Science.gov

Sample records for plasma actuators driven

  1. Light-Driven Polymeric Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Gregory; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are being developed as alternatives to prior electrically and optically driven actuators in advanced, highly miniaturized devices and systems exemplified by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEOMS), and sensor and actuator arrays in smart structures. These light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are intended to satisfy a need for actuators that (1) in comparison with the prior actuators, are simpler and less power-hungry; (2) can be driven by low-power visible or mid-infrared light delivered through conventional optic fibers; and (3) are suitable for integration with optical sensors and multiple actuators of the same or different type. The immediate predecessors of the present light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are bimorph actuators that exploit a photorestrictive effect in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics. The disadvantages of the PLZT-based actuators are that (1) it is difficult to shape the PLZT ceramics, which are hard and brittle; (2) for actuation, it is necessary to use ultraviolet light (wavelengths < 380 nm), which must be generated by use of high-power, high-pressure arc lamps or lasers; (3) it is difficult to deliver sufficient ultraviolet light through conventional optical fibers because of significant losses in the fibers; (4) the response times of the PLZT actuators are of the order of several seconds unacceptably long for typical applications; and (5) the maximum mechanical displacements of the PLZT-based actuators are limited to those characterized by low strains beyond which PLZT ceramics disintegrate because of their brittleness. The basic element of a light-driven bimorph actuator of the present developmental type is a cantilever beam comprising two layers, at least one of which is a polymer that exhibits a photomechanical effect (see figure). The dominant mechanism of the photomechanical effect is a photothermal one: absorption of light energy causes heating, which, in turn, causes thermal expansion.

  2. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  3. Gear-Driven Turnbuckle Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ricky N.

    2010-01-01

    This actuator design allows the extension and contraction of turnbuckle assemblies. It can be operated manually or remotely, and is extremely compact. It is ideal for turnbuckles that are hard to reach by conventional tools. The tool assembly design solves the problem of making accurate adjustments to the variable geometry guide vanes without having to remove and reinstall the actuator system back on the engine. The actuator does this easily by adjusting the length of the turnbuckles while they are still attached to the engine.

  4. Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2008-04-14

    Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

  5. Diagnostics for characterisation of plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsonis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    The popularity of plasma actuators as flow control devices has sparked a flurry of diagnostic efforts towards their characterisation. This review article presents an overview of experimental investigations employing diagnostic techniques specifically aimed at AC dielectric barrier discharge, DC corona and nanosecond pulse plasma actuators. Mechanical, thermal and electrical characterisation techniques are treated. Various techniques for the measurement of induced velocity, body force, heating effects, voltage, current, power and discharge morphology are presented and common issues and challenges are described. The final part of this report addresses the effect of ambient conditions on the performance of plasma actuators.

  6. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opaits, Dmitry Florievich

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) and magnetohydrodynamic phenomena are being widely studied for aerodynamic applications. The major effects of these phenomena are heating of the gas, body force generation, and enthalpy addition or extraction, [1, 2, 3]. In particular, asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are known to be effective EHD device in aerodynamic control, [4, 5]. Experiments have demonstrated their effectiveness in separation control, acoustic noise reduction, and other aeronautic applications. In contrast to conventional DBD actuators driven by sinusoidal voltages, we proposed and used a voltage profile consisting of nanosecond pulses superimposed on dc bias voltage. This produces what is essentially a non-self-sustained discharge: the plasma is generated by repetitive short pulses, and the pushing of the gas occurs primarily due to the bias voltage. The advantage of this non-self-sustained discharge is that the parameters of ionizing pulses and the driving bias voltage can be varied independently, which adds flexibility to control and optimization of the actuators performance. Experimental studies were conducted of a flow induced in a quiescent room air by a single DBD actuator. A new approach for non-intrusive diagnostics of plasma actuator induced flows in quiescent gas was proposed, consisting of three elements coupled together: the Schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and 2-D numerical fluid modeling. During the experiments, it was found that DBD performance is severely limited by surface charge accumulation on the dielectric. Several ways to mitigate the surface charge were found: using a reversing DC bias potential, three-electrode configuration, slightly conductive dielectrics, and semi conductive coatings. Force balance measurements proved the effectiveness of the suggested configurations and advantages of the new voltage profile (pulses+bias) over the traditional sinusoidal one at relatively low voltages. In view of practical applications certain questions have been also addressed, such as electrodynamic effects which accompany scaling of the actuators to real size models, and environmental effects of ozone production by the plasma actuators.

  7. Plasma sheath driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, J.H.; Freeman, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    Plasma focus driven target implosions are simulated using hydrodynamic-burn codes. Support is given to the idea that the use of a target in a plasma focus should allow ''impedance matching'' between the fuel and gun, permitting larger fusion yields from a focus-target geometry than the scaling laws for a conventional plasma focus would predict.

  8. Mixing Layer Excitation by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Richard; Little, Jesse

    2012-11-01

    The response of a mixing layer with velocity ratio 0.28 to perturbations near the high-speed side (U2=11 m/s, ReL = 0.26 × 106) of its origin from dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Both alternating current (ac) and nanosecond (ns) pulse driven plasma are investigated in an effort to clarify the mechanisms associated with each technique as well as the more general physics associated with flow control via momentum-based versus thermal actuation. Ac-DBD plasma actuators, which function through electrohydrodynamic effects, are found to generate an increase in mixing layer momentum thickness that is strongly dependent on forcing frequency. Results are qualitatively similar to previous archival literature on the topic employing oscillating flaps. Ns-DBD plasma, which is believed to function through thermal effects, has no measureable influence on the mixing layer profile at similar forcing conditions. In the context of previous archival literature, these results suggest different physical mechanisms govern active control via ac- and ns-DBD plasma actuation and more generally, momentum versus thermal perturbations. Further investigation of these phenomena will be provided through variation of the boundary/mixing layer properties and forcing parameters in the context of spatially and temporally resolved experimental data. Supported by: AFOSR and Raytheon Missile Systems.

  9. Research on Plasma Synthetic Jet Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, X. K.; Nie, W. S.; Hou, Z. Y.

    2011-09-01

    Circular dielectric barrier surface discharge (DBDs) actuator is a new concept of zero mass synthetic jet actuator. The characteristic of discharge and flow control effect of annular-circular plasma synthetic jet actuator has been studied by means of of numerical simulation and experiment. The discharge current density, electron density, electrostatic body force density and flowfield have been obtained. The results show annular-circular actuator can produce normal jet whose velocity will be greater than 2.0 m/s. The jet will excite circumfluence. In order to insure the discharge is generated in the exposed electrode annular and produce centripetal and normal electrostatic body force, the width and annular diameter of exposed electrode must be big enough, or an opposite phase drove voltage potential should be applied between the two electrodes.

  10. Pressure Dependence of Plasma Actuated Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerioti, Joseph; Corke, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine how Single Dielectric-Barrier Discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators performed under variable ambient pressure. The static pressure was varied from 0.17 to 9.0 bar. The plasma initiation voltage and static thrust were measured and compared to similar data in literature. The results showed that at a given pressure, the plasma initiation voltage scaled with the actuator capacitor per unit area. The measured thrust showed the previously observed power-law relation with voltage, but the exponent varied with pressure. These trends were evaluated against simulations from the SDBD Space-Time Lumped Element Model. Parameters in the model affected by ambient pressure (capacitance, resistance, and Debye length of the air) were then systematically investigated to determine their effects on the plasma-produced body force. The overall trends were best modeled through a pressure dependence of the Debye length.

  11. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opaits, Dmitry, F.

    2012-01-01

    This report is Part II of the final report of NASA Cooperative Agreement contract no. NNX07AC02A. It includes a Ph.D. dissertation. The period of performance was January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010. Part I of the final report is the overview published as NASA/CR-2012- 217654. Asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators driven by nanosecond pulses superimposed on dc bias voltage are studied experimentally. This produces non-self-sustained discharge: the plasma is generated by repetitive short pulses, and the pushing of the gas occurs primarily due to the bias voltage. The parameters of ionizing pulses and the driving bias voltage can be varied independently, which adds flexibility to control and optimization of the actuators performance. The approach consisted of three elements coupled together: the Schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and 2-D numerical fluid modeling. During the experiments, it was found that DBD performance is severely limited by surface charge accumulation on the dielectric. Several ways to mitigate the surface charge were found: using a reversing DC bias potential, three-electrode configuration, slightly conductive dielectrics, and semi conductive coatings. Force balance measurements proved the effectiveness of the suggested configurations and advantages of the new voltage profile (pulses+bias) over the traditional sinusoidal one at relatively low voltages. In view of practical applications certain questions have been also addressed, such as electrodynamic effects which accompany scaling of the actuators to real size models, and environmental effects of ozone production by the plasma actuators.

  12. Scalability of Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    Temporal flow control of a jet has been widely studied in the past to enhance jet mixing or reduce jet noise. Most of this research, however, has been done using small diameter low Reynolds number jets that often have little resemblance to the much larger jets common in real world applications because the flow actuators available lacked either the power or bandwidth to sufficiently impact these larger higher energy jets. The Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPA), developed at the Ohio State University (OSU), have demonstrated the ability to impact a small high speed jet in experiments conducted at OSU and the power to perturb a larger high Reynolds number jet in experiments conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. However, the response measured in the large-scale experiments was significantly reduced for the same number of actuators compared to the jet response found in the small-scale experiments. A computational study has been initiated to simulate the LAFPA system with additional actuators on a large-scale jet to determine the number of actuators required to achieve the same desired response for a given jet diameter. Central to this computational study is a model for the LAFPA that both accurately represents the physics of the actuator and can be implemented into a computational fluid dynamics solver. One possible model, based on pressure waves created by the rapid localized heating that occurs at the actuator, is investigated using simplified axisymmetric simulations. The results of these simulations will be used to determine the validity of the model before more realistic and time consuming three-dimensional simulations are conducted to ultimately determine the scalability of the LAFPA system.

  13. A Study on a Microwave-Driven Smart Material Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Kwak, M.; Cutler, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    NASA s Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) has a large deployable, fragmented optical surface (greater than or = 2 8 m in diameter) that requires autonomous correction of deployment misalignments and thermal effects. Its high and stringent resolution requirement imposes a great deal of challenge for optical correction. The threshold value for optical correction is dictated by lambda/20 (30 nm for NGST optics). Control of an adaptive optics array consisting of a large number of optical elements and smart material actuators is so complex that power distribution for activation and control of actuators must be done by other than hard-wired circuitry. The concept of microwave-driven smart actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wiring. A microwave-driven actuator was studied to realize such a concept for future applications. Piezoelectric material was used as an actuator that shows dimensional change with high electric field. The actuators were coupled with microwave rectenna and tested to correlate the coupling effect of electromagnetic wave. In experiments, a 3x3 rectenna patch array generated more than 50 volts which is a threshold voltage for 30-nm displacement of a single piezoelectric material. Overall, the test results indicate that the microwave-driven actuator concept can be adopted for NGST applications.

  14. Light-driven actuation of fluids at microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Mandar; Saggere, Laxman

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses the prospects of light-driven actuation particularly for actuating fluids at micro-scale for potential use in a novel retinal prosthesis and other drug delivery applications. The prosthesis is conceived to be comprised of an array of light-driven microfluidic-dispenser units, devices that eject very small amounts of fluids on the order of 1 picoliter per second in response to incident light energy in the range of 0.1-1 mW/cm2. A light-driven actuator, whose size will ideally be smaller than about 100 micrometers in diameter, independently powers each dispenser unit. Towards this application, various approaches for transducing light energy for actuation of fluids are explored. These approaches encompass both direct transduction of light energy to mechanical actuation of fluid and indirect transduction through an intermediary form of energy, for instance, light energy to thermal or electrical energy followed by mechanical actuation of fluid. Various existing schemes for such transduction are reviewed comprehensively and discussed from the standpoint of the application requirements. Direct transduction schemes exploiting recent developments in optically sensitive materials that exhibit direct strain upon illumination, particularly the photostrictive PLZT (Lanthanum modified Lead Zirconate Titanate), are studied for the current application, and results of some preliminary experiments involving measurement of photovoltage, photocurrent, and photo-induced strain in the meso-scale samples of the PLZT material are presented.

  15. An arm wrestling robot driven by dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Gabor; Lochmatter, Patrick; Wissler, Michael

    2007-04-01

    The first arm wrestling match between a human arm and a robotic arm driven by electroactive polymers (EAP) was held at the EAPAD conference in 2005. The primary objective was to demonstrate the potential of the EAP actuator technology for applications in the field of robotics and bioengineering. The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (Empa) was one of the three organizations participating in this competition. The robot presented by Empa was driven by a system of rolled dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators. Based on the calculated stress condition in the rolled actuator, a low number of pre-strained DE film wrappings were found to be preferential for achieving the best actuator performance. Because of the limited space inside the robot body, more than 250 rolled actuators with small diameters were arranged in two groups according to the human agonist-antagonist muscle configuration in order to achieve an arm-like bidirectional rotation movement. The robot was powered by a computer-controlled high voltage amplifier. The rotary motion of the arm was activated and deactivated electrically by corresponding actuator groups. The entire development process of the robot is presented in this paper where the design of the DE actuators is of primary interest. Although the robot lost the arm wrestling contest against the human opponent, the DE actuators have demonstrated very promising performance as artificial muscles. The scientific knowledge gained during the development process of the robot has pointed out the challenges to be addressed for future improvement in the performance of rolled dielectric elastomer actuators.

  16. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators for Flow Control *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corke, Thomas C.; Enloe, C. Lon; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    The term plasma actuator has now been a part of the fluid dynamics flow-control vernacular for more than a decade. A particular type of plasma actuator that has gained wide use is based on a single-dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) mechanism that has desirable features for use in air at atmospheric pressures. For these actuators, the mechanism of flow control is through a generated body-force vector field that couples with the momentum in the external flow. The body force can be derived from first principles, and the effect of plasma actuators can be easily incorporated into flow solvers so that their placement and operation can be optimized. They have been used in a wide range of internal and external flow applications. Although initially considered useful only at low speeds, plasma actuators are effective in a number of applications at high subsonic, transonic, and supersonic Mach numbers, owing largely to more optimized actuator designs that were developed through better understanding and modeling of the actuator physics. New applications continue to appear through a growing number of programs in the United States, Germany, France, England, the Netherlands, Russia, Australia, Japan, and China. This review provides an overview of the physics and modeling of SDBD plasma actuators. It highlights some of the capabilities of plasma actuators through examples from experiments and simulations.

  17. Carbon nanotube alignment driven rapid actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Hsien; Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Chang, Han-Chen; Lin, Wen-Yi; Fang, Wei-Leun; Hsu, Wen-Kuang

    2013-11-01

    Suspended micro-beams made from aligned carbon nanotubes and parylene deflect reversibly in an ac field and the deflection rate is three orders of magnitude greater than those for existing devices. The direction of beam deflection is determined by the area moment of inertia and the actuation mechanism involves rapid accumulation of charges at tube surfaces, the creation of Coulomb repulsive forces between tubes, beam dilation and the formation of compressive stresses at beam ends. Tube alignment plays a crucial role in the first step as is verified by experimental data and calculation.

  18. A light-driven supramolecular nanowire actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junho; Oh, Seungwhan; Pyo, Jaeyeon; Kim, Jong-Man; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-04-01

    A single photomechanical supramolecular nanowire actuator with an azobenzene-containing 1,3,5-tricarboxamide derivative is developed by employing a direct writing method. Single nanowires display photoinduced reversible bending and the bending behavior follows first-order kinetics associated with azobenzene photoisomerization. A wireless photomechanical nanowire tweezers that remotely manipulates a single micro-particle is also demonstrated.A single photomechanical supramolecular nanowire actuator with an azobenzene-containing 1,3,5-tricarboxamide derivative is developed by employing a direct writing method. Single nanowires display photoinduced reversible bending and the bending behavior follows first-order kinetics associated with azobenzene photoisomerization. A wireless photomechanical nanowire tweezers that remotely manipulates a single micro-particle is also demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns of solution-crystallized sample, meniscus-guided microwires, and freeze-dried sample of Azo-1, Schematic of experimental set-up, 3D bending motion of Azo-1 nanowire, FE-SEM image of a bent Azo-1 nanowire after UV irradiation, real-time grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) for an Azo-1 microwire, Imaging analyses, Absorption spectra of an Azo-1 film, and thermostability of Azo-1 nanowire. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01118c

  19. Liquid lens driven by elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Boya; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Zhou, Zuowei; Lee, Gi-Bbeum; Ren, Hongwen; Nah, Changwoon

    2015-09-01

    By filling a liquid droplet in the hole of a dielectric elastomer (DE) film directly, we prepared two small liquid lenses. The aperture of one lens is macro size and the other is micro size. The liquid droplet in each hole of the DE film exhibits a lens character due to its biconvex shape. In relaxed state, the focal length of each liquid droplet is the longest. When a sufficiently high DC voltage is applied, the diameter of each DE hole is decreased by the generated Maxwell stress, causing the curvature of its droplet to increase. As a result, the focal length of each lens is reduced. Here the DE film functions as an actuator. In contrast to previous approaches, our miniature liquid lenses possess the advantages of simple fabrication, fast response time (~ 540 ms), and high optical performance (~ 114 lp/mm). Moreover, the micro-sized liquid lens presents good mechanical stability.

  20. Arm-wrestling robot driven by dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Gabor; Lochmatter, Patrick

    2006-03-01

    On March 7, 2005, the first arm wrestling match of an EAP robotic arm against a human was held during the EAP-inaction session of the EAPAD conference in San Diego. The primary object was to demonstrate the potential of the EAP technology for applications in the field of robotics and bioengineering. The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (Empa), Switzerland, was one of the three participating organizations in this competition. The presented Empa robot was driven by a system of dielectric elastomer actuators. More than 250 rolled actuators were arranged in two groups according to the human agonist-antagonist operating principle in order to achieve an arm-like rotation movement in both directions. The robot was powered by a computer-controlled high voltage amplifier. The rotary motion of the arm was performed by electrical activation respectively deactivation of the corresponding actuator group.

  1. Variable area nozzle for gas turbine engines driven by shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Nancy M. (Inventor); Miller, Robin M. (Inventor); Tillman, Thomas G. (Inventor); Rukus, Robert M. (Inventor); Kettle, John L. (Inventor); Dunphy, James R. (Inventor); Chaudhry, Zaffir A. (Inventor); Pearson, David D. (Inventor); Dreitlein, Kenneth C. (Inventor); Loffredo, Constantino V. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a variable area nozzle having a plurality of flaps. The flaps are actuated by a plurality of actuating mechanisms driven by shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators to vary fan exist nozzle area. The SMA actuator has a deformed shape in its martensitic state and a parent shape in its austenitic state. The SMA actuator is heated to transform from martensitic state to austenitic state generating a force output to actuate the flaps. The variable area nozzle also includes a plurality of return mechanisms deforming the SMA actuator when the SMA actuator is in its martensitic state.

  2. Characterization of linear plasma synthetic jet actuators in an initially quiescent medium

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Reasor, Daniel A. Jr.; LeBeau, Raymond P. Jr.

    2009-04-15

    The plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) is a geometrical variant of the aerodynamic plasma actuator that can be used to produce zero-mass flux jets similar to those created by mechanical devices. This jet can be either three-dimensional using annular electrode arrays (annular PSJA) or nearly two dimensional using two rectangular-strip exposed electrodes and one embedded electrode (linear PSJA). Unsteady pulsing of the PSJA at time scales decoupled to the ac input frequency results in a flow field dominated by counter-rotating vortical structures similar to conventional synthetic jets, and the peak velocity and momentum of the jet is found to be affected by a combination of the pulsing frequency and input power. This paper investigates the fluid dynamic characteristics of linear plasma synthetic jet actuators in an initially quiescent medium. Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements on the actuator are used to validate a previously developed numerical model wherein the plasma behavior is introduced into the Navier-Stokes equations as an electrohydrodynamic force term calculated from Maxwell's equations and solved for the fluid momentum. The numerical model was implemented in an incompressible, unstructured grid code. The results of the simulations are observed to reproduce some aspects of the qualitative and quantitative experimental behavior of the jet for steady and pulsed modes of actuator operation. The self-similarity behavior of plasma synthetic jets are examined and compared to mechanically driven continuous and synthetic jets.

  3. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likhanskii, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for active flow separation control using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are limited to relatively low speed flows and atmospheric conditions. This results in low feasibility of the DBDs for aerospace applications. For active flow control at turbine blades, fixed wings, and rotary wings and on hypersonic vehicles, DBD plasma actuators must perform at a wide range of conditions, including rarified flows and combustion mixtures. An efficient, comprehensive, physically based DBD simulation tool can optimize DBD plasma actuators for different operation conditions. Researchers are developing a DBD plasma actuator simulation tool for a wide range of ambient gas pressures. The tool will treat DBD using either kinetic, fluid, or hybrid models, depending on the DBD operational condition.

  4. Manufacturing of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator for Degradation Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, Nicole M.

    The performance and broader application of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are restricted by the manufacturing methods currently employed. In the current work, two methodologies are proposed to build robust plasma actuators for active flow control; a protective silicone oil (PDMS) treatment for hand-cut and laid tape-based actuators and a microfabrication technique for glass-based devices. The microfabrication process, through which thin film electrodes are precisely deposited onto plasma-resistant glass substrates, is presented in detail. The resulting glass-based devices are characterized with respect to electrical properties and output for various operating conditions. The longevity of microfabricated devices is compared against silicone-treated and untreated hand-made devices of comparable geometries over 60 hours of continuous operation. Both tungsten and copper electrodes are considered for microfabricated devices. Human health effects are also considered in an electromagnetic field study of the area surrounding a live plasma actuator for various operating conditions.

  5. Efficient needle plasma actuators for flow control and surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Portugal, Sherlie; Roy, Subrata

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a milliwatt class needle actuator suitable for plasma channels, vortex generation, and surface cooling. Electrode configurations tested for a channel configuration show 1400% and 300% increase in energy conversion efficiency as compared to conventional surface and channel corona actuators, respectively, generating up to 3.4 m/s air jet across the channel outlet. The positive polarity of the needle is shown to have a beneficial effect on actuator efficiency. Needle-plate configuration is demonstrated for improving cooling of a flat surface with a 57% increase in convective heat transfer coefficient. Vortex generation by selective input signal manipulation is also demonstrated.

  6. Serpentine geometry plasma actuators for flow control Mark Riherd and Subrata Roy

    E-print Network

    Roy, Subrata

    Serpentine geometry plasma actuators for flow control Mark Riherd and Subrata Roy Citation: J. Appl://jap.aip.org/authors #12;Serpentine geometry plasma actuators for flow control Mark Riherd and Subrata Roya) Applied. Plasma actuators with novel geometries, including the serpentine geometry, have been effective

  7. The impulse response of a high-speed jet forced with localized arc filament plasma actuators

    E-print Network

    Colonius, Tim

    The impulse response of a high-speed jet forced with localized arc filament plasma actuators arc filament plasma actuators Aniruddha Sinha,1 Hind Alkandry,2 Martin Kearney-Fischer,3 Mo Samimy,2,a to impulsive forcing with arc-filament-plasma actuators. The impulse response is obtained with forcing Strouhal

  8. Use of Plasma Actuators as a Moving-Wake Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.; Klapetzky Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The work documented in this report tests the concept of using plasma actuators as a simple and easy way to generate a simulated moving-wake and the disturbances associated with it in turbines. This wake is caused by the blades of the upstream stages of the turbine. Two types of devices, one constructed of arrays of NACA 0018 airfoils, and the one constructed of flat plates were studied. The airfoils or plates were equipped with surface mounted dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators, which were used to generate flow disturbances resembling moving-wakes. CTA hot-wire anemometry and flow visualization using a smoke-wire were used to investigate the wake independence at various spacings and downstream locations. The flat plates were found to produce better results than the airfoils in creating large velocity fluctuations in the free-stream flow. Different dielectric materials, plasma actuator locations, leading edge contours, angles of attack and plate spacings were investigated, some with positive results. The magnitudes of the velocity fluctuations were found to be comparable to existing mechanical moving-wake generators, thus proving the feasibility of using plasma actuators as a moving-wake generator.

  9. Design of a high-speed, meso-scale nanopositioners driven by electromagnetic actuators

    E-print Network

    Golda, Dariusz, 1979-

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to generate the design and fabrication knowledge that is required to engineer high-speed, six-axis, meso-scale nanopositioners that are driven by electromagnetic actuators. When compared to ...

  10. Airflow control by non-thermal plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Eric

    2007-02-01

    Active flow control is a topic in full expansion due to associated industrial applications of huge importance, particularly for aeronautics. Among all flow control methods, such as the use of mechanical flaps, wall synthetic jets or MEMS, plasma-based devices are very promising. The main advantages of such systems are their robustness, simplicity, low power consumption and ability for real-time control at high frequency. This paper is a review of the worldwide works on this topic, from its origin to the present. It is divided into two main parts. The first one is dedicated to the recent knowledge concerning the electric wind induced by surface non-thermal plasma actuators, acting in air at atmospheric pressure. Typically, it can reach 8 m s-1 at a distance of 0.5 mm from the wall. In the second part, works concerning active airflow control by these plasma actuators are presented. Very efficient results have been obtained for low-velocity subsonic airflows (typically U? <= 30 m s-1 and Reynolds number of a few 105), and promising results at higher velocities indicate that plasma actuators could be used in aeronautics.

  11. Note: A novel curvature-driven shape memory alloy torsional actuator.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaojun; Huang, Dawei; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel, extremely simple torsional actuator which employs a special shape setting treated shape memory alloy coil. The actuator works with a so-called curvature-driven principle and can directly generate a rotary motion without any motion converting mechanism. Experiments were performed to study the output performances of several actuators with different geometry parameters. The test results show the actuator can output a rotary motion fluently, and the output torque is about several mN mm. PMID:25554345

  12. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles. PMID:26367106

  13. Demonstration of Separation Control Using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Active flow control of boundary-layer separation using glow-discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil. The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) free-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface-flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control.

  14. Demonstration of Separation Delay with Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Active flow control of boundary-layer separation using glow-discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modern low-pressure-turbine airfoil. The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2 percent) and high (2.5 percent) free-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface-flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control.

  15. Shock Generation and Control Using DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mehul P.; Cain, Alan B.; Nelson, Christopher C.; Corke, Thomas C.; Matlis, Eric H.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a NASA Phase I SBIR contract, with some revisions to remove company proprietary data. The Shock Boundary Layer Interaction (SBLI) phenomena in a supersonic inlet involve mutual interaction of oblique shocks with boundary layers, forcing the boundary layer to separate from the inlet wall. To improve the inlet efficiency, it is desired to prevent or delay shock-induced boundary layer separation. In this effort, Innovative Technology Applications Company (ITAC), LLC and the University of Notre Dame (UND) jointly investigated the use of dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma actuators for control of SBLI in a supersonic inlet. The research investigated the potential for DBD plasma actuators to suppress flow separation caused by a shock in a turbulent boundary layer. The research involved both numerical and experimental investigations of plasma flow control for a few different SBLI configurations: (a) a 12 wedge flow test case at Mach 1.5 (numerical and experimental), (b) an impinging shock test case at Mach 1.5 using an airfoil as a shock generator (numerical and experimental), and (c) a Mach 2.0 nozzle flow case in a simulated 15 X 15 cm wind tunnel with a shock generator (numerical). Numerical studies were performed for all three test cases to examine the feasibility of plasma flow control concepts. These results were used to guide the wind tunnel experiments conducted on the Mach 1.5 12 degree wedge flow (case a) and the Mach 1.5 impinging shock test case (case b) which were at similar flow conditions as the corresponding numerical studies to obtain experimental evidence of plasma control effects for SBLI control. The experiments also generated data that were used in validating the numerical studies for the baseline cases (without plasma actuators). The experiments were conducted in a Mach 1.5 test section in the University of Notre Dame Hessert Laboratory. The simulation results from cases a and b indicated that multiple spanwise actuators in series and at a voltage of 75 kVp-p could fully suppress the flow separation downstream of the shock. The simulation results from case c showed that the streamwise plasma actuators are highly effective in creating pairs of counter-rotating vortices, much like the mechanical vortex generators, and could also potentially have beneficial effects for SBLI control. However, to achieve these effects, the positioning and the quantity of the DBD actuators used must be optimized. The wind tunnel experiments mapped the baseline flow with good agreement to the numerical simulations. The experimental results were conducted with spanwise actuators for cases a and b, but were limited by the inability to generate a sufficiently high voltage due to arcing in the wind-tunnel test-section. The static pressure in the tunnel was lower than the static pressure in an inlet at flight conditions, promoting arching and degrading the actuator performance.

  16. Competition between pressure effects and airflow influence for the performance of plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegseis, J.; Barckmann, K.; Grundmann, S.; Frey, J.; Tropea, C.

    2014-05-15

    The present work addresses the combined influence of pressure variations and different airflow velocities on the discharge intensity of plasma actuators. Power consumption, plasma length, and discharge capacitance were investigated systematically for varying pressure levels (p?=?0.1–1 bar) and airflow velocities (U{sub ?}=0?100 m/s) to characterize and quantify the favorable and adverse effects on the discharge intensity. In accordance with previous reports, an increasing plasma actuator discharge intensity is observed for decreasing pressure levels. At constant pressure levels, an adverse airflow influence on the electric actuator performance is demonstrated. Despite the improved discharge intensity at lower pressure levels, the seemingly improved performance of the plasma actuators is accompanied with a more pronounced drop of the relative performance. These findings demonstrate the dependency of the (kinematic and thermodynamic) environmental conditions on the electric performance of plasma actuators, which in turn affects the control authority of plasma actuators for flow control applications.

  17. Indirect Adaptive Robust Control of Electro-Hydraulic Systems Driven by Single-Rod Hydraulic Actuator

    E-print Network

    Yao, Bin

    Indirect Adaptive Robust Control of Electro-Hydraulic Systems Driven by Single-Rod Hydraulic) of electro-hydraulic systems driven by single- rod hydraulic actuators. Unlike the tracking that the proposed IARC achieves good tracking performance and accurate parameter estimation. INTRODUCTION Electro-hydraulic

  18. Plasma Actuators for Turbomachinery Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Richard, B; Shneider, Mikhail, N.

    2012-01-01

    This report is Part I of the final report of NASA Cooperative Agreement contract no. NNX07AC02A. The period of performance was January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010. This report includes the project summary, a list of publications and reprints of the publications that appeared in archival journals. Part II of the final report includes a Ph.D. dissertation and is published separately as NASA/CR-2012-2172655. The research performed under this project was focused on the operation of surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices driven by high voltage, nanosecond scale pulses plus constant or time varying bias voltages. The main interest was in momentum production and the range of voltages applied eliminated significant heating effects. The approach was experimental supplemented by computational modeling. All the experiments were conducted at Princeton University. The project provided comprehensive understanding of the associated physical phenomena. Limitations on the performance of the devices for the generation of high velocity surface jets were established and various means for overcoming those limitations were proposed and tested. The major limitations included the maximum velocity limit of the jet due to electrical breakdown in air and across the dielectric, the occurrence of backward breakdown during the short pulse causing reverse thrust, the buildup of surface charge in the dielectric offsetting the forward driving potential of the bias voltage, and the interaction of the surface jet with the surface through viscous losses. It was also noted that the best performance occurred when the nanosecond pulse and the bias voltage were of opposite sign. Solutions include the development of partially conducting surface coatings, the development of a semiconductor diode inlaid surface material to suppress the backward breakdown. Extension to long discharge channels was studied and a new ozone imaging method developed for more quantitative determination of surface jet properties.

  19. A magnetorheological hydraulic actuator driven by a piezopump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Sirohi, Jayant; Wereley, Norman M.; Chopra, Inderjit

    2003-08-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids can be used in a variety of smart semi-active systems. The MR damper shows an especially great potential to mitigate environmentally induced vibration and shocks. Another aspect of MR fluids is the construction of MR valve networks in conjunction with a hydraulic pump resulting in a fully active actuator. Conventional hydraulic pumps, however, are bulky, contain many moving parts, and do not scale favorably with decreasing size motivating development of high energy density piezohydraulic pumps. These devices are simple, have few moving parts and can be easily miniaturized to provide a compact, high energy density pressure source. The present study describes a prototype MR-piezo hybrid actuator that combines the piezopump and MR valve actuator concepts, resulting in a self-contained hydraulic actuation device without active electro-mechanical valves. Durability and miniaturization of the hybrid device are major advantages due to its low part count and few moving parts. An additional advantage is the ability to use the MR valve network in the acuator to achieve controllable damping. The design, construction and testing of a prototype MR-piezo hybrid actuator is described. The performance and efficiency of the device is derived using ideal, biviscous and Bingham-plastic representations of MR fluid behavior, and is evaluated with experimental measurements. This will provide a design tool to develop an actuator for a specific application. The prototype actuator achieved an output velocity of 5.34mm/sec against a mass load of 5.15kg with a piezopump weighing 300gm.

  20. Transient ejection phase modeling of a Plasma Synthetic Jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurendeau, F.; Chedevergne, F.; Casalis, G.

    2014-12-01

    For several years, a promising Plasma Synthetic Jet actuator for high-speed flow control has been under development at ONERA. So far, its confined geometry and small space-time scales at play have prevented its full experimental characterization. Complementary accurate numerical simulations are then considered in this study in order to provide a complete aerothermodynamic description of the actuator. Two major obstacles have to be overcome with this approach: the modeling of the energy deposited by the electric arc and the accurate computation of the transient response of the cavity generating the pulsed jet. To solve the first problem, an Euler solver coupled with an electric circuit model was used to evaluate the energy deposition in the cavity. Such a coupling is performed by considering the electric field between the two electrodes. The second issue was then addressed by injecting these source terms in large Eddy simulations of the entire actuator. Aerodynamic results were finally compared with Schlieren visualizations. Using the proposed methodology, the temporal evolution of the jet front is remarkably well predicted.

  1. Three-dimensional effects of curved plasma actuators in quiescent air

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chincheng; Durscher, Ryan; Roy, Subrata

    2011-04-15

    This paper presents results on a new class of curved plasma actuators for the inducement of three-dimensional vortical structures. The nature of the fluid flow inducement on a flat plate, in quiescent conditions, due to four different shapes of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators is numerically investigated. The three-dimensional plasma kinetic equations are solved using our in-house, finite element based, multiscale ionized gas (MIG) flow code. Numerical results show electron temperature and three dimensional plasma force vectors for four shapes, which include linear, triangular, serpentine, and square actuators. Three-dimensional effects such as pinching and spreading the neighboring fluid are observed for serpentine and square actuators. The mechanisms of vorticity generation for DBD actuators are discussed. Also the influence of geometric wavelength ({lambda}) and amplitude ({Lambda}) of the serpentine and square actuators on vectored thrust inducement is predicted. This results in these actuators producing significantly better flow mixing downstream as compared to the standard linear actuator. Increasing the wavelengths of serpentine and square actuators in the spanwise direction is shown to enhance the pinching effect giving a much higher vertical velocity. On the contrary, changing the amplitude of the curved actuator varies the streamwise velocity significantly influencing the near wall jet. Experimental data for a serpentine actuator are also reported for validation purpose.

  2. Research on the Peristaltic Flow Acceleration Performance of Asynchronous and Duty Cycle Pulsed DBD Plasma Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Gao, Chao; Zheng, Borui; Wang, Yushuai

    2014-09-01

    Using a plexiglas plate model, the performance of peristaltic flow acceleration induced by multiple DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) plasma actuators was studied based on PIV (particle image velocimetry). The asynchronous and the duty cycle pulsed actuation modes were proposed and tested. The velocity fields induced by multiple DBD plasma actuators with different phase angles and duty cycle ratios were acquired and the momentum transfer characteristics of the flow field were discussed. Consequently, the mechanism of the peristalsis-acceleration multiple DBD plasma actuation was analyzed. The results show that the peristaltic flow acceleration effect of multiple plasma actuators occurs mainly in paraelectric direction, and the mechanism of peristaltic flow acceleration is ejection pushing effect rather than injection pumping effect. The asynchronous and the duty cycle pulsed actuation modes can, with energy consumption increase of merely 10%, achieve 65% and 42% increase of downstream velocity, and thus are promising in velocity improvement and energy saving.

  3. Optimization of a dual acting, magnetically driven, linear actuator 

    E-print Network

    Willerton, Justin Ryan

    2002-01-01

    will be found. Once complete, a different approach in meeting the design objectives of a stroke length of at least 10 mils, a low maximum coil temperature and a low actuator weight, will be taken. Instead of optimizing the geometry, the rubber pads...

  4. Control of supersonic axisymmetric base flows using passive splitter plates and pulsed plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, Todd Mitchell

    An experimental investigation evaluating the effects of flow control on the near-wake downstream of a blunt-based axisymmetric body in supersonic flow has been conducted. To better understand and control the physical phenomena that govern these massively separated high-speed flows, this research examined both passive and active flow-control methodologies designed to alter the stability characteristics and structure of the near-wake. The passive control investigation consisted of inserting splitter plates into the recirculation region. The active control technique utilized energy deposition from multiple electric-arc plasma discharges placed around the base. The flow-control authority of both methodologies was evaluated with experimental diagnostics including particle image velocimetry, schlieren photography, surface flow visualization, pressure-sensitive paint, and discrete surface pressure measurements. Using a blowdown-type wind tunnel reconstructed specifically for these studies, baseline axisymmetric experiments without control were conducted for a nominal approach Mach number of 2.5. In addition to traditional base pressure measurements, mean velocity and turbulence quantities were acquired using two-component, planar particle image velocimetry. As a result, substantial insight was gained regarding the time-averaged and instantaneous near-wake flow fields. This dataset will supplement the previous benchmark point-wise laser Doppler velocimetry data of Herrin and Dutton (1994) for comparison with new computational predictive techniques. Next, experiments were conducted to study the effects of passive triangular splitter plates placed in the recirculation region behind a blunt-based axisymmetric body. By dividing the near-wake into 1/2, 1/3, and 1/4 cylindrical regions, the time-averaged base pressure distribution, time-series pressure fluctuations, and presumably the stability characteristics were altered. While the spatial base pressure distribution was influenced considerably, the area-integrated pressure was only slightly affected. Normalized RMS levels indicate that base pressure fluctuations were significantly reduced with the addition of the splitter plates. Power-spectral-density estimates revealed a spectral broadening of fluctuating energy for the 1/2 cylinder configuration and a bimodal distribution for the 1/3 and 1/4 cylinder configurations. It was concluded that the recirculation region is not the most sensitive location to apply flow control; rather, the shear layer may be a more influential site for implementing flow control methodologies. For active flow control, pulsed plasma-driven fluidic actuators were investigated. Initially, the performance of two plasma actuator designs was characterized to determine their potential as supersonic flow control devices. For the first actuator considered, the pulsed plasma jet, electro-thermal heating from an electric discharge heats and pressurizes gas in a small cavity which is exhausted through a circular orifice forming a synthetic jet. Depending on the electrical energy addition, peak jet velocities ranged between 130 to nearly 500 m/s when exhausted to quiescent, ambient conditions. The second plasma actuator investigated is the localized arc filament plasma actuator (LAFPA), which created fluidic perturbations through the rapid, local thermal heating, generated from an electric arc discharge between two electrodes within a shallow open cavity. Electrical and emission properties of the LAFPA were first documented as a function of pressure in a quiescent, no-flow environment. Rotational and vibrational temperatures from N2 spectra were obtained for select plasma conditions and ambient pressures. Results further validate that the assumption of optically thin conditions for these electric arc plasmas is not necessary valid, even at low ambient pressure. Breakdown voltage, sustained plasma voltage, power, and energy per pulse were demonstrated to decrease with decreasing pressure. Implementing an array of eight electric arcs circumferentially around the base nea

  5. Numerical analysis of plasma evolution on dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hiroyuki; Abe, Takashi

    2011-07-01

    Time evolution of the discharge plasma in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator was simulated by the simple fluid model in which the electron and single positive ion species were considered. The characteristics of the discharge plasma evolution were investigated in detail, and the following results were obtained. When the positive-going voltage is applied, the streamer discharge is formed periodically. The periodically formed streamer expands from the exposed electrode, and its length becomes longer than the previous one. Periodic breakdown of the gas and step-by-step plasma expansion are also observed during the negative-going voltage; however, the streamer is not formed and the breakdown frequency is much higher. The simulation results with a triangular applied voltage waveform show the same characteristics as observed in the experiment; large discharge current spikes are observed during both the positive- and negative-going voltage phase, and the plasma in the negative-going voltage phase expands more smoothly than that in the positive phase because of its higher breakdown frequency. It was shown that even the simple numerical model could provide valuable insights into the physics of DBD plasma actuator; this indicates that the positive ions and electrons play a prominent role in determining the general characteristics of the plasma evolution.

  6. The beam driven plasma neutralizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrey, E.; Holmes, A.

    2013-02-01

    The improvement of the efficiency of neutral beam systems to be compatible with the economic requirements of fusion power plants is a key theme in the European research programme. A novel plasma neutralizer, in which the negative ion beam itself is the source of the plasma, is described. Its success depends on the confinement of the free electrons generated by stripping from the beam and their generation of additional plasma. The device requires no additional power in contrast to the photoneutralizer, presently the main device of research interest. Although the efficiency of the plasma device is not as high as the photoneutralizer it is essentially of a low technological risk, inherently reliable and will not require a significant R&D programme to demonstrate.

  7. Structure of propagating arc in a magneto-hydrodynamic rail plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Miles D.; Choi, Young-Joon; Sirohi, Jayant; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-01-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of a magnetically driven arc in a rail plasma flow actuator has been characterized with high-speed imaging, electrical measurements, and spectroscopy. The arc draws a peak current of ~1 kA. High-speed framing cameras were used to observe the complex arc propagation phenomenon. In particular, the anode and cathode roots were observed to have different modes of transit, which resulted in distinct types of electrode degradation on the anode and cathode surfaces. Observations of the arc electrical properties and induced magnetic fields are used to explain the transit mechanism of the arc. Emission spectroscopy revealed the arc temperature and species composition as a function of transit distance of the arc. The results obtained offer significant insights into the electromagnetic properties of the arc-rail system as well as arc-surface interaction phenomena in a propagating arc.

  8. Nonlinear actuation dynamics of driven Casimir oscillators with rough surfaces

    E-print Network

    Wijnand Broer; Holger Waalkens; Vitaly B. Svetovoy; Jasper Knoester; George Palasantzas

    2015-11-08

    At separations below 100 nm, Casimir-Lifshitz forces strongly influence the actuation dynamics of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) in dry vacuum conditions. For a micron size plate oscillating near a surface, which mimics a frequently used setup in experiments with MEMS, we show that the roughness of the surfaces significantly influences the qualitative dynamics of the oscillator. Via a combination of analytical and numerical methods, it is shown that surface roughness leads to a clear increase of initial conditions associated with chaotic motion, that eventually lead to stiction between the surfaces. Since stiction leads to malfunction of MEMS oscillators, our results are of central interest for the design of microdevices. Moreover, they are of significance for fundamentally motivated experiments performed with MEMS.

  9. Nonlinear Actuation Dynamics of Driven Casimir Oscillators with Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Wijnand; Waalkens, Holger; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Knoester, Jasper; Palasantzas, George

    2015-11-01

    At separations below 100 nm, Casimir-Lifshitz forces strongly influence the actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in dry vacuum conditions. For a micron-size plate oscillating near a surface, which mimics a frequently used setup in experiments with MEMS, we show that the roughness of the surfaces significantly influences the qualitative dynamics of the oscillator. Via a combination of analytical and numerical methods, it is shown that surface roughness leads to a clear increase of initial conditions associated with chaotic motion, that eventually lead to stiction between the surfaces. Since stiction leads to a malfunction of MEMS oscillators, our results are of central interest for the design of microdevices. Moreover, stiction is of significance for fundamentally motivated experiments performed with MEMS.

  10. Strongly-driven laser plasma coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L; Afeyan, B; Campbell, E M; Decker, C D; Kruer, W L; Moody, J; Orzechowski, T; Powers, L; Wilks, S C

    1998-06-25

    An improved understanding of strongly-driven laser plasma coupling is important for optimal use of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for both inertial fusion and for a variety of advanced applications. Such applications range from high energy x- ray sources and high temperature hohlraums to fast ignition and laser radiography. We discuss a novel model for the scaling of strongly-driven stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering. This model postulates an intensity dependent correlation length associated with spatial incoherence due to filamentation and stimulated forward scattering. We first motivate the model and then relate it to a variety of experiments. Particular attention is paid to high temperature hohlraum experiments, which exhibited low to modest stimulated Brillouin scattering even though this instability was strongly driven. We also briefly discuss the strongly nonlinear interaction physics for efficient generation of high energy electrons either _ by irradiating a large plasma with near quarter-critical density or by irradiating overdense targets with ultra intense laser

  11. Investigation of film cooling from cylindrical hole with plasma actuator on flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yang; Dai, Sheng-ji; He, Li-ming; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Hou, Peng-hui

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling studies on the effect of plasma aerodynamic actuation on combustor film cooling performance. By comparing Case (i.e. film cooling hole with plasma actuator) result to Base (i.e. film cooling hole without plasma actuator) result, the mechanism of improving film cooling performance by using plasma actuator was analyzed. The results show that the Counter Rotating Vortex Pairs in Base are weakened by a new pair of vortex in Case, which is induced by the plasma-actuator-generated arc-shape-distributed electric body force. This leads to less interaction and less mixing between the main flow and the jet flow. Then it causes enhancement of the stability and the steadiness of the jet flow. Finally the average film cooling effectiveness in Case is higher than that in Base. For Case, the uniformity of temperature distribution along spanwise wall surface is improved as the actuator electrode radian increases, so does the average film cooling effectiveness. The film cooling effectiveness is higher when actuator is closer to the exit of hole.

  12. Analysis, Design and Control of a Planar Micro-robot Driven by Two Centripetal-Force Actuators*

    E-print Network

    Papadopoulos, Evangelos

    Analysis, Design and Control of a Planar Micro-robot Driven by Two Centripetal-Force Actuators of a novel, low cost, sliding micro-robot, which is actuated by centripetal forces generated by robot mounted and readily available. The motion mechanism is based on the interaction of centripetal forces generated

  13. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-11

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  14. Numerical simulation of a plasma actuator based on ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiya; Fukagata, Koji

    2013-06-28

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation of ion transport and flow around a single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator (PA) is performed. Spatial distributions of ions and electrons as well as their time evolution are obtained by solving the transport equations of monovalent positive ions, monovalent negative ions, and electrons. Voltage and frequency of the driving alternating-current signal are assumed to be 8 kV and 5 kHz, respectively. Special focus is laid upon the effect of voltage gradient dV/dt on the magnitude of the body force. The validity of steady force models often used in flow simulation is also examined. The simulation results show that the magnitude of the body force induced by the PA increases as the voltage gradient dV/dt increases and its increase rate becomes milder at higher voltage. The mechanism of body force generation is explained from the time evolution of number density fields of ions and electrons. A comparison between flow simulations using a time-resolved body force and its time-averaged counterpart demonstrates that the time-averaged model gives sufficiently accurate results when the time scale of the flow is more than 30 times greater than that of the PA.

  15. Measurements and Simulations of Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharges Used as Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    This report is a Ph.D. dissertation performed under NRA cooperative agreement and submitted as part of the final report. Asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) have shown promise for use as aerodynamic actuators for active flow control. In this project we studied DBD actuators experimentally and numerically. Our DBDs used a symmetric triangular high voltage waveform to generate plasma in atmospheric pressure air. Time-averaged measurements indicated that the induced force of a single barrier actuator design (one electrode insulated from the plasma) can be increased exponentially above the results of previous studies by decreasing both the length and thickness of the electrode exposed to the plasma. This increased force may allow these devices to control flow separation in a wider range of flow environments. Experiments using an intensified digital camera to examine the plasma on time scales of a few nanoseconds showed that, in addition to the previously-observed filamentary and jet-like plasma structures, discharges with very thin exposed electrodes exhibited a weak but constant plasma immediately adjacent to those electrodes. In double-barrier actuators (both electrodes insulated), decreasing the diameter of the narrower electrode lead to increasing forces, and recorded images showed the simultaneous existence of both filamentary and jet-like plasma structures. The development and application of a time-dependent, two-dimensional computational fluid plasma model has aided in understanding the detailed physics of surface DBDs at all-time scales. For simulated single-barrier discharges, the model qualitatively reproduced the filamentary and jet-like micro-discharge structures. The model was somewhat successful in reproducing the observed characteristics of double-barrier actuators. For both actuator geometries, the model indicated that the majority of the forces induced on the neutral gas occur in between micro-discharges as the plasmas decay.

  16. Active Joint Mechanism Driven by Multiple Actuators Made of Flexible Bags: A Proposal of Dual Structural Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Inou, Norio

    2013-01-01

    An actuator is required to change its speed and force depending on the situation. Using multiple actuators for one driving axis is one of the possible solutions; however, there is an associated problem of output power matching. This study proposes a new active joint mechanism using multiple actuators. Because the actuator is made of a flexible bag, it does not interfere with other actuators when it is depressurized. The proposed joint achieved coordinated motion of multiple actuators. This report also discusses a new actuator which has dual cylindrical structure. The cylinders are composed of flexible bags with different diameters. The joint torque is estimated based on the following factors: empirical formula for the flexible actuator torque, geometric relationship between the joint and the actuator, and the principle of virtual work. The prototype joint mechanism achieves coordinated motion of multiple actuators for one axis. With this motion, small inner actuator contributes high speed motion, whereas large outer actuator generates high torque. The performance of the prototype joint is examined by speed and torque measurements. The joint showed about 30% efficiency at 2.0?Nm load torque under 0.15?MPa air input. PMID:24385868

  17. Power consumption, discharge capacitance and light emission as measures for thrust production of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegseis, J.; Grundmann, S.; Tropea, C.

    2011-07-01

    A new procedure of determining the time resolved capacitance of a plasma actuator during operation is introduced, representing a simple diagnostic tool that provides insight into the phenomenological behavior of plasma actuators. The procedure is demonstrated by presenting example correlations between consumed electrical energy, size of the plasma region, and the operating voltage. It is shown that the capacitance of a plasma actuator is considerably increased by the presence of the plasma; hence a system that has previously been impedance matched can be considerably de-tuned when varying the operating voltage of the actuator. Such information is fundamental for any attempts to increase the energy efficiency of plasma-actuator systems. A combined analysis of the capacitance, light emission, size of the plasma region, force production, and power consumption is presented.

  18. A multi-responsive water-driven actuator with instant and powerful performance for versatile applications

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jiuke; Hou, Chengyi; Zhu, Bingjie; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang; Zhang, Qinghong

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical actuators driven by water that respond to multiple stimuli, exhibit fast responses and large deformations, and generate high stress have potential in artificial muscles, motors, and generators. Meeting all these requirements in a single device remains a challenge. We report a graphene monolayer paper that undergoes reversible deformation. Its graphene oxide cells wrinkle and extend in response to water desorption and absorption, respectively. Its fast (~0.3?s), powerful (>100?MPa output stress, 7.5 × 105?N kg?1 unit mass force), and controllable actuation can be triggered by moisture, heat, and light. The graphene monolayer paper has potential in artificial muscles, robotic hands, and electromagnetic-free generators. PMID:25826443

  19. Bio-Inspired Polymer Composite Actuator and Generator Driven by Water Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Mingming; Guo, Liang; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the development of a water-responsive polymer film. Combining both a rigid matrix (polypyrrole) and a dynamic network (polyol-borate), strong and flexible polymer films were developed that can exchange water with the environment to induce film expansion and contraction, resulting in rapid and continuous locomotion. The film actuator can generate contractile stress up to 27 megapascals, lift objects 380 times heavier than itself, and transport cargo 10 times heavier than itself. We have assembled a generator by associating this actuator with a piezoelectric element. Driven by water gradients, this generator outputs alternating electricity at ~0.3 hertz, with a peak voltage of ~1.0 volt. The electrical energy is stored in capacitors that could power micro- and nanoelectronic devices.

  20. Bio-inspired polymer composite actuator and generator driven by water gradients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mingming; Guo, Liang; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert

    2013-01-11

    Here we describe the development of a water-responsive polymer film. Combining both a rigid matrix (polypyrrole) and a dynamic network (polyol-borate), strong and flexible polymer films were developed that can exchange water with the environment to induce film expansion and contraction, resulting in rapid and continuous locomotion. The film actuator can generate contractile stress up to 27 megapascals, lift objects 380 times heavier than itself, and transport cargo 10 times heavier than itself. We have assembled a generator by associating this actuator with a piezoelectric element. Driven by water gradients, this generator outputs alternating electricity at ~0.3 hertz, with a peak voltage of ~1.0 volt. The electrical energy is stored in capacitors that could power micro- and nanoelectronic devices. PMID:23307738

  1. A new type of a direct-drive valve system driven by a piezostack actuator and sliding spool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Juncheol; Han, Chulhee; Han, Young-Min; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-07-01

    A direct-drive valve (DDV) system is a kind of electrohydraulic servo valve system, in which the actuator directly drives the spool of the valve. In conventional DDV systems, the spool is generally driven by an electromagnetic actuator. Performance characteristics such as frequency bandwidth of DDV systems driven by the electromagnetic actuator are limited due to the actuator response property. In order to improve the performance characteristics of conventional DDV systems, in this work a new configuration for a direct-drive valve system actuated by a piezostack actuator with a flexible beam mechanism is proposed (in short, a piezo-driven DDV system). Its benefits are demonstrated through both simulation and experiment. After describing the geometric configuration and operational principle of the proposed valve system, a governing equation of the whole system is obtained by combining the dynamic equations of the fluid part and the structural parts: the piezostack, the flexible beam, and the spool. In the structural parts of the piezostack and flexible beam, a lumped parameter modeling method is used, while the conventional rule of the fluid momentum is used for the fluid part. In order to evaluate valve performances of the proposed system, an experimental apparatus consisting of a hydraulic circuit and the piezo-driven DDV system is established. The performance characteristics are evaluated in terms of maximum spool displacement, flow rate, frequency characteristics, and step response. In addition, in order to advocate the feasibility of the proposed dynamic model, a comparison between simulation and experiment is undertaken.

  2. An Investigation of Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in a 140? Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Michael; Corke, Thomas; Samper, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    An experiment is presented to examine the effectiveness of AC dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to maintain attached flow around a 140° bend in a sector of a azimuthal channel. The Mach number at the inlet to the bend ranges from 0.10 to 0.23, and the static pressure ranges from 7 to 22 atmospheres. The plasma actuator is located just upstream of the natural flow separation location. It is designed to produce a net body force that is directed downstream and towards the wall. The requirements and design of the plasma actuator were augmented by a CFD simulation that included the plasma actuator body force vector field. The measurements consist of the static pressure distribution along the outside wall of the bend, and an array of total pressure sensors across the centerline of the exit of the bend. The pressure distribution across the channel showed the desired flattening of the mean pressure profile with increasing AC voltage and frequency that was indicative of a more uniform mass flow profile at the exit of the bend. These confirmed a plasma actuator effect that scaled linearly with the AC frequency, and with AC voltage to a power that is expected from the AC DBD analytical model.

  3. Numerical and Experimental Investigation on the Attenuation of Electromagnetic Waves in Unmagnetized Plasmas Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min; Xu, Haojun; Wei, Xiaolong; Liang, Hua; Song, Huimin; Sun, Quan; Zhang, Yanhua

    2015-10-01

    The attenuation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in unmagnetized plasma generated by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) actuator has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A numerical study is conducted to investigate the propagation of EM waves in multilayer plasma structures which cover a square flat plate. Experimentally, an ICP actuator with dimensions of 20 cm×20 cm×4 cm is designed to produce a steady plasma slab. The attenuation of EM waves in the plasma generated by the ICP actuator is measured by a reflectivity arch test method at incident waves of 2.3 GHz and 10.1 GHz, respectively. A contrastive analysis of calculated and measured results of these incident wave frequencies is presented, which suggests that the experiment accords well with our theory. As expected, the plasma slab generated by the ICP actuator can effectively attenuate the EM waves, which may have great potential application prospects in aircraft stealth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51276197, 11472306 and 11402301)

  4. Modeling and simulations of new electrostatically driven, bimorph actuator for high beam steering micromirror deflection angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, John P.; Coutu, Ronald A.; Starman, LaVern

    2015-02-01

    There are numerous applications for micromirror arrays seen in our everyday lives. From flat screen televisions and computer monitors, found in nearly every home and office, to advanced military weapon systems and space vehicles, each application bringing with it a unique set of requirements. The microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industry has researched many ways micromirror actuation can be accomplished and the different constraints on performance each design brings with it. This paper investigates a new "zipper" approach to electrostatically driven micromirrors with the intent of improving duel plane beam steering by coupling large deflection angles, over 30°, and a fast switching speed. To accomplish this, an extreme initial deflection is needed which can be reached using high stress bimorph beams. Currently this requires long beams and high voltage for the electrostatic pull in or slower electrothermal switching. The idea for this "zipper" approach is to stack multiple beams of a much shorter length and allow for the deflection of each beam to be added together in order to reach the required initial deflection height. This design requires much less pull-in voltage because the pull-in of one short beam will in turn reduce the height of the all subsequent beams, making it much easier to actuate. Using modeling and simulation software to characterize operations characteristics, different bimorph cantilever beam configurations are explored in order to optimize the design. These simulations show that this new "zipper" approach increases initial deflection as additional beams are added to the assembly without increasing the actuation voltage.

  5. Laterally-actuated inside-driven RF MEMS switches fabricated by a SOG process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Feng; Han, Lei; Tang, Jie-Ying; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents two RF MEMS switches, both of them are laterally-actuated and inside-driven. One is the push-pull type switch controlled by only one actuation signal, and the other is the low voltage three-state switch actuated by rhombic structures. To fabricate RF MEMS switches, the silicon on glass (SOG) based microwave transmission line is redesigned, and an electroplated gold layer is added to the standard SOG process flow. The measured insertion loss and isolation of the push-pull type switch at 6?GHz are?-0.28?dB and?-38.4?dB, respectively, and its measured pull-in voltage is 57?V. The measured insertion loss and isolation of the low voltage three-state switch at 6?GHz are?-0.77?dB and?-53?dB, respectively, and the measured pull-in voltage is only 15?V. Preliminary lifetime tests show the lifetimes of both switches exceed the magnitude of 107 cycles.

  6. Comparisons of Force Measurement Methods for DBD Plasma Actuators in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ashpis, David E.

    2009-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the force induced by both single (one electrode insulated) and double (both electrodes insulated) dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators in quiescent air. We have shown that, for single barrier actuators with cylindrical exposed electrodes, as the electrode diameter decrease the force efficiencies increase much faster than a previously reported linear trend. This behavior has been experimentally verified using two different measurement techniques: stagnation probe measurements of the induced flow velocity and direct measurement of the force using an electronic balance. Actuators with rectangular cross-section exposed electrodes do not show the same rapid increase at small thicknesses. We have also shown that the induced force is independent of the material used for the exposed electrode. The same techniques have shown that the induced force of a double barrier actuator increases with decreasing narrow electrode diameter.

  7. Surface Wave Driven Air-Water Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarova, Elena; Henriques, Julio; Ferreira, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The performance of a surface wave driven air-water plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure and 2.45 GHz has been analyzed. A 1D model has been developed in order to describe in detail the creation and loss processes of active species of interest and to provide a complete characterization of the axial structure of the source, including the discharge and the afterglow zones. The main electron creation channel was found to be the associative ionization process N +O -->NO+ + e. The NO(X) relative density in the afterglow plasma jet ranges from 1.2% to 1.6% depending on power and water percentage according to the model predictions and the measurements. Other types of species such as NO2 and nitrous acid HNO2 have also been detected by mass and FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, high densities of O2(a1?g) singlet delta oxygen molecules and OH radicals (1% and 5%, respectively) can be achieved in the discharge zone. In the late afterglow the O2(a1?g) density is about 0.1% of the total density. The plasma source has a flexible operation and potential for channeling the energy in ways that maximize the density of active species of interest. This study was funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science, under the research contract PTDC/FIS/108411/2008.

  8. On the possibility of laminar flow control on a swept wing by means of plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, S. L.; Kuryachii, A. P.; Manuilovich, S. V.; Rusyanov, D. A.; Skvortsov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical assessment of the possibility of laminar flow control (LFC) on a swept wing owing to volumetric force and heat impact of plasma actuators is presented. The proposed approach includes numerical modeling of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuators, calculation of inviscid flow over an infinite span swept wing, calculation of compressible boundary layer spatially modulated in spanwise direction, and numerical solution of linear stability problem for stationary modes of cross-flow-type disturbances. Calculations have been performed for one set of geometrical and physical parameters describing plasma actuators to estimate qualitative features of volumetric force and heat input distributions. Inviscid flow and boundary layer calculations were executed at free stream parameters corresponding to typical cruise flight conditions. Estimation of volumetric force impact necessary for noticeable influence on cross-flowtype instability is obtained.

  9. Flow and Noise Control in High Speed and High Reynolds Number Jets Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Kastner, J.; Kim, J.-H.; Utkin, Y.; Adamovich, I.; Brown, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of manipulating flow to change its characteristics is over a century old. Manipulating instabilities of a jet to increase its mixing and to reduce its radiated noise started in the 1970s. While the effort has been successful in low-speed and low Reynolds number jets, available actuators capabilities in terms of their amplitude, bandwidth, and phasing have fallen short in control of high-speed and high Reynolds number jets of practical interest. Localized arc filament plasma actuators have recently been developed and extensively used at Gas Dynamics and Turbulence Laboratory (GDTL) for control of highspeed and high Reynolds number jets. While the technique has been quite successful and is very promising, all the work up to this point had been carried out using small high subsonic and low supersonic jets from a 2.54 cm diameter nozzle exit with a Reynolds number of about a million. The preliminary work reported in this paper is a first attempt to evaluate the scalability of the technique. The power supply/plasma generator was designed and built in-house at GDTL to operate 8 actuators simultaneously over a large frequency range (0 to 200 kHz) with independent control over phase and duty cycle of each actuator. This allowed forcing the small jet at GDTL with azimuthal modes m = 0, 1, 2, 3, plus or minus 1, plus or minus 2, and plus or minus 4 over a large range of frequencies. This power supply was taken to and used, with minor modifications, at the NASA Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR). At NATR, 32 actuators were distributed around the 7.5 in. nozzle (a linear increase with nozzle exit diameter would require 60 actuators). With this arrangement only 8 actuators could operate simultaneously, thus limiting the forcing of the jet at NATR to only three azimuthal modes m = plus or minus 1, 4, and 8. Very preliminary results at NATR indicate that the trends observed in the larger NASA facility in terms of the effects of actuation frequency and azimuthal modes are similar in both small GDTL and larger NASA jets. However, the actuation authority seems to fall short in the larger jet at higher Mach numbers, resulting in decreased amplitude response compared to the small jet, which is attributed at this point to the lack of sufficient number of actuators. The preliminary results seem also to suggest that amplitude of actuation tones is similar in both the small and larger jets.

  10. Capacitances and energy deposition curve of nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lei; He, Kun; Di, Dongxu; Zhang, Qiaogen; Liu, Chunliang

    2014-05-01

    Nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge (NPSDBD) plasma actuator is preferred to generate aerodynamic actuation which relies on the deposited energy during nanosecond time scale, named as the mechanism of fast thermalization. It is very important to understand the energy deposition process of NPSDBD plasma actuator. In this paper, an equivalent circuit model is presented to describe a typical asymmetric NPSDBD plasma actuator first. Of the three key capacitances in the equivalent circuit, the values of Capacitance C(m) and C(g) can be gotten by the calculation of the electric field, with the method of undetermined coefficients, while the value of Capacitance C(d) is determined from the charge-voltage (Q-V) plot, also called Lissajous figure. It is found that the value of Capacitance C(d) varies with the amplitude of applied pulse voltage, due to the change of the dimension of plasma sheet. Based on the circuit parameters and the measured waveforms of discharge voltage and current, the time varying characteristics of deposited energy can be obtained finally. It is indicated that the calculated results of deposited energy show a good agreement with conventional method. PMID:24880363

  11. Author's personal copy Broadband flow-induced sound control using plasma actuators

    E-print Network

    Huang, Xun

    Author's personal copy Broadband flow-induced sound control using plasma actuators Xun Huang a of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, China b Aeronautics and Astronautics, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, UK a r t i c l e i n f o Article

  12. Vane Separation Control in a Linear Cascade with Area Expansion using AC DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleven, Christopher; Corke, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Experiments are presented on the use of AC dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to prevent flow separation on vanes in a linear cascade with area expansion. The inlet Mach number to the cascade ranged from 0.3 to 0.5, and the vane chord Reynolds numbers ranged from 0 . 9 ×106 to 1 . 5 ×106 . Three cascade designs with different amounts of area expansion, providing different degrees of adverse pressure gradients, were examined. Surface flow visualization revealed a 3-D separation bubble with strong recirculation that formed on the suction side of the vanes. The pattern agreed well with CFD simulations. Plasma actuators were placed on the suction sides of the vanes, just upstream of the flow separation location. Quantitative measurements were performed in the wakes of the vanes using a 5-hole Pitot probe. The measurements were used to determine the effect of the plasma actuator separation control on the pressure loss coefficient, and flow turning angle through the cascades. Overall, the plasma actuators separation control increased the velocity magnitude and dynamic pressure in the passage between the vanes, resulted in a more spanwise-uniform flow turning angle in the vane passage, and significantly lowered the loss coefficient compared to the baseline.

  13. Current-Driven Filament Instabilities in Relativistic Plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang Ren

    2013-02-13

    This grant has supported a study of some fundamental problems in current- and flow-driven instabilities in plasmas and their applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics. It addressed current-driven instabilities and their roles in fast ignition, and flow-driven instabilities and their applications in astrophysics.

  14. Design and experimental research of a novel inchworm type piezo-driven rotary actuator with the changeable clamping radius.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongwei; Fu, Lu; Ren, Luquan; Huang, Hu; Fan, Zunqiang; Li, Jianping; Qu, Han

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel piezo-driven rotary actuator with the changeable clamping radius is developed based on the inchworm principle. This actuator mainly utilizes three piezoelectric actuators, a flexible gripper, a clamping block, and a rotor to achieve large stroke rotation with high resolution. The design process of the flexible gripper consisting of the driving unit and the clamping unit is described. Lever-type mechanisms were used to amplify the micro clamping displacements. The amplifying factor and parasitic displacement of the lever-type mechanism in the clamping unit was analyzed theoretically and experimentally. In order to investigate the rotation characteristics of the actuator, a series of experiments was carried out. Experimental results indicate that the actuator can rotate at a speed of 77,488 ?rad/s with a driving frequency of 167 Hz. The rotation resolution and maximum load torque of the actuator are 0.25 ?rad and 37 N mm, respectively. The gripper is movable along the z direction based on an elevating platform, and the clamping radius can change from 10.6 mm to 25 mm. Experimental results confirm that the actuator can achieve different rotation speeds by changing the clamping radius. PMID:23387686

  15. LES of a Jet Excited by the Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of a high-speed jet are governed by the instability waves that form in the free-shear boundary layer of the jet. Jet excitation manipulates the growth and saturation of particular instability waves to control the unsteady flow structures that characterize the energy cascade in the jet.The results may include jet noise mitigation or a reduction in the infrared signature of the jet. The Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPA) have demonstrated the ability to excite a high-speed jets in laboratory experiments. Extending and optimizing this excitation technology, however, is a complex process that will require many tests and trials. Computational simulations can play an important role in understanding and optimizing this actuator technology for real-world applications. Previous research has focused on developing a suitable actuator model and coupling it with the appropriate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods using two-dimensional spatial flow approximations. This work is now extended to three-dimensions (3-D) in space. The actuator model is adapted to a series of discrete actuators and a 3-D LES simulation of an excited jet is run. The results are used to study the fluid dynamics near the actuator and in the jet plume.

  16. A rapidly settled closed-loop control for airfoil aerodynamics based on plasma actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Wong, C. W.; Wang, L.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the response of the slope seeking with extended Kalman filter (EKF) deployed in a closed-loop system for airfoil aerodynamics control. A novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator was used to manipulate the flow around the NACA 0015 airfoil. Experiments were performed under different freestream velocities U ?, covering the chord Reynolds number Re from 4.4 × 104 to 7.7 × 104. Firstly, the advantages of applying this DBD plasma actuator (hereafter called sawtooth plasma actuator) on the airfoil were examined in an open-loop system at Re = 7.7 × 104. The sawtooth plasma actuator led to a delay in the stall angle ? stall by 5° and an increase in the maximum lift coefficient by about 9 %. On the other hand, at the same input power, the traditional DBD plasma actuator managed a delay in ? stall by only 3° and an increase in by about 3 %. Secondly, the convergence time t c of the lift force F L at Re from 4.4 × 104 to 7.7 × 104 was investigated for two closed-loop systems. It has been demonstrated that the t c was about 70 % less under the slope seeking with EKF than that under the conventional slope seeking with high-pass (HP) and low-pass (LP) filters at Re = 7.7 × 104. The reduction in t c was also observed at a different Re. Finally, the slope seeking with EKF showed excellent robustness over a moderate Re range; that is, the voltage amplitude determined by the control algorithm promptly responded to a change in Re, much faster than that of the conventional slope seeking with HP and LP filters.

  17. TEST RESULTS FOR A STIRLING-ENGINE-DRIVEN HEAT-ACTUATED HEAT PUMP BREADBOARD SYSTEM T.M. Moynihan

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    849044 TEST RESULTS FOR A STIRLING-ENGINE-DRIVEN HEAT-ACTUATED HEAT PUMP BREADBOARD SYSTEM T and hydraulic transmission (Figure 2). Engine power is transferred to the i A Free-Piston Stirling Engine prime's performance/ Stirling Engine - Spring operation over the specified operating range, Driver -'i. i, C

  18. Performance evaluation of a valveless micropump driven by a ring-type piezoelectric actuator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2006-02-01

    Presented in this paper is the study of the performance evaluation of a valveless micropump driven by a ring-type piezoelectric actuator. The application of this micropump is to circulate fuel inside a miniaturized direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) power system. A theoretical model based on the theory of plates and shells is established to estimate the deflection and the volume change of this micropump without liquid loading. Both finite-element method (FEM) and experimental method are applied to verify this model. Using this model, the optimal design parameters such as the dimensions and the mechanical properties of the micropump can be obtained. Furthermore, various system parameters that will affect the performance of the micropump system with liquid loading are identified and analyzed experimentally. It is expected that this study will provide some vital information for many micropump applications such as fuel delivery in fuel cells, ink jet printers, and biofluidics. PMID:16529122

  19. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  20. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators Thrust-Measurement Methodology Incorporating New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a large diameter, grounded, metal sleeve.

  1. Simulation of DBD plasma actuators, and nanoparticle-plasma interactions in argon-hydrogen CCP RF discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamunuru, Meenakshi

    The focus of this work is modeling and simulation of low temperature plasma discharges (LTPs). The first part of the thesis consists of the study of dielectric barrier (DBD) plasma actuators. Use of DBD plasma actuators on airfoil surfaces is a promising method for increasing airfoil efficiency. Actuators produce a surface discharge that causes time averaged thrust in the neutral gas. The thrust modifies the boundary layer properties of the flow and prevents the occurrence of separation bubbles. In simulating the working of an actuator, the focus is on the spatial characteristics of the thrust produced by the discharge over very short time and space scales. The results provide an understanding of the causes of thrust, and the basic principles behind the actuator operation. The second part of this work focusses on low pressure plasma discharges used for silicon nanoparticle synthesis. When reactive semiconductor precursor gases are passed through capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) radio frequency (RF) reactors, nano sized particles are formed. When the reactors are operated at high enough powers, a very high fraction of the nanoparticles are crystallized in the chamber. Nanoparticle crystallization in plasma is a very complex process and not yet fully understood. It can be inferred from experiments that bulk and surface processes initiated due to energetic ion impaction of the nanoparticles are responsible for reordering of silicon atoms, causing crystallization. Therefore, study of plasma-particle interactions is the first step towards understanding how particles are crystallized. The specific focus of this work is to investigate the experimental evidence that hydrogen gas presence in argon discharges used for silicon nanocrystal synthesis, leads to a superior quality of nanocrystals. Influence of hydrogen gas on plasma composition and discharge characteristics is studied. Via Monte Carlo simulation, distribution of ion energy impacting particles surface is studied. It is seen that hydrogen ions cause a reduction in particle floating potential, thereby lowering the ion impaction energies. The hydrogen ion current is also effective in delivering increased number of atomic H radicals to the particle surface, which are known to promote particle crystallization. The work therefore sheds light on the ways in which trace amount of hydrogen gas participates in silicon nanoparticle crystallization in argon silane plasma.

  2. Force Measurements of Single and Double Barrier DBD Plasma Actuators in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ashpis, David E.

    2008-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the force induced by both single (one electrode insulated) and double (both electrodes insulated) dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators in quiescent air. We have shown that, for single barrier actuators, as the electrode diameter decreased below those values previously studied the induced Force increases exponentially rather than linearly. This behavior has been experimentally verified using two different measurement techniques: stagnation probe measurements of the induced flow velocity and direct measurement of the force using an electronic balance. In addition, we have shown the the induced force is independent of the material used for the exposed electrode. The same techniques have shown that the induced force of a double barrier actuator increases with decreasing narrow electrode diameter.

  3. A plasma aerodynamic actuator supplied by a multilevel generator operating with different voltage waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Carlo A.; Cristofolini, Andrea; Grandi, Gabriele; Neretti, Gabriele; Seri, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    In this work a high voltage—high frequency generator for the power supply of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator for the aerodynamic control obtained by the electro-hydro-dynamic (EHD) interaction is described and tested. The generator can produce different voltage waveforms. The operating frequency is independent of the load characteristics and does not require impedance matching. The peak-to-peak voltage is 30?kV at a frequency up to 20?kHz and time variation rates up to 60?kV??s-1. The performance of the actuator when supplied by several voltage waveforms is investigated. The tests have been performed in still air at atmospheric pressure. Voltage and current time behaviors have been measured. The evaluation of the energy delivered to the actuator allowed the estimation of the periods in which the plasma was ignited. Vibrational and rotational temperatures of the plasma have been estimated through spectroscopic acquisitions. The flow field induced in the region above the surface of the DBD actuator has been studied and the EHD conversion efficiency has been evaluated for the voltage waveforms investigated. The nearly sinusoidal multilevel voltage of the proposed generator and the sinusoidal voltage waveform of a conventional ac generator obtain comparable plasma features, EHD effects, and efficiencies. Inverse saw tooth waveform presents the highest effects and efficiency. The rectangular waveform generates suitable EHD effects but with the lowest efficiency. The voltage waveforms that induce plasmas with higher rotational temperatures are less efficient for the conversion of the electric into kinetic energy.

  4. Measurement of transient force produced by a propagating arc magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator in quiescent atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Joon; Sirohi, Jayant; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted on a magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator consisting of two parallel, six inch long, copper electrodes flush mounted on an insulating ceramic plate. An electrical arc is generated by a???1 kA current pulse at???100?V across the electrodes. A self-induced Lorentz force drives the arc along the electrodes. The motion of the arc induces flow in the surrounding air through compression as well as entrainment, and generates a transient force, about???4?ms in duration. Experiments were performed on a prototype actuator in quiescent atmospheric air to characterize the motion of the arc and the momentum transferred to the surrounding air. Measurements included transient force and total impulse generated by the actuator as well as the armature voltage and current. The arc shape and transit velocity were determined by high-speed imaging. A peak force of 0.4 N imparting an impulse of 0.68 mN-s was measured for a peak current of 1.2 kA. The force scaled with the square of the armature current and the impulse scaled linearly with the spent capacitor energy. The results provide insight into the mechanisms of body force generation and momentum transfer of a magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator.

  5. Experimental Investigation on Aerodynamic Control of a Wing with Distributed Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Menghu; Li, Jun; Liang, Hua; Niu, Zhongguo; Zhao, Guangyin

    2015-06-01

    Experimental investigation of active flow control on the aerodynamic performance of a flying wing is conducted. Subsonic wind tunnel tests are performed using a model of a 35° swept flying wing with an nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD) plasma actuator, which is installed symmetrically on the wing leading edge. The lift and drag coefficient, lift-to-drag ratio and pitching moment coefficient are tested by a six-component force balance for a range of angles of attack. The results indicate that a 44.5% increase in the lift coefficient, a 34.2% decrease in the drag coefficient and a 22.4% increase in the maximum lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved as compared with the baseline case. The effects of several actuation parameters are also investigated, and the results show that control efficiency demonstrates a strong dependence on actuation location and frequency. Furthermore, we highlight the use of distributed plasma actuators at the leading edge to enhance the aerodynamic performance, giving insight into the different mechanism of separation control and vortex control, which shows tremendous potential in practical flow control for a broad range of angles of attack. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51276197, 51207169 and 51336011)

  6. Addendum to ‘velocity-information based force-term estimation of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegseis, J.; Maden, I.; Schwarz, C.; Tropea, C.; Grundmann, S.

    2015-08-01

    In a recent publication (Kriegseis et al 2013 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 055202) we contrasted the variety of published strategies to estimate magnitude and distribution of the body force produced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators. All approaches were applied to an identical set of velocity data, which was experimentally obtained by means of particle image velocimetry. Particularly, the determined force distributions of the above paper turned out to be beneficial for subsequent efforts to derive empirical plasma-actuator models. The purpose of this addendum, therefore, is to provide both the velocity data and the determined force distributions as discussed in the original publication. As such, a comparison of different empirical models based on identical velocity data becomes possible. In addition, numericists can directly implement the published force fields in so as to perform computational studies of discharge-based flow control.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Flow Separation Control in Low-Pressure Turbines using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Ashpis, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    A recently introduced phenomenological model to simulate flow control applications using plasma actuators has been further developed and improved in order to expand its use to complicated actuator geometries. The new modeling approach eliminates the requirement of an empirical charge density distribution shape by using the embedded electrode as a source for the charge density. The resulting model is validated against a flat plate experiment with quiescent environment. The modeling approach incorporates the effect of the plasma actuators on the external flow into Navier Stokes computations as a body force vector which is obtained as a product of the net charge density and the electric field. The model solves the Maxwell equation to obtain the electric field due to the applied AC voltage at the electrodes and an additional equation for the charge density distribution representing the plasma density. The new modeling approach solves the charge density equation in the computational domain assuming the embedded electrode as a source therefore automatically generating a charge density distribution on the surface exposed to the flow similar to that observed in the experiments without explicitly specifying an empirical distribution. The model is validated against a flat plate experiment with quiescent environment.

  8. Nanosecond pulsed sliding dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for airflow control: Electrical, optical, and mechanical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayoda, K. D.; Benard, N.; Moreau, E.

    2015-08-01

    Plasma actuators used for active flow control are widely studied because they could replace mechanical actuators. Industrial applications of these plasma actuators sometimes require a large surface plasma sheet in view of increasing the interaction region between the discharge and the incoming flow. Instead of using a typical two-electrode nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for which the interaction region is limited to about 20 mm, this study proposes to characterize a nanosecond sliding discharge based on a three-electrode geometry in order to increase the extension length up to the electrode gap. This sliding discharge is compared to the typical nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge by means of electrical, optical, and mechanical diagnostics. Electrical characterization reveals that the deposited energy can be widely increased. Time-resolved Intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) images of the discharge development over the dielectric surface highlight that the intensity and the propagation velocity of streamers are strongly affected by the DC voltage applied at the third electrode. Finally, qualitative and quantitative characterizations of the pressure wave due to the surrounding gas heating are proposed by means of Schlieren visualizations and high frequency pressure measurements, respectively.

  9. Shockwave—boundary layer interaction control by plasma aerodynamic actuation: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Quan; Cui, Wei; Li, Ying-Hong; Cheng, Bang-Qin; Jin, Di; Li, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The potential of controlling shockwave—boundary layer interactions (SWBLIs) in air by plasma aerodynamic actuation is demonstrated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 3 in-draft air tunnel. The separation-inducing shock is generated with a diamond-shaped shockwave generator located on the wall opposite to the surface electrodes, and the flow properties are studied with schlieren imaging and static wall pressure probes. The measurements show that the separation phenomenon is weakened with the plasma aerodynamic actuation, which is observed to have significant control authority over the interaction. The main effect is the displacement of the reflected shock. Perturbations of incident and reflected oblique shocks interacting with the separation bubble in a rectangular cross section supersonic test section are produced by the plasma actuation. This interaction results in a reduction of the separation bubble size, as detected by phase-lock schlieren images. The measured static wall pressure also shows that the separation-inducing shock is restrained. Our results suggest that the boundary layer separation control through heating is the primary control mechanism.

  10. An experimental study of a plasma actuator in absence of free airflow: Ionic wind velocity profile

    SciTech Connect

    Mestiri, R.; Hadaji, R.; Ben Nasrallah, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we are interested in the direct current electrical corona discharge created between two wire electrodes. The experimental results are related to some electroaerodynamic actuators based on the direct current corona discharge at the surface of a dielectric material. Several geometrical forms are selected for the dielectric surface, such as a plate, a cylinder, and a NACA 0015 aircraft wing. The current density-electric field characteristics are presented for different cases in order to determine the discharge regimes. The corona discharge produces nonthermal plasma, so it is called plasma discharge. Plasma discharge creates a tangential ionic wind above the surface at the vicinity of the wall. The ionic wind induced by the corona discharge is measured in absence of free external airflow. The ionic wind velocity profiles and the maximum induced tangential force are given for different surface forms, so it is possible to compare the actuators effect based on the span of the ionic wind velocity and thrust values. The higher ionic wind velocity is obtained with the NACA profile, which shows the effectiveness of this actuator for the airflow control.

  11. Dissipated power and induced velocity fields data of a micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for active flow control?

    PubMed Central

    Pescini, E.; Martínez, D.S.; De Giorgi, M.G.; Francioso, L.; Ficarella, A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators have gained great interest among all the active flow control devices typically employed in aerospace and turbomachinery applications [1,2]. Compared with the macro SDBDs, the micro single dielectric barrier discharge (MSDBD) actuators showed a higher efficiency in conversion of input electrical power to delivered mechanical power [3,4]. This article provides data regarding the performances of a MSDBD plasma actuator [5,6]. The power dissipation values [5] and the experimental and numerical induced velocity fields [6] are provided. The present data support and enrich the research article entitled “Optimization of micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator models based on experimental velocity and body force fields” by Pescini et al. [6]. PMID:26425667

  12. Dissipated power and induced velocity fields data of a micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for active flow control.

    PubMed

    Pescini, E; Martínez, D S; De Giorgi, M G; Francioso, L; Ficarella, A

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators have gained great interest among all the active flow control devices typically employed in aerospace and turbomachinery applications [1,2]. Compared with the macro SDBDs, the micro single dielectric barrier discharge (MSDBD) actuators showed a higher efficiency in conversion of input electrical power to delivered mechanical power [3,4]. This article provides data regarding the performances of a MSDBD plasma actuator [5,6]. The power dissipation values [5] and the experimental and numerical induced velocity fields [6] are provided. The present data support and enrich the research article entitled "Optimization of micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator models based on experimental velocity and body force fields" by Pescini et al. [6]. PMID:26425667

  13. Progress Toward Accurate Measurements of Power Consumptions of DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.; Griebeler, Elmer L.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of power consumption by Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators is a challenge due to the characteristics of the actuator current signal. Micro-discharges generate high-amplitude, high-frequency current spike transients superimposed on a low-amplitude, low-frequency current. We have used a high-speed digital oscilloscope to measure the actuator power consumption using the Shunt Resistor method and the Monitor Capacitor method. The measurements were performed simultaneously and compared to each other in a time-accurate manner. It was found that low signal-to-noise ratios of the oscilloscopes used, in combination with the high dynamic range of the current spikes, make the Shunt Resistor method inaccurate. An innovative, nonlinear signal compression circuit was applied to the actuator current signal and yielded excellent agreement between the two methods. The paper describes the issues and challenges associated with performing accurate power measurements. It provides insights into the two methods including new insight into the Lissajous curve of the Monitor Capacitor method. Extension to a broad range of parameters and further development of the compression hardware will be performed in future work.

  14. Auto-Gopher: A Wireline Deep Sampler Driven by Piezoelectric Percussive Actuator and EM Rotary Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Ressa, Aaron; Jae Lee, Hyeong; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Zacny, Kris; Paulsen, Gale L.; Beegle, Luther; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2013-01-01

    The ability to penetrate subsurfaces and perform sample acquisition at depth of meters may be critical for future NASA in-situ exploration missions to bodies in the solar system, including Mars and Europa. A corer/sampler was developed with the goal of enabling acquisition of samples from depths of several meters where if used on Mars would be beyond the oxidized and sterilized zone. For this purpose, we developed a rotary-hammering coring drill, called Auto-Gopher, which employs a piezoelectric actuated percussive mechanism for breaking formations and an electric motor that rotates the bit to remove the powdered cuttings. This sampler is a wireline mechanism that can be fed into and retrieved from the drilled hole using a winch and a cable. It includes an inchworm anchoring mechanism allowing the drill advancement and weight on bit control without twisting the reeling and power cables. The penetration rate is being optimized by simultaneously activating the percussive and rotary motions of the Auto-Gopher. The percussive mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) mechanism that is driven by piezoelectric stack and that was demonstrated to require low axial preload. The design and fabrication of this device were presented in previous publications. This paper presents the results of laboratory and field tests and lessons learned from this development.

  15. Combining Model-Based and Feature-Driven Diagnosis Approaches - A Case Study on Electromechanical Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimhan, Sriram; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Balaban, Edward; Saxena, Abhinav

    2010-01-01

    Model-based diagnosis typically uses analytical redundancy to compare predictions from a model against observations from the system being diagnosed. However this approach does not work very well when it is not feasible to create analytic relations describing all the observed data, e.g., for vibration data which is usually sampled at very high rates and requires very detailed finite element models to describe its behavior. In such cases, features (in time and frequency domains) that contain diagnostic information are extracted from the data. Since this is a computationally intensive process, it is not efficient to extract all the features all the time. In this paper we present an approach that combines the analytic model-based and feature-driven diagnosis approaches. The analytic approach is used to reduce the set of possible faults and then features are chosen to best distinguish among the remaining faults. We describe an implementation of this approach on the Flyable Electro-mechanical Actuator (FLEA) test bed.

  16. Airflow influence on the discharge performance of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegseis, J.; Tropea, C.; Grundmann, S.

    2012-07-15

    In the present work, the effect of the airflow on the performance of dielectric barrier discharge plasma-actuators is investigated experimentally. In order to analyze the actuator's performance, luminosity measurements have been carried out simultaneously with the recording of the relevant electrical parameters. A performance drop of about 10% is observed for the entire measured parameter range at a flow speed of M = 0.145 (U{sub {infinity}}=50 m/s). This insight is of particular importance, since the plasma-actuator control authority is already significantly reduced at this modest speed level. The results at higher Mach numbers (0.4

  17. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r)more »from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.« less

  18. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Richeson, Jeff; Schmidt, George; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Turchi, Peter J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). For the successful implementation of the scheme, plasma jets of the requisite momentum flux density need to be produced. Their transport over sufficiently large distances (a few meters) needs to be assured. When they collide and merge into a liner, relative differences in velocity, density and temperature of the jets could give rise to instabilities in the development of the liner. Variation in the jet properties must be controlled to ensure that the growth rate of the instabilities are not significant over the time scale of the liner formation before engaging with the target plasma. On impact with the target plasma, some plasma interpenetration might occur between the liner and the target. The operating parameter space needs to be identified to ensure that a reasonably robust and conducting contact surface is formed between the liner and the target. A mismatch in the "impedance" between the liner and the target plasma could give rise to undesirable shock heating of the liner leading to increased entropy (thermal losses) in the liner. Any irregularities in the liner will accentuate the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the compression of the target plasma by the liner.

  19. Laser-driven Acceleration in Clustered Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.; Wang, X.; Shim, B.; Downer, M. C.

    2009-01-22

    We propose a new approach to avoid dephasing limitation of laser wakefield acceleration by manipulating the group velocity of the driving pulse using clustered plasmas. We demonstrated the control of phase velocity in clustered plasmas by third harmonic generation and frequency domain interferometry experiments. The results agree with a numerical model. Based on this model, the group velocity of the driving pulse in clustered plasmas was calculated and the result shows the group velocity can approach the speed of light c in clustered plasmas.

  20. Micro Actuators Electrostatic actuator

    E-print Network

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    #12;Micro Balloon Actuators ·Use polymer (silicon rubber, parylene, polyimide etc) to form flexible Microvalve #12;· Parylene membrane. - Smaller size => small dead-volume · Heaters on a free-standing silicon. Thermopneumatic Microvalve (II) #12;(KOH) (BOE) (BOE) (Oxygen Plasma) Parylene Membrane Fabrication Process #12

  1. Magnetically driven behavior of plasma loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, Eve; Bellan, Paul

    2008-11-01

    By studying one or two current-carrying arched flux tubes in a laboratory environment, much can be learned about fundamental plasma dynamics and, potentially, analogous features found in the solar corona. These flux tubes, filled with low-beta plasma, are created with a modified plasma gun. Similar to spheromak guns but possessing a different geometry, the gun comprises an arched vacuum field linking a coplanar anode and cathode. Neutral gas is supplied from nozzles in the electrodes as high voltage is applied, ionizing the gas to form a semicircular loop of plasma. Supplying more than one neutral gas allows the resulting portions of the plasma to be imaged separately with optical filters. When two gases are supplied to a single loop, one from each electrode, high-speed jets are seen to flow from both ends into the apex. This method was used to test an MHD theory explaining flux tube collimation (P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1999 (2003)). If instead a pair of loops is created, each from a different gas, the two twist around each other and/or merge; experiments of this type suggest reconnection effects (J. F. Hansen et al, Phys. Plasmas 11, 3177 (2004)). The plasma's changing magnetic field is measured with an array of ``B dot'' probes and compared to force-free models.

  2. Dynamics of Lane Formation in Driven Binary Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Raeth, C.; Thomas, H. M.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Morfill, G. E.; Wysocki, A.; Loewen, H.; Goedheer, W. J.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.

    2009-02-27

    The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane-formation process is in good agreement with computer simulations of a binary Yukawa model with Langevin dynamics. The laning is quantified in terms of the anisotropic scaling index, leading to a universal order parameter for driven systems.

  3. Noise-driven multistability in a plasma diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J. T.; Pae, K. H.; Hahn, S. J.

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a brand-new phenomenon of competing multistability in plasma diode systems has been observed by our group [S. J. Hahn and K. H. Pae, Phys. Plasmas 10, 314 (2003)]. By employing one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with proper control of the inherent numerical noise, the noise-driven multistability and dynamical transitions between regular and multistable solutions have been investigated. Throughout this work, it is verified that the competing multistability is, in principle, a noise-driven dynamical switch between attractors and occurs due to noise fluctuations inside a system near the fractal basin boundaries.

  4. On the benefits of hysteresis effects for closed-loop separation control using plasma actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, N.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Moreau, E.; Griffin, J.; Bonnet, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    Flow separation control by a non-thermal plasma actuator is considered for a NACA 0015 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 1.9 × 105. Static hysteresis in the lift coefficient is demonstrated for increasing and then decreasing sinusoidal voltage amplitude supplying a typical single dielectric barrier discharge actuator at the leading edge of the model. In addition to these open-loop experiments, unsteady surface pressure signals are examined for transient processes involving forced reattachment and natural separation. The results show that strong pressure oscillations in the relatively slow separation process, compared to reattachment, precede the ultimate massive flow separation. To enhance the contrast between the parts of the signal related to the attached flow and those related to the incipient separation, RMS estimate of filtered values of Cp is used to define a flow separation predictor that is implemented in feedback control. Two simple controllers are proposed, one based on a predefined threshold of the unsteady Cp and another that utilizes the flow separation predictor to identify incipient separation. The latter effectively leverages the hysteresis in the post-stall regime to reduce the electrical power consumed by the actuator while maintaining continuously attached flow.

  5. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  6. Fast, strong and compliant pneumatic actuation for dexterous tendon-driven hands

    E-print Network

    Todorov, Emanuel

    kinematically, yet the lack of suitable actuation has hindered control applications. Furthermore, 3D printing technology. The rest of the paper is organized as follows. In the next section we outline the design

  7. Design and analysis of hydraulically driven actuation system For a parabolic solar trough

    E-print Network

    Popovi?, Katarina, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    This thesis documents Katarina Popovic's contribution to the design of hydraulic cylinder actuation system for day to day solar trough sun tracking, a semester long project within 2.752 Development of Mechanical Products ...

  8. Energy deposition characteristics of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: Influence of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, G.; Winkel, R.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study aimed at the characterization of energy deposition of nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators was carried out. Special attention was given on the effect of the thickness and material used for dielectric barrier. The selected materials for this study were polyimide film (Kapton), polyamide based nylon (PA2200), and silicone rubber. Schlieren measurements were carried out in quiescent air conditions in order to observe density gradients induced by energy deposited. Size of heated area was used to qualify the energy deposition coupled with electrical power measurements performed using the back-current shunt technique. Additionally, light intensity measurements showed a different nature of discharge based upon the material used for barrier, for a fixed thickness and frequency of discharge. Finally, a characterisation study was performed for the three tested materials. Dielectric constant, volume resistivity, and thermal conductivity were measured. Strong trends between the control parameters and the energy deposited into the fluid during the discharge were observed. Results indicate that efficiency of energy deposition mechanism relative to the thickness of the barrier strongly depends upon the material used for the dielectric barrier itself. In general, a high dielectric strength and a low volumetric resistivity are preferred for a barrier, together with a high heat capacitance and a low thermal conductivity coefficient in order to maximize the efficiency of the thermal energy deposition induced by an ns-DBD plasma actuator.

  9. Numerical investigation of plasma-actuator force-term estimations from flow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörr, P. C.; Kloker, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    The accuracy of the experimental force-term estimation for cold, dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators based on fluid-velocity information is investigated by means of numerical simulations for cases without and with a laminar base flow. First, a wall jet induced by a steady planar body force similar to that induced by a plasma actuator under quiescent-air conditions is simulated. Second, the same steady force is applied to stabilise a laminar two-dimensional zero-pressure-gradient boundary-layer flow under the usual assumption of force independence. For both cases the force distribution is reconstructed applying two different methods to eliminate the pressure gradients unknown from experiments. The method based on the vorticity transport equation requires the force to be dominated by one component only. It is found that its accuracy is unaffected by a base flow but strongly dependent on the characteristics of the force distribution. The other method is based on the primitive-variable formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations, and the force components are assumed to dominate the pressure gradients, which are neglected. It is shown that this assumption is valid for the wall-parallel force component only, and in the case of a base flow the pressure gradients must not be neglected. The clarification of the accuracy of the different methods enables to evaluate the force-independence assumption in detail. For the case with base flow, the effect of force unsteadiness is investigated.

  10. Plasma driven neutron/gamma generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Antolak, Arlyn

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for the generation of neutron/gamma rays is described including a chamber which defines an ion source, said apparatus including an RF antenna positioned outside of or within the chamber. Positioned within the chamber is a target material. One or more sets of confining magnets are also provided to create a cross B magnetic field directly above the target. To generate neutrons/gamma rays, the appropriate source gas is first introduced into the chamber, the RF antenna energized and a plasma formed. A series of high voltage pulses are then applied to the target. A plasma sheath, which serves as an accelerating gap, is formed upon application of the high voltage pulse to the target. Depending upon the selected combination of source gas and target material, either neutrons or gamma rays are generated, which may be used for cargo inspection, and the like.

  11. Impact of ns-DBD plasma actuation on the boundary layer transition using convective heat transfer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmer, Dirk; Peschke, Philip; Terzis, Alexandros; Ott, Peter; Weigand, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    This paper demonstrates that the impact of nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) actuators on the structure of the boundary layer can be investigated using quantitative convective heat transfer measurements. For the experiments, the flow over a flat plate with a C4 leading edge thickness distribution was examined at low speed incompressible flow (6.6-11.5 m s-1). An ns-DBD plasma actuator was mounted 5?mm downstream of the leading edge and several experiments were conducted giving particular emphasis on the effect of actuation frequency and the freestream velocity. Local heat transfer distributions were measured using the transient liquid crystal technique with and without plasma activated. As a result, any effect of plasma on the structure of the boundary layer is interpreted by local heat transfer coefficient distributions which are compared with laminar and turbulent boundary layer correlations. The heat transfer results, which are also confirmed by hot-wire measurements, show the considerable effect of the actuation frequency on the location of the transition point elucidating that liquid crystal thermography is a promising method for investigating plasma-flow interactions very close to the wall. Additionally, the hot-wire measurements indicate possible velocity oscillations in the near wall flow due to plasma activation.

  12. Towards Feedback Control of Bypass Transition: Experiments on Laminar Boundary Layer Response to a Pulsed Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Philippe; Hanson, Ronald; Naguib, Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    Plasma actuators have recently been shown to negate the effect of the transient growth instability occurring in a Blasius boundary layer for the purpose of delaying bypass transition. Specifically, a spanwise array of symmetric plasma actuators generate a counter disturbance of spanwise periodic counter-rotating vortices. During steady operation, the total disturbance energy, introduced via an array of static cylindrical roughness elements, was reduced by up to 68%, as shown by Hanson et al (Exp. Fluids, 2010). The objective of this work is to elucidate the dynamic response of a laminar boundary layer to pulsed excitation by the actuators used in the aforementioned study. The temporal evolution and decay of the disturbance is studied using phase-averaged hotwire measurements at a single plane located downstream of the actuator. The data provide insight into the spatio-temporal character of the modes excited by pulsed plasma actuation. Results are discussed with respect to eventual integration with a feedback control system in collaboration with Princeton University in a multi-university research program aimed at transition control.

  13. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  14. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2001-05-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low (˜1016W/cm2) and high (˜1018W/cm2) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  15. Please cite this article in press as: M.E. Piyasena, et al., Electroosmotically driven microfluidic actuators, Sens. Actuators B: Chem. (2009), doi:10.1016/j.snb.2009.05.014

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    - cations, such as chip cooling [21] and fuel cell water evacuation [22]. However, there has been littlePlease cite this article in press as: M.E. Piyasena, et al., Electroosmotically driven microfluidic microfluidic actuators Menake E. Piyasenaa , Robert Newbya , Thomas J. Millera , Benjamin Shapirob , Elisabeth

  16. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. I - Wave stability theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant unstable electrostatic wave modes of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma are investigated. The study is the first part of a three-phase program aimed at characterizing the current-driven turbulent dissipation degrading the efficiency of Lorentz force plasma accelerators such as the MPD thruster. The analysis uses a kinetic theory that includes magnetic and thermal effects as well as those of an electron current transverse to the magnetic field and collisions, thus combining all the features of previous models. Analytical and numerical solutions allow a detailed description of threshold criteria, finite growth behavior, destabilization mechanisms and maximized-growth characteristics of the dominant unstable modes. The lower hybrid current-driven instability is implicated as dominant and was found to preserve its character in the collisional plasma regime.

  17. Modeling and optimization of a novel two-axis mirror-scanning mechanism driven by piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zijian; Xu, Minglong; Feng, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Mirror-scanning mechanisms are a key component in optical systems for diverse applications. However, the applications of existing piezoelectric scanners are limited due to their small angular travels. To overcome this problem, a novel two-axis mirror-scanning mechanism, which consists of a two-axis tip-tilt flexure mechanism and a set of piezoelectric actuators, is proposed in this paper. The focus of this research is on the design, theoretical modeling, and optimization of the piezoelectric-driven mechanism, with the goal of achieving large angular travels in a compact size. The design of the two-axis tip-tilt flexure mechanism is based on two nonuniform beams, which translate the limited linear output displacements of the piezoelectric actuators into large output angles. To exactly predict the angular travels, we built a voltage-angle model that characterizes the relationship between the input voltages to the piezoelectric actuators and the output angles of the piezoelectric-driven mechanism. Using this analytical model, the optimization is performed to improve the angular travels. A prototype of the mirror-scanning mechanism is fabricated based on the optimization results, and experiments are implemented to test the two-axis output angles. The experimental result shows that the angular travels of the scanner achieve more than 50 mrad, and the error between the analytical model and the experiment is about 11%. This error is much smaller than the error for the model built using the previous method because the influence of the stiffness of the mechanical structure on the deformation of the piezoelectric stack is considered in the voltage-angle model.

  18. Aerospace induction motor actuators driven from a 20-kHz power link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace electromechanical actuators utilizing induction motors are under development in sizes up to 40 kW. While these actuators have immediate application to the Advanced Launch System (ALS) program, several potential applications are currently under study including the Advanced Aircraft Program. Several recent advances developed for the Space Station Freedom have allowed induction motors to be selected as a first choice for such applications. Among these technologies are bi-directional electronics and high frequency power distribution techniques. Each of these technologies are discussed with emphasis on their impact upon induction motor operation.

  19. Flow-control-induced vibrations for power generation using pulsed plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, David; Treizer, Alexander; Eidelman, Alexander; Mueller-Vahl, Hanns

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes flow-control-induced vibrations using pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators, in which boundary layer separation on a structure is actively controlled to produce periodic loads that lead to its vibration. The concept is intended for energy generation and is demonstrated experimentally using a one-degree-of-freedom pivoted cylindrical body mounted vertically within a blow-down wind tunnel. Subcritical Reynolds numbers, less than 105, were considered where typical shedding frequencies were several times larger than the system natural frequency. Static deflection experiments were performed to determine the maximum imposed aerodynamic loads as a function of control parameters and these were complemented with flow-field measurements. Periodic loading of the cylinder was achieved by periodic modulation of the actuator. Large amplitude oscillations were observed when the modulation frequency was close to the system natural frequency. In contrast to natural vortex induced vibration, the large amplitude oscillations were achieved by alternating dynamic separation and attachment of the boundary layer. Estimation of the transient loads was performed using a system identification technique and the power generated by the system was estimated on the basis of a piecewise linear model. Peak estimated power coefficients were relatively small (0.042) but can be improved by increasing the lateral force coefficients and by proportionately increasing the system's physical size.

  20. Control of a high Reynolds number Mach 0.9 heated jet using plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney-Fischer, M.; Kim, J.-H.; Samimy, M.

    2009-09-15

    The results of particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in a high subsonic, heated, jet forced using localized arc filament plasma actuators (LAFPAs) show that LAFPAs can consistently produce significant mixing enhancement over a wide range of temperatures. These actuators have been used successfully in high Reynolds number, high-speed unheated jets. The facility consists of an axisymmetric jet with different nozzle blocks of exit diameter of 2.54 cm and variable jet temperature in an anechoic chamber. The focus of this paper is on a high subsonic (M{sub j}=0.9) jet. Twelve experiments with various forcing azimuthal modes (m=0, 1, and {+-}1) and temperatures (T{sub o}/T{sub a}=1.0, 1.4, and 2.0) at a fixed forcing Strouhal number (St{sub DF}=0.3) have been conducted and PIV results compared with the baseline results to characterize the effectiveness of LAFPAs for mixing enhancement. Centerline velocity and turbulent kinetic energy as well as jet width are used for determining the LAFPAs' effectiveness. The characteristics of large-scale structures are analyzed through the use of Galilean streamlines and swirling strength. Across the range of temperatures collected, the effectiveness of LAFPAs improves as temperature increases. Possible reasons for the increase in effectiveness are discussed.

  1. Development of a plasma driven permeation experiment for TPE

    SciTech Connect

    Dean Buchenauer; Robert Kolasinski; Masa Shimada; David Donovan; Dennis Youchison; Brad Merrill

    2014-04-01

    Experiments on retention of hydrogen isotopes (including tritium) at temperatures less than 800 ?C have been carried out in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory [1,2]. To provide a direct measurement of plasma driven permeation in plasma facing materials at temperatures reaching 1000 ?C, a new TPE membrane holder has been built to hold test specimens (=1 mm in thickness) at high temperature while measuring tritium permeating through the membrane from the plasma facing side. This measurement is accomplished by employing a carrier gas that transports the permeating tritium from the backside of the membrane to ion chambers giving a direct measurement of the plasma driven tritium permeation rate. Isolation of the membrane cooling and sweep gases from TPE’s vacuum chamber has been demonstrated by sealing tests performed up to 1000 ?C of a membrane holder design that provides easy change out of membrane specimens between tests. Simulations of the helium carrier gas which transports tritium to the ion chamber indicate a very small pressure drop (~700 Pa) with good flow uniformity (at 1000 sccm). Thermal transport simulations indicate that temperatures up to 1000 ?C are expected at the highest TPE fluxes.

  2. Optical Probing of Meter Scale Beam Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Li, Zhengyan; Downer, M. C.; Gesner, Spencer; Corde, Sebastien; Litos, Mike; Clarke, Christine; Schmeltz, Margaux; Allen, James; Green, Selina; Hogan, Mark; Yakimenko, Vitaly; E224 Team

    2014-10-01

    We report results of optical visualization experiment at the FACET/SLAC user facility. Experiment E224, carried out in parallel to the ongoing e-beam driven wakefield experimental campaign at FACET, has the aim of optically observing both the short term and long term plasma structure produced by the e-beam driver. The SLAC plasma wakefield experiments have demonstrated the highest energy gain to date and continue work on further optimization. Direct visualization of the plasma wake structure would aid in the understanding of the dynamics of the beam plasma interaction and acceleration, and its optimization. It also would serve to benchmark simulations results which have been so far the main window into visualizing the beam plasma interaction. We will describe the optical probing geometry used in this initial run, a variation of a method previously developed in our group, as governed by the unique experimental challenges of the FACET beam driven experiments in their current configuration. We will discuss the current results, the limitations of the current experimental configuration, and the changes planned for future experiments.

  3. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  4. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 10{sup 25?}m{sup ?3} and 1.6?×?10{sup 28?}m{sup ?3} plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers ?20% higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?{sub p} to 0.6 ?{sub p} in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g., nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  5. Helicity-flux-driven ? effect in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, F; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-28

    The constraint imposed by magnetic helicity conservation on the ? effect is considered for both magnetically and flow dominated self-organizing plasmas. Direct numerical simulations are presented for a dominant contribution to the ? effect, which can be cast in the functional form of a total divergence of an averaged helicity flux, called the helicity-flux-driven ? (H?) effect. Direct numerical simulations of the H? effect are presented for two examples-the magnetically dominated toroidal plasma unstable to tearing modes, and the flow-dominated accretion disk. PMID:24724656

  6. Spectroscopic investigation of wave driven microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wijtvliet, R.; Felizardo, E.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Nijdam, S.; Veldhuizen, E. V.; Kroesen, G.

    2009-11-15

    Large H atom line broadening was found throughout the volume of surface wave generated He-H{sub 2} and H{sub 2} microwave plasmas at low pressures. The measured Doppler temperatures corresponding to the H{sub b}eta, H{sub g}amma, H{sub d}elta, H{sub e}psilon, and H{sub z}eta line profiles were found to be higher than the rotational temperature of the hydrogen molecular Fulcher-alpha band and the Doppler temperature of the 667.1 nm singlet He line. No excessive broadening has been found. The Lorentzian and Gaussian widths as determined by fitting the spectral lines with a Voigt profile increase with the principal quantum number of the upper level. In contrast, no such dependence for the Gaussian width has been observed in an Ar-H{sub 2} discharge. No population inversion has been observed from measurements of the relative intensities of transitions within the Balmer series.

  7. Transition to chaos in a driven dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.; Theisen, W. L.

    2010-01-15

    Dynamical chaos has previously been observed experimentally in a driven dusty plasma with three particles [T. E. Sheridan, Phys. Plasmas 12, 080701 (2005)]. In the present work, the transition to chaos in this system is studied as a function of the amplitude of a periodic driving force for two different driving frequencies f{sub d}. It is found that the system follows a quasiperiodic route to chaos. The dusty plasma's center-of-mass modes are driven by the first harmonic of f{sub d} and lock to the driving force for small driving amplitudes. The breathing mode is driven by the second harmonic of f{sub d} and shows asymmetric spectral features indicating quasiperiodic dynamics for intermediate driving amplitudes. For large driving forces both the center-of-mass and breathing modes are entrained and a region of low-dimensional chaotic dynamics due to a resonance overlap is observed. In the chaotic regime the correlation dimension and Lyapunov exponent are found to increase with the driving force.

  8. Experimental study of driven magnetic relaxation in a laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. C.; Tang, X. Z.

    2008-11-01

    The Driven Relaxation Experiment (DRX) has been built at LANL to investigate the possibility of exploiting resonances in the nonlinear force-free equation [1] to optimize magnetic flux amplification and current multiplication for driven-relaxed spheromak-like plasmas, and to explore the application of these ideas to plasma astrophysics problems [2]. It is also our goal to see whether relaxed states with ?> ?1 can be formed and sustained. The experiment uses a planar magnetized coaxial gun (100--180 kA, 1--7 mWb) to generate driven- relaxed plasmas within a cylindrical flux-conserving boundary (0.9 m diameter). Unique features of DRX include high ?gun up to 3?1, and a continuously adjustable boundary elongation. The gun is powered by a 3- stage capacitor bank to form (10 kV, 500 ?F) and sustain (5 kV, 8 mF) the plasma for up to 500 ?s, corresponding to >10 Sweet-Parker times which allows the plasma to reach a quasi-steady-state. The primary diagnostic is a 48- channel 2D magnetic probe array that will map out a poloidal cross-section of the magnetic field configuration at one toroidal position. The full equilibrium magnetic field will be constructed using a combination of the experimental data and a nonlinear force-free equilibrium solver. We will present details of the experimental setup and the first experimental data. Supported by LANL LDRD. [1] Tang & Boozer, PRL 94, 225004 (2005); PRL 98, 175001 (2007) [2] Tang, ApJ 679, 1000 (2008).

  9. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  10. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  11. Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence Driven Intrinsic Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Zakharov, L. E.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-02-25

    Progress from global gyrokinetic simulations in understanding the origin of intrinsic rotation in toroidal plasmas is reported. The turbulence-driven intrinsic torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation due to zonal flow shear induced asymmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum is shown to scale close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current, qualitatively reproducing experimental empirical scalings of intrinsic rotation. The origin of current scaling is found to be enhanced k{sub ||} symmetry breaking induced by the increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The intrinsic torque is proportional to the pressure gradient because both turbulence intensity and zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving residual stress, increase with turbulence drive, which is R/L{sub T{sub e}} and R/L{sub n{sub e}} for the trapped electron mode.

  12. Transport scaling in interchange-driven toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Paolo; Rogers, B. N.

    2009-06-15

    Two-dimensional fluid simulations of a simple magnetized torus are presented, in which the vertical and toroidal components of the magnetic field create helicoidal field lines that terminate on the upper and lower walls of the plasma chamber. The simulations self-consistently evolve the full radial profiles of the electric potential, density, and electron temperature in the presence of three competing effects: the cross-field turbulent transport driven by the interchange instability, parallel losses to the upper and lower walls, and the input of particles and heat by external plasma sources. Considering parameter regimes in which equilibrium ExB shear flow effects are weak, we study the dependence of the plasma profiles--in particular the pressure profile scale length--on the parameters of the system. Analytical scalings are obtained that show remarkable agreement with the simulations.

  13. Photothermally driven fast responding photo-actuators fabricated with comb-type hydrogels and magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunsu; Kim, Dowan; Kim, Haneul; Yoon, Jinhwan

    2015-10-01

    To overcome the slow kinetics of the volume phase transition of stimuli-responsive hydrogels as platforms for soft actuators, thermally responsive comb-type hydrogels were prepared using synthesized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) macromonomers bearing graft chains. Fast responding light-responsive hydrogels were fabricated by combining a comb-type hydrogel matrix with photothermal magnetite nanoparticles (MNP). The MNPs dispersed in the matrix provide heat to stimulate the volume change of the hydrogel matrix by converting absorbed visible light to thermal energy. In this process, the comb-type hydrogel matrix exhibited a rapid response due to the free, mobile grafted chains. The comb-type hydrogel exhibited significantly enhanced light-induced volume shrinkage and rapid recovery. The comb-type hydrogels containing MNP were successfully used to fabricate a bilayer-type photo-actuator with fast bending motion.

  14. Photothermally driven fast responding photo-actuators fabricated with comb-type hydrogels and magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsu; Kim, Dowan; Kim, Haneul; Yoon, Jinhwan

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the slow kinetics of the volume phase transition of stimuli-responsive hydrogels as platforms for soft actuators, thermally responsive comb-type hydrogels were prepared using synthesized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) macromonomers bearing graft chains. Fast responding light-responsive hydrogels were fabricated by combining a comb-type hydrogel matrix with photothermal magnetite nanoparticles (MNP). The MNPs dispersed in the matrix provide heat to stimulate the volume change of the hydrogel matrix by converting absorbed visible light to thermal energy. In this process, the comb-type hydrogel matrix exhibited a rapid response due to the free, mobile grafted chains. The comb-type hydrogel exhibited significantly enhanced light-induced volume shrinkage and rapid recovery. The comb-type hydrogels containing MNP were successfully used to fabricate a bilayer-type photo-actuator with fast bending motion. PMID:26459918

  15. A New Type of Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Driven By Magnetowaves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin; Chang, Feng-Yin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert J.; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2011-09-12

    We present a new concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator driven by magnetowaves (MPWA). This concept was originally proposed as a viable mechanism for the 'cosmic accelerator' that would accelerate cosmic particles to ultra-high energies in the astrophysical setting. Unlike the more familiar plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) and the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) where the drivers, the charged-particle beam and the laser, are independently existing entities, MPWA invokes the high-frequency and high-speed whistler mode as the driver, which is a medium wave that cannot exist outside of the plasma. Aside from the difference in drivers, the underlying mechanism that excites the plasma wakefield via the ponderomotive potential is common. Our computer simulations show that under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over many plasma wavelengths. We suggest that in addition to its celestial application, the MPWA concept can also be of terrestrial utility. A proof-of-principle experiment on MPWA would benefit both terrestrial and celestial accelerator concepts.

  16. Simulation of Beam and Laser-Driven Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsouleas, Tom

    2002-04-01

    The successful comparison between recently developed 3-D simulation algorithms and current plasma wakefield accelerator experiments represents one of the most significant achievements of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in plasma physics. This talk will briefly describe the rationale, method and results of particle-in-cell simulation of beam and laser-driven plasma waves. Pure PIC models, by virtue of their low level of approximation (full Maxwell’s equations solved self-consistently by finite difference equations in the time domain), are the most accurate as well as the most computationally intensive approach to simulating plasma wave experiments. However, massively parallel computation and specialized features that take advantage of the nearly frozen wake that accompanies a slowly evolving beam enable much shorter computation time. Some of these features such as a moving window and a quasi-static approximation that reduce the effective plasma length followed from meters to microns will be described. Examples of state-of-the-art simulation results will be presented. The application of these codes to other areas of beam physics such as electron cloud instability models for circular accelerators will be demonstrated. Work is also directed toward integrating plasma PIC models such as OSIRIS, XOOPIC, QuickPIC, WAKE and TurboWAVE into RF accelerator models to enable end-to-end simulation of accelerators with plasma elements, including wakefield sections, plasma lenses, collimators, etc. The progress in the field is leading toward a vision of the future in which high-fidelity but reduced approximation simulations are performed in real-time in the laboratory with input parameters obtained from dynamically evolving experimental conditions.

  17. Efficiency of plasma actuator ionization in shock wave modification in a rarefied supersonic flow over a flat plate

    SciTech Connect

    Joussot, Romain; Lago, Viviana; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2014-12-09

    This paper describes experimental and numerical investigations focused on the shock wave modification, induced by a dc glow discharge, of a Mach 2 flow under rarefied regime. The model under investigation is a flat plate equipped with a plasma actuator composed of two electrodes. The glow discharge is generated by applying a negative potential to the upstream electrode, enabling the creation of a weakly ionized plasma. The natural flow (i.e. without the plasma) exhibits a thick laminar boundary layer and a shock wave with a hyperbolic shape. Images of the flow obtained with an ICCD camera revealed that the plasma discharge induces an increase in the shock wave angle. Thermal effects (volumetric, and at the surface) and plasma effects (ionization, and thermal non-equilibrium) are the most relevant processes explaining the observed modifications. The effect induced by the heating of the flat plate surface is studied experimentally by replacing the upstream electrode by a heating element, and numerically by modifying the thermal boundary condition of the model surface. The results show that for a similar temperature distribution over the plate surface, modifications induced by the heating element are lower than those produced by the plasma. This difference shows that other effects than purely thermal effects are involved with the plasma actuator. Measurements of the electron density with a Langmuir probe highlight the fact that the ionization degree plays an important role into the modification of the flow. The gas properties, especially the isentropic exponent, are indeed modified by the plasma above the actuator and upstream the flat plate. This leads to a local modification of the flow conditions, inducing an increase in the shock wave angle.

  18. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators at Atmospheric and Sub-Atmospheric Pressures: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a SBIR Phase I project. It is identical to the final report submitted, after some proprietary information of administrative nature has been removed. The development of a numerical simulation tool for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is reported. The objectives of the project were to analyze and predict DBD operation at wide range of ambient gas pressures. It overcomes the limitations of traditional DBD codes which are limited to low-speed applications and have weak prediction capabilities. The software tool allows DBD actuator analysis and prediction for subsonic to hypersonic flow regime. The simulation tool is based on the VORPAL code developed by Tech-X Corporation. VORPAL's capability of modeling DBD plasma actuator at low pressures (0.1 to 10 torr) using kinetic plasma modeling approach, and at moderate to atmospheric pressures (1 to 10 atm) using hydrodynamic plasma modeling approach, were demonstrated. In addition, results of experiments with pulsed+bias DBD configuration that were performed for validation purposes are reported.

  19. The Nonlinear Landau Damping Rate of a Driven Plasma Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Benisti, D; Strozzi, D J; Gremillet, L; Morice, O

    2009-08-04

    In this Letter, we discuss the concept of the nonlinear Landau damping rate, {nu}, of a driven electron plasma wave, and provide a very simple, practical, analytic formula for {nu} which agrees very well with results inferred from Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering. {nu} actually is more complicated an operator than a plain damping rate, and it may only be seen as such because it assumes almost constant values before abruptly dropping to 0. The decrease of {nu} to 0 is moreover shown to occur later when the wave amplitude varies in the direction transverse to its propagation.

  20. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; et al

    2013-04-15

    Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. S#2;eguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of #2;210 lm throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and densitymore »profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.« less

  1. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; Delettrez, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2013-04-15

    Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. S#2;eguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of #2;210 lm throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and density profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.

  2. A compact and continuously driven supersonic plasma and neutral source.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Itagaki, H; Numasawa, H; Terashima, Y; Hirano, Y; Hirose, A

    2010-10-01

    A compact and repetitively driven plasma source has been developed by utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for diagnostics requiring deep penetration of a large amount of neutral flux. The system consists of a MCPG 95mm in length with a DN16 ConFlat connection port and an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) inverter power unit. The power supply consists of an array of eight IGBT units and is able to switch the discharge on and off at up to 10 kV and 600 A with a maximum repetitive frequency of 10 kHz. Multiple short duration discharge pulses maximize acceleration efficiency of the plasmoid. In the case of a 10 kHz operating frequency, helium-plasmoids in the velocity range of 20 km/s can be achieved. PMID:21033984

  3. A compact and continuously driven supersonic plasma and neutral sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, T.; Itagaki, H.; Numasawa, H.; Terashima, Y.; Hirano, Y.; Hirose, A.

    2010-10-01

    A compact and repetitively driven plasma source has been developed by utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for diagnostics requiring deep penetration of a large amount of neutral flux. The system consists of a MCPG 95mm in length with a DN16 ConFlat connection port and an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) inverter power unit. The power supply consists of an array of eight IGBT units and is able to switch the discharge on and off at up to 10 kV and 600 A with a maximum repetitive frequency of 10 kHz. Multiple short duration discharge pulses maximize acceleration efficiency of the plasmoid. In the case of a 10 kHz operating frequency, helium-plasmoids in the velocity range of 20 km/s can be achieved.

  4. Modelling of microwave-driven micro-plasmas in HCPCF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Debord, B.; Gerome, F.; Jamier, R.; Benabid, F.

    2012-10-01

    New UV sources based on microwave-driven micro-plasmas filling a Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibre (HCPCF) [1], exhibit an unprecedented compactness, flexibility, low-cost and high conversion efficiency. The micro-plasma (>10^14 cm-3 electron density, estimated by electromagnetic calculations) is produced by a surface-wave discharge (2.45 GHz frequency) in argon, at 1000-1400 K gas temperatures (measured by OES diagnostics). Our first approach to simulate this system replaces the cladding structure of the fibre (air-holes region) by a capillary cylindrical quartz tube. Simulations use a one-dimensional (radial) stationary model that solves the fluid transport equations for electrons and positive ions, the electron mean energy transport equations, Poisson's and Maxwell's equations for the fields and the gas energy balance equation, coupled to the electron Boltzmann equation for the calculation of the relevant electron parameters [2,3]. We analyze the modification of the plasma with changes in the work conditions, presenting simulations for various HCPCF core radii (50--500 ?m) and electron densities (1--5x10^14 cm-3), at 1mbar pressure. [1] B. Debord et al, ECOC conference Mo.2.LeCervin.5. (2011) [2] L.L. Alves et al, Phys. Rev. E 79, 016403 (2009) [3] J. Greg'orio et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 015013 (2012)

  5. Betatron Radiation from a Beam Driven Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.; /SLAC

    2012-08-13

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 x 10{sup 10} electrons, 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} spot, 20-100 {micro}m length, 20 GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of {approx} 1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 x 35 cm{sup 2} phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  6. Betatron radiation from a beam driven plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.

    2012-12-21

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons, 20 Multiplication-Sign 20{mu}m{sup 2} spot, 20 - 100{mu}m length, 20GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of {approx} 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 Multiplication-Sign 35cm{sup 2} phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  7. Betatron radiation from a beam driven plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.

    2012-12-01

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 × 1010 electrons, 20 × 20?m2 spot, 20 - 100?m length, 20GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of ˜ 1 × 1017 cm-3 will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 × 35cm2 phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  8. Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence Driven Intrinsic Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2011-02-07

    Recent progress from global gyrokinetic simulations in understanding the origin of intrinsic rotation in toroidal plasmas is reported with emphasis on electron thermal transport dominated regimes. The turbulence driven intrinsic torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation by the fluctuation intensity and the intensity gradient in the presence of zonal flow shear induced asymmetry in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is shown to scale close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current. These results qualitatively reproduce empirical scalings of intrinsic rotation observed in various experiments. The origin of current scaling is found to be due to enhanced kll symmetry breaking induced by the increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic torque on pressure gradient is that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving residual stress, increase with the strength of turbulence drive, which is R0/LTe and R0/Lne for the trapped electron mode. __________________________________________________

  9. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Sc?rer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin, S Mangles, L O Silva, R Fonseca and P A Norreys Electro-optic shocks from blowout laser wakefields D F Gordon, A Ting, M H Helle, D Kaganovich and B Hafizi Onset of self-steepening of intense laser pulses in plasmas J Vieira, F Fiúza, L O Silva, M Tzoufras and W B Mori Analysis of laser wakefield dynamics in capillary tubes N E Andreev, K Cassou, F Wojda, G Genoud, M Burza, O Lundh, A Persson, B Cros, V E Fortov and C-G Wahlstrom Characterization of the beam loading effects in a laser plasma accelerator C Rechatin, J Faure, X Davoine, O Lundh, J Lim, A Ben-Ismaïl, F Burgy, A Tafzi, A Lifschitz, E Lefebvre and V Malka Energy gain scaling with plasma length and density in the plasma wakefield accelerator P Muggli, I Blumenfeld, C E Clayton, F J Decker, M J Hogan, C Huang, R Ischebeck, R H Iverson, C Joshi, T Katsouleas, N Kirby, W Lu, K A Marsh, W B Mori, E Oz, R H Siemann, D R Walz and M Zhou Generation of tens of GeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beams from a moving double layer formed by ultraintense lasers at intensity 1021-1023Wcm-2 Lu-Le Yu, Han Xu, Wei-Min Wang, Zheng-Ming Sheng, Bai-Fei Shen, Wei Yu and Jie Zhang Carbon ion acceleration from thin foil targets irradiated by ultrahigh-contrast, ultraintense laser pulses D C Carroll, O Tresca, R Prasad, L Romagnani, P S Foster, P Gallegos, S Ter-Avetisyan, J S Green, M J V Streeter, N Dover, C A J Palmer, C M Brenner, F H Cameron, K E Quinn, J Schreiber, A P L Robinson, T Baeva, M N Quinn, X H Yuan, Z Najmudin, M Zepf, D Neely, M Borghesi and P McKenna Numerical modelling of a 10-cm-long multi-GeV laser wakefield accelerator driven by a self-guided petawatt pulse S Y Kalmykov, S A Yi, A Beck, A F Lifschitz, X Davoine, E Lefebvre, A Pukhov, V Khudik, G Shvets, S A Reed, P Dong, X Wang, D Du, S Bedacht, R Zgadzaj, W Henderson, A Bernstein, G Dyer, M Martinez, E Gaul, T Ditmire and M C Downer Effects of laser prepulses on laser-induced proton generation D Batani, R Jafer, M Veltcheva, R Dezulian, O Lundh, F Lindau, A Persson, K Osvay, C-G Wahlström, D C Carroll, P McKenna, A Flacco and V Malka Proton accelerati

  10. Documentation and Control of Flow Separation on a Low Pressure Turbine Linear Cascade of Pak-B Blades Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, Thomas c.; Thomas, FLint, O.; Huang, Junhui

    2007-01-01

    This work involved the documentation and control of flow separation that occurs over low pressure turbine (LPT) blades at low Reynolds numbers. A specially constructed linear cascade was utilized to study the flow field over a generic LPT cascade consisting of Pratt & Whitney "Pak-B" shaped blades. Flow visualization, surface pressure measurements, LDV measurements, and hot-wire anemometry were conducted to examine the flow fields with and without separation control. Experimental conditions were chosen to give a range of chord Reynolds numbers (based on axial chord and inlet velocity) from 10,000 to 100,000, and a range of freestream turbulence intensities from u'/U(infinity) = 0.08 to 2.85 percent. The blade pressure distributions were measured and used to identify the region of separation that depends on Reynolds number and the turbulence intensity. Separation control was performed using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators. Both steady and unsteady actuation were implemented and found to work well. The comparison between the steady and unsteady actuators showed that the unsteady actuators worked better than the steady ones. For the steady actuators, it was found that the separated region is significantly reduced. For the unsteady actuators, where the signal was pulsed, the separation was eliminated. The total pressure losses (a low Reynolds number) was reduced by approximately a factor of two. It was also found that lowest plasma duty cycle (10 percent in this work) was as effective as the highest plasma duty cycle (50 percent in this work). The mechanisms of the steady and unsteady plasma actuators were studied. It was suggested by the experimental results that the mechanism for the steady actuators is turbulence tripping, while the mechanism for the unsteady actuators is to generate a train of spanwise structures that promote mixing.

  11. DBD Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in Air Vehicles and Jet Engines - Simulation of Flight Conditions in Test Chambers by Density Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma actuators for active flow control in aircraft and jet engines need to be tested in the laboratory to characterize their performance at flight operating conditions. DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet electronically by creating weakly ionized plasma, therefore their performance is affected by gas discharge properties, which, in turn, depend on the pressure and temperature at the actuator placement location. Characterization of actuators is initially performed in a laboratory chamber without external flow. The pressure and temperature at the actuator flight operation conditions need to be simultaneously set in the chamber. A simplified approach is desired. It is assumed that the plasma discharge depends only on the gas density, while other temperature effects are assumed to be negligible. Therefore, tests can be performed at room temperature with chamber pressure set to yield the same density as in operating flight conditions. The needed chamber pressures are shown for altitude flight of an air vehicle and for jet engines at sea-level takeoff and altitude cruise conditions. Atmospheric flight conditions are calculated from standard atmosphere with and without shock waves. The engine data was obtained from four generic engine models; 300-, 150-, and 50-passenger (PAX) aircraft engines, and a military jet-fighter engine. The static and total pressure, temperature, and density distributions along the engine were calculated for sea-level takeoff and for altitude cruise conditions. The corresponding chamber pressures needed to test the actuators were calculated. The results show that, to simulate engine component flows at in-flight conditions, plasma actuator should be tested over a wide range of pressures. For the four model engines the range is from 12.4 to 0.03 atm, depending on the placement of the actuator in the engine. For example, if a DBD plasma actuator is to be placed at the compressor exit of a 300 PAX engine, it has to be tested at 12.4 atm for takeoff, and 6 atm for cruise conditions. If it is to be placed at the low-pressure turbine, it has to be tested at 0.5 and 0.2 atm, respectively. These results have implications for the feasibility and design of DBD plasma actuators for jet engine flow control applications. In addition, the distributions of unit Reynolds number, Mach number, and velocity along the engine are provided. The engine models are non-proprietary and this information can be used for evaluation of other types of actuators and for other purposes.

  12. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams C. B. Schroeder, E of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator-charge force of a charged particle beam. Laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) were first proposed in 1979

  13. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  14. Deep Drilling and Sampling via the Wireline Auto-Gopher Driven by Piezoelectric Percussive Actuator and EM Rotary Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Zacny, Kris; Paulsen, Gale L; Beegle, Luther; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2012-01-01

    The ability to penetrate subsurfaces and perform sample acquisition at depths of meters is critical for future NASA in-situ exploration missions to bodies in the solar system, including Mars and Europa. A corer/sampler was developed with the goal of acquiring pristine samples by reaching depths on Mars beyond the oxidized and sterilized zone. To developed rotary-hammering coring drill, called Auto-Gopher, employs a piezoelectric actuated percussive mechanism for breaking formations and an electric motor rotates the bit to remove the powdered cuttings. This sampler is a wireline mechanism that is incorporated with an inchworm mechanism allowing thru cyclic coring and core removal to reach great depths. The penetration rate is being optimized by simultaneously activating the percussive and rotary motions of the Auto-Gopher. The percussive mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) mechanism that is driven by piezoelectric stack and that was demonstrated to require low axial preload. The Auto-Gopher has been produced taking into account the a lessons learned from the development of the Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher that was designed as a percussive ice drill and was demonstrated in Antarctica in 2005 to reach about 2 meters deep. A field demonstration of the Auto-Gopher is currently being planned with objective of reaching as deep as 3 to 5 meters in tufa subsurface.

  15. Nanocomposite synthesis by absorption of nanoparticles into macroporous hydrogels. Building a chemomechanical actuator driven by electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M. A.; Rivarola, C. R.; Miras, M. C.; Lescano, D.; Barbero, C. A.

    2011-06-01

    Macroporous hydrogels irreversibly absorb solid nanoparticles from aqueous dispersions. A nanocomposite is made using a macroporous thermosensitive hydrogel (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-(2-acrylamido-2-methyl propane sulfonic acid)) (poly(NIPAm-co-AMPS)) and conductive polymer (polyaniline, PANI) nanoparticles (PANI NPs). Macroporous gels of poly(NIPAm-co-AMPS) were made by a cryogelation technique. NPs of PANI were produced by precipitation polymerization. It is found that PANI NPs are easily absorbed into the macroporous hydrogels while conventional non-porous hydrogels do not incorporate NPs. It is shown that PANI NPs, dispersed in water, absorb NIR laser light or microwave radiation, increasing their temperature. Upon irradiation of the nanocomposite with microwaves or NIR laser light, the PANI NPs heat up and induce the phase transition of the thermosensitive hydrogel matrix and the internal solution is released. Other nano-objects, such as gold nanorods and PANI nanofibers, are also easily incorporated into the macroporous gel. The resulting nanocomposites also suffer a phase transition upon irradiation with electromagnetic waves. The results suggest that, using a thermosensitive matrix and conducting nanoparticles, mechanical/chemical actuators driven at a distance by electromagnetic radiation can be built. The sensitivity of the nanocomposite to electromagnetic radiation can be modulated by the pH, depending on the nature of the incorporated nanoparticles. Additionally, it is possible to make systems which absorb either NIR or microwaves or both.

  16. Deep drilling and sampling via the wireline auto-gopher driven by piezoelectric percussive actuator and EM rotary motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Zacny, Kris; Paulsen, Gale L.; Beegle, Luther; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2012-04-01

    The ability to penetrate subsurfaces and perform sample acquisition at depths of meters is critical for future NASA in-situ exploration missions to bodies in the solar system, including Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. A corer/sampler was developed with the goal of acquiring pristine samples by reaching depths on Mars beyond the oxidized and sterilized zone. The developed rotary-hammering coring drill, called Auto-Gopher, employs a piezoelectric actuated percussive mechanism for breaking formations and an electric motor rotates the bit to remove the powdered cuttings. This sampler is a wireline drill that is incorporated with an inchworm mechanism allowing thru cyclic coring and core removal to reach great depths. The penetration rate is optimized by simultaneously activating the percussive and rotary motions of the Auto-Gopher. The percussive mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) mechanism, which is driven by a piezoelectric stack, demonstrated to require low axial preload. The Auto-Gopher has been produced taking into account the lessons learned from the development of the Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher that was designed as a percussive ice drill and was demonstrated in Antarctica in 2005 to reach about 2 meters deep. A field demonstration of the Auto-Gopher is currently being planned with the objective of reaching as deep as 3 to 5 meters in tufa formation.

  17. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  18. Dielectric barrier discharge-based plasma actuator operation in artificial atmospheres for validation of modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangina, R. S.; Enloe, C. L.; Font, G. I.

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental case study of time-resolved force production by an aerodynamic plasma actuator immersed in various mixtures of electropositive (N2) and electronegative gases (O2 and SF6) at atmospheric pressure using a fixed AC high-voltage input of 16 kV peak amplitude at 200 Hz frequency. We have observed distinct changes in the discharge structures during both negative- and positive-going voltage half-cycles, with corresponding variations in the actuator's force production: a ratio of 4:1 in the impulse produced by the negative-going half-cycle of the discharge among the various gas mixtures we explored, 2:1 in the impulse produced by the positive-going half-cycle, and cases in which the negative-going half-cycle dominates force production (by a ratio of 1.5:1), where the half-cycles produce identical force levels, and where the positive-going half cycle dominates (by a ratio of 1:5). We also present time-resolved experimental evidence for the first time that shows electrons do play a significant role in the momentum coupling to surrounding neutrals during the negative going voltage half-cycle of the N2 discharge. We show that there is sufficient macroscopic variation in the plasma that the predictions of numerical models at the microscopic level can be validated even though the plasma itself cannot be measured directly on those spatial and temporal scales.

  19. Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators: Wakefield excitation, channel guiding, and laser triggered particle injection*

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators: Wakefield excitation, channel guiding, and laser triggered; accepted 18 February 1998 Plasma-based accelerators are discussed in which high-power short pulse lasers are the power source, suitably tailored plasma structures provide guiding of the laser beam and support large

  20. Mode transition and nonlinear self-oscillations in the beam-driven collisional discharge plasma

    E-print Network

    Lee, Hae June

    regions near the anode and the cathode, and the den- sity of the ionized plasma is much higher thanMode transition and nonlinear self-oscillations in the beam-driven collisional discharge plasma Hae in a beam-injected plasma system by experiments1­7 and simulation8 has received much attention during

  1. Closed-Loop Control of Unsteady Transient Growth Disturbances in a Blasius Boundary Layer using DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Philippe; Hanson, Ronald; Bade, Kyle; Naguib, Ahmed; Belson, Brandt; Rowley, Clarence

    2012-11-01

    Plasma actuators have recently been shown to negate the effect of the transient growth instability occurring in a Blasius boundary layer for the purpose of delaying bypass transition. Specifically, during steady operation, the energy of a disturbance introduced via an array of static cylindrical roughness elements was reduced by up to 68%, as shown by Hanson et al. (Exp. Fluids, 2010). In the present work, the actuators used in the aforementioned study were integrated into a complete closed-loop control system capable of negating unsteady transient growth disturbances induced in a Blasius boundary layer established in a wind tunnel. Shear stress measurements from an array of hot-wires mounted just above the surface of the boundary-layer plate downstream of the actuators are used to provide feedback information about the state of the boundary layer. The effectiveness and robustness of the closed-loop controller are rigorously established based on both control-model simulations and experiments. NSERC and NSF grant number: CMMI 0932546.

  2. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    HEBNER,GREGORY A.; MILLER,PAUL A.

    1999-12-07

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4}, in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s{sub 5} level is metastable and the 1s{sub 4} level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the discharge while the density at the edge of the discharge was unaffected. The spatially resolved excited state density measurements were combined with previous line integrated measurements in the same discharge geometry to derive spatially resolved, absolute densities of the 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4} argon excited states and gas temperature spatial distributions. Fluorescence lifetime was a strong fi.mction of the rf power, pressure, argon fraction and spatial location. Increasing the power or pressure resulted in a factor of two decrease in the fluorescence lifetime while adding Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} increased the fluorescence lifetime. Excited state quenching rates are derived from the data. When Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} was added to the plasma, the maximum argon metastable density depended on the gas and ratio. When chlorine was added to the argon plasma, the spatial density profiles were independent of chlorine fraction. While it is energetically possible for argon excited states to dissociate some of the molecular species present in this discharge, it does not appear to be a significant source of dissociation. The major source of interaction between the argon and the molecular species BCl{sub 3} and Cl{sub 2} appears to be through modification of the electron density.

  3. Amplitude saturation effect of a laser-driven plasma beat-wave on electron accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D. N.; Singh, Mamta; Suk, H.

    2015-06-01

    A large-amplitude plasma beat-wave driven by two lasers (differing in frequencies equal to the plasma frequency) can accelerate the plasma electrons to a higher energy level. As the plasma beat-wave grows, it becomes susceptible to oscillating two-stream instability. The decayed sideband plasma wave couples with the pump wave to divert its energy by the instability, and saturates it. The saturated amplitude of the plasma beat-wave traps the electrons more effectively to accelerate them to higher energy. The saturation of plasma beat-wave amplitude is shown to have a significant effect in an electron energy gain.

  4. Enhanced Design of Turbo-jet LPT by Separation Control Using Phased Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David (Technical Monitor); Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.

    2003-01-01

    This work deals with the documentation and control of flow separation that occurs over turbine blades in the low-pressure turbine stage at low Reynolds numbers that exist at high altitude cruise. We utilize a specially constructed linear cascade that is designed to study the flow field over a generic LPT cascade consisting of Pratt & Whitney 'Pak B' shaped blades. This facility was constructed under a previous one-year NASA Glenn RC initiative. The center blade in the cascade is instrumented to measure the surface pressure coefficient distribution. Optical access allows two-component LDV measurement for boundary layer profiles. Experimental conditions have been chosen to give a range of chord Reynolds numbers from 10 to 100K, and a range of free-stream turbulence levels from u'/U(sub infinity)= 0.08 to 3 percent. The surface pressure measurements were used to define a region of separation and reattachment that depend on the free-stream conditions. The location of separation was found to be relatively insensitive to the experimental conditions. However, reattachment location was very sensitive to the turbulence level and Reynolds number. Excellent agreement was found between the measured pressure distributions and predictions from Euler and RANS simulations. Two-component LDV measurements are presently underway to document the mean and fluctuating velocity components in the boundary layer over the center blade for the range of experimental conditions. The fabrication of the plasma actuator is underway. These are designed to produce either streamwise vortices, or a downstream-directed wall jet. A precursor experiment for the former approach was performed with an array of vortex generators placed just upstream of the separation line. These led to reattachment except for the lowest Reynolds number. Progress has also been made on the proposed concept for a laterally moving wake. This involved constructing a smaller wind tunnel and molding an array of symmetric airfoils to form an array. Following its development, it will be scaled up and used to introduce lateral moving wakes upstream up the Pak-B cascade.

  5. Study of driven magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, H.; Hsu, S.; Carter, T.; Kulsrud, R.; Bretz, N.; Jobes, F.; Ono, Yasushi; Perkins, F.

    1998-12-31

    The Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) has been constructed to investigate the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in a well controlled laboratory setting. This device creates an environment satisfying the criteria for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma (S {much_gt} 1, {rho}{sub i} {much_lt} L). The boundary conditions can be controlled externally, and experiments with fully three-dimensional reconnection are now possible. In the initial experiments, the effects of the third vector component of reconnecting fields have been studied. Two distinctively different shapes of neutral sheet current layers, depending on the third component, are identified during driven magnetic reconnection. Without the third component (anti-parallel or null-helicity reconnection), a thin double-Y shaped diffusion region is identified. A neutral sheet current profile is measured accurately to be as narrow as order ion gyro-radius. In the presence of an appreciable third component (co-helicity reconnection), an O-shaped diffusion region appears and grows into a spheromak configuration.

  6. Nonlinear frequency coupling in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2010-05-03

    Plasma ionization, and associated mode transitions, in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are governed through nonlinear frequency coupling in the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. Ionization in low-power mode is determined by the nonlinear coupling of electron heating and the momentary local plasma density. Ionization in high-power mode is driven by electron avalanches during phases of transient high electric fields within the boundary sheath. The transition between these distinctly different modes is controlled by the total voltage of both frequency components.

  7. Parameter sensitivity of plasma wakefields driven by self-modulating proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.; Minakov, V. A.; Sosedkin, A. P.

    2014-08-15

    The dependence of wakefield amplitude and phase on beam and plasma parameters is studied in the parameter area of interest for self-modulating proton beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The wakefield phase is shown to be extremely sensitive to small variations of the plasma density, while sensitivity to small variations of other parameters is reasonably low. The study of large parameter variations clarifies the effects that limit the achievable accelerating field in different parts of the parameter space: nonlinear elongation of the wakefield period, insufficient charge of the drive beam, emittance-driven beam divergence, and motion of plasma ions.

  8. Improving plasma actuator performance at low pressure, and an analysis of the pointing capabilities of cubeSats using Plasmonic Force Propulsion (PFP) thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friz, Paul Daniel

    This thesis details the work done on two unrelated projects, plasma actuators, an aerodynamic flow control device, and Plasmonic Force Propulsion (PFP) thrusters, a space propulsion system for small satellites. The first half of the thesis is a paper published in the International Journal of Flow Control on plasma actuators. In this paper the thrust and power consumption of plasma actuators with varying geometries was studied at varying pressure. It was found that actuators with longer buried electrodes produce the most thrust over all and that they substantially improved thrust at low pressure. In particular actuators with 75 mm buried electrodes produced 26% more thrust overall and 34% more thrust at low pressure than the standard 15 mm design. The second half details work done modeling small satellite attitude and reaction control systems in order to compare the use of Plasmonic Force Propulsion thrusters with other state of the art reaction control systems. The model uses bang bang control algorithms and assumes the worst case scenario solar radiation pressure is the only disturbing force. It was found that the estimated 50-500 nN of thrust produced by PFP thrusters would allow the spacecraft which use them extremely high pointing and positioning accuracies (<10-9 degrees and 3 pm). PFP thrusters still face many developmental challenges such as increasing specific impulse which require more research, however, they have great potential to be an enabling technology for future NASA missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, and The Stellar Imager.

  9. Numerical Study on Blast Wave Propagation Driven by Unsteady Ionization Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Sawada, Keisuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2008-04-28

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essential for increasing the available thrust and energy conversion efficiency from a pulsed laser to a blast wave in a gas-driven laser-propulsion system. The performance of a gas-driven laser-propulsion system depends heavily on the laser-driven blast wave dynamics as well as on the ionizing and/or recombining plasma state that sustains the blast wave. In this study, we therefore develop a numerical simulation code for a laser-driven blast wave coupled with time-dependent rate equations to explore the formation of unsteady ionizing plasma produced by laser irradiation. We will also examine the various properties of blast waves and unsteady ionizing plasma for different laser input energies.

  10. ION-INDUCED INSTABILITY OF DIOCOTRON MODES IN ELECTRON PLASMAS MODELLING CURVATURE-DRIVEN FLUTE MODES

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    ION-INDUCED INSTABILITY OF DIOCOTRON MODES IN ELECTRON PLASMAS MODELLING CURVATURE-DRIVEN FLUTE, La Jolla, CA, USA 92093-0319, aakpla@physics.ucsd.edu We study ion-induced instability of flute in the periodic wave perturbation. I. INTRODUCTION Curvature-driven flute modes have been a problem for magnetic

  11. Query-driven Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data Oliver Rubel

    E-print Network

    Query-driven Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data Oliver R¨ubel LBNL Cameron G. R=high, blue=low). ABSTRACT Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thou- sands of times to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. There is a pressing need

  12. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, and W. P. Leemans

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, and W. P Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self

  13. Zonal flow driven by energetic particle during magneto-hydro-dynamic burst in a toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Minami, T.; Isobe, M.; Nishimura, S.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Takahashi, C.; Takeuchi, M.; Ito, T.; Watari, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.

    2007-11-01

    The internal structural measurements of electric field and density using twin heavy ion beam probes have been performed to elucidate the nonlinear evolution of the magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) bursty phenomenon driven by the interaction with high-energy particles in a toroidal plasma. The results have given the finest observation of the internal structure of plasma quantities, such as electric field, density and magnetic field distortion, which nonlinearly develop during the MHD phenomenon. In particular, the finding of a new kind of oscillating zonal flow driven by interaction between energetic particles and MHD modes should be emphasized for burning state plasmas.

  14. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    E-print Network

    Gschwendtner, E; Amorim, L; Apsimon, R; Assmann, R; Bachmann, A -M; Batsch, F; Bauche, J; Olsen, V K Berglyd; Bernardini, M; Bingham, R; Biskup, B; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Burrows, P N; Burt, G; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Cascella, M; Chevallay, E; Cipiccia, S; Damerau, H; Deacon, L; Dirksen, P; Doebert, S; Dorda, U; Farmer, J; Fedosseev, V; Feldbaumer, E; Fiorito, R; Fonseca, R; Friebel, F; Gorn, A A; Grulke, O; Hansen, J; Hessler, C; Hofle, W; Holloway, J; Huther, M; Jaroszynski, D; Jensen, L; Jolly, S; Joulaei, A; Kasim, M; Keeble, F; Li, Y; Liu, S; Lopes, N; Lotov, K V; Mandry, S; Martorelli, R; Martyanov, M; Mazzoni, S; Mete, O; Minakov, V A; Mitchell, J; Moody, J; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Norreys, P; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Pepitone, K; Petrenko, A; Plyushchev, G; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Ruhl, H; Salveter, F; Savard, N; Schmidt, J; Seryi, A; Shaposhnikova, E; Sheng, Z M; Sherwood, P; Silva, L; Soby, L; Sosedkin, A P; Spitsyn, R I; Trines, R; Tuev, P V; Turner, M; Verzilov, V; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wei, Y; Welsch, C P; Wing, M; Xia, G; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  15. Mechanisms for laminar separated-flow control using dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma actuator at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Makoto; Nonomura, Taku; Okada, Koichi; Asada, Kengo; Aono, Hikaru; Yakeno, Aiko; Abe, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Kozo

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of separated-flow control using a dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator at a low Reynolds number. In the present study, the mechanisms are classified according to the means of momentum injection to the boundary layer. The separated flow around the NACA 0015 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 63 000 is used as the base flow for separation control. Both normal and burst mode actuations are adopted in separation control. The burst frequency non-dimensionalized by the freestream velocity and the chord length (F+) is varied from 0.25 to 25, and we discuss the control mechanism through the comparison of the aerodynamic performance and controlled flow-fields in each normal and burst case. Lift and drag coefficients are significantly improved for the cases of F+ = 1, 5, and 15 due to flow reattachment associated with a laminar-separation bubble. Frequency and linear stability analyses indicate that the F+ = 5 and 15 cases effectively excite the natural unstable frequency at the separated shear layer, which is caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. This excitation results in earlier flow reattachment due to earlier turbulent transition. Furthermore, the Reynolds stress decomposition is conducted in order to identify the means of momentum entrainment resulted from large-scale spanwise vortical structure or small-scale turbulent vortices. For the cases with flow reattachment, the large-scale spanwise vortices, which shed from the separated shear layer through plasma actuation, significantly increase the periodic component of the Reynolds stress near the leading edge. These large-scale vortices collapse to small-scale turbulent vortices, and the turbulent component of the Reynolds stress increases around the large-scale vortices. In these cases, although the combination of momentum entrainment by both Reynolds stress components results in flow reattachment, the dominant component is identified as the turbulent component. This indicates that one of the effective control mechanisms for laminar separation is momentum entrainment by turbulent vortices through turbulent transition.

  16. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  17. A 30 mm Wide DC-Driven Brush-Shaped Cold Air Plasma Without Airflow Supplement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Xia, Guangqing; Li, Ping; Hu, Yelin; Du, Zhiwen; Zhu, Longji; Liu, Minghai; Chen, Minggong; Hu, Xiwei

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports a cold atmospheric pressure DC-driven air plasma brush. Three stainless steel needles are symmetrically mounted on a slot shaped PVC slab to act as the electrodes. The brush driven by a direct current (DC) power supply can generate an air plasma glow up to 30 mm wide with no inert gas addition and no air flow supplement. The plasma glow appears uniform no matter what kinds of material are processed. The measured current and the simulated current all show that each pulsed discharge including two peaks always occurs for different gaps between electrodes. Emission spectra measurement result shows that the obtained rotational temperatures are 300 K and the vibrational temperatures are 2250 K. Some reactive species are presented in the plasma glow, which suggest that the proposed plasma brush is beneficial to practical applications.

  18. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  19. Prospects for studying temperature-anisotropy-driven instabilities in a high-beta laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, T. A.; Dorfman, S. E.; Bardoczi, L.; Geraldini, A.; Robertson, J.; Tang, S.; Tripathi, S.; Vincena, S. T.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2013-12-01

    The mirror and firehose instabilities are driven unstable in magnetized, high-beta plasmas with anisotropic ion distribution functions. Evidence for the action of these instabilities has been found in space plasmas, in particular solar wind observations [1], and they are thought to be important in a number of astrophysical plasmas (e.g. accretion disks). Studying these important instabilities in the lab requires a high-beta, magnetized plasma and the creation of sufficient temperature anisotropy. We will discuss prospects for laboratory experiments making use of the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) at UCLA. Firehose-unstable (T? > T?) ion distributions might be driven in plasmas flowing into an expanding magnetic field (similar to the solar wind). Enhanced anisotropy could be provided by the formation of a double layer in the expanding plasma, which leads to the production of ion beams in expanding laboratory plasmas [2]. We will report on: initial experiments in LAPD studying expanding plasmas, measurements of plasma parameters in ETPD and on theoretical projections for acheivable anisotropy and instability thresholds in ETPD. [1] S.D. Bale, et al., PRL 103, 211101 (2009). [2] C. Charles, et al., PoP 11, 1706 (2004).

  20. Generation and diagnostics of atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma by laser driven plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Kensaku; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Satoshi; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure CO{sub 2} plasma was generated by a laser driven plasma wind tunnel. At an ambient pressure of 0.38 MPa, a stable plasma was maintained by a laser power of 1000 W for more than 20 min. The translational temperature was measured using laser absorption spectroscopy with the atomic oxygen line at 777.19 nm. The measured absorption profiles were analyzed by a Voigt function considering Doppler, Stark, and pressure-broadening effects. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, all broadening effects were consistent with each other. The measured temperature ranged from 8500 K to 8900 K.

  1. Current-driven plasma waves in the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, D.T.; Lee, M.C.; Riddolls, R.J.; Murphy, S.M.; Rowlands, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have been conducting laboratory experiments to investigate plasma turbulence that can affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves. This work is aimed at simulating the ionospheric plasma turbulence and cross-checking the radar experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The large toroidal plasma device, called the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF), can produce a radially inhomogeneous plasma imposed in a helically shaped magnetic field. VTF plasma has a sharp density gradient and an intense magnetic field-aligned current, simulating well the plasma environment in the auroral ionosphere. A broad spectrum of plasma waves can be exited in VTF by the injected microwaves and electron beams. In this paper, the authors discuss the excitation of low-frequency plasma waves driven by electric currents, including ion acoustic waves and current-convective modes. A good agreement has been found between the experimental results and the theories developed for the VTF plasmas. However, their experimental results are quite different from those obtained in the rocket/space shuttle experiments. The difference in the laboratory experiments and space experiments arise form two facts. One is that the plasma inhomogeneity does not play a significant role in the space experiments. The other is that the electron beam injected in the space experiments does not produce a drifting Maxwellian plasma as seen in the VTF plasmas. The contrast between the VTF experiments and the active space experiments show that VTF can adequately simulate the ionospheric plasma turbulence and complement the rocket/space shuttle experiments.

  2. Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Key Laboratory of Photo-Electronics Information Materials of Hebei Province, Baoding 071002 ; Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying

    2013-09-30

    A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

  3. Growth and phase velocity of self-modulated beam-driven plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Gruener, Florian; Leemans, Wim

    2011-09-20

    A long, relativistic particle beam propagating in an overdense plasma is subject to the self-modulation instability. This instability is analyzed and the growth rate is calculated, including the phase relation. The phase velocity of the wake is shown to be significantly less than the beam velocity. These results indicate that the energy gain of a plasma accelerator driven by a self-modulated beam will be severely limited by dephasing. In the long-beam, strongly-coupled regime, dephasing is reached in a homogeneous plasma in less than four e-foldings, independent of beam-plasma parameters.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Behavior in a Magnetic Nozzle of a Laser-plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimura, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Hayashida, K.; Maeno, A.; Nakashima, H.

    2008-12-31

    Numerical simulations of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of a Laser-Plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System are conducted. The propellant is heated and accelerated by the laser and expanded isotropically. The magnetic nozzle is a combination of solenoidal coils and used to collimate and guide the plasma to produce thrust. Simulation calculations by a three-dimensional hybrid code are conducted to examine the plasma behaviors in the nozzle and to estimate the thrust efficiency. We also estimate a fraction ({alpha}) of plasma particles leaking in the forward (spacecraft) direction. By a combination of a few coils, we could decrease {alpha} value without degrading the thrust efficiency. Finally, the shaped propellant is proposed to increase the thrust efficiency.

  5. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R.P. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-driven system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.

  6. The investigation of polarized reflectivity of explosively driven dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaporozhets, Yu B.; Mintsev, V. B.; Gryaznov, V. K.; Reinholz, H.; Röpke, G.; Omarbakiyeva, Y. A.; Fortov, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of the response of dense plasma to electromagnetic waves of moderate intensity can be used as a tool to investigate the validity of the physical models describing the behavior of matter under extreme conditions. Within this work, the new experimental data on oblique incidence of polarized electromagnetic wave are presented. The plasma composition was calculated within a chemical picture and the integration of Maxwell equations to construct the spatial profile of the density of charge carriers of plasma was based on an interpolation formula for dc conductivity.

  7. Particle balance in long duration RF driven plasmas on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Yoshida, N.; Yugami, N.; Honda, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Mishra, K.; Kuzmin, A.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Watanabe, O.; Onchi, T.; Watanabe, H.; Tokunaga, K.; Higashijima, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Takase, Y.; Fukuyama, A.; Mitarai, O.; Peng, Y. K. M.

    2015-08-01

    Global particle balance in non-inductive long-duration plasma on QUEST has been investigated. Approximately 70% of the fuel hydrogen (H) was retained in the wall and then was almost exhausted just after the discharge. The global recycling ratio (Rg), defined as the ratio of the evacuated H2 flux to that injected, was found to gradually increase during discharges and subsequently rose rapidly. To study the growth of Rg, the thermal desorption spectra after deuterium implantation in a specimen exposed to QUEST plasma was analyzed with a model which includes reflection, diffusion, solution, recombination, trapping, and plasma-induced desorption in the re-deposition layer. The model reconstructs the growth of Rg during a long-duration plasma and indicates solution plays a dominant role in the growth.

  8. Current gradient driven flute vortices in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P.K.

    1987-07-01

    It is shown that an external electron current gradient in a nonuniform magnetized plasma can drive a purely growing instability involving coupled convective cells and magnetostatic modes. Accounting for the mode coupling, it is demonstrated that the quasistationary state of the unstable flute modes can lead to a spatially ordered dipolar vortex structure. The latter could alter the transport properties and it may also be responsible for a relaxed state in a force-free magnetized plasma.

  9. Boundary-Layer Separation Control under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Modem low-pressure turbines, in general, utilize highly loaded airfoils in an effort to improve efficiency and to lower the number of airfoils needed. Typically, the airfoil boundary layers are turbulent and fully attached at takeoff conditions, whereas a substantial fraction of the boundary layers on the airfoils may be transitional at cruise conditions due to the change of density with altitude. The strong adverse pressure gradients on the suction side of these airfoils can lead to boundary-layer separation at the latter low Reynolds number conditions. Large separation bubbles, particularly those which fail to reattach, cause a significant degradation of engine efficiency. A component efficiency drop of the order 2% may occur between takeoff and cruise conditions for large commercial transport engines and could be as large as 7% for smaller engines at higher altitude. An efficient means of of separation elimination/reduction is, therefore, crucial to improved turbine design. Because the large change in the Reynolds number from takeoff to cruise leads to a distinct change in the airfoil flow physics, a separation control strategy intended for cruise conditions will need to be carefully constructed so as to incur minimum impact/penalty at takeoff. A complicating factor, but also a potential advantage in the quest for an efficient strategy, is the intricate interplay between separation and transition for the situation at hand. Volino gives a comprehensive discussion of several recent studies on transition and separation under low-pressure-turbine conditions, among them one in the present facility. Transition may begin before or after separation, depending on the Reynolds number and other flow conditions. If the transition occurs early in the boundary layer then separation may be reduced or completely eliminated. Transition in the shear layer of a separation bubble can lead to rapid reattachment. This suggests using control mechanisms to trigger and enhance early transition. Gad-el-Hak provides a review of various techniques for flow control in general and Volino discusses recent studies on separation control under low-pressure-turbine conditions utilizing passive as well as active devices. As pointed out by Volino, passive devices optimized for separation control at low Reynolds numbers tend to increase losses at high Reynolds numbers, Active devices have the attractive feature that they can be utilized only in operational regimes where they are needed and when turned off would not affect the flow. The focus in the present paper is an experimental Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil ('Pak-B'). The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) Gee-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface- flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control. of active separation control using glow discharge plasma actuators.

  10. Plasma ignition schemes for the SNS radio-frequency driven H- source

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Staples, J.W.; Thomae, W.; Reijonen, J.; Gough, R.A.; Leung, K.N.; Keller, R.

    2001-09-06

    The H{sup -} ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a cesiated, radio-frequency driven (2 MHz) multicusp volume source which operates at a duty cycle of 6% (1 ms pulses and 60 Hz). In pulsed RF driven plasma sources, ignition of the plasma affects the stability of source operation and the antenna lifetime. We are reporting on investigations of different ignition schemes, based on secondary electron generation in the plasma chamber by UV light, a hot filament, a low power RF plasma (cw, 13.56 MHz), as well as source operation solely with the high power (40 kW) 2 MHz RF. We find that the dual frequency, single antenna scheme is most attractive for the operating conditions of the SNS H{sup -} source.

  11. Two-dimensional profile measurement of plasma parameters in radio frequency-driven argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    The two-dimensional profiles of the electron density, electron temperature, neutral translational temperature, and molecular rotational temperature are investigated in an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet, which is driven by the radio frequency of 13.56 MHz by means of the laser scattering methods of Thomson, Rayleigh, and Raman. All measured parameters have maximum values at the center of the discharge and decrease toward the plasma edge. The results for the electron temperature profile are contrary to the results for the microwave-driven plasma. From our experimental results, the profiles of the plasma parameters arise from the radial contraction of plasmas and the time averaged profile of the electric field, which is obtained by a microwave simulation performed under identical conditions to the plasma jet. In the case of the neutral temperature, a higher translational temperature than the rotational temperature is measured, and its discrepancy is tentatively explained in terms of the low ion-neutral charge exchange rate and the additional degrees of freedom of the molecules. The description of our experimental results and the underlying physics are addressed in detail.

  12. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M.? J.; Li, C.? K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.? B.; Stoeckl, C.; Séguin, F.? H.; Frenje, J.? A.; Petrasso, R.? D.

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly driven, ? ? 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet ~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early inmore »time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.« less

  13. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M.? J.; Li, C.? K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.? B.; Stoeckl, C.; Séguin, F.? H.; Frenje, J.? A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly-driven, ? ? 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. Themore »absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.« less

  14. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M.? J.; Li, C.? K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.? B.; Stoeckl, C.; Séguin, F.? H.; Frenje, J.? A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly-driven, ? ? 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.

  15. Observation of Centrifugally Driven Interchange Instabilities in a Plasma Confined by a Magnetic Dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, B.; Maslovsky, D.; Mauel, M.E.

    2005-05-06

    Centrifugally driven interchange instabilities are observed in a laboratory plasma confined by a dipole magnetic field. The instabilities appear when an equatorial mesh is biased to drive a radial current that causes rapid axisymmetric plasma rotation. The observed instabilities are quasicoherent in the laboratory frame of reference; they have global radial mode structures and low azimuthal mode numbers, and they are modified by the presence of energetic, magnetically confined electrons. Results from a self-consistent nonlinear simulation reproduce the measured mode structures.

  16. Growth rate reduction of the curvature-driven flute instability by plasma blanket line tying

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, D.

    1983-09-01

    The effect of an annular, line-tied blanket, on the curvature-driven flute in a magnetic mirror is considered. The blanket is assumed to be line tied to a thermoionically emitting annular end plate. Reduction of the flute growth rate is computed as function of Larmor radius, blanket radius, and axial plasma conductance through either an external plasma or mirror sheath. It is found that significant reduction in growth rate can be achieved.

  17. Summary Report of Working Group 5: Electron Beam Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark J.; Conde, Manoel E.

    2009-01-22

    Electron beam driven plasma accelerators have seen rapid progress over the last decade. Recent efforts have built on this success by constructing a concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator based linear collider. The needs for any future collider to deliver both energy and luminosity have substantial implications for interpreting current experiments and setting priorities for the future. This working group reviewed current experiments and ideas in the context of the demands of a future collider. The many discussions and presentations are summarized here.

  18. Electron self-injection in the proton-driven-plasma-wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Wang, You-Nian

    2013-12-15

    The self-injection process of plasma electrons in the proton-driven-plasma-wakefield acceleration scheme is investigated using a two-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell method. Plasma electrons are self-injected into the back of the first acceleration bucket during the initial bubble formation period, where the wake phase velocity is low enough to trap sufficient electrons. Most of the self-injected electrons are initially located within a distance of the skin depth c/?{sub pe} to the beam axis. A decrease (or increase) in the beam radius (or length) leads to a significant reduction in the total charges of self-injected electron bunch. Compared to the uniform plasma, the energy spread, emittance and total charges of the self-injected bunch are reduced in the plasma channel case, due to a reduced injection of plasma electrons that initially located further away from the beam axis.

  19. Incoherent synchrotron emission of laser-driven plasma edge

    E-print Network

    Serebryakov, D A; Kostyukov, I Yu

    2015-01-01

    When a relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulse is incident on an overdense plasma, a dense electron layer is formed on the plasma edge which relativistic motion results in high harmonic generation, ion acceleration and incoherent synchrotron emission of gamma-photons. Here we present a self-consistent analytical model that describes the edge motion and apply it to the problem of incoherent synchrotron emission by ultrarelativistic plasma electrons. The model takes into account both coherent radiation reaction from high harmonics and incoherent radiation reaction in the Landau-Lifshitz form. The analytical results are in agreement with 3D particle-in-cell simulations in a certain parameter region that corresponds to the relativistic electronic spring interaction regime.

  20. Simulation of an asymmetric single dielectric barrier plasma actuator K. P. Singha

    E-print Network

    Singh, Kunwar Pal

    induce air flow up to several meters per second in atmospheric pressure that has experimentally been of the x force is positive and the y force is negative over the domain; therefore there is an average net force on the plasma in the positive x and negative y directions. This will result in a moving wave

  1. Laser-driven plasma waves in capillary tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wojda, F.; Cassou, K.; Cros, B.; Genoud, G.; Burza, M.; Glinec, Y.; Lundh, O.; Persson, A.; Wahlstroem, C.-G.; Vieux, G.; Brunetti, E.; Shanks, R. P.; Jaroszynski, D.; Andreev, N. E.

    2009-12-15

    The excitation of plasma waves over a length of up to 8 cm is demonstrated using laser guiding of intense laser pulses through hydrogen-filled glass capillary tubes. The plasma waves are diagnosed by spectral analysis of the transmitted laser radiation. The dependence of the spectral redshift--measured as a function of filling pressure, capillary tube length, and incident laser energy - is in excellent agreement with simulation results. The longitudinal accelerating field inferred from the simulations is in the range of 1-10 GV/m.

  2. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    E-print Network

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014), 113105], [G. Fiore, S. De Nicola, arXiv:1509.04656] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  3. Driven transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    E-print Network

    P. Bandyopadhyay; G. Prasad; A. Sen; P. K. Kaw

    2008-07-07

    The linear dispersion properties of transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma are experimentally studied by exciting them in a controlled manner with a variable frequency external source. The dusty plasma is maintained in the strongly coupled fluid regime with (1 < Gamma << Gamma_c) where Gamma is the Coulomb coupling parameter and Gamma_c is the crystallization limit. A dispersion relation for the transverse waves is experimentally obtained over a frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 2 Hz and found to show good agreement with viscoelastic theoretical results.

  4. Visualization of Shock Wave Driven by Millimeter Wave Plasma in a Parabolic Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Shimada, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Yuya; Shibata, Teppei; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-06

    By focusing a high-power millimeter wave beam generated by a 170 GHz gyrotron, a breakdown occurred and a shock wave was driven by plasma heated by following microwave energy. The shock wave and the plasma around a focal point of a parabolic thruster were visualized by a shadowgraph method, and a transition of structures between the shock wave and the plasma was observed. There was a threshold local power density to make the transition, and the propagation velocity at the transition was around 800 m/s.

  5. Alfvénic instabilities driven by runaways in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fülöp, T.; Newton, S.

    2014-08-15

    Runaway particles can be produced in plasmas with large electric fields. Here, we address the possibility that such runaway ions and electrons excite Alfvénic instabilities. The magnetic perturbation induced by these modes can enhance the loss of runaways. This may have important implications for the runaway electron beam formation in tokamak disruptions.

  6. Plasma Jet Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF)

    E-print Network

    energy applications focus of this talk Accretion disk experiment using ~12 plasma guns, with goal): subset of guns fire DT jets forming target shell immediately followed by remainder of guns firing DT/Xe composite jets forming afterburner and heavy liner to compress DT target Option (2): all guns fire

  7. Current inwave-driven plasmas Charles F. F. Karneyand NathanielJ. Fisch

    E-print Network

    Karney, Charles

    confirmed by numerous experiments in which the current was drivenby lower-hybrid waves. These results allow us to contemplatea steady-statetokamak reactorin which the to- roidal current is driven by lower-hybrid-state currents in a plasma with rf waves. In particular, it was predicted1that these currents could

  8. Fusion and Plasma Physics are at the Core of Nature's Most Intriguing Self-Driven Systems

    E-print Network

    Fusion and Plasma Physics are at the Core of Nature's Most Intriguing Self-Driven Systems CHANDRA Cassiopia A HST Eagle Nebula #12;Can we Solve the Mystery of Producing a Stationary Self-Sustained Fusion Fire?? CHANDRA Crab Nebula SOHO VLBA Galactic Jet - M87 Fusion: Power of the Cosmos Brought to Earth

  9. Localized arc filament plasma actuators for noise mitigation and mixing enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, Mohammad (Inventor); Adamovich, Igor (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A device for controlling fluid flow. The device includes an arc generator coupled to electrodes. The electrodes are placed adjacent a fluid flowpath such that upon being energized by the arc generator, an arc filament plasma adjacent the electrodes is formed. In turn, this plasma forms a localized high temperature, high pressure perturbation in the adjacent fluid flowpath. The perturbations can be arranged to produce vortices, such as streamwise vortices, in the flowing fluid to control mixing and noise in such flows. The electrodes can further be arranged within a conduit configured to contain the flowing fluid such that when energized in a particular frequency and sequence, can excite flow instabilities in the flowing fluid. The placement of the electrodes is such that they are unobtrusive relative to the fluid flowpath being controlled.

  10. Localized arc filament plasma actuators for noise mitigation and mixing enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, Mohammad (Inventor); Adamovich, Igor (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for controlling fluid flow. The device includes an arc generator coupled to electrodes. The electrodes are placed adjacent a fluid flowpath such that upon being energized by the arc generator, an arc filament plasma adjacent the electrodes is formed. In turn, this plasma forms a localized high temperature, high pressure perturbation in the adjacent fluid flowpath. The perturbations can be arranged to produce vortices, such as streamwise vortices, in the flowing fluid to control mixing and noise in such flows. The electrodes can further be arranged within a conduit configured to contain the flowing fluid such that when energized in a particular frequency and sequence, can excite flow instabilities in the flowing fluid. The placement of the electrodes is such that they are unobtrusive relative to the fluid flowpath being controlled.

  11. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R.P. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-drivenmore »system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.« less

  12. Two-dimensional scanning realized by an asymmetry fiber cantilever driven by single piezo bender actuator for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Ding, Zhihua; Wang, Kai; Chen, Minghui; Wang, Chuan

    2009-08-01

    We develop a fiber based probe that is capable of two-dimensional scanning applicable in optical coherence tomography (OCT). Based on the resonance of the fiber cantilever with asymmetry structure which has two distinguished resonant frequencies in orthogonal directions, Lissajous pattern is produced suitable for two-dimensional scanning upon a sample. Orthogonal resonances of the fiber cantilever are simultaneously excited by single piezo bender actuator with one driving signal consisting of two components corresponding to above-mentioned two resonant frequencies. By integrating a backward-placed two-dimensional position sensitive detector (PSD) into the probe, real-time lateral position of the scanning pattern is registered simultaneously for image reconstruction. Dynamical characteristics of the fiber cantilever are experimentally studied with special consideration on factors determining the resolution of the scanning pattern, including frequency and amplitude ratios between two components of the driving signal and fetching duration used for an en face image. With the developed probe implemented in our established OCT system, en face OCT images of typical samples are obtained with satisfying resolution and contrast, demonstrating the feasibility of such fiber cantilever with asymmetry structure for realizing two dimensional scanning by single actuator, potentially applicable to endoscopic OCT imaging. PMID:19654788

  13. Nozzle Driven Shocks in Post-CME Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Roger B.; Longcope, D. W.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    Models of patchy reconnection allow for heating and acceleration of plasma along reconnected field lines but do not offer a mechanism for transport of energy and momentum across field lines. Here we present a simple 2D model in which a localized region of reconnected flux creates an apparent constriction in the surrounding layer of unreconnected field. The moving constriction acts as a de Laval nozzle and ultimately leads to shocks which can extend out to several times the diameter of the flux tube, altering the density and temperature of the plasma in that region. These findings have direct implications for observations in the solar corona, particularly in regard to such phenomena as wakes seen behind supra-arcade downflows and high temperatures in post-CME current sheets. This work was supported by a joint grant from the NSF and DOE.

  14. Phenotype-Driven Plasma Biobanking Strategies and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Bowton, Erica A.; Collier, Sarah P.; Wang, Xiaoming; Sutcliffe, Cara B.; Van Driest, Sara L.; Couch, Lindsay J.; Herrera, Miguel; Jerome, Rebecca N.; Slebos, Robbert J. C.; Alborn, William E.; Liebler, Daniel C.; McNaughton, Candace D.; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Wells, Quinn S.; Brown, Nancy J.; Roden, Dan M.; Pulley, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Biobank development and integration with clinical data from electronic medical record (EMR) databases have enabled recent strides in genomic research and personalized medicine. BioVU, Vanderbilt’s DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions. Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt. This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care. Here, we describe the considerations and components involved in implementing a plasma biobank program from a feasibility assessment through pilot sample collection. PMID:26110578

  15. Sensor Driven Intelligent Control System For Plasma Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.; Campbell, V.B.

    1998-02-23

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Innovative Computing Technologies, Inc. (IC Tech) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) was undertaken to contribute to improved process control for microelectronic device fabrication. Process data from an amorphous silicon thin film deposition experiment was acquired to validate the performance of an intelligent, adaptive, neurally-inspired control software module designed to provide closed loop control of plasma processing machines used in the microelectronics industry. Data acquisition software was written using LabView The data was collected from an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source, which was available for this project through LMES's RF/Microwave Technology Center. Experimental parameters measured were RF power, RF current and voltage on the antenna delivering power to the plasma, hydrogen and silane flow rate, chamber pressure, substrate temperature and H-alpha optical emission. Experimental results obtained were poly-crystallin silicon deposition rate, crystallinity, crystallographic orientation and electrical conductivity. Owing to experimental delays resulting from hardware failures, it was not possible to assemble a complete data for IC Tech use within the time and resource constraints of the CRADA. IC Tech was therefore not able to verify the performance of their existing models and control structures and validate model performance under this CRADA.

  16. Energetic electron avalanches and mode transitions in planar inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas operated in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Niemi, K.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-07-25

    Space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements reveal that in certain parameter regimes, inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas exhibit three distinct operation modes. At low powers, the plasma operates as an alpha-mode capacitively coupled plasma driven through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath potential in front of the antenna. At high powers, the plasma operates in inductive mode sustained through induced electric fields due to the time varying currents and associated magnetic fields from the antenna. At intermediate powers, close to the often observed capacitive to inductive (E-H) transition regime, energetic electron avalanches are identified to play a significant role in plasma sustainment, similar to gamma-mode capacitively coupled plasmas. These energetic electrons traverse the whole plasma gap, potentially influencing plasma surface interactions as exploited in technological applications.

  17. Electron beam driven lower hybrid waves in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2013-05-15

    An electron beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma drives electrostatic lower hybrid waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. A dispersion relation and the growth rate of the instability for this process have been derived taking into account the dust charge fluctuations. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. Moreover, the growth rate of the instability increases with beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density. In addition, the dependence of the growth rate on the beam velocity is also discussed.

  18. Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi periodical oscillations in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Paccagnella, R.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of periodical or quasi periodical oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the observed quasi periodical oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called “Single Helical” state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other periodical phenomena observed in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is suggested.

  19. Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi periodical oscillations in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of periodical or quasi periodical oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the observed quasi periodical oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called "Single Helical" state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other periodical phenomena observed in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is suggested.

  20. Thrust Measurement of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators: New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis, Frequency Sweeps Methodology, Humidity and Enclosure Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust, or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a grounded large-diameter metal sleeve. Strong dependence on humidity is also shown; the thrust significantly increased with decreasing humidity, e.g., 44 percent increase as relative humidity changed from 18 percent and dew point 33 degF to 50 percent and dew point of 57 degF.

  1. Characteristics of turbulence-driven plasma flow and origin of experimental empirical scalings of intrinsic rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.; Lee, W. W.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-04-15

    Toroidal plasma flow driven by turbulent torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation is shown to recover the observed key features of intrinsic rotation in experiments. Specifically, the turbulence-driven intrinsic rotation scales close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current, qualitatively reproducing empirical scalings obtained from a large experimental data base. The effect of magnetic shear on the symmetry breaking in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is identified. The origin of the current scaling is found to be the enhanced k{sub ||} symmetry breaking induced by increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic rotation on the pressure gradient comes from the fact that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving the residual stress, are increased with the strength of the turbulence drives, which are R/L{sub T{sub e}} and R/L{sub n{sub e}} for the collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM). Highlighted results also include robust radial pinches in toroidal flow, heat and particle transport driven by CTEM turbulence, which emerge ''in phase,'' and are shown to play important roles in determining plasma profiles. Also discussed are the experimental tests proposed to validate findings from these gyrokinetic simulations.

  2. Characteristics of Turbulence-driven Plasma Flow and Origin of Experimental Empirical Scalings of Intrinsic Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.; Lee, W. W.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-03-20

    Toroidal plasma flow driven by turbulent torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation is shown to recover the observed key features of intrinsic rotation in experiments. Specifically, the turbulence-driven intrinsic rotation scales close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current, qualitatively reproducing empirical scalings obtained from a large experimental data base. The effect of magnetic shear on the symmetry breaking in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is identified. The origin of the current scaling is found to be the enhanced kll#3; symmetry breaking induced by increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic rotation on the pressure gradient comes from the fact that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving the residual stress, are increased with the strength of the turbulence drives, which are R/LTe and R/Lne for the collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM). Highlighted results also include robust radial pinches in toroidal flow, heat and particle transport driven by CTEM turbulence, which emerge "in phase", and are shown to play important roles in determining plasma profiles. Also discussed are experimental tests proposed to validate findings from these gyrokinetic simulations.

  3. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. III - Anomalous transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Kelly, Arnold J.; Jahn, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    In the present paper the linear stability description and weak turbulence theory are used to develop a second order description of wave-particle transport and anomalous dissipation. The goal is to arrive at anomalous transport coefficients that can be readily included in fluid flow codes. In particular, expressions are derived for the heating rates of ions and electrons by the unstable waves and for the electron-wave momentum exchange rate that controls the anomalous resistivity effect. Comparative calculations were undertaken assuming four different saturation models: ion trapping, electron trapping, ion resonance broadening, and thermodynamic bound. A foremost finding is the importance of the role of electron Hall parameter in scaling the level of anomalous dissipation for the parameter range of the MPD thruster plasma. Polynomial expressions of the relevant transport coefficients cast solely in terms of macroscopic parameters are also obtained for inclusion in plasma fluid codes for the self-consistent numerical simulation of real thruster flows including microturbulent effects.

  4. Fluid simulation of relativistic electron beam driven wakefield in a cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Ratan Kumar; Sengupta, Sudip; Das, Amita

    2015-07-01

    Excitation of wakefield in a cold homogeneous plasma, driven by an ultra-relativistic electron beam is studied in one dimension using fluid simulation techniques. For a homogeneous rigid beam having density (nb) less than or equal to half the plasma density (n0), simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical work of Rosenzweig [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 555 (1987)]. Here, Rosenzweig's work has been analytically extended to regimes where the ratio of beam density to plasma density is greater than half and results have been verified using simulation. Further in contrast to Rosenzweig's work, if the beam is allowed to evolve in a self-consistent manner, several interesting features are observed in simulation viz. splitting of the beam into beam-lets (for lb > ?p) and compression of the beam (for lb < ?p), lb and ?p, respectively, being the initial beam length and plasma wavelength.

  5. Subcutoff microwave driven plasma ion sources for multielemental focused ion beam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2008-06-15

    A compact microwave driven plasma ion source for focused ion beam applications has been developed. Several gas species have been experimented including argon, krypton, and hydrogen. The plasma, confined by a minimum B multicusp magnetic field, has good radial and axial uniformity. The octupole multicusp configuration shows a superior performance in terms of plasma density ({approx}1.3x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) and electron temperature (7-15 eV) at a power density of 5-10 W/cm{sup 2}. Ion current densities ranging from a few hundreds to over 1000 mA/cm{sup 2} have been obtained with different plasma electrode apertures. The ion source will be combined with electrostatic Einzel lenses and should be capable of producing multielemental focused ion beams for nanostructuring and implantations. The initial simulation results for the focused beams have been presented.

  6. Plasma-driven self-organization of Ni nanodot arrays on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Diwan, K.; Winkler, K.; Mariotti, D.

    2008-11-03

    The results of the combined experimental and numerical study suggest that nonequilibrium plasma-driven self-organization leads to better size and positional uniformity of nickel nanodot arrays on a Si(100) surface compared with neutral gas-based processes under similar conditions. This phenomenon is explained by introducing the absorption zone patterns, whose areas relative to the small nanodot sizes become larger when the surface is charged. Our results suggest that strongly nonequilibrium and higher-complexity plasma systems can be used to improve ordering and size uniformity in nanodot arrays of various materials, a common and seemingly irresolvable problem in self-organized systems of small nanoparticles.

  7. Experimental investigation of explosive-driven plasma-compression opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, J.H.; Caird, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-compression opening-switch techniques are being developed for use in explosive-driven magnetic-flux-compresssion-generator applications. A new test bed for performing low-cost experimentation is described. Experiments with approx.0.15 MA/cm linear current density in the switch have achieved resistance increases of a factor of 10 in a few hundred nanoseconds. Peak field strengths of 30 kV/cm are generated in these tests. Data are presented from preliminary tests that indicate reduced pressure in the plasma cavity enhanced switch performance.

  8. Simulations of plasma performance in a beam-driven tokamak fusion reactor with Q approx 2-3

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Jassby, D.L.; Manickam, J.; McCune, D.; Wieland, R.

    1990-02-01

    Supershot profiles were used to simulate plasmas in a neutral-beam driven tokamak reactor designed to achieve fusion energy production with Q {approx} 2-3. Profiles from a TFTR supershot were scaled to larger radii, density, and electron temperature. The TRANSP code was used to calculate performance of these plasmas. Examples are given of steady-state plasmas with large beam-driven bootstrap currents. The required energy transport rate is comparable to that in TFTR, but the particle transport rate must be less. The PEST code indicates that the plasmas would be MHD stable if the central q{sub {Psi}} can be controlled. 8 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Bidirectional jet formation during driven magnetic reconnection in two-beam laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, P. M.; Willingale, L.; Kaluza, M. C.; Kamperidis, C.; Wei, M. S.; Fernandes, P.; Kingham, R. J.; Najmudin, Z.; Haines, M. G.; Dangor, A. E.; Krushelnick, K.; Minardi, S.; Tatarakis, M.; Notley, M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Sherlock, M.; Evans, R. G.; Rozmus, W.

    2008-09-15

    Measurements of the bidirectional plasma jets that form at the surface of a solid target during a laser-generated driven magnetic reconnection are presented. Resistivity enhancement of at least 25x the classical Spitzer value is required when applying the Sweet-Parker model of reconnection to reconcile the experimentally observed reconnection time scale. Analytic calculations show that a fast reconnection model, which includes a priori the effects of microturbulent resistivity enhancement, better reproduces the experimental observations.

  10. Capillarity-driven blood plasma separation on paper-based devices.

    PubMed

    Kar, Shantimoy; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate capillarity-driven plasma separation from whole blood on simple paper-based H-channels. This methodology, unlike other reported techniques, does not necessitate elaborate and complex instrumentation, and the usage of expensive consumables. We believe that this technique will be ideally suited to be implemented in rapid and portable blood diagnostic devices designed to be operative at locations with limited resources. PMID:26270006

  11. Statistics of beam-driven waves in plasmas with ambient fluctuations: Reduced-parameter approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tyshetskiy, Yu.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-09-15

    A reduced-parameter (RP) model of quasilinear wave-plasma interactions is used to analyze statistical properties of beam-driven waves in plasmas with ambient density fluctuations. The probability distribution of wave energies in such a system is shown to have a relatively narrow peak just above the thermal wave level, and a power-law tail at high energies, the latter becoming progressively more evident for increasing characteristic amplitude of the ambient fluctuations. To better understand the physics behind these statistical features of the waves, a simplified model of stochastically driven thermal waves is developed on the basis of the RP model. An approximate analytic solution for stationary statistical distribution of wave energies W is constructed, showing a good agreement with that of the original RP model. The 'peak' and 'tail' features of the wave energy distribution are shown to be a result of contributions of two groups of wave clumps: those subject to either very slow or very fast random variations of total wave growth rate (due to fluctuations of ambient plasma density), respectively. In the case of significant ambient plasma fluctuations, the overall wave energy distribution is shown to have a clear power-law tail at high energies, P(W){proportional_to}W{sup -{alpha}}, with nontrivial exponent 1<{alpha}<2, while for weak fluctuations it is close to the lognormal distribution predicted by pure stochastic growth theory. The model's wave statistics resemble the statistics of plasma waves observed by the Ulysses spacecraft in some interplanetary type III burst sources. This resemblance is discussed qualitatively, and it is suggested that the stochastically driven thermal waves might be a candidate for explaining the power-law tails in the observed wave statistics without invoking mechanisms such as self-organized criticality or nonlinear wave collapse.

  12. Fusion for Space Propulsion and Plasma Liner Driven MTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y.C. Francis; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant cannot overcome the problem. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. There are similarities as well as differences at the system level between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The differences potentially provide a wider window of opportunities for applying fusion to propulsion. For example, pulsed approaches to fusion may be attractive for the propulsion application. This is particularly so in the light of significant development of the enabling pulsed power component technologies that have occurred in the last two decades because of defense and other energy requirements. The extreme states of matter required to produce fusion reactions may be more readily realizable in the pulsed states with less system mass than in steady states. Significant saving in system mass may result in pulsed fusion systems using plasmas in the appropriate density regimes. Magnetized target fusion, which attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement and inertial compression-containment into one single integrated fusion scheme, appears to have benefits that are worth exploring for propulsion application.

  13. Computational model of collisional-radiative nonequilibrium plasma in an air-driven type laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2010-05-06

    A thrust power of a gas-driven laser-propulsion system is obtained through interaction with a propellant gas heated by a laser energy. Therefore, understanding the nonequilibrium nature of laser-produced plasma is essential for increasing available thrust force and for improving energy conversion efficiency from a laser to a propellant gas. In this work, a time-dependent collisional-radiative model for air plasma has been developed to study the effects of nonequilibrium atomic and molecular processes on population densities for an air-driven type laser propulsion. Many elementary processes are considered in the number density range of 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3}<=N<=10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} and the temperature range of 300 K<=T<=40,000 K. We then compute the unsteady nature of pulsively heated air plasma. When the ionization relaxation time is the same order as the time scale of a heating pulse, the effects of unsteady ionization are important for estimating air plasma states. From parametric computations, we determine the appropriate conditions for the collisional-radiative steady state, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and corona equilibrium models in that density and temperature range.

  14. Instability of magnetic fields in electroweak plasma driven by neutrino asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B. E-mail: semikoz@yandex.ru

    2014-05-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is modified to incorporate the parity violation in the Standard Model leading to a new instability of magnetic fields in the electroweak plasma in the presence of nonzero neutrino asymmetries. The main ingredient for such a modified MHD is the antisymmetric part of the photon polarization tensor in plasma, where the parity violating neutrino interaction with charged leptons is present. We calculate this contribution to the polarization tensor connected with the Chern-Simons term in effective Lagrangian of the electromagnetic field. The general expression for such a contribution which depends on the temperature and the chemical potential of plasma as well as on the photon's momentum is derived. The instability of a magnetic field driven by the electron neutrino asymmetry for the ?-burst during the first second of a supernova explosion can amplify a seed magnetic field of a protostar, and, perhaps, can explain the generation of strongest magnetic fields in magnetars. The growth of a cosmological magnetic field driven by the neutrino asymmetry density ?n{sub ?} = n{sub ?}?n{sub ?-bar}?0 is provided by a lower bound on |?{sub ?{sub e}}| = |?{sub ?{sub e}}|/T which is consistent with the well-known Big Bang nucleosynthesis (upper) bound on neutrino asymmetries in a hot universe plasma.

  15. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric

    2010-06-30

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically-intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a non-relativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined, and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for non-relativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  16. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18?MeV per nucleon and ?5% conversion efficiency (that is 4?J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (?1012?V?m?1) and magnetic (?104?T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science. PMID:26657147

  17. Current-driven plasma instability in lower dimensional solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hanzhen

    The object of this study was to investigate the feasibility of generating Current Driven Plasma Instabilities (CDPI) in lower dimensional solid state systems. This thesis presents a complete formalism and results of numerical calculations of CDPI in lower dimensional uniform and modulated solid state systems. Random phase approximation has been used to study the response of a plasma system. The presence of a driving field, collisional heating and damping effects, as well as the inter-particle and wave-particle effects have been taken into account in the analysis of the mode structure and growth rate of unstable plasma modes. We have compared plasma waves amplification performance of different uniform two dimensional layered systems, studying in detail the effects of various material parameters on the growth rates of the unstable plasma modes. We have studied the efficiency of a grating coupler which can he used to convert the plasma wave energy into electromagnetic radiation. We have also investigated CDPI in lower dimensional solid state systems with a periodic modulation of density. CDPI can be generated at much lower applied electric fields for the modulated than for the corresponding uniform systems. The fastest and the strongest growing waves which can be generated in the systems we analyzed are relevant for device applications for radiation sources in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wave ranges.

  18. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Antici, P.; Benedetti, C.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.

    2012-08-15

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  19. Active flow separation control using synthetic jet actuators 

    E-print Network

    Rao, Preetham P

    2000-01-01

    The use of synthetic jet actuators for controlling the boundary layer flow and flow separation over a wing is investigated. A theory for the optimum design of actuators using motors is developed. A motor driven synthetic ...

  20. A water bag model of driven phase space holes in non-neutral plasmas L. Friedland,1,a

    E-print Network

    Friedland, Lazar

    A water bag model of driven phase space holes in non-neutral plasmas I. Barth,1 L. Friedland,1,a, quasi-one-dimensional water bag model of this excitation for an initially flat-top distribution plasmas. A multiwater bag approach allows us to generalize the theory to other initial distributions

  1. Increasing efficiency, speed, and responsivity of vanadium dioxide based photothermally driven actuators using single-wall carbon nanotube thin-films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tongyu; Torres, David; Fernández, Félix E; Green, Andrew J; Wang, Chuan; Sepúlveda, Nelson

    2015-04-28

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2)-based actuators have demonstrated great performance in terms of strain energy density, speed, reversible actuation, programming capabilities, and large deflection. The relative low phase transition temperature of VO2 (?68 °C) gives this technology an additional advantage over typical thermal actuators in terms of power consumption. However, this advantage can be further improved if light absorption is enhanced. Here we report a VO2-based actuator technology that incorporates single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as an effective light absorber to reduce the amount of photothermal energy required for actuation. It is demonstrated that the chemistry involved in the process of integrating the SWNT film with the VO2-based actuators does not alter the quality of the VO2 film, and that the addition of such film enhances the actuator performance in terms of speed and responsivity. More importantly, the results show that the combination of VO2 and SWNT thin films is an effective approach to increase the photothermal efficiency of VO2-based actuators. The integration of SWNT films in VO2 devices can be easily applied to other VO2-based phototransducers as well as to similar devices based on other phase-change materials. While adding a sufficiently thick layer of some arbitrary material with high absorption for the light used for actuation (? = 650 nm wavelength in this case) could have improved conversion of light to heat in the device, it could also have impeded actuation by increasing its stiffness. It is noted, however, that the low effective Young's modulus of SWNT film coating used in this work does not impair the actuation range. PMID:25853931

  2. Laser experiments to simulate coronal mass ejection driven magnetospheres and astrophysical plasma winds on compact magnetized stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Ditmire, T.; Zakharov, Yu. P.

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory experiments using a plasma wind generated by laser-target interaction are proposed to investigate the creation of a shock in front of the magnetosphere and the dynamo mechanism for creating plasma currents and voltages. Preliminary experiments are shown where measurements of the electron density gradients surrounding the obstacles are recorded to infer the plasma winds. The proposed experiments are relevant to understanding the electron acceleration mechanisms taking place in shock-driven magnetic dipole confined plasmas surrounding compact magnetized stars and planets. Exploratory experiments have been published [P. Brady, T. Ditmire, W. Horton, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 043112 (2009)] with the one Joule Yoga laser and centimeter sized permanent magnets.

  3. Transport driven plasma flows in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA Tokamak in different orientations of magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sangwan, Deepak; Jha, Ratneshwar; Brotankova, Jana; Gopalkrishna, M. V.

    2014-06-15

    Parallel plasma flows in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA tokamak are measured in two orientations of total magnetic field. In each orientation, experiments are carried out by reversing the direction of the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current. The transport-driven component is determined by averaging flow Mach numbers, measured in two directions of the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current for the same orientation. It is observed that there is a significant transport-driven component in the measured flow and the component depends on the field orientation.

  4. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-07-13

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  5. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2009-07-15

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m>{approx}[8{pi}{beta}(1+D{sub m}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}{gamma}{sub max}{sup -1})]{sup 1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  6. Experimental Evidence of Predominantly Transverse Electron Plasma Waves Driven by Stimulated Raman Scattering of Picosecond Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseaux, C.; Benisti, D.; Gremillet, L.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Adam, J. C.; Heron, A.; Strozzi, D. J.

    2009-05-08

    We report on highly time- and space-resolved measurements of the evolution of electron plasma waves driven by stimulated Raman scattering of a picosecond, single laser speckle propagating through a preformed underdense plasma. Two-dimensional Thomson scatter spectra indicate that the dominant waves have significant transverse components. These results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations which pinpoint the dominant role of the wave front bowing and of secondary nonlinear electrostatic instabilities in the evolution of the plasma waves.

  7. Excitation of the centrifugally driven interchange instability in a plasma confined by a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, B.; Maslovsky, D.; Mauel, M.E.; Waksman, J.

    2005-05-15

    The centrifugally driven electrostatic interchange instability is excited for the first time in a laboratory magnetoplasma. The plasma is confined by a dipole magnetic field, and the instability is excited when an equatorial mesh is biased to induce a radial current that creates rapid axisymmetric plasma rotation. The observed instabilities appear quasicoherent in the lab frame of reference; they have global radial mode structures and low azimuthal mode numbers, and they are modified by the presence of energetic, magnetically confined electrons. The mode structure is measured using a multiprobe correlation technique as well as a novel 96-point polar imaging diagnostic which measures particle flux along field lines that map to the pole. Interchange instabilities caused by hot electron pressure are simultaneously observed at the hot electron drift frequency. Adjusting the hot electron fraction {alpha} modifies the stability as well as the structures of the centrifugally driven modes. In the presence of larger fractions of energetic electrons, m=1 is observed to be the dominant mode. For faster rotating plasmas containing fewer energetic electrons, m=2 dominates. Results from a self-consistent nonlinear simulation reproduce the measured mode structures in both regimes. The low azimuthal mode numbers seen in the experiment and simulation can also be interpreted with a local, linear dispersion relation of the electrostatic interchange instability. Drift resonant hot electrons give the instability a real frequency, inducing stabilizing ion polarization currents that preferentially suppress high-m modes.

  8. Influence of surface conditions on plasma dynamics and electron heating in a radio-frequency driven capacitively coupled oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greb, Arthur; Gibson, Andrew Robert; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo

    2015-08-01

    The impact of changing surface condition on plasma dynamics and electron heating is investigated by means of numerical simulations, based on a semi-kinetic fluid model approach, and compared with measurements of the nanosecond electron dynamics in the plasma-surface interface region using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES). The simulations are conducted in a one-dimensional domain and account for a geometrical asymmetry comparable to the experimental setup of a radio-frequency driven capacitively coupled plasma in a gaseous electronics conference reference cell. A simple reaction scheme is considered, including electrons, \\text{O}2+ positive ions, {{\\text{O}}-} negative ions and {{\\text{O}}2}{?ft(1?\\right)} metastable singlet delta oxygen (SDO) as individual species. The role of surface loss and effective lifetime of SDO is discussed. To simulate different surface conditions, the SDO surface loss probability and the secondary electron emission coefficient were varied in the model. It is found that a change in surface condition significantly influences the metastable concentration, electronegativity, spatial particle distributions and densities as well as the ionization and electron heating dynamics. The excitation dynamics obtained from simulations are compared with PROES measurements. This allows to determine experimentally relevant SDO surface loss probabilities and secondary electron emission coefficient values in-situ and is demonstrated for two different surface materials, namely aluminum and Teflon.

  9. Diagnostic studies of ac-driven plasmas in saline solutions: the effect of frequency on the plasma behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-wen; Hsu, Cheng-che

    2011-08-01

    The effect of frequency on the characteristics of plasmas in saline solution driven by 50-1000 Hz ac power is studied. Two distinct modes, namely bubble and jetting modes, are identified. The bubble mode occurs under low frequencies. In this mode, a millimeter-sized bubble is tightly attached to the electrode tip and oscillates with the applied voltage. With an increase in frequency, it shows the jetting mode, in which bubbles, hundreds of micometers in diameter, are continuously formed and jetted away from the electrode surface. Such a significant change in the bubble behavior influences the power input at a given applied voltage and significantly affects the plasma behavior. In spite of the fact that no significant difference is seen in the optical emission spectra, the broadening of the H? peak shows that the bubble mode has a lower electron density than that of the jetting mode. The temporally resolved optical emission intensities show light emission in the negative half of the power period regardless of the modes. This shows clearly that the driving frequency significantly influences the bubble dynamics, which in turn alters the plasma behavior.

  10. Chorus intensity modulation driven by time-varying field-aligned low-energy plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Liang, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Le Contel, O.; Auster, U.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that chorus waves are responsible for scattering and precipitating the energetic electrons that drive the pulsating aurora. While some of the chorus intensity modulation events are correlated with <~100 eV electron density modulation, most of the chorus intensity modulation events in the postmidnight sector occur without apparent density changes. Although it is generally difficult to measure evolution of low-energy (<~20 eV) electron fluxes due to constraints imposed by the spacecraft potential and electrostatic analyzer (ESA) energy range limit, we identified using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite data that low-energy ions of ~100 eV show density modulation that is correlated with chorus intensity modulation. Those low-energy ions and electrons are field-aligned with major peaks in 0° (for northern hemisphere winter event) and 180° (for northern hemisphere summer event) pitch angle, indicating that outflowing plasma from the sunlit hemisphere is the source of the low-energy plasma density modulation near the equator. Plasma sheet plasma density, and ambient electric and magnetic fields do not show modulations that are correlated with the chorus intensity modulation. Assuming charge neutrality, the low-energy ions can be used to represent cold plasma density in wave growth rate calculations, and the enhancements of the low-energy plasma density are found to contribute most effectively to chorus linear growth rates. These results suggest that chorus intensity modulation is driven by a feedback process where outflowing plasma due to energetic electron precipitation increases the equatorial density that drives further electron precipitation.

  11. Toroidal rotation of multiple species of ions in tokamak plasma driven by lower-hybrid-waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Yang; Wang Shaojie; Pan Chengkang

    2012-10-15

    A numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the toroidal rotation of multiple species of ions and the radial electric field in a tokamak plasma driven by the lower-hybrid-wave (LHW). The theoretical model is based on the neoclassical transport theory associated with the anomalous transport model. Three species of ions (primary ion and two species of impurity ions) are taken into consideration. The predicted toroidal velocity of the trace impurities during the LHW injection agrees reasonably well with the experimental observation. It is shown that the toroidal rotation velocities of the trace impurity ions and the primary ions are close, therefore the trace impurity ions are representative of the primary ions in the toroidal rotation driven by the LHW.

  12. Physics-Based Model Driven by Plasma Drifts Obtained From the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Retterer, J. M.; Stoneback, R.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Roddy, P. A.; Heelis, R. A.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2010-12-01

    An important parameter in determining low-latitude ionospheric plasma density is the plasma drift. Two instruments on-board the Communication/Navigation Outage System (C/NOFS) satellite were designed to directly or indirectly measure the plasma drifts: the Ion Velocity Drift Meter (IVM) and the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI). By using the electric field measurements obtained from VEFI, the physics-based model (PBMOD) developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory has been shown to qualitatively reproduce post-midnight density trenches observed in June 2008. In this presentation, we will demonstrate simulation results obtained from PBMOD driven by averaged IVM [Stoneback and Heelis, 2010] and VEFI data [Pfaff et al., 2010]. A wave-4 structure has been identified in averaged IVM data. Based on our preliminary study, the ion density output from IVM-driven PBMOD also presents a similar wave-four structure in geographical longitudes (GLON). In addition, the lowest density region occurs near 300 degree GLON for all seasons, where the magnetic equator declination is largest. Model results will be compared with those driven by the Scherliess-Fejer drift model, as well as in-situ density measurements obtained from the Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP). Stoneback, R. and R. Heelis (2010), Equatorial ion densities and meridional ion drifts in 2009, C/NOFS Science Workshop at Breckenridge, Colorado. Pfaff, R. , H. Freudenreich, J. Klenzing, D. Rowland, and K. Bromund (2010), DC electric fields as observed on the C/NOFS satellite during solar minimum conditions, C/NOFS Science Workshop at Breckenridge, Colorado.

  13. Characterization of Heat-Wave Propagation through Laser-Driven Ti-Doped Underdense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Ohnishi, N; Fournier, K B; Fujioka, S; Iwamae, A; Hansen, S B; Nagai, K; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Brebion, D; Mima, K

    2009-02-23

    The propagation of a laser-driven heat-wave into a Ti-doped aerogel target was investigated. The temporal evolution of the electron temperature was derived by means of Ti K-shell x-ray spectroscopy, and compared with two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Reasonable agreement was obtained in the early stage of the heat-wave propagation. In the later phase, laser absorption, the propagation of the heat wave, and hydrodynamic motion interact in a complex manner, and the plasma is mostly re-heated by collision and stagnation at the target central axis.

  14. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  15. Kinetic simulation of capacitively coupled plasmas driven by trapezoidal asymmetric voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Diomede, Paola Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-06-21

    A kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulation with Monte Carlo Collisions was performed of a geometrically symmetric capacitively coupled, parallel-plate discharge in argon, driven by trapezoidal asymmetric voltage pulses with a period of 200?ns. The discharge was electrically asymmetric, making the ion energy distributions at the two electrodes different from one another. The fraction of the period (?), during which the voltage was kept at a constant (top-flat) positive value, was a critical control parameter. For the parameter range investigated, as ? increased, the mean ion energy on the grounded electrode increased and the ions became more directional, whereas the opposite was found for the ions striking the powered electrode. The absolute value of the DC self-bias voltage decreased as ? increased. Plasma instabilities, promoted by local double layers and electric field reversals during the time of the positive voltage excursion, were characterized by electron plasma waves launched from the sheath edge.

  16. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNLlaser-plasma-accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-09-10

    We discuss the design and current status of a compactfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUVpulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existingLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator,whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposedultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to thedrive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science withpulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current (&10 kA) ofthe laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes arepotentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASEand high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length andfluctuations, are considered.

  17. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-04

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (~;;10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10^13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  18. Self-organized T(sub)e Redistribution during Driven Reconnection Processes in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.; Mazzucato, E.; Luhmann, N.C., Jr.; Domier, C.W.; Xia, Z.; Munsat, T.; Donné, A.J.H.; Classen, I.G.J.; van de Pol, M.J.; TEXTOR team

    2005-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) images of electron temperature fluctuations with a high temporal and spatial resolution were employed to study the sawtooth oscillation in TEXTOR tokamak plasmas. The new findings are: 1) 2-D images revealed that the reconnection is localized and permitted the determination of the physical dimensions of the reconnection zone in the poloidal and toroidal planes. 2) The combination of a pressure driven mode and a kink instability leads to an "X-point" reconnection process. 3) Reconnection can take place anywhere along the q~1 rational magnetic surface (both high and low field sides). 4) Heat flow from the core to the outside of the inversion radius during the reconnection time is highly asymmetric and the behavior is collective. These new findings are compared with the characteristics of various theoretical models and experimental results for the study of the sawtooth oscillation in tokamak plasmas.

  19. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Gruener, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by a high-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source ({approx}10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (> or approx.10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10{sup 13} photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  20. Plasma turbulence driven by transversely large-scale standing shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra; Rao, Sathyanarayan

    2012-12-15

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study generation of turbulence consisting of transversely small-scale dispersive Alfven and electrostatic waves when plasma is driven by a large-scale standing shear Alfven wave (LS-SAW). The standing wave is set up by reflecting a propagating LS-SAW. The ponderomotive force of the standing wave generates transversely large-scale density modifications consisting of density cavities and enhancements. The drifts of the charged particles driven by the ponderomotive force and those directly caused by the fields of the standing LS-SAW generate non-thermal features in the plasma. Parametric instabilities driven by the inherent plasma nonlinearities associated with the LS-SAW in combination with the non-thermal features generate small-scale electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, yielding a broad frequency spectrum ranging from below the source frequency of the LS-SAW to ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies and beyond. The power spectrum of the turbulence has peaks at distinct perpendicular wave numbers (k{sub Up-Tack }) lying in the range d{sub e}{sup -1}-6d{sub e}{sup -1}, d{sub e} being the electron inertial length, suggesting non-local parametric decay from small to large k{sub Up-Tack }. The turbulence spectrum encompassing both electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations is also broadband in parallel wave number (k{sub ||}). In a standing-wave supported density cavity, the ratio of the perpendicular electric to magnetic field amplitude is R(k{sub Up-Tack }) = |E{sub Up-Tack }(k{sub Up-Tack })/|B{sub Up-Tack }(k{sub Up-Tack })| Much-Less-Than V{sub A} for k{sub Up-Tack }d{sub e} < 0.5, where V{sub A} is the Alfven velocity. The characteristic features of the broadband plasma turbulence are compared with those available from satellite observations in space plasmas.

  1. High and low frequency instabilities driven by counter-streaming electron beams in space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.

    2014-05-15

    A four-component plasma composed of a drifting (parallel to ambient magnetic field) population of warm electrons, drifting (anti-parallel to ambient magnetic field) cool electrons, stationary hot electrons, and thermal ions is studied in an attempt to further our understanding of the excitation mechanisms of broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) in the Earth's magnetospheric regions such as the magnetosheath, plasmasphere, and plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). Using kinetic theory, beam-driven electrostatic instabilities such as the ion-acoustic, electron-acoustic instabilities are found to be supported in our multi-component model. The dependence of the instability growth rates and real frequencies on various plasma parameters such as beam speed, number density, temperature, and temperature anisotropy of the counter-streaming (relative to ambient magnetic field) cool electron beam are investigated. It is found that the number density of the anti-field aligned cool electron beam and drift speed play a central role in determining which instability is excited. Using plasma parameters which are closely correlated with the measurements made by the Cluster satellites in the PSBL region, we find that the electron-acoustic and ion-acoustic instabilities could account for the generation of BEN in this region.

  2. Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Awe, T. J.; Davis, J. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Brockington, S. J. E.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.; Gilmore, M. A.; Lynn, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, electron temperature Almost-Equal-To 1.4 eV, velocity Almost-Equal-To 30 km/s, M Almost-Equal-To 14, ionization fraction Almost-Equal-To 0.96, diameter Almost-Equal-To 5 cm, and length Almost-Equal-To 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment, which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is at the very low end of the 8-160 times drop predicted by ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

  3. High and low frequency instabilities driven by counter-streaming electron beams in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.

    2014-05-01

    A four-component plasma composed of a drifting (parallel to ambient magnetic field) population of warm electrons, drifting (anti-parallel to ambient magnetic field) cool electrons, stationary hot electrons, and thermal ions is studied in an attempt to further our understanding of the excitation mechanisms of broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) in the Earth's magnetospheric regions such as the magnetosheath, plasmasphere, and plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). Using kinetic theory, beam-driven electrostatic instabilities such as the ion-acoustic, electron-acoustic instabilities are found to be supported in our multi-component model. The dependence of the instability growth rates and real frequencies on various plasma parameters such as beam speed, number density, temperature, and temperature anisotropy of the counter-streaming (relative to ambient magnetic field) cool electron beam are investigated. It is found that the number density of the anti-field aligned cool electron beam and drift speed play a central role in determining which instability is excited. Using plasma parameters which are closely correlated with the measurements made by the Cluster satellites in the PSBL region, we find that the electron-acoustic and ion-acoustic instabilities could account for the generation of BEN in this region.

  4. Plasma driven water shock. Technical report, 24 September 1991-31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, G.R.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the development and testing of the Phase II Plasma Driven Water Shock (PDWS ll) simulator as a continuation of the effort to develop a high energy density alternative to conventional high explosive (HE) water shock systems used for simulation of nuclear generated underwater shocks. The PDWS technique involves the rapid discharge of electrical energy, stored capacitively at high voltage, through a water plasma formed by electrical breakdown between fixed electrodes. The small volume of the plasma combined with extremely fast energy deposition results in a more nuclear like response than that obtained by the slower, more bulky HE energy release. Comparative experimental results have shown the necessity of rapid energy injection to achieve high coupling efficiency. There are strong implications based on these results for simulation using high explosives (HE) or numerical calculations that depend upon HE results. The fact that the coupling efficiency from the plasma to the water is strongly dependent upon the energy density for the microsecond time scales used here, implies that relationships developed for shock characteristic behavior from HE tests dependent upon available chemical energy or `yield` may be extremely suspect when applied to nuclear generated phenomena with radically different behavior than conventional explosives.

  5. Preparation of magnetized nanodusty plasmas in a radio frequency-driven parallel-plate reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tadsen, Benjamin Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2014-10-15

    Nanodust is produced in an rf-driven push-pull parallel-plate reactor using argon with an acetylene admixture at 5–30?Pa. A scheme for the preparation of nanodust clouds with particle radii up to 400?nm for investigations in magnetized plasmas is proposed. The confinement that keeps the nanodust of different radii inside a moderately magnetized discharge (B???500?mT) is investigated by a comparison of 2d-Langmuir probe measurements in the dust-free plasma without and with a magnetic field and by the analysis of scattered light of nanodust clouds. It is shown that the dust cloud changes its shape when the dust density changes. This results in a reversed ?-?{sup ?} transition from a dense dust cloud with a central disk-like void to a dilute dust cloud with a toroidal void. When the dust density is further reduced, filaments are observed in the central part of the cloud, which were absent in the high-density phase. It is concluded that the dense nanodust cloud is able to suppress plasma filamentation in magnetized plasmas.

  6. A gas-puff-driven theta pinch for plasma-surface interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soonwook; Kesler, Leigh; Yun, Hyun-Ho; Curreli, Davide; Andruczyk, Daniel; Ruzic, David

    2012-10-01

    DEVeX is a theta pinch device used to investigate fusion-related material interaction such as vapor shielding and ICRF antenna interactions with plasma-pulses in a laboratory setting. The simulator is required to produce high heat-flux plasma enough to induce temperature gradient high enough to study extreme conditions happened in a plasma fusion reactor. In order to achieve it, DEVeX is reconfigured to be combined with gas puff system as gas puffing may reduce heat flux loss resulting from collisions with neutral. A gas puff system as well as a conical gas nozzle is manufactured and several diagnostics including hot wire anemometer and fast ionization gauge are carried out to quantitatively estimate the supersonic flow of gas. Energy deposited on the target for gas puffing and static-filled conditions is measured with thermocouples and its application to TELS, an innovative concept utilizing a thermoelectric-driven liquid metal flow for plasma facing component, is discussed.

  7. Numerical simulation of an atmospheric pressure RF-driven plasma needle and heat transfer to adjacent human skin using COMSOL.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Maximilian; Ochoa, Angel; Breitkopf, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging field where plasma physics is used for therapeutical applications. Temperature is an important factor to take into account with respect to the applications of plasma to biological systems. During the treatment, the tissue temperature could increase to critical values. In this work, a model is presented, which is capable of predicting the skin temperature during a treatment with a radio frequency driven plasma needle. The main gas was helium. To achieve this, a discharge model was coupled to a heat transfer and fluid flow model. The results provide maximum application times for different power depositions in order to avoid reaching critical skin temperatures. PMID:25850416

  8. Measurement of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering from Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Serlin, V.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E. A.; Manka, C. K.

    2010-11-01

    With short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1˜3 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser provides unique research opportunities and potential for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Previous Nike experiments observed two plasmon decay (TPD) driven signals from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2 with total laser energies up to 1 kJ of ˜350 ps FWHM pulses. We have performed a further experiment with longer laser pulses (0.5˜4.0 ns FWHM) and will present combined results of the experiments focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and TPD instabilities. Time- or space-resolved spectral features of TPD were detected at different viewing angles and the absolute intensity calibrated spectra of thermal background were used to obtain blackbody temperatures in the plasma corona. The wave vector distribution in k-space of the participating TPD plasmons will be also discussed. These results show promise for the proposed direct-drive designs.

  9. First Observation of the High Field Side Sawtooth Crash and Heat Transfer during Driven Reconnection Processes in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, HK; Luhmann, NC; Donne, AJH; Classen, IGJ; Domier, CW; Mazzucato, E; Munsat, T; van de Pol, MJ; Xia, Z

    2005-12-01

    High resolution (temporal and spatial), two-dimensional images of electron temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations were employed to study driven reconnection processes in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. The combination of kink and local pressure driven instabilities leads to an "X-point" reconnection process that is localized in the toroidal and poloidal planes. The reconnection is not always confined to the magnetic surfaces with minimum energy. The heat transport process from the core is demonstrated to be highly collective rather than stochastic.

  10. Effect of dust charge fluctuations on current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability in a collisional magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Kavita; Gahlot, Ajay

    2013-05-15

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron (EIC) instability is studied in a collisional magnetized dusty plasma. The growth rate and unstable mode frequencies were evaluated based on existing physical parameters relevant to ion cyclotron waves in dusty plasmas. It is found that the unstable mode frequency and growth rate of current-driven EIC instability increase with ? (ion-to-electron density ratio). Moreover, the increase in electron neutral collisional frequency (?{sub e}) has no effect on the unstable mode frequency while the normalized growth rate has linear dependence on ?{sub e}.

  11. Effects of neutral interactions on velocity-shear-driven plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, C. L.; Tejero, E. M.; Amatucci, W. E.; Crabtree, C.; Ganguli, G.; Sotnikov, V.

    2014-06-15

    In a laboratory experiment, we demonstrate the substantial effects that collisions between charged and neutral particles have on low-frequency (?{sub i}????????{sub e}) shear-driven electrostatic lower hybrid waves in a plasma. We establish a strong (up to 2.5?kV/m) highly localized electric field with a length scale shorter than the ion gyroradius, so that the ions in the plasma, unlike the electrons, do not develop the full E?×?B drift velocity. The resulting shear in the particle velocities initiates the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, and we observe the formation of strong waves in the vicinity of the shear with variations in plasma densities of 10% or greater. Our experimental configuration allows us to vary the neutral background density by more than a factor of two while holding the charged particle density effectively constant. Not surprisingly, increasing the neutral density decreases the growth rate/saturation amplitude of the waves and increases the threshold electric field necessary for wave formation, but the presence of neutrals affects the dominant wave frequency as well. We show that a 50% increase in the neutral density decreases the wave frequency by 20% while also suppressing the electric field dependence of the frequency that is observed when fewer neutrals are present. The majority of these effects, as well as the values of the frequencies we observe, closely match the predictions of previously developed linear EIH instability theory, for which we present the results of a numerical solution.

  12. Boltzmann-equation simulations of radio-frequency-driven, low-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Drallos, P.J.; Riley, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    We present a method for the numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation (BE) describing plasma electrons. We apply the method to a capacitively-coupled, radio-frequency-driven He discharge in parallel-plate (quasi-1D) geometry which contains time scales for physical processes spanning six orders of magnitude. Our BE solution procedure uses the method of characteristics for the Vlasov operator with interpolation in phase space at early time, allowing storage of the distribution function on a fixed phase-space grid. By alternating this BE method with a fluid description of the electrons, or with a novel time-cycle-average equation method, we compute the periodic steady state of a He plasma by time evolution from startup conditions. We find that the results compare favorably with measured current-voltage, plasma density, and ``cited state densities in the ``GEC`` Reference Cell. Our atomic He model includes five levels (some are summed composites), 15 electronic transitions, radiation trapping, and metastable-metastable collisions.

  13. Persistence of magnetic field driven by relativistic electrons in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flacco, A.; Vieira, J.; Lifschitz, A.; Sylla, F.; Kahaly, S.; Veltcheva, M.; Silva, L. O.; Malka, V.

    2015-05-01

    The onset and evolution of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is determined by several mechanisms, including instabilities, dynamo effects and ultrahigh-energy particle flows through gas, plasma and interstellar media. These processes are relevant over a wide range of conditions, from cosmic ray acceleration and gamma ray bursts to nuclear fusion in stars. The disparate temporal and spatial scales where each process operates can be reconciled by scaling parameters that enable one to emulate astrophysical conditions in the laboratory. Here we unveil a new mechanism by which the flow of ultra-energetic particles in a laser-wakefield accelerator strongly magnetizes the boundary between plasma and non-ionized gas. We demonstrate, from time-resolved large-scale magnetic-field measurements and full-scale particle-in-cell simulations, the generation of strong magnetic fields up to 10-100 tesla (corresponding to nT in astrophysical conditions). These results open new paths for the exploration and modelling of ultrahigh-energy particle-driven magnetic-field generation in the laboratory.

  14. Wakefield-Induced Ionization injection in beam-driven plasma accelerators

    E-print Network

    de la Ossa, A Martinez; Streeter, M J V; Osterhoff, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the features and capabilities of Wakefield-Induced Ionization (WII) injection in the blowout regime of beam driven plasma accelerators. This mechanism exploits the electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and trap them in a well-defined region of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to the formation of high-quality witness-bunches. The electron-beam drivers must feature high-peak currents ($I_b^0\\gtrsim 8.5~\\mathrm{kA}$) and a duration comparable to the plasma wavelength to excite plasma waves in the blowout regime and enable WII injection. In this regime, the disparity of the magnitude of the electric field in the driver region and the electric field in the rear of the ion cavity allows for the selective ionization and subsequent trapping from a narrow phase interval. The witness bunches generated in this manner feature a short duration and small values of the normalized transverse emittance ($k_p\\sigma_z \\sim k_p\\epsilon_n \\sim 0.1$). In additi...

  15. Interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 plasma wave data: Lower hybrid waves driven by pickup ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Wei; Gurnett, Donald A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1993-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) was released from the shuttle to explore the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms were obtained from the PDP at frequencies from 0 to 30 kHz and distances up to 400 m from the shuttle. The wideband data frequently showed antenna interference patterns when the PDP was on the downstream side of the shuttle. Analysis of these interference patterns allows a determination of the wavelength, the plasma rest frame frequency, the direction of propagation, the power spectrum, and in some cases the location of the source. We concentrate our analysis on interference patterns due to lower hybrid waves: waves which have rest frame frequencies near the lower hybrid frequency and propagate perpendicular to the magnetic field. The waves have an almost flat dispersion relation with frequencies just above the lower hybrid frequency and relatively short wavelengths (1 - 4 m). The observed lower hybrid waves depend strongly on the position of the PDP relative to the shuttle and the magnetic field direction. Our results confirm previous suggestions that the lower hybrid waves are generated primarily in the vicinity of the shuttle and that they are driven by a charge exchange interaction between the ambient ionosphere and a H2O cloud around the shuttle.

  16. Tension Stiffened and Tendon Actuated Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R. (Inventor); Dorsey, John T. (Inventor); Ganoe, George G. (Inventor); King, Bruce D. (Inventor); Jones, Thomas C. (Inventor); Mercer, Charles D. (Inventor); Corbin, Cole K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A tension stiffened and tendon actuated manipulator is provided performing robotic-like movements when acquiring a payload. The manipulator design can be adapted for use in-space, lunar or other planetary installations as it is readily configurable for acquiring and precisely manipulating a payload in both a zero-g environment and in an environment with a gravity field. The manipulator includes a plurality of link arms, a hinge connecting adjacent link arms together to allow the adjacent link arms to rotate relative to each other and a cable actuation and tensioning system provided between adjacent link arms. The cable actuation and tensioning system includes a spreader arm and a plurality of driven and non-driven elements attached to the link arms and the spreader arm. At least one cable is routed around the driven and non-driven elements for actuating the hinge.

  17. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 12 APRIL 2009; CORRECTED ONLINE: 24 APRIL 2009 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1248 Proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    Proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration Allen Caldwell1 *, Konstantin Lotov2,3 , Alexander Pukhov4 accelerators at the gigaelectronvolt scale. However, it is not obvious how to scale these approaches of proton-bunch-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration, and demonstrate through numerical simulations

  18. Sheared Flow Driven Drift Instability and Vortices in Dusty Plasmas with Opposite Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, AttaUllah; Ikram, M.; Clark, R. E. H.

    2015-11-01

    Low-frequency electrostatic drift waves are studied in an inhomogeneous dust magnetoplasma containing dust with components of opposite polarity. The drift waves are driven by the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) sheared flows in the presence of electrons and ions. Due to sheared flow in the linear regime, the electrostatic dust drift waves become unstable. The conditions of mode instability, with the effects of dust streaming and opposite polarity, are studied. These are excited modes which gain large amplitudes and exhibit interactions among themselves. The interaction is governed by the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) nonlinear equation with vector nonlinearity. The stationary solutions of the HM equation in the form of a vortex chain and a dipolar vortex, including effects of dust polarity and electron (ion) temperatures, are studied. The relevance of the present work to space and laboratory four component dusty plasmas is noted.

  19. Filamentation instability of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Rastbood, E.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range have been studied using the Lorentz transformation formulas. Based on the kinetic theory, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate as well as the ion acoustic instability have been investigated. The results of the research show that the possibility and growth rate of these instabilities are significantly dependent on the electron nonextensive parameter and drift velocity. Besides, the increase of electrons nonextensive parameter and drift velocity lead to the increase of the growth rates of both instabilities. In addition, the wavelength region in which the filamentation instability occurs is more stretched in the presence of higher values of drift velocity and nonextensive parameter. Finally, the results of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities have been compared and the conditions for filamentation instability to be dominant mode of instability have been presented.

  20. Laser-Driven Plasma Deceleration of Electron Beams for Compact Photon Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Rykovanov, S. G.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-10-01

    Particle accelerators are in widespread use as intense, precisely controllable photon sources, but many applications, including nuclear nonproliferation, are limited by size. Laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) reduce accelerator size, but a compact system also requires addressing radiation hazards resulting from disposal of particle beam energy after photon production, typically requiring large and heavy "beam dumps". In this paper, we investigate, through 3-D Particle-In-Cell simulations, an LPA stage demonstrating equal effectiveness at accelerating and decelerating an electron beam over a very short distance. This indicates that in addition to providing compact accelerators, such structures can effectively reduce beam energy after photon production and hence beam dump weight and volume. This is important to the development of compact photon source systems which can satisfy needs including transportable operation or operation in populated areas.

  1. Bifurcation Theory of the Transition to Collisionless Ion-temperature-gradient-driven Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, R.A.; Krommes, J.A.

    2005-09-22

    The collisionless limit of the transition to ion-temperature-gradient-driven plasma turbulence is considered with a dynamical-systems approach. The importance of systematic analysis for understanding the differences in the bifurcations and dynamics of linearly damped and undamped systems is emphasized. A model with ten degrees of freedom is studied as a concrete example. A four-dimensional center manifold (CM) is analyzed, and fixed points of its dynamics are identified and used to predict a ''Dimits shift'' of the threshold for turbulence due to the excitation of zonal flows. The exact value of that shift in terms of physical parameters is established for the model; the effects of higher-order truncations on the dynamics are noted. Multiple-scale analysis of the CM equations is used to discuss possible effects of modulational instability on scenarios for the transition to turbulence in both collisional and collisionless cases.

  2. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Actuator Thermal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Keith S.; Liu, Yuanming; Lee, Chern-Jiin; Hendricks, Steven

    2010-01-01

    NASA will launch a 900 kg rover, part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, to Mars in October of 2011. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars in August of 2012. The rover employs 31, electric-motor driven actuators to perform a variety of engineering and science functions including: mobility, camera pointing, telecommunications antenna steering, soil and rock sample acquisition and sample processing. This paper describes the MSL rover actuator thermal design. The actuators have stainless steel housings and planetary gearboxes that are lubricated with a "wet" lubricant. The lubricant viscosity increases with decreasing temperature. Warm-up heaters are required to bring the actuators up to temperature (above -55 C) prior to use in the cold wintertime environment of Mars (when ambient atmosphere temperatures are as cold as -113 C). Analytical thermal models of all 31 MSL actuators have been developed. The actuators have been analyzed and warm-up heaters have been designed to improve actuator performance in cold environments. Thermal hardware for the actuators has been specified, procured and installed. This paper presents actuator thermal analysis predicts, and describes the actuator thermal hardware and its operation. In addition, warm-up heater testing and thermal model correlation efforts for the Remote Sensing Mast (RSM) elevation actuator are discussed.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Plasma Based Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Jacob, J. D.; Ashpis, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to simulate flow control applications using plasma actuators. The effects of the plasma actuators on the external flow are incorporated into Navier Stokes computations as a body force vector. In order to compute this body force vector, the model solves two additional equations: one for the electric field due to the applied AC voltage at the electrodes and the other for the charge density representing the ionized air. The model is calibrated against an experiment having plasma-driven flow in a quiescent environment and is then applied to simulate a low pressure turbine flow with large flow separation. The effects of the plasma actuator on control of flow separation are demonstrated numerically.

  4. Linear instabilities driven by differential rotation in very weakly magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quataert, E.; Heinemann, T.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2015-03-01

    We study the linear stability of weakly magnetized differentially rotating plasmas in both collisionless kinetic theory and Braginskii's theory of collisional, magnetized plasmas. We focus on the very weakly magnetized limit in which ? ? ?c/?, where ? is the ratio of thermal to magnetic energy and ?c/? is the ratio of the cyclotron frequency to rotation frequency. This regime is important for understanding how astrophysical magnetic fields originate and are amplified at high redshift. We show that the single instability of fluid theory - the magnetorotational instability mediated by magnetic tension - is replaced by two distinct instabilities, one associated with ions and one with electrons. Each of these has a different way of tapping into the free energy of differential rotation. The ion instability is driven by viscous transport of momentum across magnetic field lines due to a finite ion cyclotron frequency (gyroviscosity); the fastest growing modes have wavelengths significantly longer than magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and Hall MHD predictions. The electron instability is a whistler mode driven unstable by the temperature anisotropy generated by differential rotation; the growth time can be orders of magnitude shorter than the rotation period. The electron instability is an example of a broader class of instabilities that tap into the free energy of differential rotation or shear via the temperature anisotropy they generate. We briefly discuss the application of our results to the stability of planar shear flows and show that such flows are linearly overstable in the presence of fluid gyroviscosity. We also briefly describe the implications of our results for magnetic field amplification in the virialized haloes of high-redshift galaxies.

  5. Normalization schemes for ultrafast x-ray diffraction using a table-top laser-driven plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, D.; Bojahr, A.; Herzog, M.; Korff Schmising, C. von; Shayduk, R.; Leitenberger, W.; Gaal, P.; Bargheer, M.

    2012-02-15

    We present an experimental setup of a laser-driven x-ray plasma source for femtosecond x-ray diffraction. Different normalization schemes accounting for x-ray source intensity fluctuations are discussed in detail. We apply these schemes to measure the temporal evolution of Bragg peak intensities of perovskite superlattices after ultrafast laser excitation.

  6. Alpha Particle-Driven Toroidal Alfv en Eigenmodes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas: Theory and

    E-print Network

    Alpha Particle-Driven Toroidal Alfv en Eigenmodes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium en eigenmodes TAE in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor K. Young et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion on the high eld side of the magnetic axis with a mode frequency substantially below the TAE frequency. 52

  7. Ultraviolet Thomson Scattering from Two-Plasmon-Decay Electron Plasma Waves Driven by Multiple Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, R. K.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Wen, H.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to probe electron plasma waves (EPW's) driven by the common-wave two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability near the quarter-critical density. Between two and five laser beams (?3 ? = 351 nm) illuminated planar CH targets with 300- ?m-diam (FWHM) laser spots with overlapped intensities ~1015 W/cm2. A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to probe densities ranging from 0.2 to 0.25 nc while k matching the TPD common wave. The Thomson-scattering spectra show two spectral peaks consistent with scattering from forward-scattered TPD common-wave EPW's and Langmuir decay of backscattered TPD waves. Broad TPD driven spectral features were observed in an alternate scattering configuration probing EPW k vectors that do not lie along a TPD maximum-growth hyperbola, consistent with TPD k-space saturation. Experimental results are compared to ZAK3D simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Accelerated dynamics of blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, N.; Kuranz, C.; Drake, R. P.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2014-10-01

    We report the systematic analysis of experimental data describing the late time evolution of the high Mach number and high Reynolds number Rayleigh-Taylor instability which is driven by a blast wave. The parameter regime is relevant to high energy density plasmas and astrophysics. The experiments have been conducted at the Omega laser facility. By processing the experimental x-ray images, we quantified the delicate features of RT dynamics, including the measurements of the curvature of the transmitted shock and the interface envelopes, the positions of RT bubbles and spikes, and the quantification of statistics of RT mixing. The measurements were performed at four time steps and for three different initial perturbations of the target (single mode and two two-mode). We found that within the noise level the curvatures of the shock and interface envelope evolve steadily and are an imprint of laser imperfections. At late times, the bubble merge does not occur, and the flow keeps significant degree of order. Yet, the blast-wave-driven RT spikes do accelerate with the power-law exponent smaller than that in case of sustained acceleration. We compared the experimental results with the momentum model of RT mixing and stochastic model achieving good agreement. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  9. Experimental verification of dynamics modulation in a periodically-driven neon glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P. M.; Koepke, M. E.; Gunell, H.

    2010-11-01

    Two ionization wave modes in a driven neon glow discharge alternate as the dominant mode as their response to the driving force alternates between spatiotemporal and temporal periodic pulling. This phenomenon, termed dynamics modulation, was first noted by Koepke, Weltmann, and Selcher [1], who saw two limited but representative cases and proposed a mechanism [2] by which it occurs. Dynamics modulation is reproduced experimentally in a neon glow discharge plasma. The system is periodically driven near a non-dominant mode using a narrow-band ring dye laser tuned to a wavelength near the metastable neon transition at 588.35 nm. A spatially-fixed photodiode with a narrow band filter that selectively passes the primary neon spectral line at 640 nm is used to acquire the time series of luminosity oscillations. These experimental data are used to verify the proposed mechanism and explore the resulting implications for spontaneous unidirectional mode transitions that occur with a change in discharge current.[4pt] [1] M. E. Koepke, K.-D. Weltmann, and C. A. Selcher, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 40, 1716 (1995).[0pt] [2] K. -D. Weltmann, M. E. Koepke, and C. A. Selcher, Phys. Rev. E 62, 2773, (2000).

  10. Measurements and modeling of the impact of weak magnetic fields on the plasma properties of a planar slot antenna driven plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Jun Susa, Yoshio; Ventzek, Peter L. G.

    2015-05-15

    The radial line slot antenna plasma source is a type of surface wave plasma source driven by a planar slot antenna. Microwave power is transmitted through a slot antenna structure and dielectric window to a plasma characterized by a generation zone adjacent to the window and a diffusion zone that contacts a substrate. The diffusion zone is characterized by a very low electron temperature. This renders the source useful for soft etch applications and thin film deposition processes requiring low ion energy. Another property of the diffusion zone is that the plasma density tends to decrease from the axis to the walls under the action of ambipolar diffusion at distances far from where the plasma is generated. A previous simulation study [Yoshikawa and. Ventzek, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 31, 031306 (2013)] predicted that the anisotropy in transport parameters due to weak static magnetic fields less than 50 G could be leveraged to manipulate the plasma profile in the radial direction. These simulations motivated experimental tests in which weak magnetic fields were applied to a radial line slot antenna source. Plasma absorption probe measurements of electron density and etch rate showed that the magnetic fields remote from the wafer were able to manipulate both parameters. A summary of these results is presented in this paper. Argon plasma simulation trends are compared with experimental plasma and etch rate measurements. A test of the impact of magnetic fields on charge up damage showed no perceptible negative effect.

  11. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  12. Studies of bandwidth dependence of laser plasma instabilities driven by the Nike laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J.; Kehne, D.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Brown, C. M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2012-10-01

    Experiments at the Nike laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory are exploring the influence of laser bandwidth on laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by a deep ultraviolet pump (248 nm) that incorporates beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In early ISI studies with longer wavelength Nd:glass lasers (1054 nm and 527 nm),footnotetextObenschain, PRL 62(1989);Mostovych, PRL 62(1987);Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3(1991). stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (??/?˜0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (10^14-10^15 W/cm^2). The current studies will compare the emission signatures of LPI from planar CH targets during Nike operation at large bandwidth (??˜1THz) to observations for narrower bandwidth operation (??˜0.1-0.3THz). These studies will help clarify the relative importance of the short wavelength and wide bandwidth to the increased LPI intensity thresholds observed at Nike. New pulse shapes are being used to generate plasmas with larger electron density scale-lengths that are closer to conditions during pellet implosions for direct drive inertial confinement fusion.

  13. Characteristics of Muti-pulsing CHI driven ST plasmas on HIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, M.; Hanao, T.; Ito, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Higashi, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2011-10-01

    The flux amplification and sustainment of the ST configurations by operating in Multi-pulsing Coaxial Helicity Injection (M-CHI) method have been demonstrated on HIST. The multi-pulsing experiment was demonstrated in the SSPX spheromak device at LLNL. In the double pulsing discharges, we have observed that the plasma current has been sustained much longer against the resistive decay as compared to the single CHI. We have measured the radial profiles of the flow velocities by using Ion Doppler Spectrometer and Mach probes. The result shows that poloidal shear flow exists between the open flux column and the most outer closed flux surface. The poloidal velocity shear at the interface may be caused by the ion diamagnetic drift, because of a steep density gradient there. The radial electric field is determined by the flow velocities and the ion pressure gradient through the radial momentum balance equation. We have investigated the contribution of ExB or the ion pressure gradient on the poloidal velocity shear by comparing the impurity ion flow obtained from the IDS with the bulk ion flow from the Mach probe. It should be noted that the diamagnetic drift velocity of the impurity is much smaller than ExB drift velocity. We will discuss characteristics of M-CHI-driven ST plasmas by varying TF coil current and the line averaged electron density.

  14. Trapped energetic electron driven modes with second stable regime in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    He, Hongda; He, Zhixiong; Zheng, G. Y.; Lu, Gaimin; Hao, G. Z.; Tao, Xie; Wang, L. F.; Dong, J. Q.; Zhao, K.

    2014-06-15

    Features of fishbone-like trapped energetic electrons driven modes (TEEMs), which are a particular manifestation of the fishbone gap modes, are investigated taking into account model radial profile and the pitch angle distribution of the energetic electrons (EEs). The TEEMs are found unstable only when the beta values of EEs ?{sub h} (=pressure of the energetic electrons/pressure of magnetic field) are higher than certain critical values which are proportional to perturbed energy ?W{sup ^}{sub c} of background plasma and much lower than that for traditional fishbone modes. In addition, TEEMs become stable again and enter a second stable regime when ?{sub h} values are higher than second critical values. Furthermore, the modes can only be excited in plasmas which are stable for MHD instabilities. The real frequency and growth rate of the modes are approximately linear and parabolic functions of ?{sub h}, respectively. The real frequency is very low but not zero in the vicinity of lower beta region, whereas it is comparable to the toroidal precession frequency of the EEs in higher critical beta region. The numerical results show that the second stable regime is easy to form when q?=?1 flux surface is close to the magnetic axis. Suitable density gradient of EEs and magnetic shear are other two necessary conditions for excitation of the TEEMs.

  15. New insights on Titan's plasma-driven Schumann resonance inferred from Huygens and Cassini data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béghin, C.; Canu, P.; Karkoschka, E.; Sotin, C.; Bertucci, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Berthelier, J. J.; Grard, R.; Hamelin, M.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Simões, F.

    2009-12-01

    After a preliminary analysis of the low-frequency data collected with the electric antenna of the Permittivity, Wave and Altimetry (PWA) experiment onboard the Huygens Probe that landed on Titan on 14 January, 2005, it was anticipated in a previous article [Béghin et al., 2007. A Schumann-like resonance on Titan driven by Saturn's magnetosphere possibly revealed by the Huygens Probe. Icarus, 191, 251-266] that the Extremely Low-Frequency (ELF) signal at around 36 Hz observed throughout the descent, might have been generated in the upper ionosphere of Titan, driven by a plasma instability mechanism associated with the co-rotating Kronian plasma flow. The involved process was proposed as the most likely source of a Schumann resonance in the moon's atmospheric cavity, the second eigenmode of which is actually found by models to occur at around 36 Hz. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of this signal based upon the Huygens Probe attitude data deduced from the Descent Imager Spectral Radiometer (DISR), and relevant measurements obtained from the Radio Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment and from the magnetometer (MAG) onboard Cassini orbiter during flybys of Titan. We have derived several coherent characteristics of the signal which confirm the validity of the mechanism initially proposed and provide new and significant insights about such a unique type of Schumann resonance in the solar system. Indeed, the 36 Hz signal contains all the characteristics of a polarized wave, with the measured electric field horizontal component modulated by the antenna rotation, and an altitude profile in agreement with a Longitudinal Section Electric (LSE) eigenmode of the atmospheric cavity. In contrast to Earth's conditions where the conventional Transverse Magnetic mode is considered, the LSE mode appears to be the only one complying with the observations and the unexpected peculiar conditions on Titan. These conditions are essentially the lack of any lightning activity that can be ascertained from Cassini observations, the presence of an ionized layer centered around 62 km altitude that was discovered by the PWA instrumentation, and the existence of a subsurface conducting boundary which is mandatory for trapping ELF waves. A simple theoretical model derived from our analysis places tentatively consequential constraints on the conductivity profile in the lower ionosphere. It is also consistent with the presence of a conductive water ocean below an icy crust some tens of kilometers thick.

  16. Laboratory astrophysics experiments studying hydrodynamic and magnetically-driven plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Krishnan, M.; Bocchi, M.; Skidmore, J.; Swadling, G.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Burdiak, G.; de Grouchy, P.; Pickworth, L.; Suttle, L.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hall, G. N.; Khoory, E.; Wilson-Elliot, K.; Madden, R. E.; Ciardi, A.; Frank, A.

    2012-06-01

    Laboratory astrophysics is a novel approach to study different types of astrophysical phenomena by the means of carefully scaled laboratory experiments. Particularly, the formation of highly supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma jets for the study of protostellar jets is an active area of research at present. At Imperial College London, different experimental configurations allow producing plasma flows which are scalable to protostellar jets. The plasma is produced by introducing a ~1.4 MA, 250 ns current pulse from the MAGPIE generator into a load. By varying the geometry of the load it is possible to study different regions of interest in the jet. For instance, the effect of magnetic fields in the launching and collimation of the jet, and the propagation of the jet far away from the launching region as it interacts with the ambient medium. Two main experiments can address such regions of interest: radial wire arrays and radial foils. By using a radial wire array it is possible to produce a jet driven by a predominant toroidal magnetic field on the axis of a magnetic "bubble", which expands with velocities up to ~300 km/s. In a radial foil the wires are replaced by a continuous disk allowing to produce a hydrodynamic jet, i.e. a jet in which magnetic fields are not dynamically significant. With this particular configuration it is possible to introduce a neutral gas above the foil in order to study jet-ambient interactions. Experimental results from different diagnostics will be presented together with 3-D MHD simulations using the GORGON code.

  17. INJECTION OF PLASMA INTO THE NASCENT SOLAR WIND VIA RECONNECTION DRIVEN BY SUPERGRANULAR ADVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Liping; He Jiansen; Tu Chuanyi; Chen Wenlei; Zhang Lei; Wang Linghua; Yan Limei; Peter, Hardi; Marsch, Eckart; Feng, Xueshang

    2013-06-10

    To understand the origin of the solar wind is one of the key research topics in modern solar and heliospheric physics. Previous solar wind models assumed that plasma flows outward along a steady magnetic flux tube that reaches continuously from the photosphere through the chromosphere into the corona. Inspired by more recent comprehensive observations, Tu et al. suggested a new scenario for the origin of the solar wind, in which it flows out in a magnetically open coronal funnel and mass is provided to the funnel by small-scale side loops. Thus mass is supplied by means of magnetic reconnection that is driven by supergranular convection. To validate this scenario and simulate the processes involved, a 2.5 dimensional (2.5D) numerical MHD model is established in the present paper. In our simulation a closed loop moves toward an open funnel, which has opposite polarity and is located at the edge of a supergranulation cell, and magnetic reconnection is triggered and continues while gradually opening up one half of the closed loop. Its other half connects with the root of the open funnel and forms a new closed loop which is submerged by a reconnection plasma stream flowing downward. Thus we find that the outflowing plasma in the newly reconnected funnel originates not only from the upward reconnection flow but also from the high-pressure leg of the originally closed loop. This implies an efficient supply of mass from the dense loop to the dilute funnel. The mass flux of the outflow released from the funnel considered in our study is calculated to be appropriate for providing the mass flux at the coronal base of the solar wind, though additional heating and acceleration mechanisms are necessary to keep the velocity at the higher location. Our numerical model demonstrates that in the funnel the mass for the solar wind may be supplied from adjacent closed loops via magnetic reconnection as well as directly from the footpoints of open funnels.

  18. Microwave Power for Smart Membrane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.; Golembiewski, Walter T.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart membrane actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry. A large, ultra-light space structure, such as solar sails and Gossamer spacecrafts, requires a distribution of power into individual membrane actuators to control them in an effective way. A patch rectenna array with a high voltage output was developed to drive smart membrane actuators. Networked patch rectenna array receives and converts microwave power into a DC power for an array of smart actuators. To use microwave power effectively, the concept of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuit is developed and tested for networking a rectenna/actuator patch array. For the future development, the PAD circuit could be imbedded into a single embodiment of rectenna and actuator array with the thin-film microcircuit embodiment. Preliminary design and fabrication of PAD circuitry that consists of a sixteen nodal elements were made for laboratory testing.

  19. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research vessels. Heretofore, electrically actuated hydraulic pumps have been used for this purpose. By eliminating the demand for electrical energy for pumping, the use of the thermally actuated hydraulic pumps could prolong the intervals between battery charges, thus making it possible to greatly increase the durations of undersea exploratory missions.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Waves Driven by Plasma Currents Generated by Low-Frequency Alfven Waves in a Multi-Ion Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George

    2004-01-01

    When multi-ion plasma consisting of heavy and light ions is permeated by a low-frequency Alfven (LFA) wave, the crossed-electric-and-magnetic field (E x B), and the polarization drifts of the different ion species and the electrons could be quite different. The relative drifts between the charged-particle species drive waves, which energize the plasma. Using 2.5-dimensional (2.5-D) particle-in-cell simulations, we study this process of wave generation and its nonlinear consequences in terms of acceleration and heating plasma. Specifically, we study the situation for LFA wave frequency being lower than the heavy-ion cyclotron frequency in a multi-ion plasma. We impose such a wave to the plasma assuming that its wavelength is much larger than that of the waves generated by the relative drifts. For better understanding, the LFA-wave driven simulations are augmented by those driven by initialized ion beams. The driven high-frequency (HF) wave modes critically depend on the heavy ion density nh; for small values of nh, the lower hybrid (LH) waves dominate. On the other hand, for large nh a significantly enhanced level of waves occurs over a much broader frequency spectrum below the LH frequency and such waves are interpreted here as the ion Bernstein (IB) mode near the light ion cyclotron harmonics. Irrespective of the driven wave modes, both the light and heavy ions undergo significant transverse acceleration, but for the large heavy-ion densities, even the electrons are significantly accelerated in the parallel direction by the waves below the LH frequency. Even when the LFA wave drive is maintained, the ion heating leads to the cessation of HF wave excitation just after a few cycles of the former wave. On the basis of marginal stability seen in the simulations, an empirical relation for LFA wave amplitude, frequency and ion temperature is given.

  1. Basic physics of Alfven instabilities driven by energetic particles in toroidally confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    2008-05-15

    Superthermal energetic particles (EP) often drive shear Alfven waves unstable in magnetically confined plasmas. These instabilities constitute a fascinating nonlinear system where fluid and kinetic nonlinearities can appear on an equal footing. In addition to basic science, Alfven instabilities are of practical importance, as the expulsion of energetic particles can damage the walls of a confinement device. Because of rapid dispersion, shear Alfven waves that are part of the continuous spectrum are rarely destabilized. However, because the index of refraction is periodic in toroidally confined plasmas, gaps appear in the continuous spectrum. At spatial locations where the radial group velocity vanishes, weakly damped discrete modes appear in these gaps. These eigenmodes are of two types. One type is associated with frequency crossings of counterpropagating waves; the toroidal Alfven eigenmode is a prominent example. The second type is associated with an extremum of the continuous spectrum; the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode is an example of this type. In addition to these normal modes of the background plasma, when the energetic particle pressure is very large, energetic particle modes that adopt the frequency of the energetic particle population occur. Alfven instabilities of all three types occur in every toroidal magnetic confinement device with an intense energetic particle population. The energetic particles are most conveniently described by their constants of motion. Resonances occur between the orbital frequencies of the energetic particles and the wave phase velocity. If the wave resonance with the energetic particle population occurs where the gradient with respect to a constant of motion is inverted, the particles transfer energy to the wave, promoting instability. In a tokamak, the spatial gradient drive associated with inversion of the toroidal canonical angular momentum P{sub {zeta}} is most important. Once a mode is driven unstable, a wide variety of nonlinear dynamics is observed, ranging from steady modes that gradually saturate, to bursting behavior reminiscent of relaxation oscillations, to rapid frequency chirping. An analogy to the classic one-dimensional problem of electrostatic plasma waves explains much of this phenomenology. EP transport can be convective, as when the wave scatters the particle across a topological boundary into a loss cone, or diffusive, which occurs when islands overlap in the orbital phase space. Despite a solid qualitative understanding of possible transport mechanisms, quantitative calculations using measured mode amplitudes currently underestimate the observed fast-ion transport. Experimentally, detailed identification of nonlinear mechanisms is in its infancy. Beyond validation of theoretical models, the future of the field lies in the development of control tools. These may exploit EP instabilities for beneficial purposes, such as favorably modifying the current profile, or use modest amounts of power to govern the nonlinear dynamics in order to avoid catastrophic bursts.

  2. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  3. Wavebreaking-induced Transmitted Emission of Attosecond Extreme-ultraviolet Pulses from Laser-driven Overdense Plasmas

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We present a new mechanism of attosecond extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses generation from a relativistic laser-driven overdense plasma surfaces. Unlike high-order harmonic generation by reflection of a laser from the front target surface, the emission is in the transmitted direction with frequencies of local plasma frequency and its harmonics. Through simulations and analysis, we demonstrate that the ultrashort XUV emission is predominantly due to the strong plasma- density oscillation in the front skin layer induced by wavebreaking. This mechanism provides new insights into the senarios of harmonic generation from solid surfaces and the dynamics of laser- plasma interactions. It also offers a new method of attosecond XUV pulses generation which may find extensive applications in a number of fields.

  4. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  5. Plasma Physical Parameters along CME-driven Shocks. II. Observation-Simulation Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchini, F.; Susino, R.; Bemporad, A.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we compare the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters along the 1999 June 11 coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shock front with the results obtained from a CME-like event simulated with the FLIPMHD3D code, based on the FLIP-MHD particle-in-cell method. The observational data are retrieved from the combination of white-light coronagraphic data (for the upstream values) and the application of the Rankine-Hugoniot equations (for the downstream values). The comparison shows a higher compression ratio X and Alfvénic Mach number MA at the shock nose, and a stronger magnetic field deflection d toward the flanks, in agreement with observations. Then, we compare the spatial distribution of MA with the profiles obtained from the solutions of the shock adiabatic equation relating MA, X, and {? }{Bn} (the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock front normal) for the special cases of parallel and perpendicular shock, and with a semi-empirical expression for a generically oblique shock. The semi-empirical curve approximates the actual values of MA very well, if the effects of a non-negligible shock thickness {? }{sh} and plasma-to magnetic pressure ratio {? }u are taken into account throughout the computation. Moreover, the simulated shock turns out to be supercritical at the nose and sub-critical at the flanks. Finally, we develop a new one-dimensional Lagrangian ideal MHD method based on the GrAALE code, to simulate the ion-electron temperature decoupling due to the shock transit. Two models are used, a simple solar wind model and a variable-? model. Both produce results in agreement with observations, the second one being capable of introducing the physics responsible for the additional electron heating due to secondary effects (collisions, Alfvén waves, etc.).

  6. High torque miniature rotary actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben

    2005-07-01

    This paper summarizes the design and the development of a miniature rotary actuator (36 mm diameter by 100 mm length) used in spacecraft mechanisms requiring high torques and/or ultra-fine step resolution. This actuator lends itself to applications requiring high torque but with strict volume limitations which challenge the use of conventional rotary actuators. The design challenge was to develop a lightweight (less than 500 grams), very compact, high bandwidth, low power, thermally stable rotary actuator capable of producing torques in excess of 50 N.m and step resolutions as fine as 0.003 degrees. To achieve a relatively high torsional stiffness in excess of 1000 Nm/radian, the design utilizes a combination of harmonic drive and multistage planetary gearing. The unique design feature of this actuator that contributes to its light weight and extremely precise motion capability is a redundant stepper motor driving the output through a multistage reducing gearbox. The rotary actuator is powered by a high reliability space-rated stepper motor designed and constructed by Moog, Inc. The motor is a three-phase stepper motor of 15 degree step angle, producing twenty-four full steps per revolution. Since micro-stepping is not used in the design, and un-powered holding torque is exhibited at every commanded step, the rotary actuator is capable of reacting to torques as high as 35 Nm by holding position with the power off. The output is driven through a gear transmission having a total train ratio of 5120:1, resulting in a resolution of 0.003 degrees output rotation per motor step. The modular design of the multi-stage output transmission makes possible the addition of designs having different output parameters, such as lower torque and higher output speed capability. Some examples of an actuator family based on this growth capability will be presented in the paper.

  7. Ion motion in the wake driven by long particle bunches in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, J.; Silva, L. O.; Mori, W. B.

    2014-05-15

    We explore the role of the background plasma ion motion in self-modulated plasma wakefield accelerators. We employ Dawson's plasma sheet model to derive expressions for the transverse plasma electric field and ponderomotive force in the narrow bunch limit. We use these results to determine the on-set of the ion dynamics and demonstrate that the ion motion could occur in self-modulated plasma wakefield accelerators. Simulations show the motion of the plasma ions can lead to the early suppression of the self-modulation instability and of the accelerating fields. The background plasma ion motion can nevertheless be fully mitigated by using plasmas with heavier plasmas.

  8. Current-driven Langmuir oscillations and amplitude modulations—Another view on electron beam-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K.; Sydora, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    origin of Langmuir amplitude modulations and harmonic waves observed in the solar wind and in planetary foreshock regions is investigated in beam plasmas where the saturation process of the beam instability is accompanied with the formation of a plateau distribution. This saturated state represents a current which is shown to drive homogeneous electric field oscillations at the plasma frequency. This simple mechanism has been ignored in most numerical studies based on Vlasov or particle-in-cell simulations because of the use of the Poisson equation which is not suitable to describe the mechanism of current drive in plasmas with immobile ions; instead, Ampere's law must be used. A simple fluid description of stable plateau plasmas, coupled with Ampere's law, is applied to illustrate the basic elements of current-driven Langmuir oscillations. If beam-generated Langmuir/electron-acoustic waves with frequencies above or below the plasma frequency are simultaneously present, beating of both wave modes leads to Langmuir amplitude modulations, thus providing an alternative to parametric decay. Furthermore, very important implications of our studies (presented separately) concern the electrostatic and electromagnetic second harmonic generation by nonlinear interaction of Langmuir oscillations with finite wave number modes which are driven by the plateau current as well.

  9. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  10. FIRST COMPLETE DETERMINATION OF PLASMA PHYSICAL PARAMETERS ACROSS A CORONAL MASS EJECTION-DRIVEN SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Bemporad, A.; Mancuso, S.

    2010-09-01

    We report on the study of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shock associated with the solar eruption of 2002 March 22. This event was observed in the intermediate corona both in white light and the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) by the LASCO and UVCS instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, as well as in metric and decametric wavelengths through space- and ground-based radio observatories. Clear signatures of shock transit are (1) strong type II emission lanes observed after the CME initiation, (2) strong O VI {lambda}{lambda}1032, 1037 line profile broadenings (up to {approx}2 x 10{sup 7} K) associated with the shock transit across the UVCS slit field of view, and (3) a density enhancement located in LASCO images above the CME front. Since the UVCS slit was centered at 4.1 R{sub sun}, in correspondence with the flank of the expanding CME, this observation represents the highest UV detection of a shock obtained so far with the UVCS instrument. White-light and EUV data have been combined in order to estimate not only the shock compression ratio and the plasma temperature, but also the strength of the involved coronal magnetic fields, by applying the Rankine-Hugoniot equations for the general case of oblique shocks. Results show that, for a compression ratio X = 2.06 as derived from LASCO data, the coronal plasma is heated across the shock from an initial temperature of 2.3 x 10{sup 5} K up to 1.9 x 10{sup 6} K, while at the same time the magnetic field undergoes a compression from a pre-shock value of {approx}0.02 G up to a post-shock field of {approx}0.04 G. Magnetic and kinetic energy density increases at the shock are comparable (in agreement with the idea of equipartition of energy), and both are more than two times larger than the thermal energy density increase. This is the first time that a complete characterization of pre- and post-shock plasma physical parameters has been derived in the solar corona.

  11. Impurity transport driven by ion temperature gradient turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fueloep, T.; Pusztai, I.; Braun, S.

    2010-06-15

    Impurity transport driven by electrostatic turbulence is analyzed in weakly collisional tokamak plasmas using a semianalytical model based on a boundary layer solution of the gyrokinetic equation. Analytical expressions for the perturbed density responses are derived and used to determine the stability boundaries and the quasilinear particle fluxes. For moderate impurity charge number Z, the stability boundaries are very weakly affected by the increasing impurity charge for constant effective charge, while for lower impurity charge the influence of impurities is larger, if the amount of impurities is not too small. Scalings of the mode frequencies and quasilinear fluxes with charge number, effective charge, impurity density scale length, and collisionality are determined and compared to quasilinear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] resulting in very good agreement. Collisions do not affect the mode frequencies, growth rates, and impurity fluxes significantly. The eigenfrequencies and growth rates depend only weakly on Z and Z{sub eff} but they are sensitive to the impurity density gradient scale length. An analytical approximate expression of the zero-flux impurity density gradient is derived and used to discuss its parametric dependencies.

  12. Impurity transport driven by ion temperature gradient turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fülöp, T.; Braun, S.; Pusztai, I.

    2010-06-01

    Impurity transport driven by electrostatic turbulence is analyzed in weakly collisional tokamak plasmas using a semianalytical model based on a boundary layer solution of the gyrokinetic equation. Analytical expressions for the perturbed density responses are derived and used to determine the stability boundaries and the quasilinear particle fluxes. For moderate impurity charge number Z, the stability boundaries are very weakly affected by the increasing impurity charge for constant effective charge, while for lower impurity charge the influence of impurities is larger, if the amount of impurities is not too small. Scalings of the mode frequencies and quasilinear fluxes with charge number, effective charge, impurity density scale length, and collisionality are determined and compared to quasilinear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] resulting in very good agreement. Collisions do not affect the mode frequencies, growth rates, and impurity fluxes significantly. The eigenfrequencies and growth rates depend only weakly on Z and Zeff but they are sensitive to the impurity density gradient scale length. An analytical approximate expression of the zero-flux impurity density gradient is derived and used to discuss its parametric dependencies.

  13. A New Hybrid Scheme for Simulations of Highly Collisional RF-Driven Plasmas

    E-print Network

    Eremin, Denis; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This work describes a new 1D hybrid approach for modeling atmospheric pressure discharges featuring complex chemistry. In this approach electrons are described fully kinetically using Particle-In-Cell/Monte-Carlo (PIC/MCC) scheme, whereas the heavy species are modeled within a fluid description. Validity of the popular drift-diffusion approximation is verified against a "full" fluid model accounting for the ion inertia and a fully kinetic PIC/MCC code for ions as well as electrons. The fluid models require knowledge of the momentum exchange frequency and dependence of the ion mobilities on the electric field when the ions are in equilibrium with the latter. To this end an auxiliary Monte-Carlo scheme is constructed. It is demonstrated that the drift-diffusion approximation can overestimate ion transport in simulations of RF-driven discharges with heavy ion species operated in the $\\gamma$ mode at the atmospheric pressure or in all discharge simulations for lower pressures. This can lead to exaggerated plasma ...

  14. Bandwidth Dependence of Laser Plasma Instabilities Driven by the Nike KrF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Phillips, L.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.; Feldman, U.

    2011-10-01

    The Nike krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser at the Naval Research Laboratory operates in the deep UV (248 nm) and employs beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In the first ISI studies at longer wavelengths (1054 nm and 527 nm) [Obenschain, PRL 62, 768(1989);Mostovych, PRL, 59, 1193(1987); Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1479(1991)], stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (?? / ? ~ 0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (1014-1015W/cm2) . Recent Nike work showed that the threshold for quarter critical instabilities increased with the expected wavelength scaling, without accounting for the large bandwidth (?? ~ 1-3 THz). New experiments will compare laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by narrower bandwidth pulses to those observed with the standard operation. The bandwidth of KrF lasers can be reduced by adding narrow filters (etalons or gratings) in the initial stages of the laser. This talk will discuss the method used to narrow the output spectrum of Nike, the laser performance for this new operating mode, and target observations of LPI in planar CH targets. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  15. A self-organized criticality model for ion temperature gradient mode driven turbulence in confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Isliker, H.; Pisokas, Th.; Vlahos, L.; Strintzi, D.

    2010-08-15

    A new self-organized criticality (SOC) model is introduced in the form of a cellular automaton (CA) for ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode driven turbulence in fusion plasmas. Main characteristics of the model are that it is constructed in terms of the actual physical variable, the ion temperature, and that the temporal evolution of the CA, which necessarily is in the form of rules, mimics actual physical processes as they are considered to be active in the system, i.e., a heating process and a local diffusive process that sets on if a threshold in the normalized ITG R/L{sub T} is exceeded. The model reaches the SOC state and yields ion temperature profiles of exponential shape, which exhibit very high stiffness, in that they basically are independent of the loading pattern applied. This implies that there is anomalous heat transport present in the system, despite the fact that diffusion at the local level is imposed to be of a normal kind. The distributions of the heat fluxes in the system and of the heat out-fluxes are of power-law shape. The basic properties of the model are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  16. Design of an energy efficient and economical actuator for automobile windows

    E-print Network

    Durand, Keith (Keith V.)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and analysis of an efficient, yet low cost, drum driven window actuation system for an automotive power window. The design uses a novel approach that involves using cables to both actuate ...

  17. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  18. An Experimental Study of Continuous Plasma Flows Driven by a Confined Arc in a Transverse Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.; Brooks, J. D.; Beasley, W. D.

    1961-01-01

    A crossed-field, continuous-flow plasma accelerator has been built and operated. The highest measured velocity of the flow, which was driven by the interaction of the electric and magnetic fields, was about 500 meters per second. Some of the problems discussed are ion slip, stability and uniformity of the discharge, effect of the magnetic field on electron emission, use of preionization, and electrode contamination.

  19. On the Transition from Thermally-driven to Ponderomotively-driven Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Filamentation of Light in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Berger; E.J. Valeo; S. Brunner

    2005-04-04

    The dispersion properties of ion acoustic waves and their nonlinear coupling to light waves through ponderomotive and thermal forces are sensitive to the strength of electron-ion collisions. Here, we consider the growth rate of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) when the driven acoustic wave frequency and wavelength span the range of small to large compared to electron-ion collision frequency and mean free path respectively. We find in all cases the thermal contributions to the SBS growth rate are insignificant if the ion acoustic wave frequency is greater than the electron-ion collision frequency and the wavelength is much shorter than the electron-ion mean free path. On the other hand, the purely growing filamentation instability remains thermally driven for shorter wavelengths than SBS even when the growth rate is larger than the acoustic frequency.

  20. Studies of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF and magnetic reconnection using laser-produced plasmas at OMEGA

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ion kinetic effects during the shock-convergence phase of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven, laser-produced plasmas have been facilitated by the use of ...

  1. Evaluation of the time-resolved EHD force produced by a plasma actuator by particle image velocimetry - a parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, N.; Caron, M.; Moreau, E.

    2015-10-01

    Surface plasma discharges, and more specifically dielectric barrier discharge, find several applications in aerodynamic due to their capability to produce a local flow at the dielectric wall. The present study proposes a numerical method to estimate the EHD force by using experimental velocity information. Here, this method is used in a parametric study and the obtained results are compared with force balance measurements. It is shown that the EHD volume force increases in space and in amplitude for increasing voltage and increasing AC frequency. Furthermore the force distribution expands in an homothetic manner.

  2. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas M. J.-E. Manuel, C. K. Li, F. H. Sguin, N. Sinenian, J. A. Frenje et al.

    E-print Network

    Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas M. J.-E. Manuel, C. K. Li, F. H://pop.aip.org/authors #12;Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmasa) M. J.-E. Manuel,1,b),c) C. K. Li,1; published online 15 April 2013) Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae

  3. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  4. Actuator Exerts Tensile Or Compressive Axial Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozzi, John; Richards, Cuyler H.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, manually operated mechanical actuator applies controlled, limited tensile or compressive axial force. Designed to apply loads to bearings during wear tests in clean room. Intended to replace hydraulic actuator. Actuator rests on stand and imparts axial force to part attached to clevis inside or below stand. Technician turns control screw at one end of lever. Depending on direction of rotation of control screw, its end of lever driven downward (for compression) or upward (for tension). Lever pivots about clevis pin at end opposite of control screw; motion drives downward or upward link attached via shearpin at middle of lever. Link drives coupling and, through it, clevis attached to part loaded.

  5. Slowing of Magnetic Reconnection Concurrent with Weakening Plasma Inflows and Increasing Collisionality in Strongly Driven Laser-Plasma Experiments

    E-print Network

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 2 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in astrophysics, impacting dynamics of plasmas in the solar photosphere [5] and at the heliopause [6 of the Earth and other planets [12,13], though, to date, there has been little laboratory investigation

  6. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-15

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  7. Inductively Driven, 3D Liner Compression of a Magnetized Plasma to Megabar Energy Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Slough, John

    2015-02-01

    To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of fusion an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. What is proposed is a more flexible metallic liner compression scheme that minimizes the kinetic energy required to reach fusion. It is believed that it is possible to accomplish this at sub-megajoule energies. This however will require operation at very small scale. To have a realistic hope of inexpensive, repetitive operation, it is essential to have the liner kinetic energy under a megajoule which allows for the survivability of the vacuum and power systems. At small scale the implosion speed must be reasonably fast to maintain the magnetized plasma (FRC) equilibrium during compression. For limited liner kinetic energy, it becomes clear that the thinnest liner imploded to the smallest radius consistent with the requirements for FRC equilibrium lifetime is desired. The proposed work is directed toward accomplishing this goal. Typically an axial (Z) current is employed for liner compression. There are however several advantages to using a ?-pinch coil. With the ?-pinch the liner currents are inductively driven which greatly simplifies the apparatus and vacuum system, and avoids difficulties with the post implosion vacuum integrity. With fractional flux leakage, the foil liner automatically provides for the seed axial compression field. To achieve it with optimal switching techniques, and at an accelerated pace however will require additional funding. This extra expense is well justified as the compression technique that will be enabled by this funding is unique in the ability to implode individual segments of the liner at different times. This is highly advantageous as the liner can be imploded in a manner that maximizes the energy transfer to the FRC. Production of shaped liner implosions for additional axial compression can thus be readily accomplished with the modified power modules. The additional energy and switching capability proposed will thus provide for optimal utilization of the liner energy. The following tasks were outlined for the three year effort: (1) Design and assemble the foil liner compression test structure and chamber including the compression bank and test foils [Year 1]. (2) Perform foil liner compression experiments and obtain performance data over a range on liner dimensions and bank parameters [Year 2]. (3) Carry out compression experiments of the FRC plasma to Megagauss fields and measure key fusion parameters [Year 3]. (4) Develop numerical codes and analyze experimental results, and determine the physics and scaling for future work [Year 1-3]. The principle task of the project was to design and assemble the foil liner FRC formation chamber, the full compression test structure and chamber including the compression bank. This task was completed successfully. The second task was to test foils in the test facility constructed in year one and characterize the performance obtained from liner compression. These experimental measurements were then compared with analytical predictions, and numerical code results. The liner testing was completed and compared with both the analytical results as well as the code work performed with the 3D structural dynamics package of ANSYS Metaphysics®. This code is capable of modeling the dynamic behavior of materials well into the non-linear regime (e.g. a bullet hit plate glass). The liner dynamic behavior was found to be remarkably close to that predicted by the 3D structural dynamics results. Incorporating a code that can also include the magnetics and plasma physics has also made significant progress at the UW. The remaining test bed construction and assembly task is was completed, and the FRC formation and merging experiments were carried out as planned. The liner compression of the FRC to Megagauss fields was not performed due to not obtaining a sufficiently long lived FRC during the final year of the grant. Modifications planned to correct this deficiency included a larg

  8. Parallel rf Force Driven by the Inhomogeneity of Power Absorption in Magnetized Plasma Zhe Gao,1,2,* Jiale Chen,2

    E-print Network

    Parallel rf Force Driven by the Inhomogeneity of Power Absorption in Magnetized Plasma Zhe Gao,1 Jersey 08543, USA (Received 8 February 2013; published 6 June 2013) A nonlinear parallel force can no integrated force over a plasma volume, this force can redistribute momentum parallel to the magnetic field

  9. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, W.; Zhou, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Litos, M.; Li, S.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Walz, D.; England, J.; Delahaye, J. P.; Muggli, P.

    2013-10-01

    Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head) of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame) of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided) causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy) and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs) for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  10. Dynamical Plasma Response during Driven Magnetic Reconnection J Egedal,* A Fasoli,

    E-print Network

    Egedal, Jan

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 magnetic energy is transformed into plasma kinetic energy. Both issues are intimately related to strong variations both in intensity and geometry. The experiments are performed on the collisionless

  11. Dynamical Plasma Response during Driven Magnetic Reconnection J Egedal, * A Fasoli, + and J Nazemi

    E-print Network

    Egedal, Jan

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 magnetic energy is transformed into plasma kinetic energy. Both issues are intimately related to strong variations both in intensity and geometry. The experiments are performed on the collisionless

  12. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    E-print Network

    to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows by a typical Z pinch. Ideal MHD theory 3 , which ignores plasma resistivity, predicts that the only unstable

  13. Temporal and spatial profiles of emission intensities in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulse: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruixue; Zhang, Cheng; Shen, Yuan; Zhu, Weidong; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao; Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Naidis, George V.

    2015-09-01

    A needle-circular electrode structure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulsed power is studied. Spatially resolved emission results show that the emission intensity of He(33S1) line decreases monotonically along the axial direction, while those of N2(C3?u), N2+(B2?+u), and O(3p5P) reach their maxima at 3 cm, 2.6 cm, and 1.4 cm, respectively. The plasma plume of the four species shows different characteristics: The N2 emission plume travels at a fast speed along the entire plasma jet; the N2+ emission plume is composed of a bright head and relatively weak tail and travels a shorter distance than the N2 emission plume; the He emission plume travels at a slower speed for only a very short distance; propagation of the O emission plume is not observed. Results of calculation of radiation fluxes emitted by positive streamers propagating along helium plasma jets are presented. It is shown, in agreement with the results of the present experiment and with other available experimental data, that the intensities of radiation of N2(C3?u) molecules and He(33S1) atoms vary with time (along the plasma jet) quite differently. The factors resulting in this difference are discussed.

  14. Development of a Data Driven Dynamic Model for a Plasma Etching Reactor Michael Nikolaoua)

    E-print Network

    Nikolaou, Michael

    manufacturing processes such as plasma etching, accurate models based on first principles may be developed. Models of plasma etching which relate the response of process outputs (such as etch rate or etch for inductively coupled plasma reactors requires solution times on the order of several hours for a single

  15. Physical processes of driven magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas: Zero guide field case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. Z.; Inoue, S.; Ono, Y.; Horiuchi, R.

    2015-10-01

    The key physical processes of the electron and ion dynamics, the structure of the electric and magnetic fields, and how particles gain energy in the driven magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas for the zero guide field case are presented. The key kinetic physics is the decoupling of electron and ion dynamics around the magnetic reconnection region, where the magnetic field is reversed and the electron and ion orbits are meandering, and around the separatrix region, where electrons move mainly along the field line and ions move mainly across the field line. The decoupling of the electron and ion dynamics causes charge separation to produce a pair of in-plane bipolar converging electrostatic electric field ( E? e s ) pointing toward the neutral sheet in the magnetic field reversal region and the monopolar E? e s around the separatrix region. A pair of electron jets emanating from the reconnection current layer generate the quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field, which causes the parallel electric field ( E? || ) from E? i n d to accelerate particles along the magnetic field. We explain the electron and ion dynamics and their velocity distributions and flow structures during the time-dependent driven reconnection as they move from the upstream to the downstream. In particular, we address the following key physics issues: (1) the decoupling of electron and ion dynamics due to meandering orbits around the field reversal region and the generation of a pair of converging bipolar electrostatic electric field ( E? e s ) around the reconnection region; (2) the slowdown of electron and ion inflow velocities due to acceleration/deceleration of electrons and ions by E? e s as they move across the neutral sheet; (3) how the reconnection current layer is enhanced and how the orbit meandering particles are accelerated inside the reconnection region by E? i n d ; (4) why the electron outflow velocity from the reconnection region reaches super-Alfvenic speed and the ion outflow velocity reaches Alfvenic speed; (5) how the quadrupole magnetic field is produced and how E? || is produced; (6) how electrons and ions are accelerated by E? || around the separatrix region; (7) why electrons have a flat-top parallel velocity distribution in the upstream just outside the reconnection region as observed in the magnetotail; (8) how electron and ion dynamics decouple and how the monopolar electrostatic electric field is produced around the separatrix region; (9) how ions gain energy as they move across the separatrix region into the downstream and how the ion velocity distribution is thermalized in the far downstream; and (10) how electrons move across the separatrix region and in the downstream and how the electron velocity distribution is thermalized in the far downstream. Finally, the main energy source for driving magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration/heating is the inductive electric field, which accelerates both electrons and ions around the reconnection current layer and separatrix regions.

  16. Deformable mirrors: design fundamentals for force actuation of continuous facesheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravensbergen, S. K.; Hamelinck, R. F. H. M.; Rosielle, P. C. J. N.; Steinbuch, M.

    2009-08-01

    Adaptive Optics is established as essential technology in current and future ground based (extremely) large telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. Deformable mirrors for astronomic purposes have a high number of actuators (> 10k), a relatively large stroke (> 10?m) on a small spacing (< 10mm) and a high control bandwidth (> 100Hz). The availability of piezoelectric ceramics as an actuator principle has driven the development of many adaptive deformable mirrors towards inappropriately stiff displacement actuation. This, while the use of force actuation supersedes piezos in performance and longevity while being less costly per channel by a factor of 10-20. This paper presents a model which is independent of the actuator type used for actuation of continuous facesheet deformable mirrors, to study the design parameters such as: actuator spacing & coupling, influence function, peak-valley stroke, dynamical behavior: global & local, etc. The model is validated using finite element simulations and its parameters are used to derive design fundamentals for optimization.

  17. Efficient active actuation to imitate locomotion of gecko's toes using an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator enhanced by carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min; He, Qingsong; Yu, Dingshan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Ji, Aihong; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Ce; Dai, Zhendong

    2012-10-01

    Active actuation of the adhesive pads is important for a gecko-robot climbing on walls. We demonstrate the fabrication of an ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuator enhanced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and its use for actively actuating an adhesive array to imitate the locomotion of gecko's toes. The as-fabricated IPMC actuator doped with CNTs exhibits a maximum blocking force of 3.59 gf driven at a low voltage of 3 V. It can be easily controlled by voltage signals to actuate an artificial gecko's toe to attach and detach from a surface. This will allow active, distributed actuation in a gecko robot.

  18. Electric field and plasma density measurements in the strongly driven daytime equatorial electrojet. 2. Two-stream waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pfaff, R.F.; Kelley, M.C.; Kudeki, E.; Fejer, B.G.; Baker, K.D.

    1987-12-01

    Both primary and secondary two-stream (Farley-Buneman) waves have been detected by in situ electric field and plasma density probes in the strongly driven daytime equatorial electrojet over Peru. Simultaneous Jicamarca radar observations showed strong vertical and oblique 3-m type 1 echoes, also indicative of the two-stream mechanism. The rocket data show the two-stream region on the topside of the unstable layer to be situated between 103 and 111 km where the electron current was the strongest.

  19. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  20. Particle in cell simulations of Buneman instability of a current-driven plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R. Roozbahani, H.; Komaizi, D.; Hashemzadeh, M.

    2014-09-15

    The nonlinear evolution of low frequency Buneman instability in an unmagnetized current-driven plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution is investigated using particle in cell simulation. Simulation results show that the generation of electron phase space holes and the counter-streaming current induced in the plasma strongly depend on the q-parameter. It is found that by increasing the nonextensive parameter, the distribution of electron density becomes highly peaked. This density steepening or grating-like pattern occurs at the saturation time. In addition, a generalized dispersion relation is obtained using the kinetic theory. Analysis of the dispersion relation and the temporal evolution of the electric field energy density reveal that the growth rate of instability increases by increasing the q-parameter. Finally, the results of Maxwellian and q-nonextensive velocity distributions have been compared and discussed.

  1. Laser driven terahertz generation in hot plasma with step density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj Jeong, Young Uk; Tripathi, Vipin Kumar

    2015-06-15

    An analytical formalism of terahertz (THz) radiation generation by beating of two lasers in a hot plasma with step density profile is developed. The lasers propagate obliquely to plasma surface normal, and the nonlinearity arises through the ponderomotive force. The THz is emitted in the specular reflection direction, and the yield is enhanced due to coupling with the Langmuir wave when the plasma frequency is close to THz frequency. The power conversion efficiency maximizes at an optimum angle of incidence.

  2. A fibre based triature interferometer for measuring rapidly evolving, ablatively driven plasma densities.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, J; Bland, S N; Threadgold, J

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first use of a fibre interferometer incorporating triature analysis for measuring rapidly evolving plasma densities of n(e) ? 10(13)/cm(3) and above, such as those produced by simple coaxial plasma guns. The resultant system is extremely portable, easy to field in experiments, relatively cheap to produce, and—with the exception of a small open area in which the plasma is sampled—safe in operation as all laser light is enclosed. PMID:26329191

  3. A fibre based triature interferometer for measuring rapidly evolving, ablatively driven plasma densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, J.; Bland, S. N.; Threadgold, J.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first use of a fibre interferometer incorporating triature analysis for measuring rapidly evolving plasma densities of ne ˜ 1013/cm3 and above, such as those produced by simple coaxial plasma guns. The resultant system is extremely portable, easy to field in experiments, relatively cheap to produce, and—with the exception of a small open area in which the plasma is sampled—safe in operation as all laser light is enclosed.

  4. Current-driven dust ion-acoustic instability in a collisional dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    A fluid analysis of the excitation of dust ion-acoustic (DIA) waves in a collisional dusty plasma is presented. The DIA waves are excited by a relative drift of the electrons and ions produced by a steady-state electric field applied to the plasma. The DIA instability is more easily excited if the relative concentration of negatively charged dust is increased. The current interest in dusty plasmas is due to the realization of their importance in various astrophysical and geophysical environments (e.g., interstellar space, comet tails, planetary ring systems, and the polar mesosphere) as well as in industrial plasma processing devices used in semiconductor manufacturing.

  5. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter; Brandenburg, Ronny; Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology , Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  6. Reduction of time-averaged irradiation speckle nonuniformity in laser-driven plasmas due to target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R.

    1997-09-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, irradiation uniformity is improved by passing laser beams through distributed phase plates (DPPs), which produce focused intensity profiles with well-controlled, reproducible envelopes modulated by fine random speckle. [C. B. Burckhardt, Appl. Opt. {bold 9}, 695 (1970); Y. Kato and K. Mima, Appl. Phys. B {bold 29}, 186 (1982); Y. Kato {ital et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 53}, 1057 (1984); Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE Review 33, NTIS Document No. DOE/DP/40200-65, 1987 (unpublished), p. 1; Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE Review 63, NTIS Document No. DOE/SF/19460-91, 1995 (unpublished), p. 1.] A uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere acts to reduce the contribution of the speckle to the time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity by causing the intensity distribution to move relative to the absorption layer of the plasma. This occurs most directly as the absorption layer in the plasma moves with the ablation-driven flow, but it is shown that the effect of the accumulating ablated plasma on the phase of the laser light also makes a quantitatively significant contribution. Analytical results are obtained using the paraxial approximation applied to the beam propagation, and a simple statistical model is assumed for the properties of DPPs. The reduction in the time-averaged spatial spectrum of the speckle due to these effects is shown to be quantitatively significant within time intervals characteristic of atmospheric hydrodynamics under typical ICF irradiation intensities. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Reduction of time-averaged irradiation speckle nonuniformity in laser-driven plasmas due to target ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R.

    1997-09-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, irradiation uniformity is improved by passing laser beams through distributed phase plates (DPPs), which produce focused intensity profiles with well-controlled, reproducible envelopes modulated by fine random speckle. [C. B. Burckhardt, Appl. Opt. 9, 695 (1970); Y. Kato and K. Mima, Appl. Phys. B 29, 186 (1982); Y. Kato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1057 (1984); Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE Review 33, NTIS Document No. DOE/DP/40200-65, 1987 (unpublished), p. 1; Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE Review 63, NTIS Document No. DOE/SF/19460-91, 1995 (unpublished), p. 1.] A uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere acts to reduce the contribution of the speckle to the time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity by causing the intensity distribution to move relative to the absorption layer of the plasma. This occurs most directly as the absorption layer in the plasma moves with the ablation-driven flow, but it is shown that the effect of the accumulating ablated plasma on the phase of the laser light also makes a quantitatively significant contribution. Analytical results are obtained using the paraxial approximation applied to the beam propagation, and a simple statistical model is assumed for the properties of DPPs. The reduction in the time-averaged spatial spectrum of the speckle due to these effects is shown to be quantitatively significant within time intervals characteristic of atmospheric hydrodynamics under typical ICF irradiation intensities.

  8. Plasma-Density Determination from X-Ray Radiography of Laser-Driven Spherical Implosions

    E-print Network

    Frenje, Johan A.

    The fuel layer density of an imploding laser-driven spherical shell is inferred from framed x-ray radiographs. The density distribution is determined by using Abel inversion to compute the radial distribution of the opacity ...

  9. Resistive pressure gradient-driven turbulence at stellarator plasma edge Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain

    E-print Network

    Newman, David

    insight in the understanding of transition mechanisms and is essential in designing a more effective. Several analytical and numerical studies of re- sistive pressure­gradient-driven turbulence have been car

  10. Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF): Physics and Design for a Plasma Liner Formation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Scott; Cassibry, Jason; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Spherically imploding plasma liners are a potential standoff compression driver for magneto-inertial fusion, which is a hybrid of and operates in an intermediate density between those of magnetic and inertial fusion. We propose to use an array of merging supersonic plasma jets to form a spherically imploding plasma liner. The jets are to be formed by pulsed coaxial guns with contoured electrodes that are placed sufficiently far from the location of target compression such that no hardware is repetitively destroyed. As such, the repetition rate can be higher (e.g., 1 Hz) and ultimately the power-plant economics can be more attractive than most other MIF approaches. During the R&D phase, a high experimental shot rate at reasonably low cost (e.g., < 1 k/shot) may be achieved with excellent diagnostic access, thus enabling a rapid learning rate. After some background on PJMIF and its prospects for reactor-relevant energy gain, this poster describes the physics objectives and design of a proposed 60-gun plasma-liner-formation experiment, which will provide experimental data on: (i) scaling of peak liner ram pressure versus initial jet parameters, (ii) liner non-uniformity characterization and control, and (iii) control of liner profiles for eventual gain optimization.

  11. RUI: Structure and Behavior of RF-Driven Plasma Filaments in High-Pressure Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Burin, Michael

    2014-11-18

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed, yet not well understood. We investigate filament properties in a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. Results from the 3-year grant period and their physics are discussed.

  12. Studies of Zonal Flows Driven by Drift Mode Turbulence in Laboratory and Space Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, R.; Trines, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Davies, J. A.; Bamford, R. A.; Mendonca, J. T.; Silva, L. O.; Shukla, P. K.; Vaivads, A.; Mori, W. B.; Tynan, G.

    2008-10-15

    The interaction between broadband drift mode turbulence and zonal flows is an important topic associated with transport at plasma boundaries. The generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability of broad band drift waves has resulted in the observation of self organized solitary wave structures at the magnetopause. To understand these structures and their importance to future burning plasmas and space plasmas we have developed a unique numerical simulation code that describes drift wave--zonal flow turbulence. We show that observations by cluster spacecraft confirms the role of drift wave zonal flow turbulence at the Earth's magnetopause and further demonstrates that the magnetopause boundary acts in a s similar manner to transport barriers in tokamak fusion devices. Thus cementing the relationship between the plasma physics of laboratory devices and space plasmas.

  13. Persistence of magnetic field driven by relativistic electrons in a plasma

    E-print Network

    Flacco, A; Lifschitz, A; Sylla, F; Kahaly, S; Veltcheva, M; Silva, L O; Malka, V

    2015-01-01

    The onset and evolution of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is determined by several mechanisms, including instabilities, dynamo effects and ultra-high energy particle flows through gas, plasma and interstellar-media. These processes are relevant over a wide range of conditions, from cosmic ray acceleration and gamma ray bursts to nuclear fusion in stars. The disparate temporal and spatial scales where each operates can be reconciled by scaling parameters that enable to recreate astrophysical conditions in the laboratory. Here we unveil a new mechanism by which the flow of ultra-energetic particles can strongly magnetize the boundary between the plasma and the non-ionized gas to magnetic fields up to 10-100 Tesla (micro Tesla in astrophysical conditions). The physics is observed from the first time-resolved large scale magnetic field measurements obtained in a laser wakefield accelerator. Particle-in-cell simulations capturing the global plasma and field dynamics over the full plasma le...

  14. A SMA Actuated Earthworm-Like Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. K.; Song, C. N.; Wang, Z. L.; Guo, C.; Tan, Q. Y.

    Inspired by locomotion principle of earworms, a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated earthworm-like robot is designed and developed in this paper. Four groups of SMA wires as actuator and one spring as accumulator were introduced. The SMA wires and spring play a role in contraction and extension of an earthworm muscle respectively. For temporal position stopping control, two groups of electromagnets were used as setae of earthworm. By SMA wires were driven independently or simultaneity according to defined movement patterns, the all-round movement of the artificial earthworm freely to different directions was realized. A series of experiments on the self-developed robot moving and turning with different actuation frequencies were carried out. The results showed the validity of the locomotion mobility of the SMA actuated earworm-like robot.

  15. Iogenic Plasma and its Rotation-Driven Transport in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Model calculations are reported for the Iogenic plasma source created by atomic oxygen and sulfur above Io's exobase in the corona and extended clouds (Outer Region). On a circumplanetary scale, two-dimensional distributions produced by integrating the proper three dimensional rate information for electron impact and charge exchange processes along the magnetic field lines are presented for the pickup ion rates, the net-mass and total-mass loading rates, the mass per unit magnetic flux rate, the pickup conductivity, the radial pickup current, and the net-energy loading rate for the plasma torus. All of the two-dimensional distributions are highly peaked at Io's location and hence highly asymmetric about Jupiter. The Iogenic plasma source is also calculated on a much smaller near-Io scale to investigate the structure of the highly peak rates centered about lo's instantaneous location. The Iogenic plasma source for the Inner Region (pickup rates produced below Io's exobase) is, however, expected to be the dominant source near lo for the formation of the plasma torus ribbon and to be a comparable source, if not a larger contributor, to the energy budget of the plasma torus, so as to provide the necessary power to sustain the plasma torus radiative loss rate.

  16. Spectroscopy of Ablated Aluminum Foil Plasmas Driven by MA-LTD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, S. G.; Zier, J. C.; Chalenski, D. A.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Steiner, A. M.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Spectroscopic analysis has been performed on Al foil plasmas ablated by the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan. The MAIZE LTD can supply 1- MA, 100 kV pulses with 100 ns risetime into a matched load. The plasma load consisted of a 400 nm thick Al foil (cathode) placed between two, planar, current-return anode posts. An optical fiber was placed 1 cm away from the load; plasma light passed through a 0.75-m optical spectrograph and was gated for 10 ns by an intensified CCD detector. The density of the edge plasma was determined through Stark broadening of the H-alpha line. The Fourier transform was taken of the Voigt profile, which was then used to approximate the density of the Al plasma. This method resulted in a density of approximately 1015 cm-3 in the outer regions of the Al plasma at peak current. Spectra taken midway in the current rise yielded 1-2 eV plasma temperatures from the slope of the continuum emission. These data will be shown as well as planned future experiments. Research sponsored by DoE, NSF and Sandia National Labs. S.G. Patel and J.C. Zier were supported by N.P.S.C. fellowships through Sandia National Laboratories.

  17. Plasma physical parameters along coronal-mass-ejection-driven shocks. I. Ultraviolet and white-light observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bemporad, A.; Susino, R.; Lapenta, G.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, UV and white-light (WL) coronagraphic data are combined to derive the full set of plasma physical parameters along the front of a shock driven by a coronal mass ejection. Pre-shock plasma density, shock compression ratio, speed, and inclination angle are estimated from WL data, while pre-shock plasma temperature and outflow velocity are derived from UV data. The Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) equations for the general case of an oblique shock are then applied at three points along the front located between 2.2 and 2.6 R {sub ?} at the shock nose and at the two flanks. Stronger field deflection (by ?46°), plasma compression (factor ?2.7), and heating (factor ?12) occur at the nose, while heating at the flanks is more moderate (factor 1.5-3.0). Starting from a pre-shock corona where protons and electrons have about the same temperature (T{sub p} ? T{sub e} ? 1.5 × 10{sup 6} K), temperature increases derived with RH equations could better represent the proton heating (by dissipation across the shock), while the temperature increase implied by adiabatic compression (factor ?2 at the nose, ?1.2-1.5 at the flanks) could be more representative of electron heating: the transit of the shock causes a decoupling between electron and proton temperatures. Derived magnetic field vector rotations imply a draping of field lines around the expanding flux rope. The shock turns out to be super-critical (sub-critical) at the nose (at the flanks), where derived post-shock plasma parameters can be very well approximated with those derived by assuming a parallel (perpendicular) shock.

  18. Nanoporous carbon actuator and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Biener, Juergen (San Leandro, CA); Baumann, Theodore F. (Discovery Bay, CA); Shao, Lihua (Karlsruhe, DE); Weissmueller, Joerg (Stutensee, DE)

    2012-07-31

    An electrochemically driveable actuator according to one embodiment includes a nanoporous carbon aerogel composition capable of exhibiting charge-induced reversible strain when wetted by an electrolyte and a voltage is applied thereto. An electrochemically driven actuator according to another embodiment includes a nanoporous carbon aerogel composition wetted by an electrolyte; and a mechanism for causing charge-induced reversible strain of the composition. A method for electrochemically actuating an object according to one embodiment includes causing charge-induced reversible strain of a nanoporous carbon aerogel composition wetted with an electrolyte to actuate the object by the strain.

  19. Ultrafast Synchrotron-Enhanced Thermalization of Laser-Driven Colliding Pair Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobet, M.; Ruyer, C.; Debayle, A.; d'Humières, E.; Grech, M.; Lemoine, M.; Gremillet, L.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the first self-consistent numerical study of the feasibility of laser-driven relativistic pair shocks of prime interest for high-energy astrophysics. Using a QED-particle-in-cell code, we simulate the collective interaction between two counterstreaming electron-positron jets driven from solid foils by short-pulse (˜60 fs ), high-energy (˜100 kJ ) lasers. We show that the dissipation caused by self-induced, ultrastrong (>1 06 T ) electromagnetic fluctuations is amplified by intense synchrotron emission, which enhances the magnetic confinement and compression of the colliding jets.

  20. Ultrafast Synchrotron-Enhanced Thermalization of Laser-Driven Colliding Pair Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lobet, M; Ruyer, C; Debayle, A; d'Humières, E; Grech, M; Lemoine, M; Gremillet, L

    2015-11-20

    We report on the first self-consistent numerical study of the feasibility of laser-driven relativistic pair shocks of prime interest for high-energy astrophysics. Using a QED-particle-in-cell code, we simulate the collective interaction between two counterstreaming electron-positron jets driven from solid foils by short-pulse (?60??fs), high-energy (?100??kJ) lasers. We show that the dissipation caused by self-induced, ultrastrong (>10^{6}??T) electromagnetic fluctuations is amplified by intense synchrotron emission, which enhances the magnetic confinement and compression of the colliding jets. PMID:26636856

  1. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Wells, Russell P. (Kensington, CA); Craven, Glen E. (Fremont, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ion because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile.

  2. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Wells, R.P.; Craven, G.E.

    1996-12-24

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ions because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile. 8 figs.

  3. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  4. Transition from interpulse to afterglow plasmas driven by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shail; Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2012-08-15

    In the power-off phase, plasmas generated by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field show a transitive nature from interpulse to afterglow as a function of pulse duration t{sub w} = 20-200 {mu}s. The ionized medium can be driven from a highly non equilibrium to an equilibrium state inside the pulses, thereby dictating the behavior of the plasma in the power-off phase. Compared to afterglows, interpulse plasmas observed for t{sub w} < 50 {mu}s are characterized by a quasi-steady-state in electron density that persists for {approx} 20-40 {mu}s even after the end of the pulse and has a relatively slower decay rate ({approx} 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) of the electron temperature, as corroborated by optical measurements. The associated electron energy probability function indicates depletion in low energy electrons which appear at higher energies just after the end of the pulse. The transition occurs at t{sub w} {approx} 50 {mu}s as confirmed by time evolution of integrated electron numbers densities obtained from the distribution function.

  5. Electromechanical rotary actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. P.; Mcmahon, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    An electromechanical rotary actuator has been developed as the prime mover for a liquid oxygen modulation valve on the Centaur Vehicle Rocket Engine. The rotary actuator requirements, design, test, and associated problems and their solutions are discussed in this paper.

  6. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  7. Superfluid helium sloshing dynamics induced oscillations and fluctuations of angular momentum, force and moment actuated on spacecraft driven by gravity gradient or jitter acceleration associated with slew motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The generalized mathematical formulation of sloshing dynamics for partially filled liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium II in dewar containers driven by the gravity gradient and jitter accelerations associated with slew motion for the purpose to perform scientific observation during the normal spacecraft operation are investigated. An example is given with the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility-Spectroscopy (AXAF-S) for slew motion which is responsible for the sloshing dynamics. The jitter accelerations include slew motion, spinning motion, atmospheric drag on the spacecraft, spacecraft attitude motions arising from machinery vibrations, thruster firing, pointing control of spacecraft, crew motion, etc. Explicit mathematical expressions to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertia frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and solve time-dependent, three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. The explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions to cover capillary force effect on the liquid-vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. The formulations of fluid moment and angular moment fluctuations in fluid profiles induced by the sloshing dynamics, together with fluid stress and moment fluctuations exerted on the spacecraft dewar containers have also been derived. Examples are also given for cases applicable to the AXAF-S spacecraft sloshing dynamics associated with slew motion.

  8. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  9. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakland, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  10. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  11. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lenore Rasmussen, David Schramm, Paul Rasmussen, Kevin Mullaly, Ras Labs, LLC, Intelligent Materials for Prosthetics & Automation, Lewis D. Meixler, Daniel Pearlman and Alice Kirk

    2011-05-23

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  12. Laboratory Simulations of Collisionless Shocks in Low-Density, Laser-Driven Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Constantin, C. G.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Morton, L. A.; Winske, D.; Montgomery, D. S.; Flippo, K. A.; Gaillard, S. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Letzring, S. A.; Niemann, C.

    2011-10-01

    We present magnetic field and electron temperature and density data from collisionless shock experiments on the Trident laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Experiments were performed with a graphite or CH target placed inside a static magnetic field (~ 1 kG) created by a 50 cm-diameter Helmholtz coil and ablated by two sequential laser pulses at 1053 nm. The first pulse created an ambient low-density, magnetized plasma while the second pulse created a super-Alfvénic (MA ~ 10) plasma to shock the ambient plasma. A separate laser beam at 527 nm was used for Thomson scattering to characterize the ambient plasma 3 - 19 cm radially from the target and 0 . 5 - 9 . 7 ?s after the first ablation. An array of single-axis, 1 mm b-dot probes was used to measure magnetic field compression, expulsion, and fast diffusion inside and around the diamagnetic cavity formed by the laser-plasma expansion. Complimentary magnetic field data was obtained using proton deflectrometry. Now at University of Wisconsin, Madison

  13. Microwave-driven plasmas in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debord, B.; Alves, L. L.; Gérôme, F.; Jamier, R.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Benabid, F.

    2014-02-01

    Argon micro-plasmas a few centimetres long are generated at low gas pressure (6 mbar) in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres with 100 µm core diameter, using microwave excitation (2.45 GHz) based on a surfatron, with no damage to the host structure. Electromagnetic simulations assist the design of the surfatron cavity, finding optimal conditions for discharge ignition and maintenance. The plasma characterization reveals an electron density in the range 8 × 1014-1015 cm-3 (estimated from a semi-empirical analysis of the power coupled to the plasma, along the axial-direction) and a gas temperature of 1100-1300 K at the centre of the fibre (measured by optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics), thus showing an impressive ionization degree of ˜10-2 for power densities of ˜0.1 MW cm-3. The micro-plasma dynamics is investigated using a self-consistent one-dimensional (radial) fluid model, describing the charged particle and the electron energy transport, the electromagnetic excitation and the gas heating. Model results are used to confirm the diagnostics, revealing an extreme plasma confinement and a steep temperature gradient that give rise to the main operation features of this novel compact UV source.

  14. A plasma focus driven by a capacitor bank of tens of joules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Patricio; Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, José; Sylvester, Gustavo; Zambra, Marcelo; Altamirano, Luis; Bruzzone, Horacio; Clausse, Alejandro; Moreno, César

    2002-07-01

    As a first step in the design of a repetitive pulsed neutron generator, a very small plasma-focus device has been designed and constructed. The system operates at low energy (160 nF capacitor bank, 65 nH, 20-40 kV, and ˜32-128 J). The design of the electrode was assisted by a computer model of Mather plasma focus. A single-frame image converter camera (5 ns exposure) was used to obtain plasma images in the visible range. The umbrellalike current sheath running over the end of the coaxial electrodes and the pinch after the radial collapse can be clearly observed in the photographs. The observations are similar to the results obtained with devices operating at energies several orders of magnitude higher. The calculations indicate that yields of 104-105 neutrons per shot are expected with discharges in deuterium.

  15. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of current-driven waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ali; Ali Shan, S.; Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.

    2012-09-15

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of a recently proposed plasma mode of dusty plasma is studied using kappa distribution for electrons. This electrostatic wave can propagate in the plasma due to the sheared flow of electrons and ions parallel to the external magnetic field in the presence of stationary dust. The coupling of this wave with the usual drift wave and ion acoustic wave is investigated. D'Angelo's mode is also modified in the presence of superthermal electrons. In the nonlinear regime, the wave can give rise to dipolar vortex structures if the shear in flow is weaker and tripolar vortices if the flow has steeper gradient. The results have been applied to Saturn's magnetosphere corresponding to negatively charged dust grains. But the theoretical model is applicable for positively charged dust as well. This work will be useful for future observations and studies of dusty environments of planets and comets.

  16. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in a radio-frequency driven negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, D.; Tarnev, Kh.; Paunska, Ts.; Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.

    2014-02-01

    Results from initial stage of modeling of the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions currently under development in Consorzio RFX (Padova) regarding ITER are presented. A 2D model developed within the fluid plasma theory for low-pressure discharges (free-fall regime maintenance) is applied to the gas-discharge conditions planned and required for the SPIDER source: gas pressure of 0.3 Pa and radio-frequency (rf) power of 100 kW absorbed in a single driver. The results are for the spatial distribution of the plasma characteristics (charged particle densities, electron temperature and electron energy flux, plasma potential, and dc electric field) with conclusions for the role of the electron energy flux in the formation of the discharge structure.

  17. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) Driven by 30 fs Laser Pulse in Underdense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, T.; Horovitz, Y.; McGuffey, C.; Cummings, P. G.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Rousseau, P.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.

    2009-11-01

    Propagation of an ultra-short laser pulse in underdense plasma was studied in the parameter range relevant for laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) at 100 TW laser power. Filamentation of the transmitted laser pulse observed with the transverse interferpmetry was well correlated with stimulated side Raman scattering (SSRS). Experimentally measured scattered light angle relative to the laser axis is well reproduced by an analytic formula for SSRS in the range of the experimental plasma densities. Spectra orthogonal to the laser pulse showed spatially modulated intensity profile and laser intensity dependent shift for Stokes light. 2D-PIC simulation showed the evolution of the laser pulse due to SSRS.

  18. Possible energy gain for a plasma-liner-driven magneto-inertial fusion concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, C. E.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    A one-dimensional parameter study of a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) concept indicates that significant gain may be achievable. This concept uses a dynamically formed plasma shell with inwardly directed momentum to drive a magnetized fuel to ignition, which in turn partially burns an intermediate layer of unmagnetized fuel. The concept is referred to as Plasma Jet MIF or PJMIF. The results of an adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian code (Crestone) are compared to those of a Lagrangian code (LASNEX). These are the first published results using the Crestone and LASNEX codes on the PJMIF concept.

  19. Possible energy gain for a plasma-liner-driven magneto-inertial fusion concept

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C. E.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2014-07-15

    A one-dimensional parameter study of a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) concept indicates that significant gain may be achievable. This concept uses a dynamically formed plasma shell with inwardly directed momentum to drive a magnetized fuel to ignition, which in turn partially burns an intermediate layer of unmagnetized fuel. The concept is referred to as Plasma Jet MIF or PJMIF. The results of an adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian code (Crestone) are compared to those of a Lagrangian code (LASNEX). These are the first published results using the Crestone and LASNEX codes on the PJMIF concept.

  20. Influence of Ambient Plasmas to the Field Dynamics of Laser Driven Mass-Limited Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Schnuerer, M.; Sokollik, T.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Toncian, T.; Amin, M.; Willi, O.; Andreev, A. A.

    2010-02-02

    Dilute plasmas surrounding mass-limited targets provide sufficient current for influencing strong fields, which are built up due to the interaction of an intense and ultrafast laser pulse. Such situation occurs, where evaporation of the target surface is present. The high-intensity laser pulse interacts with the quasi-isolated mass-limited target and the spatial wings of the intensity distribution account for ionization of the ambient plasma. A fast change of strong electrical fields following intense laser irradiation of water droplets (16 micron diameter) has been measured with proton imaging. An analytical model explains charge transport accounting for the observation.

  1. Fast magnetic field annihilation driven by two laser pulses in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Klimo, O.; Kumar, D.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Weber, S.; Korn, G.

    2015-10-01

    Fast magnetic annihilation is investigated by using 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of two parallel ultra-short petawatt laser pulses co-propagating in underdense plasma. The magnetic field generated by the laser pulses annihilates in a current sheet formed between the pulses. Magnetic field energy is converted to an inductive longitudinal electric field, which efficiently accelerates the electrons of the current sheet. This new regime of collisionless relativistic magnetic field annihilation with a timescale of tens of femtoseconds can be extended to near-critical and overdense plasma with the ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser pulses.

  2. Electrode-plasma-driven radiation cutoff in long-pulse, high-power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Welch, D. R.; Portillo, S.

    2013-03-15

    The impact of electrode plasma dynamics on the radiation production in a high power microwave device is examined using particle-in-cell simulations. Using the design of a compact 2.4 GHz magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO) as the basis for numerical simulations, we characterize the time-dependent device power and radiation output over a range of cathode plasma formation rates. These numerical simulations can self-consistently produce radiation characteristics that are similar to measured signals in long pulse duration MILOs. This modeling capability should result in improved assessment of existing high-power microwave devices and lead to new designs for increased radiation pulse durations.

  3. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by VUV-emission of filament driven hydrogen arc discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-08

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H{sup ?} ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  4. Long lifetime current driven rotating kink modes in a non line-tied plasma column with a free end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furno, I.; Intrator, T. P.; Ryutov, D. D.; Abbate, S.; Madziwa-Nussinov, T.; Light, A.; Dorf, L.; Lapenta, G.

    2006-10-01

    We show the first experimental evidence [1] for a magnetohydrodynamic kink instability in a current rope with one end that is free to move. This free end is insulated by sheath resistivity, which breaks MHD, and is thus not line tied to the axial boundary. We find instability threshold well below the classical Kruskal-Shafranov threshold. The presence of an axial flow gives rise to a doppler shifted frequency and rotation of the kink where the eigenfunction is axially pushed in the flow direction. This oscillating and rotating state persists indefinitely without disruptions for a long lifetime. Striking agreement with a theoretical analysis is demonstrated. [1] I. Furno, T. P. Intrator, D.D. Ryutov et al. ``Current-Driven Rotating-Kink Mode in a Plasma Column with a Non-Line-Tied Free End.'' Physical Review Letters, 97: 015002 (2006).

  5. A wireless actuating drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Won-Jun; Baek, Seung-Ki; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2015-04-01

    A wireless actuating drug delivery system was devised. The system is based on induction heating for drug delivery. In this study, thermally generated nitrogen gas produced by induction heating of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) was utilized for pressure-driven release of the drug. The delivery device consists of an actuator chamber, a drug reservoir, and a microchannel. A semicircular copper disc (5 and 6?mm in diameter and 100?µm thick), and thermal conductive tape were integrated as the heating element in the actuator chamber. The final device was 2.7?mm thick. 28?µl of drug solution were placed in the reservoir and the device released the drug quickly at the rate of 6?µl?s-1 by induction heating at 160?µT of magnetic intensity. The entire drug solution was released and dispersed after subcutaneous implantation under identical experimental condition. This study demonstrates that the device was simply prepared and drug delivery could be achieved by wireless actuation of a thin, pressure-driven actuator.

  6. Physical Conditions of Coronal Plasma at the Transit of a Shock Driven by a Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susino, R.; Bemporad, A.; Mancuso, S.

    2015-10-01

    We report here on the determination of plasma physical parameters across a shock driven by a coronal mass ejection using white light (WL) coronagraphic images and radio dynamic spectra (RDS). The event analyzed here is the spectacular eruption that occurred on 2011 June 7, a fast CME followed by the ejection of columns of chromospheric plasma, part of them falling back to the solar surface, associated with a M2.5 flare and a type-II radio burst. Images acquired by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/LASCO coronagraphs (C2 and C3) were employed to track the CME-driven shock in the corona between 2-12 R? in an angular interval of about 110°. In this interval we derived two-dimensional (2D) maps of electron density, shock velocity, and shock compression ratio, and we measured the shock inclination angle with respect to the radial direction. Under plausible assumptions, these quantities were used to infer 2D maps of shock Mach number MA and strength of coronal magnetic fields at the shock's heights. We found that in the early phases (2-4 R?) the whole shock surface is super-Alfvénic, while later on (i.e., higher up) it becomes super-Alfvénic only at the nose. This is in agreement with the location for the source of the observed type-II burst, as inferred from RDS combined with the shock kinematic and coronal densities derived from WL. For the first time, a coronal shock is used to derive a 2D map of the coronal magnetic field strength over intervals of 10 R? altitude and ˜110° latitude.

  7. Computer simulations of ion motion in beam driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angles, University of

    the results are qualitatively accurate. I. Motivation for plasma wakefield ac- celeration High energy particle greater than that by a factor of 1000 have already been demonstrated in PWFAs for lengths up to 1 meter loses energy, while trailing beam absorbs the wake as it gains en- ergy. In effect, the trailing beam

  8. Observation of Self-Generated Flows in Tokamak Plasmas with Lower-Hybrid-Driven Current

    E-print Network

    Rice, John E.

    In Alcator C-Mod discharges lower hybrid waves have been shown to induce a countercurrent change in toroidal rotation of up to 60??km/s in the central region of the plasma (r/a~<0.4). This modification of the toroidal ...

  9. Revisiting shock-driven exploding pushers: Insights into plasma flows and fields, stopping power, nucleosynthesis, and

    E-print Network

    -drive ICF implosions. In addition, reactions in SEPs are being used to study the stopping power of ions in plasmas, to study reactions important for nucleosynthesis, and to identify and study kinetic phenomena is addressed below in Sec. 2. In addition, the monoenergetic particles are being used to study the stopping

  10. EUV emission of warm dense plasma on an aluminum surface driven by a pulsed MG field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuelling, Stephan; Bauer, Bruno S.; Siemon, Richard E.; Awe, Thomas J.; Makhin, Volodymyr; Goodrich, Tasha; Oxner, Andrew; Presura, Radu

    2008-04-01

    Plasma formation on an aluminum surface in the vicinity of high pulsed magnetic fields is studied using the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. This physics is important in a number of applications including magneto-inertial fusion. A variety of 1-mm diameter loads with different contact configurations were tested to minimize or inhibit plasma initiation due to contact arcing. The rod diameter was larger than the skin depth for the 70-ns current rise. The rods were monitored by an array of AXUV photodiodes with directly deposited filters to record plasma emissions in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). Other diagnostics included optical imaging to a time-gated intensified CCD camera and a streak camera, magnetic field probes, photodiodes, photomultipliers, and laser schlieren and shadowgraphy. These yielded information on the threshold for plasma formation, the expansion of the aluminum, the temperature at the surface, and the growth of the unstable m=0 mode. The relatively simple experimental setup was chosen to allow comparison with 1-D and 2-D rad-MHD modeling.

  11. Self-Consistent Hamiltonian Model of Beam Transport in a Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B. A.; Lee, F.; Tassi, M. M.; Tarkenton, G. M.

    2010-11-04

    A reduced Hamiltonian model of an electron beams in a laser-plasma accelerator is derived. We represent the beam by a small number of parameters that become the dynamical variables in the model. We illustrate the general technique deriving reduced models and discuss applications of this method to spatially asymmetric beams.

  12. Interface Driven Energy Filtering of Thermoelectric Power in Spark Plasma Sintered Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 Nanoplatelet Composites

    E-print Network

    Xiong, Qihua

    Interface Driven Energy Filtering of Thermoelectric Power in Spark Plasma Sintered Bi2Te2.7Se0 of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore § Division of Manufacturing Engineering, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University

  13. Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-02-15

    A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

  14. An efficient, selective collisional ejection mechanism for inner-shell population inversion in laser-driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    SCHROEDER,W. ANDREAS; NELSON,THOMAS R.; BORISOV,A.B.; LONGWORTH,J.W.; BOYER,K.; RHODES,C.K.

    2000-06-07

    A theoretical analysis of laser-driven collisional ejection of inner-shell electrons is presented to explain the previously observed anomalous kilovolt L-shell x-ray emission spectra from atomic Xe cluster targets excited by intense sub-picosecond 248nrn ultraviolet radiation. For incident ponderomotively-driven electrons photoionized by strong above threshold ionization, the collisional ejection mechanism is shown to be highly l-state and significantly n-state (i.e. radially) selective for time periods shorter than the collisional dephasing time of the photoionized electronic wavefunction. The resulting preference for the collisional ejection of 2p electrons by an ionized 4p state produces the measured anomalous Xe(L) emission which contains direct evidence for (i) the generation of Xe{sup 27+}(2p{sup 5}3d{sup 10}) and Xe{sup 28+}(2p{sup 5}3d{sup 9}) ions exhibiting inner-shell population inversion and (ii) a coherent correlated electron state collision responsible for the production of double 2p vacancies. For longer time periods, the selectivity of this coherent impact ionization mechanism is rapidly reduced by the combined effects of intrinsic quantum mechanical spreading and dephasing--in agreement with the experimentally observed and extremely strong {minus}{lambda}{sup {minus}6} pump-laser wavelength dependence of the efficiency of inner-shell (2p) vacancy production in Xe clusters excited in underdense plasmas.

  15. Simulation of sloshing dynamics induced forces and torques actuated on dewar container driven by gravity gradient and jitter accelerations in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.

    1993-01-01

    Some experimental spacecraft use superconducting sensors for gyro read-out and so must be maintained at a very low temperature. The boil-off from the cryogenic liquid used to cool the sensors can also be used, as the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) spacecraft does, as propellant to maintain attitude control and drag-free operation of the spacecraft. The cryogenic liquid for such spacecraft is, however, susceptible to both slosh-like motion and non-axisymmetric configurations under the influence of various kinds of gravity jitter and gravity gradient accelerations. Hence, it is important to quantify the magnitude of the liquid-induced perturbations on the spacecraft. We use the example of the GP-B to investigate such perturbations by numerical simulations. For this spacecraft disturbances can be imposed on the liquid by atmospheric drag, spacecraft attitude control maneuvers, and the earth's gravity gradient. More generally, onboard machinery vibrations and crew motion can also create disturbances. Recent studies suggest that high frequency disturbances are relatively unimportant in causing liquid motions in comparison to low frequency ones. The results presented here confirm this conclusion. After an initial calibration period, the GP-B spacecraft rotates in orbit at 0.1 rpm about the tank symmetry axis. For this rotation rate, the equilibrium liquid free surface shape is a 'doughnut' configuration for all residual gravity levels of 10(exp -6) g(sub 0) or less, as shown by experiments and by numerical simulations; furthermore, the superfluid behavior of the 1.8 K liquid helium used in GP-B eliminates temperature gradients and therefore such effects as Marangoni convection do not have to be considered. Classical fluid dynamics theory is used as the basis of the numerical simulations here, since Mason's experiments show that the theory is applicable for cryogenic liquid helium in large containers. To study liquid responses to various disturbances, we investigate and simulate three levels of gravity jitter (10(exp -6), 10(exp -7), and 10(exp -8) g(sub 0)) each at three predominant frequencies (0.1, 1.0, and 10 Hz), combined with a gravity gradient appropriate for the GP-B orbit. Dynamical evolution of sloshing dynamics excited fluid forces and torque fluctuations exerted on the dewar container driven by the combined gravity gradient and jitter accelerations are also investigated and simulated.

  16. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  17. Omnidirectional Actuator Handle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed actuator handle comprises two normally concentric rings, cables, and pulleys arranged such that relative displacement of rings from concentricity results in pulling of cable and consequent actuation of associated mechanism. Unlike conventional actuator handles like levers on farm implements, actuated from one or two directions only, proposed handle reached from almost any direction and actuated by pulling or pushing inner ring in any direction with respect to outer ring. Flanges installed on inner ring to cover gap between inner ring and housing to prevent clothing from being caught.

  18. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-15

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of JxB propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (T{sub e}) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence T{sub e} of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90 eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density n{sub e} of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4x10{sup 21}-6x10{sup 21} m{sup -3} and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2x10{sup 6} cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  19. Observations of subsonic and supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Shear layers containing strong velocity gradients appear in many high-energy-density (HED) systems and play important roles in mixing and the transition to turbulence. Yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their detailed evolution in this extreme environment where plasmas are compressible, actively ionizing, often involve strong shock waves and have complex material properties. Many shear flows produce the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which initiates the mixing at a fluid interface. We present results from two dedicated shear flow experiments that produced overall subsonic and supersonic flows using novel target designs. In the subsonic case, the Omega laser was used to drive a blast wave along a rippled interface between plastic and foam, shocking both the materials to produce two fluids separated by a sharp shear layer. The interface subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices that were accompanied by bubble-like structures of unknown origin. This was the first time the evolution of a well-resolved KH instability was observed in a HED plasma in the laboratory. We have analyzed the properties and dynamics of the plasma based on the data and fundamental models, without resorting to simulated values. In the second, supersonic experiment the Nike laser was used to drive a supersonic flow of Al plasma along a rippled, low-density foam surface. Here again the flowing plasma drove a shock into the second material, so that two fluids were separated by a shear layer. In contrast to the subsonic case, the flow developed shocks around the ripples in response to the supersonic flow of Al. Collaborators: R.P. Drake, O.A. Hurricane, J.F. Hansen, Y. Aglitskiy, T. Plewa, B.A. Remington, H.F. Robey, J.L. Weaver, A.L. Velikovich, R.S. Gillespie, M.J. Bono, M.J. Grosskopf, C.C. Kuranz, A. Visco.

  20. Networked Rectenna Array for Smart Material Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Golembiewski, Walter T.; Song, Kyo D.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart material actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry. Networked rectenna patch array receives and converts microwave power into a DC power for an array of smart actuators. To use microwave power effectively, the concept of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuit is adopted for networking a rectenna/actuator patch array. The PAD circuit is imbedded into a single embodiment of rectenna and actuator array. The thin-film microcircuit embodiment of PAD circuit adds insignificant amount of rigidity to membrane flexibility. Preliminary design and fabrication of PAD circuitry that consists of a few nodal elements were made for laboratory testing. The networked actuators were tested to correlate the network coupling effect, power allocation and distribution, and response time. The features of preliminary design are 16-channel computer control of actuators by a PCI board and the compensator for a power failure or leakage of one or more rectennas.

  1. Numerical solution to an electromagnetic model with Neumann boundary conditions, for a microwave-driven plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, R.; Alves, L. L.

    2008-11-01

    This work deals with the two-dimensional electromagnetic modelling of a microwave-driven plasma reactor, operated by an axial injection torch (AIT). The model solves Maxwell's equations, which are discretized using a finite difference scheme within staggered grids, adopting a time-harmonic description at fixed 2.45 GHz excitation frequency. The study focuses upon azimuthal axis-symmetric situations, which can be described by a single second-order Helmholtz-type differential equation for the transverse magnetic field. Perfect-conductor boundary conditions are imposed at metal walls, corresponding to zero derivatives for the magnetic field. In situations where convergence requires a more restrictive framework, these Neumann boundary conditions are better replaced by equivalent Dirichlet conditions, whose boundary values depend on the problem solution. Here, we propose a simple numerical algorithm to manage these situations, by tailoring the Dirichlet boundary values to satisfy the physical Neumann conditions. The algorithm is applied to an air-filled circular wave-guide (as a test system) and to the AIT-reactor device (in the presence of plasma). Solution benchmarking checks its accuracy with respect to the corresponding analytical solution (for the circular wave-guide), and analyses its numerical precision by using different integral expressions to calculate the power transmission coefficient (for the AIT-reactor). Results show a 99% accuracy and precision errors lower than 0.1%, for a mesh with 104 grid points.

  2. Project Icarus: Analysis of Plasma jet driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion as potential primary propulsion driver for the Icarus probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, M.; Cassibry, J. T.; Adams, R. B.

    2013-05-01

    Hopes of sending probes to another star other than the Sun are currently limited by the maturity of advanced propulsion technologies. One of the few candidate propulsion systems for providing interstellar flight capabilities is nuclear fusion. In the past many fusion propulsion concepts have been proposed and some of them have even been explored in detail, Project Daedalus for example. However, as scientific progress in this field has advanced, new fusion concepts have emerged that merit evaluation as potential drivers for interstellar missions. Plasma jet driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF) is one of those concepts. PJMIF involves a salvo of converging plasma jets that form a uniform liner, which compresses a magnetized target to fusion conditions. It is an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF)-Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) hybrid approach that has the potential for a multitude of benefits over both ICF and MCF, such as lower system mass and significantly lower cost. This paper concentrates on a thermodynamic assessment of basic performance parameters necessary for utilization of PJMIF as a candidate propulsion system for the Project Icarus mission. These parameters include: specific impulse, thrust, exhaust velocity, mass of the engine system, mass of the fuel required etc. This is a submission of the Project Icarus Study Group.

  3. Tuneable Auxiliary Control Mechanisms For RUM Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E.; Alhorn, Dean C.

    1995-01-01

    Tuneable auxiliary control mechanisms for rotating unbalanced-mass (RUM) actuators used to maximize scan amplitudes and/or minimize power consumption during changing conditions. This type of mechanism more sophisticated version of type of mechanism described in "Auxiliary Control Mechanisms for RUM Actuators" (MFS-28817). Torsional stiffness of torsionally flexible coupling made adjustable on command. Torsionally flexible coupling in tuneable version of auxiliary control mechanism adjustable by use of stepping-motor-driven worm-gear mechanism that varies bending length of flexible blade.

  4. Formation and stability of a hollow electron beam in the presence of a plasma wake field driven by an ultra-short electron bunch

    E-print Network

    Tanjia, F; De Nicola, S; Akhter, T; Jovanovic, D

    2015-01-01

    A numerical investigation on the spatiotemporal evolution of an electron beam, externally injected in a plasma in the presence of a plasma wake field, is carried out. The latter is driven by an ultra-short relativistic axially-symmetric femtosecond electron bunch. We first derive a novel Poisson-like equation for the wake potential where the driving term is the ultra-short bunch density, taking suitably into account the interplay between the sharpness and high energy of the bunch. Then, we show that a channel is formed longitudinally, through the externally injected beam while experiencing the effects of the bunch-driven plasma wake field, within the context of thermal wave model. The formation of the channel seems to be a final stage of the 3D evolution of the beam. This involves the appearance of small filaments and bubbles around the longitudinal axis. The bubbles coalesce forming a relatively stable axially-symmetric hollow beam structure.

  5. Positron Acceleration by Plasma Wakefields Driven by a Hollow Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Neeraj; Antonsen, T. M.; Palastro, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    A scheme for positron plasma wakefield acceleration using hollow or donut-shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular-shaped, electron-free region forms around the hollow driver beam, creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing) for positron acceleration. For Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET)-like parameters, the hollow beam driver produces accelerating gradients on the order of 10 GV /m . The accelerating gradient increases linearly with the total charge in the driver beam. Simulations show acceleration of a 23-GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm is possible.

  6. Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas created by the Nike laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Plewa, T.

    2008-11-01

    In high-energy-density (HED) plasmas the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability plays an important role in the evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable interfaces, as well as material interfaces that experience the passage one or multiple oblique shocks. Despite the potentially important role of the KH instability few experiments have been carried out to explore its behavior in the high-energy-density regime. We report on the evolution of a supersonic shear flow that is generated by the release of a high velocity (>100 km/s) aluminum plasma onto a CRF foam (? = 0.1 g/cc) surface. In order to seed the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability various two-dimensional sinusoidal perturbations (? = 100, 200, and 300 ?m with peak-to-valley amplitudes of 10, 20, and 30 ?m respectively) have been machined into the foam surface. This experiment was performed using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  7. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  8. Two-stage acceleration of interstellar ions driven by high-energy lepton plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, YunQian; Sheng, ZhengMing; Lu, QuanMing; Li, YuTong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of the interaction of a high-energy lepton plasma flow with background electron-proton plasma and focus on the acceleration processes of the protons. It is found that the acceleration follows a two-stage process. In the first stage, protons are significantly accelerated transversely (perpendicular to the lepton flow) by the turbulent magnetic field "islands" generated via the strong Weibel-type instabilities. The accelerated protons shows a perfect inverse-power energy spectrum. As the interaction continues, a shockwave structure forms and the protons in front of the shockwave are reflected at twice of the shock speed, resulting in a quasi-monoenergetic peak located near 200 MeV under the simulation parameters. The presented scenario of ion acceleration may be relevant to cosmic-ray generation in some astrophysical environments.

  9. Positron Acceleration by Plasma Wakefields Driven by a Hollow Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neeraj; Antonsen, T M; Palastro, J P

    2015-11-01

    A scheme for positron plasma wakefield acceleration using hollow or donut-shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular-shaped, electron-free region forms around the hollow driver beam, creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing) for positron acceleration. For Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET)-like parameters, the hollow beam driver produces accelerating gradients on the order of 10??GV/m. The accelerating gradient increases linearly with the total charge in the driver beam. Simulations show acceleration of a 23-GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm is possible. PMID:26588391

  10. High field terahertz emission from relativistic laser-driven plasma wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    We propose a method to generate high field terahertz (THz) radiation with peak strength of GV/cm level in the THz frequency gap range of 1-10 THz using a relativistic laser interaction with a gaseous plasma target. Due to the effect of local pump depletion, an initially Gaussian laser pulse undergoes leading edge erosion and eventually evolves to a state with leading edge being step function. Interacting with such a pulse, electrons gain transverse residual momentum and excite net transverse currents modulated by the relativistic plasma frequency. These currents give rise to the low frequency THz emission. We demonstrate this process with one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Large-scale magnetic field generation by alpha effect driven by collective neutrino-plasma interaction.

    PubMed

    Semikoz, V B; Sokoloff, D D

    2004-04-01

    We suggest a new mechanism for the generation of a large-scale magnetic field in the hot plasma of the early Universe which is based on parity violation in weak interactions and depends neither on the helicity of matter turbulence resulting in the standard alpha effect nor on general rotation. The mechanism can result in a self-excitation of an (almost) uniform cosmological magnetic field. PMID:15089594

  12. Computational modeling of magentically driven liner-on-plasma fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1996-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to controlled fusion which potentially avoids the difficulties of the traditional magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. It appears possible to investigate the critical issues for MTF at low cost, relative to traditional fusion programs, utilizing pulsed power drivers much less expensive than ICF drivers, and plasma configurations much less expensive than those needed for full magnetic confinement. Computational and experimental research into MTF is proceeding at Los Alamos, VNIIEF, and other laboratories.

  13. Possible Energy Gain for a Plasma Liner-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion Concept

    E-print Network

    Knapp, C E

    2014-01-01

    A one dimensional (1-D) parameter study of a magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concept indicates that significant gain may be achievable. This concept uses a dynamically formed gaseous shell with inwardly directed momentum to drive a magnetized fuel to ignition, which in turn partially burns an intermediate layer of unmagnetized fuel. The concept is referred to as Plasma Jet MIF or PJMIF. The results of an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) Eulerian code are compared to those of a Lagrangian code.

  14. Beam driven upper-hybrid-wave instability in quantized semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.; Rozina, Ch.; Moslem, W. M.; Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt , El-Shorouk City, Cairo ; Salimullah, M.

    2014-02-15

    The excitation of Upper-Hybrid waves (UHWs) induced by electron beam in semiconductor plasma is examined using quantum hydrodynamic model. Various quantum effects are taken into account including recoil effect, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange-correlation potential. The bandwidth of the UHWs spectrum shows that the system supports purely growing unstable mode. The latter has been studied for diversified parameters of nano-sized GaAs semiconductor.

  15. Spectroscopic Measurements of Planar Foil Plasmas Driven by a MA LTD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sonal; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Steiner, Adam; Jordan, Nick; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2014-10-01

    Planar foil ablation experiments are being conducted on the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan. The experiment consists of a 400 nm-thick, Al planar foil and a current return post. An optical fiber is placed perpendicular to the magnetic field and linear polarizers are used to isolate the pi and sigma lines. The LTD is charged to +/-70 kV with approximately 400-500 kA passing through the foil. Laser shadowgraphy has previously imaged the plasma and measured anisotropy in the Magneto Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. Localized magnetic field measurements using Zeeman splitting during the current rise is expected to yield some insight into this anisotropy. Initial experiments use Na D lines of Al foils seeded with sodium to measure Zeeman splitting. Several ion lines are also currently being studied, such as Al III and C IV, to probe the higher temperature core plasma. In planned experiments, several lens-coupled optical fibers will be placed across the foil, and local magnetic field measurements will be taken to measure current division within the plasma. This work was supported by US DoE. S.G. Patel and A.M. Steiner supported by NPSC funded by Sandia. D.A. Yager supported by NSF fellowship Grant DGE 1256260.

  16. Bright X-ray source from a laser-driven micro-plasma-waveguide

    E-print Network

    Yi, Longqing; Thanh, Phuc Luu; Shen, Baifei

    2015-01-01

    Bright tunable x-ray sources have a number of applications in basic science, medicine and industry. The most powerful sources are synchrotrons, where relativistic electrons are circling in giant storage rings. In parallel, compact laser-plasma x-ray sources are being developed. Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities become available. These pulses allow for interaction with micro-structured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic pre-pulses. The high-contrast laser pulses as well as the manufacturing of materials at micro- and nano-scales open a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with photonic materials at the relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, via numerical simulations, that when coupling with a readily available 1.8 Joule laser, a micro-plasma-waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls by the laser field and form a dense ...

  17. Fast particle-driven ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in tokamak plasmas and the case for an ICE diagnostic in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClements, K. G.; D'Inca, R.; Dendy, R. O.; Carbajal, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Cook, J. W. S.; Harvey, R. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pinches, S. D.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of fast particle-driven waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ion cyclotron emission or ICE) could provide a passive, non-invasive diagnostic of confined and escaping fast particles (fusion ?-particles and beam ions) in ITER, and would be compatible with the high radiation environment of deuterium-tritium plasmas in that device. Recent experimental results from ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D demonstrate the efficacy of ICE as a diagnostic of different fast ion species and of fast ion losses, while recent particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid simulations provide a more exact comparison with measured ICE spectra and open the prospect of exploiting ICE more fully as a fast ion diagnostic in future experiments. In particular the PIC/hybrid approach should soon make it possible to simulate the nonlinear physics of ICE in full toroidal geometry. Emission has been observed previously at a wide range of poloidal angles, so there is flexibility in the location of ICE detectors. Such a detector could be implemented in ITER by installing a small toroidally orientated loop near the plasma edge or by adding a detection capability to the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae. In the latter case, the antenna could be used simultaneously to heat the plasma and detect ICE, provided that frequencies close to those of the ICRH source are strongly attenuated in the detection system using a suitable filter. Wavenumber information, providing additional constraints on the fast ion distribution exciting the emission, could be obtained by measuring ICE using a toroidally distributed array of detectors or different straps of the ICRH antenna.

  18. Electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators for planetary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Leary, Sean P.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Smith, J.

    1999-05-01

    NASA is seeking to reduce the mass, size, consumed power, and cost of the instrumentation used in its future missions. An important element of many instruments and devices is the actuation mechanism and electroactive polymers (EAP) are offering an effective alternative to current actuators. In this study, two families of EAP materials were investigated, including bending ionomers and longitudinal electrostatically driven elastomers. These materials were demonstrated to effectively actuate manipulation devices and their performance is being enhanced in this on-going study. The recent observations are reported in this paper, include the operation of the bending-EAP at conditions that exceed the harsh environment on Mars, and identify the obstacles that its properties and characteristics are posing to using them as actuators. Analysis of the electrical characteristics of the ionomer EAP showed that it is a current driven material rather than voltage driven and the conductivity distribution on the surface of the material greatly influences the bending performance. An accurate equivalent circuit modeling of the ionomer EAP performance is essential for the design of effective drive electronics. The ionomer main limitations are the fact that it needs to be moist continuously and the process of electrolysis that takes place during activation. An effective coating technique using a sprayed polymer was developed extending its operation in air from a few minutes to about four months. The coating technique effectively forms the equivalent of a skin to protect the moisture content of the ionomer. In parallel to the development of the bending EAP, the development of computer control of actuated longitudinal EAP has been pursued. An EAP driven miniature robotic arm was constructed and it is controlled by a MATLAB code to drop and lift the arm and close and open EAP fingers of a 4-finger gripper.

  19. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Knauer, J. P.; Chang, P. Y.; Jang, N. W.; Shoup, M. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Betti, R.

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a <100 J capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 ?) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity—a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  20. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Gotchev, O V; Knauer, J P; Chang, P Y; Jang, N W; Shoup, M J; Meyerhofer, D D; Betti, R

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a <100 J capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 Omega) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity-a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF. PMID:19405657

  1. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gotchev, O. V.; Knauer, J. P.; Shoup, M. J. III; Chang, P. Y.; Jang, N. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Betti, R.

    2009-04-15

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a <100 J capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 {Omega}) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity--a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  2. Laser-driven plasma jets propagating in an ambient gas studied with optical and proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Koenig, M.; Waugh, J.; Woolsey, N. C.; Dono, S.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Bouquet, S.; Falize, E.; Michaut, C.; Nazarov, W.; Pikuz, S. A. Jr.

    2010-05-15

    The results of an experiment to propagate laser-generated plasma jets into an ambient medium are presented. The jets are generated via laser irradiation of a foam-filled cone target, the results and characterization of which have been reported previously [Loupias et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 265001 (2007)] for propagation in vacuum. The introduction of an ambient medium of argon at varying density is seen to result in the formation of a shock wave, and the shock front displays perturbations that appear to grow with time. The system is diagnosed with the aid of proton radiography, imaging the perturbed structure in the dense parts of the shock with high resolution.

  3. Ion-beam driven lower hybrid waves in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2013-06-15

    An ion beam drives lower hybrid waves to instability in a magnetized dusty plasma via Cerenkov interaction. A dispersion relation and the growth rate of the lower hybrid waves have been derived taking into account the dust charge fluctuations. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave instability increase with relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The lower hybrid modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. Moreover, the growth rate of the instability increases with beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density.

  4. Electronic excitation as a mode of heat dissipation in laser-driven cluster plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeev, R.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2013-12-15

    Electrons streaming out of laser plasma are known for non-local heat transport and energy deposition by the ionization wave. At 100 eV electron temperature, since the electronic excitation cross section is comparable to that of ionization for Ar and CO{sub 2}, a non-local excitation wave akin to the ionization wave is envisaged where energy deposition in excitations forms a excited cluster sheath beyond the laser focus. Here, we show that nano-cluster systems have the right parameters to form such an exciton sheath and experimentally demonstrate this via charge transfer reactions.

  5. Ion beam driven ion-acoustic waves in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Kavita; Walia, Ritu

    2012-07-01

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized potassium plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives electrostatic ion-acoustic waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The phase velocity of sound wave increases with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase, with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales as one-third power of the beam density. The real part of frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales as almost the one-half power of the beam energy.

  6. Coulomb-Driven Energy Boost of Heavy Ions for Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braenzel, J.; Andreev, A. A.; Platonov, K.; Klingsporn, M.; Ehrentraut, L.; Sandner, W.; Schnürer, M.

    2015-03-01

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultrathin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse at a peak intensity of 8 ×1 019 W / cm2 . Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to >200 MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using 1.3 J laser energy on target. 1D and 2D particle in cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ion's ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a spatial distribution of the ionization inside the thin target, leading to a field enhancement for the heavy ions by Coulomb explosion. It is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, enabling a higher efficiency for the laser-driven heavy ion acceleration.

  7. Full wave effects on the lower hybrid wave spectrum and driven current profile in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraiwa, S.; Ko, J.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J.; Ma, Y.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Wallace, G.; Wolfe, S. M.; C-Mod Group, Alcator; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-08-15

    A numerical modeling of current profile modification by lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) using a fullwave/Fokker-Planck simulation code is presented. A MHD stable LHCD discharge on Alcator C-Mod was analyzed, and the current profile from full wave simulations was found to show better agreement with the experiment than a ray-tracing code. Comparison of full wave and ray-tracing simulation shows that, although ray-tracing can reproduce the stochastic wave spectrum broadening, the full wave calculation predicts even wider spectrum broadening, and the wave spectrum fills all of the kinematically allowed domain. This is the first demonstration of LHCD current profile modeling using a full wave simulation code in a multi-pass absorption regime, showing the clear impact of full wave effects on the LHCD driven current profile.

  8. Observations of electron phase-space holes driven during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Porkolab, M.; Egedal, J.; Katz, N.; Le, A.

    2012-03-01

    This work presents detailed experimental observations of electron phase-space holes driven during magnetic reconnection events on the Versatile Toroidal Facility. The holes are observed to travel on the order of or faster than the electron thermal speed, and are of large size scale, with diameter of order 60 Debye lengths. In addition, they have 3D spheroidal structure with approximately unity aspect ratio. We estimate the direct anomalous resistivity due to ion interaction with the holes and find it to be too small to affect the reconnection rate; however, the holes may play a role in reining in a tail of accelerated electrons and they indicate the presence of other processes in the reconnection layer, such as electron energization and electron beam formation.

  9. Coulomb-driven energy boost of heavy ions for laser-plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Braenzel, J; Andreev, A A; Platonov, K; Klingsporn, M; Ehrentraut, L; Sandner, W; Schnürer, M

    2015-03-27

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultrathin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse at a peak intensity of 8×10^{19}??W/??cm^{2}. Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to >200??MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using 1.3 J laser energy on target. 1D and 2D particle in cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ion's ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a spatial distribution of the ionization inside the thin target, leading to a field enhancement for the heavy ions by Coulomb explosion. It is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, enabling a higher efficiency for the laser-driven heavy ion acceleration. PMID:25860747

  10. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1?mm copper foil is placed behind a 2?mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2?cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using??>1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 ?m size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  11. The influence of plasma actuators material and geometry on the electromagnetic characteristics of the discharge and the specific thrust of synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharnikov, V. M.; Golub, V. V.; Kazantseva, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    It was examined the effect of electrode material on the value of specific thrust of the synthetic jets produced by symmetric actuator. The dependences of specific thrust on the distance between external electrodes for copper, aluminium, nickel and titanium was made. A considerable effect of the shape of the external electrodes on the electric field and current density in the tape drive and the specific thrust of the synthetic jet were investigated. The role of autoelectronic emission on the current in streamers and the value of volume force acting on the stream were also evaluated.

  12. Inertia driven radial breathing and nonlinear relaxation in cylindrically confined pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2014-02-15

    The dynamics of cylindrically trapped electron plasma has been investigated using a newly developed 2D Electrostatic PIC code that uses unapproximated, mass-included equations of motion for simulation. Exhaustive simulations, covering the entire range of Brillouin ratio, were performed for uniformly filled circular profiles in rigid rotor equilibrium. The same profiles were then loaded away from equilibrium with an initial value of rigid rotation frequency different from that required for radial force balance. Both these sets of simulations were performed for an initial zero-temperature or cold load of the plasma with no spread in either angular velocity or radial velocity. The evolution of the off-equilibrium initial conditions to a steady state involve radial breathing of the profile that scales in amplitude and algebraic growth with Brillouin fraction. For higher Brillouin fractions, the growth of the breathing mode is followed by complex dynamics of spontaneous hollow density structures, excitation of poloidal modes, leading to a monotonically falling density profile.

  13. Coronal Heating Driven by Magnetic-gradient Pumping Mechanism in Solar Plasmas

    E-print Network

    Tan, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    The solar coronal heating is a longstanding mystery in astrophysics. Considering that the solar magnetic field is spatially inhomogeneous with considerable magnetic gradient from solar surface to the corona, this work proposes a magnetic gradient pumping (MGP) mechanism and try to explain the formation of hot plasma upflows, such as the hot type II spicules and hot plasma ejections, etc. In MGP mechanism, the magnetic gradients drive the energetic particles to move upwards from the underlying solar atmosphere and form hot upflows. These upflow energetic particles deposit in corona and make it becoming very hot. Roughly estimations indicate that the solar corona can be heated to above 1 million degrees, and the upflow velocity is about 40 km/s in chromosphere and about 130 km/s in the corona. The solar magnetic flux tubes act as pumpers to extract energetic particles from the underlying thermal photosphere, convey them and deposit in the corona. The deposition of energetic particles will make the corona become...

  14. Ion beam driven resonant ion-cyclotron instability in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2014-03-15

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are excited by axial ion beam in a dusty plasma via Cerenkov and slow cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived in the presence of positively/negatively charged dust grains. The minimum beam velocity needed for the excitation is estimated for different values of relative density of negatively charged dust grains. It is shown that the minimum beam velocity needed for excitation increases as the charge density carried by dust increases. Temperature of electrons and ions, charge and mass of dust grains, external static magnetic field and finite boundary of dusty plasma significantly modify the dispersion properties of these waves and play a crucial role in the growth of resonant ion cyclotron instability. The ion cyclotron modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. The maximum value of growth rate increases with the beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in slow cyclotron interaction.

  15. LPI Thresholds in Longer Scale Length Plasmas Driven by the Nike Laser*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J.; Oh, J.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive driver for inertial confinement fusion due to its short wavelength (248nm), large bandwidth (1-3 THz), and beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. Experiments with the Nike KrF laser have demonstrated intensity thresholds for laser plasma instabilities (LPI) higher than reported for other high power lasers operating at longer wavelengths (>=351 nm). The previous Nike experiments used short pulses (350 ps FWHM) and small spots (<260 ?m FWHM) that created short density scale length plasmas (Ln˜50-70 ?m) from planar CH targets and demonstrated the onset of two-plasmon decay (2?p) at laser intensities ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. This talk will present an overview of the current campaign that uses longer pulses (0.5-4.0 ns) to achieve greater density scale lengths (Ln˜100-200 ?m). X-rays, emission near ^1/2?o and ^3/2?o harmonics, and reflected laser light have been monitored for onset of 2?p. The longer density scale lengths will allow better comparison to results from other laser facilities. *Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR.

  16. Coronal heating driven by a magnetic gradient pumping mechanism in solar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Baolin

    2014-11-10

    The heating of the solar corona is a longstanding mystery in astrophysics. Considering that the solar magnetic field is spatially inhomogeneous with a considerable magnetic gradient from the solar surface to the corona, this work proposes a magnetic gradient pumping (MGP) mechanism to try to explain the formation of hot plasma upflows, such as hot type II spicules and hot plasma ejections. In the MGP mechanism, the magnetic gradient may drive the energetic particles to move upward from the underlying solar atmosphere and form hot upflows. These upflow energetic particles are deposited in the corona, causing it to become very hot. Rough estimations indicate that the solar corona can be heated to above 1 million degrees, and the upflow velocity is about 40 km s{sup –1} in the chromosphere and about 130 km s{sup –1} in the corona. The solar magnetic flux tubes act as pumpers to extract energetic particles from the underlying thermal photosphere, convey them, and deposit them in the corona. The deposit of these energetic particles causes the corona to become hot, and the escape of such particles from the photosphere leaves it a bit cold. This mechanism can present a natural explanation to the mystery of solar coronal heating.

  17. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K. (Albuquerque, NM); Johnston, Gabriel A. (Trophy Club, TX); Rohrer, Brandon R. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  18. Remote switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Edwin Gerard; Beauman, Ronald; Palo, Jr., Stefan

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides a device and method for actuating electrical switches remotely. The device is removably attached to the switch and is actuated through the transfer of a user's force. The user is able to remain physically removed from the switch site obviating need for protective equipment. The device and method allow rapid, safe actuation of high-voltage or high-current carrying electrical switches or circuit breakers.

  19. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-15

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67?GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  20. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-01

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  1. Observation of self-generated flows in tokamak plasmas with lower-hybrid-driven current.

    PubMed

    Ince-Cushman, A; Rice, J E; Reinke, M; Greenwald, M; Wallace, G; Parker, R; Fiore, C; Hughes, J W; Bonoli, P; Shiraiwa, S; Hubbard, A; Wolfe, S; Hutchinson, I H; Marmar, E; Bitter, M; Wilson, J; Hill, K

    2009-01-23

    In Alcator C-Mod discharges lower hybrid waves have been shown to induce a countercurrent change in toroidal rotation of up to 60 km/s in the central region of the plasma (r/a approximately <0.4). This modification of the toroidal rotation profile develops on a time scale comparable to the current redistribution time (approximately 100 ms) but longer than the energy and momentum confinement times (approximately 20 ms). A comparison of the co- and countercurrent injected waves indicates that current drive (as opposed to heating) is responsible for the rotation profile modifications. Furthermore, the changes in central rotation velocity induced by lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) are well correlated with changes in normalized internal inductance. The application of LHCD has been shown to generate sheared rotation profiles and a negative increment in the radial electric field profile consistent with a fast electron pinch. PMID:19257362

  2. Observation of Self-Generated Flows in Tokamak Plasmas with Lower-Hybrid-Driven Current

    SciTech Connect

    Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M.; Greenwald, M.; Wallace, G.; Parker, R.; Fiore, C.; Hughes, J. W.; Bonoli, P.; Shiraiwa, S.; Hubbard, A.; Wolfe, S.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Marmar, E.; Bitter, M.; Wilson, J.; Hill, K.

    2009-01-23

    In Alcator C-Mod discharges lower hybrid waves have been shown to induce a countercurrent change in toroidal rotation of up to 60 km/s in the central region of the plasma (r/a{approx}<0.4). This modification of the toroidal rotation profile develops on a time scale comparable to the current redistribution time ({approx}100 ms) but longer than the energy and momentum confinement times ({approx}20 ms). A comparison of the co- and countercurrent injected waves indicates that current drive (as opposed to heating) is responsible for the rotation profile modifications. Furthermore, the changes in central rotation velocity induced by lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) are well correlated with changes in normalized internal inductance. The application of LHCD has been shown to generate sheared rotation profiles and a negative increment in the radial electric field profile consistent with a fast electron pinch.

  3. An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anania, M. P.; Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Grant, D. W.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Geer, S. B. van der; Loos, M. J. de; Poole, M. W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J. A.; Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.

    2014-06-30

    Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260?nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2?mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20?TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9?×?10{sup 6} per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1?×?10{sup 18} photons/s/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has energy of 120–130?MeV with the radiation pulse duration in the range of 50–100 fs.

  4. Creation of persistent, straight, 2 mm long laser driven channels in underdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarri, G.; Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R.; Clark, E. L.; Hassan, S.; Jiang, J.; Kageiwa, N.; Lopes, N.; Ramis, R.; Rehman, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Russo, C.; Scott, R. H. H.; Tanimoto, T.; Temporal, M.; Borghesi, M.; Davies, J. R.; Najmudin, Z.; Tanaka, K. A.; Tatarakis, M.; Norreys, P. A.

    2010-11-01

    The experimental study of the behavior of deuterium plasma with densities between 2×1018 and 2×1020 cm-3, subjected to a 6 TW, 30 ps, 3×1018 W cm-2 laser pulse, is presented. Conclusive experimental proof that a single straight channel is generated when the laser pulse interacts with the lowest densities is provided. This channel shows no small-scale longitudinal density modulations, extends up to 2 mm in length and persists for up to 150 ps after the peak of the interaction. Bifurcation of the channel after 1 mm propagation distance is observed for the first time. For higher density interactions, above the relativistic self-focusing threshold, bubblelike structures are observed to form at late times. These observations have implications for both laser wakefield accelerators and fast ignition inertial fusion studies.

  5. Effects of initially energetic electrons on relativistic laser-driven electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdanpanah, J. Anvari, A.

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, using kinetic calculations and accurate 1D2V particle-in-cell simulations, we point out the important role of initially energetic electrons of the distribution tail in the behavior of high amplitude electron plasma waves (EPWs). In the presence of these electrons, the conventional warm fluid theory (WFT) breaks at very high wave amplitudes that are still noticeably lower than the wave breaking amplitude (WBA). The fluid breakdown results in electron super-heating with respect to the adiabatic laws. Indeed, a new kinetic regime of the relativistic EPWs appears below the WBA. It is argued that the mentioned super-heating results in WBA values lower than the corresponding WFT prediction.

  6. Implementation and analysis of an innovative digital charge amplifier for hysteresis reduction in piezoelectric stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Bazghaleh, Mohsen Grainger, Steven; Cazzolato, Ben; Lu, Tien-Fu; Oskouei, Reza

    2014-04-15

    Smart actuators are the key components in a variety of nanopositioning applications, such as scanning probe microscopes and atomic force microscopes. Piezoelectric actuators are the most common smart actuators due to their high resolution, low power consumption, and wide operating frequency but they suffer hysteresis which affects linearity. In this paper, an innovative digital charge amplifier is presented to reduce hysteresis in piezoelectric stack actuators. Compared to traditional analog charge drives, experimental results show that the piezoelectric stack actuator driven by the digital charge amplifier has less hysteresis. It is also shown that the voltage drop of the digital charge amplifier is significantly less than the voltage drop of conventional analog charge amplifiers.

  7. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  8. Hydrostatic actuation in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutzenich, Simon; Vinay, Thurai; Rosengarten, Gary

    2002-11-01

    Hydrostatic actuation is a novel method of actuation in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and provides advantages over other actuation techniques in current use. Hydrostatic actuation utilises a contained pressurised medium to straighten a bent hollow beam, similar to the Bourdon tube used to measure pressure in the macro world. Research has commenced at RMIT University to design and fabricate a microgripper prototype to validate this work. To simplify the design of this microgripper a virtual prototype has been initiated. This paper looks at the work carried out and verification of this virtual prototype using mathematical and finite element modelling. Further work to be undertaken will also be discussed.

  9. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  10. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  11. Spectro-polarimetric properties of small-scale plasma eruptions driven by magnetic vortex tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina N.

    2014-12-01

    The highly turbulent nature of convection on the Sun causes strong multi-scale interaction of subsurface layers with the photosphere and chromosphere. According to realistic 3D radiative magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations, ubiquitous small-scale vortex tubes are generated by turbulent flows below the visible surface and concentrated in the intergranular lanes. The vortex tubes can capture and amplify magnetic field, penetrate into chromospheric layers and initiate quasi-periodic flow eruptions that generate Alfvénic waves, and transport mass and energy into the solar atmosphere. The simulations revealed high-speed flow patterns, and complicated thermodynamic and magnetic structures in the erupting vortex tubes. The spontaneous eruptions are initiated and driven by strong pressure gradients in the near-surface layers, and accelerated by the Lorentz force in the low chromosphere. In this paper, the simulation data are used to further investigate the dynamics of the eruptions, their spectro-polarimetric characteristics for the Fe I 6301.5 and 6302.5 Å spectral lines, and demonstrate expected signatures of the eruptions in the Hinode Spectro-Polarimeter (SP) data. We found that the complex dynamical structure of vortex tubes (downflows in the vortex core and upflows on periphery) can be captured by the Stokes I profiles. During an eruption, the ratio of down and upflows can suddenly change, and this effect can be observed in the Stokes V profile. Also, during the eruption the linear polarization signal increases, and this also can be detected with Hinode SP.

  12. Oscillation phenomena of a plasma produced by an AC driven hot cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yuki; Miyamoto, Naoki; Kasuya, Toshiro; Wada, Motoi

    2012-11-06

    Amplitude of oscillating discharge current has been measured for Bernas-type ion source equipped with an alternating current heated hot tungsten filament cathode. Measurements have been made by changing the filament diameter from 0.2 mm to 0.7 mm, and by changing the DC discharge current from 0.1 A to 1.5 A. The fluctuation amplitude of the discharge current was found decreased as the diameter of the filament was enlarged. The fluctuation amplitude took the minimum value at a frequency from several hundred Hz to 1 kHz depending upon the filament diameter and DC discharge current. For example, the relative oscillation amplitude was the smallest at 1 kHz for 0.7 mm diameter filament. Increase in discharge current had reduced the minimum oscillation amplitude, and increased the frequency at which the oscillating amplitude took the minimum. Fundamental mechanisms relevant to these characteristics of oscillation amplitude of discharge current from an AC driven hot cathode filament are discussed.

  13. Thermal and chaotic distributions of plasma in laser driven Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters

    E-print Network

    Barbarino, M; Bonasera, A; Lattuada, D; Bang, W; Quevedo, H J; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Andreoli, P; Kimura, S; Dyer, G; Bernstein, A C; Hagel, K; Barbui, M; Schmidt, K; Gaul, E; Donovan, M E; Natowitz, J B; Ditmire, T

    2015-01-01

    In this work we explore the possibility that the motion of the deuterium ions emitted from Coulomb cluster explosions is chaotic enough to resemble thermalization. We analyze the process of nuclear fusion reactions driven by laser-cluster interactions in experiments conducted at the Texas Petawatt laser facility using a mixture of D2+3He and CD4+3He cluster targets. When clusters explode by Coulomb repulsion, the emission of the energetic ions is nearly isotropic. In the framework of cluster Coulomb explosions, we analyze the energy distributions of the ions using a Maxwell- Boltzmann (MB) distribution, a shifted MB distribution (sMB) and the energy distribution derived from a log-normal (LN) size distribution of clusters. We show that the first two distributions reproduce well the experimentally measured ion energy distributions and the number of fusions from d-d and d-3He reactions. The LN distribution is a good representation of the ion kinetic energy distribution well up to high momenta where the noise be...

  14. Mode-space energy distribution in instability-driven plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.; Makwana, K. D.; Pueschel, M. J.; Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Merz, F.

    2014-12-15

    Energy transfer to damped modes in gyrokinetic ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is studied to understand the transfer dynamics and find scaling representations for the heavily populated mode space. Proper orthogonal and linear eigenmode decompositions are introduced and examined to assess whether modes are well-resolved and what scales they encompass. It is observed that damped modes across a range of inhomogeneous scales receive energy simultaneously and directly from the unstable mode, constituting a form of parallel transfer, distinct from the serial mode-to-mode transfer of the wavenumber cascade of hydrodynamic turbulence. Controlling for modes that are well resolved and labeling the modes of the linear decomposition in order of damping rate, energy transfer in the mode space satisfies an equipartition of the energy dissipation rate, leading to a simple rule for the distribution of energy in the space of damped modes. Energy dissipation rate equipartition is the form that the canonical nonlinear invariance of energy transfer assumes in a dissipation range with parallel rather than serial transfer.

  15. Vehicle Exhaust Gas Clearance by Low Temperature Plasma-Driven Nano-Titanium Dioxide Film Prepared by Radiofrequency Magnetron Sputtering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  16. Upper-hybrid wave-driven Alfvenic turbulence in magnetized dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A. P.; Banerjee, S.

    2011-03-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of coupled electrostatic upper-hybrid (UH) and Alfven waves (AWs) is revisited in a magnetized electron-ion plasma with charged dust impurities. A pair of nonlinear equations that describe the interaction of UH wave envelopes (including the relativistic electron mass increase) and the density as well as the compressional magnetic field perturbations associated with the AWs are solved numerically to show that many coherent solitary patterns can be excited and saturated due to modulational instability of unstable UH waves. The evolution of these solitary patterns is also shown to appear in the states of spatiotemporal coherence, temporal as well as spatiotemporal chaos, due to collision and fusion among the patterns in stochastic motion. Furthermore, these spatiotemporal features are demonstrated by the analysis of wavelet power spectra. It is found that a redistribution of wave energy takes place to higher harmonic modes with small wavelengths, which, in turn, results in the onset of Alfvenic turbulence in dusty magnetoplasmas. Such a scenario can occur in the vicinity of Saturn's magnetosphere as many electrostatic solitary structures have been observed there by the Cassini spacecraft.

  17. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  18. Upper-hybrid wave-driven Alfvénic turbulence in magnetized dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Misra, A P; Banerjee, S

    2011-03-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of coupled electrostatic upper-hybrid (UH) and Alfvén waves (AWs) is revisited in a magnetized electron-ion plasma with charged dust impurities. A pair of nonlinear equations that describe the interaction of UH wave envelopes (including the relativistic electron mass increase) and the density as well as the compressional magnetic field perturbations associated with the AWs are solved numerically to show that many coherent solitary patterns can be excited and saturated due to modulational instability of unstable UH waves. The evolution of these solitary patterns is also shown to appear in the states of spatiotemporal coherence, temporal as well as spatiotemporal chaos, due to collision and fusion among the patterns in stochastic motion. Furthermore, these spatiotemporal features are demonstrated by the analysis of wavelet power spectra. It is found that a redistribution of wave energy takes place to higher harmonic modes with small wavelengths, which, in turn, results in the onset of Alfvénic turbulence in dusty magnetoplasmas. Such a scenario can occur in the vicinity of Saturn's magnetosphere as many electrostatic solitary structures have been observed there by the Cassini spacecraft. PMID:21517632

  19. Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering Measurements with Nike KrF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J.; Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; McLean, E. A.; Lehmberg, R. H.

    2008-11-01

    With the short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1˜2 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser is expected to have higher LPI thresholds than observed at other laser facilities. Previous measurements using the Nike laser [J. L. Weaver et al, Phys. Plasmas 14, 056316 (2007)] showed no LPI evidence from CH targets up to I˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. For further experiments to detect LPI excitation, Nike capabilities have been extended to achieve higher laser intensities by tighter beam focusing and higher power pulses. This talk will present results of a recent LPI experiment with the extended Nike capabilities focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and Two-Plasmon Decay (TPD) instabilities. The primary diagnostics were time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array in (0.4˜0.8)?0 and a streak camera near 0.5?0. The measurements were conducted at laser intensities of 10^15˜10^16 W/cm^2 on planar targets of CH solids and RF foams.

  20. Controlling two plasmon decay instability in intense femtosecond laser driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Chatterjee, Gourab; Brijesh, P.; Ravindra Kumar, G.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the onset of the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability in intense femtosecond laser-solid interaction. In particular, this instability, originating at the quarter critical electron density surface in the inhomogeneous plasma, is explored for a wide range of laser parameters-energy, pulse duration, and intensity contrast. By varying these laser parameters, we demonstrate ways to excite and control the growth of the TPD process. The pulse duration scan carried out under a constant laser fluence reveals the pulse width dependent nature of TPD growth. The spectral splitting of the TPD induced three-halves harmonic emission is used to infer the electron temperature near the quarter critical density surface. Moreover, by varying the laser contrast over four orders of magnitude, we find that the intensity threshold of three-halves harmonic emission increases by nearly two orders of magnitude. This contrast dependent intensity threshold for the emission of three-halves harmonic can be a useful diagnostic of the laser contrast.

  1. Electron and ion kinetic effects on non-linearly driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R. L.; Chapman, T.; Divol, L.; Still, C. H.; Brunner, S.; Valeo, E. J.

    2013-03-15

    Fully non-linear kinetic simulations of electron plasma and ion acoustic waves (IAWs) have been carried out with a new multi-species, parallelized Vlasov code. The numerical implementation of the Vlasov model and the methods used to compute the wave frequency are described in detail. For the first time, the nonlinear frequency of IAWs, combining the contributions from electron and ion kinetic effects and from harmonic generation, has been calculated and compared to Vlasov results. Excellent agreement of theory with simulation results is shown at all amplitudes, harmonic generation being an essential component at large amplitudes. For IAWs, the positive frequency shift from trapped electrons is confirmed and is dominant for the effective electron-to-ion temperature ratio, Z T{sub e}/T{sub i} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 with Z as the charge state. Furthermore, numerical results demonstrate unambiguously the dependence [R. L. Dewar, Phys. Fluids 15, 712 (1972)] of the kinetic shifts on details of the distribution of the trapped particles, which depends in turn on the conditions under which the waves were generated. The trapped particle fractions and energy distributions are derived and, upon inclusion of harmonic effects, shown to agree with the simulation results, completing a consistent picture. Fluid models of the wave evolution are considered but prove unable to capture essential details of the kinetic simulations. Detrapping by collisions and sideloss is also discussed.

  2. Einstein's Tea Leaf Analogy to Electrohydrodynamically-Driven Microfluidic Blood Plasma Separation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie; Arifin, Dian

    2006-11-01

    The application of a voltage upon a sharp electrode tip, mounted at an inclination angle above the liquid surface of a microfluidic chamber, generates an electrohydrodynamic air thrust that shears the liquid surface and hence induces liquid recirculation consisting of a primary azimuthal rotation and a secondary bulk meridional flow. Colloidal particles suspended within the liquid are then observed to be swept by the recirculation in a helical swirl-like motion and deposited at a stagnation point located centrally at the bottom of the microfluidic chamber. This is due to a delayed centrifugal force and an enhanced inward radial force at the base. We propose that the flow, which is similar to Batchelor flows arising between rotating and stationary disks, is analogous to Einstein's paradoxical observation of tea leaves centrally accumulating at the base of a stirred teacup and show that the phenomenon can be exploited for bioparticle trapping and concentration. In particular, we demonstrate the rapid separation of red blood cells from blood plasma for miniaturized blood diagnostic kits.

  3. High-quality electron beams from field-induced ionization injection in the strong blow-out regime of beam-driven plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Behrens, C.; Grebenyuk, J.; Mehrling, T.; Schaper, L.; Osterhoff, J.

    2014-03-01

    We use three-dimensional (3D) simulations with the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to demonstrate the theoretical production of high-quality electron bunches in beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA) by means of field-induced ionization injection. In these simulations, two realistic scenarios for PWFA have been considered: the FLASHForward project at DESY and the FACET experiment at SLAC. These two examples illustrate two different strategies for injection. The first one uses the transverse electric fields of the beam to induce injection, and the second constitutes a new method which utilizes only the wakefields to enable ionization and trapping of high quality electron bunches into beam driven plasma wakes. The produced bunches feature multi-kA peak currents, ~ 1 ?m transverse normalized emittances, uncorrelated energy spreads of ? 1 % on a GeV-energy scale, and few femtosecond bunch lengths.

  4. Investigation of Creep Properties in RAINBOW High Displacement Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene; Furman, Eugene; Li, Guang; Barron, Bret; Moon, Youngwoo

    1997-01-01

    Results from this study on fatigue in Rainbow and Cerambow actuators show that these high displacement actuators have definite fatigue rates and lifetimes depending upon (1) the amount of displacement generated, (2) how hard they are driven electrically, and (3) the microstructure (grain size) of the ceramic material. Lifetimes for some actuators were on the order of 10(exp 7) cycles at near dc (1 Hz) frequencies while others still retained up to 74% of their displacement at 2.1 x 10(exp 7) Hz.

  5. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  6. Flame stabilization by a plasma driven radical jet in a high speed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woong-Sik

    In current afterburners combustion is stabilized by the high temperature, recirculating region behind bluff body flame holders, such as V-gutters. Blocking the high speed flow with bluff bodies causes a significant pressure drop, and heating the flame holder by the hot combustion product causes a thermal signature, which is a critical problem in a military jet. To reduce these problems, ignition methods using a high frequency (HF) spark discharge, or a radical jet generator (RJG) were developed. The HF discharge ignited and stabilized a flame successfully in a premixed methane-air flow. The electrical power consumption was very small compared to the combustion heat release, as long as the operating velocity was relatively low. However, a theoretical study showed that the ratio of the electrical power consumption to the heat generation by the stabilized flame increases rapidly with increasing flow velocity. For flame stabilization in a high velocity flow, the developed RJG showed much better performance than direct exposure to a plasma. The present study investigated the characteristics of a radical jet produced in a RJG and injected into a main combustor. The limits of flame stabilization by this jet was measured experimentally, and compared to those of bluff body flame holders. The flame holding performance of the radical jet was also experimentally compared to that of a thermal jet. The effect of radicals on flame stabilization was examined using CHEMKIN, and the limit of flame stabilization by the radical jet was estimated for a simple flow configuration using an approximate solution. The results suggest that the reduction of local spontaneous ignition delay time by active species in the radical jet and the longer length of a typical radical jet compared to the dimension of the recirculation zone behind a bluff body increases the maximum velocity at which a flame can be stabilized.

  7. Plasma rotation and NTM onset driven by central EC deposition in TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E.; Sauter, O.; Canal, G.; Duval, B.; Federspiel, L.; Karpushov, A. N.; Kim, D.; Reimerders, H.; Rossel, J.; Testa, D.; Wagner, D.; Raju, D.; Collaboration: TCV Team

    2014-02-12

    The effects of the central electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) on the spontaneous plasma rotation and on the presence of Tearing Modes (TM), observed in the TCV tokamak[1], were recently investigated as an interplay between the toroidal velocity and NTM onset in absence of sawteeth, ELMs and error fields [2–3]. In a set of reproducible TCV discharges (I{sub p}? ?150 kA, B{sub t}? ?1.4 T, ne,{sub av?} 1.5 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}, T{sub e}? 3 keV and T{sub i}?0.25 keV, q{sub 95}?5.8) with both pure EC heating and current drive the cnt-Ip toroidal velocity was observed to be reduced with subsequent co-Ip appearance of 3/2 and 2/1 modes during the ramp up EC phases. The understanding of the capability of the on-axis EC power to modify the rotation profiles before and after the TM onset and of the sudden disappearance of 3/2 mode when 2/1 starts is the main purpose of this work. The velocity profile modifications are due to a direct effect of the EC absorbed power and also related to some variation of the perpendicular diffusion of the toroidal momentum and to magnetic braking effects of the kind of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) due to the NTM resonant field perturbations associated to the presence of TM. Numerical investigations are performed using a 1D toroidal momentum balance equation including contributions by external sources, as EC power, and NTV torques. Furthermore, the combined evolution of the 3/2 and 2/1 modes requires considering also coupling effects included in a generalized Rutherford equation for the modelling of the TM time growth.

  8. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Erickson, Carl J.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Gentile, Charles A.; Tilson, Carl; Bernasek, Stephen L.; Abelev, Esta

    2010-02-19

    Ras Labs produces electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple and now contract (new development) with low electric input. This is an important attribute because of the ability of contraction to produce life-like motion. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments were conducted to follow the movement of electrolytes and water in these EAPs when activated. Extreme temperature experiments were performed on the contractile EAPs with very favorable results. One of the biggest challenges in developing these actuators, however, is the electrode-EAP interface because of the pronounced movement of the EAP. Plasma treatments of metallic electrodes were investigated in order to improve the attachment of the embedded electrodes to the EAP material. Surface analysis, adhesive testing, and mechanical testing were conducted to test metal surfaces and metal-polymer interfaces. The nitrogen plasma treatment of titanium produced a strong metal-polymer interface; however, oxygen plasma treatment of both stainless steel and titanium produced even stronger metal-polymer interfaces. Plasma treatment of the electrodes allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface.

  9. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  10. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  11. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  12. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  13. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  14. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  15. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  16. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  17. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Burg, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM); Jensen, Brian D. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Samuel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Barnes, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  18. Dust-acoustic waves driven by an ion-dust streaming instability in laboratory discharge dusty plasma experiments

    E-print Network

    Merlino, Robert L.

    is typically much less than the ion thermal speed. Since labo- ratory dusty plasmas are generally weakly discharges,8 inductively coupled rf discharges,12 and Q ma- chine plasmas7 have also been used. One plasma experiments Robert L. Merlinoa Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, Iowa

  19. Backed Bending Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Su, Ji

    2004-01-01

    Bending actuators of a proposed type would partly resemble ordinary bending actuators, but would include simple additional components that would render them capable of exerting large forces at small displacements. Like an ordinary bending actuator, an actuator according to the proposal would include a thin rectangular strip that would comprise two bonded layers (possibly made of electroactive polymers with surface electrodes) and would be clamped at one end in the manner of a cantilever beam. Unlike an ordinary bending actuator, the proposed device would include a rigid flat backplate that would support part of the bending strip against backward displacement; because of this feature, the proposed device is called a backed bending actuator. When an ordinary bending actuator is inactive, the strip typically lies flat, the tip displacement is zero, and the force exerted by the tip is zero. During activation, the tip exerts a transverse force and undergoes a bending displacement that results from the expansion or contraction of one or more of the bonded layers. The tip force of an ordinary bending actuator is inversely proportional to its length; hence, a long actuator tends to be weak. The figure depicts an ordinary bending actuator and the corresponding backed bending actuator. The bending, the tip displacement (d(sub t)), and the tip force (F) exerted by the ordinary bending actuator are well approximated by the conventional equations for the loading and deflection of a cantilever beam subject to a bending moment which, in this case, is applied by the differential expansion or contraction of the bonded layers. The bending, displacement, and tip force of the backed bending actuator are calculated similarly, except that it is necessary to account for the fact that the force F(sub b) that resists the displacement of the tip could be sufficient to push part of the strip against the backplate; in such a condition, the cantilever beam would be effectively shortened (length L*) and thereby stiffened and, hence, made capable of exerting a greater tip force for a given degree of differential expansion or contraction of the bonded layers. Taking all of these effects into account, the cantilever-beam equations show that F(sub b) would be approximately inversely proportional to d(sup 1/2) for d less than a calculable amount, denoted the transition displacement (dt). For d less than d(sub t), part of the strip would be pressed against the backplate. Therefore, the force F(sub b) would be very large for d at or near zero and would decrease as d increases toward d(sub t). At d greater than d(sub t), none of the strip would be pressed against the backplate and F(sub b) would equal the tip force F of the corresponding ordinary bending actuator. The advantage of the proposal is that a backed bending actuator could be made long to obtain large displacement when it encountered little resistance but it could also exert a large zero-displacement force, so that it could more easily start the movement of a large mass, throw a mechanical switch, or release a stuck mechanism.

  20. Hybrid electromechanical actuator and actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid electromechanical actuator has two different types of electromechanical elements, one that expands in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto and one that contracts in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto. The two electromechanical elements are (i) disposed in relation to one another such that the transverse directions thereof are parallel to one another, and (ii) mechanically coupled to one another at least at two opposing edges thereof. Electric power is applied simultaneously to the elements.

  1. Robust, Flexible and Lightweight Dielectric Barrier Discharge Actuators Using Nanofoams/Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wilkinson, Stephen P. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Guo, Haiquan N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Robust, flexible, lightweight, low profile enhanced performance dielectric barrier discharge actuators (plasma actuators) based on aerogels/nanofoams with controlled pore size and size distribution as well as pore shape. The plasma actuators offer high body force as well as high force to weight ratios (thrust density). The flexibility and mechanical robustness of the actuators allows them to be shaped to conform to the surface to which they are applied. Carbon nanotube (CNT) based electrodes serve to further decrease the weight and profile of the actuators while maintaining flexibility while insulating nano-inclusions in the matrix enable tailoring of the mechanical properties. Such actuators are required for flow control in aeronautics and moving machinery such as wind turbines, noise abatement in landing gear and rotary wing aircraft and other applications.

  2. Toroidal current profile control during low confinement mode plasma discharges in DIII-D via first-principles-driven model-based robust control synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Justin E.; Boyer, Mark D.; Shi, Wenyu; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2012-12-01

    In order for ITER to be capable of operating in advanced tokamak operating regimes, characterized by a high fusion gain, good plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and a non-inductively driven plasma current, for extended periods of time, several challenging plasma control problems still need to be solved. Setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile in the tokamak is key for one possible advanced operating scenario characterized by non-inductive sustainment of the plasma current. At the DIII-D tokamak, the goal is to create the desired current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the plasma discharge and then actively maintain this target profile for the remainder of the discharge. The evolution in time of the toroidal current profile in tokamaks is related to the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux profile, which is modelled in normalized cylindrical coordinates using a first-principles, nonlinear, dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) referred to as the magnetic diffusion equation. The magnetic diffusion equation is combined with empirical correlations developed from physical observations and experimental data from DIII-D for the electron temperature, the plasma resistivity and the non-inductive current drive to develop a simplified, control-oriented, nonlinear, dynamic PDE model of the poloidal flux profile evolution valid for low confinement mode discharges. In this work, we synthesize a robust feedback controller to reject disturbances and track a desired reference trajectory of the poloidal magnetic flux gradient profile by employing the control-oriented model of the system. A singular value decomposition of the static gain matrix of the plant model is utilized to identify the most relevant control channels and is combined with the dynamic response of system around a given operating trajectory to design the feedback controller. A general framework for real-time feedforward + feedback control of magnetic and kinetic plasma profiles was implemented in the DIII-D Plasma Control System and was used to demonstrate the ability of the feedback controller to control the toroidal current profile evolution in the DIII-D tokamak. These experiments constitute the first time ever a first-principles-driven, model-based, closed-loop magnetic profile controller was successfully implemented and tested in a tokamak device.

  3. Soft linear electroactive polymer actuators based on polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziz, Ali; Khaldi, Alexandre; Persson, Nils-Krister; Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing demand for human-friendly robots that can interact and work closely with humans. Such robots need to be compliant, lightweight and equipped with silent and soft actuators. Electroactive polymers such as conducting polymers (CPs) are "smart" materials that deform in response to electrical simulation and are often addressed as artificial muscles due to their functional similarity with natural muscles. They offer unique possibilities and are perfect candidates for such actuators since they are lightweight, silent, and driven at low voltages. Most CP actuators are fabricated using electrochemical oxidative synthesis. We have developed new CP based fibres employing both vapour phase and liquid phase electrochemical synthesis. We will present the fabrication and characterisation of these fibres as well as their performance as linear actuators.

  4. Transfer Function Identification of an Electro-Rheological Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookfield, D. J.; Dlodlo, Z. B.

    A fluid clutch utilising an Electro-Rheological (ER) suspension provides a controlled torque coupling between input and output through the control of the applied electric field. If the input is driven at constant speed the device can be considered as an ER torque actuator and thus be used to drive robot links or other mechanisms requiring precise positioning. Such an ER torque actuator can replace a DC servo-motor in robotic applications with the benefits of low time constant and smooth output torque unaffected by cogging (i.e. variation in torque of a DC motor as the magnetic reluctance of the armature-stator path changes with rotation). Although the ER actuator has many benefits, it suffers from a non-linear and time varying relationship between input voltage and output torque. These undesirable characteristics can be mitigated by providing a local closed loop controller around the system. The design of such a controller requires a knowledge of the relationship between the applied voltage and output torque; i.e. the transfer function of the actuator. This transfer function has been determined by observing the response of an ER torque actuator in the frequency domain. It is shown that a linear transfer function model reasonable represents the actuator behaviour, that the actuator is a stable second order system and that the time constant of the clutch studied is sufficiently short to hold considerable promise for robotic applications. Furthermore, the maximum torque capability is shown to be sufficient for many medium scale industrial robots.

  5. Tough Nanocomposite Ionogel-based Actuator Exhibits Robust Performance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinhua; He, Bin; Wang, Zhipeng; Tang, Haifeng; Su, Teng; Wang, Qigang

    2014-01-01

    Ionogel electrolytes can be fabricated for electrochemical actuators with many desirable advantages, including direct low-voltage control in air, high electrochemical and thermal stability, and complete silence during actuation. However, the demands for active actuators with above features and load-driving ability remain a challenge; much work is necessary to enhance the mechanical strength of electrolyte materials. Herein, we describe a cross-linked supramolecular approach to prepare tough nanocomposite gel electrolytes from HEMA, BMIMBF4, and TiO2 via self-initiated UV polymerization. The tough and stable ionogels are emerging to fabricate electric double-layer capacitor-like soft actuators, which can be driven by electrically induced ion migration. The ionogel-based actuator shows a displacement response of 5.6?mm to the driving voltage of 3.5?V. After adding the additional mass weight of the same as the actuator, it still shows a large displacement response of 3.9?mm. Furthermore, the actuator can not only work in harsh temperature environments (100°C and ?10°C) but also realize the goal of grabbing an object by adjusting the applied voltage. PMID:25327414

  6. Robot Arm with Tendon Connector Plate and Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor); Millerman, Alexander (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven end effector, a linear actuator, a flexible tendon, and a plate assembly. The linear actuator assembly has a servo motor and a drive mechanism, the latter of which translates linearly with respect to a drive axis of the servo motor in response to output torque from the servo motor. The tendon connects to the end effector and drive mechanism. The plate assembly is disposed between the linear actuator assembly and the tendon-driven end effector and includes first and second plates. The first plate has a first side that defines a boss with a center opening. The second plate defines an accurate through-slot having tendon guide channels. The first plate defines a through passage for the tendon between the center opening and a second side of the first plate. A looped end of the flexible tendon is received within the tendon guide channels.

  7. Electric field and plasma density measurements in the strongly driven daytime equatorial electrojet. I - The unstable layer and gradient drift waves. II - Two-stream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Kelley, M. C.; Kudeki, E.; Fejer, B. G.; Baker, K. D.

    1987-01-01

    The results of electric field and plasma density measurements in the strongly driven daytime equatorial electrojet over Peru, made during the March 1983 Condor electrojet experiment from Punta Lobos, Peru, are discussed together with the rocket instrumentation used for the measurements and the pertinent payload dynamics. The overall characteristics of the irregularity layer observed in situ in the electrojet are described. Special consideration is given to the waves generated by the gradient drift instability (observed between 90 and 106.5 km) and to primary and secondary two-stream waves detected by the two probes on the topside between 103 and 111 km, where the electron current was considered to be strongest.

  8. Single-pulse driven, large-aperture 2×1 array plasma-electrodes optical switch for SG-II upgrading facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Dengsheng; Zheng, Jiangang; Zheng, Kuixing; Zhu, Qihua; Zhang, Xiongjun

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the design and performance of an optical switch that has been constructed for the SG-II upgrading facility. The device is a longitudinal, potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP), 360 mm×360 mm aperture, and 2×1 array electro-optical switch driven by a 20 kV output switching-voltage pulse generator through two plasma electrodes produced at the rise edge of the switching-voltage pulse. The results show that the temporal responses and the spatial performance of the optical switch fulfill the operation requirements of the SG-II upgrading facility.

  9. Evaluation of piezoelectric actuator-embedded composites using an absolute fiber optic strain gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, Richard O.; Bhatia, Vikram; Murphy, Kent A.; Tran, Tuan A.; Greene, Jonathan A.; DiNuccio, Jacqueline

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the use of embedded extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensors for the evaluation of composite materials containing arrays of piezoelectric actuator elements. The EFPI sensors are used in both differential and absolute measurement configurations. The extended 2D array of many small rod actuators is electrically driven through a pair of conductive electrode plates placed on top of and below the laminate. By applying an electrical potential difference between the plates, the actuator elements may be made to elongate axially. Two-dimensional spatial control of the resulting actuation function may be achieved by the interconnection of multiple conducting electrode addressing elements across the laminate.

  10. Parallel Coupled Micro-Macro Actuators

    E-print Network

    Morrell, John Bryant

    1996-01-01

    This thesis presents a new actuator system consisting of a micro-actuator and a macro-actuator coupled in parallel via a compliant transmission. The system is called the Parallel Coupled Micro-Macro Actuator, or PaCMMA. ...

  11. Sticky Actuator: Free-Form Planar Actuators for Animated Objects

    E-print Network

    Niiyama, Ryuma

    We propose soft planar actuators enhanced by free-form fabrication that are suitable for making everyday objects move. The actuator consists of one or more inflatable pouches with an adhesive back. We have developed a ...

  12. The actuated Workbench : 2D actuation in tabletop tangible interfaces

    E-print Network

    Pangaro, Gian Antonio, 1976-

    2003-01-01

    The Actuated Workbench is a new actuation mechanism that uses magnetic forces to control the two-dimensional movement of physical objects on flat surfaces. This mechanism is intended for use with existing tabletop Tangible ...

  13. Dynamics of energetic particle driven modes and MHD modes in wall-stabilized high-? plasmas on JT-60U and DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, G.; Okabayashi, M.; Aiba, N.; Boedo, J. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Hanson, J. M.; Hao, G. Z.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; In, Y.; Jackson, G. L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Luce, T. C.; McKee, G. R.; Osborne, T. H.; Pace, D. C.; Shinohara, K.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Zeng, L.; the DIII-D Team; the JT-60 Team

    2013-12-01

    In the wall-stabilized high-? plasmas in JT-60U and DIII-D, interactions between energetic particle (EP) driven modes (EPdMs) and edge localized modes (ELMs) have been observed. The interaction between the EPdM and ELM are reproducibly observed. Many EP diagnostics indicate a strong correlation between the distorted waveform of the EPdM and the EP transport to the edge. The waveform distortion is composed of higher harmonics (n ? 2) and looks like a density snake near the plasma edge. According to statistical analyses, ELM triggering by the EPdMs requires a finite level of waveform distortion and pedestal recovery. ELM pacing by the EPdMs occurs when the repetition frequency of the EPdMs is higher than the natural ELM frequency. EPs transported by EPdMs are thought to contribute to change the edge stability.

  14. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator technology over legacy analog sensor technology in both quantitative and qualitative ways. 2. To recognize and address the added difficulty of digital technology qualification, especially in regard to software common cause failure (SCCF), that is introduced by the use of digital actuator technology.

  15. Electro-Active Polymer (EAP) Actuators for Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Leary, S.; Shahinpoor, M.; Harrison, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is seeking to reduce the mass, size, consumed power, and cost of the instrumentation used in its future missions. An important element of many instruments and devices is the actuation mechanism and electroactive polymers (EAP) are offering an effective alternative to current actuators. In this study, two families of EAP materials were investigated, including bending ionomers and longitudinal electrostatically driven elastomers. These materials were demonstrated to effectively actuate manipulation devices and their performance is being enhanced in this on-going study. The recent observations are reported in this paper, include the operation of the bending-EAP at conditions that exceed the harsh environment on Mars, and identify the obstacles that its properties and characteristics are posing to using them as actuators. Analysis of the electrical characteristics of the ionomer EAP showed that it is a current driven material rather than voltage driven and the conductivity distribution on the surface of the material greatly influences the bending performance. An accurate equivalent circuit modeling of the ionomer EAP performance is essential for the design of effective drive electronics. The ionomer main limitations are the fact that it needs to be moist continuously and the process of electrolysis that takes place during activation. An effective coating technique using a sprayed polymer was developed extending its operation in air from a few minutes to about four months. The coating technique effectively forms the equivalent of a skin to protect the moisture content of the ionomer. In parallel to the development of the bending EAP, the development of computer control of actuated longitudinal EAP has been pursued. An EAP driven miniature robotic arm was constructed and it is controlled by a MATLAB code to drop and lift the arm and close and open EAP fingers of a 4-finger gripper. Keywords: Miniature Robotics, Electroactive Polymers, Electroactive Actuators, EAP Materials

  16. Freezing and Melting of 3D Complex Plasma Structures under Microgravity Conditions Driven by Neutral Gas Pressure Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.; Klumov, B. A.; Huber, P.; Thomas, H. M.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Malentschenko, Yu.; Volkov, S.

    2011-05-20

    Freezing and melting of large three-dimensional complex plasmas under microgravity conditions is investigated. The neutral gas pressure is used as a control parameter to trigger the phase changes: Complex plasma freezes (melts) by decreasing (increasing) the pressure. The evolution of complex plasma structural properties upon pressure variation is studied. Theoretical estimates allow us to identify the main factors responsible for the observed behavior.

  17. Torsional Ratcheting Actuating System

    SciTech Connect

    BARNES,STEPHEN MATTHEW; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; BITSIE,FERNANDO

    2000-01-24

    A new type of surface micromachined ratcheting actuation system has been developed at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. The actuator uses a torsional electrostatic comb drive that is coupled to an external ring gear through a ratcheting scheme. The actuator can be operated with a single square wave, has minimal rubbing surfaces, maximizes comb finger density, and can be used for open-loop position control. The prototypes function as intended with a minimum demonstrated operating voltage of 18V. The equations of motion are developed for the torsional electrostatic comb drive. The resonant frequency, voltage vs. displacement and force delivery characteristics are predicted and compared with the fabricated device's performance.

  18. Reconnection-driven Double Layers in the Stratified Plasma of the Solar Transition Region: Supply of Hot Plasma into the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2015-09-01

    A novel mechanism for the supply of hot plasma into the corona from the chromosphere is suggested here; the mechanism involves collisionless magnetic reconnection (CMR) in the transition region (TR) followed by double layer (DL) formation in the enhanced expansion of the chromospheric cold plasma mixed with CMR-heated hot electrons. It is well known that (i) the CMR produces energetic electrons and (ii) DLs naturally form in expanding dense plasmas containing a minor population of hot electrons. We apply these plasma physics facts to the dynamics of stratified plasma in the TR. In the TR where densities fall below ˜1016 m-3, all collisional mean-free paths, electron-ion, ion-neutral, and electron-neutral, become long enough to render plasma collisionless at kinetic scale lengths, making CMR and DL formation possible. The DLs accelerate the chromospheric cold ions to energies comparable to the energy of the hot electrons. When the upflowing energized ions neutralized by the escaping hot electrons thermalize, the resulting hot tenuous plasma supplies an energy flux ˜3 × 105 erg cm-2 s-1 = 3 × 102 J m-2 s-1 into the corona. The CMR-DL mechanism introduces sudden transitions in the TR as microstructures in both density and energy. The global transition in the TR could be a fractal structure containing such microscopic features. If not impossible, it is difficult to measure such microstructures, but it seems that the coronal heating begins in the nearly collisionless TR by CMR and DL formation.

  19. Dielectric Elastomers for Actuation and Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Paul A.

    The first part of this work focuses on free-standing linear soft silicone actuators as this configuration is the most relevant for real applications. A particular soft silicone has been isolated a good candidate and was extensively tested in a free-standing linear actuator configuration to determine the effects of pre-stretch and the application of mechanical loads on its actuation performance. It is shown that when the mechanical loads are properly applied, large linear actuation strains of 120% and work density of 0.5 J/cm3 can be obtained. Furthermore, we demonstrate that when coupled with single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) compliant electrodes, fault-tolerance is introduced via self-clearing leading to significantly improved operational reliability. Driven at moderate electric fields, the actuators display relatively high linear actuation strain (25%) without degradation of the electromechanical performance even after 85,000 cycles. The high performance of the aforementioned soft silicone actuators requires the application of rather large levels of prestrain. In order to eliminate this requirement a novel all-silicone prestrain-locked interpenetrating polymer network (S-IPN) elastomer was developed. The elastomer is fabricated using a combination of two silicones: a soft room temperature vulcanizing silicone that serves as the host elastomer matrix, and a more rigid high temperature vulcanizing silicone that acts to preserve the prestrain in the host network. The free-standing prestrain-locked silicones show a more than twofold performance improvement over standard free-standing silicone films, with a linear strain of 25% and an area strain of 45% when tested in a diaphragm configuration. The S-IPN procedure was leveraged to improve electrode adhesion and stability as well as improve the interlayer adhesion in multilayer actuators. It is demonstrated that strongly bonded SWNT electrodes are capable of fault tolerance through self-clearing, even in multilayer actuators. The fault-tolerance and improved interlayer adhesion was used to fabricate prestrained free-standing silicone actuators capable of stable long life actuation (>30,000 cycles at >20% strain and >500 cycles at ˜40% strain) while driving a load. Issues related to gradual electrode degradation are also addressed through the use of quasi-buckled electrodes. For generator purposes, the primary concerns are ensuring environmental stability, increasing energy density, lowering losses, and determining effective methods to couple the dielectric elastomer to natural energy sources. Using the results of this analysis, two material systems are explored: VHB acrylic elastomers at various prestrains and with various amounts of a stiffening additive, and a high energy density silicone-TiO2 nanocomposite elastomer with various amounts of additive. It is shown that increasing prestrain in the VHB acrylic system increases the energy density, while the stiffening additive has the effect of making the acrylic stiffer but results in increased losses, result in poorer performance. The silicone TiO2 composite demonstrates an increase in permittivity and stiffness with increasing additive while maintaining very high dielectric breakdown strength values. These increases are partially offset by small increases in mechanical and electrical losses. Calculations based on a simple model show that the generator energy density can be improved by a factor of 3 for a 20wt.% TiO2 loading at a strain of 50% in area. The calculated generator energy density values exceed the maximum values measured experimentally for highly prestrained VHB4910 acrylic elastomers. The focus on high energy density materials ignores the fact that not all applications require such a material, and that some applications may, in fact, benefit from the use of a softer material that is less intrusive. However, for lower energy density materials, parasitic losses due to electrode resistance and viscoelasticity play a larger role as relative energy gains are lower. With this is mind, a soft silicone sing

  20. Double-section curvature tunable functional actuator with micromachined buckle and grid wire for electricity delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Hou, Sheng-You

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC)-driven tentacle-like biocompatible flexible actuator with double-section curvature tunability. This actuator, possessing an embedded electrical transmission ability that mimics skeletal muscle nerves in the human body, affords versatile device functions. Novel micromachined copper buckles and grid wires are fabricated and their superiority in electricity delivery and driving the IPMC component with less flexural rigidity is demonstrated. In addition, soft conductive wires realized on a polydimethylsiloxane structure function as electrical signal transmitters. A light-emitting diode integrated with the developed actuator offers directional guiding light ability while the actuator performs a snake-like motion. The electrical conductivity and Young’s modulus of the key actuator components are investigated, and flexural rigidity and dynamic behavior analyses of the actuator under electrical manipulation are elaborated.