient cells by conjugation. Clones containing recombinant plasmids produced higher clearing halos in plates with insoluble phosphate as the unique (P) source, in comparison with those of strains without plasmids, demonstrating the heterologous expression of the E. herbicola gene in the recipient strains. This genetic manipulation allowed the increase in mps ability of both strains, enhancing their potentialities as growth promoters of agricultural crops. These results represent the first report on the application of the recombinant DNA methodology for the obtaining of improved phosphate solubilizing ability from rhizobacterial strains for biofertilization purposes. PMID:11090687

  8. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi osmoprotectant transporter gene ousA.

    PubMed Central

    Gouesbet, G; Trautwetter, A; Bonnassie, S; Wu, L F; Blanco, C

    1996-01-01

    Growth of Erwinia chrysanthemi in media of elevated osmolarity can be achieved by the uptake and accumulation of various osmoprotectants. This study deals with the cloning and sequencing of the ousA gene-encoded osmoprotectant uptake system A from E. chrysanthemi 3937. OusA belongs to the superfamily of solute ion cotransporters. This osmotically inducible system allows the uptake of glycine betaine, proline, ectoine, and pipecolic acid and presents strong similarities in nucleotide sequence and protein function with the proline/betaine porter of Escherichia coli encoded by proP. The control of ousA expression is clearly different from that of proP. It is induced by osmotic strength and repressed by osmoprotectants. Its expression in E. coli is controlled by H-NS and is rpoS dependent in the exponential phase but unaffected by the stationary phase. PMID:8550465

  9. Flavohaemoglobin HmpX: a new pathogenicity determinant in Erwinia chrysanthemi strain 3937.

    PubMed

    Favey, S; Labesse, G; Vouille, V; Boccara, M

    1995-04-01

    Unlike wild-type Erwinia chrysanthemi strain 3937, which fully macerates inoculated Saintpaulia plants, HmpX- mutants produce necrotic lesions or no symptoms. The hmpX gene was sequenced and the corresponding protein sequence analysed. We show that HmpX belongs to a family of flavohaemoproteins (HMP), previously identified in two yeasts and in Escherichia coli. Comparisons of protein sequences at the secondary structure level by hydrophobic cluster analysis have shown that HmpX possesses two functional regions, a haemoglobin domain in its N-terminal part and a flavin reductase domain in its C-terminal part. In an HmpX- strain, the synthesis of pectate lyases, which are pathogenicity determinants in E. chrysanthemi, was reduced in conditions of low oxygen tension. Using gus fusion in hmpX, it was shown that hmpX transcription was induced in coculture with tobacco cells. A putative function for HmpX is discussed. PMID:7773389

  10. Role of endoglucanases in Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 virulence on Saintpaulia ionantha.

    PubMed

    Boccara, M; Aymeric, J L; Camus, C

    1994-03-01

    The role of endoglucanases (endoglucanases Z and Y) in Erwinia chrysanthemi pathogenicity on Saintpaulia ionantha was assessed by mutagenizing cloned cel genes (celZ and celY) and recombining them with the chromosomal alleles. Strains with an omega interposon in celZ, a deletion in celY, or a double cel mutant were as virulent as the wild-type strain. However, in the strain with a deletion in celY, a delay in the appearance of symptoms was observed, and then maceration progressed as in plants infected with the wild-type strain, suggesting that E. chrysanthemi endoglucanases play a minor role in soft rot disease development. PMID:8113196

  11. Systemic virulence of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 requires a functional iron assimilation system.

    PubMed

    Enard, C; Diolez, A; Expert, D

    1988-06-01

    In Erwinia chrysanthemi, conditions of iron starvation initiate production of a catechol-type siderophore and enhance production of three outer membrane polypeptides. Twenty-two mutants affected in the different stages of this iron assimilation system were isolated by mini-Mu insertion mutagenesis. All of them failed to induce systemic soft rot on axenically grown Saintpaulia plants. From the siderophore auxotrophs and the iron uptake mutants, clones having recovered the missing function(s) were isolated by using the in vivo cloning vector pULB113 (RP4::mini-Mu). An R-prime plasmid containing a ca. 35.5-kilobase-pair DNA insert was identified. Restoration of the iron functions restored partially, if not completely, the virulence of the parental strain. PMID:3372473

  12. Ultrastructural alterations of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica caused by treatment with aluminum chloride and sodium metabisulfite.

    PubMed

    Yaganza, Elian-Simplice; Rioux, Danny; Simard, Marie; Arul, Joseph; Tweddell, Russell J

    2004-11-01

    Aluminum and bisulfite salts inhibit the growth of several fungi and bacteria, and their application effectively controls potato soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora. In an effort to understand their inhibitory action, ultrastructural changes in Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica after exposure (0 to 20 min) to different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 M) of these salts were examined by using transmission electron microscopy. Plasma membrane integrity was evaluated by using the SYTOX Green fluorochrome that penetrates only cells with altered membranes. Bacteria exposed to all aluminum chloride concentrations, especially 0.2 M, exhibited loosening of the cell walls, cell wall rupture, cytoplasmic aggregation, and an absence of extracellular vesicles. Sodium metabisulfite caused mainly a retraction of plasma membrane and cellular voids which were more pronounced with increasing concentration. Bacterial mortality was closely associated with SYTOX stain absorption when bacteria were exposed to either a high concentration (0.2 M) of aluminum chloride or prolonged exposure (20 min) to 0.05 M aluminum chloride or to a pH of 2.5. Bacteria exposed to lower concentrations of aluminum chloride (0.05 and 0.1 M) for 10 min or less, or to metabisulfite at all concentrations, did not exhibit significant stain absorption, suggesting that no membrane damage occurred or it was too weak to allow the penetration of the stain into the cell. While mortality caused by aluminum chloride involves membrane damage and subsequent cytoplasmic aggregation, sulfite exerts its effect intracellularly; it is transported across the membrane by free diffusion of molecular SO2 with little damage to the cellular membrane. PMID:15528547

  13. Characterization of a novel phenazine antibiotic gene cluster in Erwinia herbicola Eh1087.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Stephen R; Feng, Yunjiang; Mahanty, H Khris

    2002-08-01

    Erwinia herbicola strain Eh1087 produces the broad-spectrum phenazine antibiotic D-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA). In this report, a cluster of 16 ehp (Erwinia herbicola phenazine) plasmid genes required for the production of AGA by Eh1087 is described. The extent of the gene cluster was revealed by the isolation of 82 different Eh1087 AGA- mutants, all found to possess single mini-Tn5lacZ2 insertions within a 14 kbp DNA region. Additional transposon insertions that did not affect antibiotic production by Eh1087 were created to define the boundaries of the gene cluster. The size and location of genes between these boundaries were derived from a combination of DNA sequence analyses, minicell protein analyses and the correlation between mutation position and the production of coloured AGA intermediates by many ehp mutants. Precursor-feeding and complementation experiments resulted in 15 ehp genes being assigned to one of four functional groups according to their role in the synthesis of AGA. Group 1 is required for the synthesis of the phenazine nucleus in the form of antibiotic precursor one (AP1, phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylic acid). Group 2 is responsible for conversion of AP1 to AP2, which is subsequently modified to AP3 (griseoluteic acid) and exported by the group 3 gene products. Group 4 catalyses the addition of D-alanine to AP3 to create AGA, independently of groups 1, 2 and 3. A gene that is divergently transcribed from the 15 AGA synthesis ehp genes confers resistance to AGA. PMID:12139622

  14. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example. PMID:25789570

  15. [Effects of mitomycin C on the expression and transport of ice-nuclei proteins of Erwinia herbicola].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-Sen; Gao, Xiu-Zhi; Yan, Ya-Li; Song, Li-Ping; Pang, Guang-Chang; Guo, Shu-Hua

    2005-05-01

    Abstract: In this paper, Mitomycin C (MMC) was added to different kinds of medium to study the effects of different cultural conditions on the Erwinia herbicola 10025A. For the first time it was confirmed that the expressed activity of the ice-nuclei active protein was different from its transportable manner from the ice nucleation active bacteria (Erwinia herbicola 10025A). The findings indicated that MMC could stimulate the SOS response,and induce the synthesis of some enzymes and proteins, which take part in repairing the damaged DNA. The effects of the MMC on the E. herbicola under different media were different. It could increase the ice nucleation activity of the E. herbicola, forming new small vesicles, which are secreted to the outside of membrane. The importance of this research for study the living mechanism of cells ander poor condition was discussed. PMID:16018268

  16. Acyl-homoserine lactones from Erwinia psidii R. IBSBF 435T, a guava phytopathogen (Psidium guajava L.).

    PubMed

    Pomini, Armando M; Manfio, Gilson P; Araújo, Welington L; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2005-08-10

    The phytopathogen Erwinia psidii R. IBSBF 435T causes rot in branches, flowers, and fruits of guava (Psidium guajava L.), being responsible for crop losses, and has no effective control. It was demonstrated that this strain produces two compounds [S-(-)-N-hexanoyl and N-heptanoyl-homoserine lactone], both belonging to the class of quorum-sensing signaling substances. A protocol using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection with chiral stationary phase is described for the absolute configuration determination of a natural acyl-homoserine lactone. Biological assays with specific reporter and synthesis of identified substances are also described. This is the first report on the N-heptanoyl-homoserine lactone occurrence in the Erwinia genus. PMID:16076103

  17. Biosynthesis of the antimetabolite 6-thioguanine in Erwinia amylovora plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sébastien; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Litomska, Agnieszka; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-09-27

    Sulfur for fire: The molecular basis for the biosynthesis of the antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG) was unveiled in Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight. Bioinformatics, heterologous pathway reconstitution in E. coli, and mutational analyses indicate that the protein YcfA mediates guanine thionation in analogy to 2-thiouridylase. Assays in planta and in cell cultures reveal for the first time a crucial role of 6TG in fire blight pathogenesis. PMID:24038828

  18. Reduced genetic variation occurs among genes of the highly clonal plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, including the effector gene avrBs2.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Gale; Ritchie, David; Kousik, C S; Bergelson, Joy

    2005-05-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, also known as Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria group A, is the causal agent of bacterial spot in pepper and tomato. In order to test different models that may explain the coevolution of avrBs2 with its host plants, we sequenced avrBs2 and six chromosomal loci (total of 5.5 kb per strain) from a global sample of 55 X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria strains collected from diseased peppers. We found an extreme lack of genetic variation among all X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria genomic loci (average nucleotide diversity, pi = 9.1 x 10(-5)), including avrBs2. This lack of diversity is consistent with X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria having undergone a recent population bottleneck and/or selective sweep followed by population expansion. Coalescent analysis determined that approximately 1.4 x 10(4) to 7.16 x 10(4) bacterial generations have passed since the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the current X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria population. Assuming a range of 50 to 500 bacterial generations per year, only 28 to 1,432 years have passed since the MRCA. This time frame coincides with human intervention with the pathogen's host plants, from domestication to modern agricultural practices. Examination of 19 mutated (loss-of-function) avrBs2 alleles detected nine classes of mutations. All mutations affected protein coding, while no synonymous changes were found. The nature of at least one of the avrBs2 mutations suggests that it may be possible to observe one stage of an evolutionary arms race as X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria responds to selection pressure to alter avrBs2 to escape host plant resistance. PMID:15870329

  19. Reduced Genetic Variation Occurs among Genes of the Highly Clonal Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, Including the Effector Gene avrBs2

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Gale; Ritchie, David; Kousik, C. S.; Bergelson, Joy

    2005-01-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, also known as Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria group A, is the causal agent of bacterial spot in pepper and tomato. In order to test different models that may explain the coevolution of avrBs2 with its host plants, we sequenced avrBs2 and six chromosomal loci (total of 5.5 kb per strain) from a global sample of 55 X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria strains collected from diseased peppers. We found an extreme lack of genetic variation among all X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria genomic loci (average nucleotide diversity, π = 9.1 × 10−5), including avrBs2. This lack of diversity is consistent with X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria having undergone a recent population bottleneck and/or selective sweep followed by population expansion. Coalescent analysis determined that approximately 1.4 × 104 to 7.16 × 104 bacterial generations have passed since the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the current X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria population. Assuming a range of 50 to 500 bacterial generations per year, only 28 to 1,432 years have passed since the MRCA. This time frame coincides with human intervention with the pathogen's host plants, from domestication to modern agricultural practices. Examination of 19 mutated (loss-of-function) avrBs2 alleles detected nine classes of mutations. All mutations affected protein coding, while no synonymous changes were found. The nature of at least one of the avrBs2 mutations suggests that it may be possible to observe one stage of an evolutionary arms race as X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria responds to selection pressure to alter avrBs2 to escape host plant resistance. PMID:15870329

  20. Structure of the Full-Length Bacteriophytochrome from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris Provides Clues to its Long-Range Signaling Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Klinke, Sebastián; Rinaldi, Jimena; Velázquez-Escobar, Francisco; Mroginski, María Andrea; Fernández López, María; Malamud, Florencia; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Hildebrandt, Peter; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy

    2016-09-25

    Phytochromes constitute a major superfamily of light-sensing proteins that are reversibly photoconverted between a red-absorbing (Pr) and a far-red-absorbing (Pfr) state. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are found among photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria, including pathogens. To date, several BphPs have been biophysically characterized. However, it is still not fully understood how structural changes are propagated from the photosensory module to the output module during the signal transduction event. Most phytochromes share a common architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensor that includes the PAS2-GAF-PHY domain triad and a C-terminal variable output module. Here we present the crystal structure of the full-length BphP from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (XccBphP) bearing its photosensor and its complete output module, a PAS9 domain. In the crystals, the protein was found to be in the Pr state, whereas diffraction data together with resonance Raman spectroscopic and theoretical results indicate a ZZZssa and a ZZEssa chromophore configuration corresponding to a mixture of Pr and Meta-R state, the precursor of Pfr. The XccBphP quaternary assembly reveals a head-to-head dimer in which the output module contributes to the helical dimer interface. The photosensor, which is shown to be a bathy-like BphP, is influenced in its dark reactions by the output module. Our structural analyses suggest that the photoconversion between the Pr and Pfr states in the full-length XccBphP may involve changes in the relative positioning of the output module. This work contributes to understand the light-induced structural changes propagated from the photosensor to the output modules in phytochrome signaling. PMID:27107635

  1. Global Analysis of the HrpL Regulon in the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 Reveals New Regulon Members with Diverse Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hanh N.; Chakravarthy, Suma; Wei, Hai-Lei; BuiNguyen, HoangChuong; Stodghill, Paul V.; Collmer, Alan; Swingle, Bryan M.; Cartinhour, Samuel W.

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is required for virulence in the gram-negative plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The alternative sigma factor HrpL directly regulates expression of T3SS genes via a promoter sequence, often designated as the “hrp promoter.” Although the HrpL regulon has been extensively investigated in DC3000, it is not known whether additional regulon members remain to be found. To systematically search for HrpL-regulated genes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and bulk mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify HrpL-binding sites and likely hrp promoters. The analysis recovered 73 sites of interest, including 20 sites that represent new hrp promoters. The new promoters lie upstream of a diverse set of genes encoding potential regulators, enzymes and hypothetical proteins. PSPTO_5633 is the only new HrpL regulon member that is potentially an effector and is now designated HopBM1. Deletions in several other new regulon members, including PSPTO_5633, PSPTO_0371, PSPTO_2130, PSPTO_2691, PSPTO_2696, PSPTO_3331, and PSPTO_5240, in either DC3000 or ΔhopQ1-1 backgrounds, do not affect the hypersensitive response or in planta growth of the resulting strains. Many new HrpL regulon members appear to be unrelated to the T3SS, and orthologs for some of these can be identified in numerous non-pathogenic bacteria. With the identification of 20 new hrp promoters, the list of HrpL regulon members is approaching saturation and most likely includes all DC3000 effectors. PMID:25170934

  2. Spatiotemporal colonization of Xylella fastidiosa in its vector supports the role of egestion in the inoculation mechanism of foregut-borne plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Backus, Elaine A; Morgan, David J W

    2011-08-01

    The pathogen that causes Pierce's disease of grapevine, Xylella fastidiosa, is the only known bacterial, arthropod-transmitted plant pathogen that does not circulate in the vector's hemolymph. Instead, bacteria are foregut-borne, persistent in adult vectors but semipersistent in immatures (i.e., bacteria colonize cuticular surfaces of the anterior foregut, are retained for hours to days, but are lost during molting). Yet, exactly how a sharpshooter vector inoculates bacteria from foregut acquisition sites is unknown. The present study used confocal laser-scanning microscopy to identify locations in undissected, anterior foreguts of the glassy-winged sharpshooter colonized by green fluorescent protein-expressing X. fastidiosa. Spatial and temporal distributions of colonizing X. fastidiosa were examined daily over acquisition access periods of 1 to 6 days for both contaminated field-collected and clean laboratory-reared Homalodisca vitripennis. Results provide the first direct, empirical evidence that established populations of X. fastidiosa can disappear from vector foreguts over time. When combined with existing knowledge on behavior, physiology, and functional anatomy of sharpshooter feeding, present results support the idea that the disappearance is caused by outward fluid flow (egestion) not inward flow (ingestion) (i.e., swallowing). Thus, results support the hypothesis that egestion is a critical part of the X. fastidiosa inoculation mechanism. Furthermore, results suggest a cyclical, spatiotemporal pattern of microbial colonization, disappearance, and recolonization in the precibarium. Colonization patterns also support two types of egestion, termed rinsing and discharging egestion herein. Finally, comparison of acquisition results for field-collected versus laboratory-reared sharpshooters suggest that there may be competitive binding for optimum acquisition sites in the foregut. Therefore, successful inoculation of X. fastidiosa may depend, in large part, on

  3. Unique morphological changes in plant pathogenic phytoplasma-infected petunia flowers are related to transcriptional regulation of floral homeotic genes in an organ-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Himeno, Misako; Neriya, Yutaro; Minato, Nami; Miura, Chihiro; Sugawara, Kyoko; Ishii, Yoshiko; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2011-09-01

    Abnormal flowers are often induced by infection of certain plant pathogens, e.g. phytoplasma, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these malformations have remained poorly understood. Here, we show that infection with OY-W phytoplasma (Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris, onion yellows phytoplasma strain, line OY-W) affects the expression of the floral homeotic genes of petunia plants in an organ-specific manner. Upon infection with OY-W phytoplasma, floral morphological changes, including conversion to leaf-like structures, were observed in sepals, petals and pistils, but not in stamens. As the expression levels of homeotic genes differ greatly between floral organs, we examined the expression levels of homeotic genes in each floral organ infected by OY-W phytoplasma, compared with healthy plants. The expression levels of several homeotic genes required for organ development, such as PFG, PhGLO1 and FBP7, were significantly downregulated by the phytoplasma infection in floral organs, except the stamens, suggesting that the unique morphological changes caused by the phytoplasma infection might result from the significant decrease in expression of some crucial homeotic genes. Moreover, the expression levels of TER, ALF and DOT genes, which are known to participate in floral meristem identity, were significantly downregulated in the phytoplasma-infected petunia meristems, implying that phytoplasma would affect an upstream signaling pathway of floral meristem identity. Our results suggest that phytoplasma infection may have complex effects on floral development, resulting in the unique phenotypes that were clearly distinct from the mutant flower phenotypes produced by the knock-out or the overexpression of certain homeotic genes. PMID:21605209

  4. Genes of the de novo and Salvage Biosynthesis Pathways of Vitamin B6 are Regulated under Oxidative Stress in the Plant Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Samsatly, Jamil; Chamoun, Rony; Gluck-Thaler, Emile; Jabaji, Suha

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is recognized as an important cofactor required for numerous metabolic enzymes, and has been shown to act as an antioxidant and play a role in stress responses. It can be synthesized through two different routes: salvage and de novo pathways. However, little is known about the possible function of the vitamin B6 pathways in the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Using genome walking, the de novo biosynthetic pathway genes; RsolPDX1 and RsolPDX2 and the salvage biosynthetic pathway gene, RsolPLR were sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequences of the three genes had high degrees of similarity to other fungal PDX1, PDX2, and PLR proteins and are closely related to other R. solani anastomosis groups. We also examined their regulation when subjected to reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress inducers, the superoxide generator paraquat, or H2O2, and compared it to the well-known antioxidant genes, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The genes were differentially regulated with transcript levels as high as 33 fold depending on the gene and type of stress reflecting differences in the type of damage induced by ROS. Exogenous addition of the vitamers PN or PLP in culture medium significantly induced the transcription of the vitamin B6 de novo encoding genes as early as 0.5 hour post treatment (HPT). On the other hand, transcription of RsolPLR was vitamer-specific; a down regulation upon supplementation of PN and upregulation with PLP. Our results suggest that accumulation of ROS in R. solani mycelia is linked to transcriptional regulation of the three genes and implicate the vitamin B6 biosynthesis machinery in R. solani, similar to catalases and GST, as an antioxidant stress protector against oxidative stress. PMID:26779127

  5. Plant-pathogenic oomycetes, Escherichia coli strains, and Salmonella spp. Frequently found in surface water used for irrigation of fruit and vegetable crops in New York State.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lisa A; Worobo, Randy W; Smart, Christine D

    2014-08-01

    In the United States, surface water is commonly used to irrigate a variety of produce crops and can harbor pathogens responsible for food-borne illnesses and plant diseases. Understanding when pathogens infest water sources is valuable information for produce growers to improve the food safety and production of these crops. In this study, prevalence data along with regression tree analyses were used to correlate water quality parameters (pH, temperature, turbidity), irrigation site properties (source, the presence of livestock or fowl nearby), and precipitation data to the presence and concentrations of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and hymexazol-insensitive (HIS) oomycetes (Phytophthora and Pythium spp.) in New York State surface waters. A total of 123 samples from 18 sites across New York State were tested for E. coli and Salmonella spp., of which 33% and 43% were positive, respectively. Additionally, 210 samples from 38 sites were tested for HIS oomycetes, and 88% were found to be positive, with 10 species of Phytophthora and 11 species of Pythium being identified from the samples. Regression analysis found no strong correlations between water quality parameters, site factors, or precipitation to the presence or concentration of E. coli in irrigation sources. For Salmonella, precipitation (≤ 0.64 cm) 3 days before sampling was correlated to both presence and the highest counts. Analyses for oomycetes found creeks to have higher average counts than ponds, and higher turbidity levels were associated with higher oomycete counts. Overall, information gathered from this study can be used to better understand the food safety and plant pathogen risks of using surface water for irrigation. PMID:24878603

  6. Metabolic regulation of phytoplasma malic enzyme and phosphotransacetylase supports the use of malate as an energy source in these plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Saigo, Mariana; Golic, Adrián; Alvarez, Clarisa E; Andreo, Carlos S; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Mussi, María A; Drincovich, María F

    2014-12-01

    Phytoplasmas ('Candidatus Phytoplasma') are insect-vectored plant pathogens. The genomes of these bacteria are small with limited metabolic capacities making them dependent on their plant and insect hosts for survival. In contrast to mycoplasmas and other relatives in the class Mollicutes, phytoplasmas encode genes for malate transporters and malic enzyme (ME) for conversion of malate into pyruvate. It was hypothesized that malate is probably a major energy source for phytoplasmas as these bacteria are limited in the uptake and processing of carbohydrates. In this study, we investigated the metabolic capabilities of 'Candidatus (Ca.) phytoplasma' aster yellows witches'-broom (AYWB) malic enzyme (ME). We found that AYWB-ME has malate oxidative decarboxylation activity, being able to convert malate to pyruvate and CO2 with the reduction of either NAD or NADP, and displays distinctive kinetic mechanisms depending on the relative concentration of the substrates. AYWB-ME activity was strictly modulated by the ATP/ADP ratio, a feature which has not been found in other ME isoforms characterized to date. In addition, we found that the 'Ca. Phytoplasma' AYWB PduL-like enzyme (AYWB-PduL) harbours phosphotransacetylase activity, being able to convert acetyl-CoA to acetyl phosphate downstream of pyruvate. ATP also inhibited AYWB-PduL activity, as with AYWB-ME, and the product of the reaction catalysed by AYWB-PduL, acetyl phosphate, stimulated AYWB-ME activity. Overall, our data indicate that AYWB-ME and AYWB-PduL activities are finely coordinated by common metabolic signals, like ATP/ADP ratios and acetyl phosphate, which support their participation in energy (ATP) and reducing power [NAD(P)H] generation from malate in phytoplasmas. PMID:25294105

  7. Plant-Pathogenic Oomycetes, Escherichia coli Strains, and Salmonella spp. Frequently Found in Surface Water Used for Irrigation of Fruit and Vegetable Crops in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lisa A.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, surface water is commonly used to irrigate a variety of produce crops and can harbor pathogens responsible for food-borne illnesses and plant diseases. Understanding when pathogens infest water sources is valuable information for produce growers to improve the food safety and production of these crops. In this study, prevalence data along with regression tree analyses were used to correlate water quality parameters (pH, temperature, turbidity), irrigation site properties (source, the presence of livestock or fowl nearby), and precipitation data to the presence and concentrations of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and hymexazol-insensitive (HIS) oomycetes (Phytophthora and Pythium spp.) in New York State surface waters. A total of 123 samples from 18 sites across New York State were tested for E. coli and Salmonella spp., of which 33% and 43% were positive, respectively. Additionally, 210 samples from 38 sites were tested for HIS oomycetes, and 88% were found to be positive, with 10 species of Phytophthora and 11 species of Pythium being identified from the samples. Regression analysis found no strong correlations between water quality parameters, site factors, or precipitation to the presence or concentration of E. coli in irrigation sources. For Salmonella, precipitation (≤0.64 cm) 3 days before sampling was correlated to both presence and the highest counts. Analyses for oomycetes found creeks to have higher average counts than ponds, and higher turbidity levels were associated with higher oomycete counts. Overall, information gathered from this study can be used to better understand the food safety and plant pathogen risks of using surface water for irrigation. PMID:24878603

  8. A combined ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis to understand the basal metabolism of plant-pathogenic Fusarium spp.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Rohan G T; Allwood, J William; Galster, Aimee M; Urban, Martin; Daudi, Arsalan; Canning, Gail; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E

    2010-12-01

    Many ascomycete Fusarium spp. are plant pathogens that cause disease on both cereal and noncereal hosts. Infection of wheat ears by Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum typically results in bleaching and a subsequent reduction in grain yield. Also, a large proportion of the harvested grain can be spoiled when the colonizing Fusarium mycelia produce trichothecene mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON). In this study, we have explored the intracellular polar metabolome of Fusarium spp. in both toxin-producing and nonproducing conditions in vitro. Four Fusarium spp., including nine well-characterized wild-type field isolates now used routinely in laboratory experimentation, were explored. A metabolic "triple-fingerprint" was recorded using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and direct-injection electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. These combined metabolomic analyses revealed that this technique is sufficient to resolve different wild-type isolates and different growth conditions. Principal components analysis was able to resolve the four species explored-F. graminearum, F. culmorum, F. pseudograminearum, and F. venenatum-as well as individual isolate differences from the same species. The external nutritional environment was found to have a far greater influence on the metabolome than the genotype of the organism. Conserved responses to DON-inducing medium were evident and included increased abundance of key compatible solutes, such as glycerol and mannitol. In addition, the concentration of γ-aminobutyric acid was elevated, indicating that the cellular nitrogen status may be affected by growth on DON-inducing medium. PMID:20718668

  9. Taxonomy of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of taxonomy provides a unified approach to bacterial names and species concepts ensures accurate communication among scientists, regulators and the public. The field of taxonomy is divided into three disciplines: Classification, Nomenclature, and Identification. Whereas there are codified...

  10. Microbial Forensics and Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New awareness of the vulnerability of a nation's agricultural infrastructure to the intentional introduction of pathogens or pests has led to the enhancement of programs for prevention and preparedness. A necessary component of a balanced bio-security plan is the capability to determine whether an ...

  11. Taxonomy of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Taxonomy is the process of the classification, the application of names (nomenclature), and the practice of identification. Classification is an iterative process that follows the scientific method. Knowledge of relationships from previous findings is refined using the most powerful methods availabl...

  12. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    (Arrhenatherum elatius). Some plant-pathogenic strains of P. agglomerans are tumourigenic, inducing gall formation on table beet, an ornamental plant gypsophila (Gypsophila paniculata), wisteria, Douglas-fir and cranberry. Recently, a Pantoea species closely related to P. agglomerans has been identified as a cause of bacterial blight disease in the edible mushroom Pleurotus eryngii cultivated in China. The genetically governed determinants of plant pathogenicity in Pantoea agglomerans include such mechanisms as the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) system, phytohormones, the quorum-sensing (QS) feedback system and type III secretion system (T3SS) injecting the effector proteins into the cytosol of a plant cell. PMID:27294620

  13. Pectate lyase PelI of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 belongs to a new family.

    PubMed

    Shevchik, V E; Robert-Baudouy, J; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N

    1997-12-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 secretes five major isoenzymes of pectate lyases encoded by the pel4, pelB, pelC, pelD, and pelE genes and a set of secondary pectate lyases, two of which, pelL and pelZ, have been already identified. We cloned the pelI gene, encoding a ninth pectate lyase of E. chrysanthemi 3937. The pelI reading frame is 1,035 bases long, corresponding to a protein of 344 amino acids including a typical amino-terminal signal sequence of 19 amino acids. The purified mature PelI protein has an isoelectric point of about 9 and an apparent molecular mass of 34 kDa. PelI has a preference for partially methyl esterified pectin and presents an endo-cleaving activity with an alkaline pH optimum and an absolute requirement for Ca2+ ions. PelI is an extracellular protein secreted by the Out secretory pathway of E. chrysanthemi. The PelI protein is very active in the maceration of plant tissues. A pelI mutant displayed reduced pathogenicity on chicory leaves, but its virulence did not appear to be affected on potato tubers or Saintpaulia ionantha plants. The pelI gene constitutes an independent transcriptional unit. As shown for the other pel genes, the transcription of pelI is dependent on various environmental conditions. It is induced by pectic catabolic products and affected by growth phase, oxygen limitation, temperature, nitrogen starvation, and catabolite repression. Regulation of pelI expression appeared to be dependent on the three repressors of pectinase synthesis, KdgR, PecS, and PecT, and on the global activator of sugar catabolism, cyclic AMP receptor protein. A functional KdgR binding site was identified close to the putative pelI promoter. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of PelI revealed high homology with a pectate lyase from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (65% identity) and low homology with pectate lyases of the phytopathogenic fungus Nectria haematococca (Fusarium solani). This finding indicates that PelI belongs to pectate lyase class

  14. First report of Pantoea ananatis (Syn. Erwinia uredovora) being associated with peanut rust in Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut rust is caused by the fungus Puccinia arachidis. This disease, if not treated can cause severe damage and defoliation. While sequencing DNA of urediniospores of the rust fungus, BLAST analysis detected many sequences corresponding to the bacterial species Pantoea ananatis. This bacterium, ...

  15. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of an Acid Sphingomyelinase-Like Protein from the Bacterial Plant Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum that Hydrolyzes ATP to AMP but Not Sphingomyelin to Ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Airola, Michael V.; Tumolo, Jessica M.; Snider, Justin; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2014-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) is a human enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to generate the bioactive lipid ceramide and phosphocholine. ASMase deficiency is the underlying cause of the genetic diseases Niemann-Pick Type A and B and has been implicated in the onset and progression of a number of other human diseases including cancer, depression, liver, and cardiovascular disease. ASMase is the founding member of the aSMase protein superfamily, which is a subset of the metallophosphatase (MPP) superfamily. To date, MPPs that share sequence homology with aSMase, termed aSMase-like proteins, have been annotated and presumed to function as aSMases. However, none of these aSMase-like proteins have been biochemically characterized to verify this. Here we identify RsASML, previously annotated as RSp1609: acid sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase, as the first bacterial aSMase-like protein from the deadly plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum based on sequence homology with the catalytic and C-terminal domains of human aSMase. A biochemical characterization of RsASML does not support a role in sphingomyelin hydrolysis but rather finds RsASML capable of acting as an ATP diphosphohydrolase, catalyzing the hydrolysis of ATP and ADP to AMP. In addition, RsASML displays a neutral, not acidic, pH optimum and prefers Ni2+ or Mn2+, not Zn2+, for catalysis. This alters the expectation that all aSMase-like proteins function as acid SMases and expands the substrate possibilities of this protein superfamily to include nucleotides. Overall, we conclude that sequence homology with human aSMase is not sufficient to predict substrate specificity, pH optimum for catalysis, or metal dependence. This may have implications to the biochemically uncharacterized human aSMase paralogs, aSMase-like 3a (aSML3a) and aSML3b, which have been implicated in cancer and kidney disease, respectively, and assumed to function as aSMases. PMID:25144372

  16. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part IV. Beneficial effects.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    Pantoea agglomerans, a gammaproteobacterium of plant origin, possesses many beneficial traits that could be used for the prevention and/or treatment of human and animal diseases, combating plant pathogens, promotion of plant growth and bioremediation of the environment. It produces a number of antibiotics (herbicolin, pantocins, microcin, agglomerins, andrimid, phenazine, among others) which could be used for combating plant, animal and human pathogens or for food preservation. Japanese researchers have demonstrated that the low-molecular-mass lipopolysaccharide of P. agglomerans isolated by them and described as 'Immunopotentiator from Pantoea agglomerans 1 (IP-PA1)' reveals the extremely wide spectrum of healing properties, mainly due to its ability for the maintenance of homeostasis by macrophage activation. IP-PA1 was proved to be effective in the prevention and treatment of a broad range of human and animal disorders, such as tumours, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, ulcer, various infectious diseases, atopic allergy and stress-induced immunosuppression; it also showed a strong analgesic effect. It is important that most of these effects could be achieved by the safe oral administration of IP-PA1. Taking into account that P. agglomerans occurs commonly as a symbiont of many species of insects, including mosquitoes transmitting the Plasmodium parasites causing malaria, successful attempts were made to apply the strategy of paratransgenesis, in which bacterial symbionts are genetically engineered to express and secrete anti-Plasmodium effector proteins. This strategy shows prospects for a successful eradication of malaria, a deadly disease killing annually over one million people, as well as of other vector-borne diseases of humans, animals and plants. Pantoea agglomerans has been identified as an antagonist of many plant pathogens belonging to bacteria and fungi, as a result of antibiotic production, competition mechanisms or induction of plant resistance. Its use as

  17. Contribution of Erwinia amylovora exopolysaccharides amylovoran and levan to biofilm formation: implications in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Koczan, Jessica M; McGrath, Molly J; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W

    2009-11-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a highly virulent, necrogenic, vascular pathogen of rosaceous species that produces the exopolysaccharide amylovoran, a known pathogenicity factor, and levan, a virulence factor. An in vitro crystal violet staining and a bright-field microscopy method were used to demonstrate that E. amylovora is capable of forming a biofilm on solid surfaces. Amylovoran and levan production deletion mutants were used to determine that amylovoran was required for biofilm formation and that levan contributed to biofilm formation. In vitro flow cell and confocal microscopy were used to further reveal the architectural detail of a mature biofilm and differences in biofilm formation between E. amylovora wild-type (WT), Deltaams, and Deltalsc mutant cells labeled with green fluorescent protein or yellow fluorescent protein. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of E. amylovora WT cells following experimental inoculation in apple indicated that extensive biofilm formation occurs in xylem vessels. However, Deltaams mutant cells were nonpathogenic and died rapidly following inoculation, and Deltalsc mutant cells were not detected in xylem vessels and were reduced in movement into apple shoots. These results demonstrate that biofilm formation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of E. amylovora. PMID:19821727

  18. Global small RNA chaperone Hfq and regulatory small RNAs are important virulence regulators in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Quan; McNally, R Ryan; Sundin, George W

    2013-04-01

    Hfq is a global small RNA (sRNA) chaperone that interacts with Hfq-regulated sRNAs and functions in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this work, we identified Hfq to be a virulence regulator in the Gram-negative fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Deletion of hfq in E. amylovora Ea1189 significantly reduced bacterial virulence in both immature pear fruits and apple shoots. Analysis of virulence determinants in strain Ea1189Δhfq showed that Hfq exerts pleiotropic regulation of amylovoran exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation, motility, and the type III secretion system (T3SS). Further characterization of biofilm regulation by Hfq demonstrated that Hfq limits bacterial attachment to solid surfaces while promoting biofilm maturation. Characterization of T3SS regulation by Hfq revealed that Hfq positively regulates the translocation and secretion of the major type III effector DspE and negatively controls the secretion of the putative translocator HrpK and the type III effector Eop1. Lastly, 10 Hfq-regulated sRNAs were identified using a computational method, and two of these sRNAs, RprA and RyhA, were found to be required for the full virulence of E. amylovora. PMID:23378513

  19. Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes discriminate between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infective genotypes of Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Braun-Kiewnick, Andrea; Mann, Rachel A; Rodoni, Brendan; Goesmann, Alexander; Duffy, Brion; Smits, Theo H M

    2012-10-01

    Comparative genomic analysis revealed differences in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis gene cluster between the Rubus-infecting strain ATCC BAA-2158 and the Spiraeoideae-infecting strain CFBP 1430 of Erwinia amylovora. These differences corroborate rpoB-based phylogenetic clustering of E. amylovora into four different groups and enable the discrimination of Spiraeoideae- and Rubus-infecting strains. The structure of the differences between the two groups supports the hypothesis that adaptation to Rubus spp. took place after species separation of E. amylovora and E. pyrifoliae that contrasts with a recently proposed scenario, based on CRISPR data, in which the shift to domesticated apple would have caused an evolutionary bottleneck in the Spiraeoideae-infecting strains of E. amylovora which would be a much earlier event. In the core region of the LPS biosynthetic gene cluster, Spiraeoideae-infecting strains encode three glycosyltransferases and an LPS ligase (Spiraeoideae-type waaL), whereas Rubus-infecting strains encode two glycosyltransferases and a different LPS ligase (Rubus-type waaL). These coding domains share little to no homology at the amino acid level between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting strains, and this genotypic difference was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of the associated DNA region in 31 Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting strains. The LPS biosynthesis gene cluster may thus be used as a molecular marker to distinguish between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting strains of E. amylovora using primers designed in this study. PMID:22583486

  20. One-step purification and kinetic properties of the recombinant L-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora.

    PubMed

    Krasotkina, Julya; Borisova, Anna A; Gervaziev, Yuri V; Sokolov, Nikolay N

    2004-04-01

    ECAR-LANS, the recombinant L-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora, is a prospective therapeutic enzyme for leukaemia treatment. An efficient and economical scheme was developed for the purification, cloning and expression in Eschericha coli of ECAR-LANS. More than 90% purity, complemented with 72% active enzyme recovery, was achieved with a single chromatographic purification step. The activity of purified L-asparaginase was 630 i.u./mg. The ECAR-LANS K (m) value was 98x10(-6) M for the main physiological substrate L-Asn and 3400x10(-6) M for L-Gln. ECAR-LANS was found to have low relative glutaminase activity (1.2%) at physiological concentrations of L-Asn and L-Gln in blood. Kinetic studies of ECAR-LANS showed that the recombinant asparaginase combined the main advantages of Erw. chrysanthemi and E. coli L-asparaginases II, currently used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. PMID:15032742

  1. Purification, Characterization, and Effect of Thiol Compounds on Activity of the Erwinia carotovora L-Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Warangkar, Suchita C.; Khobragade, Chandrahas N.

    2010-01-01

    L-asparaginase was extracted from Erwinia carotovora and purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation (60–70%), Sephadex G-100, CM cellulose, and DEAE sephadex chromatography. The apparent Mr of enzyme under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions was 150 kDa and 37 ± 0.5 kDa, respectively. L-asparaginase activity was studied in presence of thiols, namely, L-cystine (Cys), L-methionine (Met), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), and reduced glutathione (GSH). Kinetic parameters in presence of thiols (10–400 μM) showed an increase in Vmax values (2000, 2223, 2380, 2500, and control 1666.7 μmoles mg−1min−1) and a decrease in Km values (0.086, 0.076, 0.062, 0.055 and control 0.098 mM) indicating nonessential mode of activation. KA values displayed propensity to bind thiols. A decrease in Vmax/Km ratio in concentration plots showed inverse relationship between free thiol groups (NAC and GSH) and bound thiol group (Cys and Met). Enzyme activity was enhanced in presence of thiol protecting reagents like dithiothreitol (DTT), 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), and GSH, but inhibited by p-chloromercurybenzoate (PCMB) and iodoacetamide (IA). PMID:21048860

  2. Bacterial phytoene synthase: molecular cloning, expression, and characterization of Erwinia herbicola phytoene synthase.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Math, Shivanand K; Desai, Shrivallabh B; Poulter, C Dale

    2003-03-25

    Phytoene synthase (PSase) catalyzes the condensation of two molecules of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to give prephytoene diphosphate (PPPP) and the subsequent rearrangement of the cyclopropylcarbinyl intermediate to phytoene. These reactions constitute the first pathway specific step in carotenoid biosynthesis. The crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was isolated from a plasmid containing the carotenoid gene cluster in Erwinia herbicola and cloned into an Escherichia coli expression system. Upon induction, recombinant phytoene synthase constituted 5-10% of total soluble protein. To facilitate purification of the recombinant enzyme, the structural gene for PSase was modified by site-directed mutagenesis to incorporate a C-terminal Glu-Glu-Phe (EEF) tripepetide to allow purification by immunoaffinity chromatography on an immobilized monoclonal anti-alpha-tubulin antibody YL1/2 column. Purified recombinant PSase-EEF gave a band at 34.5 kDa upon SDS-PAGE. Recombinant PSase-EEF was then purified to >90% homogeneity in two steps by ion-exchange and immunoaffinity chromatography. The enzyme required Mn(2+) for activity, had a pH optimum of 8.2, and was strongly stimulated by detergent. The concentration of GGPP needed for half-maximal activity was approximately 35 microM, and a significant inhibition of activity was seen at GGPP concentrations above 100 microM. The sole product of the reaction was 15,15'-Z-phytoene. PMID:12641468

  3. Molecular cloning and expression of an Erwinia sp. gene encoding diphenyl ether cleavage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, H J; Srinivasan, V R

    1989-01-01

    A 2.1-kilobase fragment obtained by restriction enzyme HindIII digestion of Erwinia sp. genomic DNA was cloned into plasmid pUC19 and introduced into Escherichia coli by transformation. The transformants with diphenyl ether cleaving activity (Dpe+) were selected on agar plates with a specially designed medium (LTFN) containing 4-nitrodiphenyl ether. The positive clones showed a clear zone around the colonies. Analysis of mutants obtained by transposon mini-Mu dI(lacZ Kmr) mutagenesis indicated the coding region of the gene (dpe) and the utilization of a lacZ promoter of pUC19 for transcription of dpe. Clones with dpe in the opposite orientation in pUC19 were not expressed, confirming the need for a lacZ promoter. Utilization of a lacZ promoter in pUC19 was further confirmed by the observation that the degradation of 4-nitrodiphenyl ether was enhanced in the presence of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside. Expression of dpe was also found in pDPE7321, generated from cloning this gene into another plasmid, pSP73. Analysis of the plasmid-encoded proteins by the maxicell technique showed a polypeptide of 21,000 molecular weight as the product of dpe. Images PMID:2679381

  4. The PecT repressor coregulates synthesis of exopolysaccharides and virulence factors in Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Condemine, G; Castillo, A; Passeri, F; Enard, C

    1999-01-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 synthesizes an exopolysaccharide (EPS) composed of rhamnose, galactose, and galacturonic acid. Fourteen transcriptional fusions in genes required for EPS synthesis, named eps, were obtained by Tn5-B21 mutagenesis. Eleven of them are clustered on the chromosome and are repressed by PecT, a regulator of pectate lyase synthesis. In addition, expression of these fusions is repressed by the catabolite regulatory protein, CRP, and induced in low osmolarity medium. The three other mutations are located in genes that are not regulated by pecT. A 13-kb DNA fragment containing pecT-regulated eps genes has been cloned. All the genes identified on this fragment are transcribed in the same orientation and could form a large operon. The promoter region of this operon has been sequenced. It contains a JUMP-start sequence, a sequence required for the expression of polysaccharide-associated operons. E. chrysanthemi 3937 produces a systemic soft rot on its host Saintpaulia ionantha. An eps mutant was less efficient than the wild-type strain in initiating a maceration symptom, suggesting that production of EPS is required for the full expression of the E. chrysanthemi virulence. PMID:9885192

  5. Characterization and virulence properties of Erwinia chrysanthemi lipopolysaccharide-defective, phi EC2-resistant mutants.

    PubMed

    Schoonejans, E; Expert, D; Toussaint, A

    1987-09-01

    Outer membrane alterations were characterized in spontaneous mutants of the Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937jRH, which were selected for resistance to bacteriophage phi EC2. All but one of the mutants analyzed were affected in their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure, lacking the entire heterogeneous region of apparent high molecular weight present in the wild-type E. chrysanthemi LPS. At least two 3937jRH mutants, one selected as phi EC2 resistant (RH6065) and the other previously selected (D. Expert and A. Toussaint, J. Bacteriol. 163:221-227, 1985) as bacteriocin resistant (R1456), were cross-resistant to bacteriophage Mu and had rough LPSs with an altered core structure. Two phi EC2r mutants (RH6053 and RH6065) were most severely affected in their outer membrane integrity and also lost their virulence on saintpaulia plants, although they still possessed normal extracellular levels of pectinolytic and cellulolytic activities. The two Mur mutants RH6065 and R1456 were also able to induce systemic resistance in the challenged plant. All the other phi EC2r mutants retained the virulence of 393jRH. PMID:3624200

  6. Iron Deficiency Induced by Chrysobactin in Saintpaulia Leaves Inoculated with Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Neema, C.; Laulhere, J. P.; Expert, D.

    1993-07-01

    In this communication, we examine the fate of iron during soft rot pathogenesis caused by Erwinia chrysanthemi on its host, Saintpaulia ionantha. The spread of soft rot caused by this enterobacterium was previously shown to depend on a functional genetic locus encoding a high-affinity iron assimilation system involving the catechol-type siderophore chrysobactin. Leaf intercellular fluid from healthy plants was analyzed with regard to the iron content and its availability for bacterial growth. It was compared to the fluid from diseased plants for the presence of strong iron ligands, using a new approach based on the iron-binding property of an ion-exchange resin. Further characterization allowed the identification of chrysobactin in diseased tissues, thus providing the first evidence for the external release of a microbial siderophore during pathogenesis. Competition for nutritional iron was also studied through a plant-bacterial cell system: iron incorporated into plant ferritin appeared to be considerably reduced in bacteria-treated suspension soybean cells. The same effect was visualized during treatment of soybean cells with axenic leaf intercellular fluid from E. chrysanthemi-inoculated saintpaulia leaves or with chrysobactin. PMID:12231882

  7. Temperature and Pomaceous Flower Age Related to Colonization by Erwinia amylovora and Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pusey, P L; Curry, E A

    2004-08-01

    ABSTRACT Fire blight of apple and pear is initiated by epiphytic populations of Erwinia amylovora on flower stigmas. Predicting this disease and managing it with microbial antagonists depends on an understanding of bacterial colonization on stigmas. Detached 'Manchurian' crab apple flowers were inoculated with E. amylovora and subjected to a range of constant temperatures or various fluctuating temperature regimes. Results may have application to disease risk assessment systems such as the Cougarblight model, which now are based on in vitro growth of the pathogen. In other experiments, detached crab apple flowers and attached 'Gala' apple flowers were maintained at different temperatures for various periods before inoculation with E. amylovora or antagonists (Pseudomonas fluorescens strain A506 and Pantoea agglomerans strains C9-1 and E325). Maximum stigma age supporting bacterial multiplication decreased as temperature increased, and was reduced by pollination. Stigmas were receptive to bacteria at ages older than previously reported, probably due to less interference from indigenous organisms. The study revealed antagonist limitations that possibly affect field performance (e.g., the inability of strain A506 to grow on relatively old stigmas conducive to the pathogen). Such deficiencies could be overcome by selecting other antagonists or using antagonist mixtures in the orchard. PMID:18943112

  8. Design and Characterization of Erwinia Chrysanthemi l-Asparaginase Variants with Diminished l-Glutaminase Activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien Anh; Su, Ying; Lavie, Arnon

    2016-08-19

    Current FDA-approved l-asparaginases also possess significant l-glutaminase activity, which correlates with many of the toxic side effects of these drugs. Therefore, l-asparaginases with reduced l-glutaminase activity are predicted to be safer. We exploited our recently described structures of the Erwinia chrysanthemi l-asparaginase (ErA) to inform the design of mutants with diminished ability to hydrolyze l-glutamine. Structural analysis of these variants provides insight into the molecular basis for the increased l-asparagine specificity. A primary role is attributed to the E63Q mutation that acts to hinder the correct positioning of l-glutamine but not l-asparagine. The substitution of Ser-254 with either an asparagine or a glutamine increases the l-asparagine specificity but only when combined with the E63Q mutation. The A31I mutation reduces the substrate Km value; this is a key property to allow the required therapeutic l-asparagine depletion. Significantly, an ultra-low l-glutaminase ErA variant maintained its cell killing ability. By diminishing the l-glutaminase activity of these highly active l-asparaginases, our engineered ErA variants hold promise as l-asparaginases with fewer side effects. PMID:27354283

  9. Protection of Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage Y2 from UV-induced damage by natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Born, Yannick; Bosshard, Lars; Duffy, Brion; Loessner, Martin J.; Fieseler, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages have regained much attention as biocontrol agents against bacterial pathogens. However, with respect to stability, phages are biomolecules and are therefore sensitive to a number of environmental influences. UV-irradiation can readily inactivate phage infectivity, which impedes their potential application in the plant phyllosphere. Therefore, phages for control of Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight, need to be protected from UV-damage by adequate measures. We investigated the protective effect of different light-absorbing substances on phage particles exposed to UV-light. For this, natural extracts from carrot, red pepper, and beetroot, casein and soy peptone in solution, and purified substances such as astaxanthin, aromatic amino acids, and Tween 80 were prepared and tested as natural sunscreens for phage. All compounds were found to significantly increase half-life of UV-irradiated phage particles and they did not negatively affect phage viability or infectivity. Altogether, a range of readily available, natural substances are suitable as UV-protectants to prevent phage particles from UV-light damage. PMID:26904378

  10. Modified inoculation and disease assessment methods reveal host specificity in Erwinia tracheiphila-Cucurbitaceae interactions.

    PubMed

    Nazareno, Eric S; Dumenyo, C Korsi

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a greenhouse trial to determine specific compatible interactions between Erwinia tracheiphila strains and cucurbit host species. Using a modified inoculation system, E. tracheiphila strains HCa1-5N, UnisCu1-1N, and MISpSq-N were inoculated to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cv. 'Sweet Burpless', melon (Cucumis melo) cv. 'Athena Hybrid', and squash (Cucubita pepo) cv. 'Early Summer Crookneck'. We observed symptoms and disease progression for 30 days; recorded the number of days to wilting of the inoculated leaf (DWIL), days to wilting of the whole plant (DWWP), and days to death of the plant (DDP). We found significant interactions between host cultivar and pathogen strains, which imply host specificity. Pathogen strains HCa1-5N and UnisCu1-1N isolated from Cucumis species exhibited more virulence in cucumber and melon than in squash, while the reverse was true for strain MISpSq-N, an isolate from Cucurbita spp. Our observations confirm a previous finding that E. tracheiphila strains isolated from Cucumis species were more virulent on Cucumis hosts and those from Cucubita were more virulent on Cucubita hosts. This confirmation helps in better understanding the pathosystem and provides baseline information for the subsequent development of new disease management strategies for bacterial wilt. We also demonstrated the efficiency of our modified inoculation and disease scoring methods. PMID:26522078

  11. Characterization of Erwinia amylovora strains from Bulgaria by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Iliana; Urshev, Zoltan; Hristova, Petya; Bogatzevska, Nevena; Moncheva, Penka

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize genetically Bulgarian Erwinia amylovora strains using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Fifty E. amylovora strains isolated from different hosts, locations, as well as in different years were analysed by PFGE after XbaI, SpeI, and XhoI digestion of the genomic DNA. The strains were distributed into four groups according to their XbaI-generated profile. About 82% of the strains displayed a PFGE profile identical to that of type Pt2. Three strains belonged to the Central Europe Pt1 type. Two new PFGE profiles, not reported so far, were established--one for a strain isolated from Malus domestica and another for all Fragaria spp. strains. The same grouping of the strains was obtained after analysis of the SpeI digestion patterns. On the basis of PFGE profiles, after XbaI and SpeI digestion, a genetic differentiation between the strains associated with subfamily Maloideae and subfamily Rosoideae was revealed. The presence of more than one PFGE profile in the population of E. amylovora in Bulgaria suggests a multiple source of inoculum. PMID:22624335

  12. Auxofuran, a Novel Metabolite That Stimulates the Growth of Fly Agaric, Is Produced by the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces Strain AcH 505†

    PubMed Central

    Riedlinger, Julia; Schrey, Silvia D.; Tarkka, Mika T.; Hampp, Rüdiger; Kapur, Manmohan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505 improves mycelial growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi and formation of ectomycorrhizas between Amanita muscaria and spruce but suppresses the growth of plant-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that it produces both fungal growth-stimulating and -suppressing compounds. The dominant fungal-growth-promoting substance produced by strain AcH 505, auxofuran, was isolated, and its effect on the levels of gene expression of A. muscaria was investigated. Auxofuran and its synthetic analogue 7-dehydroxy-auxofuran were most effective at a concentration of 15 μM, and application of these compounds led to increased lipid metabolism-related gene expression. Cocultivation of strain AcH 505 and A. muscaria stimulated auxofuran production by the streptomycete. The antifungal substances produced by strain AcH 505 were identified as the antibiotics WS-5995 B and C. WS-5995 B completely blocked mycelial growth at a concentration of 60 μM and caused a cell stress-related gene expression response in A. muscaria. Characterization of these compounds provides the foundation for molecular analysis of the fungus-bacterium interaction in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between fly agaric and spruce. PMID:16672502

  13. Auxofuran, a novel metabolite that stimulates the growth of fly agaric, is produced by the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505.

    PubMed

    Riedlinger, Julia; Schrey, Silvia D; Tarkka, Mika T; Hampp, Rüdiger; Kapur, Manmohan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2006-05-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505 improves mycelial growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi and formation of ectomycorrhizas between Amanita muscaria and spruce but suppresses the growth of plant-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that it produces both fungal growth-stimulating and -suppressing compounds. The dominant fungal-growth-promoting substance produced by strain AcH 505, auxofuran, was isolated, and its effect on the levels of gene expression of A. muscaria was investigated. Auxofuran and its synthetic analogue 7-dehydroxy-auxofuran were most effective at a concentration of 15 microM, and application of these compounds led to increased lipid metabolism-related gene expression. Cocultivation of strain AcH 505 and A. muscaria stimulated auxofuran production by the streptomycete. The antifungal substances produced by strain AcH 505 were identified as the antibiotics WS-5995 B and C. WS-5995 B completely blocked mycelial growth at a concentration of 60 microM and caused a cell stress-related gene expression response in A. muscaria. Characterization of these compounds provides the foundation for molecular analysis of the fungus-bacterium interaction in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between fly agaric and spruce. PMID:16672502

  14. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  15. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  16. Ralstonia syzygii, the Blood Disease Bacterium and Some Asian R. solanacearum Strains Form a Single Genomic Species Despite Divergent Lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Gilles; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Mangenot, Sophie; Barbe, Valérie; Lajus, Aurélie; Vallenet, David; Medigue, Claudine; Fegan, Mark; Allen, Caitilyn; Prior, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The Ralstonia solanacearum species complex includes R. solanacearum, R. syzygii, and the Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB). All colonize plant xylem vessels and cause wilt diseases, but with significant biological differences. R. solanacearum is a soilborne bacterium that infects the roots of a broad range of plants. R. syzygii causes Sumatra disease of clove trees and is actively transmitted by cercopoid insects. BDB is also pathogenic to a single host, banana, and is transmitted by pollinating insects. Sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that despite their phenotypic differences, these three plant pathogens are actually very closely related, falling into the Phylotype IV subgroup of the R. solanacearum species complex. To better understand the relationships among these bacteria, we sequenced and annotated the genomes of R. syzygii strain R24 and BDB strain R229. These genomes were compared to strain PSI07, a closely related Phylotype IV tomato isolate of R. solanacearum, and to five additional R. solanacearum genomes. Whole-genome comparisons confirmed previous phylogenetic results: the three phylotype IV strains share more and larger syntenic regions with each other than with other R. solanacearum strains. Furthermore, the genetic distances between strains, assessed by an in-silico equivalent of DNA-DNA hybridization, unambiguously showed that phylotype IV strains of BDB, R. syzygii and R. solanacearum form one genomic species. Based on these comprehensive data we propose a revision of the taxonomy of the R. solanacearum species complex. The BDB and R. syzygii genomes encoded no obvious unique metabolic capacities and contained no evidence of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria occupying similar niches. Genes specific to R. syzygii and BDB were almost all of unknown function or extrachromosomal origin. Thus, the pathogenic life-styles of these organisms are more probably due to ecological adaptation and genomic convergence during vertical

  17. A Nightmare for Males? A Maternally Transmitted Male-Killing Bacterium and Strong Female Bias in a Green Lacewing Population

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Masaya; Yukuhiro, Fumiko; Nomura, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    For maternally transmitted microbes, a female-biased host sex ratio is of reproductive advantage. Here we found a strong female bias in a field population of the green lacewing, Mallada desjardinsi (Insecta; Neuroptera). This bias was attributed to the predominance of individuals harboring a maternally inherited male-killing bacterium that was phylogenetically closely related to the plant-pathogenic Spiroplasma phoeniceum and Spiroplasma kunkelii. Among 35 laboratory-reared broods produced by wild-caught females, 21 broods (60%)—all infected with Spiroplasma—consisted of only females (940 individuals). Among 14 broods consisting of both males and females (516 and 635 individuals, respectively), 4 broods were doubly infected with Spiroplasma and Rickettsia, 6 broods were singly infected with Rickettsia, and 3 broods were uninfected (remaining one brood was unknown). Mortality during embryonic and larval development was prominent in all-female broods but not in normal sex ratio broods. Following antibiotic treatment on all-female broods, mortality was significantly reduced and the sex ratio was restored to 1:1. Strong expression and high prevalence of this male-killer is remarkable considering its low density (~10−5–10−4 cells per host mitochondrial gene copy based on quantitative PCR). In addition, a bacterium closely related to Rickettsia bellii was present in 25 of 34 broods (73.5%), irrespective of the sex ratio, with the infection density comparable to other cases of endosymbiosis (~10−2–10−1 cells per mitochondrial gene copy). Higher density of Rickettsia than Spiroplasma was also demonstrated by electron microscopy which visualized both Spiroplasma-like cells and Rickettsia-like cells inside and outside the ovarian cells. PMID:27304213

  18. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B.; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Chang C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21–amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals. PMID:26601222

  19. Transformation of the phytopathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganense subsp. michiganense by electroporation and development of a cloning vector.

    PubMed Central

    Meletzus, D; Eichenlaub, R

    1991-01-01

    We constructed a cloning vector for use in the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganense subsp. michiganense. The vector pDM100 consists of a 3.2-kb restriction fragment of the Clavibacter plasmid pCM1 joined to a pBR325 derivative carrying the neomycin phosphotransferase of transposon Tn5 and the gentamicin acetyltransferase of Tn1696. Both antibiotic resistance genes are efficiently expressed in C. michiganense subsp. michiganense. Although polyethylene glycol-mediated transfection of spheroplasts with the DNA of the C. michiganense subsp. michiganense-specific bacteriophage CMP1 yielded about 3 x 10(3) transfectants per microgram of DNA, in transformations with plasmid DNA only a very few transformants were obtained. However, the transformation efficiency could be improved by electroporation of intact cells, giving about 2 x 10(3) transformants per microgram of plasmid DNA. Since a transformation procedure and a cloning vector are now available, pathogenicity in C. michiganense subsp. michiganense can now be analyzed genetically. PMID:1898919

  20. Ieodoglucomide C and Ieodoglycolipid, New Glycolipids from a Marine-Derived Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis 09IDYM23.

    PubMed

    Tareq, Fakir Shahidullah; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jong Seok; Shin, Hee Jae

    2015-05-01

    Chemical examination of the ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of the marine-derived bacterium Bacillus licheniformis resulted in the isolation of two new glycolipids, ieodoglucomide C (1) and ieodoglycolipid (2). The structural characterization of 1 and 2 was achieved by extensive spectroscopic evidence, including 2D NMR experiments. A combination of chemical derivatization techniques followed by NMR studies, LC-MS data analysis and a literature review was deployed for the establishment of the stereo-configurations of 1 and 2. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited good antibiotic properties against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MICs ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 μM. Furthermore, the antifungal activity of 1 and 2 was evaluated against plant pathogenic fungi Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum acutatum as well as the human pathogen Candida albicans. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited the mycelial growth of these pathogens with MIC values of 0.03-0.05 μM, revealing that these compounds are good candidates for the development of new fungicides. PMID:25893812