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Sample records for plasma assisted measurements

  1. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. This type of pulsed thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Dis- charge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA), shown in Fig. 1, is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta-pinch coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil also serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [1, 2]. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance (specific impulse, thrust efficiency) of the MAD-IPA thruster. Impulse data are obtained at various pulse energies, mass flow rates and inductive coil geometries. Dependencies on these experimental parameters are discussed in the context of the current sheet formation and electromagnetic plasma

  2. Thrust Stand Measurements Using Alternative Propellants in the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    Storable propellants (for example water, ammonia, and hydrazine) are attractive for deep space propulsion due to their naturally high density at ambient interplanetary conditions, which obviates the need for a cryogenic/venting system. Water in particular is attractive due to its ease of handling and availability both terrestrially and extra-terrestrially. While many storable propellants are reactive and corrosive, a propulsion scheme where the propellant is insulated from vulnerable (e.g. metallic) sections of the assembly would be well-suited to process these otherwise incompatible propellants. Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters meet this criterion because they can be operated without direct propellant-electrode interaction. During operation of these devices, electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil creating a time-varying current in the coil that interacts with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, many pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta

  3. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daksha, M.; Berger, B.; Schuengel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Koepke, M.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-06-01

    A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (γ-CAST) in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and particle-based kinetic simulations. In such plasmas (under most conditions in electropositive gases) the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation/ionization rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within each RF period. While one maximum is the consequence of the energy gain of electrons due to sheath expansion, the second maximum is produced by secondary electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the adjacent sheath. Due to these different excitation/ionization mechanisms, the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to the secondary electron emission coefficient γ. This sensitvity, in turn, allows γ to be determined by comparing experimental excitation profiles and simulation data obtained with various γ-coefficients. The diagnostic, tested here in a geometrically symmetric argon discharge, yields an effective secondary electron emission coefficient of γ =0.066+/- 0.01 for stainless steel electrodes.

  4. Modeling of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki

    2012-10-01

    Recently, many experimental study of plasma-assisted combustion has been done. However, numerous complex reactions in combustion of hydrocarbons are preventing from theoritical study for clarifying inside the plasma-assisted combustion, and the effect of plasma-assist is still not understood. Shinohara and Sasaki [1,2] have reported that the shortening of flame length by irradiating microwave without increase of gas temperature. And they also reported that the same phenomena would occur when applying dielectric barrier discharges to the flame using simple hydrocarbon, methane. It is suggested that these phenomena may result by the electron heating. To clarify this phenomena, electron behavior under microwave and DBD was examined. For the first step of DBD plasma-assisted combustion simulation, electron Monte Carlo simulation in methane, oxygen and argon mixture gas(0.05:0.14:0.81) [2] has been done. Electron swarm parameters are sampled and electron energy distribution function (EEDF)s are also determined. In the combustion, gas temperature is higher(>1700K), so reduced electric field E/N becomes relatively high(>10V/cm/Torr). The electrons are accelerated to around 14 eV. This result agree with the optical emission from argon obtained by the experiment of reference [2]. Dissociation frequency of methane and oxygens are obtained in high. This might be one of the effect of plasma-assist. And it is suggested that the electrons should be high enough to dissociate methane, but plasma is not needed.[4pt] [1] K. Shinohara et al, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys., 42, 182008 (1-7) (2009).[0pt] [2] K. Sasaki, 64th Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, 56, 15 CT3.00001(2011).

  5. In-Plasma Photo-Assisted Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre

    2015-09-01

    A methodology to precisely control the ion energy distribution (IED) on a substrate allowed the study of silicon etching as a function of ion energy at near-threshold energies. Surprisingly, a substantial etching rate was observed, independent of ion energy, when the ion energy was below the ion-assisted etching threshold (~ 16 eV for etching silicon with chlorine plasma). Careful experiments led to the conclusion that this ``sub-threshold'' etching was due to photons, predominately at wavelengths <1700 Å. Among the plasmas investigated, photo-assisted etching (PAE) was lowest in Br2/Ar gas mixtures and highest in HBr/Cl2/Ar. Above threshold etching rates scaled with the square root of ion energy. PAE rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM) revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. In-plasma PAE may be be a complicating factor for processes that require low ion energies, such as atomic layer etching. On the other hand PAE could produce sub-10 nm high aspect ratio (6:1) features by highly selective plasma etching to transfer nascent nanopatterns in silicon. Work supported by DOE Plasma Science Center and NSF.

  6. Ion-Assisted Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Daniel; Abraham-Shrauner, Barbara

    1996-11-01

    We analyze plasma etching of two-dimensional, long trenches where directed ions modeled by drifted Maxwellian distribution functions and isotropic neutral molecules contribute to the etch rate. Analytic expressions for the etch rates enable the user to plot the etch profiles by using standard computer packages for nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equations for the point and its slope. First, etch profiles are shown for ion-assisted etching where the thermal etching of the neutrals is enhanced by the ions. Second, we show etch profiles of a multiple layer device where one layer is n-type silicon (arsenic doped) that etches isotropically (G.S. Oehrlein, "Reactive Ion Etching," Handbook of Plasma Processing, Technology, Ed. S.M. Rossnagel, et al., Noyes Pub., NJ, 1990) The etch rates for the other layers are in the ion flux-limited regime. The lateral etching of the n-type silicon illustrates the necessity of sidewall passivation for this structure.

  7. Electrostatic quadrupole plasma mass spectrometer measurements during thin film depositions using simultaneous matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation and magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C. N.; Check, M. H.; Muratore, C.; Voevodin, A. A.

    2010-05-15

    A hybrid plasma deposition process, combining matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of carbon nanopearls (CNPs) with magnetron sputtering of gold was investigated for growth of composite films, where 100 nm sized CNPs were encapsulated into a gold matrix. Composition and morphology of such composite films was characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Carbon deposits on a gold magnetron sputter target and carbon impurities in the gold matrices of deposited films were observed while codepositing from gold and frozen toluene-CNP MAPLE targets in pure argon. Electrostatic quadrupole plasma analysis was used to determine that a likely mechanism for generation of carbon impurities was a reaction between toluene vapor generated from the MAPLE target and the argon plasma originating from the magnetron sputtering process. Carbon impurities of codeposited films were significantly reduced by introducing argon-oxygen mixtures into the deposition chamber; reactive oxygen species such as O and O+ effectively removed carbon contamination of gold matrix during the codeposition processes. Increasing the oxygen to argon ratio decreased the magnetron target sputter rate, and hence hybrid process optimization to prevent gold matrix contamination and maintain a high sputter yield is needed. High resolution TEM with energy dispersive spectrometry elemental mapping was used to study carbon distribution throughout the gold matrix as well as embedded CNP clusters. This research has demonstrated that a hybrid MAPLE and magnetron sputtering codeposition process is a viable means for synthesis of composite thin films from premanufactured nanoscale constituents, and that cross-process contaminations can be overcome with understanding of hybrid plasma process interaction mechanisms.

  8. Measurement of Electron Density and Ion Collision Frequency with Dual Assisted Grounded Electrode DBD in Atmospheric Pressure Helium Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiujiao; Qi, Bing; Huang, Jianjun; Pan, Lizhu; Liu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    The properties of a helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are diagnosed with a dual assisted grounded electrode dielectric barrier discharge device. In the glow discharge, we captured the current waveforms at the positions of the three grounded rings. From the current waveforms, the time delay between the adjacent positions of the rings is employed to calculate the plasma bullet velocity of the helium APPJ. Moreover, the electron density is deduced from a model combining with the time delay and current intensity, which is about 1011 cm‑3. In addition, The ion-neutral particles collision frequency in the radial direction is calculated from the current phase difference between two rings, which is on the order of 107 Hz. The results are helpful for understanding the basic properties of APPJs. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11105093), the Technological Project of Shenzhen, China (No. JC201005280485A), and the Planned S&T Program of Shenzhen, China (No. JC201105170703A)

  9. Laser diagnostics of plasma assisted combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xing

    In this study, a microwave re-entrant cavity discharge system and a direct current (DC) plasmatron are used to investigate flame enhancement and nitric oxide (NO) formation using laser and optical diagnostics. The uniqueness of this study lies in the direct coupling concept, a novel highly efficient strategy used here for the first time. To investigate combustion dynamics of direct microwave coupled combustion, an atmospheric high-Q re-entrant cavity applicator is used to couple microwave (2.45 GHz) electromagnetic energy directly into the reaction zone of a premixed laminar methane-oxygen flame using a compact torch. When microwave energy increases, a transition from electric field enhancement to microwave plasma discharge is observed. At 6 to 10 Watts, ionization and eventually break-down occurs. 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of hydroxyl radicals (OH) and carbon monoxide (CO) is conducted in the reaction zone over this transition, as well as spectrally resolved flame emission measurements. These measurements serve to monitor excited state species and derive rotational temperatures using OH chemiluminescence for a range of equivalence ratios (both rich and lean) and total flow rates. Combustion dynamics is also investigated for plasma enhanced methane-air flames in premixed and nonpremixed configurations using a transient arc DC plasmatron. Results for OH and CO PLIF also indicate the differences in stability mechanism, and energy consumption for premixed and nonpremixed modes. It is shown that both configurations are significantly influenced by in-situ fuel reforming at higher plasma powers. Parametric studies are conducted in a plasma assisted methane/air premixed flame for quantitative NO production using a DC plasmatron with PLIF imaging. Quantitative measurements of NO are reported as a function of gas flow rate (20 to 50 SCFH), plasma power (100 to 900 mA, 150 to 750 W) and equivalence ratio (0.7 to 1.3). NO PLIF images and single point NO

  10. Plasma-assisted microwave processing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin (Inventor); Ylin, Tzu-yuan (Inventor); Jackson, Henry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A microwave plasma assisted method and system for heating and joining materials. The invention uses a microwave induced plasma to controllably preheat workpiece materials that are poorly microwave absorbing. The plasma preheats the workpiece to a temperature that improves the materials' ability to absorb microwave energy. The plasma is extinguished and microwave energy is able to volumetrically heat the workpiece. Localized heating of good microwave absorbing materials is done by shielding certain parts of the workpiece and igniting the plasma in the areas not shielded. Microwave induced plasma is also used to induce self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) process for the joining of materials. Preferably, a microwave induced plasma preheats the material and then microwave energy ignites the center of the material, thereby causing a high temperature spherical wave front from the center outward.

  11. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  12. Application of diamond films to electric propulsion: Low energy sputter yield measurement and MPD plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandino, John Joseph

    One application of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films under evaluation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the coating of ion thruster electrodes subject to sputter erosion from xenon ions. Sputter yields were measured for polycrystalline diamond, single crystal diamond, a carbon-carbon composite, and molybdenum subject to xenon ion bombardment. The tests were performed using a 3 cm Kaufman ion source to produce incident ions with energy in the range of 150--750 eV and a profilometry-based technique to measure the amount of sputtered material. The yields increased monotonically with energy with values ranging from 0.16 atoms/ion at 150 eV to 0.80 at 750 eV for the molybdenum and 0.06 to 0.14 for the carbon-carbon. At 150 eV the yield for both diamond samples was 0.07 and at 7 50 eV, 0.19 and 0.17 for the CVD and single crystal diamond respectively. In terms of erosion rate, this translates into a factor of 7--12 lower erosion rate for diamond compared to molybdenum and at least a factor of 1.5 compared to carbon-carbon. In addition, an experimental investigation of an electromagnetic (magnetoplasmadynamic or MPD) plasma source for diamond CVD was undertaken using gas mixtures of methane, hydrogen and argon. Numerous trials were conducted using methane to hydrogen mixture ratios of 1.5--3.5 percent by volume, four different methane injector configurations, and substrate biasing at potentials of 25--75 V positive with respect to facility ground. These tests were performed at discharge currents of 700--950 A at approximately 18 V (12--17 kW). Crystalline films were produced with growth rates of 0.8 to 6.3 microns/hr. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy was used to identify at least one unambiguous diamond peak in each sample. The films all exhibited poor Raman spectra with no well defined peak at 1332 cm-1 and a broad background possibly due to high background levels of nitrogen, defects, and metal vapor contamination. Finally, the potential benefits of the MPD

  13. Optical Absorption Measurements of Sputtered Ti Ion Density and Discussion of Ionization Mechanisms in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Assisted DC Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okimura, Kunio; Nakamura, Tadashi; Mori, Hisashi

    This study discusses the ionization mechanisms of sputtered titanium (Ti) in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-assisted dc magnetron sputtering based on measurements and model analyses. Ionic and atomic densities of sputtered titanium were measured using an optical absorption method under an Ar pressure of 3.5 Pa against rf(13.56MHz) power applied to the inserted coil. A Langmuir probe provided measurements of electron densities against coil rf power, giving input parameters for model analyses. We adopted a model analysis method presented by J. Hopwood and F. Qian [J. Appl. Phys. 78, 758 (1995)]. Variations of ionic and atomic densities and ionization fractions against electron density from model calculation agreed with those obtained by measurements. The results showed clearly that electron impact ionization dominates ionization of sputtered titanium in high er electron density regions compared to Penning ionization through Ar metastable atoms. Penning ionization played an important role at the lower electron density region because of the longer time for radiative decay of Ar metastable atoms.

  14. Measurements of plasma zinc

    PubMed Central

    Davies, I. J. T.; Musa, M.; Dormandy, T. L.

    1968-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element. Previous methods of measuring zinc in clinical material have been difficult and reported findings must be treated with caution. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy it has been established that plasma zinc is one of the most uniform biochemical characteristics of normal adult blood. Sex and age differences in adult life are insignificant. Increased metabolic activity, on the other hand, induces a marked, immediate fall in plasma zinc level. The possible implications of this are discussed. Zinc levels in patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and anaemia due to acute blood loss have been within normal limits. Plasma zinc is low in certain types of liver disease. PMID:5303355

  15. Plasma Assisted ISRU at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Kuhl, Christopher A.; Templeton, Justin D.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals for Mars and Beyond will require new power systems and in situ resource utilization (ISRU) technologies. Regenerative aerobraking may offer a revolutionary approach for in situ power generation and oxygen harvesting during these exploration missions. In theory, power and oxygen can be collected during aerobraking and stored for later use in orbit or on the planet. This technology would capture energy and oxygen from the plasma field that occurs naturally during hypersonic entry using well understood principles of magnetohydrodynamics and oxygen filtration. This innovative approach generates resources upon arrival at the operational site, and thus greatly differs from the traditional approach of taking everything you need with you from Earth. Fundamental analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and some testing of experimental hardware have established the basic feasibility of generating power during a Mars entry. Oxygen filtration at conditions consistent with spacecraft entry parameters at Mars has been studied to a lesser extent. Other uses of the MHD power are presented. This paper illustrates how some features of regenerative aerobraking may be applied to support human and robotic missions at Mars.

  16. Plasma assisted deposition of metal fluorides for 193nm applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Martin; Sode, Maik; Gaebler, Dieter; Kaiser, Norbert; Tuennermann, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    The ArF lithography technology requires a minimization of optical losses due to scattering and absorption. Consequently it is necessary to optimize the coating process of metal fluorides. The properties of metal fluoride thin films are mainly affected by the deposition methods, their parameters, and the vacuum conditions. Until now the best results were achieved by metal boat evaporation with high substrate temperature and without plasma assistance. In fact, it was demonstrated that the plasma assisted deposition process results in optical thin films with high packing density but the losses due to absorption were extremely high for deep and vacuum ultraviolet applications. This paper will demonstrate that most of the common metal fluorides can be deposited by electron beam evaporation with plasma assistance. In comparison to other deposition methods, the prepared thin films show low absorption in the VUV spectral range, high packing density, and less water content. The densification of the thin films was performed by a Leybold LION plasma source. As working gas, a variable mixture of fluorine and argon gas was chosen. To understand the deposition process and the interaction of the plasma with the deposition material, various characterization methods like plasma emission spectroscopy and ion current measurements were implemented.

  17. Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E2H phonon modes of InxAl1-xN nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; Mishra, Pawan; Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Prabaswara, Aditya; Yang, Yang; Albadri, Abdulrahman M.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-07-01

    The dislocation free InxAl1-xN nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si(111) by nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy in the temperature regime of 490 °C-610 °C yielding In composition ranges over 0.50 ≤ x ≤ 0.17. We study the optical properties of these NWs by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopies since they possesses minimal strain with reduced defects comparative to the planar films. The optical bandgap measurements of InxAl1-xN NWs are demonstrated by SE where the absorption edges of the NW samples are evaluated irrespective of substrate transparency. A systematic Stoke shift of 0.04-0.27 eV with increasing x was observed when comparing the micro-photoluminescence spectra with the Tauc plot derived from SE. The micro-Raman spectra in the NWs with x = 0.5 showed two-mode behavior for A1(LO) phonons and single mode behavior for E2H phonons. As for x = 0.17, i.e., high Al content, we observed a peculiar E2H phonon mode splitting. Further, we observe composition dependent frequency shifts. The 77 to 600 K micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements show that both AlN- and InN-like modes of A1(LO) and E2H phonons in InxAl1-xN NWs are redshifted with increasing temperature, similar to that of the binary III group nitride semiconductors. These studies of the optical properties of the technologically important InxAl1-xN nanowires will path the way towards lasers and light-emitting diodes in the wavelength of the ultra-violet and visible range.

  18. Plasma-assisted cleaning by electrostatics (PACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, W. M.; Neumann, M. J.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2006-03-01

    As feature sizes shrink, particle contamination on EUV masks used in the fabrication process of semiconductor chips is an increasingly difficult problem that leads to lower wafer throughput and higher costs of chip production. Current practices to remove particulates off of masks include using a sulfuric acid bath, ultrasonic cleansing, and rinsing in de-ionized water. However, nanometer-scale etching occurs through this cleaning process in addition to the presence of residual contamination due to the chemicals used, which leads to feature devolution. Currently, pellicles are used to protect the reticle with the pellicle being transparent to 193 nm light; however with current EUV technology being developed for 13.5 nm light, the pellicle is no longer transparent at this wavelength and thus cannot be used. Other mask-cleaning processes such as laser-induce plasma cleaning (LIP) run the risk of substrate damage due to potentially destructive methods. Plasma-assisted electrostatic cleaning involves using a potential drop in a plasma sheath electric field and charge imbalance between the particle and the substrate to propel the nanoparticles off the surface. Through applying a positive bias to the substrate and using a weak local plasma to charge the particles, the contamination is removed from the surface. As the particle size decreases the amount of time to charge the particle is longer thus leading to a longer removal period. However, as long as the particle is in the plasma sheath region, there is no theoretical limit on the size of the particle removed.

  19. Comparision of Emissive Probe assisted Measurements of Plasma Density to that of a Surface Wave Probe, in a Dual Frequency Confined Capacitively Coupled Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnane, S.; Ellingboe, A. R.

    2003-10-01

    Dual frequency confined capacitively coupled plasmas are increasingly used in semiconductor manufacturing for dielectric etching, allowing greater (and independent) control of ion energies and ion flux on the etched substrate. One electrode is driven with the summation of 27MHz and 2MHz sinusoidal voltages, while the other electrode is grounded. The electrode areas are similar in size, giving an electrode aspect ratio less than 2. Because of this low aspect ratio, there are large oscillations in the plasma potential. The expectation is for sinusoidal oscillations at the higher driving frequency, due to capacitive sheaths, while a rectified oscillation is expected at the lower driving frequency [1]. The emissive probe and circuitry allows measurement of plasma potential oscillations at both driving frequencies and their harmonics, thus allowing measurement of the actual time-varying and time-independant plasma potential. Ion saturation current is measured with a single Langmuir probe. Tuned RF filters isolated the probe tip from the external voltage supply (which otherwise acts as a high frequency ground). To further enable the Langmuir probe to follow the plasma potential oscillations, the tip is capacitively coupled to the emissive probe. These results will then be compared with a simple surface wave probe technique [2], which uses the resonant absorption of surface waves by the plasma, to determine plasma density. [1] E. Kawamura, V. Vahedi, M. A. Lieberman and C. K. Birdsall, Plasma Sources Sci. Technology. 8 (1999) R45-R64 [2] Conference proceedings, Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics V, 2003 pg 30. "Novel Plasma Monitoring by Surface Wave Probe" H.Sugai and K. Nakamura

  20. Plasma assisted synthesis of vanadium pentoxide nanoplates

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar Kumar; Kumar, Prabhat Reddy, G. B.

    2015-08-28

    In this work, we report the growth of α-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (orthorhombic) nanoplates on glass substrate using plasma assisted sublimation process (PASP) and Nickel as catalyst. 100 nm thick film of Ni is deposited over glass substrate by thermal evaporation process. Vanadium oxide nanoplates have been deposited treating vanadium metal foil under high vacuum conditions with oxygen plasma. Vanadium foil is kept at fixed temperature growth of nanoplates of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} to take place. Samples grown have been studied using XPS, XRD and HRTEM to confirm the growth of α-phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which revealed pure single crystal of α- V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in orthorhombic crystallographic plane. Surface morphological studies using SEM and TEM show nanostructured thin film in form of plates. Uniform, vertically aligned randomly oriented nanoplates of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been deposited.

  1. Plasma Assisted Decontamination of Bacterial Spores

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Spencer P

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy and mechanism of killing bacterial spores by a plasma torch is studied. Bacterial-spore (Bacillus cereus) suspension is inoculated onto glass/paper slide-coupons and desiccated into dry samples, and inoculated into well-microplate as wet sample. The exposure distance of all samples is 4 cm from the nozzle of the torch. In the experiment, paper slide-coupon is inserted inside an envelope. The kill times on spores in three types of samples are measured to be about 3, 9, and 24 seconds. The changes in the morphology and shape of still viable spores in treated wet samples are recorded by scanning electron and atomic force microscopes. The loss of appendages and exosporium in the structure and squashed/flattened cell shape are observed. The emission spectroscopy of the torch indicates that the plasma effluent carries abundant reactive atomic oxygen, which is responsible for the destruction of spores. PMID:19662115

  2. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrle, A.; Schnick, M.; Rose, S.; Demuth, C.; Beyer, E.; Füssel, U.

    2011-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  3. Assessment of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for the measurement of lead isotope ratios in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costas-Rodríguez, M.; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was evaluated as a sample preparation procedure for lead isotope ratio measurements in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 20 mg of marine biological tissue and 1 mL of acid extractant were sonicated for 3 min at 60% ultrasound amplitude. Matrix separation was performed in the supernatant using a chromatographic exchange resin (Sr-Spec™). Total elimination of organic matter was achieved during the separation step. Microwave-assisted digestion and dry-ashing were used for comparative purposes. No significant differences were found in lead isotope ratios at 95% of confidence level. UAE emerges as an advantageous alternative to classical methods for sample preparation owing to its simplicity and rapidity ( i.e. operation steps were reduced), low reagent consumption and low contamination risks.

  4. COLD-PLASMA ASSISTED GRAFTING OF PAPER

    SciTech Connect

    Gaiolas, C.; Costa, A. P.; Nunes, M.; Silva, M. J. Santos; Belgacem, M. N.

    2008-08-28

    The treatment of cellulose with cold-plasma in the presence of two silanes (vinyltrimethoxysilane and {gamma}-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane) was found to be efficient in grafting of cellulose macromolecules. The occurrence of the grafting was proved by contact angle measurement, ESCA and SEM. Thus, after solvent extraction of the modified substrates, in order to remove unbounded grafts, the polar component of the surface energy of treated samples decreased from 23 mJ/m{sup 2} to practically zero. The ESCA spectra showed the appearance of two new peaks at 102 and 150 eV, relative to the presence of Si atoms and a substantial increase in C1 signal, attributed to the enrichment of the surface by C-H moieties borne by the silanes.

  5. OH(A,X) radicals in microwave plasma-assisted combustion of methane/air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Fuh, Che; Wang, Chuji; Laser Spectroscopy and Plasma Team

    2014-10-01

    A novel microwave plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) system, which consists of a microwave plasma-assisted combustor, a gas flow control manifold, and a set of optical diagnostic systems, was developed as a new test platform to study plasma enhancement of combustion. Using this system, we studied the state-resolved OH(A,X) radicals in the plasma-assisted combustion and ignition of a methane/air mixture. Experimental results identified three reaction zones in the plasma-assisted combustor: the plasma zone, the hybrid plasma-flame zone, and the flame zone. The OH(A) radicals in the three distinct zones were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Results showed a surge of OH(A) radicals in the hybrid zone compared to the plasma zone and the flame zone. The OH(X) radicals in the flame zone were measured using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), and the absolute number density distribution of OH(X) was quantified in two-dimension. The effect of microwave argon plasma on combustion was studied with two different fuel/oxidizer injection patterns, namely the premixed methane/air injection and the nonpremixed (separate) methane/air injection. Parameters investigated included the flame geometry, the lean flammability limit, the emission spectra, and rotational temperature. State-resolved OH(A,X) radicals in the PAC of both injection patterns were also compared. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation through the Grant No. CBET-1066486.

  6. Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, San Hua; Luo, Zhiqiang; Shen, Zexiang; Lin, Jianyi

    2010-09-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma.

  7. Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lim, San Hua; Luo, Zhiqiang; Shen, Zexiang; Lin, Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma. PMID:20802785

  8. Plasma-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) in the production and modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be reviewed. The challenges of PECVD methods to grow CNTs include low temperature synthesis, ion bombardment effects and directional growth of CNT within the plasma sheath. New strategies have been developed for low temperature synthesis of single-walled CNTs based the understanding of plasma chemistry and modelling. The modification of CNT surface properties and synthesis of CNT hybrid materials are possible with the utilization of plasma. PMID:20802785

  9. Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, Toshiki; Hidaka, Hiroki; Muguruma, Hitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is presented. A system with a re-entrant microwave cavity realizes simple matching, stable plasma, and free space under the orifice of plasma steam. Hexamethyldisiloxane is employed as a monomer, while argon is used as a carrier gas. The effective area of the hydrophobic coating film used corresponds to a circle of 20 mm diameter and the deposition rate considered is 5 nm/min. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy shows that the coating film has a large molecular weight (>200 kDa), suggesting that a high-crosslinking and three-dimensional polymer matrix is formed and microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is fulfilled.

  10. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  11. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2002-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  12. Environment-Assisted Precision Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, G.; Maze, J. R.; Lukin, M. D.; Cappellaro, P.; Hodges, J. S.; Jiang, L.; Soerensen, A. S.

    2011-04-08

    We describe a method to enhance the sensitivity of precision measurements that takes advantage of the environment of a quantum sensor to amplify the response of the sensor to weak external perturbations. An individual qubit is used to sense the dynamics of surrounding ancillary qubits, which are in turn affected by the external field to be measured. The resulting sensitivity enhancement is determined by the number of ancillas that are coupled strongly to the sensor qubit; it does not depend on the exact values of the coupling strengths and is resilient to many forms of decoherence. The method achieves nearly Heisenberg-limited precision measurement, using a novel class of entangled states. We discuss specific applications to improve clock sensitivity using trapped ions and magnetic sensing based on electronic spins in diamond.

  13. Environment-assisted precision measurement.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, G; Cappellaro, P; Maze, J R; Hodges, J S; Jiang, L; Sørensen, A S; Lukin, M D

    2011-04-01

    We describe a method to enhance the sensitivity of precision measurements that takes advantage of the environment of a quantum sensor to amplify the response of the sensor to weak external perturbations. An individual qubit is used to sense the dynamics of surrounding ancillary qubits, which are in turn affected by the external field to be measured. The resulting sensitivity enhancement is determined by the number of ancillas that are coupled strongly to the sensor qubit; it does not depend on the exact values of the coupling strengths and is resilient to many forms of decoherence. The method achieves nearly Heisenberg-limited precision measurement, using a novel class of entangled states. We discuss specific applications to improve clock sensitivity using trapped ions and magnetic sensing based on electronic spins in diamond. PMID:21561175

  14. Performance Measures for Student Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathman, Jane McGurn; Kathman, Michael D.

    1992-01-01

    Argues that performance measures for student employees in academic libraries should set expectations for their performance and become management tools to motivate, evaluate, and reward them. Management literature on full-time employees is modified to fit students' needs, i.e., that they are part-time and not necessarily motivated by the work…

  15. Characterization of a Laser-Assisted Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Masatoshi; Igari, Akira; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kimura, Itsuro

    2004-03-01

    An assessment of a novel laser-electric hybrid propulsion system was conducted, in which a laser-induced plasma was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a target and accelerated by electrical means instead of the direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. A fundamental study of newly developed rectangular laser-assisted pulsed-plasma thruster (PPT) was conducted. Inducing a short-duration conductive plasma between electrodes with certain voltages, short-duration switching or a discharge was achieved. At low-voltage conditions (~ 100 V), applied to electrodes or charged to a capacitor, it was confirmed that electric discharge can be achieved even under low voltage conditions. From the results, it was found that discharge duration at the low-voltage case was as long as that of laser-induced plasma. Therefore, the discharge in the low-voltage case must be controlled with an incident laser pulse, or a laser-induced plasma. While in high-voltage cases (~ 2000 V), the discharge duration was much longer than that of laser-induced plasma. In this case, the laser-induced plasma should be leading main discharge from a capacitor, where some amount of neutral components of vaporized propellant must be ionized through the discharge. Considering ratios of the laser energy to the discharge energies, the discharge process in the high-voltage mode cases must be defined as the laser-assisted electric discharge, or the laser-assisted electric propulsion mode, while in the low-voltage mode case with smaller electric energy, as the electrically-assisted laser-induced process, or the electric-assisted laser propulsion mode. Moreover, plasma behaviors emitted from each thruster in various cases were observed with the ICCD camera. It was shown that the plasma behaviors were almost identical between low and high voltage cases in initial several hundred nanoseconds, however, plasma emission with longer duration was observed in higher voltage cases. Canted current sheet

  16. Plasma Anemometer Measurements and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Curtis; Matlis, Eric; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2013-11-01

    Velocity measurements using a constant-current plasma anemometer were performed in a Mach 0.4 jet in order to further optimize the anemometer design. The plasma anemometer uses an AC glow discharge (plasma) formed in the air gap between two protruding low profile electrodes as the flow sensing element. The output from the anemometer is an amplitude modulated version of the AC voltage input that contains information about the mean fluctuating velocity components. Experiments were performed to investigate the effect of the electrode gap, AC current, and AC frequency on the mean and fluctuating velocity sensitivity and repeatability of the sensor. This involved mean velocity calibrations from 0 to 140 m/s and mean and fluctuating velocity profiles through the shear layer of the jet. Measurements with a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer were used for reference. The results showed an improvement in performance with increasing AC frequency that was attributed a more stable glow discharge. The agreement with the hot-wire were good, with the advantage of the plasma anemometer being its 100-times higher frequency response. Supported by Air Force SBIR Phase II FA8650-11-C-2199.

  17. Atmospheric pressure plasma assisted calcination of composite submicron fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvecká, Veronika; Kováčik, Dušan; Tučeková, Zlata; Zahoranová, Anna; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The plasma assisted calcination of composite organic/inorganic submicron fibers for the preparation of inorganic fibers in submicron scale was studied. Aluminium butoxide/polyvinylpyrrolidone fibers prepared by electrospinning were treated using low-temperature plasma generated by special type of dielectric barrier discharge, so called diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) at atmospheric pressure in ambient air, synthetic air, oxygen and nitrogen. Effect of plasma treatment on base polymer removal was investigated by using Attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Influence of working gas on the base polymer reduction was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and CHNS elemental analysis. Changes in fibers morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High efficiency of organic template removal without any degradation of fibers was observed after plasma treatment in ambient air. Due to the low-temperature approach and short exposure time, the plasma assisted calcination is a promising alternative to the conventional thermal calcination. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  18. Plasma"anti-assistance" and"self-assistance" to high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2009-01-30

    A plasma assistance system was investigated with the goal to operate high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at lower pressure than usual, thereby to enhance the utilization of the ballistic atoms and ions with high kinetic energy in the film growth process. Gas plasma flow from a constricted plasma source was aimed at the magnetron target. Contrary to initial expectations, such plasma assistance turned out to be contra-productive because it led to the extinction of the magnetron discharge. The effect can be explained by gas rarefaction. A better method of reducing the necessary gas pressure is operation at relatively high pulse repetition rates where the afterglow plasma of one pulse assists in the development of the next pulse. Here we show that this method, known from medium-frequency (MF) pulsed sputtering, is also very important at the much lower pulse repetition rates of HiPIMS. A minimum in the possible operational pressure is found in the frequency region between HiPIMS and MF pulsed sputtering.

  19. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Based Chemically Assisted Plasma Etching Of Silicon in CF4/Ar Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, R. K.; Angra, S. K.; Bajpai, R. P.; Lal, Madan; Bharadwaj, Lalit M.

    2005-09-01

    Etching of silicon in Chemical Assisted Plasma Etching mode with CF4 gas being sprayed on the surface of wafer in process chamber and Ar fed to ECR cavity in Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) source was carried out. The plasma source was 2.45 GHz microwave source superimposed with mirror type magnetic field configuration to have resonance. Effect of CF4/Ar ratio and substrate bias on etching rate of silicon and anisotropy of etched profile has been investigated. The variation of etch rate and anisotropy has been correlated to the availability of fluorine atoms and other radicals available for etching. Optimum parameters required for etching of silicon in chemical assisted plasma etching with self-assembled ECR plasma source has been established.

  20. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Based Chemically Assisted Plasma Etching Of Silicon in CF4/Ar Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, R.K.; Angra, S.K.; Bajpai, R.P.; Lal, Madan; Bharadwaj, Lalit M.

    2005-09-09

    Etching of silicon in Chemical Assisted Plasma Etching mode with CF4 gas being sprayed on the surface of wafer in process chamber and Ar fed to ECR cavity in Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) source was carried out. The plasma source was 2.45 GHz microwave source superimposed with mirror type magnetic field configuration to have resonance. Effect of CF4/Ar ratio and substrate bias on etching rate of silicon and anisotropy of etched profile has been investigated. The variation of etch rate and anisotropy has been correlated to the availability of fluorine atoms and other radicals available for etching. Optimum parameters required for etching of silicon in chemical assisted plasma etching with self-assembled ECR plasma source has been established.

  1. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  2. Commercialization of Plasma-Assisted Technologies: The Indian Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, P. I.

    The paper describes an initiative by the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India in establishing links with the Indian industry for developing and commercialising advanced plasma-based industrial technologies. This has culminated in the creation of a self-financing technology development, incubation, demonstration and delivery facility. A business plan for converting the knowledge base to commercially viable technologies conceived technology as a product and the industry as the market and addressed issues like resistance to new technologies, the key role of entrepreneur, thrust areas and the necessity of technology incubation and delivery. Success of this strategy is discussed in a few case studies. We conclude by identifying the cost, environmental, strategic and techno-economic aspects, which would be the prime drivers for plasma-assisted manufacturing technology in India.

  3. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes - An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1987-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation. These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  4. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  5. Ion composition measurement techniques for space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, George

    1990-01-01

    Plasmas found in space range from the solar wind with a typical temperature of 100,000-1,000,000 K, about 400 km/s bulk flow speed, and high ionization (charge states) of ions, to the hot, slowly moving plasmas in the outer magnetospheres of the giant planets, to the cold, corotating plasmas in inner magnetospheres. Space plasma instruments and techniques are reviewed, with an emphasis on hot plasma composition measurements. Starting with Faraday Cup detectors some 30 years ago, plasma instruments have evolved to the present time-of-flight systems with excellent mass resolution and three-dimensional viewing capabilities.

  6. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  7. Plasma-assisted ignition and deflagration-to-detonation transition.

    PubMed

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nickolay; Rakitin, Aleksandr

    2012-02-13

    Non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and to become an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation gas turbine engines, piston engines, RAMjets, SCRAMjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. The analysis of discharge processes shows that the discharge energy can be deposited into the desired internal degrees of freedom of molecules when varying the reduced electric field, E/n, at which the discharge is maintained. The amount of deposited energy is controlled by other discharge and gas parameters, including electric pulse duration, discharge current, gas number density, gas temperature, etc. As a rule, the dominant mechanism of the effect of non-equilibrium plasma on ignition and combustion is associated with the generation of active particles in the discharge plasma. For plasma-assisted ignition and combustion in mixtures containing air, the most promising active species are O atoms and, to a smaller extent, some other neutral atoms and radicals. These active particles are efficiently produced in high-voltage, nanosecond, pulse discharges owing to electron-impact dissociation of molecules and electron-impact excitation of N(2) electronic states, followed by collisional quenching of these states to dissociate the molecules. Mechanisms of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) initiation by non-equilibrium plasma were analysed. For longitudinal discharges with a high power density in a plasma channel, two fast DDT mechanisms have been observed. When initiated by a spark or a transient discharge, the mixture ignited simultaneously over the volume of the discharge channel, producing a shock wave with a Mach number greater than 2 and a flame. A gradient mechanism of DDT similar to that proposed by Zeldovich has been observed experimentally under streamer initiation. PMID:22213667

  8. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  9. Plasma-Assisted Mist Chemical Vapor Deposition of Zinc Oxide Films for Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-assisted mist chemical vapor deposition of ZnO films was performed for transparent conductive oxide formation of flexible electronics. In this study, ZnO films deposition using atmospheric-pressure He plasma generated by a micro-hollow cathode-type plasma source has been demonstrated. To obtain detail information according to generation of species in the plasma, the optical emission spectra of the atmospheric pressure He plasma with and without mist were measured. The result without mist shows considerable emissions of He lines, emissions attributed to the excitation and dissociation of air including N2 and O2 (N, O, and NO radials, and N2 molecule; N2 second positive band and first positive band), while the results with mist showed strong emissions attributed to the dissociation of H2O (OH and H radicals). The deposition of ZnO films was performed using atmospheric-pressure He plasma. The XRD patterns showed no crystallization of the ZnO films irradiated with pure He. On the other hand, the ZnO film crystallized with the irradiation with He/O2 mixture plasma. These results indicate that the atmospheric-pressure He/O2 mixture plasma has sufficient reactivity necessary for the crystallization of ZnO films at room temperature. This work was supported partly by The Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (KAKENHI) (Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research(C)) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

  10. Dyslipidemia causes overestimation of plasma mitotane measurements

    PubMed Central

    Paci, Angelo; Hescot, Ségolène; Seck, Atmane; Jublanc, Christel; Mercier, Lionel; Vezzosi, Delphine; Drui, Delphine; Quinkler, Marcus; Fassnacht, Martin; Bruckert, Eric; Lombès, Marc; Leboulleux, Sophie; Broutin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mitotane (o,p′-DDD) is the standard treatment for advanced adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Monitoring of plasma mitotane levels is recommended to look for a therapeutic window between 14 and 20mg/L, but its positive predictive value requires optimization. We report the case of an ACC patient with a history of dyslipidemia treated with mitotane in whom several plasma mitotane levels >30mg/L were found together with an excellent neurological tolerance. This observation led us to compare theoretical or measured o,p′-DDD and o,p′-DDE levels in a series of normolipidemic and dyslipidemic plasma samples to explore potential analytical issues responsible for an overestimation of plasma mitotane levels. We demonstrate an overestimation of mitotane measurements in dyslipidemic patients. Mitotane and o,p′-DDE measurements showed a mean 20% overestimation in hypercholesterolemic and hypertriglyceridemic plasma, compared with normolipidemic plasma. The internal standard p,p′-DDE measurements showed a parallel decrease in hypercholesterolemic and hypertriglyceridemic plasma, suggesting a matrix effect. Finally, diluting plasma samples and/or using phospholipid removal cartridges allowed correcting such interference. Learning points Hypercholesterolemia (HCH) and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) induce an overestimation of plasma mitotane measurements. We propose a routine monitoring of lipidemic status. We propose optimized methodology of measurement before interpreting high plasma mitotane levels. PMID:27298727

  11. Photo-assisted etching of silicon in chlorine- and bromine-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weiye; Sridhar, Shyam; Liu, Lei; Hernandez, Eduardo; Donnelly, Vincent M. Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-05-28

    Cl{sub 2}, Br{sub 2}, HBr, Br{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2}, and HBr/Cl{sub 2} feed gases diluted in Ar (50%–50% by volume) were used to study etching of p-type Si(100) in a rf inductively coupled, Faraday-shielded plasma, with a focus on the photo-assisted etching component. Etching rates were measured as a function of ion energy. Etching at ion energies below the threshold for ion-assisted etching was observed in all cases, with Br{sub 2}/Ar and HBr/Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas having the lowest and highest sub-threshold etching rates, respectively. Sub-threshold etching rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Etching rates measured under MgF{sub 2}, quartz, and opaque windows showed that sub-threshold etching is due to photon-stimulated processes on the surface, with vacuum ultraviolet photons being much more effective than longer wavelengths. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. Photo-assisted etching in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas resulted in the formation of 4-sided pyramidal features with bases that formed an angle of 45° with respect to 〈110〉 cleavage planes, suggesting that photo-assisted etching can be sensitive to crystal orientation.

  12. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  13. Hollow ballistic pendulum for plasma momentum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, S.F.; Pashinin, P.P.; Perov, V.Y.; Serov, R.V.; Yanovsky, V.P.

    1988-05-01

    A novel pendulum design: hollow ballistic pendulum: is suggested for plasma momentum measurements. It has an advantage over the pendula used earlier in laser plasma experiments of being insensitive to a momentum of matter evaporated and scattered by the pendulum wall exposed to the plasma, which usually exceeds plasma momentum to be measured. Simple expressions describing pendulum performance are derived, and requirements of shape and size are established. Using this kind of pendulum in experiments on laser acceleration of thin foils made it possible to measure the momentum of accelerated foil with an accuracy of about 10%.

  14. Subsatellite measurements of plasma and energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.; Chase, L. M.; Lin, R. P.; Mccoy, J. E.; Mcguire, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 particles and fields subsatellite is instrumented to measure (1) plasma and energetic-particle fluxes, (2) vector magnetic fields, and (3) velocity of the subsatellite to a high precision for the purpose of determining lunar gravitational anomalies. Results from the magnetic-field and gravitational-field experiments are discussed. The results obtained from the plasma and energetic-particle detectors are discussed briefly. The plasma and energetic-particles experiment describes the various plasma regimes in which the moon moves, and determines how the moon interacts with the plasma and magnetic fields in the environment.

  15. Measurement of electronegativity at different laser wavelengths: accuracy of Langmuir probe assisted laser photo-detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirse, N.; Oudini, N.; Bendib, A.; Ellingboe, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    Langmuir probe (LP) assisted pulsed laser photo-detachment (LPD) of negative ions is one of the frequently used diagnostic techniques in electronegative plasmas. The technique is based on measuring the rise in electron saturation current following photo-detachment. During the photo-detachment process it is assumed that the background electron parameters (temperature and density) remain unchanged in the laser channel and the photo-detached electrons thermalize instantaneously with the background electrons (same temperature). Therefore, the measured electronegativity should be independent of laser wavelengths. However, our recent simulation results (2015 Phys. Plasmas 22 073509) demonstrates a failure of these assumptions and suggests that the measured rise in electron saturation current has a dependence on the laser wavelength. This letter presents experimental evidence in support of these simulation results. In this work, photo-detachment is performed at two different laser wavelengths in an oxygen inductively coupled plasma discharge. Electronegativity measured by LP assisted LPD is compared with those obtained by the hairpin probe (HPP) assisted LPD which is based on quasi-neutrality assumption. The experimental results reveal that the electronegativities measured by LP assisted LPD are affected by the laser wavelength, whereas, electronegativities measured by HPP assisted LPD are almost independent. The discrepancy between the measurements is higher at high electronegativities. In conclusion, the experimental results validate the weakness of assumptions to estimate electronegativity from LPD combined with LP and therefore emphasizes the need of a more realistic model to analyze raw data or an alternate solution is to utilize HPP.

  16. Laser ablation plasma-assisted stabilization of premixed methane/air flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Yang; Peng, Jiangbo; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Sun, Rui; Chen, Deying

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation plasma has been applied to assist stabilization of premixed methane/air flames with a flow speed up to 15.3 m/s. The ablation plasma was generated using the 50 Hz, 1064 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser onto a tantalum slab. With the ablation plasma, the stabilization equivalence ratio has been extended to the fuel-leaner end and the blow off limits have been enhanced by from 3.6- to 14.8-folds for flames which can stabilize without the plasma. The laser pulse energy required for flameholding was reduced to 10 mJ, a 64 % reduction compared with that of gas breakdown plasma, which will ease the demand for high-power lasers for high-frequency plasma generation. The temporal evolutions of the flame kernels following the ablation plasma were investigated using the OH* chemiluminescence imaging approach, and the flame propagation speed ( v f) was measured from the flame kernel evolutions. With the ablation plasma, the v f with flow speed of 4.7-9.0 m/s and equivalence ratio of 1.4 has been enhanced from 0.175 m/s of laminar premixed methane/air flame to 2.79-4.52 and 1.59-5.46 m/s, respectively, in the early and late time following the ablation plasma. The increase in the combustion radical concentrations by the ablation plasma was thought to be responsible for the v f enhancement and the resulted flame stabilization.

  17. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Fundamental Studies and Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K.

    Successful and efficient ignition in short residence time environments or ultra-lean mixtures is a key technological challenge for the evolution of advanced combustion devices in terms of both performance and efficiency. To meet this challenge, interest in plasma assisted combustion (PAC) has expanded over the past 20 years. However, understanding of the underlying physical processes of ignition by plasma discharge remains elementary. In order to shed light on the key processes involved, two main thrusts of research were undertaken in this dissertation. First, demonstration of the applicability of plasma discharges in engines and engine-like environments was carried out using a microwave discharge and a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in an internal combustion engine and a pulsed detonation engine, respectively. Major conclusions include the extension of lean ignition limits for both engines, significant reduction of ignition time for mixtures with large minimum ignition energy, and the discovery of the inter-pulse coupling effect of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges at high frequency. In order to understand the kinetic processes that led to these improvements, the second thrust of research directly explored the chemical kinetic processes of plasma discharges with hydrocarbon fuels. For this purpose, a low pressure flow reactor with a NRP dielectric barrier discharge cell was assembled. The discharge cell was fitted with a Herriott type multipass mirror arrangement, which allowed quantitative laser absorption spectroscopy to be performed in situ during the plasma discharge. Experiments on methane and ethylene mixtures with oxygen, argon, and helium revealed the importance of low temperature oxidation pathways in PAC. In particular, oxygen addition reactions were shown to be of primary importance in the oxidation of these small hydrocarbons in the temperature range of 300-600 K. Kinetic modeling tools, including both a coupled plasma and

  18. Laser-assisted plasma coating at atmospheric pressure: production of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Zihao; Meng, Liang; Raman, Priya; Cho, Tae S.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2011-07-01

    A laser-assisted plasma-coating technique at atmospheric pressure (LAPCAP) has been investigated. The electron temperature, electron density and gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure plasma have been measured using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). LAPCAP utilizes laser ablation of 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia into an atmospheric helium/nitrogen plasma to deposit thermal barrier coatings on a nickel-based substrate. The deposited film shows columnar structures similar to films prepared by high-vacuum deposition methods, such as physical vapour deposition and conventional pulsed-laser deposition. However, the LAPCAP films have smaller columns and higher porosity, compared with the films deposited by other techniques. The morphology and characteristics of the films have been analysed by scanning electron microscope, focused ion beam and x-ray diffraction.

  19. Computational Simulation of Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge for Plasma Assisted Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takana, H.; Adamovich, I. V.; Nishiyama, H.

    2014-11-01

    Detailed two dimensional numerical simulations of a nanosecond pulsed pin-to-pin discharge in a lean methane/air mixture were conducted under 10 atm and 600 K for plasma assisted combustion in internal combustion engines. It was clarified from this study that the produced radicals were locally higher in the vicinity of electrodes, and high density radicals are more widely distributed on the anode side rather than the cathode side which the streamer is propagating toward. The electron energy partition has been clarified during a single pulse. Total electron energy increases with fuel equivalent ratio under the same applied voltage. Pronounced enhancement of ignition delay has been shown by nanosecond pulsed discharge.

  20. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  1. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  2. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  3. Measurement of Human Blood and Plasma Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Szalkay, H. G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Report reviews techniques for measuring blood-plasma volume in humans. Common technique of using radioactive iodine isotope to label plasma albumin involves unwarranted risks from low-level radiation. Report emphasizes techniques using Evans-blue-dye (T-1824) labeling of albumin, hematocrit or hemoglobin/hematocrit measurements, or blood densitometry. In Evans-blue-dye technique, plasma volume determined from decrease in dye concentration occurring after small amount of dye solution injected into circulatory system. Subjection of Evans blue dye to test for carcinogenicity gave negative results.

  4. PRECISE CHARGE MEASUREMENT FOR LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Donahue, Rich; Rodgers, David; Smith, Alan; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-19

    Cross-calibrations of charge diagnostics are conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). Employed diagnostics are a scintillating screen, activation based measurement, and integrating current transformer. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8 %, showing that they can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided they are used properly.

  5. Characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Ikai; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Chen, Wen-Yen; Hsu, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Gary Z. L.

    2013-06-15

    The characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on LiAlO{sub 2} substrate was studied by cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence measurements. We demonstrated that the cathodoluminescence from oblique semi-polar surfaces of mushroom-shaped GaN was much brighter than that from top polar surface due to the reduction of polarization field on the oblique semi-polar surfaces. It implies that the oblique semi-polar surface is superior for the light-emitting surface of wurtzite nano-devices.

  6. Low temperature deposition of indium tin oxide films by plasma ion-assisted evaporation.

    PubMed

    Füchsel, Kevin; Schulz, Ulrike; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Coatings of transparent conductive oxides, especially indium tin oxide (ITO), are important in different fields. So far, application of these materials has been limited to substrates with high thermal stability. We describe an improved coating process for ITO based on plasma ion-assisted evaporation at a substrate temperature below 100 degrees C, which is suitable for organic substrates. In characterizing the thin films, we used the classical Drude theory to calculate the resistivity from optical film properties and compared the data with linear four-point measurements. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy was used to determine the structural properties of the thin films. PMID:18449263

  7. Design of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    The design and construction of a thruster that employs electrodeless plasma preionization and pulsed inductive acceleration is described. Preionization is achieved through an electron cyclotron resonance discharge that produces a weakly-ionized plasma at the face of a conical theta pinch-shaped inductive coil. The presence of the preionized plasma allows for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages than those employed in other pulsed inductive accelerators that do not employ preionization. The location of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge is controlled through the design of the applied magnetic field in the thruster. Finite element analysis shows that there is an arrangement of permanent magnets that yields a small volume of resonant magnetic field at the coil face. Preionization in the resonant zone leads to current sheet formation at the coil face, which minimizes the initial inductance of the pulse circuit and maximizes the potential electrical efficiency of the accelerator. A magnet assembly was constructed around an inductive coil to provide structural support to the selected arrangement of neodymium magnets. Measured values of the resulting magnetic field compare favorably with the finite element model.

  8. Measurements of an expanding surface flashover plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.

    2014-05-21

    A better understanding of vacuum surface flashover and the plasma produced by it is of importance for electron and ion sources, as well as advanced accelerators and other vacuum electronic devices. This article describes time-of-flight and biased-probe measurements made on the expanding plasma generated from a vacuum surface flashover discharge. The plasma expanded at velocities of 1.2–6.5 cm/μs, and had typical densities of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}. The expansion velocity of the plasma leading edge often exhibited a sharp increase at distances of about 50 mm from the discharge site. Comparison with biased-probe data suggests that, under most conditions, the plasma leading edge was dominated by negative ions, with the apparent increase in velocity being due to fast H{sup −} overtaking slower, heavier ions. In some cases, biased-probe data also showed abrupt discontinuities in the plasma energy distribution co-located with large changes in the intercepted plasma current, suggesting the presence of a shock in the leading edge of the expanding plasma.

  9. Photothermal Measurements on Human Serum and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Sosa, M.; Hernández, L. C.; Hernández-Cabrera, F.; Mayén-Mondragón, R.; Yánez-Limón, J. M.; Flores-Farías, R.; Palomares, P.; Juárez, P.; Ramírez, R.

    2003-09-01

    Using a thermal lens experimental set up, the thermal diffusivity of serum and plasma was measured. Several samples were studied and the results are reported as the average with the standard deviation. The serum and plasma were obtained by aleatory sampling of healthy adult donors at the Guanajuato State Transfusion Center, Mexico; the donors were free of hepatitis and other diseases, clinically tested. The parameters reported were obtained using the thermal lens aberrant model with the lasers operating in the mismatched mode.

  10. Nanosecond-laser plasma-assisted ultradeep microdrilling of optically opaque and transparent solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Stanley; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, Susan D.

    2007-02-01

    A mechanism of ultradeep (up to tens of microns per pulse, submillimeter total hole depths) plasma-assisted ablative drilling of optically opaque and transparent materials by high-power nanosecond lasers has been proposed and verified experimentally using optical transmission and contact photoacoustic techniques to measure average drilling rates per laser shot versus laser intensity at constant focusing conditions. The plots of average drilling rates versus laser intensity exhibit slopes which are in good agreement with those predicted by the proposed model and also with other experimental studies. The proposed ultradeep drilling mechanism consists of a number of stages, including ultradeep "nonthermal" energy delivery into bulk solids by the short-wavelength radiation of the hot ablative plasma, bulk heating and melting, accompanied by subsurface boiling in the melt pool, and resulting melt expulsion from the target.

  11. Structural Evolution of SiC Films During Plasma-Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Siye; Yan, Guanchao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhou, Haiyang

    2009-04-01

    Evolution of chemical bonding configurations for the films deposited from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) diluted with H2 during plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition is investigated. In the experiment a small amount of CH4 was added to adjust the plasma environment and modify the structure of the deposited films. The measurements of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the production of 6H-SiC embedded in the amorphous matrix without the input of CH4. As CH4 was introduced into the deposition reaction, the transition of 6H-SiC to cubic SiC in the films took place, and also the film surfaces changed from a structure of ellipsoids to cauliflower-like shapes. With a further increase of CH4 in the flow ratio, the obtained films varied from Si-C bonding dominant to a sp2/sp3 carbon-rich composition.

  12. Electron density measurements in highly electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental measurements of the electron density in very electronegative ‘ion–ion’ Ar–SF6 plasmas where previous investigations using Langmuir probes have observed electronegativities of up to 5000. The electron density is measured using a short matched dipole probe technique that provides a tolerance better than  ±2 · 1013 m‑3. The results demonstrate that the electron density in the low pressure plasma source (which contains a magnetic filter) can be reduced to around 2.7 · 1013 m‑3 with a corresponding plasma electronegativity of about 4000; close to that from fluid simulation predictions. The highest electronegativity, and lowest electron density, is achieved with a pure SF6 plasma, while adding only 6% SF6 to Ar allows the electronegativity to be increased from 0 to a few hundred with a corresponding decrease in the electron density by more than a thousand. The impedance probe based on a short matched dipole appears to be a practical diagnostic that can be used for independent measurements of the electron density in very electronegative plasmas, and opens up the possibility to further investigate and optimize electronegative plasma sources.

  13. Temperature dependence of inductively coupled plasma assisted growth of TiN thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W. J.; Curtis, T. J.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.

    1999-11-01

    The use of low pressure high density plasmas to assist the synthesis of ceramic thin film materials is in its infancy. Using an inductively coupled plasma assisted magnetron sputtering system, we examine the dependence of plasma-assisted growth of TiN thin films on growth temperature at different ratios of ion flux to neutral atom flux. Our results indicate that a temperature independent densification of TiN films occurs above a certain ion to neutral atom flux ratio. As an example of this temperature independent densification, we demonstrate the formation of dense B1 TiN crystalline thin films at growth temperatures down to {approx}100 K.

  14. Thomson Scattering Measurements of Plasma Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, A; Redmer, R; Tschentscher, T; Toleikis, S; Forster, E; Cao, L; Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P

    2006-03-29

    The authors propose to investigate the dynamics of plasmas in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime on ultra-short time scales. Accessible plasma conditions are in the density range of n = 10{sup 20} - 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} and at moderate temperatures of T = 1 - 20 eV. These plasmas are of importance for laboratory astrophysics, high energy density science and inertial confinement fusion. They are characterized by a coupling parameter of {Lambda} {approx}> 1, where electromagnetic interactions are of the same order as the kinetic energy. The high density of the plasma makes it opaque to radiation in the visible range and, as a consequence, UV up to x-ray radiation can be used to probe such systems. Therefore a wide range in the temperature-density plane of WDM is presently unexplored and only the VUV-FEL opens for the first time the opportunity for its detailed investigation. In equilibrium, the macroscopic state of the plasma is completely characterized by its density and temperature. In pump-probe experiments however, the plasma is initially in a nonequilibrium state and relaxes towards equilibrium within the relaxation time {tau}{sub R}. For t > {tau}{sub R}, the plasma is in an equilibrium state and expands hydrodynamically on a time scale {tau}{sub H}. The proposed experiment measures the time-resolved Thomson scattering signal with the VUV-FEL radiation characterizing the plasma in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states. Both regimes are extremely interesting and will provide new insight into the following phenomena: (1) details of nonequilibrium correlations, (2) relaxation phenomena, (3) hydrodynamic expansion, (4) recombination kinetics. The time-resolved Thomson scattering signal is obtained in a pump-probe experiment by varying the delay between pump and probe. The final stage of the relaxation process (t {approx} {tau}{sub R}) is of special interest since the plasma components (electrons and ion species) can be assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium. This

  15. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  16. Miniaturized Energy Spectrometer for Space Plasma Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes de Lima, Raphaela; Scime, Earl; Keesee, Amy; Lusk, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Taking advantage of technological developments in lithographic fabrication techniques over the past two decades, we have designed an ultra-compact plasma spectrometer that requires only low voltage power supplies, no microchannel plates, and has a high aperture area to instrument area ratio. The designed target is for ions in the 3- 20 keV range with a highly directional field of view. In addition to reducing mass, size, and voltage requirements, the new design will revolutionize the manufacturing process of plasma spectrometers, enabling large quantities of identical instruments to be manufactured at low individual unit cost. Such a plasma spectrometer is ideal for Heliophysics plasma investigations, particularly for small satellite and multi-spacecraft missions. Here we present initial measurements of the performance of the instrument components and designs of the electronics for the low energy threshold solid state detector. Work Support under NASA grant - NNX14AJ36G.

  17. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  18. Hydrogen and Ethene Plasma Assisted Ignition by NS discharge at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-09-01

    The kinetics of ignition in lean H2:O2:Ar and C2H4:O2:Ar mixtures has been studied experimentally and numerically after a high-voltage nanosecond discharge. The ignition delay time behind a reflected shock wave was measured with and without the discharge. It was shown that the initiation of the discharge with a specific deposited energy of 10 - 30 mJ/cm3 leads to an order of magnitude decrease in the ignition delay time. Discharge processes and following chain chemical reactions with energy release were simulated. The generation of atoms, radicals and excited and charged particles was numerically simulated using the measured time - resolved discharge current and electric field in the discharge phase. The calculated densities of the active particles were used as input data to simulate plasma-assisted ignition. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated ignition delay times and the experimental data. It follows from the analysis of the calculated results that the main mechanism of the effect of gas discharge on the ignition of hydrocarbons is the electron impact dissociation of O2 molecules in the discharge phase. Detailed kinetic mechanism for plasma assisted ignition of hydrogen and ethene is elaborated and verified.

  19. Reflectometric measurement of plasma imaging and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, A.; Ito, N.; Oda, M.; Komada, Y.; Nagae, D.; Zhang, D.; Kogi, Y.; Tobimatsu, S.; Maruyama, T.; Shimazu, H.; Sakata, E.; Sakai, F.; Kuwahara, D.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tokuzawa, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G.; Lee, W.; Padhi, S.; Kim, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in microwave and millimeter-wave technologies has made possible advanced diagnostics for application to various fields, such as, plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, alien substance detection, airborne and spaceborne imaging radars called as synthetic aperture radars, living body measurements. Transmission, reflection, scattering, and radiation processes of electromagnetic waves are utilized as diagnostic tools. In this report we focus on the reflectometric measurements and applications to biological signals (vital signal detection and breast cancer detection) as well as plasma diagnostics, specifically by use of imaging technique and ultra-wideband radar technique.

  20. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Matthew W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Litchford, Ron J.

    2005-01-01

    An inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted to measure explosive plasma jet conductivities. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-inch diameter probe was designed and constructed, and calibration was accomplished by firing an aluminum slug through the probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-gram high explosive shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 3 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 20 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2% potassium carbonate by mass.

  1. Measuring Assistive Technology Outcomes in Schools Using Functional Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michelle Kaye; Stratman, Kristine Freiberg; Smith, Roger O.

    2000-01-01

    Activities of Project OATS (Outcomes of Assistive Technology in the Schools) are described, including identification and piloting of existing assessment instruments for use as an outcome measure, examining the validity of the School Function Assessment, and field testing the School Function Assessment-Assistive Technology Version, an adaptation of…

  2. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) operated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon flow rates between 19 - 46 standard cubic centimeter per minute. The HCA was centrally mounted in the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster and was operated in the "spot" and "plume" modes with additional data taken with an applied magnetic field. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orifice of the HCA and to assess the charge state of the near-field plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 electron volt) and plasma potentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operation with an applied-field yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, and increased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with an applied field, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies significantly exceeding the applied discharge voltage. These findings are correlated with high-frequency oscillations associated with each mode.

  3. Super-paramagnetic nanoparticles synthesis in a thermal plasma reactor assisted by magnetic bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartaya, R.; Puerta, J.; Martín, P.

    2015-03-01

    The present work is a study of the synthesis of super-paramagnetic particles. A preliminary study based on thermodynamic diagrams of Gibbs free energy minimization, was performed with the CSIRO Thermochemical System. In this way, the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles from precursor powder of ore iron in a thermal reactor, was performed. Then the process was simulated mathematically using magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic equations, in order to predict the synthesis process. A cylindrical reactor assisted by magnetic mirrors was used. The peak intensity of 0.1 tesla (1000 Gauss) was measured at the end of the solenoid. A PlazjetTM 105/15 thermal plasma torch was used. The precursor powder was iron oxide and the plasma gas, nitrogen. The magnetite powder was magnetized whit rare-earth super-magnets, alloy of neodymium-iron boron (NdFeB) grade N-42. The synthesized nanoparticles diameters was measured with a scanning electron microscope LECO and the permanent magnetization with a YOKOGAWA gauss meter, model 325i. Our experimental results show that it is possible the synthesis of super-paramagnetic nanoparticles in thermal plasma reactors.

  4. Substrate-biasing during plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition to tailor metal-oxide thin film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Profijt, H. B.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2013-01-15

    Two substrate-biasing techniques, i.e., substrate-tuned biasing and RF biasing, have been implemented in a remote plasma configuration, enabling control of the ion energy during plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD). With both techniques, substrate bias voltages up to -200 V have been reached, which allowed for ion energies up to 272 eV. Besides the bias voltage, the ion energy and the ion flux, also the electron temperature, the electron density, and the optical emission of the plasma have been measured. The effects of substrate biasing during plasma-assisted ALD have been investigated for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and TiO{sub 2} thin films. The growth per cycle, the mass density, and the crystallinity have been investigated, and it was found that these process and material properties can be tailored using substrate biasing. Additionally, the residual stress in substrates coated with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films varied with the substrate bias voltage. The results reported in this article demonstrate that substrate biasing is a promising technique to tailor the material properties of thin films synthesized by plasma-assisted ALD.

  5. Optical properties of plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy grown InN/sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Devki N.; Liao, Ying Chieh; Chen, Li Chyong; Chen, Kuei Hsien; Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2014-11-01

    The optical properties of as-grown InN/sapphire films prepared by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) are characterized by photoluminescence (PL), Raman scattering (RS) and infrared (IR) reflectance techniques. The PL measurements have consistently exhibited lower values of InN band gaps providing clear indications of electron concentration dependent peak energy shifts and widths. The phonon modes identified by RS are found to be in good agreement with the grazing inelastic X-ray scattering measurements and ab initio lattice dynamical calculations. An effective medium theory used to analyze IR reflectance spectra of InN/sapphire films has provided reasonable estimates of free charge carrier concentrations.

  6. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing.

  8. Electron temperature measurement in an ultracold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrousheh, K.; Bohlouli, P. Z.; Fedorov, M.; Mugford, A.; Martin, J. D. D.

    2004-05-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years in studying ultracold plasmas. These cold plasmas are produced by photoionizing a sample of cold atoms in a MOT. Of interest is the evolution of electron temperature in these plasmas. Strong correlation due to low initial temperature, as well as lack of correlation due to rapid heating are two possible scenarios. We will present a unique experimental method for measuring electron temperature in a cold plasma, as well as our calculation of the feasibility of the proposed method. In this process, which we call stimulated photoattachment, we stimulate the transition of free electrons from the continuum to bound states of nearby atoms by a laser beam. The negative ions produced can be observed with a microchannel plate detector. For electrons with well-defined energy this is a resonant process. The width of the resonance indicates the electron temperature. This technique has advantage of high temporal resolution of the evolution of electron temperature after the plasma is formed.

  9. Electron-beam-assisted dry etching for GaAs using electron cyclotron resonance plasma electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Matsui, Shinji

    1992-12-01

    Electron-beam (EB)-assisted dry etching of GaAs using Ar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma as an electron shower source is developed to achieve a low energy and high current density electron beam (EB). The rate of EB-assisted dry etching is more than ten times larger than for Cl2 gas etching.It is confirmed, through photoluminescence measurement, that this etching method causes less damage than ion beam techniques and is very effective for damaged layer removal. Using this technique, a 0.4 μm linewidth low-damage fine structure of GaAs was fabricated.

  10. Measurement-assisted Landau-Zener transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechen, Alexander; Trushechkin, Anton

    2015-05-01

    Nonselective quantum measurements, i.e., measurements without reading the results, are often considered as a resource for manipulating quantum systems. In this work, we investigate optimal acceleration of the Landau-Zener (LZ) transitions by nonselective quantum measurements. We use the measurements of a population of a diabatic state of the LZ system at certain time instants as control and find the optimal time instants which maximize the LZ transition. We find surprising nonmonotonic behavior of the maximal transition probability with increase of the coupling parameter when the number of measurements is large. This transition probability gives an optimal approximation to the fundamental quantum Zeno effect (which corresponds to continuous measurements) by a fixed number of discrete measurements. The difficulty for the analysis is that the transition probability as a function of time instants has a huge number of local maxima. We resolve this problem both analytically by asymptotic analysis and numerically by the development of efficient algorithms mainly based on the dynamic programming. The proposed numerical methods can be applied, besides this problem, to a wide class of measurement-based optimal control problems.

  11. Plasma-Assisted ALD of an Al2O3 Permeation Barrier Layer on Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wenwen; Li, Xingcun; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Zhengduo

    2012-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique is used in the preparation of organic/inorganic layers, which requires uniform surfaces with their thickness down to several nanometers. For film with such thickness, the growth mode defined as the arrangement of clusters on the surface during the growth is of significance. In this work, Al2O3 thin film was deposited on various interfacial species of pre-treated polyethylene terephthalate (PET, 12 μm) by plasma assisted atomic layer deposition (PA-ALD), where trimethyl aluminium was used as the Al precursor and O2 as the oxygen source. The interfacial species, -NH3, -OH, and -COOH as well as SiCHO (derived from monomer of HMDSO plasma), were grafted previously by plasma and chemical treatments. The growth mode of PA-ALD Al2O3 was then investigated in detail by combining results from in-situ diagnosis of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and ex-situ characterization of as-deposited layers from the morphologies scanned by atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, the oxygen transmission rates (OTR) of the original and treated plastic films were measured. The possible reasons for the dependence of the OTR values on the surface species were explored.

  12. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) oper-ated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon ow rates between 19 - 46 sccm.The HCA was centrally mounted in the annulus of the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster andwas operated in the spot and plume modes with additional data taken with an appliedmagnetic eld. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spec-troscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orice of the HCA and toassess the charge state of the near-eld plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 eV) and plasmapotentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operationwith an applied-eld yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, andincreased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with anapplied eld, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies signicantlyexceeding the applied discharge voltage. These ndings are correlated with high-frequencyoscillations associated with each mode.

  13. Design of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    A new plasma accelerator concept that employs electrodeless plasma preionization and pulsed inductive acceleration is presented. Preionization is achieved through an electron cyclotron resonance discharge that produces a weakly-ionized plasma at the face of a conical theta pinch-shaped inductive coil. The presence of the preionized plasma allows for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages than those found in other pulsed inductive accelerators. The location of an electron cyclotron resonance discharge can be controlled through the design of the applied magnetic field in the thruster. A finite-element model of the magnetic field was used as a design tool, allowing for the implementation of an arrangement of permanent magnets that yields a small volume of preionized propellant at the coil face. This allows for current sheet formation at the face of the inductive coil, minimizing the initial inductance of the pulse circuit and maximizing the potential efficiency of the new accelerator.

  14. Measurements of the Plasma Parameters and Low Frequency Oscillations in the Fisk Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Edward, Jr.; Wallace, Kent; Lampkin, Gregory; Watson, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A new plasma device, the Fisk Plasma Source (FPS), has been developed at Fisk University. This plasma device is used to study the physics of low temperature plasmas and plasma-material interactions. The FPS device is a stainless steel vacuum 6-way cross vacuum vessel with at 10-inch inner diameter. Low temperature argon plasmas are generated using DC glow discharge and thermionic filament techniques. Spatial profiles of the plasma density, plasma potential, and electron temperature are measured using Langmuir probes. We present initial experimental measurements of density and temperature profiles in the FPS device. Experimental and theoretical studies of low frequency oscillations observed in the FPS device are also presented.

  15. Plasma ion composition measurements for Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, E. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Paterson, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Lipatov, A. S.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Paschalidis, N. P.; Coplan, M. A.; Cassidy, T. A.; Richardson, J. D.; Fegley, B.; Andre, N.

    2013-11-01

    Jupiter magnetospheric interactions and surface composition, both important to subsurface ocean detection for the Galilean icy moons Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, can be measured using plasma ion mass spectrometry on either an orbiting spacecraft or one designed for multiple flybys of these moons. Detection of emergent oceanic materials at the Europa surface is more likely than at Ganymede and Callisto. A key challenge is to resolve potential intrinsic Europan materials from the space weathering patina of iogenic species implanted onto the sensible surface by magnetospheric interactions. Species-resolved measurements of pickup ion currents are also critical to extraction of oceanic induced magnetic fields from magnetospheric interaction background dominated by these currents. In general the chemical astrobiological potential of Europa should be determined through the combination of surface, ionospheric, and pickup ion composition measurements. The requisite Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) for these measurements would need to work in the high radiation environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere between the orbits of Europa and Ganymede, and beyond. A 3D hybrid model of the moon-magnetosphere interaction is also needed to construct a global model of the electric and magnetic fields, and the plasma environment, around Europa. Europa's ionosphere is probably usually dominated by hot pickup ions with 100-1000 eV temperatures, excursions to a "classical" cold ionosphere likely being infrequent. A field aligned ionospheric wind driven by the electron polarization electric field should arise and be measurable.

  16. Measurement of reactive species for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Plasma medicine has been intensively studied over the last decade. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are responsible for the therapeutic effects in plasma medicine. To examine the therapeutic effects of reactive species, the densities of OH, O, and NO were measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). A helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (10 kV, 10 kHz of 40 μs pulses) and a nanosecond streamer discharge (24 kV, 8 ns, 30 Hz) were utilized to treat mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium. Correlation between the dose of reactive species and deactivation rate of melanoma cells was measured with the aid of LIF. The results showed that the rate of cell death correlates with OH density, but not with O and NO densities. Next, a method to supply a specific reactive species to living organisms was developed. It utilizes photolysis of helium-buffered H2O and O2 by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light to produce reactive species. The VUV method was utilized to sterilize Bacillus atrophaeus on agar plate. With the VUV method, it was succeeded to show sterilization only by OH radicals. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals caused visible sterilization.

  17. Observation assistants: sitter effectiveness and industry measures.

    PubMed

    Harding, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety remains a strategic goal and of societal importance for better health care. Direct observation remains an ineffective and expensive means of providing for patient safety. The nursing quality team found that using assessment tools helped to objectively categorize which patients are at risk. Defining patient volume, actual productive sitter usage, and assessing demand for patients in psychiatric crisis and patients at high risk to fall in the form of average daily census provided an easy-to-translate, familiar unit of measure to compare patient volume to demand and utilization. The sitter utilization case was unable to provide correlation of sitter use to decreased fall rates, elopement, or assault behaviors. Currently, there is no research to suggest the use of constant observation reduces the risk of patient harm related to their risk for falling or harming themselves. PMID:21158254

  18. Plasma assisted synthesis of hollow nanofibers using electrospun sacrificial templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmathullah, Aflal M.; Jason Robinette, E.; Chen, Hong; Elabd, Yossef A.; Palmese, Giuseppe R.

    2007-12-01

    In this work, we describe the synthesis of nanostructured polymeric materials of controlled tubular geometries using oxygen plasma and polysiloxane-grafting onto electrospun fiber sacrificial templates. The fibers were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the extent of grafting, graft chemistry and the influence of plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the morphology and size of the electrospun fibers and nanotubes. The average diameter of the electrospun fibers employed ranged between 300 nm and 1500 nm. The micrographs revealed differences that are dependent on the type of grafting chemistry as well as plasma treatment times. The template synthesis of polysiloxane nanotubes using polyester track-etched membranes also shows that the technique is applicable to different substrates.

  19. Measurement of Debye length in laser-produced plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Debye length of an expanded plasma created by placing an evacuated chamber with an entrance slit in the path of a freely expanding laser produced plasma was measured, using the slab geometry. An independent measurement of electron density together with the observed value for the Debye length also provided a means for evaluating the plasma electron temperature. This temperature has applications in ascertaining plasma conductivity and magnetic field necessary for confinement of the laser produced plasma. Also, the temperature obtained would be useful in analyzing electron-ion recombination rates in the expanded plasma and the dynamics of the cooling process of the plasma expansion.

  20. Recent results from tokamak divertor plasma measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.

    1996-05-01

    New diagnostics have been developed to address key divertor physics questions, including: target plate heat flux reduction by radiation, basic edge transport issues, and plasma wall interactions (PWI) such as erosion. A system of diagnostics measures the target plate heat flux (imaging IR thermography) and particle flux (probes, pressure and Penning gauges, and visible emission arrays). Recently, T{sub e},n{sub e}, and P{sub e} (electron pressure) have been measured in 2-D with divertor Thomson Scattering. During radiative divertor operation T{sub e} is less than 2 eV, indicating that new atomic processes are important. Langmuir probes measure higher T{sub e} in some cases. In addition, the measured P{sub e} near the separatrix at the target plate is lower than the midplane pressure, implying radial momentum transport. Bolometer arrays, inverted with reconstruction algorithms, provide the 2-D core and divertor radiation profiles. Spectroscopic measurements identify the radiating species and provide information on impurity transport; both absolute chordal measurements and tomographic reconstructions of images are used. Either intrinsic carbon or an inert species (e.g., injected Ne) are usually observed, and absolute particle inventories are obtained. Computer codes are both benchmarked with the experimental data and provide important consistency checks. Several techniques are used to measure fundamental plasma transport and fluctuations, including probes and reflectometry. PWI issues are studied with in-situ coupons and insertable samples (DiMES). Representative divertor results from DIII-D with references to results on other tokamaks will be presented.

  1. Experimental investigation of effects of airflows on plasma-assisted combustion actuator characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing-Jian; He, Li-Ming; Yu, Jin-Lu; Zhang, Hua-Lei

    2015-04-01

    The effects of the airflow on plasma-assisted combustion actuator (PACA) characteristics are studied in detail. The plasma is characterized electrically, as well as optically with a spectrometer. Our results show that the airflow has an obvious influence on the PACA characteristics. The breakdown voltage and vibrational temperature decrease, while the discharge power increases compared with the stationary airflow. The memory effect of metastable state species and the transportation characteristics of charged particles in microdischarge channel are the dominant causes for the variations of the breakdown voltage and discharge power, respectively, and the vibrational temperature calculated in this work can describe the electron energy of the dielectric barrier discharge plasma in PACA. These results offer new perspectives for the use of PACA in plasma-assisted combustion. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51436008, 50776100, and 51106179).

  2. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, Fulvio; Cohen, Samuel A.; Bennett, Timothy; Timberlake, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  3. Laser plasma formation assisted by ultraviolet pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Yalin, Azer P. Dumitrache, Ciprian; Wilvert, Nick; Joshi, Sachin; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2014-10-15

    We present experimental and modeling studies of air pre-ionization using ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses and its effect on laser breakdown of an overlapped near-infrared (NIR) pulse. Experimental studies are conducted with a 266 nm beam (fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG) for UV pre-ionization and an overlapped 1064 nm NIR beam (fundamental of Nd:YAG), both having pulse duration of ∼10 ns. Results show that the UV beam produces a pre-ionized volume which assists in breakdown of the NIR beam, leading to reduction in NIR breakdown threshold by factor of >2. Numerical modeling is performed to examine the ionization and breakdown of both beams. The modeled breakdown threshold of the NIR, including assist by pre-ionization, is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Comparative Shock-Tube Study of Autoignition and Plasma-Assisted Ignition of C2-Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, Ilya; Kindysheva, Svetlana; Plastinin, Eugeny; Aleksandrov, Nikolay; Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of pulsed picosecond and nanosecond discharge development in liquid water, ethanol and hexane Using a shock tube with a discharge cell, ignition delay time was measured in a lean (φ = 0.5) C2H6:O2:Ar mixture and in lean (φ = 0.5) and stoichiometric C2H4:O2:Ar mixtures with a high-voltage nanosecond discharge and without it. The measured results were compared with the measurements made previously with the same setup for C2H6-, C2H5OH- and C2H2-containing mixtures. It was shown that the effect of plasma on ignition is almost the same for C2H6, C2H4 and C2H5OH. The reduction in time is smaller for C2H2, the fuel that is well ignited even without the discharge. Autoignition delay time was independent of the stoichiometric ratio for C2H6 and C2H4, whereas this time in stoichiometric C2H2- and C2H5OH-containing mixtures was noticeably shorter than that in the lean mixtures. Ignition after the discharge was not affected by a change in the stoichiometric ratio for C2H2 and C2H4, whereas the plasma-assisted ignition delay time for C2H6 and C2H5OH decreased as the equivalence ratio changed from 1 to 0.5. Ignition delay time was calculated in C2-hydrocarbon-containing mixtures under study by simulating separately discharge and ignition processes. Good agreement was obtained between new measurements and calculated ignition delay times.

  5. Probe measurements in ion-beam plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dudin, S.V.

    1994-12-31

    The particularities of the electric probe measurements in the ion-beam plasma (IBP) have been investigated. To find the electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub c} as well as electron energy distribution it is necessary to separate electron current from full probe current, because ion part of this current is often large enough to mask the electron part. According to collisionless probe theory, radius of ion layer in strongly non-isothermal plasma (as in their case) and consequently the ion current are determined by Child`s law. However, at presence of ion beam with high enough energy {var_epsilon}{sub b} >> e{var_phi}{sub p}, this law is broken. The author has found the dependence of Langmuir probe ion current I{sub i} on probe potential {var_phi}{sub p} at presence of IB. The constant ion density approach was used in cylindrical and spherical geometry of the probe layer. Dependence of ion current founded experimentally accords with Child`s law when the probe is placed outside the beam and linear--within the beam. Application of only the chemical Langmuir probe is insufficient for energoanalysis of IBP electrons because of ion current interference. To solve this problem combination of the techniques of cylindrical probe, large plate probe (5 x 5mm) and two-grid energoanalyzer was used. Design and parameters of the two-grid analyzer are presented. Measuring system is described for determination of electron energy distribution function in low temperature plasma by double differentiation of the electric probe volt-ampere characteristic by modulation method.

  6. Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Valone, Steven M.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Trkula, Mitchell; Coates, Don M.; Shah, S. Ismat

    1996-01-01

    A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

  7. A feasibility study on adaptive plasma-assisted incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Filion, J.; Munz, R.J.; Salin, E.D.

    1995-12-31

    The incineration of hazardous organic waste in dilute form, such as in contaminated soil, is limited in its efficiency. Problems include the cost and difficulty of treating bulk material at high temperature, and the formation of incomplete combustion products in flame incinerators. Plasmas, although expensive to operate, offer extreme temperature and reactivity allowing complete decomposition of any organic material. The authors propose to couple an incinerator with a plasma afterburner whose operation is optimized to meet the required performance at a minimum additional cost. Continuous on-line spectroscopic analysis of the off-gas and feedback control make the system adaptive and effective under variable feed loads. The feasibility study presented here focuses on the diagnostic and optimization aspects of this concept.

  8. Shock assisted ionization injection in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Lifschitz, A; Ta Phuoc, K; Hansson, M; Grittani, G; Gautier, J; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Lundh, O; Malka, V

    2015-01-01

    Ionization injection is a simple and efficient method to trap an electron beam in a laser plasma accelerator. Yet, because of a long injection length, this injection technique leads generally to the production of large energy spread electron beams. Here, we propose to use a shock front transition to localize the injection. Experimental results show that the energy spread can be reduced down to 10 MeV and that the beam energy can be tuned by varying the position of the shock. This simple technique leads to very stable and reliable injection even for modest laser energy. It should therefore become a unique tool for the development of laser-plasma accelerators. PMID:26549584

  9. Shock assisted ionization injection in laser-plasma accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Thaury, C.; Guillaume, E.; Lifschitz, A.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Hansson, M.; Grittani, G.; Gautier, J.; Goddet, J.-P.; Tafzi, A.; Lundh, O.; Malka, V.

    2015-01-01

    Ionization injection is a simple and efficient method to trap an electron beam in a laser plasma accelerator. Yet, because of a long injection length, this injection technique leads generally to the production of large energy spread electron beams. Here, we propose to use a shock front transition to localize the injection. Experimental results show that the energy spread can be reduced down to 10 MeV and that the beam energy can be tuned by varying the position of the shock. This simple technique leads to very stable and reliable injection even for modest laser energy. It should therefore become a unique tool for the development of laser-plasma accelerators. PMID:26549584

  10. Microwave plasma assisted pyrolysis of refuse derived fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khongkrapan, Parin; Thanompongchart, Patipat; Tippayawong, Nakorn; Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat

    2014-03-01

    This work combined plasma reactivity and pyrolysis for conversion of solid wastes. Decomposition of refuse derived fuel (RDF) and its combustible components (paper, biomass, and plastic) in an 800 W microwave plasma reactor was investigated at varying argon flow rates of 0.50 to 1.25 lpm for 3 minutes. The characteristic bright light emission of plasma was observed with calculated maximum power density of about 35 W/cm3. The RDF and its components were successfully converted into char and combustible gas. The average char yield was found to be 12-21% of the original mass, with a gross calorific value of around 39 MJ/kg. The yield of the product gas was in the range 1.0-1.7 m3/kg. The combustible gas generated from the pyrolysis of the RDF contained about 14% H2, 66% CO, and 4% CH4 of the detected gas mass, with a heating value of 11 MJ/m3. These products are potentially marketable forms of clean energy.

  11. Computational comparative study of microwave probes for plasma density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.; Oh, W. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A microwave probe is known to be a suitable method to measure plasma density, even in the processing condition and is widely used in various environments of low-temperature processing plasmas. Various types of microwave probes have been researched and developed to measure the precise plasma density. Extensive research has been conducted to investigate each probes characteristic responding to the plasma parameters (plasma density, electron temperature, pressure, sheath width, and so forth) based on both experiments and simulations. However, a comparative study elucidating the relative characteristics of each probe has not been completed yet, despite the wide applications of the probes in processing plasma. We conduct a comparative study among the microwave probes using the numerical method of three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. In this study, the microwave probes are compared by investigating the precision of plasma density measurement under a comprehensive range of plasma parameters (plasma density, pressure, and sheath width).

  12. 42GHz ECRH assisted Plasma Breakdown in tokamak SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, B. K.; Pradhan, S.; Patel, Paresh; Babu, Rajan; Patel, Jatin; Patel, Harshida; Dhorajia, Pragnesh; Tanna, V.; Atrey, P. K.; Manchanda, R.; Gupta, Manoj; Joisa, Shankar; Gupta, C. N.; Danial, Raju; Singh, Prashant; Jha, R.; Bora, D.

    2015-03-01

    In SST-1, 42GHz ECRH system has been commissioned to carry out breakdown and heating experiments at 0.75T and 1.5T operating toroidal magnetic fields. The 42GHz ECRH system consists of high power microwave source Gyrotron capable to deliver 500kW microwave power for 500ms duration, approximately 20 meter long transmission line and a mirror based launcher. The ECRH power in fundamental O-mode & second harmonic X-mode is launched from low field side (radial port) of the tokamak. At 0.75T operation, approximately 300 kW ECH power is launched in second harmonic X-mode and successful ECRH assisted breakdown is achieved at low loop_voltage ~ 3V. The ECRH power is launched around 45ms prior to loop voltage. The hydrogen pressure in tokamak is maintained ~ 1×10-5mbar and the pre-ionized density is ~ 4×1012/cc. At 1.5T operating toroidal magnetic field, the ECH power is launched in fundamental O-mode. The ECH power at fundamental harmonic is varied from 100 kW to 250 kW and successful breakdown is achieved in all ECRH shots. In fundamental harmonic there is no delay in breakdown while at second harmonic ~ 40ms delay is observed, which is normal in case of second harmonic ECRH assisted breakdown.

  13. Finite Larmor radius assisted velocity shear stabilization of the interchange instability in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Sheungwah; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-06-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, originally shown to stabilize magnetized plasma interchange modes at short wavelength, are shown to assist velocity shear stabilization of long wavelength interchanges. It is shown that the FLR effects result in stabilization with roughly the same efficacy as the stabilization from dissipative (resistive and viscous) effects found earlier.

  14. Tunable molten oxide pool assisted plasma-melter vitrification systems

    DOEpatents

    Titus, Charles H.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides tunable waste conversion systems and apparatus which have the advantage of highly robust operation and which provide complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The systems provide the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced use or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a net energy or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production. Methods and apparatus for converting metals, non-glass forming waste streams and low-ash producing inorganics into a useful gas are also provided. The methods and apparatus for such conversion include the use of a molten oxide pool having predetermined electrical, thermal and physical

  15. EDITORIAL: Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Gutsol, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This special issue is based on the symposium on Non-thermal Plasma Assisted Fuel Conversion for Green Chemistry, a part of the 240th ACS National Meeting & Exposition held in Boston, MA, USA, 22-26 August 2010. Historically, the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has featured three plasma-related symposia since 2000, and has launched special issues in Catalysis Today on three occasions: 'Catalyst Preparation using Plasma Technologies', Fall Meeting, Washington DC, USA, 2000. Special issue in Catalysis Today 72 (3-4) with 12 peer-reviewed articles. 'Plasma Technology and Catalysis', Spring Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 2003. Special issue in Catalysis Today 89 (1-2) with more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. 'Utilization of Greenhouse Gases II' (partly focused on plasma-related technologies), Spring Meeting, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2004. Special issue in Catalysis Today 98 (4) with 25 peer-reviewed articles. This time, selected presentations are published in this Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics special issue. An industrial material and energy conversion technology platform is established on thermochemical processes including various catalytic reactions. Existing industry-scale technology is already well established; nevertheless, further improvement in energy efficiency and material saving has been continuously demanded. Drastic reduction of CO2 emission is also drawing keen attention with increasing recognition of energy and environmental issues. Green chemistry is a rapidly growing research field, and frequently highlights renewable bioenergy, bioprocesses, solar photocatalysis of water splitting, and regeneration of CO2 into useful chemicals. We would also like to emphasize 'plasma catalysis' of hydrocarbon resources as an important part of the innovative next-generation green technologies. The peculiarity of non-thermal plasma is that it can generate reactive species almost independently of reaction temperature. Plasma

  16. Cluster II: Plasma Measurements in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C. P.; Schmidt, R.

    After the dramatic accident of the first Ariane 5 rocket on 4 June 1996, causing the loss of the four European Space Agency's Cluster spacecraft, a recovery programme was initiated. During 10 months, alternative studies and intense negotiations were conducted with industry, and on 3 April 1997, the ESA Science Programme Committee agreed on the re-flight of the full Cluster mission. The four satellites will be launched in pairs by two Russian Soyuz launchers in June and July 2000. The main goal of the ClusterII mission is to study, in three dimensions, the small-scale plasma stuctures in the key plasma regions: solar wind and bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail, and auroral zone. The relative distance between the four spacecraft will be varied between 200 and 18000 km during the course of the mission. The Cluster II spacecraft have state-of-the-art plasma instrumentation to measure electric and magnetic fields, from quasi-static up to high frequency, and electron and ion distribution functions from around 0 eV to a few MeV in energy. The science operations are coordinated by the Joint Science Operation Centre in Rutherford Appleton laboratory (UK) and implemented by the European Space Operation Centre (Germany). A data distribution system, constituted of eight data centres, has been implemented for the production of physical parameters and their distribution to the end users all over the world. The latest information on Cluster II can be found on the Web at: http://sci. esa. int/cluster/.

  17. Physics and chemistry of plasma-assisted combustion.

    PubMed

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-08-13

    There are several mechanisms that affect a gas when using discharge plasma to initiate combustion or to stabilize a flame. There are two thermal mechanisms-the homogeneous and inhomogeneous heating of the gas due to 'hot' atom thermalization and vibrational and electronic energy relaxation. The homogeneous heating causes the acceleration of the chemical reactions. The inhomogeneous heating generates flow perturbations, which promote increased turbulence and mixing. Non-thermal mechanisms include the ionic wind effect (the momentum transfer from an electric field to the gas due to the space charge), ion and electron drift (which can lead to additional fluxes of active radicals in the gradient flows in the electric field) and the excitation, dissociation and ionization of the gas by e-impact, which leads to non-equilibrium radical production and changes the kinetic mechanisms of ignition and combustion. These mechanisms, either together or separately, can provide additional combustion control which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition engines, among others. Despite the lack of knowledge in mechanism details, non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential for controlling ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and is extremely promising technology for a very wide range of applications. PMID:26170435

  18. Plasma Assisted Combustion Mechanism for Hydrogen and Small Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nikolay

    2015-09-01

    The main mechanisms of nonequilibrium gas excitation and their influence on the ignition and combustion were briefly discussed. Rotational excitation, vibrational excitation, electronic excitation, dissociation by electron impact and ionization were all analyzed, as well as the ways in which the selectivity of the gas excitation in the discharge can be controlled. The model consists of two parts. The first part describes gas excitation by electron impact - rotational, vibrational and electronic states population by pulsed discharges. The second part considers energy relaxation in the plasma (formation of Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium across translational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom of molecules), quenching and decomposition of excited states, their reactions and recombination - with formation of thermally-equilibrium pool of radicals, which could be considered as initial conditions for any detailed combustion kinetic mechanism. The mechanism was verified against available kinetic data in a wide temperature range. Despite of some lack of knowledge of mechanism details, nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential for controlling ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and is an extremely promising technology for a very wide range of applications.

  19. Physics and chemistry of plasma-assisted combustion

    PubMed Central

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    There are several mechanisms that affect a gas when using discharge plasma to initiate combustion or to stabilize a flame. There are two thermal mechanisms—the homogeneous and inhomogeneous heating of the gas due to ‘hot’ atom thermalization and vibrational and electronic energy relaxation. The homogeneous heating causes the acceleration of the chemical reactions. The inhomogeneous heating generates flow perturbations, which promote increased turbulence and mixing. Non-thermal mechanisms include the ionic wind effect (the momentum transfer from an electric field to the gas due to the space charge), ion and electron drift (which can lead to additional fluxes of active radicals in the gradient flows in the electric field) and the excitation, dissociation and ionization of the gas by e-impact, which leads to non-equilibrium radical production and changes the kinetic mechanisms of ignition and combustion. These mechanisms, either together or separately, can provide additional combustion control which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition engines, among others. Despite the lack of knowledge in mechanism details, non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential for controlling ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and is extremely promising technology for a very wide range of applications. PMID:26170435

  20. Plasma-assisted heterogeneous catalysis for NOx reduction in lean-burn engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wan, C.Z.; Rice, G.W.; Voss, K.E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the combination of a plasma with a catalyst to improve the reduction of NO{sub x} under lean-burn conditions. The authors have been investigating the effects of a plasma on the NO{sub x} reduction activity and temperature operating window of various catalytic materials. One of the goals is to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between the gas-phase plasma chemistry and the heterogeneous chemistry on the catalyst surface. The authors have observed that plasma assisted heterogeneous catalysis can facilitate NO{sub x} reduction under conditions that normally make it difficult for either the plasma or the catalyst to function by itself. By systematically varying the plasma electrode and catalyst configuration, they have been able to elucidate the process by which the plasma chemistry affects the chemical reduction of NO{sub x} on the catalyst surface. They have discovered that the main effect of the plasma is to induce the gas-phase oxidation of NO to NO{sub 21}. The reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} is then accomplished by heterogeneous reaction of O with activated hydrocarbons on the catalyst surface. The use of a plasma opens the opportunity for a new class of catalysts that are potentially more durable, more active, more selective and more sulfur-tolerant compared to conventional lean-NO{sub x} catalysts.

  1. Development of a 100 kW plasma torch for plasma assisted combustion of low heating value fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takali, S.; Fabry, F.; Rohani, V.; Cauneau, F.; Fulcheri, L.

    2014-11-01

    Most thermal power plants need an auxiliary power source to (i) heat-up the boiler during start up phases before reaching autonomy power and (ii) sustain combustion at low load. This supplementary power is commonly provided with high LHV fossil fuel burners which increases operational expenses and disables the use of anti-pollutant filters. A Promising alternative is under development and consists in high temperature plasma assisted AC electro-burners. In this paper, the development of a new 100 kW three phase plasma torch with graphite electrodes is detailed. This plasma torch is working at atmospheric pressure with air as plasma gas and has three-phase power supply and working at 680 Hz. The nominal air flow rate is 60 Nm3.h-1 and the outlet gas temperature is above 2 500 K. At the beginning, graphite electrodes erosion by oxidizing medium was studied and controlling parameters were identified through parametric set of experiments and tuned for optimal electrodes life time. Then, a new 3-phase plasma torch design was modelled and simulated on ANSYS platform. The characteristics of the plasma flow and its interaction with the environing elements of the torch are detailed hereafter.

  2. Energy Measurement in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ischebeck, R

    2007-07-06

    In the E-167 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment, electrons with an initial energy of 42GeV are accelerated in a meter-scale lithium plasma. Particles are leaving plasma with a large energy spread. To determine the spectrum of the accelerated particles, a two-plane spectrometer has been set up.

  3. Membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael; Gross, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D; Edelstein, Paul H; Collman, Ronald G; Bau, Haim H

    2013-11-01

    Often, high-sensitivity, point-of-care (POC) clinical tests, such as HIV viral load, require large volumes of plasma. Although centrifuges are ubiquitously used in clinical laboratories to separate plasma from whole blood, centrifugation is generally inappropriate for on-site testing. Suitable alternatives are not readily available to separate the relatively large volumes of plasma from milliliters of blood that may be needed to meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low-abundance target molecules. We report on a simple-to-use, low-cost, pump-free, membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from undiluted whole blood within minutes. This plasma separator consists of an asymmetric, porous, polysulfone membrane housed in a disposable chamber. The separation process takes advantage of both gravitational sedimentation of blood cells and size exclusion-based filtration. The plasma separator demonstrated a "blood in-plasma out" capability, consistently extracting 275 ± 33.5 μL of plasma from 1.8 mL of undiluted whole blood within less than 7 min. The device was used to separate plasma laden with HIV viruses from HIV virus-spiked whole blood with recovery efficiencies of 95.5% ± 3.5%, 88.0% ± 9.5%, and 81.5% ± 12.1% for viral loads of 35,000, 3500, and 350 copies/mL, respectively. The separation process is self-terminating to prevent excessive hemolysis. The HIV-laden plasma was then injected into our custom-made microfluidic chip for nucleic acid testing and was successfully subjected to reverse-transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), demonstrating that the plasma is sufficiently pure to support high-efficiency nucleic acid amplification. PMID:24099566

  4. 78 FR 25079 - Forum on Environmental Measurements Announcement of Competency Policy for Assistance Agreements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... AGENCY Forum on Environmental Measurements Announcement of Competency Policy for Assistance Agreements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Announcement of Competency Policy for Assistance... Agency-funded assistance agreements to submit documentation of their competency prior to award of...

  5. Precise charge measurement for laser plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, Dave; Donahue, Rick; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-10-01

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics was conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. Using an integrating current transformer as a calibration reference, the sensitivity of the Lanex Fast was found to decrease by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. By using electron beams from LPA, cross calibrations of the charge were carried out with an integrating current transformer, scintillating screen (Lanex from Kodak), and activation based measurement. The diagnostics agreed within ~8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided necessary cares. Work supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  6. Polarity inversion of N-face GaN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.H.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Wu Feng; Mates, Thomas E.; Speck, James S.

    2008-11-01

    The polarity of GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was inverted from N-face to Ga-face by simultaneously exposing the surface to Mg and activated N fluxes during a growth interruption at a reduced substrate temperature. Growth studies suggested that a Mg{sub x}N{sub y} compound was responsible for inverting the crystal. The change in polarity was verified in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction via GaN surface reconstructions, and ex situ by convergent beam electron diffraction and KOH etch studies. The surface of the inverted material showed smooth step flow features. Ga-face high electron mobility transistors with good dc and small signal performance were fabricated on the inverted epilayers. A drain-source current of 0.84 A/mm was measured at a gate-source voltage of +1 V. Current-gain cutoff and maximum oscillation frequencies of 22 and 53 GHz, respectively, were measured in these devices. The device performance is similar to that of Ga-face transistors with comparable dimensions.

  7. Unambiguous atomic Bell measurement assisted by multiphoton states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan Mauricio; Bernád, József Zsolt; Alber, Gernot

    2016-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate an unambiguous Bell measurement of atomic qubits assisted by multiphoton states. The atoms interact resonantly with the electromagnetic field inside two spatially separated optical cavities in a Ramsey-type interaction sequence. The qubit states are postselected by measuring the photonic states inside the resonators. We show that if one is able to project the photonic field onto two coherent states on opposite sites of phase space, an unambiguous Bell measurement can be implemented. Thus, our proposal may provide a core element for future components of quantum information technology such as a quantum repeater based on coherent multiphoton states, atomic qubits and matter-field interaction.

  8. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Pulsed Inductive Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters can su er from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA)[4], shown in Fig. 1 is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that is able to operate at lower pulse energies by partially ionizing propellant with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside a conical inductive coil whose geometry serves to potentially increase propellant and plasma plume containment relative to at coil geometries. The ECR plasma is created with the use of permanent mag- nets arranged to produce a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation and, in turn, current sheet formation to areas of high magnetic coupling to the driving coil.

  9. Surface oxidation of GaN(0001): Nitrogen plasma-assisted cleaning for ultrahigh vacuum applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Subhashis; Schmidt, Thomas Kruse, Carsten; Figge, Stephan; Hommel, Detlef; Falta, Jens

    2014-09-01

    The cleaning of metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxial GaN(0001) template layers grown on sapphire has been investigated. Different procedures, performed under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, including degassing and exposure to active nitrogen from a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source have been compared. For this purpose, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy have been employed in order to assess chemical as well as structural and morphological surface properties. Initial degassing at 600 °C under ultrahigh vacuum conditions only partially eliminates the surface contaminants. In contrast to plasma assisted nitrogen cleaning at temperatures as low as 300 °C, active-nitrogen exposure at temperatures as high as 700 °C removes the majority of oxide species from the surface. However, extended high-temperature active-nitrogen cleaning leads to severe surface roughening. Optimum results regarding both the removal of surface oxides as well as the surface structural and morphological quality have been achieved for a combination of initial low-temperature plasma-assisted cleaning, followed by a rapid nitrogen plasma-assisted cleaning at high temperature.

  10. High electron mobility GaN grown under N-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Wu, F.; Mates, T.; Speck, J. S.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.

    2007-11-26

    An alternative approach is presented for the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of high-quality GaN. Under N-rich growth conditions, an unexpected layer-by-layer growth mode was found for a wide range of growth temperatures in the GaN thermal decomposition regime (>750 deg. C). Consequently, superior surface morphologies with roughness of less than 1 nm (rms) have been achieved. For lightly Si-doped GaN films, room-temperature electron mobilities exceeding 1100 cm{sup 2}/V s were measured, surpassing the commonly insulating nature of GaN grown under N-rich conditions at low temperature.

  11. Microwave plasma burner and temperature measurements in its flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Cheon; Bang, Chan Uk; Shin, Dong Hun; Kim, Jong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup; Yi, Won Ju

    2006-05-15

    An apparatus for generating flames and more particularly the microwave plasma burner for generating high-temperature large-volume plasma flame was presented. The plasma burner is operated by injecting liquid hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge and by mixing the resultant gaseous hydrogen and carbon compounds with air or oxygen gas. The microwave plasma torch can instantaneously vaporize and decompose the hydrogen and carbon containing fuels. It was observed that the flame volume of the burner was more than 50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 550 K at a measurement point, that of the plasma-burner flame with the addition of 0.025 lpm (liters per minute) kerosene and 20 lpm oxygen drastically increased to about 1850 K. A preliminary experiment was carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions.

  12. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, J H; Molvik, A W; Turner, W C

    1982-07-07

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane.

  13. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Thrust Efficiency of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley; Polzin, Kurt; Emsellem, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) [4, 5] is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and permanent magnets that are arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the inductive coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil is under investigation. The conical geometry serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [2, 3], however a conical coil imparts a direct radial acceleration of the current sheet that serves to rapidly decouple the propellant from the coil, limiting the direct axial electromagnetic acceleration in favor of an indirect acceleration mechanism that requires significant heating of the propellant within the volume bounded by the current sheet. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance

  14. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  15. Proposed method for high-speed plasma density measurement in proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Tarkeshian, R.; Reimann, O.; Muggli, P.

    2012-12-21

    Recently a proton-bunch-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the CERN-SPS beam was proposed. Different types of plasma cells are under study, especially laser ionization, plasma discharge, and helicon sources. One of the key parameters is the spatial uniformity of the plasma density profile along the cell that has to be within < 1% of the nominal density (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}). Here a setup based on a photomixing concept is proposed to measure the plasma cut-off frequency and determine the plasma density.

  16. Process diagnostics and monitoring using the multipole resonance probe in an inhomogeneous plasma for ion-assisted deposition of optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styrnoll, T.; Harhausen, J.; Lapke, M.; Storch, R.; Brinkmann, R. P.; Foest, R.; Ohl, A.; Awakowicz, P.

    2013-08-01

    The application of a multipole resonance probe (MRP) for diagnostic and monitoring purposes in a plasma ion-assisted deposition (PIAD) process is reported. Recently, the MRP was proposed as an economical and industry compatible plasma diagnostic device (Lapke et al 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 042001). The major advantages of the MRP are its robustness against dielectric coating and its high sensitivity to measure the electron density. The PIAD process investigated is driven by the advanced plasma source (APS), which generates an ion beam in the deposition chamber for the production of high performance optical coatings. With a background neutral pressure of p0 ˜ 20 mPa the plasma expands from the source region into the recipient, leading to an inhomogeneous spatial distribution. Electron density and electron temperature vary over the distance from substrate (ne ˜ 109 cm-3 and Te,eff ˜ 2 eV) to the APS (ne ≳ 1012 cm-3 and Te,eff ˜ 20 eV) (Harhausen et al 2012 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21 035012). This huge variation of the plasma parameters represents a big challenge for plasma diagnostics to operate precisely for all plasma conditions. The results obtained by the MRP are compared to those from a Langmuir probe chosen as reference diagnostics. It is demonstrated that the MRP is suited for the characterization of the PIAD plasma as well as for electron density monitoring. The latter aspect offers the possibility to develop new control schemes for complex industrial plasma environments.

  17. Microwave plasma-assisted ignition and flameholding in premixed ethylene/air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Che A.; Wu, Wei; Wang, Chuji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a 2.45 GHz microwave source and a surfatron were used, coupled with a T-shaped quartz combustor, to investigate the role of a nonthermal microwave argon plasma jet on the plasma-assisted ignition and flameholding of a premixed ethylene/air mixture. A modified U-shaped plot of the minimum plasma power required for ignition versus fuel equivalence ratio was obtained, whereby the plasma power required for plasma-assisted ignition decreased with increase in fuel equivalence ratios in the range 0.2–0.6, but for fuel equivalence ratios of 0.7 and above, the plasma power required for ignition remained fairly constant throughout. It was observed that leaner fuel/air mixtures were more sensitive to heat losses to the surrounding and this sensitivity decreased with increase in the fuel equivalence ratio. Comparison with results obtained from previous studies suggested that the mixing scheme between the plasma and the premixed fuel/air mixture and the energy density of the fuel used played an important role in influencing the minimum plasma power required for ignition with the effect being more pronounced for near stoichiometric to rich fuel equivalence ratios (0.7–1.4). Flame images obtained showed a dual layered flame with an inner white core and a bluish outer layer. The images also showed an increased degree of flameholding (tethering of the flame to the combustor orifice) with increase in plasma power. The concurrency of the dual peaks in the emission intensity profiles for OH(A), CH(A), C2(d), and the rotational temperature profiles obtained via optical emission spectroscopy along with the ground state OH(X) number density profiles in the flame using cavity ringdown spectroscopy led to the proposal that the mechanism of plasma-assisted flameholding in ethylene/air flames is predominantly radical dependent with the formation of an inner radical rich flame core which enhances the ignition and stabilization of the surrounding coflow.

  18. Simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with application to plasma-assisted supersonic combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Kenji

    Plasma assisted combustion (PAC) is a promising alternative to hold or ignite a fuel and air mixture in a supersonic environment. Efficient supersonic combustion is of primary importance for SCRAMJET technology. The advantages of PAC is the addition of large amounts of energy to specific regions of the SCRAMJET flow-field for short periods of time, and as a result accelerate the fuel/air kinetic rates to achieve a self-sustaining condition. Moreover, the promise of enhancement of fuel-air mixing by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow control offers significant improvement of combustion performance. The development of a numerical tool for investigating high-temperature chemistry and plasmadynamic effects of a discharge arc is desired to gain understanding of PAC technology and the potential improvement of the operational efficiency of SCRAMJET engines. The main objective of this research is to develop a comprehensive model with the capability of modeling both high Reynolds number and high magnetic Reynolds number turbulent flow for application to supersonic combustor. The development of this model can be divided into three categories: first, the development of a self-consistent MHD numerical model capable of modeling magnetic turbulence in high magnetic Reynolds number applications. Second, the development of a gas discharge model which models the interaction of externally applied fields in conductive medium. Third, the development of models necessary for studying supersonic combustion applications with plasma-assistance such the extension of chemical kinetics models to extremely high temperature and non-equilibrium phenomenon. Finally, these models are combined and utilized to model plasma assisted combustion in a SCRAMJET. Two types of plasmas are investigated: an equilibrium electrical discharge (arc) and a non-equilibrium plasma jet. It is shown that both plasmas significantly increase the concentration of radicals such as O, OH and H, and both have positive impact

  19. Water-plasma-assisted synthesis of black titania spheres with efficient visible-light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Watthanaphanit, Anyarat; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-06-01

    Black titania spheres (H-TiO2-x) were synthesized via a simple green method assisted by water plasma at a low temperature and atmospheric pressure. The in situ production of highly energetic hydroxyl and hydrogen species from water plasma are the prominent factors in the oxidation and hydrogenation reactions during the formation of H-TiO2-x, respectively. The visible-light photocatalytic activity toward the dye degradation of H-TiO2-x can be attributed to the synergistic effect of large-surface area, visible-light absorption and the existence of oxygen vacancies and Ti(3+) sites. PMID:25946395

  20. Field emission from carbon nanotubes produced using microwave plasma assisted CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Yoon, S.F.; Ahn, J.; Gan, B.; Rusli; Yu, M.B.; Cheah, L.K.; Shi, X.

    2000-01-30

    Electron field emission from carbon nanotubes prepared using microwave plasma assisted CVD has been investigated. The nanotubes, ranging from 50 to 120 nm in diameter and a few tens of microns in length, were formed under methane and hydrogen plasma at 720 C with the aid of iron-oxide particles. The morphology and growth direction of the nanotubes are found to be strongly influenced by the flow ratio of methane to hydrogen. However, the electron field emission from these massive nanotubes show similar characteristics, i.e., high emission current at low electric fields.

  1. Novel diagnostics of metabolic dysfunction detected in breath and plasma by selective isotope-assisted labeling.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Julia A; Tonelli, Marco; Haughey, Dermot T; Porter, Warren P; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2012-08-01

    Metabolomics is the study of a unique fingerprint of small molecules present in biological systems under healthy and disease conditions. One of the major challenges in metabolomics is validation of fingerprint molecules to identify specifically perturbed pathways in metabolic aberrations. This step is crucial to the understanding of budding metabolic pathologies and the ability to identify early indicators of common diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We present a novel approach to diagnosing aberrations in glucose utilization including metabolic pathway switching in a disease state. We used a well-defined prenatally exposed glucocorticoid mouse model that results in adult females with metabolic dysfunction. We applied the complementary technologies of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy to analyze serial plasma samples and real-time breath measurements following selective (13)C-isotope-assisted labeling. These platforms allowed us to trace metabolic markers in whole animals and identify key metabolic pathway switching in prenatally glucocorticoid-treated animals. Total glucose flux is significantly proportionally increased through the major oxidative pathways of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway in the prenatally glucocorticoid-treated animals relative to the control animals. This novel diagnostics approach is fast, noninvasive, and sensitive for determining specific pathway utilization, and provides a direct translational application in the health care field. PMID:22304834

  2. Novel diagnostics of metabolic dysfunction detected in breath and plasma by selective isotope assisted labeling (SIAL)

    PubMed Central

    Haviland, Julia A.; Tonelli, Marco; Haughey, Dermot T.; Porter, Warren P.; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Metabolomics is the study of a unique fingerprint of small molecules present in biological systems under healthy and disease conditions. One of the major challenges in metabolomics is validation of fingerprint molecules to identify specifically perturbed pathways in metabolic aberrations. This step is crucial to the understanding of budding metabolic pathologies and the ability to identify early indicators of common diseases such as obesity, diabetes mellitus type II, metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We present a novel approach to diagnosing aberrations in glucose utilization including metabolic pathway switching in a disease state. METHODS We used a well-defined prenatally exposed glucocorticoid mouse model that results in adult females with metabolic dysfunction. We applied the complementary technologies of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cavity ringdown spectroscopy to analyze serial plasma samples and real-time breath measurements following selective 13C-isotope assisted labeling (SIAL). These platforms allowed us to trace metabolic markers in whole animals and identify key metabolic pathway switching in prenatally glucocorticoid-treated animals. RESULTS Total glucose flux is significantly proportionally increased through the major oxidative pathways of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway in the prenatally glucocorticoid-treated animals relative to the control animals. CONCLUSION This novel diagnostics approach is fast, non-invasive and sensitive for determining specific pathway utilization, and provides a direct translational application in the healthcare field. PMID:22304834

  3. Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of SnO 2 on TiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M. Y.; White, M. E.; Speck, J. S.

    2008-08-01

    Epitaxial growth of SnO 2 on TiO 2 (1 1 0) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was studied under various growth conditions to explore the potential for high-quality single crystalline growth. Phase-pure (1 1 0)-oriented SnO 2 films with an optimum on-axis X-ray rocking curve scan full-width at half-maximum equal to 0.612° were grown. The film epitaxy proceeded in the Volmer-Weber growth mode. We identified different growth regimes by measuring growth rate variations correlated with increasing tin fluxes at a fixed oxygen pressure. Beginning in the oxygen-rich growth regime, growth rates increased linearly as the tin flux increased. Atomically flat surfaces were observed in the oxygen-rich regime. Continued tin flux increases resulted in a maximum growth rate of 470 nm/h. Further tin flux increases prevented SnO 2 formation on the growth surface and acted as a nucleation barrier of SnO 2 on the TiO 2 substrates identifying a metal-rich growth regime.

  4. Two-dimensional-spatial distribution measurement of electron temperature and plasma density in low temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Jang, Sung-Ho; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-05-15

    A real-time measurement method for two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density was developed. The method is based on the floating harmonic method and the real time measurement is achieved with little plasma perturbation. 2D arrays of the sensors on a 300 mm diameter wafer-shaped printed circuit board with a high speed multiplexer circuit were used. Experiments were performed in an inductive discharge under various external conditions, such as powers, gas pressures, and different gas mixing ratios. The results are consistent with theoretical prediction. Our method can measure the 2D spatial distribution of plasma parameters on a wafer-level in real-time. This method can be applied to plasma diagnostics to improve the plasma uniformity of plasma reactors for plasma processing.

  5. An ultrasound-assisted digestion method for the determination of toxic element concentrations in ash samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ilander, Aki; Väisänen, Ari

    2007-10-29

    A method of ultrasound-assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) used for the determination of toxic element concentrations (arsenic, barium, cobalt, copper, lead, nickel, strontium, vanadium and zinc) in ash samples was developed. All the measurements were performed in robust plasma conditions which were tested by measuring the Mg(II) 280.270 nm/Mg(I) 285.213 nm line intensity ratios. The highest line intensity ratios were observed when a nebulizer gas flow of 0.6 L min(-1), auxiliary gas flow of 0.2 L min(-1) and plasma power of 1400 W were used for radially viewed plasma. The analysis of SRM 1633b showed that the ultrasound-assisted method developed is highly comparable with the microwave digestion method standardized by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-3052). The ultrasound-assisted digestion with a digestion solution of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid (HF) resulted in recovery rates of over 81%. One exception is arsenic which resulted in recoveries of about 60% only; however, it could be digested with good recovery (>90%) using a digestion solution of 5 mL of water and 5 mL of aqua regia. The major advantage of the ultrasound-assisted digestion over microwave digestion is the high treatment rate (30 samples simultaneously with a sonication time of 18 min). PMID:17933604

  6. Sequential quadrature measurements for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Hidalgo, Julio

    The study of the ionosphere has been very important due to its effects on terrestrial and satellite communications. This thesis presents an introduction of the ionosphere effects, its modeling and measurement methods that have been used along the history. The Sweeping Impedance Probe (SIP) has proven over the years to be a reliable method based on the radio frequency (RF) behavior of the plasma. A new SIP architecture is presented based on the latest techniques available, using a Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) detection and employing dynamic correction of errors with Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) and a reference channel. The design will be detailed showing the component selection based on their performance parameters. In this sense, several analyses have been made to ensure that the sweep rate and accuracy requirements can be met. The testing and calibration methodology is developed to further increase the final accuracy of the instrument. Lastly, the main conclusions of the project are summarized and new and exciting lines of work are presented for what is expected to be the next generation of SIP instruments.

  7. Plasma Sensor Measurements in Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlis, Eric; Marshall, Curtis; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2014-11-01

    Measurements have been conducted in a pulse detonation and rotating detonation engine using a newly developed plasma sensor. This sensor relies on the novel approach of using an ac-driven, weakly-ionized electrical discharge as the main sensing element. The advantages of this approach include a native high bandwidth of 1 MHz without the need for electronic frequency compensation, a dual-mode capability that provides sensitivity to multiple flow parameters, including velocity, pressure, temperature, and gas-species, and a simple and robust design making it very cost effective. The sensor design is installation-compatible with conventional sensors commonly used in gas-turbine research such as the Kulite dynamic pressure sensor while providing much better longevity. Developmental work was performed in high temperature facilities that are relevant to the propulsion and high-speed research community. This includes tests performed in a J85 augmentor at full afterburner and pulse-detonation engines at the University of Cincinnati (UC) at temperatures approaching 2760°C (5000°F).

  8. Measurement of supersonic plasma interacting with stationary plasma by electric probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Han; Kang, In Je; Bae, Min Keun; Cho, Soon-Gook; Kim, Sang-You; Choi, Heung-Gyoon; Hong, Sung-Hoon; Lho, Tae-Hyup; Chung, Kyu-Sun

    2015-09-01

    Supersonic plasma is generally related to the formation of young star object (YSO), active galactic nuclei (AGN) and new galaxies via plasma bubble expansion during the event of super nova. Capacitive coupled plasma (CCP) is produced by RF power of 13.56 MHz and the plasma is accelerated by negatively biased cascade grid to produce supersonic flow. Electron temperature, plasma density and Mach number are measured by using a single probe and a Mach probe. Electron temperature and plasma density of CCP are 0.8 eV and 1.8 × 109 cm-3, respectively. Mach number of supersonic plasma flow is about 2 and 50 W RF power at 52 mTorr. Ambient plasma is generated by DC filament discharge and its electron temperature and plasma density are 0.5 eV and 3 × 1010 cm-3, respectively. When the supersonic plasma flow interact with ambient plasma, electron temperature is increased higher than ambient plasma up to 4 eV, and plasma density is decreased from 4 × 1010 cm-3 to 1 × 1010 cm-3. Density contrast η of supersonic plasma flow of our experiment is about 0.04, while AGN jets in universe are observed to have density contrast η of lower than 10-2.

  9. Laser assisted works for pulsed ion sources: Plasma productions, diagnostics and related computations

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Watanabe, M.; Matsuno, S.; Kamiya, T.; Suzuki, T.; Hushiki, T.; Horioka, K.; Kawakita, Y.; Kuwahara, T.; Shioda, K.; Kanazawa, H.; Okuda, H. )

    1994-10-05

    Recent laser assisted works for pulsed ion beam drivers are described in this paper. The first one is a plasma production by a KrF laser light which may be applicable to an ion source. The second item is a transverse-mode-diagnostic of a discharge-pumped laser. The third one is a one-dimensional computation of the latter laser. [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

  10. Epitaxial growth of AlN films via plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nepal, N.; Qadri, S. B.; Hite, J. K.; Mahadik, N. A.; Mastro, M. A.; Eddy, C. R. Jr.

    2013-08-19

    Thin AlN layers were grown at 200–650 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy (PA-ALE) simultaneously on Si(111), sapphire (1120), and GaN/sapphire substrates. The AlN growth on Si(111) is self-limited for trimethyaluminum (TMA) pulse of length > 0.04 s, using a 10 s purge. However, the AlN nucleation on GaN/sapphire is non-uniform and has a bimodal island size distribution for TMA pulse of ≤0.03 s. The growth rate (GR) remains almost constant for T{sub g} between 300 and 400 °C indicating ALE mode at those temperatures. The GR is increased by 20% at T{sub g} = 500 °C. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurement shows that the ALE AlN layers grown at T{sub g} ≤ 400 °C have no clear band edge related features, however, the theoretically estimated band gap of 6.2 eV was measured for AlN grown at T{sub g} ≥ 500 °C. X-ray diffraction measurements on 37 nm thick AlN films grown at optimized growth conditions (T{sub g} = 500 °C, 10 s purge, 0.06 s TMA pulse) reveal that the ALE AlN on GaN/sapphire is (0002) oriented with rocking curve full width at the half maximum (FWHM) of 670 arc sec. Epitaxial growth of crystalline AlN layers by PA-ALE at low temperatures broadens application of the material in the technologies that require large area conformal growth at low temperatures with thickness control at the atomic scale.

  11. Measurement of the edge plasma rotation on J-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z F; Luo, J; Wang, Z J; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, X L; Hou, S Y; Cheng, C; Zhuang, G

    2013-07-01

    A multi-channel high resolution spectrometer was developed for the measurement of the edge plasma rotation on J-TEXT tokamak. With the design of two opposite viewing directions, the poloidal and toroidal rotations can be measured simultaneously, and velocity accuracy is up to 1 km∕s. The photon flux was enhanced by utilizing combined optical fiber. With this design, the time resolution reaches 3 ms. An assistant software "Spectra Assist" was developed for implementing the spectrometer control and data analysis automatically. A multi-channel monochromatic analyzer is designed to get the location of chosen ions simultaneously through the inversion analysis. Some preliminary experimental results about influence of plasma density, different magnetohydrodynamics behaviors, and applying of biased electrode are presented. PMID:23902064

  12. Plasma Diagnostics by Antenna Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, C. M.; Baker, K. D.; Pound, E.; Jensen, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The impedance of an electrically short antenna immersed in a plasma provides an excellent in situ diagnostic tool for electron density and other plasma parameters. By electrically short we mean that the wavelength of the free-space electromagnetic wave that would be excited at the driving frequency is much longer than the physical size of the antenna. Probes using this impedance technique have had a long history with sounding rockets and satellites, stretching back to the early 1960s. This active technique could provide information on composition and temperature of plasmas for comet or planetary missions. Advantages of the impedance probe technique are discussed and two classes of instruments built and flown by SDL-USU for determining electron density (the capacitance and plasma frequency probes) are described.

  13. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes by argon plasma-assisted ultraviolet grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y. H.; Chan-Park, M. B.; Zhou, Q.; Li, C. M.; Yue, C. Y.

    2005-11-01

    We have demonstrated the functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by argon (Ar) plasma-assisted ultraviolet (UV) grafting of 1-vinylimidazole (VZ). The Ar plasma treatment generates defect sites at the tube ends and sidewalls, which act as the active sites for the subsequent UV grafting of VZ monomer. Atomic force microscopy analyses indicate that the original nanotube bundles exfoliate to individual tubes after the VZ grafting. By control of the deposited energy of Ar plasma treatment (200W) and treatment time (5min), no visible chopping of the functionalized SWNT was observed. This method may be extended to other vinyl monomers and offers another diverse way of sidewall functionalization of SWNT.

  14. Theoretical modeling of the plasma-assisted catalytic growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Neha

    2015-12-15

    A theoretical modeling for the catalyst-assisted growth of graphene sheet in the presence of plasma has been investigated. It is observed that the plasma parameters can strongly affect the growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet. The model developed accounts for the charging rate of the graphene sheet; number density of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms; various elementary processes on the surface of the catalyst nanoparticle; surface diffusion and accretion of ions; and formation of carbon-clusters and large graphene islands. In our investigation, it is found that the thickness of the graphene sheet decreases with the plasma parameters, number density of hydrogen ions and RF power, and consequently, the field emission of electrons from the graphene sheet surface increases. The time evolution of the height of graphene sheet with ion density and sticking coefficient of carbon species has also been examined. Some of our theoretical results are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  15. Plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy of GaN with growth rates >2.6 μm/h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSkimming, Brian M.; Wu, F.; Huault, Thomas; Chaix, Catherine; Speck, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxial (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was explored with a novel modification of a commercially available nitrogen plasma source. The modified nitrogen plasma source enabled a dramatic increase in the flux of active nitrogen and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N2 gas flow rates between 1 and 8 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux achieved was ~2.65 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 μm×3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1×1016 and 5×1016 respectively, comparable to the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown template layer. Initial un-optimized electron mobility measurements of 1 μm thick GaN layers have shown a peak mobility of ~705 cm2/V s for an electron concentration of ~3.5×1016 cm-3. A revised universal growth diagram is proposed allowing the rapid determination of the metal flux needed to grow in a specific growth regime for any and all active nitrogen fluxes available.

  16. Germanium doping of self-assembled GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Schörmann, Jörg; Hille, Pascal; Schäfer, Markus; Müßener, Jan; Becker, Pascal; Klar, Peter J.; Hofmann, Detlev M.; Teubert, Jörg; Eickhoff, Martin; Kleine-Boymann, Matthias; Rohnke, Marcus; Mata, Maria de la; Arbiol, Jordi

    2013-09-14

    Germanium doping of GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates is studied. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements reveal a constant Ge-concentration along the growth axis. A linear relationship between the applied Ge-flux and the resulting ensemble Ge-concentration with a maximum content of 3.3×10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} is extracted from energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements and confirmed by a systematic increase of the conductivity with Ge-concentration in single nanowire measurements. Photoluminescence analysis of nanowire ensembles and single nanowires reveals an exciton localization energy of 9.5 meV at the neutral Ge-donor. A Ge-related emission band at energies above 3.475 eV is found that is assigned to a Burstein-Moss shift of the excitonic emission.

  17. Ion-assisted functional monolayer coating of nanorod arrays in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, E.; Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Keidar, M.; Xu, S.

    2007-02-01

    Uniformity of postprocessing of large-area, dense nanostructure arrays is currently one of the greatest challenges in nanoscience and nanofabrication. One of the major issues is to achieve a high level of control in specie fluxes to specific surface areas of the nanostructures. As suggested by the numerical experiments in this work, this goal can be achieved by manipulating microscopic ion fluxes by varying the plasma sheath and nanorod array parameters. The dynamics of ion-assisted deposition of functional monolayer coatings onto two-dimensional carbon nanorod arrays in a hydrogen plasma is simulated by using a multiscale hybrid numerical simulation. The numerical results show evidence of a strong correlation between the aspect ratios and nanopattern positioning of the nanorods, plasma sheath width, and densities and distributions of microscopic ion fluxes. When the spacing between the nanorods and/or their aspect ratios are larger, and/or the plasma sheath is wider, the density of microscopic ion current flowing to each of the individual nanorods increases, thus reducing the time required to apply a functional monolayer coating down to 11 s for a 7-μm-wide sheath, and to 5 s for a 50-μm-wide sheath. The computed monolayer coating development time is consistent with previous experimental reports on plasma-assisted functionalization of related carbon nanostructures [B. N. Khare et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 5237 (2002)]. The results are generic in that they can be applied to a broader range of plasma-based processes and nanostructures, and contribute to the development of deterministic strategies of postprocessing and functionalization of various nanoarrays for nanoelectronic, biomedical, and other emerging applications.

  18. Ion-assisted functional monolayer coating of nanorod arrays in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, E.; Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Keidar, M.; Xu, S.

    2007-03-01

    Uniformity of postprocessing of large-area, dense nanostructure arrays is currently one of the greatest challenges in nanoscience and nanofabrication. One of the major issues is to achieve a high level of control in specie fluxes to specific surface areas of the nanostructures. As suggested by the numerical experiments in this work, this goal can be achieved by manipulating microscopic ion fluxes by varying the plasma sheath and nanorod array parameters. The dynamics of ion-assisted deposition of functional monolayer coatings onto two-dimensional carbon nanorod arrays in a hydrogen plasma is simulated by using a multiscale hybrid numerical simulation. The numerical results show evidence of a strong correlation between the aspect ratios and nanopattern positioning of the nanorods, plasma sheath width, and densities and distributions of microscopic ion fluxes. When the spacing between the nanorods and/or their aspect ratios are larger, and/or the plasma sheath is wider, the density of microscopic ion current flowing to each of the individual nanorods increases, thus reducing the time required to apply a functional monolayer coating down to 11s for a 7-μm-wide sheath, and to 5s for a 50-μm-wide sheath. The computed monolayer coating development time is consistent with previous experimental reports on plasma-assisted functionalization of related carbon nanostructures [B. N. Khare et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 5237 (2002)]. The results are generic in that they can be applied to a broader range of plasma-based processes and nanostructures, and contribute to the development of deterministic strategies of postprocessing and functionalization of various nanoarrays for nanoelectronic, biomedical, and other emerging applications.

  19. Optoelectronic and structural properties of InGaN nanostructures grown by plasma-assisted MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidlitz, Daniel; Senevirathna, M. K. I.; Abate, Y.; Hoffmann, A.; Dietz, N.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents optoelectronic and structural layer properties of InN and InGaN epilayers grown on sapphire templates by Migration-Enhanced Plasma Assisted Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MEPA-MOCVD). Real-time characterization techniques have been applied during the growth process to gain insight of the plasma-assisted decomposition of the nitrogen precursor and associated growth surface processes. Analyzed Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (PES) and UV Absorption Spectroscopy (UVAS) provide detection and concentrations of plasma generated active species (N*/NH*/NHx*). Various precursors have been used to assess the nitrogen-active fragments that are directed from the hollow cathode plasma tube to the growth surface. The in-situ diagnostics results are supplemented with ex-situ materials structures investigation results of nanoscale structures using Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM). The structural properties have been analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance. The Optoelectronic and optical properties were extracted by modeling the FTIR reflectance (e.g. free carrier concentration, high frequency dielectric constant, mobility) and optical absorption spectroscopy. The correlation and comparison between the in-situ metrology results with the ex-situ nano-structural and optoelectronic layer properties provides insides into the growth mechanism on how plasma-activated nitrogen-fragments can be utilized as nitrogen precursor for group III-nitride growth. The here assessed growth process parameter focus on the temporal precursor exposure of the growth surface, the reactor pressure, substrate temperature and their effects of the properties of the InN and InGaN epilayers.

  20. Ion-assisted functional monolayer coating of nanorod arrays in hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, E.; Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Keidar, M.; Xu, S.

    2007-02-15

    Uniformity of postprocessing of large-area, dense nanostructure arrays is currently one of the greatest challenges in nanoscience and nanofabrication. One of the major issues is to achieve a high level of control in specie fluxes to specific surface areas of the nanostructures. As suggested by the numerical experiments in this work, this goal can be achieved by manipulating microscopic ion fluxes by varying the plasma sheath and nanorod array parameters. The dynamics of ion-assisted deposition of functional monolayer coatings onto two-dimensional carbon nanorod arrays in a hydrogen plasma is simulated by using a multiscale hybrid numerical simulation. The numerical results show evidence of a strong correlation between the aspect ratios and nanopattern positioning of the nanorods, plasma sheath width, and densities and distributions of microscopic ion fluxes. When the spacing between the nanorods and/or their aspect ratios are larger, and/or the plasma sheath is wider, the density of microscopic ion current flowing to each of the individual nanorods increases, thus reducing the time required to apply a functional monolayer coating down to 11 s for a 7-{mu}m-wide sheath, and to 5 s for a 50-{mu}m-wide sheath. The computed monolayer coating development time is consistent with previous experimental reports on plasma-assisted functionalization of related carbon nanostructures [B. N. Khare et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 5237 (2002)]. The results are generic in that they can be applied to a broader range of plasma-based processes and nanostructures, and contribute to the development of deterministic strategies of postprocessing and functionalization of various nanoarrays for nanoelectronic, biomedical, and other emerging applications.

  1. Measuring the positional accuracy of computer assisted surgical tracking systems.

    PubMed

    Clarke, J V; Deakin, A H; Nicol, A C; Picard, F

    2010-01-01

    Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) technology is constantly evolving with support from a growing number of clinical trials. In contrast, reports of technical accuracy are scarce, with there being no recognized guidelines for independent measurement of the basic static performance of computer assisted systems. To address this problem, a group of surgeons, academics and manufacturers involved in the field of CAOS collaborated with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International and drafted a set of standards for measuring and reporting the technical performance of such systems. The aims of this study were to use these proposed guidelines in assessing the positional accuracy of both a commercially available and a novel tracking system. A standardized measurement object model based on the ASTM guidelines was designed and manufactured to provide an array of points in space. Both the Polaris camera with associated active infrared trackers and a novel system that used a small visible-light camera (MicronTracker) were evaluated by measuring distances and single point repeatability. For single point registration the measurements were obtained both manually and with the pointer rigidly clamped to eliminate human movement artifact. The novel system produced unacceptably large distance errors and was not evaluated beyond this stage. The commercial system was precise and its accuracy was well within the expected range. However, when the pointer was held manually, particularly by a novice user, the results were significantly less precise by a factor of almost ten. The ASTM guidelines offer a simple, standardized method for measuring positional accuracy and could be used to enable independent testing of tracking systems. The novel system demonstrated a high level of inaccuracy that made it inappropriate for clinical testing. The commercially available tracking system performed well within expected limits under optimal conditions, but revealed a

  2. Comparison of Theory with Rotation Measurements in JET ICRH Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Giroud; R.J. Goldston; D. McCune; J. Ongena; F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; K.-D. Zastrow; and contributors to the EFDA-JET work programme

    2001-06-27

    Plasma rotation appears to improve plasma performance by increasing the E x B flow shearing rate, thus decreasing radial correlations in the microturbulence. Also, plasma rotation can increase the stability to resistive MHD modes. In the Joint European Torus (JET), toroidal rotation rates omega (subscript ''tor'') with high Mach numbers are generally measured in NBI-heated plasmas (since the neutral beams aim in the co-plasma current direction). They are considerably lower with only ICRH (and Ohmic) heating, but still surprisingly large considering that ICRH appears to inject relatively small amounts of angular momentum. Either the applied torques are larger than naively expected, or the anomalous transport of angular momentum is smaller than expected. Since ICRH is one of the main candidates for heating next-step tokamaks, and for creating burning plasmas in future tokamak reactors, this paper attempts to understand ICRH-induced plasma rotation.

  3. Microwave engineering of plasma-assisted CVD reactors for diamond deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F.; Hassouni, K.; Bonnin, X.; Gicquel, A.

    2009-09-01

    The unique properties of CVD diamond make it a compelling choice for high power electronics. In order to achieve industrial use of CVD diamond, one must simultaneously obtain an excellent control of the film purity, very low defect content and a sufficiently rapid growth rate. Currently, only microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPACVD) processes making use of resonant cavity systems provide enough atomic hydrogen to satisfy these requirements. We show in this paper that the use of high microwave power density (MWPD) plasmas is necessary to promote atomic hydrogen concentrations that are high enough to ensure the deposition of high purity diamond films at large growth rates. Moreover, the deposition of homogeneous films on large surfaces calls for the production of plasma with appropriate shapes and large volumes. The production of such plasmas needs generating a fairly high electric field over extended regions and requires a careful design of the MW coupling system, especially the cavity. As far as MW coupling efficiency is concerned, the presence of a plasma load represents a mismatching perturbation to the cavity. This perturbation is especially important at high MWPD where the reflected fraction of the input power may be quite high. This mismatch can lead to a pronounced heating of the reactor walls. It must therefore be taken into account from the very beginning of the reactor design. This requires the implementation of plasma modelling tools coupled to detailed electromagnetic simulations. This is discussed in section 3. We also briefly discuss the operating principles of the main commercial plasma reactors before introducing the reactor design methodology we have developed. Modelling results for a new generation of reactors developed at LIMHP, working at very high power density, will be presented. Lastly, we show that scaling up this type of reactor to lower frequencies (915 MHz) can result in high density plasmas allowing for fast and

  4. Microwave engineering of plasma-assisted CVD reactors for diamond deposition.

    PubMed

    Silva, F; Hassouni, K; Bonnin, X; Gicquel, A

    2009-09-01

    The unique properties of CVD diamond make it a compelling choice for high power electronics. In order to achieve industrial use of CVD diamond, one must simultaneously obtain an excellent control of the film purity, very low defect content and a sufficiently rapid growth rate. Currently, only microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPACVD) processes making use of resonant cavity systems provide enough atomic hydrogen to satisfy these requirements. We show in this paper that the use of high microwave power density (MWPD) plasmas is necessary to promote atomic hydrogen concentrations that are high enough to ensure the deposition of high purity diamond films at large growth rates. Moreover, the deposition of homogeneous films on large surfaces calls for the production of plasma with appropriate shapes and large volumes. The production of such plasmas needs generating a fairly high electric field over extended regions and requires a careful design of the MW coupling system, especially the cavity. As far as MW coupling efficiency is concerned, the presence of a plasma load represents a mismatching perturbation to the cavity. This perturbation is especially important at high MWPD where the reflected fraction of the input power may be quite high. This mismatch can lead to a pronounced heating of the reactor walls. It must therefore be taken into account from the very beginning of the reactor design. This requires the implementation of plasma modelling tools coupled to detailed electromagnetic simulations. This is discussed in section 3. We also briefly discuss the operating principles of the main commercial plasma reactors before introducing the reactor design methodology we have developed. Modelling results for a new generation of reactors developed at LIMHP, working at very high power density, will be presented. Lastly, we show that scaling up this type of reactor to lower frequencies (915 MHz) can result in high density plasmas allowing for fast and

  5. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  6. Langmuir Probe Measurements in Plasma Shadows

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, O.; Koch, B.; Fussmann, G.

    2006-01-15

    When immersing a target into a plasma streaming along magnetic field lines, a distinct shadow region extending over large distances is observed by the naked eye downstream of the target.In this work we present an experimental study of the effect applying Langmuir probes. In contrast to expectations, there are only marginal changes in the profiles of temperature and density behind masks that cut away about 50% of the plasma cross-section. On the other hand, the mean density is drastically reduced by an order of magnitude. First attempts to simulate the observations by solving the classical 2D diffusion equation were not successful.

  7. Selective Reduction of NOx in Oxygen Rich Environment with Plasma-Assisted Catalysis: Role of Plasma and Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, Alexander G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Balmer, Marilou L.; Peden, Charles HF.; Malkin, A; Hoard, John; Balmer, M.L.; Fisher, G.; Hoard, J.

    2001-09-01

    Catalytic activity of selected materials (BaY and NaY zeolites, and g-Alumina) for selective NOx reduction in combination with a non-thermal plasma was investigated. Our studies suggest that aldehydes formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, all materials that are active in plasma-assisted catalysis were found to be very effective in the thermal reduction of NOx in the presence of aldehydes. For example, the thermal catalytic activity of a BaY zeolite with aldehydes gives 80-90% NOx removal at 250 C with 200ppm NOx at the inlet, 1000ppm of C1 as acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and butyraldehyde, and SV=12,000 h?. The hydrocarbon reductants, n-octane and 1-propyl alcohol have also shown high thermal catalytic activity for NOx removal over BaY, NaY and g-alumina. We believe that this activity is due to the fact that in an oxygen rich environment these compounds can be thermally oxidized over the catalysts to form the important aldehyde reaction intermediates.

  8. Microwave radiation measurements near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallavarpu, R.; Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave emission near the electron plasma frequency was observed, and its relation to the average electron density and the dc toroidal magnetic field was examined. The emission was detected using a spectrum analyzer and a 50 omega miniature coaxial probe. The radiation appeared as a broad amplitude peak that shifted in frequency as the plasma parameters were varied. The observed radiation scanned an average plasma density ranging from 10 million/cu cm to 8 hundred million/cu cm. A linear relation was observed betweeen the density calculated from the emission frequency and the average plasma density measured with a microwave interferometer. With the aid of a relative density profile measurement of the plasma, it was determined that the emissions occurred from the outer periphery of the plasma.

  9. Interferometer for the measurement of plasma density

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Abram R.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer which combines the advantages of a coupled cavity interferometer requiring alignment of only one light beam, and a quadrature interferometer which has the ability to track multi-fringe phase excursions unambiguously. The device utilizes a Bragg cell for generating a signal which is electronically analyzed to unambiguously determine phase modulation which is proportional to the path integral of the plasma density.

  10. Measurement of plasma temperature and density using laser absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A laser radiation absorption technique, suitable for temporal measurement of the electron density, the temperature, or a simultaneous determination of both, in an LTE plasma, is discussed. The theoretical calculation of the absorption coefficient for a hydrogen plasma is outlined; some results are presented for visible wavelengths. Measurements of electron density and temperature are presented and shown to be in good agreement with those values obtained by other methods. Finally, the possible use of the argon ion laser for simultaneous electron density and temperature measurement is discussed, and the theoretical curves necessary for its application to hydrogen plasma diagnostics are shown.

  11. Plasma Sheet Velocity Measurement Techniques for the Pulsed Plasma Thruster SIMP-LEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Lau, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of the first plasma sheet was determined between the electrodes of a pulsed plasma thruster using three measurement techniques: time of flight probe, high speed camera and magnetic field probe. Further, for time of flight probe and magnetic field probe, it was possible to determine the velocity distribution along the electrodes, as the plasma sheet is accelerated. The results from all three techniques are shown, and are compared for one thruster geometry.

  12. Plasma Parameters in Io's Torus: Measurements from Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Turner, Jake; Schmidt, Carl; Thelen, Michael; McNeil, Eric; Rugenski, Stacey; Chanover, Nancy; Oza, Apurva; Thelen, Alexander; Johnson, Robert E.; Bittle, Lauren; King, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    We report observations from nine nights of observations of the Io plasma torus made in conjunction with JAXA's Hisaki mission torus observations and the Hubble Space telescope auroral campaign. Groundbased remote sensing of forbidden line emissions yield measures of plasma density which cannot be made at UV wavelengths.

  13. Measurements of the negative ion density in reactive gas plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Masako; Ueda, Yoko; Kawai, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Nobuo

    1999-11-01

    The reactive gas plasmas, such as C_4F_8, SiH4 and SF6 gas plasmas, have been widely used in plasma etching or CVD. The radicals and ions species in these plasmas have been reported in a lot of study. However, the negative ion density has not been measured quantitatively, since the conventional Langmuir probe cannot be used due to film depositions on its surface. In this study, the negative ion density in the reactive gas plasmas was measured with a heated Langmuir probe and an 8-mm microwave interferometer as a function of gas flow rate and radial position. Furthermore, the following equation was suggested to estimate the negative ion density only from the probe measurements: fracI_+(X )I_+(Ar) = [ fracI_-(X)I_-(Ar) + fracN_-(X )N_+(Ar)√fracT_e(X)T_e(Ar) ] √fracM_+(Ar)M_+(X), where N- denotes negative ion density and the other characteristics represent the conventional ones. The positive ion mass M+ should be assumed properly. It was confirmed that this equation provides the negative ion density both in the magnetized plasmas, such as ECR plasmas, and non-magnetized plasmas.

  14. Plasma assisted spectroscopic monitoring of alkali metals in pressurised combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Haeyrinen, V.T.; Hernberg, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    The paper describes an instrument for on-line concentration measurement of vaporised alkali compounds in pressurised industrial combustion and gasification processes. The measurement is based on Plasma Excited Alkali Resonance Line Spectroscopy (PEARLS) at the elevated pressure (1-3 MPa) of the process. Results are presented from laboratory calibration measurements and test measurements of sodium and potassium vapours resulting from the combustion of coal powder in a pressurised entrained flow reactor.

  15. Measurement of acceleration in femtosecond laser-plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haessner, R.; Theobald, W.; Niedermeier, S.; Michelmann, K.; Feurer, T.; Schillinger, H.; Sauerbrey, R.

    1998-02-20

    Accelerations up to 4x10{sup 19} m/s{sup 2} are measured in femtosecond laser-produced plasmas at intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} using the Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) technique. A high density plasma is formed by focusing an ultrashort unchirped laser pulse on a plane carbon target and part of the reflected pulse is eventually detected by a FROG autocorrelator. Radiation pressure and thermal pressure accelerate the plasma which causes a chirp in the reflected laser pulse. The retrieved phase and amplitude information reveal that the plasma motion is dominated by the large light pressure which pushes the plasma into the target. This is supported by theoretical estimates and by the results of independently measured time integrated spectra of the reflected pulse.

  16. Graphene matrix for signal enhancement in ambient plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cuilan; Li, Xianjiang; Bai, Yu; Xu, Gege; Feng, Baosheng; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2013-09-30

    In this work, the signal intensity of ambient plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (PALDI-MS) was significantly increased with graphene as matrix. The graphene functions as a substrate to trap analytes, absorb energy from the visible laser irradiation and transfer energy to the analytes to facilitate the laser desorption process. The desorbed analytes are further ionized by helium plasma and analyzed by MS. Compared with a traditional organic matrix, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), graphene exhibited much higher desorption efficiency for most of the compounds benefitting from the strong optical absorption at 532nm. The performance has been confirmed by the facile analysis of more than forty compounds with various structures. Additionally, this method was successfully applied to distinguish three kinds of Chinese tea leaves by detecting the endogenous caffeine and theanine, which proved the utility, facility and convenience of this method for rapid screening of main components in real samples. PMID:23953441

  17. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L [Knoxville, TN; Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; Bigelow, Timothy S [Knoxville, TN

    2010-11-02

    A system to continuously produce fully carbonized or graphitized carbon fibers using microwave-assisted plasma (MAP) processing comprises an elongated chamber in which a microwave plasma is excited in a selected gas atmosphere. Fiber is drawn continuously through the chamber, entering and exiting through openings designed to minimize in-leakage of air. There is a gradient of microwave power within the chamber with generally higher power near where the fiber exits and lower power near where the fiber enters. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN), pitch, or any other suitable organic/polymeric precursor fibers can be used as a feedstock for the inventive system. Oxidized or partially oxidized PAN or pitch or other polymeric fiber precursors are run continuously through a MAP reactor in an inert, non-oxidizing atmosphere to heat the fibers, drive off the unwanted elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen, and produce carbon or graphite fibers faster than conventionally produced carbon fibers.

  18. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4 nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  19. Rapid labeling of lipoproteins in plasma with radioactive cholesterol. Application for measurement of plasma cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, F.T.; Nishida, T. )

    1990-02-01

    In order to efficiently and rapidly label lipoproteins in plasma with ({sup 3}H)cholesterol, micelles consisting of lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and ({sup 3}H)cholesterol (molar ratio, 50:1) were prepared. When trace amounts of these micelles were injected into plasma, ({sup 3}H)cholesterol rapidly equilibrated among the plasma lipoproteins, as compared to ({sup 3}H)cholesterol from an albumin-stabilized emulsion. The distributions of both ({sup 3}H)cholesterol and unlabeled free cholesterol in plasma lipoproteins were similar in labeled plasma samples. This method of labeling can be used for the measurement of cholesterol esterification, or lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity, in small amounts (20-40 microliters) of plasma samples.

  20. High Active Nitrogen Flux Growth of (Indium) Gallium Nitride by Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSkimming, Brian Matthew

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) has evolved over the past two decades due to progress in growth science and in the active nitrogen plasma source hardware. The transition from electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma sources to radio frequency (RF) plasma sources has enabled higher growth rates, reduced ion damage and improved operation at higher growth chamber pressures. Even with further improvements in RF plasma sources, PAMBE has remained primarily a research tool partially due to limitations in material growth rates. This dissertation presents results based upon two modifications of a commercially available nitrogen plasma source. These modifications have resulted in record active nitrogen fluxes, and therefore record growth rates of more than 7.6 mum/h. For optimized growth conditions in the standard metal-rich growth regime, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 mumx3 mum) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) impurity analysis demonstrates unintentional oxygen incorporation of ˜1x1016, comparable to the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown template layer. Additionally, a revised universal growth diagram is proposed allowing the rapid determination of the metal flux needed to grow in a specific growth regime for any and all active nitrogen fluxes available. High temperature nitrogen rich PAMBE growth of GaN has been previously demonstrated as a viable alternative to the challenges presented in maintaining the Ga bilayer required by metal rich growth of GaN. This dissertation also present results demonstrating PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ˜100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. Finally, a revised growth diagram is proposed highlighting a large growth window available at high temperatures.

  1. Lithium phosphorous oxynitride films synthesized by a plasma-assisted directed vapor deposition approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Gu; Wadley, H. N. G.

    2008-01-15

    A plasma-assisted directed vapor deposition approach has been explored for the synthesis of lithium phosphorous oxynitride (Lipon) thin films. A Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} source was first evaporated using a high voltage electron beam and the resulting vapor entrained in a nitrogen-doped supersonic helium gas jet and deposited on a substrate at ambient temperature. This approach failed to incorporate significant concentrations of nitrogen in the films. A hollow cathode technique was then used to create an argon plasma that enabled partial ionization of both the Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} vapor and nitrogen gas just above the substrate surface. The plasma-enhanced deposition process greatly increased the gas phase and surface reactivity of the system and facilitated the synthesis and high rate deposition of amorphous Lipon films with the N/P ratios between 0.39 and 1.49. Manipulation of the plasma-enhanced process conditions also enabled control of the pore morphology and significantly affected the ionic transport properties of these films. This enabled the synthesis of electrolyte films with lithium ion conductivities in the 10{sup -7}-10{sup -8} S/m range. They appear to be well suited for thin-film battery applications.

  2. Microdetermination of chondroitin sulfate in normal human plasma by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE).

    PubMed

    Volpi, Nicola; Maccari, Francesca

    2005-06-01

    An inexpensive, simple, sensitive and reproducible analytical method for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of chondroitin sulfate (CS) from human blood plasma samples by using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE) has been developed. After treatment with a nonspecific protease to convert proteins into small peptides, CS from 100 microl of normal human plasma was extracted by using a filter membrane (molecular mass cut-off of 3000 Da) or purification by using an anion-exchange resin. The recovered CS was converted into unsaturated disaccharides through the action of chondroitin ABC lyase, derivatized with 2-aminoacridone by reductive amination in the presence of cyanoborohydride and separated by FACE. The procedure using the purification of plasma CS on the anion-exchange resin produced a cleaner separation and a better resolution of Delta-disaccharides then using microfiltration. The linearity, sensitivity and reproducibility of the method were determined in comparison with HPLC equipped with postcolumn derivatization and fluorescence detection using 2-cyanoacetamide as a fluorogenic reagent. The detection limit was calculated to be 50 ng of CS with a linear response from 50 to 2000 ng. The recovery was found greater than 85% (from 2 to 10 microg CS) with a variation coefficient of approx. 10%. Furthermore, the results obtained from 100 microl plasma were almost identical to those obtained using 20 microl, 50 microl and 200 microl. This method was applied to the characterization of CS in 33 healthy human subjects ageing from 30 to 63 years old. PMID:15936308

  3. Plasma absorption evidence via chirped pulse spectral transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia; Minardi, Stefano; Couairon, Arnaud; Jukna, Vytautas; Selva, Marco; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2015-06-08

    This work aims at highlighting the plasma generation dynamics and absorption when a Bessel beam propagates in glass. We developed a simple diagnostics allowing us to retrieve clear indications of the formation of the plasma in the material, thanks to transmission measurements in the angular and wavelength domains. This technique featured by the use of a single chirped pulse having the role of pump and probe simultaneously leads to results showing the plasma nonlinear absorption effect on the trailing part of the pulse, thanks to the spectral-temporal correspondence in the measured signal, which is also confirmed by numerical simulations.

  4. Measurement Performance of a Computer Assisted Vertebral Motion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Reginald J.; Lee, David C.; Cheng, Boyle

    2015-01-01

    Background Segmental instability of the lumbar spine is a significant cost within the US health care system; however current thresholds for indication of radiographic instability are not well defined. Purpose To determine the performance measurements of sagittal lumbar intervertebral measurements using computerassisted measurements of the lumbar spine using motion sequences from a video-fluoroscopic technique. Study design Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, prevalence, and test-retest reliability evaluation of digitized manual versus computer-assisted measurements of the lumbar spine. Patient sample A total of 2239 intervertebral levels from 509 symptomatic patients, and 287 intervertebral levels from 73 asymptomatic participants were retrospectively evaluated. Outcome measures Specificity, sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), diagnostic accuracy, and prevalence between the two measurement techniques; Measurements of Coefficient of repeatability (CR), limits of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC; type 3,1), and standard error of measurement for both measurement techniques. Methods Asymptomatic individuals and symptomatic patients were all evaluated using both the Vertebral Motion Analysis (VMA) system and fluoroscopic flexion extension static radiographs (FE). The analysis was compared to known thresholds of 15% intervertebral translation (IVT, equivalent to 5.3mm assuming a 35mm vertebral body depth) and 25° intervertebral rotation (IVR). Results The VMA measurements demonstrated greater specificity, % change in sensitivity, NPV, prevalence, and reliability compared with FE for radiographic evidence of instability. Specificity was 99.4% and 99.1% in the VMA compared to 98.3% and 98.2% in the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. Sensitivity in this study was 41.2% and 44.6% greater in the VMA compared to the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. NPV was 91% and 88% in the VMA compared to 62% and 66% in the FE for IVR and IVT

  5. Note: Zeeman splitting measurements in a high-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2010-12-15

    The Zeeman effect has been used for measurement of magnetic fields in low-temperature plasma, but the diagnostic technique is difficult to implement in a high-temperature plasma. This paper describes new instrumentation and methodology for simultaneous measurement of the entire Doppler-broadened left and right circularly polarized Zeeman spectra in high-temperature plasmas. Measurements are made using spectra emitted parallel to the magnetic field by carbon impurities in high-temperature plasma. The Doppler-broadened width is much larger than the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting, thus simultaneous recording of the two circularly polarized Zeeman line profiles is key to accurate measurement of the magnetic field in the ZaP Z-pinch plasma device. Spectral data are collected along multiple chords on both sides of the symmetry axis of the plasma. This enables determination of the location of the current axis of the Z-pinch and of lower-bound estimates of the local magnetic field at specific radial locations in the plasma.

  6. Plasma Measurements: An Overview of Requirements and Status

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2008-01-04

    This paper introduces this special issue on plasma diagnostics for magnetic fusion devices. Its primary purpose is to relate the measurements of plasma parameters to the physics challenges to be faced on operating and planned devices, and also to identify the diagnostic techniques that are used to make these measurements. The specific physics involved in the application of the techniques will be addressed in subsequent chapters. This chapter is biased toward measurements for tokamaks because of their proximity to the burning plasma frontier, and to set the scene for the development work associated with ITER. Hence, there is some emphasis on measurements for alpha-physics studies and the needs for plasma measurements as input to actuators to control the plasma, both for optimizing the device performance and for protection of the surrounding material. The very different approach to the engineering of diagnostics for a burning plasma is considered, emphasizing the needs for new calibration ideas, reliability and hardness against, and compatibility with, radiation. New ideas take a long time to be converted into "work-horse" sophisticated diagnostics so that investment in new developments is essential for ITER, particularly for the measurement of alpha-particles.

  7. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas.

    PubMed

    Goel, A; Tarantino, P M; Lauben, D S; Close, S

    2015-04-01

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments. PMID:25933852

  8. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, A.; Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S.

    2015-04-01

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  9. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, A. Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S.

    2015-04-15

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  10. Oxygen plasma power dependence on ZnO grown on porous silicon substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Giwoong; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Do Yeob; Yim, Kwang Gug; Kim, Soaram; Kim, Sung-O.; Lee, Dong-Yul; Leem, Jae-Young; Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Gimhae, Gyungnam 621-749

    2012-10-15

    ZnO thin films were deposited on porous silicon by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy using different radio frequency power settings. Optical emission spectrometry was applied to study the characteristics of the oxygen plasma, and the effects of the radio frequency power on the properties of the ZnO thin films were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. The grain sizes for radio frequency powers of 100, 200, and 300 W were 46, 48, and 62 nm, respectively. In addition, the photoluminescence intensities of the ultraviolet and the visible range increased at 300 W, because the density of the atomic oxygen transitions increased. The quality of the ZnO thin films was enhanced, but the deep-level emission peaks increased with increasing radio frequency power. The structural and optical properties of the ZnO thin films were improved at the radio frequency power of 300 W. Moreover, the optical properties of the ZnO thin films were improved with porous silicon, instead of Si.

  11. Plasma Stopping Power Measurements Relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, Aaron; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hoffman, Nelson; Schmitt, Mark; Rubery, Michael; Garbett, Warren; Horsfield, Colin; Gales, Steve; Zylstra, Alex; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Petrasso, Richard; Marshall, Frederic; Batha, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments may be achieved if the alpha particle energy deposition results in a thermonuclear burn wave induced in the dense DT fuel layer surrounding the hotspot. As such, understanding the physics of particle energy loss in a plasma is of critical importance to designing ICF experiments. Experiments have validated various stopping power models under select ne and Te conditions, however there remain unexplored regimes where models predict differing rates of energy deposition. An upcoming experiment at the Omega laser facility will explore charged particle stopping in CH plastic capsule ablators across a range of plasma conditions (ne between 1024 cm-3 and 1025 cm-3 and Te on the order of hundreds of eV). Plasma conditions will be measured using x-ray and gamma ray diagnostics, while plasma stopping power will be measured using charged particle energy loss measurements. Details on the experiment and the theoretical models to be tested will be presented.

  12. Testing THEMIS wave measurements against the cold plasma theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolik, Ondrej; Le Contel, Olivier; Bonnell, John

    2016-04-01

    The THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) mission records a multitude of electromagnetic waves inside Earth's magnetosphere and provides data in the form of high-resolution electric and magnetic waveforms. We use multi-component measurements of whistler mode waves and test them against the theory of wave propagation in a cold plasma. The measured ratio cB/E (c is speed of light in vacuum, B is magnetic wave amplitude, E is electric wave amplitude) is compared to the same quantity calculated from cold plasma theory over linearized Faraday's law. The aim of this study is to get estimates for measurement uncertainties, especially with regard to the electric field and the cold plasma density, as well as evaluating the validity of cold plasma theory inside Earth's radiation belts.

  13. Tuning the Electrical Properties of Graphene via Nitrogen Plasma-Assisted Chemical Modification.

    PubMed

    Jung, Min Wook; Song, Wooseok; Jung, Dae Sung; Lee, Sun Sook; Park, Chong-Yun; An, Ki-Seok

    2016-03-01

    The control in electrical properties of graphene is essentially required in order to realize graphenebased nanoelectronics. In this study, N-doped graphene was successfully obtained via nitrogen plasma treatment. Graphene was synthesized on copper foil using thermal chemical vapor deposition. After N2 plasma treatment, the G-band of the graphene was blueshifted and the intensity ratio of 2D- to G-bands decreased with increasing the plasma power. Pyrrolic-N bonding configuration induced by N2 plasma treatment was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Remarkably, electrical characterization including Hall measurement and I-V characteristics of the N-doped graphene exhibit semiconducting behavior as well as the n-type doping effect. PMID:27455703

  14. Microwave Reflectometry Measurements of Mode Transitions in Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Robert; Boivin, Robert; Balkey, Matthew; Scime, Earl

    1999-10-01

    Considerable research effort has been devoted to developing probe techniques for measurements of electron temperatures and densities in rf plasmas. However, the densities (n > 10E13 cm-3) and electron temperatures (T > 3 eV) found in steady-state helicon plasmas make probe measurements problematic, particularly in helium plasmas as they have significantly higher electron temperatures. We have designed and built a microwave density diagnostic for a steady-state helicon plasma. The cornerstone of the diagnostic is a 20 - 40 GHz variable frequency microwave source. The microwave horns located inside the vacuum chamber are configured so that the system operates in the far-field diffraction regime. The diagnostic can be operated in two different configurations: 1) Simple interferometry, where at a fixed microwave frequency the average electron density is obtained by measuring either the phase shift of the attenuation of the microwave beam; 2) Differential interferometery where the Fourier transform of the plasma phase shift response to a slightly non-linear frequency ramp yields the average density. The change in peak plasma density is reported for transitions into the helicon mode for both helium and argon plasmas. The transitions occur as a function of rf power, magnetic field, and rf frequency.

  15. Polarity control and transport properties of Mg-doped (0001) InN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soojeong; Wu Feng; Bierwagen, Oliver; Speck, James S.

    2013-05-15

    The authors report on the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth and carrier transport of Mg-doped In-face (0001) InN. The 1.2 {mu}m thick InN films were grown on GaN:Fe templates under metal rich conditions with Mg concentration from 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3}. A morphological transition, associated with the formation of V-shape polarity inversion domains, was observed at Mg concentration over 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Seebeck measurements indicated p-type conductivity for Mg-concentrations from 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}, i.e., as it exceeded the compensating (unintentional) donor concentration.

  16. Enhanced growth of high quality single crystal diamond by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at high gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Qi; Chin Chengyi; Lai, Joseph; Yan Chihshiue; Meng Yufei; Mao Hokwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2009-01-12

    Single crystals of diamond up to 18 mm in thickness have been grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at gas pressures of up to 350 torr. Growth rates of up to 165 {mu}m/h at 300 torr at high power density have been achieved. The processes were evaluated by optical emission spectroscopy. The high-quality single-crystal diamond grown at optimized conditions was characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The measurements reveal a direct relationship between residual absorption and nitrogen content in the gas chemistry. Fabrication of high quality single-crystal diamond at higher growth rates should be possible with improved reactor design that allows still higher gas synthesis pressures.

  17. Optical and mechanical characteristics of nanocrystalline boron carbonitride films synthesized by plasma-assisted physical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Z. X.; Oechsner, H.

    2003-01-01

    Nanocrystalline boron carbonitride thin films were prepared using the electron-cyclotron- wave-resonance plasma-assisted deposition, whereby the energy for precursor ions was adjusted between 70 and 180 eV. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of ternary sp3-bonded structure and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed a punctured lattice. The deposits unfold grains of about 200 nm in dimension under atomic force microscope, yet they exhibit extremely flat surfaces with a root-mean-square roughness less than 3 nm. For a 1.2 μm thick film, the transmittance in the visible light range is as high as 80%. The Vicker's hardness measures over 28 GPa. Therefore, this ternary material is competitive to nanocrystalline diamond in application as protective coatings for optical components. Remarkably, also very strong photoluminescence peaked at 430 nm was detected in the as-deposited films at room temperature.

  18. Multilayered metal oxide thin film gas sensors obtained by conventional and RF plasma-assisted laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitu, B.; Marotta, V.; Orlando, S.

    2006-04-01

    Multilayered thin films of In 2O 3 and SnO 2 have been deposited by conventional and RF plasma-assisted reactive pulsed laser ablation, with the aim to evaluate their behaviour as toxic gas sensors. The depositions have been carried out by a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser ( λ = 532 nm, τ = 7 ns) on Si(1 0 0) substrates, in O 2 atmosphere. The thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical resistance measurements. A comparison of the electrical response of the simple (indium oxide, tin oxide) and multilayered oxides to toxic gas (nitric oxide, NO) has been performed. The influence on the structural and electrical properties of the deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature and RF power is reported.

  19. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5mN with a resolution of 15μN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  20. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-15

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 {mu}N. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  1. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas.

    PubMed

    West, Michael D; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 microN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments. PMID:19485509

  2. How plasma parameters fluctuations influence emissive probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bousselin, G. Plihon, N.; Lemoine, N.; Heuraux, S.; Cavalier, J.

    2015-05-15

    Relationship between the floating potential of an emissive probe and plasma potential oscillations is studied in the case of controlled oscillations of plasma parameters. This relationship is compared to a quasi-static model for floating potential oscillations that assumes a constant emission current and includes the fluctuations of plasma parameters (density and electron temperature). Two different plasma regimes are considered. In the first one, the model is coherent with experimental results. In the second, the model does not fulfill one of the assumption due to the evidence of emission current oscillations when the mean emission current exceeds a given threshold. This second regime highlights the importance of taking into account emission current oscillations in the interpretation of emissive probe measurements. Nevertheless, discrepancies are still observed between emissive probe floating potential and plasma potential oscillations.

  3. Plasma detector for TEA CO2 laser pulse measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Mitsuishi, A.; Fujita, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamanaka, C.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Takai, M.

    1983-10-01

    Laser-pulse evolution can be detected by measuring the emf generated by fast electrons in a laser-produced plasma when the laser radiation is focused onto a solid metal target in a vacuum. Using this phenomenon a 'plasma detector' is constructed, and its characteristics for the TEA CO2 laser radiation of intensity 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 10th W/sq cm are investigated experimentally. The plasma detector operates at room temperature and is strong against laser damages. For the evacuated plasma detector down to 0.1 torr, a maximum output voltage of 90 V and a rise time shorter than 1 ns are observed. The plasma detector, therefore, can be used as a power monitor for laser pulses and as a trigger voltage source.

  4. Debye size microprobes for electric field measurements in laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.; Nakamoto, M.; Lawrence, E.; Chiang, F.; Stillman, J.; Judy, J.; Katz, N.; Kintner, P.; Niknejadi, P.

    2006-07-15

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of a host of tiny machines and sensors over the past decade. Plasma physics is in great need of small detectors for several reasons. First of all, very small detectors do not disturb a plasma, and secondly some detectors can only work because they are very small. We report on the first of a series of small (sub-Debye length) probes for laboratory plasmas undertaken at the basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA. The goal of the work is to develop robust and sensitive diagnostic probes that can survive in a plasma. The probes must have electronics packages in close proximity. We report on the construction and testing of probes that measure the electric field.

  5. Analysis of plasma measurements for the Geotail mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Louis A.

    1995-01-01

    The first phase of the Geotail mission, an exploration of the distant magnetotail, was successfully concluded in October 1994. Geotail is currently engaged in a survey of plasmas at distances from Earth approximately 10 to 30 R(sub E). Throughout the mission the Comprehensive Plasma Instrumentation has functioned well with successful return of data. The analysis of the CPI measurements has resulted in a series of publications, and research efforts are ongoing. Research topics include interaction of the magnetotail with the fields and plasmas of the solar wind, steady-state magnetic reconnection in the distant magnetotail at a neutral line bounded by a pair of slow-mode magnetohydrodynamic shocks, development and evolution of plasmoids in magnetotail and magnetospheric substorms, and cold ion beams coexisting as distinct components in the presence of hot plasma-sheet plasmas.

  6. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2004-12-16

    For many decades optical interferometers have been used to measure the electron density of plasmas. During the last ten years X-ray lasers in the wavelength range 14 to 47 nm have enabled researchers to use interferometers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes that the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index of refraction less than one and the electron density proportional to the number of fringe shifts. Recent experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one and made us question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction. Recent calculations showed how the anomalous dispersion from the bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction in many types of plasma and make the index greater than one or enhance the index such that one would greatly overestimate the electron density of the plasma using interferometers. In this work we calculate the index of refraction of C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV (12.4 nm) using a new average-atom code. The results show large variations from the free electron approximation under many different plasma conditions. We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  7. Ultra-deep plasma-assisted drilling of solids by high-power nanosecond lasers: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Stanley; Lyon, Kevin; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Allen, Susan D.

    2006-02-01

    A new mechanism of ultra-deep (up to tens of microns per pulse, sub-mm total hole depths) plasma-assisted ablative drilling of optically opaque and transparent materials by high-power nanosecond lasers proposed by Kudryashov et al. has been studied experimentally using average drilling rate and photoacoustic measurements. In the drilling experiments, average multi-micron crater depth per laser shot and instantaneous recoil pressure of ablated products have been measured as a function of laser energy at constant focusing conditions using optical transmission and contact photo acoustic techniques, respectively. Experimental results of this work support the theoretical explanation of the ultra-deep drilling mechanism as a number of stages including ultra-deep "non-thermal" energy delivery by a short-wavelength radiation of the surface high-temperature ablative plasma, bulk heating and melting of these materials, accompanied by the following subsurface boiling in the melt pool and resulting melt expulsion off of the target.

  8. Antenna impedance measurements in a magnetized plasma. II. Dipole antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Messer, Sarah J.; Amatucci, William E.

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents experimental impedance measurements of a dipole antenna immersed in a magnetized plasma. The impedance was derived from the magnitude and phase of the reflected power using a network analyzer over a frequency range of 1 MHz-1 GHz. The plasma density was varied between 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} in weakly ({omega}{sub ce}<{omega}{sub pe}) and strongly ({omega}{sub ce}>{omega}{sub pe}) magnetized plasmas in the Space Physics Simulation Chamber at the Naval Research Laboratory. Over this range of plasma conditions the wavelength in the plasma varies from the short dipole limit ({lambda}>>L) to the long dipole limit ({lambda}{approx}L). As with previous impedance measurements, there are two resonant frequencies observed as frequencies where the impedance of the antenna is real. Measurements have indicated that in the short dipole limit the majority of the power deposition takes place at the lower resonance frequency which lies between the cyclotron frequency and the upper hybrid frequency. These measured curves agree very well with the analytic theory for a short dipole in a magnetoplasma. In the long dipole regime, in addition to the short dipole effects still being present, there is resonant energy deposition which peaks at much higher frequencies and correlates to 1/2 and 3/2 wavelength dipole resonances. The wavelengths in the plasma predicted by these resonances are consistent with the antenna radiating R and L-waves.

  9. Annealing Mechanism and Effect of Microwave Plasma Assisted Annealing on Properties of Sputtered Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jing; Yang, Chengtao; He, Ming

    2016-03-01

    To solve some problems existing in PZT films, such as: large residual stresses, interface diffusion, and lead loss, etc., which were caused by high post-annealing temperatures, and to obtain thin films with high-preferred orientation and uniform size grain and dense microstructure, different technological conditions of microwave plasma assisted post-annealing had been pilot studied. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the crystal structures of the films. Transmission electronic microscope was used to analyze the surface and the interface morphology of the films. Ferroelectric properties were showed by measuring the remnant polarization and the leakage current dependence of electric field. The results indicated that it was good for reducing lead loss and annealing temperature of PZT films by microwave plasma assisted annealing. Ferroelectric properties of the film could also be enhanced by this pilot annealing method. PMID:27455722

  10. 78 FR 39283 - Forum on Environmental Measurements Announcement of Competency Policy for Assistance Agreements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY Forum on Environmental Measurements Announcement of Competency Policy for Assistance Agreements... Implementation Extension for Competency Policy for Assistance Agreements. SUMMARY: As published in the Federal... Agency-funded assistance agreements to submit documentation of their competency prior to award of...

  11. Microwave plasma jet assisted combustion of premixed methane-air: Roles of OH(A) and OH(X) radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Wu, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Plasma assisted combustion (PAC) technology can enhance combustion performance by pre-heating combustion fuels, shortening ignition delay time, enhancing flame holding, or increasing flame volume and flame speed. PAC can also increase fuel efficiency by extending fuel lean flammability limit (LFL) and help reduce combustion pollutant emissions. Experiment results have shown that microwave plasma could modify flame structure, increase flame volume, flame speed, flame temperature, and flame stability, and could also extend the fuel lean flammability limit. We report on a novel microwave PAC system that allows us to study PAC using complicated yet well-controlled combinations of operating parameters, such as fuel equivalence ratio (φ) , fuel mixture flow rate, plasma gas flow rate, plasma gases, plasma jet configurations, symmetric or asymmetric fuel-oxidant injection patterns, etc. We have investigated the roles of the stated-resolved OH(A, X) radicals in plasma assisted ignition and combustion of premixed methane-air fuel mixtures. Results suggest that that both the electronically excited state OH(A) and the electronic ground state OH(X) enhance the methane-air ignition process, i.e. extending the fuel LFL, but the flame stabilization and flame holding is primarily determined by the electronic ground state OH(X) as compared to the role of the OH(A). E-mail: cw175@msstate.edu. Supported by National Science Foundation through the grant of ``A quantitative survey of combustion intermediates toward understanding of plasma-assisted combustion mechanism'' (CBET-1066486).

  12. Direct measurements of the ionization profile in krypton helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.; Gulbrandsen, N.

    2012-12-15

    Helicons are efficient plasma sources, capable of producing plasma densities of 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} with only 100 s W of input rf power. There are often steep density gradients in both the neutral density and plasma density, resulting in a fully ionized core a few cm wide surrounded by a weakly ionized plasma. The ionization profile is usually not well known because the neutral density is typically inferred from indirect spectroscopic measurements or from edge pressure gauge measurements. We have developed a two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) diagnostic capable of directly measuring the neutral density profile. We use TALIF in conjunction with a Langmuir probe to measure the ionization fraction profile as a function of driving frequency, magnetic field, and input power. It is found that when the frequency of the driving wave is greater than a critical frequency, f{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 3f{sub lh}, where f{sub lh} is the lower hybrid frequency at the antenna, the ionization fraction is small (0.1%) and the plasma density low (10{sup 17} m{sup -3}). As the axial magnetic field is increased, or, equivalently, the driving frequency decreased, a transition is observed. The plasma density increases by a factor of 10 or more, the plasma density profile becomes strongly peaked, the neutral density profile becomes strongly hollow, and the ionization fraction in the core approaches 100%. Neutral depletion in the core can be caused by a number of mechanisms. We find that in these experiments the depletion is due primarily to plasma pressure and neutral pumping.

  13. Laboratory measurements of the resistivity of warm dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Nicola; Robinson, Alex; Hakel, Peter; Gregori, Ginaluca; Rajeev, Pattathil; Woolsey, Nigel

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we will present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory in which we interrogate the microphysics of the low energy electron distributions associated with an anisotropic return current. Through experimental measurements of the polarization of the Ly- α doublet emission (2s1 / 2-2p1 / 2,3/2 transitions) of sulphur, we determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to warm dense conditions by an ultra-intense laser at relativistic intensities, I ~ 5 ×1020 Wcm-2. We describe a method of exploiting classical x-ray scattering to separately measure both the π- and σ- polarizations of Ly-α1 spectral emission in a single shot. These measurements make it possible to explore fundamental material properties such as resistivity in warm and hot dense plasmas through matching plasma physics modelling to atomic physics calculations of the experimentally measured large, positive, polarisation.

  14. Operational Characteristics and Plasma Measurements in a Low-Energy FARAD Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Best, S.; Rose, M. F.; Miller, R.; Owens, T.

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma accelerators are spacecraft propulsion devices in which energy is stored in a capacitor and then discharged through an inductive coil. The device is electrodeless, inducing a plasma current sheet in propellant located near the face of the coil. The propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (order of 10 km/s) through the interaction of the plasma current with an induced magnetic field. The Faraday Accelerator with RF-Assisted Discharge (FARAD) thruster is a type of pulsed inductive plasma accelerator in which the plasma is preionized by a mechanism separate from that used to form the current sheet and accelerate the gas. Employing a separate preionization mechanism in this manner allows for the formation of an inductive current sheet at much lower discharge energies and voltages than those found in previous pulsed inductive accelerators like the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT). In this paper, we present measurements aimed at quantifying the thruster's overall operational characteristics and providing additional insight into the nature of operation. Measurements of the terminal current and voltage characteristics during the pulse help quantify the output of the pulsed power train driving the acceleration coil. A fast ionization gauge is used to measure the evolution of the neutral gas distribution in the accelerator prior to a pulse. The preionization process is diagnosed by monitoring light emission from the gas using a photodiode, and a time-resolved global view of the evolving, accelerating current sheet is obtained using a fast-framing camera. Local plasma and field measurements are obtained using an array of intrusive probes. The local induced magnetic field and azimuthal current density are measured using B-dot probes and mini-Rogowski coils, respectively. Direct probing of the number density and electron temperature is performed using a triple probe.

  15. Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system.

    PubMed

    Pottinger, S J; Lamprou, D; Knoll, A K; Lappas, V J

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges. PMID:22462919

  16. Measuring ionospheric electron density using the plasma frequency probe

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.D.; Baker, K.D. )

    1992-02-01

    During the past decade, the plasma frequency probe (PFP) has evolved into an accurate, proven method of measuring electron density in the ionosphere above about 90 km. The instrument uses an electrically short antenna mounted on a sounding rocket that is immersed in the plasma and notes the frequency where the antenna impedance is large and nonreactive. This frequency is closely related to the plasma frequency, which is a direct function of free electron concentration. The probe uses phase-locked loop technology to follow a changing electron density. Several sections of the plasma frequency probe circuitry are unique, especially the voltage-controlled oscillator that uses both an electronically tuned capacitor and inductor to give the wide tuning range needed for electron density measurements. The results from two recent sounding rocket flights (Thunderstorm II and CRIT II) under vastly different plasma conditions demonstrate the capabilities of the PFP and show the importance of in situ electron density measurements of understanding plasma processes. 9 refs.

  17. Spectroscopic Measurements of Collision-less Coupling Between Explosive Debris Plasmas and Ambient, Magnetized Background Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Anton; Schaeffer, Derek; Everson, Erik; Vincena, Stephen; van Compernolle, Bart; Constantin, Carmen; Clark, Eric; Niemann, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Emission spectroscopy is currently being utilized in order to assess collision-less momentum and energy coupling between explosive debris plasmas and ambient, magnetized background plasmas of astrophysical relevance. In recent campaigns on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) (nelec =1012 -1013 cm-3, Telec ~ 5 eV, B0 = 200 - 400 G) utilizing the new Raptor laser facility (1053 nm, 100 J per pulse, 25 ns FWHM), laser-ablated carbon debris plasmas were generated within ambient, magnetized helium background plasmas and prominent spectral lines of carbon and helium ions were studied in high spectral (0 . 01 nm) and temporal (50 ns) resolution. Time-resolved velocity components extracted from Doppler shift measurements of the C+4 227 . 1 nm spectral line along two perpendicular axes reveal significant deceleration as the ions stream and gyrate within the helium background plasma, indicating collision-less momentum coupling. The He+1 320 . 3 nm and 468 . 6 nm spectral lines of the helium background plasma are observed to broaden and intensify in response to the carbon debris plasma, indicative of strong electric fields (Stark broadening) and energetic electrons. The experimental results are compared to 2D hybrid code simulations.

  18. Measurements of the Hall Dynamo in MST Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triana, J. C.; Almagri, A. F.; McCollam, K. J.; Sarff, J. S.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    Fluctuation-induced emfs correlated with tearing mode activity govern the relaxation process in RFP plasmas. Previous radial profile measurements in the edge of MST plasmas (ra/> 0 . 8) revealed a competition of the Hall, 1 ne < j ~ × b ~ >|| , and MHD, < v ~ × b ~ >|| , terms in Ohm's law. A robust magnetic probe allows measurements of the Hall-dynamo profile much deeper in the plasma (ra > 0 . 4) for low current conditions. The mode composition of the dynamo emf is computed using pseudospectral (cross-correlation) analysis with the spectrum measured from a toroidal magnetic array at the plasma surface. Extended MHD simulations with parameters comparable to the experiment have been performed using NIMROD. They predict complex variation of the Hall and MHD dynamo profiles across the plasma radius. Measurements of the Hall-dynamo profile can inform future computational work in addition to directing future experimental measurements of the MHD term. Work supported by U.S. DOE and NSF.

  19. Growth Optimization of III-N Electronic Devices by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh

    InAlN has received significant attention due to its great potential for electronic and optoelectronic applications. In particular, In 0.18Al0.82N presents the advantage of being lattice-matched to GaN and simultaneously exhibiting a high spontaneous polarization charge, making In0.18 Al0.82N attractive for use as the barrier layer in high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). However, in the case of InAlN growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE), a strong non-uniformity in the in-plane In distribution was observed for both N-face and metal-face In0.18Al 0.82N. This compositional inhomogeneity manifests itself as a columnar microstructure with AlN-rich cores (5-10 nm in width) and InN-rich intercolumn boundaries. Because of the large differences between the bandgaps and polarization of InN and AlN, this non-uniformity in InAlN composition could be a source of scattering, leading to mobility degradation in HEMTs. In this work, the growth conditions for high quality lattice-matched InAlN layers on free-standing GaN substrates were explored by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) in the N-rich regime. The microstructure of N-face InAlN layers, lattice-matched to GaN, was investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Microstructural analysis showed an absence of the lateral composition modulation that was previously observed in InAlN films grown by PAMBE. Using same growth conditions for InAlN layer, N-face GaN/AlN/GaN/InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors with lattice-matched InAlN back barriers were grown directly on SiC. A room temperature two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility of 1100cm2 V-1s-1 and 2DEG sheet charge density of 1.9 x1013 cm 2 was measured on these devices. However, the threading dislocation density (TDD) of GaN grown directly on SiC by PAMBE (≈2 x10 10 cm-2 ) is two orders of magnitude higher than GaN grown by MOCVD on SiC or sapphire (≈5 x10 8 cm-2). This high TDD can

  20. Measurement of the edge plasma rotation on J-TEXT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Z. F.; Luo, J.; Wang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, X. L.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.; Zhuang, G.

    2013-07-15

    A multi-channel high resolution spectrometer was developed for the measurement of the edge plasma rotation on J-TEXT tokamak. With the design of two opposite viewing directions, the poloidal and toroidal rotations can be measured simultaneously, and velocity accuracy is up to 1 km/s. The photon flux was enhanced by utilizing combined optical fiber. With this design, the time resolution reaches 3 ms. An assistant software “Spectra Assist” was developed for implementing the spectrometer control and data analysis automatically. A multi-channel monochromatic analyzer is designed to get the location of chosen ions simultaneously through the inversion analysis. Some preliminary experimental results about influence of plasma density, different magnetohydrodynamics behaviors, and applying of biased electrode are presented.

  1. Plasma mevalonate as a measure of cholesterol synthesis in man.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T S; McNamara, D J; Brown, C D; Kolb, R; Ahrens, E H; Alberts, A W; Tobert, J; Chen, J; De Schepper, P J

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of mevalonic acid (MVA) concentrations in plasma or 24-h urine samples is shown to be useful in studies of the regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and cholesterol synthesis. Plasma MVA concentrations, measured either at 7-9 a.m. after an overnight fast, or throughout the 24-h cycle, were compared with cholesterol synthesis rates that were measured by the sterol balance method: plasma MVA concentrations were directly related to the rate of whole body cholesterol synthesis (r = 0.972; p less than 0.001; n = 18) over a tenfold range of cholesterol synthesis rates. Moreover, hourly examination of MVA concentrations throughout the day demonstrated that interventions such as fasting or cholesterol feeding cause suppression of the postmidnight diurnal rise in plasma MVA concentrations, with little change in the base-line of the rhythm. Thus, the daily rise and fall of plasma MVA appears to reflect changes in tissues and organs, such as the liver and intestine, that are known to be most sensitive to regulation by fasting or by dietary cholesterol. The hypothesis that short-term regulation of HMG-CoA reductase in tissues is quickly reflected by corresponding variations in plasma MVA was tested by using a specific inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, mevinolin, to block MVA synthesis. Mevinolin caused a dose-dependent lowering of plasma MVA after a single dose; and in patients who received the drug twice a day for 4 wk, it decreased 24-h urinary MVA output. Significant lowering of plasma cholesterol was achieved through administration of mevinolin at doses that only moderately limit MVA production. PMID:6565710

  2. Surface chemistry of plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 studied by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langereis, E.; Keijmel, J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2008-06-01

    The surface groups created during plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 were studied by infrared spectroscopy. For temperatures in the range of 25-150°C, -CH3 and -OH were unveiled as dominant surface groups after the Al(CH3)3 precursor and O2 plasma half-cycles, respectively. At lower temperatures more -OH and C-related impurities were found to be incorporated in the Al2O3 film, but the impurity level could be reduced by prolonging the plasma exposure. The results demonstrate that -OH surface groups rule the surface chemistry of the Al2O3 process and likely that of plasma-assisted ALD of metal oxides from organometallic precursors in general.

  3. Direct current dielectric barrier assistant discharge to get homogeneous plasma in capacitive coupled discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yinchang; Li, Yangfang; Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Zhe

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, we propose a method to get more homogeneous plasma in the geometrically asymmetric capacitive coupled plasma (CCP) discharge. The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used for the auxiliary discharge system to improve the homogeneity of the geometrically asymmetric CCP discharge. The single Langmuir probe measurement shows that the DBD can increase the electron density in the low density volume, where the DBD electrodes are mounted, when the pressure is higher than 5 Pa. By this manner, we are able to improve the homogeneity of the plasma production and increase the overall density in the target volume. At last, the finite element simulation results show that the DC bias, applied to the DBD electrodes, can increase the homogeneity of the electron density in the CCP discharge. The simulation results show a good agreement with the experiment results.

  4. Plasma-assisted directed vapor deposition for synthesizing lithium phosphorus oxynitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon Gu

    This dissertation explores a new vapor deposition route for synthesizing lithium phosphorus oxynitride (Lipon) thin-film electrolytes for rechargeable thin-film Li/Li-ion batteries. These batteries operate at a high voltage (around 4.0 V) and exhibit a long cyclic life (over 10,000 charge/discharge cycles). These features stem from the extremely low leakage current of the Lipon film electrolyte when in contact with a lithium anode, and its good Li-ion conductivity (in the 10-6-10-7 S/cm range). Lipon films have usually been synthesized by reactive RF-magnetron sputtering, which suffers from a very low deposition rate (˜2 nm/min). It therefore takes many hours to make the 1-2 mum thick films needed for battery applications. Other deposition approaches, such as Pulsed Laser Deposition, Ion Beam Assisted Deposition, and E-beam evaporation, have been investigated but resulted in unsatisfactory Lipon film performance. Here, a plasma-assisted directed vapor deposition (PA-DVD) approach has been explored to synthesize dense, amorphous Lipon films. Unlike conventional e-beam evaporation, the e-beam based DVD approach employs an annular nozzle to generate a rarefied supersonic inert gas jet around the periphery of an electron beam evaporated source material. The vapor is entrained in the jet and rapidly transferred to a substrate. Because the supersonic gas jet focuses the vapor (it impedes lateral spreading of the vapor flux), most of the evaporant reaches the substrate. As a result, the deposition rate of Lipon films can be potentially much higher than most other processes. The PA-DVD approach used here employs a hollow cathode to create low-energy plasma through which the vapor is propagated. This plasma ionized some of the evaporant and reactive gases (nitrogen) that were added to the jet. This increased their reactivity and atomic mobility on a substrate enabling the reactive synthesis of lithium phosphorus oxynitride from a lithium phosphate source. This dissertation

  5. Analysis of plasma measurements for the Geotail mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Louis A.

    1994-01-01

    Data processing and research efforts for the period October 1993 to September 1994 are reported. Routine data processing includes the production of color spectrograms and computing of quantitative plasma parameters such as the plasma number density, bulk flow velocity, temperature, and pressure. In addition, specialized analysis software is being developed for specific and general applications. Research activities include the measurement of plasmas from the Geotail spacecraft; the processing of the measurements from a hot plasma analyzer to compute one minute averages of plasma densities, temperatures, and velocities for a substantial part of the Geotail deep tail mission; and, a preliminary survey of the magnetotail for geocentric radial distances of 10 to 210 earth radii. The topology of the magnetotail with its various regions and boundaries is determined by a complex interaction with the fields and plasmas of the solar wind. Observations of the rotation of the magnetic field in the solar wind show that it is well correlated with repeated transitions at Geotail from the magnetotail lobe to a magnetosheath-like boundary layer.

  6. Visible Light Photocatalysis with Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buzby,S.; Barakat, M.; Lin, H.; Ni, C.; Rykov, S.; Chen, J.; Shah, S.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized via plasma assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Nitrogen dopant concentration was varied from 0 to 1.61 at. %. The effect of nitrogen ion doping on visible light photocatalysis has been investigated. Samples were analyzed by various analytical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure. Titanium tetraisopropoxide was used as the titanium precursor, while rf-plasma-decomposed ammonia was used as the source for nitrogen doping. The N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were deposited on stainless steel mesh under a flow of Ar and O2 gases at 600 {sup o}C in a tube reactor. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples was tested by the degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an aqueous solution using a visible lamp equipped with an UV filter. The efficiency of photocatalytic oxidation of 2-CP was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Results obtained revealed the formation of N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples as TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}, and a corresponding increase in the visible light photocatalytic activity.

  7. Simultaneous Multi-angle Measurements of Plasma Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    We report the results from a recent series of experiments employing the HAARP HF transmitter to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at HAARP, the Super DARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control and suppression of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI). This allows the isolation of ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. For the first time, plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region displayed marked but contemporaneous differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Line (OPL) spectra, rarely observed in past experiments, occurred with sufficient regularity for experimentation. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  8. Measurements of uranium mass confined in high density plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An X-ray absorption method for measuring the amount of uranium confined in high density, rf-heated uranium plasmas is described. A comparison of measured absorption of 8 keV X-rays with absorption calculated using Beer Law indicated that the method could be used to measure uranium densities from 3 times 10 to the 16th power atoms/cu cm to 5 times 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. Tests were conducted to measure the density of uranium in an rf-heated argon plasma with UF6 infection and with the power to maintain the discharge supplied by a 1.2 MW rf induction heater facility. The uranium density was measured as the flow rate through the test chamber was varied. A maximum uranium density of 3.85 times 10 to the 17th power atoms/cu cm was measured.

  9. Anticipated progress from future multipoint measurements of space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrak, R.; Slavin, J.

    ANTICIPATED PROGRESS FROM FUTURE MULTIPOINT MEASUREMENTS OF SPACE PLASMAS R. Vondrak (1) and J. Slavin (1) (1) NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA 20771 vondrak@gsfc.nasa.gov Fax: 01-301-286-1683 Within space plasmas many significant processes occur rapidly over a large range of spatial scales. An important limitation on our understanding of these processes is the space-time ambiguity that results from the small number of measurements that are possible with existing space missions. Further scientific progress requires the deployment of advanced missions capable of multipoint measurements. These multipoint measurements generally fall into two categories: compact clusters and constellations. The compact clusters function as traveling microscopes that measure processes occurring in thin current sheets at boundaries of plasma regions. Constellations of many spacecraft distributed over a large region can measure the temporal and spatial evolution of space plasma processes at multiple scales. Each of these approaches is enabled by new technologies that greatly enhance mission capabilities. The scientific value of these new multipoint missions will be discussed. Several examples will be presented of NASA multipoint missions planned for the next decade in the strategic Solar Terrestrial Probes program, as well as mission concepts proposed for the Explorer program.

  10. Cyan laser diode grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Turski, H. Muziol, G.; Wolny, P.; Cywiński, G.

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate AlGaN-cladding-free laser diodes (LDs), operating in continuous wave (CW) mode at 482 nm grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The maximum CW output power was 230 mW. LDs were grown on c-plane GaN substrates obtained by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The PAMBE process was carried out in metal-rich conditions, supplying high nitrogen flux (Φ{sub N}) during quantum wells (QWs) growth. We found that high Φ{sub N} improves quality of high In content InGaN QWs. The role of nitrogen in the growth of InGaN on (0001) GaN surface as well as the influence of LDs design on threshold current density are discussed.

  11. Multiple substrate microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition single crystal diamond synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Asmussen, J.; Grotjohn, T. A.; Reinhard, D. K.; Schuelke, T.; Becker, M. F.; Yaran, M. K.; King, D. J.; Wicklein, S.

    2008-07-21

    A multiple substrate, microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis process for single crystal diamond (SCD) is demonstrated using a 915 MHz reactor. Diamond synthesis was performed using input chemistries of 6-8% of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, microwave input powers of 10-11.5 kW, substrate temperatures of 1100-1200 deg. C, and pressures of 110-135 Torr. The simultaneous synthesis of SCD over 70 diamond seeds yielded good quality SCD with deposition rates of 14-21 {mu}m/h. Multiple deposition runs totaling 145 h of deposition time added 1.8-2.5 mm of diamond material to each of the 70 seed crystals.

  12. Opacity Measurement and Theoretical Investigation of Hot Silicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Hu, Zhimin; Zhao, Yang; Qing, Bo; Yang, Guohong; Wei, Minxi; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Li, Hang; Yuan, Zheng; Lv, Min; Meng, Xujun; Xu, Yan; Wu, Zeqing; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report on opacity measurements of a silicon (Si) plasma at a temperature of (72 ± 5) eV and a density of (6.0 ± 1.2) mg cm-3 in the photon energy range of 1790-1880 eV. A 23 μg cm-2 Si foil tamped by 50 μg cm-2 CH layers on each side was heated to a hot-dense plasma state by X-ray radiation emitted from a D-shaped gold cavity that was irradiated by intense lasers. Absorption lines of 1s - 2p transitions of Si xiii to Si ix ions have been measured using point-projection spectroscopy. The transmission spectrum of the silicon plasma was determined by comparing the light passing through the plasma to the light from the same shot passing by the plasma. The density of the Si plasma was determined experimentally by side-on radiography and the temperature was estimated from the radiation flux data. Radiative hydrodynamic simulations were performed to obtain the temporal evolutions of the density and temperature of the Si plasma. The experimentally obtained transmission spectra of the Si sample plasma have been reproduced using a detailed term account model with the local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation. The energy levels, oscillator strengths and photoionization cross-sections used in the calculation were generated by the flexible atomic code. The experimental transmission spectrum was compared with the theoretical calculation and good agreement was found. The present experimental spectrum and theoretical calculation were also compared with the new opacities available in the Los Alamos OPLIB database.

  13. Aerosol and Plasma Measurements in Noctilucent Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop rocket-borne probes to detect charged aerosol layers in the mesosphere. These include sporadic E layers, which have their origin in meteoric dust, and noctilucent clouds, which form in the arctic summer and are composed of ice crystals. The probe being developed consists of a charge collecting patch connected to a sensitive electrometer which measures the charge deposited on the patch by impacting aerosols. The ambient electrons and light ions in the mesosphere are prevented from being collected by a magnetic field. The magnetic force causes these lighter particles to turn so that they miss the collecting patch.

  14. Plasma-assisted physical vapor deposition surface treatments for tribological control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1990-01-01

    In any mechanical or engineering system where contacting surfaces are in relative motion, adhesion, wear, and friction affect reliability and performance. With the advancement of space age transportation systems, the tribological requirements have dramatically increased. This is due to the optimized design, precision tolerance requirements, and high reliability expected for solid lubricating films in order to withstand hostile operating conditions (vacuum, high-low temperatures, high loads, and space radiation). For these problem areas the ion-assisted deposition/modification processes (plasma-based and ion beam techniques) offer the greatest potential for the synthesis of thin films and the tailoring of adherence and chemical and structural properties for optimized tribological performance. The present practices and new approaches of applying soft solid lubricant and hard wear resistant films to engineering substrates are reviewed. The ion bombardment treatments have increased film adherence, lowered friction coefficients, and enhanced wear life of the solid lubricating films such as the dichalcogenides (MoS2) and the soft metals (Au, Ag, Pb). Currently, sputtering is the preferred method of applying MoS2 films; and ion plating, the soft metallic films. Ultralow friction coefficients (less than 0.01) were achieved with sputtered MoS2. Further, new diamond-like carbon and BN lubricating films are being developed by using the ion assisted deposition techniques.

  15. Measurement of charged-particle stopping in warm dense plasma.

    PubMed

    Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Grabowski, P E; Li, C K; Collins, G W; Fitzsimmons, P; Glenzer, S; Graziani, F; Hansen, S B; Hu, S X; Johnson, M Gatu; Keiter, P; Reynolds, H; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2015-05-29

    We measured the stopping of energetic protons in an isochorically heated solid-density Be plasma with an electron temperature of ∼32  eV, corresponding to moderately coupled [(e^{2}/a)/(k_{B}T_{e}+E_{F})∼0.3] and moderately degenerate [k_{B}T_{e}/E_{F}∼2] "warm-dense matter" (WDM) conditions. We present the first high-accuracy measurements of charged-particle energy loss through dense plasma, which shows an increased loss relative to cold matter, consistent with a reduced mean ionization potential. The data agree with stopping models based on an ad hoc treatment of free and bound electrons, as well as the average-atom local-density approximation; this work is the first test of these theories in WDM plasma. PMID:26066441

  16. Two-species presheath measurements in a multipole plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hala, A.M.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1999-07-01

    Emissive probe measurements of plasma presheath potential profiles were made in a DC hot filament multidipole plasma discharge. The measurements were done with Argon, Xenon and a combination of the two gases. The presheath plasma potential near a negatively biased plate was mapped in two dimensions. The inflection point method in the limit of zero emission was used. The presheath was found to be a region of constant electric field with characteristic length the order of the ion-neutral collision length. The results show contraction of the presheath in the direction perpendicular to the plate as the pressure increases (between 0.5 and 3 mtorr). Two competing processes affect the presheath. These are ionization and collisions with ionization becoming more important at lower pressures. Experimental results are compared to various presheath models.

  17. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  18. Plasma-assisted combustion technology for NOx reduction in industrial burners.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Hoon; Kim, Kwan-Tae; Kang, Hee Seok; Song, Young-Hoon; Park, Jae Eon

    2013-10-01

    Stronger regulations on nitrogen oxide (NOx) production have recently promoted the creation of a diverse array of technologies for NOx reduction, particularly within the combustion process, where reduction is least expensive. In this paper, we discuss a new combustion technology that can reduce NOx emissions within industrial burners to single-digit parts per million levels without employing exhaust gas recirculation or other NOx reduction mechanisms. This new technology uses a simple modification of commercial burners, such that they are able to perform plasma-assisted staged combustion without altering the outer configuration of the commercial reference burner. We embedded the first-stage combustor within the head of the commercial reference burner, where it operated as a reformer that could host a partial oxidation process, producing hydrogen-rich reformate or synthesis gas product. The resulting hydrogen-rich flow then ignited and stabilized the combustion flame apart from the burner rim. Ultimately, the enhanced mixing and removal of hot spots with a widened flame area acted as the main mechanisms of NOx reduction. Because this plasma burner acted as a low NOx burner and was able to reduce NOx by more than half compared to the commercial reference burner, this methodology offers important cost-effective possibilities for NOx reduction in industrial applications. PMID:24032692

  19. Dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma probe for sensitive and specific detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendong; Hou, Keyong; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2015-09-01

    A dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma (DARLTP) probe was developed for sensitive and specific detection of explosives by a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. The DARLTP probe was fabricated using a T-shaped quartz tube. The dopant gas was introduced into the plasma stream through a side-tube. Using CH2Cl2 doped wet air as the dopant gas, the detection sensitivities were improved about 4-fold (RDX), 4-fold (PETN), and 3-fold (tetryl) compared with those obtained using the conventional LTP. Furthermore, the formation of [M + (35)Cl](-) and [M + (37)Cl](-) for these explosives enhanced the specificity for their identification. Additionally, the quantities of fragment ions of tetryl and adduct ions such as [RDX + NO2](-) and [PETN + NO2](-) were dramatically reduced, which simplified the mass spectra and avoided the overlap of mass peaks for different explosives. The sensitivity improvement may be attributed to the increased intensity of reactant ion [HNO3 + NO3](-), which was enhanced 4-fold after the introduction of dopant gas. The limits of detection (LODs) for RDX, tetryl, and PETN were down to 3, 6, and 10 pg, respectively. Finally, an explosive mixture was successfully analyzed, demonstrating the potential of the DARLTP probe for qualitative and quantitative analysis of complicated explosives. PMID:26191543

  20. Rotational CARS Temperature Measurements in Nanosecond Pulse Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzeek, Yvette; Takashima, Keisuke; Adamovich, Igor; Lempert, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Time-resolved and spatially resolved temperatures in repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharges in air and ethylene-air mixtures have been measured by purely rotational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Specroscopy (CARS). The experiments have been done in a capacitively coupled plane-to-plane discharge and in an atmospheric pressure near-surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD), both powered by repetitive nanosecond duration voltage pulses. Gated ICCD camera images demonstrated that the capacitively coupled discharge plasma remains diffuse and stable, with no sign of arc filaments. Comparison of the experimental results with plasma chemical kinetic modeling calculations shows good agreement. The results demonstrate that the rate of heating in the fuel-air plasma is significantly more rapid compared to the one in the air plasma. Kinetic model analysis shows that this occurs due to exothermic reactions of fuel with radical species generated in the plasma, such as O atoms. The present results provide additional insight into kinetics of hydrocarbon fuel oxidation in low-temperature plasmas and into the mechanism of localized heating of air flows by nanosecond DBD discharges.

  1. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  2. RESNA Resource Guide for Assistive Technology Outcomes: Measurement Tools. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This resource guide, the first of three volumes, lays out the fundamentals of outcome measurements for assistive technology. It includes the whys and hows of gathering data so that assistive technology practitioners can integrate outcomes measurement activities in their daily practice. Chapters include: (1) "Concepts and Rationale for…

  3. Online post-column solvent assisted and direct solvent-assisted electrospray ionization for chiral analysis of propranolol enantiomers in plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Elmongy, Hatem; Ahmed, Hytham; Wahbi, Abdel-Aziz; Koyi, Hirsh; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2015-10-30

    An Online post-column solvent-assisted ionization (OPSAI) method was developed for enhancing the ionization of the beta-blocker propranolol utilizing normal phase LC-MS/MS. Solvent-assisted electrospray ionization (SAESI) was studied by the introduction of the assistant solvents A: 0.5% Formic acid in Isopropanolol, B: 0.5% Formic acid in Isopropanolol-Water (1:1), and C: 0.5% Formic acid in water into the electrospray ionization chamber using a spray needle. Analyte molecules can be directly ionized by the aid of the assistant solvent spray. Both methods were applied to the chiral separation of propranolol enantiomers using normal phase analysis on cellulose-based chiral column. Interestingly, both methods are easy to handle and offer a wide range of assistant solvents that can be used in order to gain the optimum ionization of the analyte molecules. The both methods considerably improved the analyte signal and the peak area greatly increased. The propranolol average signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio was enhanced from 26±1 and 42±1 to 2341±61 and 1725±29 for R-propranolol and S-propranolol, respectively, when the post-column solvent method (OPSAI) was used with isopropanol-assistant solvent (A). While in case of solvent-assisted electrospray ionization method (SAESI) signal was enhanced from 26±1 and 42±1 to 2223±72 and 2155±58 for R-propranolol and S-propranolol, respectively, with water as an assistant solvent. The limit of detection was 10ng/mL and the method was linear in the range 50-2000ng/mL. The NPLC-MS method was applied for the determination of propranolol enantiomers in human plasma after microextraction by packed C18 sorbent. PMID:26422307

  4. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-01

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φp, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λD. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, Vb. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ωpi ≪ ω ≪ ωpe, where ωpi is the ion plasma frequency and ωpe is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Zac) and Im(Zac) are available from Γ. When Re(Zac) is plotted versus Vb, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φp [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Zac) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φp. As ne decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Zac) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Zac) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Zac).

  5. Anticoagulants used in plasma collection affect adipokine multiplexed measurements.

    PubMed

    Allione, Alessandra; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Dani, Nadia; Barberio, Davide; Sieri, Sabina; Krogh, Vittorio; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important health problem worldwide. Adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ that secretes various bioactive substances, called adipokines, including pro-inflammatory biomarkers such as TNF-α, IL-6, leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) and anti-inflammatory molecules such as adiponectin. The deregulated production of adipokines in obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of various disease processes and monitoring their variation is critical to understand metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the plasma concentration of adipokines in healthy subjects by multiplexed measurements and the effect of anticoagulants on their levels. Plasma samples from 10 healthy donors were collected in two different anticoagulants (sodium citrate or heparin). All markers, excluding TNF-α, showed significantly higher concentrations in heparinized compared to citrate plasma. However, levels of adipokines in different plasma samples were highly correlated for most of these markers. We reported that different anticoagulants used in the preparation of the plasma samples affected the measurements of some adipokines. The importance of the present results in epidemiology is relevant when comparing different studies in which blood samples were collected with different anticoagulants. PMID:26945995

  6. [Study of plasma temperature measurements for oxygen discharge].

    PubMed

    Li, Liu-Cheng; Wang, Zeng-Qiang; Li, Gu-Fu; Duo, Li-Ping

    2011-10-01

    A radio-frequency discharge setup was constructed by two shell-shaped copper electrodes and a 30 cm long pyrex glass tube (i. d. = 1.65 cm) to examine the gas temperature of oxygen plasma in electric discharge oxygen iodine laser. The discharge was supplied by a 500 watt, 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power. The gas pressure in the discharge cavity was 1 330 Pa. The temperature of oxygen discharge plasma was measured by using the P branch of O2 (b, v = 0) rotational emission spectrum. Two methods were used to deduce the oxygen gas temperature. They are Boltzman plotting method and computer simulating spectrum method, respectively. Gauss fitting method was used to distinguish spectrum peaks for lower resolution spectrum. The spectrum peak area was used to characterize the optical emission intensity. The gas temperature of oxygen discharge plasma was obtained by Boltzmann plotting method. Alternatively, the optical emission spectrum was simulated by computer modeling with spectrometer slit function which was obtained by He-Ne laser. Consequently, the gas temperature of oxygen plasma was obtained by comparing the computer simulating spectrum and the experimentally observed spectrum according to the least square fitting rule. The measurement results with the two methods agree well. It was concluded that the simple optical technique can be used conveniently in the temperature diagnostics of oxygen radio-frequency discharge plasma. PMID:22250527

  7. Measurement realities of current collection in dynamic space plasma environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, Edward P.

    1990-01-01

    Theories which describe currents collected by conducting and non-conducting bodies immersed in plasmas have many of their concepts based upon the fundamentals of sheath-potential distributions and charged-particle behavior in superimposed electric and magnetic fields. Those current-collecting bodies (or electrodes) may be Langmuir probes, electric field detectors, aperture plates on ion mass spectrometers and retarding potential analyzers, or spacecraft and their rigid and tethered appendages. Often the models are incomplete in representing the conditions under which the current-voltage characteristics of the electrode and its system are to be measured. In such cases, the experimenter must carefully take into account magnetic field effects and particle anisotropies, perturbations caused by the current collection process itself and contamination on electrode surfaces, the complexities of non-Maxwellian plasma distributions, and the temporal variability of the local plasma density, temperature, composition and fields. This set of variables is by no means all-inclusive, but it represents a collection of circumstances guaranteed to accompany experiments involving energetic particle beams, plasma discharges, chemical releases, wave injection and various events of controlled and uncontrolled spacecraft charging. Here, an attempt is made to synopsize these diagnostic challenges and frame them within a perspective that focuses on the physics under investigation and the requirements on the parameters to be measured. Examples include laboratory and spaceborne applications, with specific interest in dynamic and unstable plasma environments.

  8. Tensile adhesion test measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings are briefly studied, including a critical analysis of the experimental scatter for duplicate tests. The application of a simple method which presents adhesion strength data in a fracture mechanics perspective is demonstrated. Available data are analyzed in a way which suggests an approach to finding the overall defect contribution to reducing the apparent strength of coatings.

  9. Application of coherent lidar to ion measurements in plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A coherent lidar system has been constructed for the measurement of alpha particles in a burning plasma. The lidar system consists of a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser transmitter and a heterodyne receiver. The receiver local oscillator is a cw, sequence-band CO{sub 2} laser operating with a 63.23 GHz offset from the transmitter.

  10. High Resolution Spectral Measurements of Electrical Propulsion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Murat; Batishchev, Oleg; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    2007-11-01

    Among various diagnostics methods in studying the EP thrusters' plasma, emission spectroscopy provides a non-invasive, fast and economical diagnostics allowing also the ability to access hard to reach locations. This study presents the spectral measurement results of SPT (BHT-200) and TAL (MHT-9) Hall Effect thrusters and mini-Helicon (mHTX@MIT) thruster plasmas. The measurements were conducted using a 750mm focal length spectrometer with a spectral resolution of up to ˜0.01 nm in the UV-VIS-NIR wavelength range, 200-1000nm. For one set of the measurements, collection optics was placed on a portable optical shelf attached to the window port of the vacuum chamber. For another set of measurements the thruster plasma radiation emission was collected using a collimating lens inside the vacuum chamber and the signal was brought out of the chamber to the spectrometer by the use of UV-rated optical fibers. Accurate spectral characterization was done for Xe and Ar plasma in a broad operational range. Additionally, emission spectroscopy was used to detect line radiation due to wall erosion products in SPT, to study the effect of thruster operational parameters on the ceramic lining erosion rate, subsequently of the thruster's lifetime.