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Sample records for plasma chemical vaporization

  1. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Aaron; Bett, Dominic; Cunningham, Monisha; Sen, Sudip

    2015-04-01

    Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) is a process used to deposit thin films from a gas state (vapor) to a solid state on a substrate. Recent study from the X-ray diffraction spectra of SnO2 films deposited as a function of RF power apparently indicates that RF power is playing a stabilizing role and hence in the better deposition. The results show that the RF power results in smoother morphology, improved crystallinity, and lower sheet resistance value in the PECVD process. The PECVD processing allows deposition at lower temperatures, which is often critical in the manufacture of semiconductors. In this talk we will address two aspects of the problem, first to develop a model to study the mechanism of how the PECVD is effected by the RF power, and second to actually simulate the effect of RF power on PECVD. As the PECVD is a very important component of the plasma processing technology with many applications in the semiconductor technology and surface science, the research proposed here has the prospect to revolutionize the plasma processing technology through the stabilizing role of the RF power.

  3. Radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition growth of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Duane E.; Dillon, Rodney O.; Woollam, John A.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at 13.56 MHz has been used to produce diamond particles in two different inductively coupled systems with a mixture of methane and hydrogen. The effect of a diamondlike carbon (DLC) overcoating on silicon, niobium, and stainless-steel substrates has been investigated and in the case of silicon has been found to enhance particle formation as compared to uncoated polished silicon. In addition the use of carbon monoxide in hydrogen has been found to produce well-defined individual faceted particles as well as polycrystalline films on quartz and DLC coated silicon substrates. Plasma CVD is a competitive approach to production of diamond films. It has the advantage over microwave systems of being easily scaled to large volume and high power.

  4. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies ion the processing of semiconductor materials arising from understanding etch chemistries are being developed through a research collaboration between Stanford University and NASA-Ames Research Center, Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of materials processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. In addition, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. The research described involves the study of plasmas used in semiconductor processes. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics and chemistries. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities (approximately 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and lower operating pressures (approximately 7 mTorr) than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The motivation for this study is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental parameters, such as gas-phase and surface reaction rates. species

  5. Removal characteristics of plasma chemical vaporization machining with a pipe electrode for optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Takino, Hideo; Yamamura, Kazuya; Sano, Yasuhisa; Mori, Yuzo

    2010-08-10

    Plasma chemical vaporization machining (CVM) is a high-precision chemical shaping method using rf plasma generated in the proximity of an electrode in an atmospheric environment. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the removal characteristics of plasma CVM using a pipe electrode. Polished fused silica plates were processed by plasma CVM, polishing, and precision grinding under various conditions. The removal rate of plasma CVM was about 4 to 1100 times faster than that of polishing, and the maximum removal rate was almost equal to that of precision grinding. The roughness of the resultant surfaces was almost the same as that of the polished surfaces.

  6. Plasma effects in aligned carbon nanoflake growth by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. B.; Zheng, K.; Cheng, Q. J.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanofilms are directly grown on silicon substrates by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition in methane environment. It is shown that the nanofilms are composed of aligned carbon nanoflakes by extensive investigation of experimental results of field emission scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In comparison with the graphene-like films grown without plasmas, the carbon nanoflakes grow in an alignment mode and the growth rate of the films is increased. The effects of the plasma on the growth of the carbon nanofilms are studied. The plasma plays three main effects of (1) promoting the separation of the carbon nanoflakes from the silicon substrate, (2) accelerating the motion of hydrocarbon radicals, and (3) enhancing the deposition of hydrocarbon ions onto the substrate surface. Due to these plasma-specific effects, the carbon nanofilms can be formed from the aligned carbon nanoflakes with a high rate. These results advance our knowledge on the synthesis, properties and applications of graphene-based materials.

  7. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, G.; Tholeti, S. S.; Alrefae, M. A.; Fisher, T. S.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model of hydrogen plasma inside a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. This model will help in understanding and optimizing the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D axisymmetric model of the system is implemented using the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and the heat transfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics. The system is modeled to study variation in parameters with reactor geometry, microwave power, and gas pressure. The results are compared with experimental measurements from the Q-branch of the H2 Fulcher band of hydrogen using an optical emission spectroscopy technique. The parameter γ in Füner's model is calibrated to match experimental observations at a power of 500 W and 30 Torr. Good agreement is found between the modeling and experimental results for a wide range of powers and pressures. The gas temperature exhibits a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. The inclusion of a vertical dielectric pillar that concentrates the plasma increases the maximum electron temperature by 70%, the maximum gas temperature by 50%, and the maximum electron number density by 70% when compared to conditions without the pillar at 500 W and 30 Torr. Experimental observations also indicate intensified plasma with the inclusion of a pillar.

  8. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes by Slot-Excited Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Gyu Il; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Kono, Satoshi; Ohno, Yutaka; Ishijima, Tatsuo

    2008-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fabricated by adopting plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with a planar microwave plasma source. Plasma is produced by a slot antenna at 2.45-GHz microwave injection in CH4/H2 mixture. In this study, it is shown that avoiding the exposure of the substrate to the plasma drastically improves the CNT growth. Furthermore, it is found that the CNT quality can be controlled with the optimization of one of the steps in the catalyst treatment, such as the preheating procedure; the treated catalyst is considered to be unaffected by the heating in the high-density microwave plasma treatment during the CNT growth.

  9. Vertically aligned peptide nanostructures using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Milana C; Koerner, Hilmar; Singh, Kristi M; Partlow, Benjamin P; Kaplan, David L; Gazit, Ehud; Bunning, Timothy J; Naik, Rajesh R

    2014-02-10

    In this study, we utilize plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for the deposition of nanostructures composed of diphenylalanine. PECVD is a solvent-free approach and allows sublimation of the peptide to form dense, uniform arrays of peptide nanostructures on a variety of substrates. The PECVD deposited d-diphenylalanine nanostructures have a range of chemical and physical properties depending on the specific discharge parameters used during the deposition process. PMID:24400716

  10. Laser/Plasma/Chemical-Vapor Deposition Of Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed process for deposition of diamond films includes combination of plasma induced in hydrocarbon feed gas by microwave radiation and irradiation of plasma and substrate by lasers. Deposition of graphite suppressed. Reaction chamber irradiated at wavelength favoring polymerization of CH2 radical into powders filtered out of gas. CH3 radicals, having desired sp3 configuration, remains in gas to serve as precursors for deposition. Feed gas selected to favor formation of CH3 radicals; candidates include CH4, C2H4, C2H2, and C2H6. Plasma produced by applying sufficient power at frequency of 2.45 GHz and adjusting density of gas to obtain electron kinetic energies around 100 eV in low-pressure, low-temperature regime.

  11. Reduced chemical warfare agent sorption in polyurethane-painted surfaces via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Durke, Erin M

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoralkalation via plasma chemical vapor deposition has been used to improve hydrophobicity of surfaces. We have investigated this technique to improve the resistance of commercial polyurethane coatings to chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents. The reported results indicate the surface treatment minimizes the spread of agent droplets and the sorption of agent into the coating. The improvement in resistance is likely due to reduction of the coating's surface free energy via fluorine incorporation, but may also have contributing effects from surface morphology changes. The data indicates that plasma-based surface modifications may have utility in improving chemical resistance of commercial coatings. PMID:25775244

  12. Microstructure of boron nitride coated on nuclear fuels by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör; Toker, Canan

    1998-08-01

    Three nuclear fuels, pure urania, 5% and 10% gadolinia containing fuels were coated with boron nitride to improve nuclear and physical properties. Coating was done by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique by using boron trichloride and ammonia. The specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Boron nitride formed a grainy structure on all fuels. Gadolinia decreased the grain size of boron nitride. The fractal dimensions of fragmentation and of area-perimeter relation were determined.

  13. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes obtained by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousinho, A. P.; Mansano, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition represents an assembly approach to place and orient nanotubes at a stage as early as when they are synthesized. In this work, the carbon nanotubes were obtained at room temperature by High Density Plasmas Chemical Vapor Deposition (HDPCVD) system. This CVD system uses a new concept of plasma generation, where a planar coil coupled to an RF system for plasma generation was used with an electrostatic shield for plasma densification. In this mode, high density plasmas are obtained. We also report the patterned growth of carbon nanotubes on full 4-in Si wafers, using pure methane plasmas and iron as precursor material (seed). Photolithography processes were used to pattern the regions on the silicon wafers. The carbon nanotubes were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the spectra showed very single-walled carbon nanotubes axial vibration modes around 1590 cm-1 and radial breathing modes (RBM) around 120-400 cm-1, confirming that high quality of the carbon nanotubes obtained in this work. The carbon nanotubes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy too. The results showed that is possible obtain high-aligned carbon nanotubes with patterned growth on a silicon wafer with high reproducibility and control.

  14. Single crystal chemical vapor deposit diamond detector for energetic plasma measurement in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, K.; Broiles, T. W.; Coulter, K. E.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Livi, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Walther, B. C.

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the performance of single crystal chemical vapor deposit diamond detectors for measuring space plasma and energetic particles: ~7 keV energy resolution for protons with a 14 keV threshold level, and good response linearity for ions and electrons as expected from Monte-Carlo calculations of primary particle energy loss. We investigated that these diamond detectors are able to operate at high temperature (> 70 ° C) and have fast response times (< 1 ns rise time). While silicon detectors have proven capability over this energy range for space plasma measurements, diamond detectors offer a faster response, higher temperature operation, greater radiation tolerance, and immunity to light.

  15. Fluid modeling for plasma-enhanced direct current chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismagilov, Rinat R.; Khamidullin, Ildar R.; Kleshch, Victor I.; Malykhin, Sergei A.; Alexeev, Andrey M.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    A self-consistent continuum (fluid) model for a direct current discharge used in a chemical vapor deposition system is developed. The model is built for a two-dimensional axisymmetric system and incorporates an electron energy balance for low-pressure Ar gas. The underlying physics of the fluid model is briefly discussed. The fluid and Poisson equations for plasma species are used as the model background. The plasma species considered in the model include electrons, Ar+ ions, and Ar atoms in ground and excited states. Nine reactions between these species are taken into account, including surface reactions. The densities of various plasma species as well as the relative contributions of generation and annihilation processes for electrons, ions, and atoms are calculated. The concentrations for electrons and Ar+ ions on the order of 1020 m-3 are obtained for the plasma in the computer simulations.

  16. Optical emission diagnostics of plasmas in chemical vapor deposition of single-crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hemawan, Kadek W. Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-15

    A key aspect of single crystal diamond growth via microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition is in-process control of the local plasma–substrate environment, that is, plasma gas phase concentrations of activated species at the plasma boundary layer near the substrate surface. Emission spectra of the plasma relative to the diamond substrate inside the microwave plasma reactor chamber have been analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The spectra of radical species such as CH, C{sub 2}, and H (Balmer series) important for diamond growth were identified and analyzed. The emission intensities of these electronically excited species were found to be more dependent on operating pressure than on microwave power. Plasma gas temperatures were calculated from measurements of the C{sub 2} Swan band (d{sup 3}Π → a{sup 3}Π transition) system. The plasma gas temperature ranges from 2800 to 3400 K depending on the spatial location of the plasma ball, microwave power and operating pressure. Addition of Ar into CH{sub 4}+H{sub 2} plasma input gas mixture has little influence on the Hα, Hβ, and Hγ intensities and single-crystal diamond growth rates.

  17. Plasma-Assisted Mist Chemical Vapor Deposition of Zinc Oxide Films for Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-assisted mist chemical vapor deposition of ZnO films was performed for transparent conductive oxide formation of flexible electronics. In this study, ZnO films deposition using atmospheric-pressure He plasma generated by a micro-hollow cathode-type plasma source has been demonstrated. To obtain detail information according to generation of species in the plasma, the optical emission spectra of the atmospheric pressure He plasma with and without mist were measured. The result without mist shows considerable emissions of He lines, emissions attributed to the excitation and dissociation of air including N2 and O2 (N, O, and NO radials, and N2 molecule; N2 second positive band and first positive band), while the results with mist showed strong emissions attributed to the dissociation of H2O (OH and H radicals). The deposition of ZnO films was performed using atmospheric-pressure He plasma. The XRD patterns showed no crystallization of the ZnO films irradiated with pure He. On the other hand, the ZnO film crystallized with the irradiation with He/O2 mixture plasma. These results indicate that the atmospheric-pressure He/O2 mixture plasma has sufficient reactivity necessary for the crystallization of ZnO films at room temperature. This work was supported partly by The Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (KAKENHI) (Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research(C)) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

  18. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first. PMID:21875044

  19. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous Si on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupina, G.; Strobel, C.; Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Kitzmann, J.; Krause, H. M.; Wenger, Ch.; Lukosius, M.; Wolff, A.; Albert, M.; Bartha, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin a-Si:H layers on transferred large area graphene is investigated. Radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and very high frequency (VHF, 140 MHz) plasma processes are compared. Both methods provide conformal coating of graphene with Si layers as thin as 20 nm without any additional seed layer. The RF plasma process results in amorphization of the graphene layer. In contrast, the VHF process keeps the high crystalline quality of the graphene layer almost intact. Correlation analysis of Raman 2D and G band positions indicates that Si deposition induces reduction of the initial doping in graphene and an increase of compressive strain. Upon rapid thermal annealing, the amorphous Si layer undergoes dehydrogenation and transformation into a polycrystalline film, whereby a high crystalline quality of graphene is preserved.

  20. One-step synthesis of chlorinated graphene by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liwei; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Pingping; Sun, Xuhui

    2015-08-01

    We developed an approach to synthesize the chlorinated single layer graphene (Cl-G) by one-step plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Copper foil was simply treated with hydrochloric acid and then CuCl2 formed on the surface was used as Cl source under the assistance of plasma treatment. Compared with other two-step methods by post plasma/photochemical treatment of CVD-grown single layer graphene (SLG), one-step Cl-G synthesis approach is quite straightforward and effective. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that ∼2.45 atom% Cl remained in SLG. Compared with the pristine SLG, the obvious blue shifts of G band and 2D band along with the appearance of D' band and D + G band in the Raman spectra indicate p-type doping of Cl-G.

  1. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method to coat micropipettes with diamond-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kakuta, Naoto; Watanabe, Mayu; Yamada, Yukio; Okuyama, Naoki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2005-07-15

    This article provides a simple method for coating glass micropipettes with diamond-like carbon (DLC) through plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The apparatus uses a cathode that is a thin-metal-coated micropipette itself and an anode that is a meshed cylinder with its cylinder axis along the micropipette length. To produce a uniform plasma and prevent a temperature increase at the tip due to ion collision concentration, we investigated the effect of the height and diameter of the meshed cylindrical anode on the plasma. Intermittent deposition is also effective for inhibiting the temperature rise and producing high quality DLC films. Measured Raman spectra and electric resistivity indicate that a DLC film suitable for use as an insulating film can be produced on the micropipette. This coating method should also be useful for other extremely small probes.

  2. Free-standing thin film Ge single crystals grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Hopson, P., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The films, which are approximately 10 microns in thickness, are grown epitaxially on polished (100) NaCl substrates at 450 C by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Upon cooling, the films are separated from the substrate by differential shear stress, leaving free-standing films of Ge which can be handled. Growths are attained by nucleating at minimum plasma power for very brief intervals and then raising the power to 65 W to increase the growth rate to approximately 10 microns/h. It is found that substrate exposure to the plasma at too high a power for too long a time sputters and erodes the surface, thereby substantially degrading the nucleation process and the ultimate growths. It is noted that the free-standing films are visually specular and exhibit a high degree of crystalline order when examined by X-ray diffraction. Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays reveal no detectable bulk contamination.

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanowall by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rulin; Chi, Yaqing; Fang, Liang; Tang, Zhensen; Yi, Xun

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is widely used for the synthesis of carbon materials, such as diamond-like carbons (DLCs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanowalls (CNWs). Advantages of PECVD are low synthesis temperature compared with thermal CVD and the ability to grow vertically, free-standing structures. Due to its self-supported property and high specific surface area, CNWs are a promising material for field emission devices and other chemical applications. This article reviews the recent process on the synthesis of CNW by the PECVD method. We briefly introduce the structure and properties of CNW with characterization techniques. Growth mechanism is also discussed to analyze the influence of plasma conditions, substrates, temperature, and other parameters to the final film, which will give a suggestion on parameter modulation for desired film. PMID:24749447

  4. Growth and Characteristics of Freestanding Hemispherical Diamond Films by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Liang; Lü, Xian-Yi; Li, Liu-An; Cheng, Shao-Heng; Li, Hong-Dong

    2010-04-01

    Freestanding hemispherical diamond films have been fabricated by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition using graphite and molybdenum (Mo) as substrates. Characterized by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, the crystalline quality of the films deposited on Mo is higher than that on graphite, which is attributed to the difference in intrinsic properties of the two substrates. By decreasing the methane concentration, the diamond films grown on the Mo substrate vary from black to white, and the optical transparency is enhanced. After polishing the growth side, the diamond films show an infrared transmittance of 35-60% in the range 400-4000 cm-1.

  5. Deposition of aligned bamboo-like carbon nanotubes via microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H.; Zhou, O.; Stoner, B. R.

    2000-11-01

    Aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes have been grown on silicon substrates by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane/ammonia mixtures. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the nanotubes are well aligned with high aspect ratio and growth direction normal to the substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the majority phase has a bamboo-like structure. Data are also presented showing process variable effects on the size and microstructure of the aligned nanotubes, giving insight into possible nucleation and growth mechanisms for the process.

  6. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors Using Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, Hirofumi; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takashi

    2006-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are grown using grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The field effect transistor operation was confirmed using the PECVD grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The preferential growth of the semiconducting nanotubes was confirmed in the grid-inserted PECVD by measuring current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the devices. Based on the measurement of the electrical breakdown of the metallic CNTs, the probability of growing the semiconducting nanotubes has been estimated to be more than 90%.

  7. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  8. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  9. Effects of plasma power on the growth of carbon nanotubes in the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Y.; Arzi, E.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2008-11-01

    Effects of plasma power on the growth of the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are reported. CNTs were grown on the silicon wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method using a mixture of acetylene and hydrogen at the temperature of 650°C. Plasma powers ranging from zero to 35W were applied on the samples and the effects of different magnitudes of the plasma power on the growth direction of the CNTs were investigated. Regular vertically aligned nanotubes were obtained at plasma power of 25W. In order to set on the plasma during the growth, electrical force was applied on the carbon ions. Nickel layer was used as a catalyst, and prior to the nanotubes growth step, it was treated by hydrogen plasma bombardment in order to obtain the Ni nano-islands. In this step, as the plasma power on the Ni layer was increased, the grain size of nickel nano-particles decreased, and hence, nanotubes of smaller diameter were obtained later on. At the last step some anomalous structures of agglomerated CNTs were obtained by controlling the plasma power. Samples were analyzed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  10. The evolution of carbon nanotubes during their growth by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengzhi; Ren, Z F

    2011-10-01

    During the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), plasma etching is the crucial factor that determines the growth mode and alignment of the CNTs. Focusing on a thin catalyst coating (Ni = 5 nm), this study finds that the CNT growth by PECVD goes through three stages from randomly entangled (I-CNTs) to partially aligned (II-CNTs) to fully aligned (III-CNTs). The I-CNTs and II-CNTs are mostly etched away by the plasma as time goes by ending up with III-CNTs as the only product when growth time is long enough. However, with a thickness of the catalyst coating of 10 nm or more, neither I-CNTs nor II-CNTs are produced, but III-CNTs are the only type of CNTs grown during the whole growth process. During the growth of III-CNTs, the catalyst particles (Ni) stay on the tips of each of the aligned CNTs and act as a 'safety helmet' to protect the CNTs from plasma ion bombardment. On the other hand, it is also the plasma that limits the growth of III-CNTs, since the plasma eventually etches all the catalytic particles out and stops the growth. PMID:21911923

  11. The evolution of carbon nanotubes during their growth by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hengzhi; Ren, Z. F.

    2011-10-01

    During the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), plasma etching is the crucial factor that determines the growth mode and alignment of the CNTs. Focusing on a thin catalyst coating (Ni = 5 nm), this study finds that the CNT growth by PECVD goes through three stages from randomly entangled (I-CNTs) to partially aligned (II-CNTs) to fully aligned (III-CNTs). The I-CNTs and II-CNTs are mostly etched away by the plasma as time goes by ending up with III-CNTs as the only product when growth time is long enough. However, with a thickness of the catalyst coating of 10 nm or more, neither I-CNTs nor II-CNTs are produced, but III-CNTs are the only type of CNTs grown during the whole growth process. During the growth of III-CNTs, the catalyst particles (Ni) stay on the tips of each of the aligned CNTs and act as a 'safety helmet' to protect the CNTs from plasma ion bombardment. On the other hand, it is also the plasma that limits the growth of III-CNTs, since the plasma eventually etches all the catalytic particles out and stops the growth.

  12. Latest innovations in large area web coating technology via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition source technology

    SciTech Connect

    George, M. A.; Chandra, H.; Morse, P.; Madocks, J.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, the authors discuss the latest results of our development of large area plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) source technologies for flexible substrates. A significant challenge is the economical application of thin films for use as vapor barriers, transparent conductive oxides, and optical interference thin films. Here at General Plasma the authors have developed two innovative PECVD source technologies that provide an economical alternative to low temperature sputtering technologies and enable some thin film materials not accessible by sputtering. The Penning Discharge Plasma (PDP trade mark sign ) source is designed for high rate direct PECVD deposition on insulating, temperature sensitive web [J. Modocks, Proceedings of the Society of Vacuum Coaters, 2003 (unpublished), p. 187]. This technology has been utilized to deposit SiO{sub 2} and SiC:H for barrier applications [V. Shamamian et al. Proceedings of the Flexible Displays and Manufacturing Conferrence, 2006 (unpublished)]. The Plasma Beam Source (PBS trade mark sign ) is a remote plasma source that is more versatile for deposition on not only insulating flexible substrates but also conductive or rigid substrates for deposition of thin films that are sensitive to the high ion bombardment flux inherent to the PDP trade mark sign technology. The authors have developed PBS thin film processes in our laboratory for deposition of SiO{sub 2}, SiC:O, SiN:C, SiN:H, ZnO, FeO{sub x}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. [M. A. George, Conference Proceedings of the Association of Industrial Metallizers, Coaters, and Laminators (AIMCAL), 2007 (unpublished)]. The authors discuss the design of the patented sources, plasma physics, and chemistry of the deposited thin films.

  13. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit "coral" and "cauliflower-like" morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  14. Nickel doping of boron carbide grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Remmes, N.B.; Dowben, P.A.; McIlroy, D.N.

    1996-07-01

    We have nickel doped boron carbide grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The source gas closo-1,2-dicarbadodecaborane (ortho-carborane) was used to grow the boron carbide, while nickelocene [Ni(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}] was used to introduce nickel into the growing film. The doping of nickel transformed a {ital p}-type, B{sub 5}C material, relative to lightly doped {ital n}-type silicon, to an {ital n}-type material. Both {ital n}-{ital n} heterojunction diodes and {ital n}-{ital p} heterojunction diodes were constructed, using as substrates {ital n}- and {ital p}-type Si(111), respectively. With sufficient partial pressures of nickelocene in the plasma reactor, diodes with characteristic tunnel diode behavior can be successfully fabricated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  15. Fabrication of nanocrystalline silicon layers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from silicon tetrafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Sennikov, P. G. Golubev, S. V.; Shashkin, V. I.; Pryakhin, D. A.; Drozdov, M. N.; Andreev, B. A.; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Pohl, H.-J.

    2009-07-15

    The data on fabrication of silicon layers on various substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from the (silicon tetrafluoride)-hydrogen system are reported. The emission spectra of the plasma in the system are recorded. The samples were studied by the X-ray diffraction and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques. The morphologic properties of the surface are examined, and the Raman spectra, the transmittance spectra in the infrared region, and photoluminescence spectra are recorded. The phase composition of the layers corresponds to nanocrystalline silicon, in which the dimensions of coherent-scattering grains vary with the conditions of the preparation process in the range from 3 to 9 nm. The layers exhibit intense photoluminescence at room temperature.

  16. Growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on carbon microfibers by dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L H.; AuBuchon, J F.; Chen, I C.; Daraio, C; Ye, X R.; Gapin, A; Jin, Sungho; Wang, Chong M.

    2006-01-16

    It is shown that unidirectionally aligned carbon nanotubes can be grown on electrically conductive network of carbon microfibers via control of buffer layer material and applied electric field during dc plasma chemical vapor deposition growth. Ni catalyst deposition on carbon microfiber produces relatively poorly aligned nanotubes with significantly varying diameters and lengths obtained. The insertion of Ti 5 nm thick underlayer between Ni catalyst layer and C microfiber substrate significantly alters the morphology of nanotubes, resulting in much better aligned, finer diameter, and longer array of nanotubes. This beneficial effect is attributed to the reduced reaction between Ni and carbon paper, as well as prevention of plasma etching of carbon paper by inserting a Ti buffer layer. Such a unidirectionally aligned nanotube structure on an open-pore conductive substrate structure may conveniently be utilized as a high-surface-area base electrodes for fuel cells, batteries, and other electrochemical and catalytic reactions.

  17. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  18. Plasma restructuring of catalysts for chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cantoro, M.; Hofmann, S.; Pisana, S.; Parvez, A.; Fasoli, A.; Scardaci, V.; Ferrari, A. C.; Robertson, J.; Mattevi, C.; Ducati, C.

    2009-03-15

    The growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers by catalytic chemical vapor deposition at lower temperatures is found to be aided by a separate catalyst pretreatment step in which the catalyst thin film is restructured into a series of nanoparticles with a more active surface. The restructuring is particularly effective when carried out by an ammonia plasma. The nature of the restructuring is studied by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman. We find that as the growth temperature decreases, there is a limiting maximum catalyst thickness, which gives any nanotube growth. Plasmas are found to restructure the catalyst by a combination of physical etching and chemical modification. Large plasma powers can lead to complete etching of thin catalyst films, and hence loss of activity. Ni is found to be the better catalyst at low temperatures because it easily reduced from any oxide form to the catalytically active metallic state. On the other hand, Fe gives the largest nanotube length and density yield at moderate temperatures because it is less easy to reduce at low temperatures and it is more easily poisoned at high temperatures.

  19. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  20. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Song, W; Lee, S Y; Jeon, C; Jung, W; Kim, M; Park, C-Y

    2011-06-27

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 °C down to 450 °C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 Ω∕sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film. PMID:21799537

  1. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-06-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 °C down to 450 °C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 Ω/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  2. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-06-27

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 deg. C down to 450 deg. C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 {Omega}/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  3. Growth of cubic boron nitride on diamond particles by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yarbrough, W. A.

    1991-06-01

    The nucleation and growth of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) onto diamond powder using solid NaBH4 in low pressure gas mixtures of NH3 and H2 by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been studied. Boron nitride was deposited on submicron diamond seed crystals scattered on (100) silicon single crystal wafers and evidence was found for the formation of the cubic phase. Diamond powder surfaces appear to preferentially nucleate c-BN. In addition, it was found that the ratio of c-BN to turbostratic structure boron nitride (t-BN) deposited increases with decreasing NH3 concentration in H2. It is suggested that this may be due to an increased etching rate for t-BN by atomic hydrogen whose partial pressure may vary with NH3 concentration.

  4. Analysis of mass transport in an atmospheric pressure remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, R. P.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.; Gries, T.; Tixhon, E.

    2010-01-15

    In remote microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes operated at atmospheric pressure, high deposition rates are associated with the localization of precursors on the treated surface. We show that mass transport can be advantageously ensured by convection for the heavier precursor, the lighter being driven by turbulent diffusion toward the surface. Transport by laminar diffusion is negligible. The use of high flow rates is mandatory to have a good mixing of species. The use of an injection nozzle with micrometer-sized hole enables us to define accurately the reaction area between the reactive species. The localization of the flow leads to high deposition rates by confining the reactive species over a small area, the deposition yield being therefore very high. Increasing the temperature modifies nonlinearly the deposition rates and the coating properties.

  5. In situ nitrogen-doped graphene grown from polydimethylsiloxane by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chundong; Zhou, Yungang; He, Lifang; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Hong, Guo; Wu, Qi-Hui; Gao, Fei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun

    2013-01-21

    Due to its unique electronic properties and wide spectrum of promising applications, graphene has attracted much attention from scientists in various fields. Control and engineering of graphene's semiconducting properties is considered to be key to its applications in electronic devices. Here, we report a novel method to prepare in situ nitrogen-doped graphene by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) as a solid carbon source. Based on this approach, the concentration of nitrogen-doping can be easily controlled via the flow rate of nitrogen during the CVD process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the nitrogen atoms doped into the graphene lattice were mainly in the forms of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures. Moreover, first-principles calculations show that the incorporated nitrogen atoms can lead to p-type doping of graphene. This in situ approach provides a promising strategy to prepare graphene with controlled electronic properties. PMID:23203220

  6. Electrical characterization of graphene films synthesized by low-temperature microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okigawa, Yuki; Tsugawa, Kazuo; Yamada, Takatoshi; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, we discuss the results of Hall effect measurements to examine the electrical properties of the graphene films synthesized by low-temperature microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. Van der Pauw devices with sizes of 50-100 μm were fabricated, for which we observed p-type conduction and mobility from 10 to 100 cm2/V s. To investigate the mobility dispersion, we performed Raman mapping to quantify the number of defects and the disorder in graphene films. The results suggest that the D-band/G-band intensity ratio is correlated with the mobility. Moreover, we discuss the factors controlling the mobility and how to improve the quality of the graphene films by reducing the number of defects.

  7. In situ nitrogen-doped graphene grown from polydimethylsiloxane by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chundong; Zhou, Yungang; He, Lifang; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Hong, Guo; Wu, Qi-Hui; Gao, Fei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun

    2013-01-21

    Due to its unique electronic properties and wide spectrum of promising applications, graphene has attracted much attention from scientists in various fields. Control and engineering of graphene’s semiconducting properties is considered to be the key of its applications in electronic devices. Here, we report a novel method to prepare in situ nitrogen-doped graphene by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) as a solid carbon source. Based on this approach, the concentration of nitrogen-doping can be easily controlled via the flow rate of nitrogen during the CVD process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the nitrogen atoms doped into graphene lattice were mainly in the forms of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures. Moreover, first-principles calculations show that the incorporated nitrogen atoms can lead to p-type doping of graphene. This in situ approach provides a promising strategy to prepare graphene with controlled electronic properties.

  8. High Current Emission from Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Linfan; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Jiao, Tifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vertically, carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were successfully fabricated on hexagon patterned Si substrates through radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using gas mixtures of acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) with Fe/Al2O3 catalysts. The CNTs were found to be graphitized with multi-walled structures. Different H2/C2H2 gas flow rate ratio was used to investigate the effect on CNT growth, and the field emission properties were optimized. The CNT emitters exhibited excellent field emission performance (the turn-on and threshold fields were 2.1 and 2.4 V/μm, respectively). The largest emission current could reach 70 mA/cm2. The emission current was stable, and no obvious deterioration was observed during the long-term stability test of 50 h. The results were relevant for practical applications based on CNTs.

  9. High Current Emission from Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linfan; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Jiao, Tifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vertically, carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were successfully fabricated on hexagon patterned Si substrates through radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using gas mixtures of acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) with Fe/Al2O3 catalysts. The CNTs were found to be graphitized with multi-walled structures. Different H2/C2H2 gas flow rate ratio was used to investigate the effect on CNT growth, and the field emission properties were optimized. The CNT emitters exhibited excellent field emission performance (the turn-on and threshold fields were 2.1 and 2.4 V/μm, respectively). The largest emission current could reach 70 mA/cm(2). The emission current was stable, and no obvious deterioration was observed during the long-term stability test of 50 h. The results were relevant for practical applications based on CNTs. PMID:26666912

  10. Homogeneous nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide films prepared by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijin; Xu, S; Long, Jidong; Huang, Shiyong; Guo, Jun

    2007-11-21

    Silicon carbide films with different carbon concentrations x(C) have been synthesized by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition from a SiH(4)/CH(4)/H(2) gas mixture at a low substrate temperature of 500 °C. The characteristics of the films were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Our experimental results show that, at x(C) = 49 at.%, the film is made up of homogeneous nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide without any phase of silicon, graphite, or diamond crystallites/clusters. The average size of SiC crystallites is approximately 6 nm. At a lower value of x(C), polycrystalline silicon and amorphous silicon carbide coexist in the films. At a higher value of x(C), amorphous carbon and silicon carbide coexist in the films. PMID:21730481

  11. Plasma-enhanced-chemical-vapor-deposited ultralow k for a postintegration porogen removal approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jousseaume, V.; Favennec, L.; Zenasni, A.; Passemard, G.

    2006-05-01

    Conventional Cu-ultra low K (ULK) integration schemes lead to a drastic increase of the effective dielectric constant due to porous material degradation during process steps. Although a postintegration porogen removal scheme allows overcoming these issues, only spin-on dielectrics were developed to validate this approach. In this letter, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used to deposit ULK dielectric (k<2.5). The precursor chemistry and the deposition conditions have been chosen to obtain a material with the required characteristics to use a postintegration porogen removal approach: porogen thermal stability up to 325 deg. C, good mechanical properties of the hybrid film, no metallic barrier diffusion in the film, and a minimal shrinkage after the porogen removal treatment.

  12. Stress hysteresis and mechanical properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurn, Jeremy; Cook, Robert F.; Kamarajugadda, Mallika; Bozeman, Steven P.; Stearns, Laura C.

    2004-02-01

    A comprehensive survey is described of the responses of three plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited dielectric film systems to thermal cycling and indentation contact. All three films—silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon oxy-nitride—exhibited significant nonequilibrium permanent changes in film stress on thermal cycling or annealing. The linear relationship between stress and temperature changed after the films were annealed at 300 °C, representing a structural alteration in the film reflecting a change in coefficient of thermal expansion or biaxial modulus. A double-substrate method was used to deduce both thermoelastic properties before and after the anneal of selected films and the results were compared with the modulus deconvoluted from small-scale depth-sensing indentation experiments (nanoindentation). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and hydrogen forward scattering were used to deduce the composition of the films and it was found that all the films contained significant amounts of hydrogen.

  13. Multiple substrate microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition single crystal diamond synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Asmussen, J.; Grotjohn, T. A.; Reinhard, D. K.; Schuelke, T.; Becker, M. F.; Yaran, M. K.; King, D. J.; Wicklein, S.

    2008-07-21

    A multiple substrate, microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis process for single crystal diamond (SCD) is demonstrated using a 915 MHz reactor. Diamond synthesis was performed using input chemistries of 6-8% of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, microwave input powers of 10-11.5 kW, substrate temperatures of 1100-1200 deg. C, and pressures of 110-135 Torr. The simultaneous synthesis of SCD over 70 diamond seeds yielded good quality SCD with deposition rates of 14-21 {mu}m/h. Multiple deposition runs totaling 145 h of deposition time added 1.8-2.5 mm of diamond material to each of the 70 seed crystals.

  14. Metal-free plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of large area nanocrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Marek E.; Xu, Cigang; Cooke, Mike; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Chong, Harold M. H.

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on large area, metal-free deposition of nanocrystalline graphene (NCG) directly onto wet thermally oxidized 150 mm silicon substrates using parallel-plate plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Thickness non-uniformities as low as 13% are achieved over the whole substrate. The cluster size {{L}_{\\text{a}}} of the as-obtained films is determined from Raman spectra and lies between 1.74 and 2.67 nm. The film uniformity was further confirmed by Raman mapping. The sheet resistance {{R}_{\\text{sq}}} of 3.73 \\text{k}\\Omega and charge carrier mobility μ of 2.49\\;\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}^{2}}\\;{{\\text{V}}^{-1}}\\;{{\\text{s}}^{-1}} are measured. We show that the NCG films can be readily patterned by reactive ion etching. NCG is also successfully deposited onto quartz and sapphire substrates and showed >85% optical transparency in the visible light spectrum.

  15. Enhanced stability of Cu-BTC MOF via perfluorohexane plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Decoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W; Smith, Martin W; Stone, Corinne A; Willis, Colin R

    2012-01-25

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are a leading class of porous materials for a wide variety of applications, but many of them have been shown to be unstable toward water. Cu-BTC (1,3,5 benzenetricarboxylic acid, BTC) was treated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of perfluorohexane creating a hydrophobic form of Cu-BTC. It was found that the treated Cu-BTC could withstand high humidity and even submersion in water much better than unperturbed Cu-BTC. Through Monte Carlo simulations it was found that perfluorohexane sites itself in such a way within Cu-BTC as to prevent the formation of water clusters, hence preventing the decomposition of Cu-BTC by water. This PECVD of perfluorohexane could be exploited to widen the scope of practical applications of Cu-BTC and other MOFs. PMID:22239201

  16. Carbon nanowalls grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition during the carbonization of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jiangling; Su Shi; Kundrat, Vojtech; Abbot, Andrew M.; Ye, Haitao; Zhou Lei; Mushtaq, Fajer; Ouyang Defang; James, David; Roberts, Darren

    2013-01-14

    We used microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) to carbonize an electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor to form carbon fibers. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the fibers at different evolution stages. It was found that MPECVD-carbonized PAN fibers do not exhibit any significant change in the fiber diameter, whilst conventionally carbonized PAN fibers show a 33% reduction in the fiber diameter. An additional coating of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) was formed on the surface of the carbonized PAN fibers during the MPECVD process without the assistance of any metallic catalysts. The result presented here may have a potential to develop a novel, economical, and straightforward approach towards the mass production of carbon fibrous materials containing CNWs.

  17. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  18. Ultralow-k silicon containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Ajmera, P. K.; Lee, G. S.; Singh, Varshni

    2005-09-01

    Low dielectric constant materials as interlayer dielectrics (ILDs) offer a way to reduce the RC time delay in high-performance ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits. Fluorocarbon films containing silicon have been developed for interlayer applications below 50-nm linewidth technology. The preparation of the films was carried out by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using gas precursors of tetrafluorocarbon as the source of active species and disilane (5 vol.% in helium) as a reducing agent to control the ratio of F/C in the films. The basic properties of the low dielectric constant (low-k) interlayer dielectric films are studied as a function of the fabrication process parameters. The electrical, mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties were evaluated including dielectric constant, surface planarity, hardness, residual stress, chemical bond structure, and shrinkage upon heat treatments. The deposition process conditions were optimized for film thermal stability while maintaining a relative dielectric value as low as 2.0. The average breakdown field strength was 4.74 MV/cm. The optical energy gap was in the range 2.2 2.4 eV. The hardness and residual stress in the optimized processed SiCF films were, respectively, measured to be in the range 1.4 1.78 GPa and in the range 11.6 23.2 MPa of compressive stress.

  19. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  20. Practical silicon deposition rules derived from silane monitoring during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlome, Richard De Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Ballif, Christophe; Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios

    2015-05-28

    We clarify the difference between the SiH{sub 4} consumption efficiency η and the SiH{sub 4} depletion fraction D, as measured in the pumping line and the actual reactor of an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In the absence of significant polysilane and powder formation, η is proportional to the film growth rate. Above a certain powder formation threshold, any additional amount of SiH{sub 4} consumed translates into increased powder formation rather than into a faster growing Si film. In order to discuss a zero-dimensional analytical model and a two-dimensional numerical model, we measure η as a function of the radio frequency (RF) power density coupled into the plasma, the total gas flow rate, the input SiH{sub 4} concentration, and the reactor pressure. The adjunction of a small trimethylboron flow rate increases η and reduces the formation of powder, while the adjunction of a small disilane flow rate decreases η and favors the formation of powder. Unlike η, D is a location-dependent quantity. It is related to the SiH{sub 4} concentration in the plasma c{sub p}, and to the phase of the growing Si film, whether the substrate is glass or a c-Si wafer. In order to investigate transient effects due to the RF matching, the precoating of reactor walls, or the introduction of a purifier in the gas line, we measure the gas residence time and acquire time-resolved SiH{sub 4} density measurements throughout the ignition and the termination of a plasma.

  1. [Optical Spectroscopy for High-Pressure Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond Films].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Zhi-bin

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond growth by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at high-pressure (34.5 kPa) was investigated. The CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma was detected online by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and the spatial distribution of radicals in the CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma was studied. Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze the properties of the diamond films deposited in different oxygen volume fraction. The uniformity of diamond films quality was researched. The results indicate that the spectrum intensities of C₂, CH and Hα decrease with the oxygen volume fraction increasing. While the intensity ratios of C₂, CH to Hα also reduced as a function of increasing oxygen volume fraction. It is shown that the decrease of the absolute concentration of carbon radicals is attributed to the rise volume fraction of oxygen, while the relative concentration of carbon radicals to hydrogen atom is also reducing, which depressing the growth rate but improving the quality of diamond film. Furthermore, the OH radicals, role of etching, its intensities increase with the increase of oxygen volume fraction. Indicated that the improvement of OH concentration is also beneficial to reduce the content of amorphous carbon in diamond films. The spectrum space diagnosis results show that under high deposition pressure the distribution of the radicals in the CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma is inhomogeneous, especially, that of radical C₂ gathered in the central region. And causing a rapid increase of non-diamond components in the central area, eventually enable the uneven distribution of diamond films quality. PMID:26978897

  2. Practical silicon deposition rules derived from silane monitoring during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor depositiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlome, Richard; De Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Ballif, Christophe; Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios

    2015-05-01

    We clarify the difference between the SiH4 consumption efficiency η and the SiH4 depletion fraction D, as measured in the pumping line and the actual reactor of an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In the absence of significant polysilane and powder formation, η is proportional to the film growth rate. Above a certain powder formation threshold, any additional amount of SiH4 consumed translates into increased powder formation rather than into a faster growing Si film. In order to discuss a zero-dimensional analytical model and a two-dimensional numerical model, we measure η as a function of the radio frequency (RF) power density coupled into the plasma, the total gas flow rate, the input SiH4 concentration, and the reactor pressure. The adjunction of a small trimethylboron flow rate increases η and reduces the formation of powder, while the adjunction of a small disilane flow rate decreases η and favors the formation of powder. Unlike η, D is a location-dependent quantity. It is related to the SiH4 concentration in the plasma cp, and to the phase of the growing Si film, whether the substrate is glass or a c-Si wafer. In order to investigate transient effects due to the RF matching, the precoating of reactor walls, or the introduction of a purifier in the gas line, we measure the gas residence time and acquire time-resolved SiH4 density measurements throughout the ignition and the termination of a plasma.

  3. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide as an implantable dielectric coating.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Stuart F; Edell, David J; Guzelian, Andrew A; Ping Liu, Ying; Edell, Robyn

    2003-12-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), have been evaluated as insulating coatings for implantable microelectrodes. The a-SiC was deposited on platinum or iridium wire for measurement of electrical leakage through the coating in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4). Low leakage currents of <10(-11) A were observed over a +/-5-V bias. The electronic resistivity of a-SiC was 3 x 10(13) Omega-cm. Dissolution rates of a-SiC in PBS at 37 and 90 degrees C were determined from changes in infrared absorption band intensities and compared with those of silicon nitride formed by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). Dissolution rates of LPCVD silicon nitride were 2 nm/h and 0.4 nm/day at 90 and 37 degrees C, respectively, while a-SiC had a dissolution rate of 0.1 nm/h at 90 degrees C and no measurable dissolution at 37 degrees C. Biocompatibility was assessed by implanting a-SiC-coated quartz discs in the subcutaneous space of the New Zealand White rabbit. Histological evaluation showed no chronic inflammatory response and capsule thickness was comparable to silicone or uncoated quartz controls. Amorphous SiC-coated microelectrodes were implanted in the parietal cortex for periods up to 150 days and the cortical response evaluated by histological evaluation of neuronal viability at the implant site. The a-SiC was more stable in physiological saline than LPCVD Si(3)N(4) and well tolerated in the cortex. PMID:14613234

  4. Preparation of cubic boron nitride thin film by the helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Kim, I.; Kim, K.

    1996-12-01

    Cubic boron nitride ({ital c}-BN) film was deposited on Si(100) substrate using the chemical vapor deposition process assisted by high density plasma of Helicon wave with Borazine (B{sub 3}N{sub 3}H{sub 6}) precursor. It was found that the bombardment of ions with high flux and energy onto the film was necessarily required for synthesizing a {ital c}-BN film. Increasing a negative rf bias on the substrate increased the formation fraction of {ital c}-BN in the film. A nearly pure {ital c}-BN phase was synthesized at the conditions of plasma density in the reactor and rf substrate bias, above 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3} and {minus}350 V, respectively. The phase identification of BN film was carried out by the transmission electron microscopy as well as Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The infrared spectra for {ital c}-BN film synthesized at the rf bias of {minus}350 V appeared at 1093 cm{sup {minus}1} with a strong single peak, which is close to a value for the characteristic vibration mode of bulk {ital c}-BN (1065 cm{sup {minus}1}). The {ital c}-BN in the film was also confirmed and found to be a fine poly-crystalline with the grain sizes ranging from 200 to 400 A. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Controlled surface diffusion in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen Chi; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the growth of GaN nanowires by controlling the surface diffusion of Ga species on sapphire in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, Ga has a tendency to adsorb on the substrate surface diffusing to nanowires to contribute to their growth. The significance of surface diffusion on the growth of nanowires is dependent on the environment of the nanowire on the substrate surface as well as the gas phase species and compositions. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, the growth rate is strongly dependent on the surface diffusion of gallium, but the addition of 5% hydrogen in nitrogen plasma instantly diminishes the surface diffusion effect. Gallium desorbs easily from the surface by reaction with hydrogen. On the other hand, under gallium-rich growth conditions, nanowire growth is shown to be dominated by the gas phase deposition, with negligible contribution from surface diffusion. This is the first study reporting the inhibition of surface diffusion effects by hydrogen addition, which can be useful in tailoring the growth and characteristics of nanowires. Without any evidence of direct deposition on the nanowire surface, gallium and nitrogen are shown to dissolve into the catalyst for growing the nanowires at 900 degrees C. PMID:19417353

  6. Open-air type plasma chemical vaporization machining by applying pulse-width modulation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoshiki; Hata, Yuki; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2014-03-01

    Photolithography techniques have been used to enable the low-cost and high-speed transfer of a pattern onto a silicon wafer. However, owing to the high integration of semiconductors, extreme ultraviolet will be increasingly used as the exposure light source and all optics must be reflective to focus light because the wavelength of the light will be so short that it cannot pass through a lens. The form accuracy of reflective optics affects the accuracy of transfer, and a flatness of less than 32 nm on a 6 inch photomask substrate is required according to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors roadmap. Plasma chemical vaporization machining is an ultraprecise figuring technique that enables a form accuracy of nanometre order to be obtained. In our previous study, the removal volume was controlled by changing the scanning speed of the worktable. However, a discrepancy between the theoretical scanning speed and the actual scanning speed occurred owing to the inertia of the worktable when the change in speed was rapid. As an attempt to resolve this issue, we controlled the removal volume by controlling the electric power applied during plasma generation while maintaining a constant scanning speed. The methods that we adapted to control the applied electric power were amplitude-modulation (AM) control and pulse-width modulation (PWM) control. In this work, we evaluate the controllability of the material removal rate in the AM and PWM control modes.

  7. Passivation of aluminum nanoparticles by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for energetic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Shahravan, Anaram; Desai, Tapan; Matsoukas, Themis

    2014-05-28

    We have produced passivating coatings on 80-nm aluminum particles by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Three organic precursors--isopropyl alcohol, toluene, and perfluorodecalin--were used to fabricate thin films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 30 nm. The coated samples and one untreated sample were exposed to 85% humidity at 25 °C for two months, and the active Al content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in the presence of oxygen. The results were compared with an uncoated sample stored in a glovebox under argon for the same period. We find that all three coatings provide protection against humidity, compared to the control, and their efficacy ranks in the following order: isopropyl alcohol < toluene < perfluorodecalin. This order also correlates with increasing water contact angle of the three solid coatings. The amount of heat released in the oxidation, measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), was found to increase in the same order. Perfluorodecalin resulted in providing the best protection, and it produced the maximum enthalpy of combustion, ΔH = 4.65 kJ/g. This value is higher than that of uncoated aluminum stored in the glovebox, indicating that the coatings promote more complete oxidation of the core. Overall, we conclude that the plasma polymer coatings of this study are suitable passivating thin film for aluminum nanoparticles by providing protection against oxidation while facilitating the complete oxidation of the metallic core at elevated temperature. PMID:24787245

  8. Conformal encapsulation of three-dimensional, bioresorbable polymeric scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Hawker, Morgan J; Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Fisher, Ellen R

    2014-10-21

    Bioresorbable polymers such as poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have a multitude of potential biomaterial applications such as controlled-release drug delivery and regenerative tissue engineering. For such biological applications, the fabrication of porous three-dimensional bioresorbable materials with tunable surface chemistry is critical to maximize their surface-to-volume ratio, mimic the extracellular matrix, and increase drug-loading capacity. Here, two different fluorocarbon (FC) precursors (octofluoropropane (C3F8) and hexafluoropropylene oxide (HFPO)) were used to deposit FC films on PCL scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). These two coating systems were chosen with the intent of modifying the scaffold surfaces to be bio-nonreactive while maintaining desirable bulk properties of the scaffold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed high-CF2 content films were deposited on both the exterior and interior of PCL scaffolds and that deposition behavior is PECVD system specific. Scanning electron microscopy data confirmed that FC film deposition yielded conformal rather than blanket coatings as the porous scaffold structure was maintained after plasma treatment. Treated scaffolds seeded with human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) demonstrate that the cells do not attach after 72 h and that the scaffolds are noncytotoxic to HDF. This work demonstrates conformal FC coatings can be deposited on 3D polymeric scaffolds using PECVD to fabricate 3D bio-nonreactive materials. PMID:25247481

  9. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  10. Growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond film by DC Arcjet plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. C.; Li, B.; Yan, Z. Q.; Liu, J.; Lu, F. X.; Ye, H.

    2012-06-01

    Self-standing diamond films were grown by DC Arcjet plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The feed gasses were Ar/H2/CH4, in which the flow ratio of CH4 to H2 (F/F) was varied from 5% to 20%. Two distinct morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), i.e. the "pineapple-like" morphology and the "cauliflower-like" morphology. It was found that the morphologies of the as-grown films are strongly dependent on the flow ratio of CH4 to H2 in the feed gasses. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) survey results revealed that there were nanocrystalline grains within the "pineapple-like" films whilst there were ultrananocrystalline grains within "cauliflower-like" films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results suggested that (110) crystalline plane was the dominant surface in the "cauliflower-like" films whilst (100) crystalline plane was the dominant surface in the "pineapple-like" films. Raman spectroscopy revealed that nanostructured carbon features could be observed in both types of films. Plasma diagnosis was carried out in order to understand the morphology dependent growth mechanism. It could be concluded that the film morphology was strongly influenced by the density of gas phases. The gradient of C2 radical was found to be different along the growth direction under the different growth conditions.

  11. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition synthesis of vertically oriented graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zheng; Yang, Yong; Chen, Junhong; Yu, Kehan; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2013-06-21

    Vertically oriented graphene (VG) nanosheets have attracted growing interest for a wide range of applications, from energy storage, catalysis and field emission to gas sensing, due to their unique orientation, exposed sharp edges, non-stacking morphology, and huge surface-to-volume ratio. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) has emerged as a key method for VG synthesis; however, controllable growth of VG with desirable characteristics for specific applications remains a challenge. This paper attempts to summarize the state-of-the-art research on PECVD growth of VG nanosheets to provide guidelines on the design of plasma sources and operation parameters, and to offer a perspective on outstanding challenges that need to be overcome to enable commercial applications of VG. The review starts with an overview of various types of existing PECVD processes for VG growth, and then moves on to research on the influences of feedstock gas, temperature, and pressure on VG growth, substrate pretreatment, the growth of VG patterns on planar substrates, and VG growth on cylindrical and carbon nanotube (CNT) substrates. The review ends with a discussion on challenges and future directions for PECVD growth of VG. PMID:23670071

  12. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition synthesis of vertically oriented graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Zheng; Yang, Yong; Chen, Junhong; Yu, Kehan; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2013-05-01

    Vertically oriented graphene (VG) nanosheets have attracted growing interest for a wide range of applications, from energy storage, catalysis and field emission to gas sensing, due to their unique orientation, exposed sharp edges, non-stacking morphology, and huge surface-to-volume ratio. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) has emerged as a key method for VG synthesis; however, controllable growth of VG with desirable characteristics for specific applications remains a challenge. This paper attempts to summarize the state-of-the-art research on PECVD growth of VG nanosheets to provide guidelines on the design of plasma sources and operation parameters, and to offer a perspective on outstanding challenges that need to be overcome to enable commercial applications of VG. The review starts with an overview of various types of existing PECVD processes for VG growth, and then moves on to research on the influences of feedstock gas, temperature, and pressure on VG growth, substrate pretreatment, the growth of VG patterns on planar substrates, and VG growth on cylindrical and carbon nanotube (CNT) substrates. The review ends with a discussion on challenges and future directions for PECVD growth of VG.

  13. Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of thin silicon films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, J.; Gualdino, A.; Lemke, B.; Paul, O.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical and piezoresistance characterization of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using substrate temperatures between 100 and 250 °C. The microtensile technique is used to determine film properties such as Young's modulus, fracture strength and Weibull parameters, and linear and quadratic piezoresistance coefficients obtained at large applied stresses. The 95%-confidence interval for the elastic constant of the films characterized, 85.9 ± 0.3 GPa, does not depend significantly on the deposition method or on film structure. In contrast, mean fracture strength values range between 256 ± 8 MPa and 600 ± 32 MPa: nanocrystalline layers are slightly stronger than their amorphous counterparts and a pronounced increase in strength is observed for films deposited using HWCVD when compared to those grown by PECVD. Extracted Weibull moduli are below 10. In terms of piezoresistance, n-doped radio-frequency nanocrystalline silicon films deposited at 250 °C present longitudinal piezoresistive coefficients as large as -(2.57 ± 0.03) × 10-10 Pa-1 with marginally nonlinear response. Such values approach those of crystalline silicon and of polysilicon layers deposited at much higher temperatures.

  14. Functional metal oxide coatings by molecule-based thermal and plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Ruegamer, T; Donia, N; Shen, H

    2008-05-01

    Deposition of thin films through vaccum processes plays an important role in industrial processing of decorative and functional coatings. Many metal oxides have been prepared as thin films using different techniques, however obtaining compositionally uniform phases with a control over grain size and distribution remains an enduring challenge. The difficulties are largely related to complex compositions of functional oxide materials, which makes a control over kinetics of nucleation and growth processes rather difficult to control thus resulting in non-uniform material and inhomogeneous grain size distribution. Application of tailor-made molecular precursors in low pressure or plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques offers a viable solution for overcoming thermodynamic impediments involved in thin film growth. In this paper molecule-based CVD of functional coatings is demonstrated for iron oxide (Fe2O3, Fe3O4), vanadium oxide (V2O5, VO2) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) phases followed by the characterization of their microstructural, compositional and functional properties which support the advantages of chemical design in simplifying deposition processes and optimizing functional behavior. PMID:18572690

  15. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  16. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  17. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Patel, P.; Barik, T. K.

    2010-06-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of CC, CH, SiC, and SiH bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio ID/IG. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  18. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxide films with divinyldimethylsilane and tetravinylsilane

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Gyu; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2006-03-15

    Carbon-doped silicon oxide (SiCOH) low-k films were deposited with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using divinyldimethylsilane (DVDMS) with two vinyl groups and tetravinylsilane (TVS) with four vinyl groups compared with vinyltrimethylsilane (VTMS) with one vinyl group. With more vinyl groups in the precursor, due to the crosslinking of the vinyl groups, the film contains more of an organic phase and organic phase became less volatile. It was confirmed that the deposition rate, refractive index, and k value increase with more vinyl groups in the precursor molecule. After annealing, the SiCOH films deposited with DVDMS and TVS showed a low dielectric constant of 2.2 and 2.4 at optimum conditions, respectively. In both cases, the annealed film had low leakage current density (J=6.7x10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} for SiCOH film of DVDMS and J=1.18x10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2} for SiCOH film of TVS at 1 MV/cm) and relatively high breakdown field strength (E>4.0 MV/cm at 1 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is comparable to those of PECVD SiO{sub 2}.

  19. Chain Assemblies from Nanoparticles Synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: The Computational View.

    PubMed

    Mishin, Maxim V; Zamotin, Kirill Y; Protopopova, Vera S; Alexandrov, Sergey E

    2015-12-01

    This article refers to the computational study of nanoparticle self-organization on the solid-state substrate surface with consideration of the experimental results, when nanoparticles were synthesised during atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD). The experimental study of silicon dioxide nanoparticle synthesis by AP-PECVD demonstrated that all deposit volume consists of tangled chains of nanoparticles. In certain cases, micron-sized fractals are formed from tangled chains due to deposit rearrangement. This work is focused on the study of tangled chain formation only. In order to reveal their formation mechanism, a physico-mathematical model was developed. The suggested model was based on the motion equation solution for charged and neutral nanoparticles in the potential fields with the use of the empirical interaction potentials. In addition, the computational simulation was carried out based on the suggested model. As a result, the influence of such experimental parameters as deposition duration, particle charge, gas flow velocity, and angle of gas flow was found. It was demonstrated that electrical charges carried by nanoparticles from the discharge area are not responsible for the formation of tangled chains from nanoparticles, whereas nanoparticle kinetic energy plays a crucial role in deposit morphology and density. The computational results were consistent with experimental results. PMID:26682441

  20. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  1. Differing morphologies of textured diamond films with electrical properties made with microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wen Chi; Wu, Yu-Shiang; Chang, Hou-Cheng; Lee, Yuan-Haun

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the orientation of textured diamond films produced through microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at 1200 W, 110 Torr, CH 4/H 2 = 1/20, with depositions times of 0.5-4.0 h. After a growth period of 2.0-4.0 h, this particular morphology revealed a rectangular structure stacked regularly on the diamond film. The orientation on {1 1 1}-textured diamond films grew a preferred orientation of {1 1 0} on the surface, as measured by XRD. The formation of the diamond epitaxial film formed textured octahedrons in ball shaped (or cauliflower-like) diamonds in the early stages (0.5 h), and the surface of the diamond film extended to pile the rectangular structure at 4.0 h. The width of the tier was approximately 200 nm at the 3.0 h point of deposition, according to TEM images. The results revealed that the textured diamond films showed two different morphological structures (typical ball shaped and rectangular diamonds), at different stages of the deposition period. The I- V characteristics of the oriented diamond films after 4.0 h of deposition time showed good conformity with the ohmic contact.

  2. Growth of diamond by RF plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Duane E.; Ianno, Natale J.; Woollam, John A.; Swartzlander, A. B.; Nelson, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    A system has been designed and constructed to produce diamond particles by inductively coupled radio-frequency, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. This is a low-pressure, low-temperature process used in an attempt to deposit diamond on substrates of glass, quartz, silicon, nickel, and boron nitride. Several deposition parameters have been varied including substrate temperature, gas concentration, gas pressure, total gas flow rate, RF input power, and deposition time. Analytical methods employed to determine composition and structure of the deposits include scanning electron microscopy, absorption spectroscopy, scanning Auger microprobe spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Analysis indicates that particles having a thin graphite surface, as well as diamond particles with no surface coatings, have been deposited. Deposits on quartz have exhibited optical bandgaps as high as 4.5 eV. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that particles are deposited on a pedestal which Auger spectroscopy indicates to be graphite. This is a phenomenon that has not been previously reported in the literature.

  3. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Patel, P.; Barik, T. K.

    2010-06-15

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of C-C, C-H, Si-C, and Si-H bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio I{sub D}/I{sub G}. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  4. Heteroepitaxial growth of wafer scale highly oriented graphene using inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Libo; Xu, Hai; Li, Linjun; Yang, Yang; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-06-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu has attracted much attention because of its industrial scalability. Herein, we report inductively coupled plasma-assisted CVD of epitaxially grown graphene on (111)-textured Cu film alloyed with a small amount of Ni, where large area high quality graphene film can be grown in less than 5 min at 800 °C, thus affording industrial scalability. The epitaxially grown graphene films on (111)-textured Cu contain grains which are predominantly aligned with the Cu lattice and about 10% of 30°-rotated grains (anti-grains). Such graphene films are exclusively monolayer and possess good electrical conductivity, high carrier mobility, and room temperature quantum Hall effect. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal that the reduction of the grain sizes from 150 nm to 50 nm produce increasing Anderson localization and the appearance of a transport gap. Owing to the presence of grain boundaries in these anti-grains, epitaxially grown graphene films possess n-type characteristics and exhibit ultra-high sensitivity to adsorbates.

  5. Preparation and structure of porous dielectrics by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. M.; Neumayer, D. A.; Sherwood, M. H.; Grill, A.; Wang, X.; Sankarapandian, M.

    2007-05-01

    The preparation of ultralow dielectric constant porous silicon, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen alloy dielectrics, called "pSiCOH," using a production 200mm plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition tool and a thermal treatment is reported here. The effect of deposition temperature on the pSiCOH film is examined using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, dielectric constant (k), and film shrinkage measurements. For all deposition temperatures, carbon in the final porous film is shown to be predominantly Si -CH3 species, and lower k is shown to correlate with increased concentration of Si -CH3. NMR and FTIR spectroscopies clearly detect the loss of a removable, unstable, hydrocarbon (CHx) phase during the thermal treatment. Also detected are increased cross-linking of the Si-O skeleton, and concentration changes for three distinct structures of carbon. In the as deposited films, deposition temperature also affects the hydrocarbon (CHx) content and the presence of C O and C C functional groups.

  6. Microbridge testing of plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposited silicon oxide films on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Tong-Yi; Zhang, Xin

    2005-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposited (PECVD) silane-based oxides (SiOx) have been widely used in both microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to form electrical and/or mechanical components. In this paper, a nanoindentation-based microbridge testing method is developed to measure both the residual stresses and Young's modulus of PECVD SiOx films on silicon wafers. Theoretically, we considered both the substrate deformation and residual stress in the thin film and derived a closed formula of deflection versus load. The formula fitted the experimental curves almost perfectly, from which the residual stresses and Young's modulus of the film were determined. Experimentally, freestanding microbridges made of PECVD SiOx films were fabricated using the silicon undercut bulk micromachining technique. Some microbridges were subjected to rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at a temperature of 400 °C, 600 °C, or 800 °C to simulate the thermal process in the device fabrication. The results showed that the as-deposited PECVD SiOx films had a residual stress of -155±17MPa and a Young's modulus of 74.8±3.3GPa. After the RTA, Young's modulus remained relatively unchanged at around 75 GPa, however, significant residual stress hysteresis was found in all the films. A microstructure-based mechanism was then applied to explain the experimental results of the residual stress changes in the PECVD SiOx films after the thermal annealing.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Nanocrystalline Silicon Prepared by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugdersuren, Battogtokh; Liu, Xiao; Kearney, Brian; Queen, Daniel; Metcalf, Thomas; Culbertson, James; Chervin, Christopher; Katz, Michael; Stroud, Rhonda

    Nanocrystallization by ball milling has been used successfully to reduce the thermal conductivity of silicon-germanium alloys (SiGe) and turn them into useful thermoelectric materials at a temperature of a few hundred degrees C. Currently the smallest grain sizes in nanocrystalline SiGe are in the 10 nm range. Germanium is added to scatter short wavelength phonons by impurity scattering. In this work, we report a record low thermal conductivity in nanocrystalline silicon prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. By varying hydrogen to silane ratio, we can vary the average grain sizes from greater than 10 nm down to 3 nm, as determined by both the high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The values of thermal conductivity, as measured by the 3 ω technique, can be correspondingly modulated from that of ball-milled nanocrystalline SiGe to a record low level of 0.3 W/mK at room temperature. This low thermal conductivity is only about 1/3 of the minimum thermal conductivity limit of silicon. Possible causes of such a large reduction are discussed. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  8. Analysis of photoluminescence background of Raman spectra of carbon nanotips grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B. B.; Ostrikov, K.; Tsakadze, Z. L.; Xu, S.

    2009-07-01

    Carbon nanotips with different structures were synthesized by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using different deposition conditions, and they were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that the photoluminescence background of the Raman spectra is different for different carbon nanotips. Additionally, the Raman spectra of the carbon nanotips synthesized using nitrogen-containing gas precursors show a peak located at about 2120 cm{sup -1} besides the common D and G peaks. The observed difference in the photoluminescence background is related to the growth mechanisms, structural properties, and surface morphology of a-C:H and a-C:H:N nanotips, in particular, the sizes of the emissive tips.

  9. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method of forming vanadium oxide films and vanadium oxide thin-films prepared thereby

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Turner, John A.; Liu, Ping

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed of forming a vanadium oxide film on a substrate utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The method includes positioning a substrate within a plasma reaction chamber and then forming a precursor gas comprised of a vanadium-containing chloride gas in an inert carrier gas. This precursor gas is then mixed with selected amounts of hydrogen and oxygen and directed into the reaction chamber. The amounts of precursor gas, oxygen and hydrogen are selected to optimize the final properties of the vanadium oxide film An rf plasma is generated within the reaction chamber to chemically react the precursor gas with the hydrogen and the oxygen to cause deposition of a vanadium oxide film on the substrate while the chamber deposition pressure is maintained at about one torr or less. Finally, the byproduct gases are removed from the plasma reaction chamber.

  10. Hollow electrode enhanced radio frequency glow plasma and its application to the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, Toshihiro; Mizukami, Hiroyuki; Takashiri, Masayuki

    2004-09-01

    A hollow electrode enhanced radio frequency (rf) glow plasma excitation technique and its application to the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline silicon films have been studied. In this technique, the reactor has two types of hollow structure. One is a hollow counterelectrode, and the other serves as both a hollow counterelectrode and a hollow rf electrode. The application of these discharge types to semiconductor processing is studied in the case of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon thin films. High crystallinity, photosensitivity and a maximum deposition rate of 6.0 nm/s can all be achieved at plasma excitation frequency of 13.56 MHz and substrate temperature of 300 deg. C. Properties of these plasmas are investigated by observing the plasma emission pattern, optical emission spectrum analysis and electrical parameters of the rf electrode. It is found that the plasma technique using both types of hollow discharge not only results in higher intensity of SiH{sup *} and H{alpha} but also in much smaller self-bias voltage of the rf electrode. Faster processing of device grade hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films can also be achieved under lower rf power compared to use of the hollow counterelectrode technique alone.

  11. Low-Temperature Silicon Epitaxy by Remote, Plasma - Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl, Scott Dwight

    The dynamics of low temperature Si homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth, by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, RPECVD, have been investigated. For the critical step of pre-deposition surface preparation of Si(100) surfaces, the attributes of remote plasma generated atomic H are compared to results obtained with a rapid thermal desorption, RTD, technique and a hybrid H-plasma/RTD technique. Auger electron spectroscopy, AES, and electron diffraction analysis indicate the hybrid technique to be very effective at surface passivation, while the RTD process promotes the formation of SiC precipitates, which induce defective epitaxial growth. For GaP and GaAs substrates, the use of atomic H exposure is investigated as a surface passivation technique. AES shows this technique to be effective at producing atomically clean surfaces. For processing at 400^circrm C, the GaAs(100) surface is observed to reconstruct to a c(8 x 2)Ga symmetry while, at 530^ circrm C the vicinal GaP(100) surface, miscut 10^circ , is observed to reconstruct to a (1 x n) type symmetry; an unreconstructed (1 x 1) symmetry is observed for GaP(111). Differences in the efficiency with which native oxides are removed from the surface are attributed to variations in the local atomic bonding order of group V oxides. The microstructure of homoepitaxial Si films, deposited at temperatures of 25-450^circ rm C and pressures of 50-500 mTorr, is catalogued. Optimized conditions for the deposition of low defect, single crystal films are identified. The existence of two pressure dependent regimes for process activation are observed. In-situ mass spectral analysis indicates that the plasma afterglow is dominated by monosilane ions below 200 mTorr, while above 200 mTorr, low mass rm H_{x} ^+ (x = 1,2,3) and rm HHe^+ ions dominate. Consideration of the growth rate data indicates that downstream dissociative silane ionization, in the lower pressure regime, is responsible for an enhanced surface H

  12. On the low-temperature growth mechanism of single walled carbon nanotubes in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariat, M.; Shokri, B.; Neyts, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    Despite significant progress in single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) production by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), the growth mechanism in this method is not clearly understood. We employ reactive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate how plasma-based deposition allows growth at low temperature. We first investigate the SWCNT growth mechanism at low and high temperatures under conditions similar to thermal CVD and PECVD. We then show how ion bombardment during the nucleation stage increases the carbon solubility in the catalyst at low temperature. Finally, we demonstrate how moderate energy ions sputter amorphous carbon allowing for SWCNT growth at 500 K.

  13. Preparation of glasses in the Ge-S-I system by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, L. A.; Churbanov, M. F.; Velmuzhov, A. P.; Lobanov, A. S.; Kornev, R. A.; Sennikov, G. P.

    2015-08-01

    The glass samples of the Ge-S-I system were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in a low-temperature non-equilibrium RF-plasma discharge. The vapors of S and GeI4 were the initial substances. The process was carried out in a flowing quartz reactor at the walls temperature of 300-500 °C and the total pressure range of 1.9-22.8 Torr. The phase and the elemental compositions of the deposited glassy batches were investigated. The glasses obtained by melting of the solid reaction products were homogenized in the evacuated quartz glass ampoule and they were studied by DSC, X-ray microanalysis, and atomic emission spectroscopy. The proposed method allows to prepare the glasses of the system Ge-S-I with Si content less than 3 ṡ 10-5 wt.%.

  14. Low Temperature Deposition of β-phase Silicon Nitride Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshirsagar, Abhijeet; Duttagupta, S. P.; Gangal, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon nitride (SiN) films have been deposited at low temperature (≤100° C), by Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (ICPCVD) technique. The chemical and physical properties of deposited SiN films such as refractive index, deposition rate, and film stress have been measured. Additional structural characterization is performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Micro Raman Spectroscopy. It is found that the films obtained are of low stress and have β-phase. To the best of authors knowledge such low temperature, low stress, β-phase SiN films deposition using ICPCVD are being reported for the first time.

  15. Microwave processing of epoxy resins and synthesis of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Liming

    Microwave processing of advanced materials has been studied as an attractive alternative to conventional thermal processing. In this dissertation, work was preformed in four sections. The first section is a review on research status of microwave processing of polymer materials. The second section is investigation of the microwave curing kinetics of epoxy resins. The curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 3, 3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) system under microwave radiation at 145 °C was governed by an autocatalyzed reaction mechanism. A kinetic model was used to describe the curing progress. The third section is a study on dielectric properties of four reacting epoxy resins over a temperature range at 2.45 GHz. The epoxy resin was DGEBA. The four curing agents were DDS, Jeffamine D-230, m-phenylenediamine, and diethyltoluenediamine. The mixtures of DGEBA and the four curing agents were stoichiometric. The four reacting systems were heated under microwave irradiation to certain cure temperatures. Measurements of temperature and dielectric properties were made during free convective cooling of the samples. The cooled samples were analyzed with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter to determine the extents of cure. The Davidson-Cole model can be used to describe the dielectric data. A simplified Davidson-Cole expression was proposed to calculate the parameters in the Davidson-Cole model and describe the dielectric properties of the DGEBA/DDS system and part of the dielectric data of the other three systems. A single relaxation model was used with the Arrhenius expression for temperature dependence to model the results. The evolution of all parameters in the models during cure was related to the decreasing number of the epoxy and amine groups in the reactants and the increasing viscosity of the reacting systems. The last section is synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of a gas mixture of

  16. Diamond thin films grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Leksono, M.

    1991-09-05

    Undoped and boron doped diamond thin films have been successfully grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, and B{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The films were characterized using x- ray diffraction techniques, Raman and infrared spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and various electrical measurements. The deposition rates of the diamond films were found to increase with the CH{sub 4} concentration, substrate temperature, and/or pressure, and at 1.0% methane, 900{degrees}C, and 35 Torr, the value was measured to be 0.87 {mu}m/hour. The deposition rate for boron doped diamond films, decreases as the diborane concentration increases. The morphologies of the undoped diamond films are strongly related to the deposition parameters. As the temperature increases from 840 to 925 C, the film morphology changes from cubo-octahedron to cubic structures, while as the CH{sub 4} concentration increases from 0.5 to 1.0%, the morphology changes from triangular (111) faces with a weak preferred orientation to square (100) faces. At 2.0% Ch{sub 4} or higher the films become microcrystalline with cauliflower structures. Scanning electron microscopy analyses also demonstrate that selective deposition of undoped diamond films has been successfully achieved using a lift-off process with a resolution of at least 2 {mu}m. The x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra demonstrate that high quality diamond films have been achieved. The concentration of the nondiamond phases in the films grown at 1.0% CH{sub 4} can be estimated from the Raman spectra to be at less than 0.2% and increases with the CH{sub 4} concentration. The Raman spectra of the boron doped diamond films also indicate that the presence of boron tends to suppress the nondiamond phases in the films. Infrared spectra of the undoped diamond films show very weak CH stretch peaks which suggest that the hydrogen concentration is very low.

  17. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Woehrl, Nicolas Schulz, Stephan; Ochedowski, Oliver; Gottlieb, Steven; Shibasaki, Kosuke

    2014-04-15

    A plasma enhanced vapor deposition process is used to synthesize graphene from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture on copper samples. The graphene samples were transferred onto SiO{sub 2} substrates and characterized by Raman spectroscopic mapping and atomic force microscope topographical mapping. Analysis of the Raman bands shows that the deposited graphene is clearly SLG and that the sheets are deposited on large areas of several mm{sup 2}. The defect density in the graphene sheets is calculated using Raman measurements and the influence of the process pressure on the defect density is measured. Furthermore the origin of these defects is discussed with respect to the process parameters and hence the plasma environment.

  18. Green light emission from terbium doped silicon rich silicon oxide films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wojcik, J.; Wilson, P. R. J.; Mascher, P.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of silicon concentration and annealing temperature on terbium luminescence was investigated for thin silicon rich silicon oxide films. The structures were deposited by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural properties of these films were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. The optical properties were investigated by means of photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay spectroscopy. It was found that both the silicon concentration in the film and the annealing temperature have a strong impact on the terbium emission intensity. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of these issues and determine the optimal silicon concentration and annealing temperature.

  19. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Basa, D. K.; Abbate, G.; Ambrosone, G.; Marino, A.; Coscia, U.

    2010-01-15

    The optical properties of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films, prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique from silane and methane gas mixture diluted in helium, have been investigated using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry in the photon energy range from 0.73 to 4.59 eV. Tauc-Lorentz model has been employed for the analysis of the optical spectra and it has been demonstrated that the model parameters are correlated with the carbon content as well as to the structural properties of the studied films.

  20. Low-Temperature Growth of Carbon Nanotubes by Grid-Inserted Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Mizutani, Takashi

    2007-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been successfully grown at a temperature as low as 400 °C by grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The grid and a thin double-layer catalyst of Fe (1 nm)/Ti (1 nm) were effective in growing the CNTs. The growth rates were 10 nm/min at 400 °C and 10 μm/min at 600 °C. The intensity ratios between G-peak and D-peak (G/D ratio) of the Raman scattering spectroscopy were almost the same for the CNTs grown at temperatures between 400 and 600 °C.

  1. Green light emission from terbium doped silicon rich silicon oxide films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Podhorodecki, A; Zatryb, G; Misiewicz, J; Wojcik, J; Wilson, P R J; Mascher, P

    2012-11-30

    The effect of silicon concentration and annealing temperature on terbium luminescence was investigated for thin silicon rich silicon oxide films. The structures were deposited by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural properties of these films were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. The optical properties were investigated by means of photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay spectroscopy. It was found that both the silicon concentration in the film and the annealing temperature have a strong impact on the terbium emission intensity. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of these issues and determine the optimal silicon concentration and annealing temperature. PMID:23110801

  2. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, H.; Kato, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Sekiguchi, H.; Wakahara, A.; Furukawa, M.

    2014-02-20

    Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma is investigated. Feasibility of precursors of triethylsilane (TES) and bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS) is discussed based on a calculation of bond energies by computer simulation. Refractive indices of 1.81 and 1.71 are obtained for deposited films with TES and BDMADMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the deposited film revealed that TES-based film coincides with the stoichiometric thermal silicon nitride.

  3. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of

  4. Single-chamber plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of transparent organic/inorganic multilayer barrier coating at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S. M.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, S. I.; Lee, N.-E.

    2008-07-15

    Deposition of organic/inorganic multilayers is usually carried out by two different process steps by two different deposition methods. A single-chamber process for the deposition of multilayer stacks can make the process and deposition system simpler. In this work, SiOCH and plasma-polymerized methylcyclohexane (pp-MCH) films and their multilayer stacks for application to transparent diffusion barrier coatings were deposited in a single low-temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor using hexamethyldisilazane/N{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}/Ar and methylcyclohexane/Ar mixtures for SiOCH and pp-MCH layers, respectively. The deposition rates of the SiOCH and pp-MCH layers were increased with increasing the N{sub 2}O:O{sub 2} gas flow ratio and rf plasma power, respectively. Oxygen concentration in the SiOCH films was decreased and carbon and hydrogen incorporation was increased when increasing the N{sub 2}O:O{sub 2} gas flow ratio from 0:1 to 3:1. In this work, the water vapor transmission rate of polyester sulfone substrate could be reduced from a level of 50 (bare substrate) to 0.8 g/m{sup 2} day after deposition of a pp-MCH/SiOCH/pp-MCH multilayer coating.

  5. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-02-01

    Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W2CoB2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600-730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes on diamond-like carbon by the hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Chang; Park, Yong Seob; Hong, Byungyou

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention as possible routes to device miniaturization due to their excellent mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties. These properties show great potential for devices such as field emission displays, transistors, and sensors. The growth of CNTs can be explained by interaction between small carbon patches and the metal catalyst. The metals such as nickel, cobalt, gold, iron, platinum, and palladium are used as the catalysts for the CNT growth. In this study, diamond-like carbon (DLC) was used for CNT growth as a nonmetallic catalyst layer. DLC films were deposited by a radio frequency (RF) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) method with a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases. CNTs were synthesized by a hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD) method with ammonia (NH3) as a pretreatment gas and acetylene (C2H2) as a carbon source gas. The grown CNTs and the pretreated DLC films were observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) measurement, and the structure of the grown CNTs was analyzed by high resolution transmission scanning electron microscopy (HR-TEM). Also, using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurement, we confirmed that only the carbon component remained on the substrate. PMID:19318258

  7. Investigation on growth behavior of CNTs synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system on Fe catalyzed substrate.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bum Ho; Kim, Won Jae; Kim, Young Baek; Lee, Jong Ho; Park, Jong Woon; Kim, Woo Sam; Shin, Dong Chan

    2008-10-01

    We have studied growth behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on iron (Fe) catalyzed substrate using newly developed atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) system. To investigate the improved growth performance with simple equipment and process on large scale, a new AP-PECVD system containing different concept on downstream gas was designed and manufactured. As a catalyst, either sputtered or evaporated Fe thin film on SiO2/Si substrate was used and acetylene gas was used as a carbon source. We observed growth behavior of CNTs such as height, rate and density were strongly affected by plasma power. The maximum height of 427 microm and 267 microm was synthesized under RF plasma power of 30 W for 30 min and 40 W for 3 min, respectively. The growth rate dramatically increased to 6.27 times as plasma power increased from 30 to 40 W which opens the possibility the mass production of CNTs. By SEM and TEM observation, it was verified the grown CNTs was consists of mixture of single-wall and multi-wall CNTs. The graphitization ratio was measured to be 0.93, indicating that the graphitized CNTs forest was formed and relatively high purity of CNTs was synthesized, being useful for nano-composite materials to reinforce the strength. From our experiments, we can observe that the height and growth rate of CNTs is strong function of plasma power. PMID:19198378

  8. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiOx layers for application in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingsporn, M.; Kirner, S.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Costina, I.; Lehmann, M.; Stannowski, B.

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiOx) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO0.8:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  9. Characterization of TiO x film prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a multi-jet hollow cathode plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Korzec, Dariusz; Aoki, Toru; Engemann, Jurgen; Hatanaka, Yoshinori

    2001-05-01

    The high rate deposition of TiO x film at low temperature was achieved by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a source material. The multi-jet hollow cathode plasma source was used to generate the high-density plasma, which was showered toward the substrate. The emission spectra suggest that oxygen radicals play an important role for dissociation of the source material and for yielding the precursors. The high deposition rate up to 50 nm/min was achieved by this process. The as-deposited films are completely amorphous. They consist of structures with complex bondings including both tetrahedral and octahedral components. Though they have such complex bondings, the hydrophilicity of the PECVD film is excellent comparing to that of the annealed crystalline anatase structure. It seems that the PECVD using the multi-jet plasma source is promising for fabrication of hydrophilic TiO x films in low-temperature process.

  10. Chemical and physical sputtering effects on the surface morphology of carbon films grown by plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, Luis

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the influence of chemical and physical sputtering on the surface morphology of hydrogenated carbon films deposited on silicon substrates by bias-enhanced electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition. Atomic force microscopy based power spectrum density (PSD) and roughness analysis have been used to investigate the film morphology. This study has been possible due to the appropriate choice of the experimental variables, in particular, gas mixture, resulting in either nitrogen-free (a-C:H) or nitrogenated carbon (a-CN:H) films, and substrate bias (V{sub b}). Under these conditions, chemical sputtering is present for a-CN:H deposition but it is negligible for a-C:H film growth, while physical sputtering processes appear for both systems for V{sub b}<=-85 V. When physical sputtering does not operate, the film growth with simultaneous chemical sputtering leads to a characteristic a-CN:H granular surface morphology. Furthermore, PSD analysis reveals that a spatial correlation of the a-CN:H film surface roughness, up to distances approx300 nm, becomes a fingerprint of the coexistence of growth and chemical erosion processes on the film morphology. However, once physical sputtering takes place, the influence of chemical sputtering by reactive nitrogen species on the final surface morphology becomes negligible and both a-CN:H and a-C:H film morphologies are ultrasmooth.

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Venu; Nair, Aswathi R.; Shivashankar, S. A.; Mohan Rao, G.

    2015-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  12. A solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of post-plasma reactions in organosilicone microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) coatings.

    PubMed

    Hall, Colin J; Ponnusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Murphy, Peter J; Lindberg, Mats; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-06-11

    Plasma-polymerized organosilicone coatings can be used to impart abrasion resistance and barrier properties to plastic substrates such as polycarbonate. Coating rates suitable for industrial-scale deposition, up to 100 nm/s, can be achieved through the use of microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with optimal process vapors such as tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO) and oxygen. However, it has been found that under certain deposition conditions, such coatings are subject to post-plasma changes; crazing or cracking can occur anytime from days to months after deposition. To understand the cause of the crazing and its dependence on processing plasma parameters, the effects of post-plasma reactions on the chemical bonding structure of coatings deposited with varying TMDSO-to-O2 ratios was studied with (29)Si and (13)C solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) using both single-pulse and cross-polarization techniques. The coatings showed complex chemical compositions significantly altered from the parent monomer. (29)Si MAS NMR spectra revealed four main groups of resonance lines, which correspond to four siloxane moieties (i.e., mono (M), di (D), tri (T), and quaternary (Q)) and how they are bound to oxygen. Quantitative measurements showed that the ratio of TMDSO to oxygen could shift the chemical structure of the coating from 39% to 55% in Q-type bonds and from 28% to 16% for D-type bonds. Post-plasma reactions were found to produce changes in relative intensities of (29)Si resonance lines. The NMR data were complemented by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Together, these techniques have shown that the bonding environment of Si is drastically altered by varying the TMDSO-to-O2 ratio during PECVD, and that post-plasma reactions increase the cross-link density of the silicon-oxygen network. It appears that Si-H and Si-OH chemical groups are the most susceptible to post-plasma reactions. Coatings produced at a

  13. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  14. Deposition kinetics and characterization of stable ionomers from hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urstöger, Georg; Resel, Roland; Koller, Georg; Coclite, Anna Maria

    2016-04-01

    A novel ionomer of hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid was synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PECVD process, being solventless, allows mixing of monomers with very different solubilities, and for polymers formed at high deposition rates and with high structural stability (due to the high number of cross-links and covalent bonding to the substrate) to be obtained. A kinetic study over a large set of parameters was run with the aim of determining the optimal conditions for high stability and proton conductivity of the polymer layer. Copolymers with good stability over 6 months' time in air and water were obtained, as demonstrated by ellipsometry, X-Ray reflectivity, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Stable coatings showed also proton conductivity as high as 1.1 ± 0.1 mS cm-1. Chemical analysis showed that due to the high molecular weight of the chosen precursors, it was possible to keep the plasma energy-input-per-mass low. This allowed limited precursor fragmentation and the functional groups of both monomers to be retained during the plasma polymerization.

  15. Characterization of low temperature graphene synthesis in inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition process with optical emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yifei; Kim, Daekyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature graphene was synthesized at 400 degrees C with inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The effects of plasma power and flow rate of various carbon containing precursors and hydrogen on graphene properties were investigated with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Various radicals monitored by OES were correlated with graphene film properties such as sheet resistance, I(D)/I(G) ratio of Raman spectra and transparency. C2H2 was used as a main precursor and the increase of plasma power enhanced intensity of carbon (C2) radical OES intensity in plasma, reduced sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films. The reduced flow rate of C2H2 decreased sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films in the range of this study. H2 addition was found to increase sheet resistance, transparency and attributed to reduction of graphene grain and etching graphene layers. OES analysis showed that C2 radicals contribute to graphite networking and sheet resistance reduction. TEM and AFM were applied to provide credible information that graphene had been successfully grown at low temperature. PMID:25971011

  16. Mass densification and defect restoration in chemical vapor deposition silicon dioxide film using Ar plasma excited by microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Kazumasa Motoya, Tsukasa; Uehara, Yasushi; Teramoto, Akinobu; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2014-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been treated with Ar plasma excited by microwave. The changes of the mass densities, carrier trap densities, and thicknesses of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films with the Ar plasma treatments were investigated. The mass density depth profiles were estimated with X-Ray Reflectivity (XRR) analysis using synchrotron radiation. The densities of carrier trap centers due to defects of Si-O bond network were estimated with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) time-dependent measurement. The changes of the thicknesses due to the oxidation of Si substrates were estimated with the XRR and XPS. The mass densities of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films are increased by the Ar plasma treatments. The carrier trap densities of the films are decreased by the treatments. The thicknesses of the films are not changed by the treatments. It has been clarified that the mass densification and defect restoration in the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films are caused by the Ar plasma treatments without the oxidation of the Si substrates.

  17. Free standing carbon nanotubes growth on large-area by nanoimprint and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Won Seok; Choi, Dae-Geon; Chung, Jun-Ho; Huh, Kab-Soo

    2008-03-01

    Among various synthesis methods for carbon nanotube growth, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has been widely used for various advantages such as high quality, vertical alignment, controlled diameter and length of nanotubes and so on. Especially, vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube could be grown using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). In this paper, we presented growth of free standing carbon nanotubes by PECVD for the fabrication of nano-electrode. For the growth of nanotubes on the large area 50 mm x 50 mm, catalyst dots were formed by nanoimprint and lift-off process. The synthesis of carbon nanotube requires a metal catalyst layer, etchant gas, and a carbon source. Ammonia (NH3) and acetylene (C2H2) were used as the etchant gas and carbon source, respectively. And iron (Fe) of catalyst metal was deposited on silicon wafer substrates. To form Fe nano dots with diameter of 150 nm and thickness of 50 nm, nano holes patterned imprint resin was used for lift-off process. Carbon nanotubes were grown on pretreated substrates at approximately 30% C2H2:NH3 flow ratios for 40 min.

  18. Argon–germane in situ plasma clean for reduced temperature Ge on Si epitaxy by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Erica A.; Sheng, Josephine J.; Verley, Jason C.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2015-06-04

    We found that the demand for integration of near infrared optoelectronic functionality with silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has for many years motivated the investigation of low temperature germanium on silicon deposition processes. Our work describes the development of a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition process that uses a low temperature (<460 °C) in situ germane/argon plasma surface preparation step for epitaxial growth of germanium on silicon. It is shown that the germane/argon plasma treatment sufficiently removes SiOx and carbon at the surface to enable germanium epitaxy. Finally, the use of this surface preparation step demonstrates an alternative way to produce germanium epitaxy at reduced temperatures, a key enabler for increased flexibility of integration with CMOS back-end-of-line fabrication.

  19. Argon–germane in situ plasma clean for reduced temperature Ge on Si epitaxy by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Douglas, Erica A.; Sheng, Josephine J.; Verley, Jason C.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2015-06-04

    We found that the demand for integration of near infrared optoelectronic functionality with silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has for many years motivated the investigation of low temperature germanium on silicon deposition processes. Our work describes the development of a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition process that uses a low temperature (<460 °C) in situ germane/argon plasma surface preparation step for epitaxial growth of germanium on silicon. It is shown that the germane/argon plasma treatment sufficiently removes SiOx and carbon at the surface to enable germanium epitaxy. Finally, the use of this surface preparation step demonstrates anmore » alternative way to produce germanium epitaxy at reduced temperatures, a key enabler for increased flexibility of integration with CMOS back-end-of-line fabrication.« less

  20. Optical emission study of a doped diamond deposition process by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayar, M.; Supiot, P.; Veis, P.; Gicquel, A.

    2008-08-01

    Standard H2/CH4/B2H6 plasmas (99% of H2 and 1% of CH4, with 0-100ppm of B2H6 added) used for doped diamond film growth are studied by optical emission spectroscopy in order to gain a better understanding of the influence of boron species on the gas phase chemistry. Only two boron species are detected under our experimental conditions (9/15/23Wcm-3 average microwave power density values), and the emission spectra used for studies reported here are B(S1/22-P1/2,3/202) and BH [AΠ1-XΣ+1(0,0)]. Variations of their respective emission intensities as a function of the ratio B /C, the boron to carbon ratio in the gas mixture, are reported. We confirmed that the plasma parameters (Tg, Te, and ne) are not affected by the introduction of diborane, and the number densities of B atoms and BH radical species were estimated from experimental measurements. The results are compared to those obtained from a zero-dimensional chemical kinetic model where two groups of reactions are considered: (1) BHx+H ↔BHx -1+H2 (x=1-3) by analogy with the well-known equilibrium CHx+H set of reactions, which occurs, in particular, in diamond deposition reactors; and (2) from conventional organic chemistry, the set of reactions involving boron species: BHx+C2H2 (x =0-1). The results clearly show that the model based on hydrogen and boron hydrides reactions alone is not consistent with the experimental results, while it is so when taking into account both sets of reactions. Once an upper limit for the boron species number densities has been estimated, axial profiles are calculated on the basis of the plasma model results obtained previously in Laboratoire d'Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Hautes Pressions, and significant differences in trends for different boron species are found. At the plasma-to-substrate boundary, [BH] and [B] drop off in contrast to [BH2], which shows little decrease, and [BH3], which shows little increase, in this region.

  1. Polymorphous silicon thin films obtained by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using dichlorosilane as silicon precursor.

    PubMed

    Remolina, A; Monroy, B M; García-Sánchez, M F; Ponce, A; Bizarro, M; Alonso, J C; Ortiz, A; Santana, G

    2009-06-17

    Polymorphous silicon thin films (pm-Si) have been deposited from mixtures of dichlorosilane and hydrogen, using argon as the diluting gas by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The deposition conditions were chosen to simultaneously obtain both Si nanocrystallites and an amorphous silicon matrix in the as-grown samples. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies show the crystallinity of Si domains whose dimensions are in the interval of 2-14 nm. The surface passivation state of the silicon nanocrystals was inferred from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Two optical absorption edges, corresponding to the amorphous matrix and the Si nanocrystals, were observed for all the pm-Si thin films. Intense visible photoluminescence was observed for the as-grown samples. The possibility of using these thin films for the down-conversion effect in silicon solar cells is discussed. PMID:19471076

  2. Plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of silicon nitride film for high resistance to potential-induced degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishina, Ken; Ogishi, Atsufumi; Ueno, Kiyoshi; Jonai, Sachiko; Ikeno, Norihiro; Saruwatari, Tetsuya; Hara, Kohjiro; Ogura, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Toshiharu; Doi, Takuya; Shinohara, Makoto; Masuda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    The antireflection coating (ARC) on crystalline silicon solar cells plays an important role in preventing potential-induced degradation (PID). In a previous work, we reported that the module, which has an ARC prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PE-CVD) using a hollow cathode, indicated high resistance to PID with a constant conventional refractive index (RI). In this work, we report further investigation of the high-PID-resistant ARC. The results indicate that the high-PID resistant ARC had high conductivity, high Si-H bond density, and low N-H bond density. Furthermore, both higher PID resistance and higher conversion efficiency are achieved using an ARC of double or triple layers comprising stacked silicon nitride layers of different RI than those of a conventional single-layer ARC.

  3. Enhanced growth of high quality single crystal diamond by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at high gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Qi; Chin Chengyi; Lai, Joseph; Yan Chihshiue; Meng Yufei; Mao Hokwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2009-01-12

    Single crystals of diamond up to 18 mm in thickness have been grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at gas pressures of up to 350 torr. Growth rates of up to 165 {mu}m/h at 300 torr at high power density have been achieved. The processes were evaluated by optical emission spectroscopy. The high-quality single-crystal diamond grown at optimized conditions was characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The measurements reveal a direct relationship between residual absorption and nitrogen content in the gas chemistry. Fabrication of high quality single-crystal diamond at higher growth rates should be possible with improved reactor design that allows still higher gas synthesis pressures.

  4. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-24

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (∼0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices. PMID:27181294

  5. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterization of high-permittivity hafnium and zirconium silicate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiromitsu; Nango, Tomohiro; Miyagawa, Takeshi; Katagiri, Takahiro; Seol, Kwang Soo; Ohki, Yoshimichi

    2002-07-01

    Deposition of hafnium silicate films with various hafnium contents was tried by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using tetraethoxysilane and a hafnium alkoxide. From x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the deposited films are confirmed to be silicate with Hf-O-Si bonds but without any Hf-Si bonds. The permittivity calculated from the capacitance of the accumulation layer increases monotonically with an increase in the hafnium content, whereas the optical band gap energy estimated from vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectra decreases. Similar results were obtained from zirconium silicate films deposited using tetraethoxysilane and a zirconium alkoxide. If we compare the films with the same hafnium or zirconium content, the hafnium silicate exhibits a higher permittivity and a larger band gap energy than the zirconium silicate.

  6. On the nature of carbon nitride nanocrystals formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. F.; Wee, A. T. S.; Lin, J.; Chua, D. H. C.; Huan, C. H. A.

    1999-06-01

    Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopy, carbon nitride nanocrystals were observed in films deposited by RF plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) followed by a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) to 1000°C. The (30±10) nm crystals are embedded in an amorphous matrix, and the interplanar lattice spacings suggest that the crystals are the hexagonal β-carbon nitride phase. Investigations using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the films show that RTA increases the sp 3 content of the films but decreases the CN (nitrile), N-H and C-H content.

  7. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (∼0–600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50–400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  8. Growth kinetics of low temperature single-wall and few walled carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohier, A.; Minea, T. M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Jiménez, J.; Granier, A.

    2007-03-01

    Single-wall, double walled or few walled nanotubes (FWNT) are grown by electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ECR-PECVD) at temperature as low as 600 °C. Most of these structures are isolated and self-oriented perpendicular to the substrate. The growth mechanism observed for single-wall and few walled (less than seven walls) nanotubes is the “base-growth” mode. Their grow kinetics is investigated regarding two parameters namely the growth time and the synthesis temperature. It is shown that nucleation and growth rate is correlated with the number of walls into FWNT. It also provides an evidence of a critical temperature for FWNT synthesis.

  9. Synthesis and growth mechanism of Fe-catalyzed carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Feng, Tao; Cheng, Xinhong; Dai, Lijuan; Cao, Gongbai; Jiang, Bingyao; Wang, Xi; Liu, Xianghuai; Zou, Shichang

    2006-03-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was used to grow Fe-catalyzed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The nanotubes had a uniform diameter in the range of about 10-20 nm. A base growth mode was responsible for the CNTs growth using a mixture of H 2 (60 sccm) and C 2H 2 (15 sccm). For a mixture of H 2 (100 sccm) and C 2H 2 (25 sccm), a complicated growth mechanism took place involving both the base growth and the tip growth. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that the grown CNTs contained C-H covalent bonds and Fe-C bonds located at the interface between them and the substrates. The factors determining the growth mechanism of CNTs are discussed and their growth mechanisms with the different gas ratios are suggested.

  10. Influence of the normalized ion flux on the constitution of alumina films deposited by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kurapov, Denis; Reiss, Jennifer; Trinh, David H.; Hultman, Lars; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2007-07-15

    Alumina thin films were deposited onto tempered hot working steel substrates from an AlCl{sub 3}-O{sub 2}-Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The normalized ion flux was varied during deposition through changes in precursor content while keeping the cathode voltage and the total pressure constant. As the precursor content in the total gas mixture was increased from 0.8% to 5.8%, the deposition rate increased 12-fold, while the normalized ion flux decreased by approximately 90%. The constitution, morphology, impurity incorporation, and the elastic properties of the alumina thin films were found to depend on the normalized ion flux. These changes in structure, composition, and properties induced by normalized ion flux may be understood by considering mechanisms related to surface and bulk diffusion.

  11. Monitoring and analyses of substrate surface in first stages of graphene growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Masahiro; Yamada, Shunya; Hayashi, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    In situ ellipsometry was carried out as well as ex situ measurements by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for the analyses of substrate surface in the first stage of graphene growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Evolutions of the ellipsometric parameters Ψ and Δ were precisely measured during the growth of graphene with the sensitivity far less than 1 nm in film thickness. By the fitting of the experimentally obtained trajectory of ellipsometric parameters on the Ψ–Δ coordinate plane to that of the calculated ones, we confirmed that the graphite volume fraction decreased with growth after a dense graphite material initially formed. This suggests that carbon nanowalls grew on a thin graphitic layer.

  12. Effect of plasma parameters on characteristics of silicon nitride film deposited by single and dual frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride films using various low-temperature plasmas. Utilizing radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and ultra-high frequency (UHF, 320 MHz) powers, different plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes are conducted in the mixture of reactive N2/NH3/SiH4 gases. The processes are extensively characterized using different plasma diagnostic tools to study their plasma and radical generation capabilities. A typical transition of the electron energy distribution function from single- to bi-Maxwellian type is achieved by combining RF and ultra-high powers. Data analysis revealed that the RF/UHF dual frequency power enhances the plasma surface heating and produces hot electron population with relatively low electron temperature and high plasma density. Using various film analysis methods, we have investigated the role of plasma parameters on the compositional, structural, and optical properties of the deposited films to optimize the process conditions. The presented results show that the dual frequency power is effective for enhancing dissociation and ionization of neutrals, which in turn helps in enabling high deposition rate and improving film properties.

  13. Parametric Study for Selective Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Karatsu, Takuya; Yoshida, Shinpei; Okazaki, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) growth mechanism in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is presented. Previously developed atmospheric pressure glow discharge reactor was modified and used for this purpose. First, pressure-dependent transition (20-100 kPa) of CNT morphology was investigated with fixed input power (60 W) and different catalyst loading (Fe/Al2Ox: 20 nm). High-purity, vertically-aligned single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) were synthesized when capacitively coupled non-thermal plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, fraction of double-walled and multi-walled CNTs increased as total pressure decreased. Although CNT growth rate was decelerated at reduced input power (5-20 W), SWCNTs were also synthesized in the root growth regime at 20 kPa. Plasma-generated reactive species are the important driving force of CNT growth; however, generation and transportation of those species must be properly suppressed for selective growth of single-, double-, and multi-walled CNTs.

  14. Low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin films combining mechanical stiffness, electrical insulation, and homogeneity in microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, S.; Guenther, M.; Hauschild, D.; Richter, F.

    2010-08-15

    The deposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) as well as hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbonitride (SiCN:H) films was investigated in view of a simultaneous realization of a minimum Young's modulus (>70 GPa), a high electrical insulation ({>=}1 MV/cm), a low permittivity and the uniform coverage of microcavities with submillimeter dimensions. For the a-C:H deposition the precursors methane (CH{sub 4}) and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were used, while SiCN:H films were deposited from mixtures of trimethylsilane [SiH(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] with nitrogen and argon. To realize the deposition of micrometer thick films with the aforementioned complex requirements at substrate temperatures {<=}200 deg. C, several plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods were investigated: the capacitively coupled rf discharge and the microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma, combined with two types of pulsed substrate bias. SiCN:H films deposited at about 1 Pa from ECR plasmas with pulsed high-voltage bias best met the requirements. Pulsed biasing with pulse periods of about 1 {mu}s and amplitudes of about -2 kV was found to be most advantageous for the conformal low temperature coating of the microtrenches, thereby ensuring the required mechanical and insulating film properties.

  15. Effects of ion bombardments on electronic properties of amorphous carbon films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Hirotsugu; Jia, Lingyun; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films show huge variety of optical and electronic properties, because of a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonding carbon. Therefore, it's expected to apply a-C films to optical and electrical device applications, such as solar cells. However, there has been no report about a photovoltaic effect in a-C junction solar cells. Growth mechanism and relationship between plasma factors and film properties are not clarified yet. It is important to clear the effect of radicals and ions on their film properties. In this study, a-C films were synthesized by a radical-injection plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 550 degree C, in which 20 or 250 W VHF powers was applied to capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP). And, RF bias powers were applied to substrates to control the self-bias voltage (VDC) . VDC values were adjusted to 200, 275, and 400V, respectively. As the CCP power increased, optical emission intensity of C2 radicals increased, and G-band peaks became shaper which indicates development of graphitization. With increasing the VDC, optical band gap decreased and conductivity increased. From these results, it was found that formation of sp2 bonds and modification of energy bandgap can be realized by control of ion energy.

  16. Effects of Ammonia Plasma Treatment on the Electrical Properties of Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Carbide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Way; Chen, Chia-Fu

    2002-09-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films were deposited from a mixture of silane and methane gases using the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The properties of the film, following ammonia plasma treatment, are reported. A lower silane flow rate reduces the refractive index, but increases the carbon content and the optical band gap. Increasing the carbon concentration of the a-SiC:H films reduces the dielectric constant. The films were treated with ammonia plasma for various treatment periods. The original film has a smooth surface with a roughness of 0.231 nm, but increasing the ammonia plasma treatment period gradually roughens the surface. The chemical bonding nature of the a-SiC:H films with higher silicon content was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Various nitrogen ionization species reacted with Si to promote the formation of silicon nitride. As a result, although the dielectric constant of the a-SiC:H films increased slightly, the leakage current density declined as the ammonia plasma treatment time increased.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  18. Preparation of Y-Ba-Cu-O high T(c) superconducting thin films by plasma-assisted organometallic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, G. R.; Tao, W.; Wang, R.; Xie, L. M.; Zhang, X. K.

    1989-07-01

    This paper reports the preparation of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting films with smooth, shiny surfaces, uniform composition, and high T(c) using plasma-assisted organometallic chemical vapor deposition (PAOMCVD). In addition to the advantages of pyrolysis OMCVD, PAOMCVD also affords some characteristics of physical vapor deposition. By adjusting the deposition conditions to get an appropriate combination of the features of physical vapor deposition with those of pyrolysis OMCVD, it is possible to prepare high T(c) metal oxide superconducting thin films having even better properties.

  19. Boron nitride phosphide thin films grown on quartz substrate by hot-filament and plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.; Xu, S. Y.; Han, G. R.

    2004-10-01

    Boron nitride phosphide films are, for the first time, grown on transparent quartz substrate by hot filament and radio-frequency plasma co-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. XPS, XRD, SEM, and UV measurements are performed to study the chemical composition, crystallization, microstructure, and optical absorption, respectively. A centipede-like microstructure and undulating ground morphology on the film surface are observed, and their growth mechanism is speculated upon. The chemical composition is determined as BN1-xPx, whose characteristic XRD peak is preliminarily identified. The optical band gap can be modulated between 5.52 eV and 3.74 eV, simply by adjusting the phosphorus content in BN1-xPx through modifying the PH3 flux during the film-deposition process. The merits of the BN1-xPx film, such as high ultraviolet photoelectric sensitivity with negligible sensitivity in the visible region, modifiable wide optical band gap, and good adhesion on transparent substrate, suggest potential applications for ultraviolet photo-electronics.

  20. Characteristics of ultra low-k nanoporous and fluorinated silica based films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi-Firouzjah, M.; Shokri, B.

    2013-12-01

    Low dielectric constant (low-k) silica based films were deposited on p-type silicon and polycarbonate substrates by radio frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method at low temperature. A mixture of tetraethoxysilane vapor, oxygen, and tetrafluoromethane (CF4) was used for the deposition of the films in forms of two structures called as SiOxCy and SiOxCyFz. Properties of the films were controlled by amount of porosity and fluorine content in the film matrix. The influence of RF power and CF4 flow on the elemental composition, deposition rate, surface roughness, leakage current, refractive index, and dielectric constant of the films were characterized. Moreover, optical emission spectroscopy was applied to monitor the plasma process at the different parameters. Electrical characteristics of SiOxCy and SiOxCyFz films with metal-oxide-semiconductor structure were investigated using current-voltage analysis to measure the leakage current and breakdown field, as well as capacitance-voltage analysis to obtain the film's dielectric constant. The results revealed that SiOxCy films, which are deposited at lower RF power produce more leakage current, meanwhile the dielectric constant and refractive index of these films decreased mainly due to the more porosity in the film structure. By adding CF4 in the deposition process, fluorine, the most electronegative and the least polarized atom, doped into the silica film and led to decrease in the refractive index and the dielectric constant. In addition, no breakdown field was observed in the electrical characteristics of SiOxCyFz films and the leakage current of these films reduced by increment of the CF4 flow.

  1. Characteristics of ultra low-k nanoporous and fluorinated silica based films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi-Firouzjah, M.; Shokri, B.

    2013-12-07

    Low dielectric constant (low-k) silica based films were deposited on p-type silicon and polycarbonate substrates by radio frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method at low temperature. A mixture of tetraethoxysilane vapor, oxygen, and tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) was used for the deposition of the films in forms of two structures called as SiO{sub x}C{sub y} and SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z}. Properties of the films were controlled by amount of porosity and fluorine content in the film matrix. The influence of RF power and CF{sub 4} flow on the elemental composition, deposition rate, surface roughness, leakage current, refractive index, and dielectric constant of the films were characterized. Moreover, optical emission spectroscopy was applied to monitor the plasma process at the different parameters. Electrical characteristics of SiO{sub x}C{sub y} and SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z} films with metal-oxide-semiconductor structure were investigated using current-voltage analysis to measure the leakage current and breakdown field, as well as capacitance-voltage analysis to obtain the film's dielectric constant. The results revealed that SiO{sub x}C{sub y} films, which are deposited at lower RF power produce more leakage current, meanwhile the dielectric constant and refractive index of these films decreased mainly due to the more porosity in the film structure. By adding CF{sub 4} in the deposition process, fluorine, the most electronegative and the least polarized atom, doped into the silica film and led to decrease in the refractive index and the dielectric constant. In addition, no breakdown field was observed in the electrical characteristics of SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z} films and the leakage current of these films reduced by increment of the CF{sub 4} flow.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

  3. Visible Light Photocatalysis with Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buzby,S.; Barakat, M.; Lin, H.; Ni, C.; Rykov, S.; Chen, J.; Shah, S.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized via plasma assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Nitrogen dopant concentration was varied from 0 to 1.61 at. %. The effect of nitrogen ion doping on visible light photocatalysis has been investigated. Samples were analyzed by various analytical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure. Titanium tetraisopropoxide was used as the titanium precursor, while rf-plasma-decomposed ammonia was used as the source for nitrogen doping. The N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were deposited on stainless steel mesh under a flow of Ar and O2 gases at 600 {sup o}C in a tube reactor. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples was tested by the degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an aqueous solution using a visible lamp equipped with an UV filter. The efficiency of photocatalytic oxidation of 2-CP was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Results obtained revealed the formation of N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples as TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}, and a corresponding increase in the visible light photocatalytic activity.

  4. Preparation of Hydrophobic Metal-Organic Frameworks via Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Perfluoroalkanes for the Removal of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    DeCoste, Jared B.; Peterson, Gregory W.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of perfluoroalkanes has long been studied for tuning the wetting properties of surfaces. For high surface area microporous materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), unique challenges present themselves for PECVD treatments. Herein the protocol for development of a MOF that was previously unstable to humid conditions is presented. The protocol describes the synthesis of Cu-BTC (also known as HKUST-1), the treatment of Cu-BTC with PECVD of perfluoroalkanes, the aging of materials under humid conditions, and the subsequent ammonia microbreakthrough experiments on milligram quantities of microporous materials. Cu-BTC has an extremely high surface area (~1,800 m2/g) when compared to most materials or surfaces that have been previously treated by PECVD methods. Parameters such as chamber pressure and treatment time are extremely important to ensure the perfluoroalkane plasma penetrates to and reacts with the inner MOF surfaces. Furthermore, the protocol for ammonia microbreakthrough experiments set forth here can be utilized for a variety of test gases and microporous materials. PMID:24145623

  5. Synthesis of large scale graphene oxide using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method and its application in humidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Yuming

    2016-03-01

    Large scale graphene oxide (GO) is directly synthesized on copper (Cu) foil by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method under 500 °C and even lower temperature. Compared to the modified Hummer's method, the obtained GO sheet in this article is large, and it is scalable according to the Cu foil size. The oxygen-contained groups in the GO are introduced through the residual gas of methane (99.9% purity). To prevent the Cu surface from the bombardment of the ions in the plasma, we use low intensity discharge. Our experiment reveals that growth temperature has important influence on the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O ratio) in the GO; and it also affects the amount of π-π* bonds between carbon atoms. Preliminary experiments on a 6 mm × 12 mm GO based humidity sensor prove that the synthesized GO reacts well to the humidity change. Our GO synthesis method may provide another channel for obtaining large scale GO in gas sensing or other applications.

  6. Growth of high-quality thin-film Ge single crystals by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Hopson, P., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Thin-film Ge single crystals (approx. 10 microns) have been epitaxially grown on polished NaCl(100) substrates at 450C by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Films on approximately 1 sq cm and larger were separated from the NaCl by either melting the salt or by differential shear stress upon cooling to room temperature. The ordered growth of the Ge was found to be most sensitive to the initial plasma power and to the continuum flow dynamics within the carbon susceptor. The films were visually specular and exhibited a high degree of crysalline order when examined by X-ray diffraction. The films were found to be p-type with a carrier concentration of approximately 3 x 10 to the 16th power/cu cm, a resistivity of 0.11 ohm-cm, and a Hall hole mobility of 1820 sq cm/v/s at room temperature. Vacuum firing minimized the primary contaminant, Na, and corresponding lowered the carrier concentration to 4 x 10 to the 14th power/cu cm.

  7. Determination of photocatalytic activity in amorphous and crystalline titanium oxide films prepared using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chiang, Bo-Sheng; Chang, Springfield; Liu, Day-Shan

    2011-01-01

    Hydro-oxygenated amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO x:OH) films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using precursors of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and oxygen. The influences of chemical states and crystal quality on the photocatalytic activity were systematically investigated in the as-deposited and post-annealed films. The degree of the photocatalytic activity was deeply correlated with the porosity related to the hydroxyl (OH) groups in the as-deposited amorphous film. The crystallized anatase structures was observed from the 200 °C-deposited a-TiO x:OH film after a post-annealing treatment at 400 °C. The photocatalytic activity related to the film with anatase structure was markedly superior to that of an amorphous film with porous structures. The larger the crystal size of the anatase structure, the higher the photocatalytic activity obtained. At elevated annealed temperatures, the inferior anatase structure due to the crystalline transformation led to a low photocatalytic activity. It was concluded that the photocatalytic activity of an amorphous TiO x film prepared using PECVD was determined by the porosity originating from the functional OH groups in the film, whereas the crystalline quality of anatase phase in the annealed poly-TiO x film was crucial to the photocatalytic activity.

  8. Effects of feed gas composition and catalyst thickness on carbon nanotube and nanofiber synthesis by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Garg, R K; Kim, S S; Hash, D B; Gore, J P; Fisher, T S

    2008-06-01

    Many engineering applications require carbon nanotubes with specific characteristics such as wall structure, chirality and alignment. However, precise control of nanotube properties grown to application specifications remains a significant challenge. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) offers a variety of advantages in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes in that several important synthesis parameters can be controlled independently. This paper reports an experimental study of the effects of reacting gas composition (percentage methane in hydrogen) and catalyst film thickness on carbon nanotube (CNT) growth and a computational study of gas-phase composition for the inlet conditions of experimentally observed carbon nanotube growth using different chemical reaction mechanisms. The simulations seek to explain the observed effects of reacting gas composition and to identify the precursors for CNT formation. The experimental results indicate that gas-phase composition significantly affects the synthesized material, which is shown to be randomly aligned nanotube and nanofiber mats for relatively methane-rich inlet gas mixtures and non-tubular carbon for methane-lean incoming mixtures. The simulation results suggest that inlet methane-hydrogen mixture coverts to an acetylene-methane-hydrogen mixture with minor amounts of ethylene, hydrogen atom, and methyl radical. Acetylene appears to be the indicator species for solid carbon formation. The simulations also show that inlet methane-hydrogen mixture does not produce enough gas-phase precursors needed to form quality CNTs below 5% CH4 concentrations in the inlet stream. PMID:18681048

  9. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of ortho-carborane: structural insights and interaction with Cu overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Robinson; Pasquale, Frank L.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2013-09-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, UPS) are used to investigate the chemical and electronic structure of boron carbide films deposited from ortho-carborane precursors using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the reactivity of PECVD films toward sputter-deposited Cu overlayers. The XPS data provide clear evidence of enhanced ortho-carborane reactivity with the substrate, and of extra-icosahedral boron and carbon species; these results differ from results for films formed by condensation and electron beam induced cross-linking of ortho-carborane (EBIC films). The UPS data show that the valence band maximum for PECVD films is ∼1.5 eV closer to the Fermi level than for EBIC films. The XPS data also indicate that PECVD films are resistant to thermally-stimulated diffusion of Cu at temperatures up to 1000 K in UHV, in direct contrast to recently reported results, but important for applications in neutron detection and in microelectronics.

  10. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of ortho-carborane: structural insights and interaction with Cu overlayers.

    PubMed

    James, Robinson; Pasquale, Frank L; Kelber, Jeffry A

    2013-09-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, UPS) are used to investigate the chemical and electronic structure of boron carbide films deposited from ortho-carborane precursors using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the reactivity of PECVD films toward sputter-deposited Cu overlayers. The XPS data provide clear evidence of enhanced ortho-carborane reactivity with the substrate, and of extra-icosahedral boron and carbon species; these results differ from results for films formed by condensation and electron beam induced cross-linking of ortho-carborane (EBIC films). The UPS data show that the valence band maximum for PECVD films is ∼1.5 eV closer to the Fermi level than for EBIC films. The XPS data also indicate that PECVD films are resistant to thermally-stimulated diffusion of Cu at temperatures up to 1000 K in UHV, in direct contrast to recently reported results, but important for applications in neutron detection and in microelectronics. PMID:23883590

  11. Microwave Plasma-Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nitrogen-Doped Diamond. I. N2/H2 and NH3/H2 Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Benjamin S; Kelly, Mark W; Potter, Katie J; Johnson, Mack; Ashfold, Michael N R; Mankelevich, Yuri A

    2015-12-31

    We report a combined experimental/modeling study of microwave activated dilute N2/H2 and NH3/H2 plasmas as a precursor to diagnosis of the CH4/N2/H2 plasmas used for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of N-doped diamond. Absolute column densities of H(n = 2) atoms and NH(X(3)Σ(-), v = 0) radicals have been determined by cavity ring down spectroscopy, as a function of height (z) above a molybdenum substrate and of the plasma process conditions, i.e., total gas pressure p, input power P, and the nitrogen/hydrogen atom ratio in the source gas. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to investigate variations in the relative number densities of H(n = 3) atoms, NH(A(3)Π) radicals, and N2(C(3)Πu) molecules as functions of the same process conditions. These experimental data are complemented by 2-D (r, z) coupled kinetic and transport modeling for the same process conditions, which consider variations in both the overall chemistry and plasma parameters, including the electron (Te) and gas (T) temperatures, the electron density (ne), and the plasma power density (Q). Comparisons between experiment and theory allow refinement of prior understanding of N/H plasma-chemical reactivity, and its variation with process conditions and with location within the CVD reactor, and serve to highlight the essential role of metastable N2(A(3)Σ(+)u) molecules (formed by electron impact excitation) and their hitherto underappreciated reactivity with H atoms, in converting N2 process gas into reactive NHx (x = 0-3) radical species. PMID:26593853

  12. Nitrogen Plasma Instabilities and the Growth of Silicon Nitride by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, F. S.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen plasma instabilities have been identified through fluctuations in the ion current density and substrate floating potential. The plasma characteristics for both nitrogen and silane-nitrogen plasmas are consistent with a transition from an underdense to overdense plasma at 0.9 and 1.0 mTorr respectively.

  13. Compositional study of silicon oxynitride thin films deposited using electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.; Sah, R.E.

    2005-05-01

    We have used backscattering spectrometry and {sup 15}N({sup 1}H,{alpha},{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis techniques to study in detail the variation in the composition of silicon oxynitride films with deposition parameters. The films were deposited using 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from mixtures of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at deposition temperature 90 deg. C. The deposition pressure and nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio have been found to have a pronounced influence on the composition of the films. When the deposition pressure was varied for a given nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio, the amount of silicon and nitrogen increased with the deposition pressure, while the amount of oxygen decreased. For a given deposition pressure, the amount of incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen decreased while that of oxygen increased with increasing nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio. For nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio of 5, we obtained films which contained neither chemically bonded nor nonbonded nitrogen atoms as revealed by the results of infrared spectroscopy, backscattering spectrometry, and nuclear reaction analysis. Our results demonstrate the nitrogen-free nearly stoichiometric silicon dioxide films can be prepared from a mixture of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at low substrate temperature using high-density PECVD technique. This avoids the use of a hazardous and an often forbidden pair of silane and oxygen gases in a plasma reactor.

  14. Low-temperature synthesis of diamond films by photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, Mayuri Ojiro, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji; Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Okano, Ken

    2014-03-15

    Photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PA-PECVD), a process in which photoelectrons emitted from a substrate irradiated with ultraviolet light are utilized as a trigger for DC discharge, was investigated in this study; specifically, the DC discharge characteristics of PA-PECVD were examined for an Si substrate deposited in advance through hot-filament chemical vapor deposition with a nitrogen-doped diamond layer of thickness ∼1 μm. Using a commercially available Xe excimer lamp (hν = 7.2 eV) to illuminate the diamond surface with and without hydrogen termination, the photocurrents were found to be 3.17 × 10{sup 12} and 2.11 × 10{sup 11} electrons/cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The 15-fold increase in photocurrent was ascribed to negative electron affinity (NEA) caused by hydrogen termination on the diamond surfaces. The DC discharge characteristics revealed that a transition bias voltage from a Townsend-to-glow discharge was considerably decreased because of NEA (from 490 to 373 V for H{sub 2} gas and from 330 to 200 V for Ar gas), enabling a reduction in electric power consumption needed to synthesize diamond films through PA-PECVD. In fact, the authors have succeeded in growing high-quality diamond films of area 2.0 cm{sup 2} at 540 °C with a discharge power of only 1.8 W, plasma voltage of 156.4 V, and discharge current of 11.7 mA under the glow discharge of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gases. In addition to having only negligible amounts of graphite and amorphous carbon, the diamond films exhibit a relatively high diamond growth rate of 0.5 μm/h at temperatures as low as 540 °C, which is attributed to Ar{sup +} ions impinging on the diamond surface, and causing the removal of hydrogen atoms from the surface through sputtering. This process leads to enhanced CH{sub x} radical adsorption, because the sample was applied with a negative potential to accelerate photoelectrons in PA-PECVD.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  16. Ultralow k films by using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition porogen approach: Study of the precursor reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Castex, A.; Jousseaume, V.; Deval, J.; Bruat, J.; Favennec, L.; Passemard, G.

    2008-09-15

    As interconnects are scaled down, much effort is made to achieve ultralow k material with a dielectric constant lower than 2.5. Thus, many new precursors are investigated in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. This is particularly true with the porogen approach where two molecules are used: an organosilicon to create the silicon matrix and an organic molecule 'porogen' that creates material porosity during a post-treatment such as annealing. In this article, the influence of the organosilicon molecular structure is investigated. Two 'matrix precursors' with different structures are therefore compared. The first one, referred to as D5, has a ring structure (decamethyl pentacyclosiloxane); the second one, referred to as DEOMS, has a star structure (diethoxymethyl silane). The porogen organic molecule, referred to as CHO, is cyclohexen oxide. The fragmentation paths of the precursor molecules in the plasma are investigated by quadrupole mass spectroscopy and the film structure is studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The mass spectroscopy analysis shows that the fragmentation in plasma is highest for DEOMS, intermediate for CHO, and lowest for D5 in comparable process conditions. At the maximum plasma power setting, the loss rate, which yields molecule consumption, is 43%-81% for the D5-CHO mixture, respectively, and 73%-37% for the DEOMS-CHO mixture, respectively. This is related to higher bond-dissociation energy for the siloxane (Si-O-Si) link in D5 than silane (Si-H), silylethoxyde (Si-OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}) in DEOMS, or C-C and epoxy cycle in CHO. Indeed, a higher electron-energy relative threshold for dissociation under electron impact is measured for D5 (around 7 eV) than for DEOMS and CHO (around 4 eV). Moreover, the fragment structures differ from one precursor to another. Methyl groups are abstracted from D5 and a few polysiloxane chains are produced from pentacycle opening and fragmentation. In the case of DEOMS, many single silicon

  17. Controlling Degree of Crystalline Boron Carbide by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, Joseph

    2007-03-01

    There has been a recent resurgence in the interest of semiconducting boron carbide, based on its use as a radiation hard semiconductor. Here, we present growth character and commensurate structural and electronic properties from the low temperature but large area (6" wafer) deposition of boron carbide from the solid source precursor, 1,2 - dicarbadodecaborane. Of special interest is the control over the degree of crystallinity as provided from changing plasma pressure growth.

  18. Modeling and experimental study on the growth of silicon germanium film by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lai

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon germanium µc-SiGe:H deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is of great interest to photovoltaic (PV) applications due to its low process temperature and good uniformity over large area. The nature of high optical absorption and low optical bandgap makes it promising as the bottom cell absorbing layer for tandem junction solar cells. However, the addition of germane (GeH4) gas changes deposited film properties and makes it rather complicated for the established silane (SiH4) based discharge process with hydrogen (H2) dilution. Despite existing experimental studies for SiH 4/GeH4/H2 3-gas mixture discharge and comprehensive numerical simulations for SiH4/H2 or SiH4/Ar plasma, to the author's best knowledge, a numerical model for both SiH 4 and GeH4 in a high pressure regime is yet to be developed. The plasma discharge, the film growth and their effects on film properties and the solar device performance need deep understanding. In this dissertation, the growth of the µc-SiGe:H film by radio frequency (RF) PECVD is studied through modeling simulation as well as experiments. The first numerical model for the glow discharge of SiH4/GeH 4/H2 3-gas mixture in a high pressure regime is developed based on one dimensional fluid model. Transports of electrons, molecules, radicals and ions in the RF excitation are described by diffusion equations that are coupled with the Poisson's equation. The deposition is integrated as the boundary conditions for discharge equations through the sticking coefficient model. Neutral ionizations, radical dissociations and chemical reactions in the gas phase and surface kinetics such as the diffusive motion, chemical reactions and the hydrogen etching are included with interaction rate constants. Solved with an explicit central-difference discretization scheme, the model simulates mathematical features that reflect the plasma physics such as the plasma sheath and gas species

  19. Film Characteristics of Low-Temperature Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Dioxide Using Tetraisocyanatesilane and Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Irman; Sugiura, Osamu

    1998-12-01

    Silicon dioxide films were deposited in a parallel-plate electrode RF plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system using hydrogen-free tetraisocyanatesilane (TICS) and oxygen. The deposition parameters were varied systematically, and the films were characterized by measuring infrared spectra, density, etch rate, refractive index, and current-voltage (I V) and capacitance-voltage (C V) characteristics, as well as by examining their annealing behavior. At 300°C and a TICS partial pressure ratio of 20%, a water-free and hydroxyl-group-free SiO2 film was obtained. The film density, BHF etch rate, refractive index, resistivity, and dielectric constant were 2.3 g/cm3, 330 nm/min, 1.46, 7×1015 Ω·cm, and 3.6, respectively. The film quality degraded and, simultaneously, the film absorbed moisture from the atmosphere with decreasing deposition temperature; however, the quality can be improved by reducing TICS partial pressure. SiO2 films could be deposited even at 15°C, and had a resistivity of about 1013Ω·cm. Infrared measurements showed that SiO2 films deposited from TICS/O2 contained less absorbed water than those deposited from hydrogen-containing source materials at the same deposition temperature.

  20. Optimal design of antireflection coating and experimental verification by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in small displays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. M.; Hsieh, Y. C.; Jeng, C. A.

    2009-03-15

    Conventional antireflection coating by thin films of quarter-wavelength thickness is limited by material selections and these films' refractive indices. The optimal design by non-quarter-wavelength thickness is presented in this study. A multilayer thin-film model is developed by the admittance loci to show that the two-layer thin film of SiN{sub x}/SiO{sub y} at 124/87 nm and three layer of SiN{sub x}/SiN{sub y}/SiO{sub z} at 58/84/83 nm can achieve average transmittances of 94.4% and 94.9%, respectively, on polymer, glass, and silicon substrates. The optimal design is validated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of N{sub 2}O/SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4} to achieve the desired optical constants. Application of the antireflection coating to a 4 in. liquid crystal display demonstrates that the transmittance is over 94%, the mean luminance can be increased by 25%, and the total reflection angle increased from 41 deg. to 58 deg.

  1. Tribological and thermal stability study of nanoporous amorphous boron carbide films prepared by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liza, Shahira; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan M.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the thermal stability and the oxidation and tribological behavior of nanoporous a-BC:H films are studied and compared with those in conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. a-BC:H films were deposited by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition using B(CH3)3 gas as the boron source. A DLC interlayer was used to prevent the a-BC:H film delamination produced by oxidation. Thermal stability of a-BC:H films, with no delamination signs after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h, is better than that of the DLC films, which completely disappeared under the same conditions. Tribological test results indicate that the a-BC:H films, even with lower nanoindentation hardness than the DLC films, show an excellent boundary oil lubricated behavior, with lower friction coefficient and reduce the wear rate of counter materials than those on the DLC film. The good materials properties such as low modulus of elasticity and the formation of micropores from the original nanopores during boundary regimes explain this better performance. Results show that porous a-BC:H films may be an alternative for segmented DLC films in applications where severe tribological conditions and complex shapes exist, so surface patterning is unfeasible.

  2. Photocatalytic Functional Coating of TiO2 Thin Film Deposited by Cyclic Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jung-Dae; Rha, Jong-Joo; Nam, Kee-Seok; Park, Jin-Seong

    2011-08-01

    Photocatalytic TiO2 thin films were prepared with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) using cyclic plasma chemical vapor deposition (CPCVD) at atmospheric pressure. The CPCVD TiO2 films contain carbon-free impurities up to 100 °C and polycrystalline anatase phases up to 200 °C, due to the radicals and ion-bombardments. The CPCVD TiO2 films have high transparency in the visible wavelength region and absorb wavelengths below 400 nm (>3.2 eV). The photocatalytic effects of the CPCVD TiO2 and commercial sprayed TiO2 films were measured by decomposing methylene blue (MB) solution under UV irradiation. The smooth CPCVD TiO2 films showed a relatively lower photocatalytic efficiency, but superior catalyst-recycling efficiency, due to their high adhesion strength on the substrates. This CPCVD technique may provide the means to produce photocatalytic thin films with low cost and high efficiency, which would be a reasonable candidate for practical photocatalytic applications, because of the reliability and stability of their photocatalytic efficiency in a practical environment.

  3. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, M. H. Jr.; Viana, G. A.; Marques, F. C.; Lima, M. M. Jr. de; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.

    2010-12-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH{sub 4}) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  4. Antireflection coating formed by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition for terahertz-frequency germanium optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosako, Iwao

    2003-07-01

    A method of manufacturing optical coatings for germanium optics used at terahertz frequencies has been developed. The various optical coatings used at terahertz frequencies are difficult to manufacture conventionally because these coatings must be as thick as several tens of micrometers, which is far thicker than those used in the optical region. One way to overcome this problem is to form a silicon oxide layer through plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition, with silane (SiH4) as a source gas. Using this method, I formed 21-μm-thick silicon oxide films as antireflection (AR) layers for germanium optics and obtained low reflection at 1.7 THz (wavelength, λ = 175 μm). This method is easily applied to large-aperture optics and micro-optics as well as to optics with a complex surface form. The AR coatings can also be formed for photoconductive detectors made from germanium doped with gallium at a low temperature (160 °C) this low temperature ensures that the doped impurities in the germanium do not diffuse. Fabrication of optical coatings upon substrates that have refractive indices of 3.84-11.7 may also be possible by control of the refractive indices of the deposited layers.

  5. Creating Voids by Annealing a-SiC:O:H Films Prepared by Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, S.; Lahlouh, B.; Rajagopalan, T.; Biswas, N.; Mehta, N.; Lubguban, J. A.

    2004-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from diethylsilane (C4H12Si) diluted in methane (CH4). The deposition conditions resulted in a highly unstable a-SiC:H film, which reacted with oxygen when exposed to air, forming Si-OH and H-OH bonds and Si-O networks as well. The Rutherford Back Scattering analysis shows 15incorporation. The Fourier transfom infra-red (FT-IR) measurement suggests the presence of a-SiC:O:H component and a-C:H moieties throughout the film. The films were then thermally annealed in vacuum at 450C to removed unstable C-H bonds and Si-OH and H-OH groups creating voids in the film. The removal of C-H, Si-OH and H-OH is evident from the FT-IR spectra. During the annealing process, the film also cross-links and formed a stable a-SiC:O:H film. After annealing, the dielectric constant of the films decreased from 4.2 to 2.1 suggesting the presence of voids/pores in the films.

  6. Structure and characteristics of C3N4 thin films prepared by rf plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawei, Wu; Dejun, Fu; Huaixi, Guo; Zhihong, Zhang; Xianquan, Meng; Xiangjun, Fan

    1997-08-01

    C3N4 films were prepared on Si(111) by rf plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using Si3N4/TiN and Si3N4/ZrN as transition layers. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron diffraction revealed that the films deposited have a polycrystalline structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of sp3 and sp2 hybridized C atoms tetrahedrally and hexagonally bonded with N atoms, respectively. The nitrogen concentration was calculated from the XPS spectra. Graphite-free C3N4 films were obtained under optimal conditions. The Vickers hardness of the C3N4 films falls in the range of 2950-5100 kgf/mm2. The C3N4 films exhibit high resistance against acid and electrochemical etching. Thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis showed that the films are thermally stable at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1200 °C.

  7. Enhanced field emission characteristics of boron doped diamond films grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koinkar, Pankaj M.; Patil, Sandip S.; Kim, Tae-Gyu; Yonekura, Daisuke; More, Mahendra A.; Joag, Dilip S.; Murakami, Ri-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Boron doped diamond films were synthesized on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) technique. The effect of B 2O 3 concentration varied from 1000 to 5000 ppm on the field emission characteristics was examined. The surface morphology and quality of films were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology obtained by SEM showed variation from facetted microcrystal covered with nanometric grains to cauliflower of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) particles with increasing B 2O 3 concentration. The Raman spectra confirm the formation of NCD films. The field emission properties of NCD films were observed to improve upon increasing boron concentration. The values of the onset field and threshold field are observed to be as low as 0.36 and 0.08 V/μm, respectively. The field emission current stability investigated at the preset value of ˜1 μA is observed to be good, in each case. The enhanced field emission properties are attributed to the better electrical conductivity coupled with the nanometric features of the diamond films.

  8. Reaction Gas Ratio Effect on the Growth of a Diamond Film Using Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Joung, Y H; Kang, F S; Lee, S; Kang, H; Choi, W S; Choi, Y K; Song, B S; Lee, J; Hong, B

    2016-05-01

    In this study, diamond films were prepared using the microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system, which included a DC bias system to enhance the nucleation of the films. The films were synthesized on Si wafers with different ratios of methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases. We have studied the effects of the CH4-to-H2 ratio on the structural and optical properties of diamond films. The thickness and surface profile of the films were characterized via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Raman was used to investigate the structural properties of the diamond films. The refractive indexes as functions of the CH4-to-H2 ratio were measured using an ellipsometer. The FE-SEM analysis showed that the 3 and 5 sccm CH4 created diamond films. The Raman analysis indicated that a nanocrystalline diamond film was formed at 3 sccm; a general diamond film, at 5 sccm; and films similar to the a-C:H film, at 7 sccm. The ellipsometer measurement showed that the refractive index of the synthesized diamond film was around 2.42 at 3 sccm. This value decreased as the CH4 volume increased. PMID:27483918

  9. Large-area SiC membrane produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at relatively high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu; Xie, Changqing

    2015-09-15

    Advances in the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) thin films with outstanding thermal and mechanical properties have received considerable attention. However, the fabrication of large-area free-standing SiC membrane still remains a challenge. Here, the authors report a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at a relatively high temperature to improve the free-standing SiC membrane area. A systematic study on the microstructural, mechanical, and optical properties of hydrogenated polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC{sub x}:H) thin films deposited at 600 °C with different annealing temperatures has been performed. In the as-deposited state, SiC{sub x}:H thin films show a polycrystalline structure. The crystallinity degree can be further improved with the increase of the postdeposition annealing temperature. The resulting process produced free-standing 2-μm-thick SiC membranes up to 70 mm in diameter with root mean square roughness of 3.384 nm and optical transparency of about 70% at 632.8 nm wavelength. The large-area SiC membranes made out of poly-SiC{sub x}:H thin films deposited at a relatively high temperature can be beneficial for a wide variety of applications, such as x-ray diffractive optical elements, optical and mechanical filtering, lithography mask, lightweight space telescopes, etc.

  10. Coating of diamond-like carbon nanofilm on alumina by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process.

    PubMed

    Rattanasatien, Chotiwan; Tonanon, Nattaporn; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan; Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) nanofilms with thickness varied from under one hundred to a few hundred nanometers have been successfully deposited on alumina substrates by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD) process. To obtain dense continuous DLC nanofilm coating over the entire sample surface, alumina substrates were pre-treated to enhance the nucleation density. Raman spectra of DLC films on samples showed distinct diamond peak at around 1332 cm(-1), and the broad band of amorphous carbon phase at around 1550 cm(-1). Full width at half maximum height (FWHM) values indicated good formation of diamond phase in all films. The result of nano-indentation test show that the hardness of alumina samples increase from 7.3 +/- 2.0 GPa in uncoated samples to 15.8 +/- 4.5-52.2 +/- 2.1 GPa in samples coated with DLC depending on the process conditions. It is observed that the hardness values are still in good range although the thickness of the films is less than a hundred nanometer. PMID:22524033

  11. A study of preferential growth of carbon nanotubes with semiconducting behavior grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Takashi; Ohnaka, Hirofumi; Okigawa, Yuki; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka

    2009-10-01

    The electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have been studied by measuring the I-V characteristics of many CNT-field effect transistors. The ratio of modulation current to total current was as high as 97%, with a small nondepletable OFF current component. This suggests that CNTs with semiconducting behavior were preferentially grown in the PECVD process. Raman scattering spectroscopy of the PECVD-grown CNTs, however, revealed several peaks of the radial breezing mode, which correspond to the presence of metallic CNTs. Scanning gate microscopy measurement of the CNT-FET with an ON/OFF ratio of 100 revealed the existence of a potential barrier in the metallic CNTs. These results suggest that observation of the preferential growth of CNTs with semiconducting behavior in the CNT-FETs fabricated via the present PECVD process results from the opening of the band gap due to defects caused by irradiation damage during the PECVD growth.

  12. Growth of non-polar ZnO thin films with different working pressures by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chung-Hua; Wei, Da-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Non-polar coexisting m-plane (10\\bar{1}0) and a-plane (11\\bar{2}0) zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been synthesized onto commercial silicon (100) substrates by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system at different working pressures. The effects of the working pressure on crystal orientation, microstructure, surface morphology, and optical properties of the ZnO thin films were investigated. From the X-ray diffraction patterns, the non-polar ZnO thin films were successfully synthesized at the working pressures of 6 and 9 Torr, respectively. The non-polar ZnO thin films showed stripes-like surface morphology and with smooth surface roughness (˜3.53 nm) was performed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. All the ZnO films show a remarkable near-band-edge (NBE) emission peak located at ultraviolet (UV) band accompanying a negligible deep-level (DL) emission at visible region detected by photoluminescence (PL) spectra at room temperature. From the above systematic measurement analysis, indicating the better crystallinity and optical character of ZnO thin film was improved with reducing the working pressure. The wettability of non-polar ZnO thin films was also explored in this presented article.

  13. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films by bias-enhanced nucleation and bias-enhanced growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Tzeng, Yonhua; Auciello, Orlando

    2014-01-14

    Effects of biasing voltage-current relationship on microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films on (100) silicon in hydrogen diluted methane by bias-enhanced nucleation and bias-enhanced growth processes are reported. Three biasing methods are applied to study their effects on nucleation, growth, and microstructures of deposited UNCD films. Method A employs 320 mA constant biasing current and a negative biasing voltage decreasing from −490 V to −375 V for silicon substrates pre-heated to 800 °C. Method B employs 400 mA constant biasing current and a decreasing negative biasing voltage from −375 V to −390 V for silicon pre-heated to 900 °C. Method C employs −350 V constant biasing voltage and an increasing biasing current up to 400 mA for silicon pre-heated to 800 °C. UNCD nanopillars, merged clusters, and dense films with smooth surface morphology are deposited by the biasing methods A, B, and C, respectively. Effects of ion energy and flux controlled by the biasing voltage and current, respectively, on nucleation, growth, microstructures, surface morphologies, and UNCD contents are confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission-electron-microscopy, and UV Raman scattering.

  14. Density change and viscous flow during structural relaxation of plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xin

    2004-10-01

    The structural relaxation of plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited (PECVD) silane-based silicon oxide films during thermal cycling and annealing has been studied using wafer curvature measurements. These measurements, which determine stress in the amorphous silicon oxide films, are sensitive to both plastic deformation and density changes. A quantitative case study of such changes has been done based upon the experimental results. A microstructure-based mechanism elucidates seams as a source of density change and voids as a source of plastic deformation, accompanied by a viscous flow. This theory was then used to explain a series of experimental results that are related to thermal cycling as well as annealing of PECVD silicon oxide films including stress hysteresis generation and reduction and coefficient of thermal-expansion changes. In particular, the thickness effect was examined; PECVD silicon oxide films with a thickness varying from 1to40μm were studied, as certain demanding applications in microelectromechanical systems require such thick films serving as heat/electrical insulation layers.

  15. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma-chemical-vapor deposition from silane and germane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Nobuhiro; Matsuda, Akihisa; Tanaka, Kazunobu

    1987-04-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and emission spectroscopy are employed for the diagnostics of radio-frequency discharge plasmas of silane and germane; CARS signal of germane molecule; and LIF signal and ultraviolet emission signal of germanium atom in discharges, as well as signals from nongermanium-related neutral species are measured. The effect of hydrogen dilution on emission signal intensities in the steady-state discharge explains dynamic behaviors of the emission and CARS signal intensities in the closed discharge; these spectroscopic techniques are powerful diagnostic tools for gas-phase processes using mixed gas sources.

  16. Glutamate biosensor based on carbon nanowalls grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatsu, Masakazu; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are composed of few-layer graphene standing almost vertically on the substrate. Due to the large surface area of vertical nanographene network, CNWs draw attention as platform for electrochemical sensing, biosensing and energy conversion applications. In this work, CNWs were grown on nickel substrate using inductively coupled plasma with methane/Ar mixture. After the CNW growth, the surface of CNWs was oxidized using Ar atmospheric pressure plasma to obtain super-hydrophilic surface. For the biosensing application, the surface of CNWs was decorated with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles by the reduction of hydrogen hexachloroplatinate (IV) solution. The resultant Pt particle size was estimated to be 3-4 nm. From the XPS analysis, pure Pt existed without being oxidized on the CNW surface. Electrochemical surface area of the Pt catalyst was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Pt-decorated CNWs will be used as an electrode for electrochemical glutamate biosensing. L-glutamate is one of the most important in the mammalian central nervous system, playing a vital role in many physiological processes. Nanoplatform based on vertical nanographene offers great promise for providing a new class of nanostructured electrodes for electrochemical sensing.

  17. Aerosol generation and charging phenomena in plasma- enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, Bruce Riley

    This thesis is concerned with advancing the theoretical study of the origin and acquisition of particle charge from aerosol generation. A newly designed integral mobility charge analyzer was constructed and calibrated to measure the electrical charge distribution on aerosol particles between 10 nanometer (nm) and 10 micrometer ( m m). The charge analyzer can be used in a wide variety of laboratory and industrial applications due to its broad operating range. Initially, the analyzer performance was tested by generating a variety of aerosol particles with and without neutralization by two different radioactive sources. As a result, experimental charge distributions can be compared with analytical and numerical models of spray and contact electrification related to the interface's double layer. The liquid surface can be simply modeled as a flat plate electrical capacitor with a stored dipole charge layer near the interface. Experimental research will investigate the charge state of a surface double layer using the interaction of dissolved particles. Ion interactions with a particle- liquid interface in the electrical double layer can be analyzed by measuring the aerosol charge distribution from different concentrations of salts, colloids and organic solutions. However, the main thesis research goal is to monitor charged contaminants in process exhaust using the developed integral mobility charge analyzer. Experimental measurements can then be correlated with the dynamic behavior of different nucleated species in the reactor. Hypothetically, particles formed in the plasma volume will have a different charge and size distribution than exhaust line particles originating from unreacted gas species in the pump line. A thorough understanding of the charge level of particles within the plasma volume is necessary to understand the charging, trapping and behavior of contaminant species in the CVD film processes. Charge neutralization by free ion attachment in the exhaust lines

  18. Characterization of low dielectric constant plasma polymer films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using decamethyl-cyclopentasiloxane and cyclohexane as the precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Lee, Sungwoo; Park, Hyoungsun; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2006-01-15

    We investigated the properties of plasma polymer films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of decamethyl-cyclopentasiloxane (C{sub 10}H{sub 30}O{sub 5}Si{sub 5}) and cyclohexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}) as the precursors, which we refer to as plasma polymerized decamethyl-cyclopentasiloxane: cyclohexane (PPDMCPSO:CHex) films. The relative dielectric constants, k, of the plasma polymer films were correlated with the Fourier transform infrared absorption peaks of the C-Hx, Si-CH{sub 3}, and Si-O related groups. As the amount of the CHx species in the as-deposited plasma polymer films increased, the k value and the leakage current density of the thin films decreased. The subsequent annealing of the PPDMCPSO:CHex film at 400 deg. C for 1 h further reduced the k value to as low as k=2.05. This annealed PPDMCPSO:CHex thin film showed a leakage current density of the order of 4x10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} at 1 MV/cm and a breakdown field of 6.5 MV/cm. Through the bias-temperature stress test, it was estimated that the PPDMCPSO:CHex film with a k value of 2.05 would retain its insulating properties for ten years at 167 deg. C under an electrical field of 1 MV/cm, when it is presented as a layer adjacent to Cu/TaN(10 nm)

  19. Cell proliferation on modified DLC thin films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Stoica, Adrian; Manakhov, Anton; Polčák, Josef; Ondračka, Pavel; Buršíková, Vilma; Zajíčková, Renata; Medalová, Jiřina; Zajíčková, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Recently, diamondlike carbon (DLC) thin films have gained interest for biological applications, such as hip and dental prostheses or heart valves and coronary stents, thanks to their high strength and stability. However, the biocompatibility of the DLC is still questionable due to its low wettability and possible mechanical failure (delamination). In this work, DLC:N:O and DLC: SiOx thin films were comparatively investigated with respect to cell proliferation. Thin DLC films with an addition of N, O, and Si were prepared by plasma enhanced CVD from mixtures of methane, hydrogen, and hexamethyldisiloxane. The films were optically characterized by infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry in UV-visible spectrum. The thickness and the optical properties were obtained from the ellipsometric measurements. Atomic composition of the films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy combined with elastic recoil detection analysis and by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanical properties of the films were studied by depth sensing indentation technique. The number of cells that proliferate on the surface of the prepared DLC films and on control culture dishes were compared and correlated with the properties of as-deposited and aged films. The authors found that the level of cell proliferation on the coated dishes was high, comparable to the untreated (control) samples. The prepared DLC films were stable and no decrease of the biocompatibility was observed for the samples aged at ambient conditions. PMID:25967153

  20. Long-term stable water vapor permeation barrier properties of SiN/SiCN/SiN nanolaminated multilayers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at extremely low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Bum Ho Lee, Jong Ho

    2014-08-04

    We investigated the water vapor permeation barrier properties of 30-nm-thick SiN/SiCN/SiN nanolaminated multilayer structures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 7 mTorr. The derived water vapor transmission rate was 1.12 × 10{sup −6} g/(m{sup 2} day) at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity, and this value was maintained up to 15 000 h of aging time. The X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the nanolaminated film was composed of an amorphous phase. A mixed phase was observed upon performing high resolution transmission electron microscope analysis, which indicated that a thermodynamically stable structure was formed. It was revealed amorphous SiN/SiCN/SiN multilayer structures that are free from intermixed interface defects effectively block water vapor permeation into active layer.

  1. Monitoring and Analyses of Initial Stages of Graphene Growth in Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yasuaki; Yamada, Junya; Kawano, Masahiro; Sano, Kazuya

    2015-09-01

    RF magnetron plasma was used for the growth of graphene. Copper films deposited by sputtering on mirror-polished silicon were used for substrates. Slant view-ports are welded to the side wall of vacuum chamber. In-situ ellipsometry is able to be carried out for the monitoring of substrate surface. The growth of graphene was started by the introduction of C2H4 gas in addition to hydrogen. Substrate temperature was controlled at 680°C at the first stage. An RF power up to 100 W was applied. C2H4 and H2 gases were introduced with the flow rate of 20 and 10 sccm, respectively. The pressure in the vacuum chamber was maintained at 200 Pa. The result of Raman analysis showed that the ratio of height of D (1350 cm-1) peak to G (1580 cm-1) peak, as well as that of 2D (2700 cm-1) peak to G peak, increased with time. Time evolution of height and width of graphene or graphite tips showed that, during the first 5 min, the width abruptly increases, while the increase speed of the height is lower than that after 5 min. The result implies that graphene sheets horizontally grow on the surface of substrate first before perpendicularly aligned CNWs grow. In order to analyze the first stage of the graphene growth, in-situ and precise measurement is required. For this purpose, in-situ ellipsometry should play an important role. Therefore we carried out a preliminary experiment of in-situ ellipsometry monitoring. Evolutions of ellipsometric parameters, Ψ and Δ, were precisely measured before the growth of graphene of 1 nm in thickness.

  2. Methane as an effective hydrogen source for single-layer graphene synthesis on Cu foil by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Seung; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Young Duck; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Joo, Kisu; Kim, Eunho; Jung, Jongwan; Yoon, Euijoon; Park, Yun Daniel; Seo, Sunae; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    A single-layer graphene is synthesized on Cu foil in the absence of H2 flow by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). In lieu of an explicit H2 flow, hydrogen species are produced during the methane decomposition process into their active species (CHx<4), assisted with the plasma. Notably, the early stage of growth depends strongly on the plasma power. The resulting grain size (the nucleation density) has a maximum (minimum) at 50 W and saturates when the plasma power is higher than 120 W because hydrogen partial pressures are effectively tuned by a simple control of the plasma power. Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements show that decomposed methane alone can provide a sufficient amount of hydrogen species for high-quality graphene synthesis by PECVD.A single-layer graphene is synthesized on Cu foil in the absence of H2 flow by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). In lieu of an explicit H2 flow, hydrogen species are produced during the methane decomposition process into their active species (CHx<4), assisted with the plasma. Notably, the early stage of growth depends strongly on the plasma power. The resulting grain size (the nucleation density) has a maximum (minimum) at 50 W and saturates when the plasma power is higher than 120 W because hydrogen partial pressures are effectively tuned by a simple control of the plasma power. Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements show that decomposed methane alone can provide a sufficient amount of hydrogen species for high-quality graphene synthesis by PECVD. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Schematic diagram of the ICP-CVD system, substrate heating by plasma, differential-pumping technique for mass spectra measurement, and transport properties of a single-domain graphene device. See DOI. 10.1039/c2nr33034b

  3. Application of diamond films to electric propulsion: Low energy sputter yield measurement and MPD plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandino, John Joseph

    One application of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films under evaluation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the coating of ion thruster electrodes subject to sputter erosion from xenon ions. Sputter yields were measured for polycrystalline diamond, single crystal diamond, a carbon-carbon composite, and molybdenum subject to xenon ion bombardment. The tests were performed using a 3 cm Kaufman ion source to produce incident ions with energy in the range of 150--750 eV and a profilometry-based technique to measure the amount of sputtered material. The yields increased monotonically with energy with values ranging from 0.16 atoms/ion at 150 eV to 0.80 at 750 eV for the molybdenum and 0.06 to 0.14 for the carbon-carbon. At 150 eV the yield for both diamond samples was 0.07 and at 7 50 eV, 0.19 and 0.17 for the CVD and single crystal diamond respectively. In terms of erosion rate, this translates into a factor of 7--12 lower erosion rate for diamond compared to molybdenum and at least a factor of 1.5 compared to carbon-carbon. In addition, an experimental investigation of an electromagnetic (magnetoplasmadynamic or MPD) plasma source for diamond CVD was undertaken using gas mixtures of methane, hydrogen and argon. Numerous trials were conducted using methane to hydrogen mixture ratios of 1.5--3.5 percent by volume, four different methane injector configurations, and substrate biasing at potentials of 25--75 V positive with respect to facility ground. These tests were performed at discharge currents of 700--950 A at approximately 18 V (12--17 kW). Crystalline films were produced with growth rates of 0.8 to 6.3 microns/hr. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy was used to identify at least one unambiguous diamond peak in each sample. The films all exhibited poor Raman spectra with no well defined peak at 1332 cm-1 and a broad background possibly due to high background levels of nitrogen, defects, and metal vapor contamination. Finally, the potential benefits of the MPD

  4. Growth and characterization of large, high quality single crystal diamond substrates via microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) substrates can be utilized in a wide range of applications. Important issues in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of such substrates include: shrinking of the SCD substrate area, stress and cracking, high defect density and hence low electronic quality and low optical quality due to high nitrogen impurities. The primary objective of this thesis is to begin to address these issues and to find possible solutions for enhancing the substrate dimensions and simultaneously improving the quality of the grown substrates. The deposition of SCD substrates is carried out in a microwave cavity plasma reactor via the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The operation of the reactor was first optimized to determine the safe and efficient operating regime. By adjusting the matching of the reactor cavity with the help of four internal tuning length variables, the system was further matched to operate at a maximum overall microwave coupling efficiency of ˜ 98%. Even with adjustments in the substrate holder position, the reactor remains well matched with a coupling efficiency of ˜ 95% indicating good experimental performance over a wide range of operating conditions. SCD substrates were synthesized at a high pressure of 240 Torr and with a high absorbed power density of 500 W/cm3. To counter the issue of shrinking substrate size during growth, the effect of different substrate holder designs was studied. An increase in the substrate dimensions (1.23 -- 2.5 times) after growth was achieved when the sides of the seeds were shielded from the intense microwave electromagnetic fields in a pocket holder design. Using such pocket holders, high growth rates of 16 -- 32 mum/hr were obtained for growth times of 8 -- 72 hours. The polycrystalline diamond rim deposition was minimized/eliminated from these growth runs, hence successfully enlarging the substrate size. Several synthesized CVD SCD substrates were laser cut and separated

  5. A comparative study of nitrogen plasma effect on field emission characteristics of single wall carbon nanotubes synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-12-01

    Vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with large scale control of diameter, length and alignment have successfully been grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The nickel (Ni) as catalyst deposited on silicon (Si) substrate was used to grow the SWCNTs. Field emission (FE) characteristics of the as grown SWCNTs were measured using indigenously designed setup in which a diode is configured in such a way that by applying negative voltage on the copper plate (cathode) with respect to stainless steel anode plate, current density can be recorded. To measure the FE characteristics, SWCNTs film pasted on the copper plate with silver epoxy was used as electron emitter source. The effective area of anode was ∼78.5 mm2 for field emission measurements. The emission measurements were carried out under high vacuum pressure of the order of 10-6 Torr to minimize the electron scattering and degradation of the emitters. The distance between anode and cathode was kept 500 μm (constant) during entire field emission studies. The grown SWCNTs are excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 25 mA/cm2 at turn-on field 1.3 V/μm. In order to enhance the field emission characteristics, the as grown SWCNTs have been treated under nitrogen (N2) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics have been measured. The N2 plasma treated SWCNTs show a good enhancement in the field emission properties with emission current density 81.5 mA/cm2 at turn on field 1.2 V/μm. The as-grown and N2 plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), Raman spectrometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  6. Copper-induced dielectric breakdown in silicon oxide deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using trimethoxysilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Ken-ichi; Ryuzaki, Daisuke; Mine, Toshiyuki; Hinode, Kenji; Yoneyama, Ryo

    2003-08-01

    The barrier mechanism against copper-ion diffusion in silicon-oxide films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using trimethoxysilane (TMS) and nitrous oxide (N2O) chemistry (PE-TMS oxide) was studied. It was found that the flow ratio of TMS gas to N2O gas during deposition strongly affects a time-dependent dielectric-breakdown lifetime of PE-TMS oxide with a copper electrode as well as other PE-TMS oxide film properties such as electrical properties (leakage current and dielectric constant), a physical property (atomic composition), and chemical properties (chemical bonding states and wet-etching rate). The dielectric-breakdown lifetime of PE-TMS oxide film with a copper anode is a maximum at a source-gas ratio ranging from 1.7% to 3.3%. On the other hand, leakage current density, wet-etch rate, and dielectric-breakdown lifetime of PE-TMS oxide film with an aluminum electrode are degraded by increasing the source-gas flow ratio (0.83% to 12%). These results suggest that two types of degradation mode exist in the dielectric breakdown of PE-TMS oxide with a copper electrode. Namely, at low flow ratio (<1.7%), copper-induced degradation is dominant, but at high flow ratio (>3.3%), the dielectric degradation is probably not caused by copper contamination but by low-quality dielectric material. The dielectric-breakdown lifetimes of a PE-TMS oxide film (flow ratio: 3.3%) with a copper anode show an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence. That is, the activation energy of the dielectric-breakdown lifetime depends on the applied electric field and decreases from 1.8 to 0.55 eV when the applied field is increased from 0 to 5 MV/cm. As a simple kinetic model of the copper injection reaction at the anode surface, a thermally activated reaction process between two energy states—copper atom state on the anode surface and copper ion state in the dielectric material—is proposed.

  7. Impact of the etching gas on vertically oriented single wall and few walled carbon nanotubes by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohier, A.; Minea, T. M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Granier, A.

    2007-03-01

    Vertically oriented single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and few walled nanotubes (FWNTs) have been grown by electronic cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on silica flat substrates. The impact of the plasma parameters on SWNT and FWNT growth has been investigated using two different etching gas mixtures, namely, C2H2/NH3 and C2H2/H2 with various ratios and applied bias voltages. Kinetic studies are also proposed in order to describe the FWNT growth mechanism by plasma techniques. A key role played by the reactive gas (NH3 and H2) is observed in the PECVD process, contrary to multiwalled nanotube growth. It is demonstrated that the balance between FWNT growth versus FWNT etching can be widely modulated by varying the gas mixture and bias voltage. It is shown that the use of hydrogen for hydrocarbon gas dilution restricts the destruction of SWNT and FWNT by the plasma species (ions and radicals).

  8. Preparation Of Sources For Plasma Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, William J.; Sliney, Hal; Kowalski, D.

    1993-01-01

    Multicomponent metal targets serving as sources of vapor for plasma vapor deposition made in modified pressureless-sintering process. By use of targets made in modified process, one coats components with materials previously plasma-sprayed or sintered but not plasma-vapor-deposited.

  9. Room temperature synthesis of porous SiO2 thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, A.; Cotrino, J.; Yubero, F.; Espinós, J. P.; González-Elipe, A. R.

    2004-07-01

    Silicon dioxide thin films with variable and controlled porosity have been prepared at room temperature by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in an electron cyclotron resonance microwave reactor with a downstream configuration. The procedure consists of the deposition of successive cycles consisting of a sacrificial organic-polymeric layer and, afterward, a silicon dioxide layer. Toluene and oxygen are used as precursors of the organic layers and Si(CH3)3Cl and oxygen for the SiO2. During deposition of the latter, the organic layer is simultaneously burned off. In these conditions, the release of gases produced by oxidation of the organic-polymeric layer take place while the oxide layer is being deposited. Thus, modification of the nucleation and growing mechanism of the silicon oxide thin film take place. The porosity of the final porous SiO2 thin films increases with the thickness of the sacrificial organic layer. The porous SiO2 films prepared with the aforementioned method are free of carbon and chlorine contamination as confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Depending on their porosity, the SiO2 thin films are either transparent or scattered visible light. The former have refractive index lower than that of thermal silicon dioxide and the latter show membranelike behavior in gas diffusion experiments. All the samples have good adhesion to the substrates used for the deposition, either polished Si wafer, glass plates, or standard porous supports. They have columnar microstructure, as determined by scanning electron microscopy. A preliminary ultraviolet-visible characterization of the optically transparent thin films reveals that transmission of light through glass increases by 7%-8% when the porous silica is deposited on this substrate. These films prove to be very efficient as antireflective coatings and are of interest for photovoltaic and similar applications

  10. Determination of Hg and Pb in fuels by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using flow injection chemical vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2009-12-01

    An isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Hg and Pb in fuels using flow injection vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A simple and inexpensive in-situ nebulizer/vapor generator was employed in this study. An emulsion containing 10% v/v fuel, 2% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.0% m/v tartaric acid was injected into VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Hg and Pb. Sodium borohydride was used for vapor generation. Since the sensitivities of Hg and Pb in emulsion and those in aqueous solution are quite different, isotope dilution and standard addition methods were used for the determination of Hg and Pb in selected fuel samples. The influences of vapor generation conditions and emulsion preparation on the ion signals are reported. This method has been applied for the determination of Hg and Pb in various fuel samples such as diesel, gasoline and engine oil obtained locally. The analytical results obtained by isotope dilution and standard addition methods were in good agreement with each other and also with those of digested samples analyzed by pneumatic nebulization ICP-MS. Under the optimum operating conditions, the detection limits obtained were 0.02 and 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Hg and Pb, respectively, in prepared emulsified solutions, corresponding to 0.2 and 0.3 ng mL(-1) of Hg and Pb, respectively, in the original fuel samples. PMID:20009337

  11. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  12. Effect of power on interface and electrical properties of SiO2 films produced by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landheer, D.; Xu, D.-X.; Tao, Y.; Sproule, G. I.

    1995-02-01

    The effect of power on the electrical and interface properties of silicon dioxide films produced by direct plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition, using nitrous oxide and silane with high helium dilution, has been investigated. Auger depth profiling measurements indicate that while the bulk of the films have no measurable impurities, the interface region contains about 1.6 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm of nitrogen. In contrast to thermal oxides, there is no thick interface layer with a large intrinsic compressive stress. The interface-state densities of the films obtained from capacitance-voltage measurements on metal-oxide-semiconductor diodes increase with increasing plasma power, but these can be removed to some extent by high-temperature annealing at temperatures in the range 800-950 C. The flatband voltage is relatively insensitive to plasma power. Thermal oxide samples have been subjected to the plasma processes and these also show evidence of plasma damage. A thin layer produced at the interface by a separate plasma oxynitridation process is shown to be incapable of protecting the Si/SiO2 interface from the plasma damage produced by subsequent high-power plasma deposition processes. The nature of the interface states is discussed.

  13. Novel chemical vapor deposition process of ZnO films using nonequilibrium N2 plasma generated near atmospheric pressure with small amount of O2 below 1%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Yukinori; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Ashida, Atsushi; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Norifumi

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process of ZnO films involving a nonequilibrium N2 plasma generated near atmospheric pressure with small O2 concentration (O2%) below 1%. In the optical emission (OE) spectra of the plasma, OE lines corresponding to the NO-γ system ( A 2 Σ + → X 2 Πγ + ) were observed, despite the only introduced gases being N2 and O2; these vanish at an O2% of more than 1%. ZnO films were grown on a glass substrate placed in the plasma at a growth temperature of as low as 200 °C and at an O2% of below 1% in the presence of the NO-γ system. This plasma yielded almost the same growth rate for ZnO films as O2 plasma including atomic O radicals that are often observed in low-pressure O2 plasma, suggesting that some highly reactive oxidant was sufficiently generated in such a small O2%. ZnO films synthesized using this plasma exhibited excellent ( 0001 ) preferred orientation without other diffractions such as 10 1 ¯ 1 diffraction, and with an optical bandgap of 3.30 eV. Based on the analyses of the plasma and the exhaust gases, the coexistence state of NO-γ and O3 should be essential and useful for the decomposition and oxidation of Zn source material in the proposed CVD process.

  14. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  15. Synthesis and characterization of silicon carbonitride films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS), as membrane for a small molecule gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafrouni, W.; Rouessac, V.; Julbe, A.; Durand, J.

    2010-12-01

    Silicon carbonitride thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS) as a function of X = (BDMADMS/(BDMADMS + NH 3)) between 0.1 and 1, and plasma power P (W) between 100 and 400 W. The microstructure of obtained materials has been studied by SEM, FTIR, EDS, ellipsometrie, and contact angle of water measurements. The structure of the materials is strongly depended on plasma parameters; we can pass from a material rich in carbon to a material rich in nitrogen. Single gas permeation tests have been carried out and we have obtained a helium permeance of about 10 -7 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 and ideal selectivity of helium over nitrogen of about 20.

  16. Control of carbon content in amorphous GeTe films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) for phase-change random access memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoukar, M.; Szkutnik, P. D.; Jourde, D.; Pelissier, B.; Michallon, P.; Noé, P.; Vallée, C.

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous and smooth GeTe thin films are deposited on 200 mm silicon substrates by plasma enhanced—metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) using the commercial organometallic precursors TDMAGe and DIPTe as Ge and Te precursors, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show a stoichiometric composition of the deposited GeTe films but with high carbon contamination. Using information collected by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) and XPS, the origin of carbon contamination is determined and the dissociation mechanisms of Ge and Te precursors in H2 + Ar plasma are proposed. As a result, carbon level is properly controlled by varying operating parameters such as plasma radio frequency power, pressure and H2 rate. Finally, GeTe films with carbon level as low as 5 at. % are obtained.

  17. Hydrogen-Free Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Dioxide Using Tetra-isocyanate-silane (Si(NCO) 4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Irman; Sugiura, Osamu

    1995-06-01

    Deposition of silicon dioxide by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique using tetra-isocyanate-silane (Si(NCO)4 : TICS) and oxygen for interlayer dielectric film application is proposed. Film properties strongly depend on the gas composition. The film which was deposited under an oxygen-rich condition was water-free after deposition. The film density, refractive index, resistivity, and dielectric constant were 2.3 g/cm3, 1.46, 5×1014 Ω·cm, and 3.6, respectively. The etch rate by buffered HF was 330 nm/min.

  18. Low-temperature in situ formation of Y-Ba-Cu-O high T sub c superconducting thin films by plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Noh, D.W.; Chern, C.; Li, Y.Q.; Norris, P.; Gallois, B.; Kear, B. )

    1990-06-04

    Highly textured, highly dense, superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} thin films with mirror-like surfaces have been prepared, {ital in} {ital situ}, at a reduced substrate temperature as low as 570 {degree}C by a remote microwave plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process (PE-MOCVD). Nitrous oxide was used as the oxidizer gas. The as-deposited films grown by PE-MOCVD show attainment of zero resistance at 72 K. PE-MOCVD was carried out in a commercial scale MOCVD reactor.

  19. Influence of density on N-H bond stretch vibration in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited SiN{sub x}:H

    SciTech Connect

    Dekkers, H. F. W.; Pourtois, G.; Srinivasan, Nagendra Babu

    2010-01-04

    The infrared absorption of hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}:H) films provides information about the average configuration of covalent bonds in the film. In plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited SiN{sub x}:H, the absorption spectrum of the N-H bonds shows both a systematic shift and a tailing toward lower frequency with the increase in the film density. First-principles computations of N-H vibrations show an increased degree of anharmonicity when the H site is weakly interacting with a second neighboring N atom. This interaction becomes more pronounced in films with higher density, which consequently shifts the vibrational spectrum down.

  20. Preparation of epitaxial AlN films by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition on Ir- and Pt-coated sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Vargas, Roberto; Goto, Takashi; Someno, Yoshihiro; Hirai, Toshio

    1994-03-01

    AlN epitaxial films have been fabricated on Ir- and Pt-coated α-Al2O3 substrates via electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (ECRPACVD) using an AlBr3-N2-H2-Ar gas system at substrate temperatures ranging from 500 to 700 °C. The epitaxial relationships between AlN films and substrates were determined by x-ray diffraction, x-ray pole figure, and reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The results are useful in practical applications, such as AlN/metal/α-Al2O3 structure in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices.

  1. Atmospheric pressure plasma-initiated chemical vapor deposition (AP-PiCVD) of poly(diethylallylphosphate) coating: a char-forming protective coating for cellulosic textile.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Florian; Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Levalois-Grützmacher, Joëlle; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An innovative atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method toward the deposition of polymeric layers has been developed. This latter involves the use of a nanopulsed plasma discharge to initiate the free-radical polymerization of an allyl monomer containing phosphorus (diethylallylphosphate, DEAP) at atmospheric pressure. The polymeric structure of the film is evidence by mass spectrometry. The method, highly suitable for the treatment of natural biopolymer substrate, has been carried out on cotton textile to perform the deposition of an efficient and conformal protective coating. PMID:25362895

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  3. Preparation of FePt Magnetic Nanoparticle Film by Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition for Ultrahigh Density Data Storage Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Isao

    2006-10-01

    We prepared an FePt nanoparticle film for magnetic storage media using 13.56 MHz glow-discharge plasma. Vapors of metal organics, namely biscyclopentadienyl iron (ferrocene) for Fe and (methylcyclopentadienyl)trimethyl platinum for Pt, were introduced into a capacitively coupled flow—through plasma chamber, which consisted of a shower head RF electrode and a grounded orifice plate electrode. Synthesized nanoparticles were directly collected onto a transmission electron microscope (TEM) grid or MgO substrate placed just below the grounded orifice electrode. TEM images showed two kinds of particles, one of which was nanometer sized and isolated and the other appeared as a coagulate of small particles. The diameter of the coagulated particle was larger than 10 nm. Nanometer size particles were separated and deposited on MgO substrate by adjusting the gas flow rate through the grounded orifice plate. The magnetization of the FePt nanoparticle film was evaluated by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy. As-synthesized nanoparticles did not exhibit a loop-shape magnetization curve. Annealing in atmospheric hydrogen was conducted to transform crystal from fcc structure to fct L10 ordered structure. The higher annealing temperature resulted in the more ordered L10 phase formation and the larger coercivity. A sample annealed at 750 °C exhibited a room temperature coercivity of 10 kOe. Also, it was confirmed that nanoparticle film density is critical to the magnetization.

  4. The chemical vapor synthesis of inorganic nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hong Yong; Ryu, Taegong; Choi, Jin Won; Hwang, Kyu Sup; Han, Gilsoo; Choi, Young Joon; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2007-12-01

    Chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is a process for making fine solid particles by the vapor-phase chemical reactions of precursors. At the University of Utah, this process has been applied to the synthesis of the aluminides of titanium and nickel, other metallic and intermetallic powders, and subsequently aluminum nanopowder and WC-Co nanocomposite powder. This work has demonstrated that it is possible to prepare fine particles of 5-200 nm size by CVS. Further, it has been shown that this technique has a unique capability to produce uniformly mixed powders of different solids. This is possible because the reactants are perfectly mixed in the gas phase. More recently, the CVS process has been carried out in a plasma reactor. This system has shown considerable promise for many applications as a method of producing nanosized powders.

  5. Development of speckle-free channel-cut crystal optics using plasma chemical vaporization machining for coherent x-ray applications.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Osaka, Taito; Sano, Yasuhisa; Inubushi, Yuichi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Tono, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a method of fabricating speckle-free channel-cut crystal optics with plasma chemical vaporization machining, an etching method using atmospheric-pressure plasma, for coherent X-ray applications. We investigated the etching characteristics to silicon crystals and achieved a small surface roughness of less than 1 nm rms at a removal depth of >10 μm, which satisfies the requirements for eliminating subsurface damage while suppressing diffuse scattering from rough surfaces. We applied this method for fabricating channel-cut Si(220) crystals for a hard X-ray split-and-delay optical system and confirmed that the crystals provided speckle-free reflection profiles under coherent X-ray illumination. PMID:27370437

  6. Development of speckle-free channel-cut crystal optics using plasma chemical vaporization machining for coherent x-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Takashi; Osaka, Taito; Sano, Yasuhisa; Inubushi, Yuichi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Tono, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a method of fabricating speckle-free channel-cut crystal optics with plasma chemical vaporization machining, an etching method using atmospheric-pressure plasma, for coherent X-ray applications. We investigated the etching characteristics to silicon crystals and achieved a small surface roughness of less than 1 nm rms at a removal depth of >10 μm, which satisfies the requirements for eliminating subsurface damage while suppressing diffuse scattering from rough surfaces. We applied this method for fabricating channel-cut Si(220) crystals for a hard X-ray split-and-delay optical system and confirmed that the crystals provided speckle-free reflection profiles under coherent X-ray illumination.

  7. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  8. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J; Apollo, Nicholas V; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm(3), were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:26805546

  9. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:26805546

  10. Effect of gas residence time on near-edge X-ray absorption fine structures of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lingyun; Sugiura, Hirotsugu; Kondo, Hiroki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Hori, Masaru

    2016-04-01

    In hydrogenated amorphous carbon films, deposited using a radical-injection plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, the chemical bonding structure was analyzed by near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. With a change in the residence times of source gases in a reactor, whereby total gas flow rates of H2/CH4 increased from 50 to 400 sccm, sp2-C fractions showed the minimum value at 150 sccm, while H concentration negligibly changed according to the results of secondary ion mass spectroscopy. On the other hand, widths of σ* C-C peaks increased with decreasing gas residence time, which indicates an increase in the fluctuation of bonding structures.

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Venu E-mail: venuanand83@gmail.com; Shivashankar, S. A.; Nair, Aswathi R.; Mohan Rao, G.

    2015-08-31

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  12. Vapor Phase Deposition Using Plasma Spray-PVD™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, K.; Gindrat, M.; Refke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma spray—physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology to deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. PS-PVD is a part of the family of new hybrid processes recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland) on the basis of the well-established low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology. Included in this new process family are plasma spray—chemical vapor deposition (PS-CVD) and plasma spray—thin film (PS-TF) processes. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying and LPPS, these new processes use a high energy plasma gun operated at a work pressure below 2 mbar. This leads to unconventional plasma jet characteristics which can be used to obtain specific and unique coatings. An important new feature of PS-PVD is the possibility to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats, but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional PVD technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and EB-PVD coatings. This paper reports on the progress made at Sulzer Metco to develop functional coatings build up from vapor phase of oxide ceramics and metals.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  14. Effect of Gas Sources on the Deposition of Nano-Crystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Jun; Xiong, Liwei; Wang, Jianhua; Man, Weidong; Chen, Guanhu

    2010-12-01

    Nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films were deposited on silicon substrates by a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor in C2H5OH/H2 and CH4/H2/O2 systems, respectively, with a constant ratio of carbon/hydrogen/oxygen. By means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), it was shown that the NCD films deposited in the C2H5OH/H2 system possesses more uniform surface than that deposited in the CH4/H2/O2 system. Results from micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed that the quality of the NCD films was different even though the plasmas in the two systems contain exactly the same proportion of elements. In order to explain this phenomenon, the bond energy of forming OH groups, energy distraction in plasma and the deposition process of NCD films were studied. The experimental results and discussion indicate that for a same ratio of carbon/hydrogen/oxygen, the C2H5OH/H2 plasma was beneficial to deposit high quality NCD films with smaller average grain size and lower surface roughness.

  15. Effect of ion bombardment on the synthesis of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Sanhua; You, Yumeng; Miao, Jianmin; Gong, Hao; Zhang, Jixuan; Wang, Shanzhong; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2008-06-25

    The synthesis of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was achieved at 500-600 °C, using ethylene as the carbon source and 1 nm Fe film as the catalyst. For growth of high-quality VA-SWNTs in a plasma sheath, it is crucial to alleviate the undesirable ion bombardment etching effects by the optimization of plasma input power and gas pressure. The resistibility of synthesized VA-SWNTs against ion bombardment etching was found to be closely related to the growth temperature. At relatively low temperature (500 °C), the VA-SWNTs were very susceptible to ion bombardments, which could induce structural defects, and even resulted in a structural transition to few-walled nanotubes. For capacitively coupled radio frequency (rf) PECVD operating at moderate gas pressure (0.3-10 Torr), the ion bombardment etching effect is mainly dependent on the ion flux, which is related to the plasma input power and gas pressure. PMID:21828659

  16. Impact of the etching gas on vertically oriented single wall and few walled carbon nanotubes by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gohier, A.; Minea, T. M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Granier, A.

    2007-03-01

    Vertically oriented single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and few walled nanotubes (FWNTs) have been grown by electronic cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on silica flat substrates. The impact of the plasma parameters on SWNT and FWNT growth has been investigated using two different etching gas mixtures, namely, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/NH{sub 3} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2} with various ratios and applied bias voltages. Kinetic studies are also proposed in order to describe the FWNT growth mechanism by plasma techniques. A key role played by the reactive gas (NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}) is observed in the PECVD process, contrary to multiwalled nanotube growth. It is demonstrated that the balance between FWNT growth versus FWNT etching can be widely modulated by varying the gas mixture and bias voltage. It is shown that the use of hydrogen for hydrocarbon gas dilution restricts the destruction of SWNT and FWNT by the plasma species (ions and radicals)

  17. Effect of ion bombardment on the synthesis of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Sanhua; You, Yumeng; Miao, Jianmin; Gong, Hao; Zhang, Jixuan; Wang, Shanzhong; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2008-06-01

    The synthesis of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was achieved at 500-600 °C, using ethylene as the carbon source and 1 nm Fe film as the catalyst. For growth of high-quality VA-SWNTs in a plasma sheath, it is crucial to alleviate the undesirable ion bombardment etching effects by the optimization of plasma input power and gas pressure. The resistibility of synthesized VA-SWNTs against ion bombardment etching was found to be closely related to the growth temperature. At relatively low temperature (500 °C), the VA-SWNTs were very susceptible to ion bombardments, which could induce structural defects, and even resulted in a structural transition to few-walled nanotubes. For capacitively coupled radio frequency (rf) PECVD operating at moderate gas pressure (0.3-10 Torr), the ion bombardment etching effect is mainly dependent on the ion flux, which is related to the plasma input power and gas pressure.

  18. Determination of Se in biological samples by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after digestion with aqua regia and on-line chemical vapor generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Éder José; Herrmann, Amanda Beatriz; de Caires, Suzete Kulik; Frescura, Vera Lúcia Azzolin; Curtius, Adilson José

    2009-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the determination of Se in biological samples, including food, by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using on-line chemical vapor generation (CVG-ICP OES) is proposed. The concentrations of HCl and NaBH 4, used in the chemical vapor generation were optimized by factorial analysis. Six certified materials (non-fat milk powder, lobster hepatopancreas, human hair, whole egg powder, oyster tissue, and lyophilised pig kidney) were treated with 10 mL of aqua regia in a microwave system under reflux for 15 min followed by additional 15 min in an ultrasonic bath. The solutions were transferred to a 100 mL volumetric flask and the final volume was made up with water. The Se was determined directly in these solutions by CVG-ICP OES, using the analytical line at 196.026 nm. Calibration against aqueous standards in 10% v/v aqua regia in the concentration range of 0.5-10.0 µg L - 1 Se(IV) was used for the analysis. The quantification limit, considering a 0.5 g sample weight in a final volume of 100 mL - 1 was 0.10 µg g - 1. The obtained concentration values were in agreement with the total certified concentrations, according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level.

  19. Studies of gas phase reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition of aluminum using dimethylethylamine alane as source percursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Andreas H.

    The work presented herein focuses on the use of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition (PPCVD) of aluminum (Al) using dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) as source precursor to provide an integrated, low temperature alternative to currently employed Al deposition methods in ultra large sale integration ULSI multilevel metal wiring schemes. In this respect, key findings are reported and discussed from critical scientific and technical aspects of an research and development effort, which was successfully executed to identify a viable Al CVD deposition process. In this respect, advanced atomic scale analytical techniques were successfully employed to characterize the PPCVD deposition process at the molecular level, and document the dependence of film's structural and compositional properties on key process parameters. This led to the development and optimization of a PPCVD Al process for ULSI applications. In addition, gas phase quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was employed to study the gas phase evolution during TCVD and PPCVD in order to gain a thorough understanding of the potential chemical and physical reactions that could occur in the gas phase and derive corresponding optimized reaction pathways for both CVD processes. Key reaction mechanisms involved in thermal and plasma promoted CVD as a function of processing parameters were investigated, including the role of hydrogen plasma in providing an efficient pathway to aluminum nucleation and growth. The resulting reaction mechanisms were then employed to identify the most likely precursor decomposition pathways and explore relevant implications for thermal and plasma promoted CVD Al. Furthermore, the nucleation and growth of Al in both TCVD and PPCVD were thoroughly characterized. Time evolution studies were carried out employing a variety of relevant liners and seed layers under selected surface chemical states. The surface morphology of the resulting films were analyzed by means of scanning probe microscopy

  20. The Performance Improvement of N2 Plasma Treatment on ZrO2 Gate Dielectric Thin-Film Transistors with Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition IGZO Channel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hung; Huang, Bo-Wen; Chang, Kow-Ming; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Lin, Jian-Hong; Hsu, Jui-Mei

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the N2 plasma treatment for high-κ ZrO2 gate dielectric stack (30 nm) with indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Experimental results reveal that a suitable incorporation of nitrogen atoms could enhance the device performance by eliminating the oxygen vacancies and provide an amorphous surface with better surface roughness. With N2 plasma treated ZrO2 gate, IGZO channel is fabricated by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) technique. The best performance of the AP-PECVD IGZO TFTs are obtained with 20 W-90 sec N2 plasma treatment with field-effect mobility (μ(FET)) of 22.5 cm2/V-s, subthreshold swing (SS) of 155 mV/dec, and on/off current ratio (I(on)/I(off)) of 1.49 x 10(7). PMID:27427669

  1. Superconducting YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x thin films on silver substrates by in situ plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Li, Y.Q.; Chern, C.S.; Norris, P.; Gallois, B.; Kear, B.; Wessels, B.W. )

    1991-01-07

    An {ital in} {ital situ} microwave plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process was used to fabricate highly {ital c}-axis oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} superconducting thin films on metallic Ag substrates. The films were deposited at a reduced substrate temperature of 740 {degree}C in about 270 Pa of N{sub 2}O ambient. Magnetic susceptibilities versus temperature of the as-deposited films show attainment of zero resistance of 85 K and composition of single (high {ital T}{sub {ital c}}) phase. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the films deposited at 740 {degree}C have highly preferential orientation of the crystallite {ital c} axes perpendicular to the substrate surface.

  2. Study on effects of substrate temperature on growth and structure of alignment carbon nanotubes in plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Chun; Wang, Tingzhi

    2006-11-01

    Alignment carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) were synthesized on silicon substrate coated with Ni catalyst film and Ta buffer layer by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition using CH 4, NH 3, and H 2 as the reaction gas, and they were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the diameter of the bamboo-structured ACNTs is increased from 62 to 177 nm when the substrate temperature was changed from 626 to 756 °C. Their growth rate is enhanced by the substrate temperature in a range of 626-683 °C and it is reversely reduced with the substrate temperature after the substrate temperature is over 683 °C. Beginning with wetting phenomenon, the effects of the substrate temperature on the structure and growth rate of the ACNTs are analyzed.

  3. Preparation of Aligned Ultra-long and Diameter-controlled Silicon Oxide Nanotubes by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Electrospun PVP Nanofiber Template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Jinyuan; Li, Ruishan; Xie, Erqing

    2010-02-01

    Well-aligned and suspended polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers with 8 mm in length were obtained by electrospinning. Using the aligned suspended PVP nanofibers array as template, aligned ultra-long silicon oxide (SiO x) nanotubes with very high aspect ratios have been prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The inner diameter (20-200 nm) and wall thickness (12-90 nm) of tubes were controlled, respectively, by baking the electrospun nanofibers and by coating time without sacrificing the orientation degree and the length of arrays. The micro-PL spectrum of SiO x nanotubes shows a strong blue-green emission with a peak at about 514 nm accompanied by two shoulders around 415 and 624 nm. The blue-green emission is caused by the defects in the nanotubes.

  4. Thin film transistors using preferentially grown semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Eun Hong; Kim, Jong Min; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-07-01

    Nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistors were fabricated and their reproducible transport properties were investigated. The networked single-walled carbon nanotubes were directly grown by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Optical analysis confirmed that the nanotubes were mostly semiconductors without clear metallic resonances in both the Raman and the UV-vis-IR spectroscopy. The transistors made by the nanotube networks whose density was much larger than the percolation threshold also showed no metallic paths. Estimation based on the conductance change of semiconducting nanotubes in the SWNT network due to applied gate voltage difference (conductance difference for on and off state) indicated a preferential growth of semiconducting nanotubes with an advantage of water-assisted PECVD. The nanotube transistors showed 10-5 of on/off ratio and ~8 cm2 V-1 s-1 of field effect mobility.

  5. Thin film transistors using preferentially grown semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Eun Hong; Kim, Jong Min; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-07-22

    Nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistors were fabricated and their reproducible transport properties were investigated. The networked single-walled carbon nanotubes were directly grown by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Optical analysis confirmed that the nanotubes were mostly semiconductors without clear metallic resonances in both the Raman and the UV-vis-IR spectroscopy. The transistors made by the nanotube networks whose density was much larger than the percolation threshold also showed no metallic paths. Estimation based on the conductance change of semiconducting nanotubes in the SWNT network due to applied gate voltage difference (conductance difference for on and off state) indicated a preferential growth of semiconducting nanotubes with an advantage of water-assisted PECVD. The nanotube transistors showed 10(-5) of on/off ratio and approximately 8 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) of field effect mobility. PMID:19567966

  6. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of wear resistant gradual a-Si1-x:Cx:H coatings on nickel-titanium for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niermann, Benedikt; Böke, Marc; Schauer, Janine-Christina; Winter, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been used to deposit thin films with gradual transitions from silicon to carbon on Cu, Ni, stainless steel, and NiTi. Thus show low stress, elasticity, and wear resistance with excellent adhesion on all metals under investigation. Already at low Si concentrations of 10 at. % the intrinsic stress is considerably reduced compared to pure diamondlike carbon (DLC) films. The deposition process is controlled by optical emission spectroscopy. This technique has been applied to monitor the growth precursors and to correlate them with the film composition. The compositions of the films were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and XPS measurements. Due to the elastic properties of the gradual transition and the excellent biocompatibility of DLC, the described film systems present a useful coating for biomedical applications.

  7. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nano-Structured Sn/C Composite Thin-Film Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Marcinek, M.; Hardwick, L.J.; Richardson, T.J.; Song, X.; Kostecki, R.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin-film composite Sn/C anodes for lithium batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon decorated with uniformly distributed Sn nanoparticles were synthesized from a solid organic precursor Sn(IV) tert-butoxide by a one step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The thin-film Sn/C electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half cells and produced a reversible capacity of 440 and 297 mAhg{sup -1} at C/25 and 5C discharge rates, respectively. A long term cycling of the Sn/C nanocomposite anodes showed 40% capacity loss after 500 cycles at 1C rate.

  8. Structural Characterization of Polycrystalline 3C-SiC Films Prepared at High Rates by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Monomethylsilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Ryota; Aketa, Masatoshi; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2006-10-01

    Polycrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films were deposited at a relatively low temperature of 1070 K on Si(001) substrates by atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition. Monomethylsilane (CH3SiH3) was used as the single source. CH4 and SiH4 dual sources were also used to compare deposition characteristics. Under the present deposition conditions, very high deposition rates of more than 3 nm/s were obtained. The structure of the SiC films was evaluated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. In addition, optical emission spectroscopy was employed to study the chemical reactions in the CH4/SiH4 and CH3SiH3 plasmas. The results showed that increasing H2 concentration is essential in forming a high quality 3C-SiC film by enhancing the hydrogen elimination reaction at the film-growing surface. From the optical emission spectra, it was found that atomic hydrogen generated by adding H2 in the plasma increase the amount of principal precursors for the film growth. The utilization of CH3SiH3 also led to a higher concentration of principal precursors in the plasma, enhancing the incorporation of Si-C bonds into the film. As a consequence of simultaneously using a high H2 concentration and the CH3SiH3 single source, the columnar growth of 3C-SiC crystallites was achieved.

  9. Validating optical emission spectroscopy as a diagnostic of microwave activated CH{sub 4}/Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas used for diamond chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jie; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-02-15

    Spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) has been used to investigate the gas phase chemistry and composition in a microwave activated CH{sub 4}/Ar/H{sub 2} plasma operating at moderate power densities ({approx}30 W cm{sup -3}) and pressures ({<=}175 Torr) during chemical vapor deposition of polycrystalline diamond. Several tracer species are monitored in order to gain information about the plasma. Relative concentrations of ground state H (n=1) atoms have been determined by actinometry, and the validity of this method have been demonstrated for the present experimental conditions. Electronically excited H (n=3 and 4) atoms, Ar (4p) atoms, and C{sub 2} and CH radicals have been studied also, by monitoring their emissions as functions of process parameters (Ar and CH{sub 4} flow rates, input power, and pressure) and of distance above the substrate. These various species exhibit distinctive behaviors, reflecting their different formation mechanisms. Relative trends identified by OES are found to be in very good agreement with those revealed by complementary absolute absorption measurements (using cavity ring down spectroscopy) and with the results of complementary two-dimensional modeling of the plasma chemistry prevailing within this reactor.

  10. Sensitive determination of bromine and iodine in aqueous and biological samples by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a chemical modifier.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Konishi, Chie; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Terufumi; Ito, Kazuaki

    2008-06-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of bromine and iodine by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry was investigated. In order to prevent the decrease in the ionization efficiencies of bromine and iodine atoms caused by the introduction of water mist, electrothermal vaporization was used for sample introduction into the ICP mass spectrometer. To prevent loss of analytes during the drying process, a small amount of tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution was placed as a chemical modifier into the tungsten boat furnace. After evaporation of the solvent, the analytes instantly vaporized and were then introduced into the ICP ion source to detect the (79)Br(+), (81)Br(+), and (127)I(+) ions. By using this system, detection limits of 0.77 pg and 0.086 pg were achieved for bromine and iodine, respectively. These values correspond to 8.1 pg mL(-1) and 0.91 pg mL(-1) of the aqueous bromide and iodide ion concentrations, respectively, for a sampling volume of 95 microL. The relative standard deviations for eight replicate measurements were 2.2% and 2.8% for 20 pg of bromine and 2 pg of iodine, respectively. Approximately 25 batches were vaporizable per hour. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of various certified reference materials and practical situations as biological and aqueous samples. There is further potential for the simultaneous determination of fluorine and chlorine. PMID:18496883

  11. Si nanowires grown by Al-catalyzed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition: synthesis conditions, electrical properties and application to lithium battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toan, Le Duc; Moyen, Eric; Zamfir, Mihai Robert; Joe, Jemee; Kim, Young Woo; Pribat, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanowires have been synhesized using Al as a catalyst. Silane (SiH4) diluted in H2 carrier gas was employed as Si precursor in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system operated at various temperatures (450 °C and 550 °C). Those growth temperatures, which are lower than the eutectic temperature in the Al-Si system (577 °C) suggests a vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism. Four point resistance measurements and back-gated current-voltage measurements indicated that silicon nanowires were heavily doped (p type), with a doping concentration of a few 1019 cm-3. We have measured hole mobility values of ˜16 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 450 °C and ˜30 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 550 °C. Transmission electron microscope analyses showed that the silicon nanowires were highly twinned even when they grow epitaxially on (111) Si substrates. We have also evaluated the use of those highly doped Si nanowires for lithium-ion battery anodes. We have observed a good cycling behavior during the first 65 charge-discharge cycles, followed by a slow capacity decay. After 150 cycles at a charge-discharge rate of 0.1 C, the electrode capacity was still 1400 mAh g-1. The ageing mechanism seems to be related to the delamination of the SiNWs from the stainless steel substrate on which they were grown.

  12. Single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of high-quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jiming; Gardiner, Robin A.; Kirlin, Peter S.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Steinbeck, John

    1992-01-01

    High quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films were grown in-situ on LaAlO3 (100) by a novel single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process. The metalorganic complexes M(thd) (sub n), (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate; M = Y, Ba, Cu) were dissolved in an organic solution and injected into a vaporizer immediately upstream of the reactor inlet. The single liquid source technique dramatically simplifies current CVD processing and can significantly improve the process reproducibility. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that single phase, highly c-axis oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) was formed in-situ at substrate temperature 680 C. The as-deposited films exhibited a mirror-like surface, had transition temperature T(sub cO) approximately equal to 89 K, Delta T(sub c) less than 1 K, and Jc (77 K) = 10(exp 6) A/sq cm.

  13. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2009-08-12

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals using flow injection chemical vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 6% m/v flour, 0.7% m/v thiourea, 0.4 microg mL(-1) Co(II), and 2.5% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the elements studied in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, a standard addition method and an isotope dilution method were used for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in selected cereal samples. The influences of vapor generation conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals were reported. The effectiveness of the vapor generation sample introduction technique in alleviating various spectral interferences in ICP-MS analysis has been demonstrated. This method has been applied for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour reference material, NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour reference material, and cereal samples obtained from local market. The As, Cd, and Hg analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 0.10, 0.16, and 0.07 ng g(-1) for As, Cd, and Hg, respectively, in the original cereal samples. PMID:19606866

  14. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) yields better Hydrolytical Stability of Biocompatible SiOx Thin Films on Implant Alumina Ceramics compared to Rapid Thermal Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD).

    PubMed

    Böke, Frederik; Giner, Ignacio; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Fischer, Horst

    2016-07-20

    Densely sintered aluminum oxide (α-Al2O3) is chemically and biologically inert. To improve the interaction with biomolecules and cells, its surface has to be modified prior to use in biomedical applications. In this study, we compared two deposition techniques for adhesion promoting SiOx films to facilitate the coupling of stable organosilane monolayers on monolithic α-alumina; physical vapor deposition (PVD) by thermal evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). We also investigated the influence of etching on the formation of silanol surface groups using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid solutions. The film characteristics, that is, surface morphology and surface chemistry, as well as the film stability and its adhesion properties under accelerated aging conditions were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and tensile strength tests. Differences in surface functionalization were investigated via two model organosilanes as well as the cell-cytotoxicity and viability on murine fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). We found that both SiOx interfaces did not affect the cell viability of both cell types. No significant differences between both films with regard to their interfacial tensile strength were detected, although failure mode analyses revealed a higher interfacial stability of the PE-CVD films compared to the PVD films. Twenty-eight day exposure to simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C revealed a partial delamination of the thermally deposited PVD films whereas the PE-CVD films stayed largely intact. SiOx layers deposited by both PVD and PE-CVD may thus serve as viable adhesion-promoters for subsequent organosilane coupling agent binding to α-alumina. However, PE-CVD appears to be favorable for long-term direct film exposure to aqueous

  15. A simple method to deposit palladium doped SnO{sub 2} thin films using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Soon; Wahab, Rizwan; Shin, Hyung-Shik; Ansari, S. G.; Ansari, Z. A.

    2010-11-15

    This work presents a simple method to deposit palladium doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin films using modified plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition as a function of deposition temperature at a radio frequency plasma power of 150 W. Stannic chloride (SnCl{sub 4}) was used as precursor and oxygen (O{sub 2}, 100 SCCM) (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) as reactant gas. Palladium hexafluroacetyleacetonate (Pd(C{sub 5}HF{sub 6}O{sub 2}){sub 2}) was used as a precursor for palladium. Fine granular morphology was observed with tetragonal rutile structure. A peak related to Pd{sub 2}Sn is observed, whose intensity increases slightly with deposition temperature. Electrical resistivity value decreased from 8.6 to 0.9 m{Omega} cm as a function of deposition temperature from 400 to 600 deg. C. Photoelectron peaks related to Sn 3d, Sn 3p3, Sn 4d, O 1s, and C 1s were detected with varying intensities as a function of deposition temperature.

  16. Synthesis of Diamond-Like Carbon Films on Planar and Non-Planar Geometries by the Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noborisaka, Mayui; Hirako, Tomoaki; Shirakura, Akira; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Masashi; Seki, Masaki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by the dielectric barrier discharge-based plasma deposition at atmospheric pressure and their hardness and gas barrier properties were measured. A decrease in size of grains and heating substrate temperature improved nano-hardness up to 3.3 GPa. The gas barrier properties of DLC-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) sheets were obtained by 3-5 times of non-coated PET with approximately 0.5 µm in film thickness. The high-gas-barrier DLC films deposited on PET sheets are expected to wrap elevated bridge of the super express and prevent them from neutralization of concrete. We also deposited DLC films inside PET bottles by the microwave surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method at near-atmospheric pressure. Under atmospheric pressure, the films were coated uniformly inside the PET bottles, but did not show high gas barrier properties. In this paper, we summarize recent progress of DLC films synthesized at atmospheric pressure with the aimed of food packaging and concrete pillar.

  17. Exploring High Refractive Index Silicon-Rich Nitride Films by Low-Temperature Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition and Applications for Integrated Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ng, Doris K T; Wang, Qian; Wang, Ting; Ng, Siu-Kit; Toh, Yeow-Teck; Lim, Kim-Peng; Yang, Yi; Tan, Dawn T H

    2015-10-01

    Silicon-rich nitride films are developed and explored using an inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition system at low temperature of 250 °C with an ammonia-free gas chemistry. The refractive index of the developed silicon-rich nitride films can increase from 2.2 to 3.08 at 1550 nm wavelength while retaining a near-zero extinction coefficient when the amount of silane increases. Energy dispersive spectrum analysis gives the silicon to nitrogen ratio in the films. Atomic force microscopy shows a very smooth surface, with a surface roughness root-mean-square of 0.27 nm over a 3 μm × 3 μm area of the 300 nm thick film with a refractive index of 3.08. As an application example, the 300 nm thick silicon-rich nitride film is then patterned by electron beam lithography and etched using inductively coupled plasma system to form thin-film micro/nano waveguides, and the waveguide loss is characterized. PMID:26375453

  18. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  19. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films deposited by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition enhanced by electrostatic confinement: structure, properties, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufrène, S. M. M.; Cemin, F.; Soares, M. R. F.; Aguzzoli, C.; Maia da Costa, M. E. H.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Figueroa, C. A.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) is a state-of-the-art material with established properties such as high mechanical resistance, low friction, and chemical inertness. In this work, a-C:H thin films were deposited by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The deposition process was enhanced by electrostatic confinement that leads to decrease the working pressure achieving relative high deposition rates. The a-C:H thin films were characterized by elastic recoil detection analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation measurements. The hydrogen content and hardness of a-C:H thin films vary from 30 to 45 at% and from 5 to 15 GPa, respectively. The hardness of a-C:H thin films shows a maximum as a function of the working pressure and is linearly increased with the shifting of the G-peak position and I D/I G ratio. The structure of a-C:H thin films suffers a clustering process at low working pressures. A physical model is proposed to estimate the mean ion energy of carbonaceous species arriving at the surface of a-C:H thin films as a function of processing parameters as pressure and voltage and by considering fundamentals scattering events between ion species and neutral molecules and atoms.

  20. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry growth studies on the Al-doped ZnO films deposited by remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Volintiru, I.; Creatore, M.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2008-02-01

    In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was applied to study the pyramidlike and pillarlike growth of Al doped ZnO (AZO) films deposited by means of remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition for transparent conductive oxide applications. Real time SE studies in the visible region allowed discerning between the two growth modes by addressing the time evolution of the bulk and surface roughness layer thickness. While the pillarlike mode is characterized by a constant growth rate, a slower rate in the initial stage (up to 150-200 nm film thickness), compared to the bulk, is observed for the growth of pyramidlike AZO films. The two modes differ also in terms of surface roughness development: a saturation behavior is observed for film thickness above 150-200 nm in the case of the pyramidlike films, while a slow linear increase with film thickness characterizes the pillarlike mode. By extending the SE analysis of the AZO films to the near infrared region, valuable information about the in grain properties could be extracted: excellent in grain mobility values, i.e., larger than 100 and 50 cm{sup 2}/V s, are determined for the pyramidlike and pillarlike AZO layers, respectively. The comparison between the outcome of the in situ real time SE studies and the ex situ electrical and chemical characterization highlights the limitations in the electron transport occurring in both types of films and allows one to address routes toward further improvement in AZO conductivity.

  1. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  2. Microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for the fabrication of ceramic matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration. This period has been devoted in part to the exploration of material systems suitable for MACVI processing. A number of potential processing schemes are possible using combinations of absorbing and transparent material as composite components. This includes the use of an absorbing preform (nicalon fiber) combined with a transparent matrix (silicon nitride). Composites 5 cm in diameter by 1 cm. thick have been fabricated to densities of 65% theoretical. Processing times for these materials are under 20 hours. Higher densities will require additional microwave power now possible with the new reactor. The most effective MACVI scheme will involve the use of a transparent fiber with an absorbing matrix. The hot spot will be initiated by appropriate treatment of the central region of the preform. To this end alumna fibers with pretreatments to control thermal gradients has been explored. Nextel 610 fibers have been effectively pretreated carbon coating resulting in preferential heating in the interior of the preform. Possible matrix materials include siliconized silicon carbide, doped silicon carbide, alumna and zirconia. A patent for MACVI has been issued 10/19/93.

  3. Evolution of the electrical and structural properties during the growth of Al doped ZnO films by remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Volintiru, I.; Creatore, M.; Kniknie, B. J.; Spee, C. I. M. A.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2007-08-15

    Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were deposited by means of remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from oxygen/diethylzinc/trimethylaluminum mixtures. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and morphology), and chemical properties of the deposited films were investigated using Hall, four point probe, x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron recoil detection (ERD), Rutherford backscattering (RBS), and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), respectively. We found that the working pressure plays an important role in controlling the sheet resistance R{sub s} and roughness development during film growth. At 1.5 mbar the AZO films are highly conductive (R{sub s}<6 {omega}/{open_square} for a film thickness above 1200 nm) and very rough (>4% of the film thickness), however, they are characterized by a large sheet resistance gradient with increasing film thickness. By decreasing the pressure from 1.5 to 0.38 mbar, the gradient is significantly reduced and the films become smoother, but the sheet resistance increases (R{sub s}{approx_equal}100 {omega}/{open_square} for a film thickness of 1000 nm). The sheet resistance gradient and the surface roughness development correlate with the grain size evolution, as determined from the AFM and SEM analyses, indicating the transition from pyramid-like at 1.5 mbar to pillar-like growth mode at 0.38 mbar. The change in plasma chemistry/growth precursors caused by the variation in pressure leads to different concentration and activation efficiency of Al dopant in the zinc oxide films. On the basis of the experimental evidence, a valid route for further improving the conductivity of the AZO film is found, i.e., increasing the grain size at the initial stage of film growth.

  4. Improvement of the thickness distribution of a quartz crystal wafer by numerically controlled plasma chemical vaporization machining

    SciTech Connect

    Shibahara, Masafumi; Yamamura, Kazuya; Sano, Yasuhisa; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Mori, Yuzo

    2005-09-15

    To improve the thickness uniformity of thin quartz crystal wafer, a new machining process that utilizes an atmospheric pressure plasma was developed. In an atmospheric pressure plasma process, since the kinetic energy of ions that impinge to the wafer surface is small and the density of the reactive species is large, high-efficiency machining without damage is realized, and the thickness distribution is corrected by numerically controlled scanning of the quartz wafer to the localized high-density plasma. By using our developed machining process, the thickness distribution of an AT cut wafer was improved from 174 nm [peak to valley (p-v)] to 67 nm (p-v) within 94 s. Since there are no unwanted spurious modes in the machined quartz wafer, it was proved that the developed machining method has a high machining efficiency without any damage.

  5. Deposition of Amorphous Silicon and Silicon-Based Dielectrics by Remote Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: Application to the Fabrication of Tft's and Mosfet's.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Soo

    1990-01-01

    This thesis discusses the deposition of device quality silicon dioxide (SiO_2), silicon nitride (Si_3N_4 ), and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) by the remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (Remote PECVD) technique at low substrate temperature (100 ^circC < T _{rm s} < 450^ circC). An ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) compatible, multi-chamber integrated processing system has been built and used for this study. This system provides: (1) in -situ substrate processing; (2) surface analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and reflected high energy electron diffraction (RHEED); and (3) thin film deposition by Remote PECVD. Six issues are addressed: (1) in-situ semiconductor surface cleaning for Si, Ge, GaAs, and CdTe; (2) substrate surface characterization by using RHEED and AES; (3) process gas-substrate interactions (subcutaneous oxidation) occurring during the thin film deposition; (4) the thin film deposition process for silicon-based dielectrics and for doped and intrinsic amorphous silicon; (5) physical properties of the thin films deposited by Remote PECVD using in-situ AES, and ex-situ infrared (ir) spectroscopy and ellipsometry; and (6) electrical performance of thin films in device structures including metal-oxide/or insulator-semiconductor (MOS or MIS) capacitors formed on silicon, and hydrogenated -amorphous silicon thin film transistors (a-Si:H TFT's). Atomically clean semiconductor surfaces are obtained by a remote hydrogen plasma treatment prior to thin film deposition. In the remote PECVD process the process gases are selectively excited, the silane reactant, the source of silicon atoms in the films is never directly plasma excited, and the substrate is also remote from the plasma discharge region. These differences between the remote PECVD process and the conventional direct PECVD process, result in improved control of the insulator stoichiometry, and a reduction in level of chemical impurities such as hydrogen. We find that the

  6. Low temperature synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes in an inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition system.

    PubMed

    Weng, Cheng-Hui; Yang, Chao-Shun; Lin, Hsuan; Tsai, Chuen-Horng; Leou, Keh-Chyang

    2008-05-01

    In this work, we present a parametric study on the low temperature synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) CVD system using dry bi-layered catalytic thin-films (Fe/Al and Ni/Al, deposited by electron-beam evaporation method) as the catalysts. With a low substrate temperature of 550 degrees C and above, SWNTs were successfully synthesized on both catalysts, as revealed from the characteristic peaks of SWNTs in the micro-Raman spectra. By the reduction of plasma power and the shortening of the process times, the lowest synthesis temperature of SWNTs achieved in our system was approached to 500 degrees C on Ni/Al catalysts; on the other hands, the lowest temperature for Fe/Al catalysts was 550 degrees C. Our results suggest that as compared with Fe/Al, Ni/Al is more favorable for plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD) synthesis of SWNTs at low temperatures. This work can be used for further improvements and better understanding on the production processes of SWNTs by PECVD methods. PMID:18572678

  7. Numerical analysis of a mixture of Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhi; Zhao Zhen; Li Xuehui

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge at low pressure. The electromagnetic field model solved by the three-dimensional Simpson method is coupled to a fluid plasma model. The finite difference method was employed to discrete the governing equations. 40 species (neutrals, radicals, ions, and electrons) are consisted in the model. In total, 75 electron-neutral, 43 electron-ion, 167 neutral-neutral, 129 ion-neutral, 28 ion-ion, and 90 3-body reactions are used in the model. According to the simulation, the distribution of the densities of the considered plasma species has been showed and the mechanisms of their variations have been discussed. It is found that the main neutrals (Ar*, Ar**, NH{sub 3}{sup *}, NH, H{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, H, and N{sub 2}) are present at high densities in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge when the mixing ratio of Ar/NH{sub 3} is 1:1 at 20 Pa. The density of NH is more than that of NH{sub 2} atom. And NH{sub 3}{sup +} are the most important ammonia ions. But the uniformity of the space distribution of NH{sub 3}{sup +} is lower than the other ammonia ions.

  8. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  9. Simultaneous synthesis of nanodiamonds and graphene via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PE-CVD) on copper.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Steven; Wöhrl, Nicolas; Schulz, Stephan; Buck, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous growth of both nanodiamonds and graphene on copper samples is described for the first time. A PE-CVD process is used to synthesize graphene layers and nanodiamond clusters from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture as it is typically done successfully in thermal CVD processes for graphene synthesis. However, the standard thermal CVD process is not without problems since the deposition of graphene is affected by the evaporation of a notable amount of copper caused by the slow temperature increase typical for thermal CVD resulting in a long process time. In sharp contrast, the synthesis of graphene by PE-CVD can circumvent this problem by substantially shortening the process time at holding out the prospect of a lower substrate temperature. The reduced thermal load and the possibility to industrially scale-up the PE-CVD process makes it a very attractive alternative to the thermal CVD process with respect to the graphene production in the future. Nanodiamonds are synthesized in PE-CVD reactors for a long time because these processes offer a high degree of control over the film's nanostructure and simultaneously providing a significant high deposition rate. To model the co-deposition process, the three relevant macroscopic parameters (pressure, gas mixture and microwave power) are correlated with three relevant process properties (plasma ball size, substrate temperature and C2/Hα-ratio) and the influence on the quality of the deposited carbon allotropes is investigated. For the evaluation of the graphene as well as the nanodiamond quality, Raman spectroscopy used whereas the plasma properties are measured by optical methods. It is found that the diamond nucleation can be influenced by the C2/Hα-ratio in the plasma, while the graphene quality remains mostly unchanged by this parameter. Moreover it is derived from the experimental data that the direct plasma contact with the copper surface is beneficial for the nucleation of the diamond while the growth and

  10. Low-dielectric-constant fluorinated diamond-like carbon thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jeong Woo

    Fluorinated amorphous carbon (a-C:F) thin films are developed for a low dielectric constant interlayer dielectric material from hexafluorobenze (C 6F6) or 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (FCH2CF 4) as the source gas and argon as the diluent gas in an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf (radio frequency) plasma reactor and an inductively coupled plasma reactor. Effects of input rf power, fluorination, applied bias voltage and post annealing on the properties of a-C:F films are investigated. For depositing a-C:F films from highly diluted C6F6 (3%) and argon (97%) in the capacitively rf plasma reactor at 150 mTorr, the dielectric constant of the film increases from 2.0 to 2.8 as the rf power is increased from 10 W to 70 W, while the optical energy gap decreases from 2.6 eV to 1.9 eV and the transparency in a ultra-violet range is degraded. At input power of 100 W, the deposited film exhibits high residual stress of 40 MPa and easily peeled off by a Scotch tape test. This is due to high self-bias voltage (-230 V) developed at the substrate holder during deposition. When depositing amorphous carbon films from tetrafluoroethane (TFE) and methane in the capacitively coupled plasma reactor, the incorporation of fluorine in the film is increased with increasing TFE fraction in the feed gas mixture. The dielectric constant of the a-C:F film deposited from pure TFE is as low as 2.3, but the film exhibits poor thermal stability while a-C:H (diamond-like carbon) film deposited from pure methane has a dielectric constant of 3.8 and shows good thermal stability up to 400°C. As the TFE content in the feed is increased, the dielectric constant and the refractive index decrease while the transparency of the film is enhanced significantly. When depositing a-C:F films from C6F6 (4 sccm) and Ar (5 sccm) in the inductively coupled rf plasma reactor, the bias voltage (from a separate 100 KHz source) applied to the substrate holder affects the film properties significantly. As the negative bias

  11. Compositional effects on plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Chern, C.S.; Li, Y.Q.; Norris, P.; Gallois, B.; Kear, B.; Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E. )

    1991-06-17

    Epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} superconducting thin films with a zero resistance transition temperatures of about 90 K have been prepared, {ital in} {ital situ}, on LaAlO{sub 3} by a plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process at a substrate temperature of 670 {degree}C in 1 Torr partial pressure of N{sub 2}O. The composition of the films was varied systematically to investigate the effect of changes in the Ba/Y and Cu/Y ratio on the film properties. The results indicated that superconducting current densities exceeding 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}, measured at 77 K by a transport method, could be obtained on films with an anomalously wide range of film compositions. Excess Cu (up to 60%) and deficiency in Ba (down to 30%) from their stoichiometric values did not significantly degrade the superconducting properties of the films. As the composition approached the Y-Ba-Cu ratio of 1-2-3, an improvement in surface morphology and a decrease in superconducting transition temperature were found.

  12. High-quality YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x thin films by plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Li, Y.Q.; Chern, C.S.; Lu, P.; Norris, P.; Gallois, B.; Kear, B.; Cosandey, F.; Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Garrison, S.M. )

    1991-09-02

    Single-crystalline epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{ital x}} thin films with a sharp superconducting transition temperature of 90 K and a critical current density of 3.3{times}10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K were prepared by a plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) process. The films were formed {ital in} {ital situ} on (100) LaAlO{sub 3} substrates at a temperature of 670 {degree}C in 2 Torr partial pressure of N{sub 2}O. X-ray analysis indicated that films grew epitaxially with the {ital c}-axis perpendicular to the substrate and the {ital a} and {ital b} axes uniformly aligned along the LaAlO{sub 3} (100) directions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy along with electron diffraction revealed that the films grew epitaxially with atomically abrupt film-substrate interfaces. The high degree of epitaxial crystallinity of the films was also confirmed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy which gave a minimum channeling yield of 9%.

  13. Electrical characterization of rapid thermal nitrided and reoxidized plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited silicon dioxide metal-oxide-silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, S. S.; Shi, Y. J.; Brown, W. D.

    1994-12-01

    The electrical characteristics of rapid thermal nitrided and reoxidized plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited (PECVD) silicon dioxide metal-oxide-silison (MOS) structures were investigated. Both nitridation temperature and time affect the properties of the MOS structures as revealed by capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics. Nitridation at 1000 C for 60 s followed by reoxidtion for 60 s at 1000 C in an oxygen/ nitrogen ambient was found to be superior to the same nitridation followed by reoxidation in pure oxygen. Typical vlaues of fixed charge and interface state densities for devices subjected to nitridation and reoxidation in a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen were 4 x 10(exp 10) cm(exp -2) and 7 x 10(exp 10) eV(exp -1) cm(exp -2), respectively. Avalanche electron injection using electric field of 3-5 MV/cm produced negative shifts in flatband voltage for low fluence levels and positive flatband voltage shifts for larger fluence levels. Furthermore, the magnitudes of both positive and negative shifts and the electron fluence level at which turnaround occurs increase with electric field. However, independent of the electric field, the flatband voltage saturates very close to its preinjection vlaue. These results strongly suggest that device quality MOS dielectrics can be realized by nitridation/reoxidation of PECVD oxide.

  14. Characterization of Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 thin films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on Ir-based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Chul; Lee, Won-Jong

    2002-11-01

    Structural and electrical characteristics of Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) ferroelectric thin films deposited on various Ir-based electrodes (Ir, IrO2, and Pt/IrO2) using electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated. On the Ir electrode, stoichiometric PZT films with pure perovskite phase could be obtained over a very wide range of processing conditions. However, PZT films prepared on the IrO2 electrode contain a large amount of PbOx phases and exhibited high Pb-excess composition. The deposition characteristics were dependent on the behavior of PbO molecules on the electrode surface. The PZT thin film capacitors prepared on the Ir bottom electrode showed different electrical properties depending on top electrode materials. The PZT capacitors with Ir, IrO2, and Pt top electrodes showed good leakage current characteristics, whereas those with the Ru top electrode showed a very high leakage current density. The PZT capacitor exhibited the best fatigue endurance with an IrO2 top electrode. An Ir top electrode provided better fatigue endurance than a Pt top electrode. The PZT capacitor with an Ir-based electrode is thought to be attractive for the application to ferroelectric random access memory devices because of its wide processing window for a high-quality ferroelectric film and good polarization, fatigue, and leakage current characteristics.

  15. Structure, mechanical, and frictional properties of hydrogenated fullerene-like amorphous carbon film prepared by direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Junyan

    2016-07-01

    In this study, fullerene like carbon (FL-C) is introduced in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film by employing a direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The film has a low friction and wear, such as 0.011 and 2.3 × 10-9mm3/N m in the N2, and 0.014 and 8.4 × 10-8mm3/N m in the humid air, and high hardness and elasticity (25.8 GPa and 83.1%), to make further engineering applications in practice. It has several nanometers ordered domains consisting of less frequently cross-linked graphitic sheet stacks. We provide new evidences for understanding the reported Raman fit model involving four vibrational frequencies from five, six, and seven C-atom rings of FL-C structures, and discuss the structure evolution before or after friction according to the change in the 1200 cm-1 Raman band intensity caused by five- and seven-carbon rings. Friction inevitably facilitates the transformation of carbon into FL-C nanostructures, namely, the ultra low friction comes from both such structures within the carbon film and the sliding induced at friction interface.

  16. Electrical and Optical Properties of Si-Incorporated a-C:H Films via the Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jun; Choi, Won Seok; Hong, Byungyou

    2016-05-01

    The optical and electrical properties of silicon-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:Si) films deposited via the radio frequency (RF) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method using a mixture of CH4, H2, and SiH4 were observed. The silane gas whose ranged from 0 to 25 vol.% [SiH4/(SiH4 + CH4) was fed into the reactor while the other deposition parameters were kept constant. The basic properties of these films were investigated via Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible spectrometry, I-V measurement, and surface profiling. The experiment results showed that the film thickness increased from 300 nm to 800 nm for the same deposition time as the silane gas increased. The Raman spectrum obtained from the silicon-incorporated a-C:H films suggested that the film property changed from graphitic-like to more diamond-like. As the silane gas increased, the optical gap, E04, slightly increased from 1.98 eV to 2.62 eV. It was shown that the Si atoms incorporated into the a-C:H films reduced the size of the sp2 clusters. As for the I-V characteristics, the Si-incorporated a-C:H films had a lower leakage current than the a-C:H films without Si. PMID:27483937

  17. Low-temperature growth and characterization of single crystalline ZnO nanorod arrays using a catalyst-free inductively coupled plasma-metal organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang-Hun; Lee, Chang-Bae; Moon, Won-Jin; Song, Ho-Jun

    2008-10-01

    Vertically aligned ZnO nanorod arrays have been synthesized on c-plane sapphires at a low temperature of 400 degrees C using catalyst-free inductively coupled plasma (ICP) metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique by varying the ICP powers. Diameters of the ZnO nanorods changed from 200 nm to 400 nm as the ICP power increased from 200 to 400 Watt. TEM and XRD investigations indicated that the ZnO nanorod arrays grown at ICP powers above 200 Watt had a homogeneous in-plane alignment and single crystalline nature. PL study at room temperature (RT) and 6 K confirmed that the ZnO nanorod arrays in the present study are of high optical quality as well as good crystalline quality, showing only exciton-related emission peaks without any trace of defect-related deep level emissions in visible range. The blueshift of exciton emission peak in RTPL spectra was also found as rod diameter decreased and it is deduced that this shift in emission energy may be due to the surface resonance effect resulted from the increased surface-to-volume ratio, based on the observation and behavior of the surface exciton (SX) emission in the high-resolution 6 K PL spectra. PMID:19198399

  18. Nanocrystalline-Si-dot multi-layers fabrication by chemical vapor deposition with H-plasma surface treatment and evaluation of structure and quantum confinement effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kosemura, Daisuke Mizukami, Yuki; Takei, Munehisa; Numasawa, Yohichiroh; Ogura, Atsushi; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2014-01-15

    100-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nano-Si)-dot multi-layers on a Si substrate were fabricated by the sequential repetition of H-plasma surface treatment, chemical vapor deposition, and surface oxidation, for over 120 times. The diameter of the nano-Si dots was 5–6 nm, as confirmed by both the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The annealing process was important to improve the crystallinity of the nano-Si dot. We investigated quantum confinement effects by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Based on the experimental results, we simulated the Raman spectrum using a phenomenological model. Consequently, the strain induced in the nano-Si dots was estimated by comparing the experimental and simulated results. Taking the estimated strain value into consideration, the band gap modulation was measured, and the diameter of the nano-Si dots was calculated to be 5.6 nm by using PL. The relaxation of the q ∼ 0 selection rule model for the nano-Si dots is believed to be important to explain both the phenomena of peak broadening on the low-wavenumber side observed in Raman spectra and the blue shift observed in PL measurements.

  19. Growth, microstructure, and field-emission properties of synthesized diamond film on adamantane-coated silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Chang Li

    2010-05-15

    Diamond nucleation on unscratched Si surface is great importance for its growth, and detailed understanding of this process is therefore desired for many applications. The pretreatment of the substrate surface may influence the initial growth period. In this study, diamond films have been synthesized on adamantane-coated crystalline silicon {l_brace}100{r_brace} substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gaseous mixture of methane and hydrogen gases without the application of a bias voltage to the substrates. Prior to adamantane coating, the Si substrates were not pretreated such as abraded/scratched. The substrate temperature was {approx}530 deg. C during diamond deposition. The deposited films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements provide definitive evidence for high-crystalline quality diamond film, which is synthesized on a SiC rather than clean Si substrate. Characterization through atomic force microscope allows establishing fine quality criteria of the film according to the grain size of nanodiamond along with SiC. The diamond films exhibit a low-threshold (55 V/{mu}m) and high current-density (1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}) field-emission (FE) display. The possible mechanism of formation of diamond films and their FE properties have been demonstrated.

  20. Effects of total CH 4/Ar gas pressure on the structures and field electron emission properties of carbon nanomaterials grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, J. L.; Wang, X.; Zheng, W. T.; Tian, H. W.; Liu, C.; Lu, Y. L.; Peng, Y. S.; Cheng, G.

    2009-12-01

    The effects of total CH 4/Ar gas pressure on the growth of carbon nanomaterials on Si (1 0 0) substrate covered with CoO nanoparticles, using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), were investigated. The structures of obtained products were correlated with the total gas pressure and changed from pure carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through hybrid CNTs/graphene sheets (GSs), to pure GSs as the total gas pressure changed from 20 to 4 Torr. The total gas pressure influenced the density of hydrogen radicals and Ar ions in chamber, which in turn determined the degree of how CoO nanoparticles were deoxidized and ion bombardment energy that governed the final carbon nanomaterials. Moreover, the obtained hybrid CNTs/GSs exhibited a lower turn-on field (1.4 V/μm) emission, compared to either 2.7 V/μm for pure CNTs or 2.2 V/μm for pure GSs, at current density of 10 μA/cm 2.

  1. Structural and electrical properties and current–voltage characteristics of nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon films on Si substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Masato; Murakami, Kazuki; Magara, Kohei; Nakamura, Kazuki; Ohashi, Haruka; Tokuda, Kengo; Takami, Takahiro; Ogasawara, Haruka; Enta, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Yushi; Ando, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    We have deposited nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (N-DLC) films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using CH4, N2, and Ar, and investigated the effects of N doping on the structure and the electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of the N-DLC films. We fabricated undoped DLC/p-type Si and N-DLC/p-type Si heterojunctions and examined the current–voltage characteristics of the heterojunctions. When the N2 flow ratio was increased from 0 to 3.64%, the resistivity markedly decreased from the order of 105 Ω·cm to that of 10‑2 Ω·cm and the internal stress also decreased. The resistivity gradually increased with increasing N2 flow ratio from 3.64 to 13.6%, and then it decreased at a N2 flow ratio of 13.6%. These behaviors can be explained in terms of the clustering of sp2 carbons and the formation of sp3C–N, sp2C=N, sp1C≡N, and C–H n bonds. The rectification ratio of the heterojunction using the N-DLC film prepared at 3.64% was 35.8 at ±0.5 V.

  2. Thermal expansion coefficient and thermomechanical properties of SiN(x) thin films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Tien, Chuen-Lin; Lin, Tsai-Wei

    2012-10-20

    We present a new method based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) for evaluating the thermal expansion coefficient and thermomechanical properties of thin films. The silicon nitride thin films deposited on Corning glass and Si wafers were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in this study. The anisotropic residual stress and thermomechanical properties of silicon nitride thin films were studied. Residual stresses in thin films were measured by a modified Michelson interferometer associated with the FFT method under different heating temperatures. We found that the average residual-stress value increases when the temperature increases from room temperature to 100°C. Increased substrate temperature causes the residual stress in SiN(x) film deposited on Si wafers to be more compressive, but the residual stress in SiN(x) film on Corning glass becomes more tensile. The residual-stress versus substrate-temperature relation is a linear correlation after heating. A double substrate technique is used to determine the thermal expansion coefficients of the thin films. The experimental results show that the thermal expansion coefficient of the silicon nitride thin films is 3.27×10(-6)°C(-1). The biaxial modulus is 1125 GPa for SiN(x) film. PMID:23089776

  3. Microcrystalline silicon thin films deposited by matrix-distributed electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using an SiF4 /H2 chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junkang; Bulkin, Pavel; Florea, Ileana; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Erik

    2016-07-01

    For the growth of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin films by low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4) has recently attracted interest as a precursor due to the resilient optoelectronic performance of the resulting material and devices. In this work, μc-Si:H films are deposited at high rates (7 Å s‑1) from a SiF4 and hydrogen (H2) gas mixture by matrix-distributed electron cyclotron resonance PECVD (MDECR-PECVD). Increased substrate temperature and moderate ion bombardment energy (IBE) are demonstrated to be of vital importance to achieve high quality μc-Si:H films under such low process pressure and high plasma density conditions, presumably due to thermally-induced and ion-induced enhancement of surface species migration. Two well-defined IBE thresholds at 12 eV and 43 eV, corresponding respectively to SiF+ ion-induced surface and bulk atomic displacement, are found to be determinant to the final film properties, namely the surface roughness, feature size and crystalline content. Moreover, a study of the growth dynamics shows that the primary challenge to producing highly crystallized μc-Si:H films by MDECR-PECVD appears to be the nucleation step. By employing a two-step method to first prepare a highly crystallized seed layer, μc-Si:H films lacking any amorphous incubation layer have been obtained. A crystalline volume fraction of 68% is achieved with a substrate temperature as low as 120 °C, which is of great interest to broaden the process window for solar cell applications.

  4. Capillary jet injection of SiH{sub 4} in the high density plasma chemical vapor deposition of SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Botha, R.; Novikova, T.; Bulkin, P.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, the authors compare the thickness profiles and OH content of SiO{sub 2} films deposited using capillary jet injection of silane in a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition (HDP CVD) system with the results of phenomenological modeling using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) gas flow calculations. A tube with an internal diameter of 1 mm is located vertically at 3 cm in front of the substrate surface and is used for the injection of the silane. The deposition plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). Studying the thickness-normalized OH absorption in the deposited film at various points on the substrate, the authors gain insight into the contribution of the water flux to the OH content in the deposited SiO{sub 2} film. Gas flow simulations using the DSMC technique are used to study the fluxes of the species onto the substrate plane. From the results the authors conclude that (i) the flux of the H{sub 2}O onto the substrate holder is uniform, while the SiH{sub 4} flux varies considerably along the substrate holder, which leads to a lower level of hydroxyl incorporated into the deposited film in regions of high deposition rate; (ii) HDP CVD systems cannot be considered as well mixed when using SiH{sub 4} because its reaction products have high sticking coefficients and the ground-state molecules have the possibility to be consumed on the surface through reactions with oxygen radicals and ions when depositing SiO{sub 2}; (iii) the primary beamlike flux of undissociated SiH{sub 4} onto the substrate surface has an important influence on the film's deposition rate; and (iv) the SiH{sub 4} reactive sticking coefficient is estimated to be between 0.01 and 0.03.

  5. Use of SiBN and SiBON films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from borazine as interconnection dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, W.F.; Cohen, S.A.; Hummel, J.P.; Luther, B.; Beach, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    Thin films of silicon boron nitride (SiBN) of typical composition Si{sub 0.09}B{sub 0.39}N{sub 0.51} and silicon boron oxynitride (SiBON) of typical composition Si{sub 0.16}B{sub 0.29}O{sub 0.41}N{sub 0.14} were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and the properties of these films were evaluated with respect to their suitability as interconnection dielectrics in microelectronic fabrication. Films were deposited on 125 mm silicon substrates in a parallel-plate reactor at a substrate temperature of 400 C and a plasma power of 0.5 W/cm{sup 2}. Boron nitride, for comparison of electrical properties, was deposited from borazine (B{sub 3}N{sub 3}H{sub 6}); silicon boron nitride was deposited from borazine, disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}); silicon boron oxynitride was deposited from borazine, disilane, ammonia, and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Metal-insulator-metal capacitors were fabricated and electrical measurements indicated that all three films had excellent dielectric properties with dielectric constants of 4.1, 4.7, and 3.9 for BN, SiBN, and SiBON, respectively. Tests of conformality indicated that deposition into trenches with an aspect ratio of 4:1 gave conformality greater than 70%. Silicon boron oxynitride was shown to be an excellent barrier to the diffusion of copper. A planar, single level metal-insulator structure was constructed using a SiBN/SiBON insulator with copper metallization.

  6. Formation of size controlled silicon nanocrystals in nitrogen free silicon dioxide matrix prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, J. Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.; Bruns, M.; Kübel, C.; Weiss, C.

    2014-12-14

    This paper reports the growth of silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) from SiH4–O{sub 2} plasma chemistry. The formation of an oxynitride was avoided by using O{sub 2} instead of the widely used N{sub 2}O as precursor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to prove the absence of nitrogen in the layers and determine the film stoichiometry. It is shown that the Si rich film growth is achieved via non-equilibrium deposition that resembles a interphase clusters mixture model. Photoluminescence and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy are used to monitor the formation process of the SiNCs, to reveal that the phase separation is completed at lower temperatures as for SiNCs based on oxynitrides. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy proves that the SiNC sizes are well controllable by superlattice configuration, and as a result, the optical emission band of the Si nanocrystal can be tuned over a wide range.

  7. Effects of pulse voltage and deposition time on the adhesion strength of graded metal/carbon films deposited on bendable stainless steel foils by hybrid cathodic arc - glow discharge plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamesh, Mohammed Ibrahim; Boxman, R. L.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Kocer, Cenk; Hu, Tingwei; Zhang, Xuming; McKenzie, David R.; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-03-01

    Graded Ti/C composite films with carbon topcoats are prepared on bendable stainless steel foils by hybrid cathodic arc / glow discharge plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition to simulate cardiovascular stents. Strong adhesion between the stainless steel substrate and carbon topcoat is achieved due to the graded Ti/C interface and it is further improved by increasing the pulse voltage. Moreover, the graded coating is more hydrophilic than the stainless steel substrate.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of High c-axis ZnO Thin Film by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition System and its UV Photodetector Application.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chung-Hua; Wei, Da-Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with high c-axis (0002) preferential orientation have been successfully and effectively synthesized onto silicon (Si) substrates via different synthesized temperatures by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The effects of different synthesized temperatures on the crystal structure, surface morphologies and optical properties have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that the intensity of (0002) diffraction peak became stronger with increasing synthesized temperature until 400 (o)C. The diffraction intensity of (0002) peak gradually became weaker accompanying with appearance of (10-10) diffraction peak as the synthesized temperature up to excess of 400 (o)C. The RT photoluminescence (PL) spectra exhibited a strong near-band-edge (NBE) emission observed at around 375 nm and a negligible deep-level (DL) emission located at around 575 nm under high c-axis ZnO thin films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images revealed the homogeneous surface and with small grain size distribution. The ZnO thin films have also been synthesized onto glass substrates under the same parameters for measuring the transmittance. For the purpose of ultraviolet (UV) photodetector application, the interdigitated platinum (Pt) thin film (thickness ~100 nm) fabricated via conventional optical lithography process and radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. In order to reach Ohmic contact, the device was annealed in argon circumstances at 450 (o)C by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system for 10 min. After the systematic measurements, the current-voltage (I-V) curve of photo and dark current and time-dependent photocurrent response results exhibited a good responsivity and reliability, indicating that the high c-axis ZnO thin film is a suitable sensing layer for UV photodetector application. PMID:26484561

  9. High-temperature degradation in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation layers on crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kühnhold, Saskia; Saint-Cast, Pierre; Kafle, Bishal; Hofmann, Marc; Colonna, Francesco; Zacharias, Margit

    2014-08-07

    In this publication, the activation and degradation of the passivation quality of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) layers with different thicknesses (10 nm, 20 nm, and 110 nm) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) during long and high temperature treatments are investigated. As indicated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, the concentration of tetrahedral and octahedral sites within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer changes during temperature treatments and correlates with the amount of negative fixed charges at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface, which was detected by Corona Oxide Characterization of Semiconductors. Furthermore, during a temperature treatment at 820 °C for 30 min, the initial amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer crystallize into the γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure and was enhanced by additional oxygen as was proven by x-ray diffraction measurements and underlined by Density Functional Theory simulations. The crystallization correlates with the increase of the optical density up to 20% while the final Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness decreases at the same time up to 26%. All observations described above were detected to be Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness dependent. These observations reveal novel aspects to explain the temperature induced passivation and degradation mechanisms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers at a molecular level like the origin of the negative fixe charges at the Si/SiO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface or the phenomena of blistering. Moreover, the crystal phase of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} does not deliver good surface passivation due to a high concentration of octahedral sites leading to a lower concentration of negative fixed charges at the interface.

  10. Friction and Wear Properties of Selected Solid Lubricating Films. Part 3; Magnetron-Sputtered and Plasma-Assisted, Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Iwaki, Masanori; Gotoh, Kenichi; Obara, Shingo; Imagawa, Kichiro

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate commercially developed dry solid film lubricants for aerospace bearing applications, an investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC) and plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DLC) films in sliding contact with 6-mm-diameter American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 440C stainless steel balls. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a load of 5.9 N (600 g), a mean Hertzian contact pressure of 0.79 GPa (maximum Hertzian contact pressure of L-2 GPa), and a sliding velocity of 0.2 m/s. The experiments were conducted at room temperature in three environments: ultrahigh vacuum (vacuum pressure, 7x10(exp -7) Pa), humid air (relative humidity, approx.20 percent), and dry nitrogen (relative humidity, <1 percent). The resultant films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and surface profilometry. Marked differences in the friction and wear of the DLC films investigated herein resulted from the environmental conditions. The main criteria for judging the performance of the DLC films were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.3 and on the order of 10(exp -6) cu mm/N-m or less, respectively. MS DLC films and PACVD DLC films met the criteria in humid air and dry nitrogen but failed in ultrahigh vacuum, where the coefficients of friction were greater than the criterion, 0.3. In sliding contact with 440C stainless steel balls in all three environments the PACVD DLC films exhibited better tribological performance (i.e., lower friction and wear) than the MS DLC films. All sliding involved adhesive transfer of wear materials: transfer of DLC wear debris to the counterpart 440C stainless steel and transfer of 440C stainless steel wear debris to the counterpart DLC film.

  11. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without

  12. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  13. Single drop solution electrode glow discharge for plasma assisted-chemical vapor generation: sensitive detection of zinc and cadmium in limited amounts of samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-ang; Tan, Qing; Hou, Xiandeng; Xu, Kailai; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-12-16

    A simple and sensitive approach is proposed and evaluated for determination of ultratrace Zn and Cd in limited amounts of samples or tens of cells based on a novel single drop (5-20 μL) solution electrode glow discharge assisted-chemical vapor generation technique. Volatile species of Zn and Cd were immediately generated and separated from the liquid phase for transporting to atomic fluorescence or atomic mass spectrometric detectors for their determination only using hydrogen when the glow discharge was ignited between the surface of a liquid drop and the tip of a tungsten electrode. Limits of detection are better than 0.01 μg L(-1) (0.2 pg) for Cd and 0.1 μg L(-1) (2 pg) for Zn, respectively, and comparable or better than the previously reported results due to only a 20 μL sampling volume required, which makes the proposed technique convenient for the determination of Zn and Cd in limited amounts of samples or even only tens of cells. The proposed method not only retains the advantages of conventional chemical vapor generation but also provides several unique advantages, including better sensitivity, lower sample and power consumption, higher chemical vapor generation efficiencies and simpler setup, as well as greener analytical chemistry. The utility of this technique was demonstrated by the determination of ultratrace Cd and Zn in several single human hair samples, Certified Reference Materials GBW07601a (human hair powder) and paramecium cells. PMID:25409265

  14. Effect of Annealing Temperature on Dielectric Constant and Bonding Structure of Low-k SiCOH Thin Films Deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Yang, Jaeyoung; Yeo, Sanghak; Lee, Jaewon; Jung, Donggeun; Boo, Jin-hyo; Kim, Hyoungsub; Chae, Heeyeop

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the effect of annealing temperature on the properties of SiCOH films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using or a mixture of Si-O containing and hydrocarbon precursors, decamethyl-cyclopentasiloxane (DMCPSO-C10H30O5Si5) and cyclohexane (CHex-C6H12). These SiCOH films were deposited at pressures of 0.6 and 1.5 Torr and the as-deposited SiCOH films were subjected to annealing temperatures from 25 to 500 °C in a furnace for 1 h in N2 ambient at a pressure of 1 atm. The relative dielectric constants, k, of the SiCOH films deposited at 0.6 and 1.5 Torr were 2.76 and 2.26, respectively, before the annealing process. The subsequent annealing of the SiCOH film at 500 °C further reduced the k values to as low as 2.31 and 1.85, respectively. Decreases in the refractive index, hardness, and modulus were observed as the annealing temperature increased to 450 °C. However, further increasing annealing temperature to 500 °C caused the refractive index, hardness, and modulus to increase again. Trends of decreases in both the hardness and modulus with increasing annealing temperature were found. The refractive index and the film thickness retention also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. The change in the k value as a function of the annealing temperature was correlated with the change in the Fourier transform infrared absorption peaks of C-Hx, Si-CH3, and Si-O related groups. As the annealing temperature increased, the intensity of both the CHx and Si-CH3 peaks decreased, respectively. In particular, the C-H2 (asymmetric and symmetric) peaks provide direct evidence of the presence of ethylene groups in the SiCOH films. Thus the decrease in intensity of the peaks corresponding to the CHx groups and Si-O cage structure in the SiCOH films was considered to be responsible for lowering they dielectric constant, refractive index, hardness and modulus of the films. The leakage current density of the SiCOH films at 1 MV/cm is obtained

  15. Low-pressure, chemical vapor deposition polysilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B. D.; Crotty, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of polycrystalline silicon was investigted. The physical system was described, as was the controlling process parameters and requirements for producing films for use as an integral portion of the solar cell contact system.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  17. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  18. Remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of fluorinated silicon oxide films using 1,2bis(methyldifluorosilyl)ethane and triethoxyfluorosilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhongping

    2005-07-01

    The deposition characteristics of fluorinated silicon dioxide (SiO xFy) films using two fluorine-containing precursors, 1,2bis(methyldifluorosilyl)ethane (FASi-4) and triethoxyfluorosilane (FTES) were investigated in a custom-built remote microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) micro-reactor system. These studies were motivated by the finding that incorporation of fluorine in the oxide films reduces the dielectric permittivity of the films. Statistically-designed experiments were performed to identify significant independent parameters and their interactions, and to determine preferred operating windows; subsequent one factor at a time experiments were performed to better understand the effects of important single variables. Complementary film characterization methods including Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Fourier transform infrared transmission spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate and quantify film physical, chemical and electrical properties. Arrhenius-type plots for the dependence of the deposition rate on substrate inverse temperature show that the FASi-4 sourced process is mildly activated with an apparent activation energy of 0.17 eV at a pressure of 0.4 Torr and 0.05 eV at a pressure of 0.1 Torr. Single factor experiments indicate that the deposition rates exhibit maxima at 0.1 Torr and 0.31 Torr for FASi-4 and FTES, respectively. The deposition rate maxima occur at lower pressures than the corresponding maximum observed for PETEOS deposition (˜0.6 Torr). Deposition rate maxima were also observed as a function of oxygen to source gas flow ratio. The deposition rate maximizes at 108 A/min with an oxygen: FTES flow ratio of 12:1. The deposition rate with TEOS, on the other hand, maximizes at over 400 A/min at an oxygen: TEOS flow ratio of 3:1. RBS data indicate that decreasing O2:FASi-4 ratio from 15:1 to 8:1 increases the fluorine content in the deposited fluorinated silicon

  19. Organo-Chlorinated Thin Films Deposited by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition for Adhesion Enhancement between Rubber and Zinc-Plated Steel Monofilaments.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Cédric; Bulou, Simon; Maurau, Rémy; Siffer, Frederic; Belmonte, Thierry; Choquet, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    A continuous-flow plasma process working at atmospheric pressure is developed to enhance the adhesion between a rubber compound and a zinc-plated steel monofilament, with the long-term objective to find a potential alternative to the electrolytic brass plating process, which is currently used in tire industry. For this purpose, a highly efficient tubular dielectric barrier discharge reactor is built to allow the continuous treatment of "endless" cylindrical substrates. The best treatment conditions found regarding adhesion are Ar/O2 plasma pretreatment, followed by the deposition from dichloromethane of a 75 nm-thick organo-chlorinated plasma polymerized thin film. Ar/O2 pretreatment allows the removal of organic residues, coming from drawing lubricants, and induces external growth of zinc oxide. The plasma layer has to be preferably deposited at low power to conserve sufficient hydrocarbon moieties. Surface analyses reveal the complex chemical mechanism behind the establishment of strong adhesion levels, more than five times higher after the plasma treatment. During the vulcanization step, superficial ZnO reacts with the chlorinated species of the thin film and is converted into porous and granular bump-shaped ZnwOxHyClz nanostructures. Together, rubber additives diffuse through the plasma layer and lead to the formation of zinc sulfide on the substrate surface. Hence, two distinct interfaces, rubber/thin film and thin film/substrate, are established. On the basis of these observations, hypotheses explaining the high bonding strength results are formulated. PMID:26069994

  20. Making Ceramic Fibers By Chemical Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal V. S.; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1994-01-01

    Research and development of fabrication techniques for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ceramic fibers presented in two reports. Fibers of SiC, TiB2, TiC, B4C, and CrB2 intended for use as reinforcements in metal-matrix composite materials. CVD offers important advantages over other processes: fibers purer and stronger and processed at temperatures below melting points of constituent materials.

  1. Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport is discussed. The operating characteristics of the purification process, including factors affecting the rate, purification efficiency and photovoltaic quality of the refined silicon were studied. The casting of large alloy plates was accomplished. A larger research scale reactor is characterized, and it is shown that a refined silicon product yields solar cells with near state of the art conversion efficiencies.

  2. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  4. Operating a radio-frequency plasma source on water vapor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sonca V T; Foster, John E; Gallimore, Alec D

    2009-08-01

    A magnetically enhanced radio-frequency (rf) plasma source operating on water vapor has an extensive list of potential applications. In this work, the use of a rf plasma source to dissociate water vapor for hydrogen production is investigated. This paper describes a rf plasma source operated on water vapor and characterizes its plasma properties using a Langmuir probe, a residual gas analyzer, and a spectrometer. The plasma source operated first on argon and then on water vapor at operating pressures just over 300 mtorr. Argon and water vapor plasma number densities differ significantly. In the electropositive argon plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i) approximately = n(e), where n(i) is the positive ion density. But in the electronegative water plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i+) = n(i-) + n(e). The positive ion density and electron density of the water vapor plasma are approximately one and two orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of argon plasma. These results suggest that attachment and dissociative attachment are present in electronegative water vapor plasma. The electron temperature for this water vapor plasma source is between 1.5 and 4 eV. Without an applied axial magnetic field, hydrogen production increases linearly with rf power. With an axial magnetic field, hydrogen production jumps to a maximum value at 500 W and then saturates with rf power. The presence of the applied axial magnetic field is therefore shown to enhance hydrogen production. PMID:19725651

  5. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  6. A nucleation and growth model of vertically-oriented carbon nanofibers or nanotubes by plasma-enhanced catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, C S; Senger, A; Le Normand, F

    2006-05-01

    Carbon nanofibers are grown by direct current and hot filaments-activated catalytic chemical vapor deposition while varying the power of the hot filaments. Observations of these carbon nanofibers vertically oriented on a SiO2 (8 nm thick)/Si(100) substrate covered with Co nanoparticles (10-15 nm particle size) by Scanning Electron and Transmission Electron Microscopies show the presence of a graphitic "nest" either on the surface of the substrate or at the end of the specific nanofiber that does not encapsulate the catalytic particle. Strictly in our conditions, the activation by hot filaments is required to grow nanofibers with a C2H2 - H2 gas mixture, as large amounts of amorphous carbon cover the surface of the substrate without using hot filaments. From these observations as well as data of the literature, it is proposed that the nucleation of carbon nanofibers occurs through a complex process involving several steps: carbon concentration gradient starting from the catalytic carbon decomposition and diffusion from the surface of the catalytic nanoparticles exposed to the activated gas and promoted by energetic ionic species of the gas phase; subsequent graphitic condensation of a "nest" at the interface of the Co particle and substrate. The large concentration of highly reactive hydrogen radicals mainly provided by activation with hot filaments precludes further spreading out of this interfacial carbon nest over the entire surface of the substrate and thus selectively orientates the growth towards the condensation of graphene over facets that are perpendicular to the surface. Carbon nanofibers can then be grown within the well-known Vapor-Liquid-Solid process. Thus the effect of energetic ions and highly reactive neutrals like atomic hydrogen in the preferential etching of carbon on the edge of graphene shells and on the broadening of the carbon nanofiber is underlined. PMID:16792361

  7. Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor infiltration in carbon fiber bundles is studied under isothermal conditions over the temperature range 1000--1090 C at a nominal pressure of 300 Torr. Pyrolytic decomposition of methane is used in the infiltration experiments with carbon weight gain data obtained continuously from thermogravimetric analysis. The sensitivity of the infiltration dynamics to initial yarn porosity and to spatial variations in fiber positioning are explored. Results indicate that small changes in initial porosity can have significant impact on the weight gain above the solid phase percolation threshold.

  8. Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration in carbon fiber bundles is studied under isothermal conditions over the temperature range 1000--1090 C at a nominal pressure of 300 Torr. Pyrolytic decomposition of methane is used in the infiltration experiments with carbon weight gain data obtained continuously from thermogravimetric analysis. The sensitivity of the infiltration dynamics to initial yarn porosity and to spatial variations in fiber positioning are explored. Results indicate that small changes in initial porosity can have significant impact on the weight gain above the solid phase percolation threshold.

  9. Determination of As, Hg and Pb in herbs using slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chia-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of herbs for As, Hg and Pb has been carried out using slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with flow injection vapor generation. Slurry containing 0.5% m/v herbal powder, 0.1% m/v citric acid and 2% v/v HCl was injected into the VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Hg and Pb that obviate dissolution and mineralization. Standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for quantifications in selected herbal powders. This method has been validated by the determination of As, Hg and Pb in NIST standard reference materials SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The As, Hg and Pb analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The precision obtained by the reported procedure was better than 7% for all determinations. The detection limit estimated from standard addition curve was 0.008, 0.003, and 0.007 ng mL(-1) for As, Hg and Pb, respectively. PMID:26304347

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper at reduced temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Eric M.; Willner, Bruce I.; Hwang, Jeonghyun; Sun, Shangzhu; Spencer, Michael; Salagaj, Tom; Mitchel, William C.; Sbrockey, Nick; Tompa, Gary S.

    2012-09-01

    A preliminary study on reduced temperature chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper substrates was performed. Graphene's exceptional mechanical strength, very high electrical and thermal conductivity, and stability at atomic layer thicknesses, generates potential for a broad range of applications, from nanodevices to transparent conductor to chemical sensor. Of the techniques demonstrated for graphene formation, chemical vapor deposition is the sole process suitable for manufacturing large area films. While large area film deposition of graphene has been shown on metal substrates, this process has been limited to high temperatures, 900-1000C, which increases the cost of production and limits methods of integrating the graphene with other material structures. In this work, CVD of graphene on copper foil was attempted over a range of temperatures (650 - 950C) on substrates as large as 5 x 15 cm in a horizontal tube reactor. Depositions were performed using both CVD and upstream Plasma-Enhanced CVD (PECVD), and the results are compared for both techniques. Quality of graphene films deposited with and without plasma enhancement was characterized by micro Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Chemical Vapor Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus

    The generation of nanoparticles in the gas phase by Chemical Vapor Synthesis (CVS) may be described from the point of view of chemical engineering as a sequence of unit operations among which reactant delivery, reaction energy input, and product separation are key processes which determine the product characteristics and quality required by the applications of nanoparticles and powders. In case of CVS, the volatility of the reactants (precursors) may severely limit the possible type of products as well as the production rate. It is shown that these limits can be lifted by use of a laser flash evaporator which also enables the use of precursor mixtures for the production of complex oxides as shown for Co-doped ZnO and the pulsed operation to influence powder characteristics. The mode in which energy is supplied to the particle synthesis reactor has also substantial influence on particle and powder characteristics as is shown for TiO2 using different time-temperatureprofiles.

  12. Epitaxial growth of GaN by radical-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (REMOCVD) in the downflow of a very high frequency (VHF) N2/H2 excited plasma - effect of TMG flow rate and VHF power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oda, Osamu; Takeda, Keigo; Sekine, Makoto; Amano, Hiroshi; Hori, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films have been grown by using our newly developed Radical-Enhanced Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (REMOCVD) system. This system has three features: (1) application of very high frequency (60 MHz) power in order to increase the plasma density, (2) introduction of H2 gas together with N2 gas in the plasma discharge region to generate not only nitrogen radicals but also active NHx molecules, and (3) radical supply under remote plasma arrangement with suppression of charged ions and photons by employing a Faraday cage. Using this new system, we have studied the effect of the trimethylgallium (TMG) source flow rate and of the plasma generation power on the GaN crystal quality by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and double crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). We found that this REMOCVD allowed the growth of epitaxial GaN films of the wurtzite structure of (0001) orientation on sapphire substrates with a high growth rate of 0.42 μm/h at a low temperature of 800 °C. The present REMOCVD is a promising method for GaN growth at relatively low temperature and without using costly ammonia gas.

  13. Oxygen incorporation in highly c -axis oriented YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced metalorgainic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.Q.; Zhao, J.; Chern, C.S.; Lemoine, E.E.; Gallois, B.; Norris, P.; Kear, B. )

    1991-05-20

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} superconducting thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition which exhibit high transition temperatures ({ital T}{sub {ital c}}{similar to}90 K) and high critical current densities ({ital J}{sub {ital c}}{gt}10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} at 77.7 K and 0 T) generally have copper-rich precipitates on the surface. We have studied both near-stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric highly {ital c}-axis oriented thin films formed by plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. We show that the reduction in transport properties ({ital T}{sub {ital c}} and {ital J}{sub {ital c}}) observed in stoichiometric films with smooth morphologies may result from a dramatic reduction of the oxygen diffusion rate in these thin films as compared to nonstoichiometric films. The significant enhancement of the transport properties of these films was achieved by further oxygen anneals at 480 {degree}C.

  14. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ni; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling; Sahayam, A C

    2015-02-20

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL(-1) Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g(-1) for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample. PMID:25682241

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Tour, James M

    2014-04-15

    As a two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-bonded carbon allotrope, graphene has attracted enormous interest over the past decade due to its unique properties, such as ultrahigh electron mobility, uniform broadband optical absorption and high tensile strength. In the initial research, graphene was isolated from natural graphite, and limited to small sizes and low yields. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have emerged as an important method for the scalable production of large-size and high-quality graphene for various applications. However, CVD-derived graphene is polycrystalline and demonstrates degraded properties induced by grain boundaries. Thus, the next critical step of graphene growth relies on the synthesis of large graphene single crystals. In this Account, we first discuss graphene grain boundaries and their influence on graphene's properties. Mechanical and electrical behaviors of CVD-derived polycrystalline graphene are greatly reduced when compared to that of exfoliated graphene. We then review four representative pathways of pretreating Cu substrates to make millimeter-sized monolayer graphene grains: electrochemical polishing and high-pressure annealing of Cu substrate, adding of additional Cu enclosures, melting and resolidfying Cu substrates, and oxygen-rich Cu substrates. Due to these pretreatments, the nucleation site density on Cu substrates is greatly reduced, resulting in hexagonal-shaped graphene grains that show increased grain domain size and comparable electrical properties as to exfoliated graphene. Also, the properties of graphene can be engineered by its shape, thickness and spatial structure. Thus, we further discuss recently developed methods of making graphene grains with special spatial structures, including snowflakes, six-lobed flowers, pyramids and hexagonal graphene onion rings. The fundamental growth mechanism and practical applications of these well-shaped graphene structures should be interesting topics and

  16. Synthesis and Mechanical Wear Studies of Ultra Smooth Nanostructured Diamond (USND) Coatings Deposited by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition with He/H2/CH4/N2 Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, S.; Borham, J.; Catledge, S. A.; Eberhardt, A. W.; Johnson, P. S.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2008-01-01

    Ultra smooth nanostructured diamond (USND) coatings were deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) technique using He/H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture. The RMS surface roughness as low as 4 nm (2 micron square area) and grain size of 5–6 nm diamond coatings were achieved on medical grade titanium alloy. Previously it was demonstrated that the C2 species in the plasma is responsible for the production of nanocrystalline diamond coatings in the Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. In this work we have found that CN species is responsible for the production of USND coatings in He/H2/CH4/N2 plasma. It was found that diamond coatings deposited with higher CN species concentration (normalized by Balmer Hα line) in the plasma produced smoother and highly nanostructured diamond coatings. The correlation between CN/Hα ratios with the coating roughness and grain size were also confirmed with different set of gas flows/plasma parameters. It is suggested that the presence of CN species could be responsible for producing nanocrystallinity in the growth of USND coatings using He/H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture. The RMS roughness of 4 nm and grain size of 5–6 nm were calculated from the deposited diamond coatings using the gas mixture which produced the highest CN/Hα species in the plasma. Wear tests were performed on the OrthoPOD®, a six station pin-on-disk apparatus with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) pins articulating on USND disks and CoCrMo alloy disk. Wear of the UHMWPE was found to be lower for the polyethylene on USND than that of polyethylene on CoCrMo alloy. PMID:19112519

  17. In situ growth of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x high Tc superconducting thin films directly on sapphire by plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, C.S.; Zhao, J.; Li, Y.Q.; Norris, P.; Kear, B.; Gallois, B. )

    1990-08-13

    Highly {ital c}-axis oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} superconducting thin films have been, {ital in} {ital situ}, deposited directly on sapphire substrate by a remote microwave plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process (PE-MOCVD). The films were deposited at a substrate temperature of 730 {degree}C followed by a fast cooling. The as-deposited films show attainment of zero resistance at 82 K and have critical current density of 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 70 K. ac susceptibility measurement indicated that the films contain a single superconducting phase. PE-MOCVD was carried out in a commercial-scale MOCVD reactor with capability of uniform deposition over 100 cm{sup 2} per growth run.

  18. Microstructure and initial growth characteristics of nanocrystalline silicon films fabricated by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with highly H{sub 2} dilution of SiH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiang; Huang Rui; Song Jie; Guo Yanqing; Ding Honglin

    2010-06-15

    Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) film deposited on silicon oxide in a very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with highly H{sub 2} dilution of SiH{sub 4} has been investigated by Raman spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that at early growth stage the initial amorphous incubation layer in nc-Si:H growth on silicon oxide can be almost eliminated and crystallites with diameter of about 6 to 10 nm are directly formed on the silicon oxide. Nearly parallel columnar structures with complex microstructure are found from cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of the film. It is considered that highly H{sub 2} dilution and higher excitation frequency are the main reason for eliminating the initial amorphous incubation layer in nc-Si:H growth on silicon oxide.

  19. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of wear resistant gradual a-Si{sub 1-x}:C{sub x}:H coatings on nickel-titanium for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Niermann, Benedikt; Boeke, Marc; Schauer, Janine-Christina; Winter, Joerg

    2010-03-15

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been used to deposit thin films with gradual transitions from silicon to carbon on Cu, Ni, stainless steel, and NiTi. Thus show low stress, elasticity, and wear resistance with excellent adhesion on all metals under investigation. Already at low Si concentrations of 10 at. % the intrinsic stress is considerably reduced compared to pure diamondlike carbon (DLC) films. The deposition process is controlled by optical emission spectroscopy. This technique has been applied to monitor the growth precursors and to correlate them with the film composition. The compositions of the films were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and XPS measurements. Due to the elastic properties of the gradual transition and the excellent biocompatibility of DLC, the described film systems present a useful coating for biomedical applications.

  20. Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Larkin, David J.; Matus, Lawrence G.; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1993-01-01

    Large single-crystal SiC boules from which wafers of large area cut now being produced commerically. Availability of wafers opens door for development of SiC semiconductor devices. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process produces thin single-crystal SiC films on SiC wafers. Essential step in sequence of steps used to fabricate semiconductor devices. Further development required for specific devices. Some potential high-temperature applications include sensors and control electronics for advanced turbine engines and automobile engines, power electronics for electromechanical actuators for advanced aircraft and for space power systems, and equipment used in drilling of deep wells. High-frequency applications include communication systems, high-speed computers, and microwave power transistors. High-radiation applications include sensors and controls for nuclear reactors.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  3. Prediction of TiO2 thin film growth on the glass beads in a rotating plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Kyo-Seon

    2010-05-01

    We calculated the concentration profiles of important chemical species for TiO2 thin film growth on the glass beads in the TTIP + O2 plasmas and compared the predicted growth rates of thin films with the experimental measurements. The film thickness profile depends on the concentration profile of TiO(OC3H7)3 precursors in the gas phase because TiO(OC3H7)3 is the main precursor of the thin film. The TTIP concentration decreases with time, while the TiO(OC3H7)3 concentration increases, and they reach the steady state about 2 approximately 3 sec. The growth rate of TiO2 film predicted in this study was 9.2 nm/min and is in good agreements with the experimental result of 10.5 nm/min under the same process conditions. This study suggests that a uniform TiO2 thin film on particles can be obtained by using a rotating cylindrical PCVD reactor. PMID:20358924

  4. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    SciTech Connect

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  5. Characterization of Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesser, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations to develop a more complete understanding of the reactive fluid dynamics of chemical vapor deposition were conducted. In the experimental phases of the effort, a horizontal CVD reactor configuration was used for the growth of InP at UVA and for laser velocimetry measurements of the flow fields in the reactor at LaRC. This horizontal reactor configuration was developed for the growth of III-V semiconductors and has been used by our research group in the past to study the deposition of both GaAs and InP. While the ultimate resolution of many of the heat and mass transport issues will require access to a reduced-gravity environment, the series of groundbased research makes direct contributions to this area while attempting to answer the design questions for future experiments of how low must gravity be reduced and for how long must this gravity level be maintained to make the necessary measurements. It is hoped that the terrestrial experiments will be useful for the design of future microgravity experiments which likely will be designed to employ a core set of measurements for applications in the microgravity environment such as HOLOC, the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, or the Schlieren photography, the Laser Imaging Velocimetry and the Laser Doppler Velocimetry instruments under development for the Advanced Fluids Experiment Module.

  6. Theoretical modeling of temperature dependent catalyst-assisted growth of conical carbon nanotube tip by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2015-02-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to examine the effect of substrate temperature on the growth of the conical carbon nanotube (CNT) tip assisted by the catalyst in a reactive plasma. The growth rate of the CNT with conical tip because of diffusion and accretion of ions on catalyst nanoparticle including the charging rate of the CNT, kinetics of plasma species, and the evolution of the substrate temperature in reactive plasma has been taken into account. The effect of substrate temperature for different ion densities and temperatures on the growth of the conical CNT tip has been investigated for typical glow discharge plasma parameters. The results of the present model can serve as a major tool in better understanding of plasma heating effects on the growth of CNTs.

  7. Theoretical modeling of temperature dependent catalyst-assisted growth of conical carbon nanotube tip by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2015-02-15

    A theoretical model has been developed to examine the effect of substrate temperature on the growth of the conical carbon nanotube (CNT) tip assisted by the catalyst in a reactive plasma. The growth rate of the CNT with conical tip because of diffusion and accretion of ions on catalyst nanoparticle including the charging rate of the CNT, kinetics of plasma species, and the evolution of the substrate temperature in reactive plasma has been taken into account. The effect of substrate temperature for different ion densities and temperatures on the growth of the conical CNT tip has been investigated for typical glow discharge plasma parameters. The results of the present model can serve as a major tool in better understanding of plasma heating effects on the growth of CNTs.

  8. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  9. Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochrane, J. C.; Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used for MWCNT synthesis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) are useful methods for analyzing the structure, morphology and composition of MWCNT. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. In MWCNT growth by CVD, the plasma assisted method is normally used for low temperature growth. However a high temperature environment is required for thermal CVD. A systematic study of temperature and pressure-dependence is very helpful to understanding MWCNT growth. Transition metal particles are commonly used as catalysis in carbon nanotube growth. It is also interesting to know how temperature and pressure affect the interface of carbon species and catalyst particles

  10. Preventing Chemical-Vapor Deposition In Selected Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, Joseph T.; Goela, Jitendra Singh; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1991-01-01

    Method for prevention of chemical-vapor deposition of material in selected areas developed. Gas shroud isolates specific area from rest of deposition system. Inert gas flowing from beneath substrate prevents deposition between substrate and outer ring. Method extremely successful in selective deposition of SiC in chemical-vapor-deposition reactor. Used in deposition of SiC mirror blanks in Large Mirror Substrate and Lidar Mirror programs. Critical element in overall chemical-vapor-deposition process for producing large, lightweight mirrors.

  11. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors. PMID:27174318

  12. Correlation of gas-phase composition with film properties in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongping; Zhou, Jie; Fisher, Ellen R.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride (a-C:N:H) films were synthesized from CH4/N2, C2H4/N2, and C2H2/N2 gas mixtures using inductively coupled rf plasmas. These deposition systems were characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). The effects of varying the nitrogen partial pressure on film growth and film properties were investigated, and experimental results indicate that the hydrocarbon species produced in the gas phase contribute directly to film growth. Although the CN radical is formed in the mixed gas systems, it does not appear to be a factor in controlling the rate of film deposition. The nature and energy of the ions in these systems were explored with MS. No clear dependence of ion energy on mass or plasma conditions was observed. Although films formed in the methane and ethylene systems were relatively smooth, a-C :N:H films prepared from acetylene-nitrogen plasmas had comparatively rough surfaces, most likely as a result of the strong gas-phase polymerization process produced by the ion-molecule reactions, CnHy++C2H2→C(n+2)Hy++H2 (n >1, y =1-3). Correlations between the a-C :N:H growth processes and the gas-phase plasma diagnostic data are discussed.

  13. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-15

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100–260 Torr pressure range and 1.5–2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η{sub coup}) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  14. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-01

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100-260 Torr pressure range and 1.5-2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η(coup)) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance. PMID:26233399

  15. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-01

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100-260 Torr pressure range and 1.5-2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (ηcoup) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  16. Worker Protection from Chemical Vapors: Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.J.

    2007-07-01

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank head-spaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns, risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits (OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors. (authors)

  17. Ellipsometric investigation of nitrogen doped diamond thin films grown in microwave CH4/H2/N2 plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficek, Mateusz; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Ryl, Jacek; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Lin, I.-Nan; Haenen, Ken; Darowicki, Kazimierz

    2016-06-01

    The influence of N2 concentration (1%-8%) in CH4/H2/N2 plasma on structure and optical properties of nitrogen doped diamond (NDD) films was investigated. Thickness, roughness, and optical properties of the NDD films in the VIS-NIR range were investigated on the silicon substrates using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The samples exhibited relatively high refractive index (2.6 ± 0.25 at 550 nm) and extinction coefficient (0.05 ± 0.02 at 550 nm) with a transmittance of 60%. The optical investigation was supported by the molecular and atomic data delivered by Raman studies, bright field transmission electron microscopy imaging, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy diagnostics. Those results revealed that while the films grown in CH4/H2 plasma contained micron-sized diamond grains, the films grown using CH4/H2/(4%)N2 plasma exhibited ultranano-sized diamond grains along with n-diamond and i-carbon clusters, which were surrounded by amorphous carbon grain boundaries.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgharkar, Narendra Shamkant

    We have studied the kinetics of copper chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for interconnect metallization using hydrogen (Hsb2) reduction of the Cu(hfac)sb2 (copper(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate) precursor. Steady-state deposition rates were measured using a hot-wall microbalance reactor. For base case conditions of 2 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C, a growth rate of 0.5 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 10 nm minsp{-1}) is observed. Reaction order experiments suggest that the deposition rate passes through a maximum at partial pressure of 2 Torr of Cu(hfac)sb2. The deposition rate has an overall half-order dependence on Hsb2 partial pressure. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expression is used to describe the observed kinetic dependencies on Cu(hfac)sb2, Hsb2, and H(hfac). Based on the rate expression a mechanism is proposed in which the overall rate is determined by the surface reaction of adsorbed Cu(hfac)sb2 and H species. Additionally, the role of alcohols in enhancing the deposition rate has been investigated. Addition of isopropanol results in a six fold enhancement to yield a deposition rate of 3.3 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}) at 5 Torr of isopropanol, 0.4 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C. Ethanol and methanol give lower enhancements of 1.75 and 1.1 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1}, respectively. A mechanism based on the ordering of the aqueous pKsba values of the alcohols is proposed to explain the observed results. Lastly, we have built a warm-wall Pedestal reactor apparatus to demonstrate copper CVD on TiN/Si substrates. The apparatus includes a liquid injection system for transport of isopropanol-diluted precursor solutions. At optimized conditions of precursor and substrate pre-treatments, we have deposited uniform films of copper on TiN/Si substrates at an average deposition rate of 3.0 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}).

  19. Epitaxial thin films of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x on LaAlO sub 3 substrates deposited by plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, C.S.; Zhao, J.; Li, Y.Q.; Norris, P.; Kear, B.; Gallois, B.; Kalman, Z. )

    1991-01-14

    High quality epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} (YBCO) superconducting thin films (0.3 {mu}m thick) were grown on the closely lattice and thermal expansion matched substrate, LaAlO{sub 3}, which has low dielectric loss. The YBCO layers were prepared, {ital in} {ital situ}, by a microwave plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process. The films, which had mirror-like smooth surfaces, were deposited at a substrate temperature of 730 {degree}C with a partial pressure of 2 Torr of N{sub 2}O. The electrical resistance and magnetic susceptibility versus temperature of the as-deposited films show metallic behavior in the normal state and sharp superconducting transitions with {ital T}{sub {ital c}} ({ital R}=0) of 88 K. Critical current densities measured on patterned bridges were 5{times}10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 78 K for the films deposited on LaAlO{sub 3}. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that films grow epitaxially in the plane of the substrate with axis perpendicular to the substrate surface.

  20. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1989--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes research to reduce the intrinsic bonding defects in amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloys by controlling the bonding chemistry and the microstructure via the deposition process reactions. The specific approach was to use remote plasma-enhanced, chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) and reactive magnetron sputtering to limit the multiplicity of deposition inaction pathways, and thereby gain increased control over the thin-film chemistry and microstrucre. The research included (1) the deposition of amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloy materials by the PECVD process and by reactive magnetron sputtering, and (2) the evaluation of the material properties of these films for potential applications in PV devices. The focus of the research was on pining a fundamental understanding of the relationships between deposition reaction pathways, the bonding of dopant and alloy atoms, and the electrical provides of importance for PV applications. This involved studying the factors that contribute to defect generation and to defect removal and/or neutralization. In addition to the experimental studies, the research also included theoretical and modeling studies aimed at understanding the relationships between local atomic arrangements of Si and alloy atoms, and the electrical, optical, vibrational, and defect properties.

  1. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, M.M.; Kostecki, R.; Marcinek, M.; Wilcoc, J.D.

    2008-12-10

    In this paper, we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin film conductive carbon coatings on LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} cathode active material powders for lithium-ion batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon were produced from a solid organic precursor, anthracene, by a one-step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. The structure and morphology of the carbon coatings were examined using SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half coin cells. The composite cathodes made of the carbon-coated LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder showed superior electrochemical performance and increased capacity compared to standard composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes.

  2. Plasma-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition of AlN thin films on ZnO buffer layer: toward highly c-axis-oriented, uniform, insulative films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, M.; Mehdipour, H.; Ganesh, V.; Ameera, A. N.; Goh, B. T.; Shuhaimi, A.; Rahman, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    c-Axis-oriented aluminum nitride (AlN) thin film with improved quality was deposited on Si(111) substrate using ZnO buffer layer by plasma-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The optical and electrical properties and surface morphology as well as elemental composition of the AlN films deposited with and without ZnO buffer layer were investigated using a host of measurement techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and current-voltage (I-V) characteristic measurement. The XRD and XPS results reveal that the AlN/ZnO/Si films are free of metallic Al particles. Also, cross-sectional FESEM observations suggest formation of a well-aligned, uniform, continuous, and highly (002) oriented structure for a bi-layered AlN film when Si(111) is covered with ZnO buffer. Moreover, a decrease in full width at half maximum of the E2 (high)-mode peak in Raman spectrum indicates a better crystallinity for the AlN films formed on ZnO/Si substrate. Finally, I-V curves obtained indicate that the electrical behavior of the AlN thin films switches from conductive to insulative when film is grown on a ZnO-buffered Si substrate.

  3. Effect of Si and C concentration on the microstructure, and the mechanical, tribological and electrochemical properties of nanocomposite TiC/a-SiC:H/a-C:H coatings prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duanjie; Hassani, Salim; Poulin, Suzie; Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Martinu, Ludvik; Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta E.

    2012-02-01

    The nanocomposite TiC/a-SiC:H/a-C:H (presented as Ti-Si-C) coatings attract considerable interest due to their possible applications such as wear protective coatings, diffusion barriers, and materials for solar cells and electrical contacts. In order to explore new film properties and open new opportunities, in the present work, we prepare a series of C-rich Ti-Si-C coatings with different Si and C concentrations using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and we systematically investigate the effect of elemental composition on the microstructure, and on the mechanical, tribological and electrochemical properties. XRD and XPS analyses demonstrate that the Ti-Si-C coatings mainly consist of nanocrystalline (nc-) TiC embedded in amorphous (a-) SiC:H and a-C:H matrices. Ti-Si-C coatings with a high Si concentration possess enhanced mechanical properties (high hardness), while those with additional C exhibit superior tribological behaviors. The increase of Si and/or C concentrations leads to a grain size refinement of the TiC nanocrystals and to an expansion of the amorphous phase. This in turn substantially enhances their corrosion resistance. Ti-Si-C coatings with the highest Si or C contents exhibit the best corrosion performance among the tested samples by improving the corrosion resistance of the SS410 substrate by a factor of ˜400.

  4. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon from Silane Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praturi, A. K.; Lutwack, R.; Hsu, G.

    1977-01-01

    The four basic elements in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane are analytically treated from a kinetic standpoint. These elements are mass transport of silane, pyrolysis of silane, nucleation of silicon, and silicon crystal growth. Rate expressions that describe the various steps involved in the chemical vapor deposition of silicon were derived from elementary principles. Applications of the rate expressions for modeling and simulation of the silicon CVD are discussed.

  5. Plasma-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition of Titanium Oxide Films by Dielectric Barrier Discharge in TiCl4/O2/N2 Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jinhai; Zhang, Zhihui; Fan, Hongyu; Yang, Qi; Liu, Dongping; Qiu, Jieshan

    2014-07-01

    Low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) TiCl4/O2 and N2 plasmas have been used to deposit titanium oxide films at different power supply driving frequencies. A homemade large area low pressure DBD reactor was applied, characterized by the simplicity of the experimental set-up and a low consumption of feed gas and electric power, as well as being easy to operate. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements have been used to characterize the deposited films. Experimental results show all deposited films are uniform and hydrophilic with a contact angle of about 15°. Compared to titanium oxide films deposited in TiCl4/O2 gas mixtures, those in TiCl4/O2/N2 gas mixtures are much more stable. The contact angle of titanium oxide films in TiCl4/O2/N2 gas mixtures with the addition of 50% N2 and 20% TiCl4 is still smaller than 20°, while that of undoped titanium oxide films is larger than 64° when they are measured after one week. The low-pressure TiCl4/O2 plasmas consist of pulsed glow-like discharges with peak widths of several microseconds, which leads to the uniform deposition of titanium oxide films. Increasing a film thickness over several hundreds of nm leads to the film's fragmentation due to the over-high film stress. Optical emission spectra (OES) of TiCl4/O2 DBD plasmas at various power supply driving frequencies are presented.

  6. Differentiation of vapor mixture with chemical sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulki; Jung, Youngmo; Moon, Hi Gyu; Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Bum Ju; Lim, Chaehyun; Choi, Jaebin; Seo, Minah; Kim, Jae Hun; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Sang Kyung; Kang, Chong Yun; Lee, Taikjin; Lee, Seok

    2015-07-01

    Arrays of partially selective chemical sensors have been the focus of extensive research over the past decades because of their potential for widespread application in ambient air monitoring, health and safety, and biomedical diagnostics. Especially, vapor sensor arrays based on functionalized nanomaterials have shown great promise with their high sensitivity by dimensionality and outstanding electronic properties. Here, we introduce experiments where individual vapors and mixtures of them are examined by different chemical sensor arrays. The collected data from those sensor arrays are further analyzed by a principal component analysis (PCA) and targeted vapors are recognized based on prepared database.

  7. Structure and gas-barrier properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on inner walls of cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Gong, Chunzhi; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of radio-frequency (RF) power on the structure and gas permeation through amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on cylindrical polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples is investigated. The results show that a higher radio-frequency power leads to a smaller sp 3/sp 2 value but produces fewer defects with smaller size. The permeability of PET samples decreases significantly after a-C:H deposition and the RF only exerts a small influence. However, the coating uniformity, color, and wettability of the surface are affected by the RF power. A higher RF power results in to better uniformity and it may be attributed to the combination of the high-density plasma and sample heating.

  8. Role of hydrogen on the deposition and properties of fluorinated silicon-nitride films prepared by inductively coupled plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using SiF{sub 4}/N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fandino, J.; Santana, G.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L.; Cheang-Wong, J.C.; Ortiz, A.; Alonso, J.C.

    2005-03-01

    Fluorinated silicon-nitride films have been prepared at low temperature (250 deg. C) by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using mixtures of SiF{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, Ar, and various H{sub 2} flow rates. The deposited films were characterized by means of single wavelength ellipsometry, infrared transmission, resonant nuclear reactions, Rutherford backscattering analysis, and current-voltage measurements. It was found that films deposited without hydrogen grow with the highest deposition rate, however, they result with the highest fluorine content ({approx}27 at. %) and excess of silicon (Si/N ratio{approx_equal}1.75). These films also have the lowest refractive index and the highest etch rate, and exhibit very poor dielectric properties. As a consequence of the high fluorine content, these films hydrolize rapidly upon exposure to the ambient moisture, forming Si-H and N-H bonds, however, they do not oxidize completely. The addition of hydrogen to the deposition process reduces the deposition rate but improves systematically the stability and insulating properties of the films by reducing the amount of both silicon and fluorine incorporated during growth. All the fluorinated silicon-nitride films deposited at hydrogen flow rates higher than 3.5 sccm resulted free of Si-H bonds. In spite of the fact that films obtained at the highest hydrogen flow rate used in this work are still silicon rich (Si/N ratio{approx_equal}1.0) and contain a considerable amount of fluorine ({approx}16 at. %), they are chemically stable and show acceptable dielectric properties.

  9. Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} interconversion in hydrocarbon/H{sub 2} gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jie; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Hay, Kenneth G.; Wright, Stephen; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-08-01

    CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules (and their interconversion) in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H{sub 2} gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used for plasma enhanced diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been investigated by line-of-sight infrared absorption spectroscopy in the wavenumber range of 1276.5-1273.1 cm{sup -1} using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. Parameters explored include process conditions [pressure, input power, source hydrocarbon, rare gas (Ar or Ne), input gas mixing ratio], height (z) above the substrate, and time (t) after addition of hydrocarbon to a pre-existing Ar/H{sub 2} plasma. The line integrated absorptions so obtained have been converted to species number densities by reference to the companion two-dimensional (r,z) modeling of the CVD reactor described in Mankelevich et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113304 (2008)]. The gas temperature distribution within the reactor ensures that the measured absorptions are dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules in the cool periphery of the reactor. Nonetheless, the measurements prove to be of enormous value in testing, tensioning, and confirming the model predictions. Under standard process conditions, the study confirms that all hydrocarbon source gases investigated (methane, acetylene, ethane, propyne, propane, and butane) are converted into a mixture dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The interconversion between these two species is highly dependent on the local gas temperature and the H atom number density, and thus on position within the reactor. CH{sub 4}->C{sub 2}H{sub 2} conversion occurs most efficiently in an annular shell around the central plasma (characterized by 1400CH{sub 4} is favored in the more distant regions where T{sub gas}<1400 K. Analysis of the multistep interconversion mechanism reveals substantial net consumption of H atoms accompanying the CH{sub 4}->C{sub 2}H{sub 2

  10. Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH4 and C2H2 interconversion in hydrocarbon/H2 gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jie; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Hay, Kenneth G.; Wright, Stephen; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-08-01

    CH4 and C2H2 molecules (and their interconversion) in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H2 gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used for plasma enhanced diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been investigated by line-of-sight infrared absorption spectroscopy in the wavenumber range of 1276.5-1273.1 cm-1 using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. Parameters explored include process conditions [pressure, input power, source hydrocarbon, rare gas (Ar or Ne), input gas mixing ratio], height (z) above the substrate, and time (t) after addition of hydrocarbon to a pre-existing Ar/H2 plasma. The line integrated absorptions so obtained have been converted to species number densities by reference to the companion two-dimensional (r ,z) modeling of the CVD reactor described in Mankelevich et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113304 (2008)]. The gas temperature distribution within the reactor ensures that the measured absorptions are dominated by CH4 and C2H2 molecules in the cool periphery of the reactor. Nonetheless, the measurements prove to be of enormous value in testing, tensioning, and confirming the model predictions. Under standard process conditions, the study confirms that all hydrocarbon source gases investigated (methane, acetylene, ethane, propyne, propane, and butane) are converted into a mixture dominated by CH4 and C2H2. The interconversion between these two species is highly dependent on the local gas temperature and the H atom number density, and thus on position within the reactor. CH4→C2H2 conversion occurs most efficiently in an annular shell around the central plasma (characterized by 1400

  11. Sensitivity of porous silicon rugate filters for chemical vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, M. S.; Sailor, M. J.; Fukami, K.; Sakka, T.; Ogata, Y. H.

    2008-04-01

    The characteristics of chemical vapor sensors constructed from porous Si rugate filters are examined. The peak position of the resonant wavelength exhibits a redshift response upon exposure to ethanol vapors. The filter response scales with the vapor partial pressure; the concentration level is estimated based on theoretical calculations. The formation of two stacked rugate filters with similar index contrast but different periodicities is used to test the extent of liquid infiltration into each individual filter. The penetration length of the condensate is found to be comparable to the thickness of the filter; in a 11.3-μm-thick filter, a steady-state response is achieved in 4min.

  12. pH-dependent immobilization of proteins on surfaces functionalized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of poly(acrylic acid)- and poly(ethylene oxide)-like films.

    PubMed

    Belegrinou, Serena; Mannelli, Ilaria; Lisboa, Patricia; Bretagnol, Frederic; Valsesia, Andrea; Ceccone, Giacomo; Colpo, Pascal; Rauscher, Hubert; Rossi, François

    2008-07-15

    The interaction of the proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (Lys), lactoferrin (Lf), and fibronectin (Fn) with surfaces of protein-resistant poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and protein-adsorbing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been studied with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). We focus on several parameters which are crucial for protein adsorption, i.e., the isoelectric point (pI) of the proteins, the pH of the solution, and the charge density of the sorbent surfaces, with the zeta-potential as a measure for the latter. The measurements reveal adsorption stages characterized by different segments in the plots of the dissipation vs frequency change. PEO remains protein-repellent for BSA, Lys, and Lf at pH 4-8.5, while weak adsorption of Fn was observed. On PAA, different stages of protein adsorption processes could be distinguished under most experimental conditions. BSA, Lys, Lf, and Fn generally exhibit a rapid initial adsorption phase on PAA, often followed by slower processes. The evaluation of the adsorption kinetics also reveals different adsorption stages, whereas the number of these stages does not always correspond to the structurally different phases as revealed by the D- f plots. The results presented here, together with information obtained in previous studies by other groups on the properties of these proteins and their interaction with surfaces, allow us to develop an adsorption scenario for each of these proteins, which takes into account electrostatic protein-surface and protein-protein interaction, but also the pH-dependent properties of the proteins, such as shape and exposure of specific domains. PMID:18549295

  13. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica flims, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  14. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma or thermally enhanced low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond films is an exciting development with many challenging fundamental problems. The early stages of nucleation is relevant to the initial growth rate and the perfection and morphology of the deposit. To isolate one of the factors that influence nucleation, we have studied the effect of surface topography on the nucleation process. Our earlier work has shown preferential nucleation on sharp convex features and we have proposed several possible reasons for this behavior, including dangling bonds at the convex features. In our recent work, we have extended our investigation to include a novel patterning of silicon substrates used to pattern silicon solar cells. The results are consistent with our earlier observations that the majority of nucleation events occur on protruding surface features. In an effort to establish whether dangling bonds at the protruding surfaces may be responsible for the selective nucleation, we have evaluated the dangling bond concentration using electron spin resonance. We have carried out deposition under nominally identical surface topography, but with different concentrations of dangling bonds at or near the surface. The results of this study indicate that dangling bonds play a minor role in enhancing nucleation, in contrast to a substantial role played by special surface topographical features. In the course of the past year, we have submitted four manuscripts for publication and have made six presentations.

  15. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  16. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  17. Synthetic Graphene Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Copper Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting Fung; Shen, Tian; Cao, Helin; Jauregui, Luis A.; Wu, Wei; Yu, Qingkai; Newell, David; Chen, Yong P.

    2013-04-01

    The discovery of graphene, a single layer of covalently bonded carbon atoms, has attracted intense interest. Initial studies using mechanically exfoliated graphene unveiled its remarkable electronic, mechanical and thermal properties. There has been a growing need and rapid development in large-area deposition of graphene film and its applications. Chemical vapor deposition on copper has emerged as one of the most promising methods in obtaining large-scale graphene films with quality comparable to exfoliated graphene. In this paper, we review the synthesis and characterizations of graphene grown on copper foil substrates by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. We also discuss potential applications of such large-scale synthetic graphene.

  18. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    chemiresistor device and used as a chemical sensor, where its resistance is temporarily modified while exposed to chemical compounds. The inherent, broad selective nature of graphene is demonstrated by testing a sensor against a diverse set of volatile organic compounds and also against a set of chemically similar compounds. The sensor exhibits excellent selectivity and is capable of achieving high classification accuracies. The kinetics of the sensor's response are further investigated revealing a relationship between the transient behavior of the response curve and physiochemical properties of the compounds, such as the molar mass and vapor pressure. This kinetic information is also shown to provide important information for further pattern recognition and classification, which is demonstrated by increased classification accuracy of very similar compounds. Covalent modification of the graphene surface is demonstrated by means of plasma treatment and free radical exchange, and sensing performance compared to an unmodified graphene sensor. Finally, the first example of a graphene-based, cross-reactive chemical sensor array is demonstrated by applying various polymers as coatings over an array of graphene sensors. The sensor array is tested against a variety of compounds, including the complex odor of Scotch whiskies, where it is capable of perfect classification of 10 Scotch whiskey variations.

  19. A novel chemically selective siloxane polymer for chemical vapor sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jia; Jiang, Yadong; Du, Xiaosong; Bi, Juan

    2010-10-01

    A new hydrogen-bond acidic carbosiloxane polymer for quartz crystal microbalance sensors (QCMs) application was synthesized via O-alkylation, Claisen rearrange, hydrosilylation reaction and functionalized the polysiloxane with trifluoroacetone groups (TFA). The trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane was characterized by FT-IR and 1HNMR. And this novel siloxane polymer was coated onto AT-cut 8 MHz QCM sensors to investigate its gas sensitive responses to the organophosphorus nerve agent stimulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor as well as other interfering organic vapors. The research work indicated that frequency shifts of the trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane based QCM sensor to the DMMP vapor were completely linear, and with a regression coefficient of 0.9973 in the concentration range of 10-60 ppm. In addition, the sensitivity of the fabricated QCM sensors to DMMP was up to 10.64 Hz/ ppm, and much higher than the other interfering vapors, limits of detection (LODs) of the QCM sensors was 0.28 ppm, thus high selectivity to DMMP was demonstrated in this work.

  20. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  1. Plasma Chemical Aspects Of Dust Formation In Hydrocarbon Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stepanovic, O.; Stefanovic, I.; Winter, J.

    2008-09-07

    This contribution deals with some plasma chemical aspects of dust formation in hydrocarbon plasmas. The interplay between dust formation and plasma chemistry will be discussed by means of different experimental results. One specific example concerns the formation of benzene and the role of atomic hydrogen for plasma chemical processes and dust formation in hydrocarbon discharges.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits including the wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading on to a sending air track is discussed. Passivation using electron beam deposited quartz is also considered.

  3. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  4. Chemical-vapor deposition of silicon from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Lutwack, R.; Praturi, A. K.

    1979-01-01

    Report lists tables of standard free-energy change, equilibrium constant, and heat of reaction for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane over temperature range of 100 to 1000 K. Data indicates silicon CVD may be a commercially economical process for production of silicon for solar arrays and other applications.

  5. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  6. Influence of plasma treatment time on plasma induced vapor phase grafting modification of PBO fiber surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Meng, L. H.; Huang, Y. D.

    2012-05-01

    The surface of poly-p-phenylene benzobisthiazole (PBO) fibers was treated through oxygen plasma induced vapor phase grafting (PIVPG) method under various oxygen plasma pre-treatment time conditions. The surface chemical composition, surface morphologies and surface free energy of pristine and treated PBO fibers were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Cahn DCAA system. The mechanics property of these fibers was evaluated by tensile strength and interfacial shear strength (IFSS). It was found that the surface characteristics of treated PBO fibers occurred significant change compare with the pristine PBO fibers. After treatment, the polar functional groups were introduced on the fiber surface. Carbon concentration decreased; oxygen concentration and elemental ratio of oxygen to carbon increased. Acrylic acid can react with the activated PBO fibers surface, which led to the fiber surface roughness increased. The surface free energy increased from 41.4 mN/m to 62.8 mN/m when PBO fibers were plasma pre-treated for 10 min, while the IFSS of PBO fibers with epoxy resin increased from 36.6 MPa to 55.8 MPa. Therefore, PIVPG can be used to enhance the interfacial bond between PBO fibers and epoxy resin.

  7. Chemiluminescence chemical detection of vapors and device

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.E.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.

    1995-07-10

    A solid phase chemical sensor includes a polymer film which has a chemiluminescent reagent immobilized therein. The polymer film and chemiluminescent reagent are chosen to significantly enhance the selectivity of the sensor to the analyte in the gaseous phase to which the sensor is exposed. The sensor is then positioned so that, when exposed to the gaseous mixture, any chemiluminescence generated will be detected by a photomultiplier tube or other photoelectric device, such as a photodiode. The sensor is particularly useful in the detection of O2, N2H4, SO2, NO2, and halogenated hydrocarbons.

  8. Modelling of Laser-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Research is directed at development of a detailed model of mass and heat transfer and chemical reaction in the pyrolysis of silane for the growth of thin amorphous silicon substrates incorporating laser heating of the gas phase above the film. The model will be the basis for evaluation of the relative importances of the decomposition of SiH4 in the vapor phase, mass transfer of the intermediate species, e.g., SiH2, and the evolution of hydrogen gas. Plans are also underway for developing a model for homogeneous nucleation of Si in the vapor phase to model the rate limitations observed at high gas-phase temperatures and high partial pressures of silane. Work was concentrated on an almost one-dimensional model for the coupling of the CO2 laser beam for heat transfer of the vapor phase with simple kinetic models for SiH4 decomposition and subsequent absorption of Si vapor on the substrate. Mass transfer in the vapor phase is assumed to be solely by diffusion. The role of convection in the vapor phase caused by the large changes in density in and around the center of the laser beam will be analyzed to evaluate the potential of microgravity experiments for increasing the uniformity of the film and the deposition rate.

  9. Solvent-assisted dewetting during chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xichong; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2009-10-01

    This study examines the use of a nonreactive solvent vapor, tert-butanol, during initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) to promote polymer film dewetting. iCVD is a solventless technique to grow polymer thin films directly from gas phase feeds. Using a custom-built axisymmetric hot-zone reactor, smooth poly(methyl methacrylate) films are grown from methyl methacrylate (MMA) and tert-butyl peroxide (TBPO). When solvent vapor is used, nonequilibrium dewetted structures comprising of randomly distributed polymer droplets are observed. The length scale of observed topographies, determined using power spectral density (PSD) analysis, ranges from 5 to 100 microm and is influenced by deposition conditions, especially the carrier gas and solvent vapor flow rates. The use of a carrier gas leads to faster deposition rates and suppresses thin film dewetting. The use of solvent vapor promotes dewetting and leads to larger length scales of the dewetted features. Control over lateral length scale is demonstrated by preparation of hierarchal "bump on bump" topographies. Vapor-induced dewetting is demonstrated on silicon wafer substrate with a native oxide layer and also on hydrophobically modified substrate prepared using silane coupling. Autophobic dewetting of PMMA from SiOx/Si during iCVD is attributed to a thin film instability driven by both long-range van der Waals forces and short-range polar interactions. PMID:19670895

  10. Effect of vapor-phase oxygen on chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Tomo-o.; Saiki, Koichiro

    2015-03-01

    To obtain a large-area single-crystal graphene, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on Cu is considered the most promising. Recently, the surface oxygen on Cu has been found to suppress the nucleation of graphene. However, the effect of oxygen in the vapor phase was not elucidated sufficiently. Here, we investigate the effect of O2 partial pressure (PO2) on the CVD growth of graphene using radiation-mode optical microscopy. The nucleation density of graphene decreases monotonically with PO2, while its growth rate reaches a maximum at a certain pressure. Our results indicate that PO2 is an important parameter to optimize in the CVD growth of graphene.

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  13. Single crystal diamond detectors grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuvè, C.; Angelone, M.; Bellini, V.; Balducci, A.; Donato, M. G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M. E.; Pillon, M.; Potenza, R.; Pucella, G.; Russo, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Sutera, C.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2007-01-01

    The detection properties of heteropitaxial (polycrystalline, pCVD) and homoepitaxial (single crystal, scCVD) diamond films grown by microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the Laboratories of Roma "Tor Vergata" University are reported. The pCVD diamond detectors were tested with α-particles from different sources and 12C ions produced by 15 MV Tandem accelerator at Southern National Laboratories (LNS) in Catania (Italy). pCVDs were also used to monitor 14 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T plasma at Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, U.K. The limit of pCVDs is the poor energy resolution. To overcome this problem, we developed scCVD diamonds using the same reactor parameters that optimized pCVD diamonds. scCVD were grown on a low cost (1 0 0) HPHT single crystal substrate. A detector 110 μm thick was tested under α-particles and under 14 MeV neutron irradiation. The charge collection efficiency spectrum measured under irradiation with a triple α-particle source shows three clearly resolved peaks, with an energy resolution of about 1.1%. The measured spectra under neutron irradiation show a well separated C(n,α0)9Be12 reaction peak with an energy spread of 0.5 MeV for 14.8 MeV neutrons and 0.3 MeV for 14.1 MeV neutrons, which are fully compatible with the energy spread of the incident neutron beams.

  14. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  15. Capillary - Discharge Based Hand-Held Detector For Chemical Vapor Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang

    2005-05-31

    A handheld/portable detector for chemical vapor monitoring includes a housing and a discharge chamber that is established therein. The plasma discharge has a relatively small volume, e.g., in the micro-liter range. A first electrode and a second electrode are disposed within the discharge chamber and a discharge gap is established therebetween. A sample gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a sample gas to the discharge chamber. Also, a plasma gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a plasma gas thereto. Accordingly, the plasma gas can be used to maintain microplasma discharge between the electrodes and the sample gas can be introduced into the microplasma discharge. A spectrometer optically connected to the handheld/portable detector is used to measure the radiation emitted by the sample gas when subjected to the microplasma discharge.

  16. Growth of zinc oxide by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Makoto; Eto, Toshiaki; Wang, JiFeng; Masa, Yoshihiko; Isshiki, Minoru

    2005-04-01

    ZnO crystal growth by chemical vapor transport (CVT) is carried out using carbon as a transport agent. Under the optimum ΔT and growth temperature, a single crystal was grown. The carbon contamination is not detected by SIMS measurements and all the crystals are orange-red colored. It is claimed that the orange-red color is attributed to the shift of stoichiometry to zinc rich atmosphere.

  17. Chemical vapor infiltration of non-oxide ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites are enabling new, high temperature structural applications. Chemical vapor infiltration methods for producing these composites are being investigated, with the complexity of filament weaves and deposition chemistry merged with standard heat and mass transport relationships. Silicon carbide- based materials are, by far, the most mature, and are already being used in aerospace applications. This paper addresses the state-of-the-art of the technology and outlines current issues.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition coating of fibers using microwave application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Hoover, Gordon (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition coating is carried out in a cylindrical cavity. The fibers are heated by a microwave source that is uses a TM0N0 mode, where O is an integer, and produces a field that depends substantially only on radius. The fibers are observed to determine their heating, and their position can be adjusted. Once the fibers are uniformly heated, a CVD reagent is added to process the fibers.

  19. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  20. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  1. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  2. Chemical vapor deposition modeling: An assessment of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The shortcomings of earlier approaches that assumed thermochemical equilibrium and used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams are pointed out. Significant advancements in predictive capabilities due to recent computational developments, especially those for deposition rates controlled by gas phase mass transport, are demonstrated. The importance of using the proper boundary conditions is stressed, and the availability and reliability of gas phase and surface chemical kinetic information are emphasized as the most limiting factors. Future directions for CVD are proposed on the basis of current needs for efficient and effective progress in CVD process design and optimization.

  3. A numerical study of the sodium vapor discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Ahmed, R.; Araoud, Z.; Charrada, K.

    2011-06-15

    In this article we will discuss, in detail, the results obtained for a simple geometry of discharge (two-dimensional stationary or one-dimensional non stationary). It aims to give an idea about the discharge properties that emerge from the interaction of various physical processes. By using a variation of the fundamental parameters, we can show the capacity of the model to reproduce all the macroscopic properties of plasma discharge in sodium vapor. The validation of the model will be discussed and some comparisons with the existing experimental data will be presented.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of conformal, functional, and responsive polymer films.

    PubMed

    Alf, Mahriah E; Asatekin, Ayse; Barr, Miles C; Baxamusa, Salmaan H; Chelawat, Hitesh; Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Petruczok, Christy D; Sreenivasan, Ramaswamy; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Trujillo, Nathan J; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Xu, Jingjing; Gleason, Karen K

    2010-05-11

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization utilizes the delivery of vapor-phase monomers to form chemically well-defined polymeric films directly on the surface of a substrate. CVD polymers are desirable as conformal surface modification layers exhibiting strong retention of organic functional groups, and, in some cases, are responsive to external stimuli. Traditional wet-chemical chain- and step-growth mechanisms guide the development of new heterogeneous CVD polymerization techniques. Commonality with inorganic CVD methods facilitates the fabrication of hybrid devices. CVD polymers bridge microfabrication technology with chemical, biological, and nanoparticle systems and assembly. Robust interfaces can be achieved through covalent grafting enabling high-resolution (60 nm) patterning, even on flexible substrates. Utilizing only low-energy input to drive selective chemistry, modest vacuum, and room-temperature substrates, CVD polymerization is compatible with thermally sensitive substrates, such as paper, textiles, and plastics. CVD methods are particularly valuable for insoluble and infusible films, including fluoropolymers, electrically conductive polymers, and controllably crosslinked networks and for the potential to reduce environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with solvents. Quantitative models aid the development of large-area and roll-to-roll CVD polymer reactors. Relevant background, fundamental principles, and selected applications are reviewed. PMID:20544886

  5. Model for the Vaporization of Mixed Organometallic Compounds in the Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Temperature Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Guangyao; Zhou, Gang; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1993-01-01

    A model of the vaporization and mass transport of mixed organometallics from a single source for thin film metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented. A stoichiometric gas phase can be obtained from a mixture of the organometallics in the desired mole ratios, in spite of differences in the volatilities of the individual compounds. Proper film composition and growth rates are obtained by controlling the velocity of a carriage containing the organometallics through the heating zone of a vaporizer.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition modeling for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    The formalism for the accurate modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes has matured based on the well established principles of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics in the gas phase and on surfaces. The utility and limitations of such models are discussed in practical applications for high temperature structural materials. Attention is drawn to the complexities and uncertainties in chemical kinetics. Traditional approaches based on only equilibrium thermochemistry and/or transport phenomena are defended as useful tools, within their validity, for engineering purposes. The role of modeling is discussed within the context of establishing the link between CVD process parameters and material microstructures/properties. It is argued that CVD modeling is an essential part of designing CVD equipment and controlling/optimizing CVD processes for the production and/or coating of high performance structural materials.

  7. The response of the ionosphere to the injection of chemically reactive vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    As a gas released in the ionosphere expands, it is rapidly cooled. When the vapor becomes sufficiently tenuous, it is reheated by collisions with the ambient atmosphere and its flow is then governed by diffusive expansion. As the injected gas becomes well mixed with the plasma, a hole is created by chemical processes. In the case of diatomic hydrogen release, depression of the electron concentrations is governed by the charge exchange reaction between oxygen ions and hydrogen, producing positive hydroxyl ions. Hydroxyl ions rapidly react with the electron gas to produce excited oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Enhanced airglow emissions result from the transition of the excited atoms to lower energy states. The electron temperature in the depleted region rises sharply causing a thermal expansion of the plasma and a further reduction in the local plasma concentration.

  8. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  9. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  10. Fundamental studies of chemical vapor deposition diamond growth processes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Heatherly, L.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing laser spectroscopic techniques to foster a fundamental understanding of diamond film growth by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several spectroscopic techniques are under investigation to identify intermediate species present in the bulk reactor volume, the thin active volume immediately above the growing film, and the actual growing surface. Such a comprehensive examination of the overall deposition process is necessary because a combination of gas phase and surface chemistry is probably operating. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) techniques have been emphasized. A growth rector that permits through-the-substrate gas sampling for REMPI/time-of-flight mass spectroscopy has been developed. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Unusual thermopower of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung; Yurgens, August

    2014-01-01

    We report on thermopower (TEP) and resistance measurements of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Unlike the conventional resistance of pristine graphene, the gate-dependent TEP shows a large electron-hole asymmetry. This can be accounted for by inhomogeneity of the CVD-graphene where individual graphene regions contribute with different TEPs. At the high magnetic field and low temperature, the TEP has large fluctuations near the Dirac point associated with the disorder in the CVD-graphene. TEP measurements reveal additional characteristics of CVD-graphene, which are difficult to obtain from the measurement of resistance alone.

  12. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J.; Starr, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  13. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  14. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide mirrors for extreme ultraviolet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Osantowski, John F.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Saha, Timo T.; Wright, Geraldine A.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Fleetwood, Charles M.; Madison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in optical coating and materials technology have made possible the development of instruments with substantially improved efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). For example, the development of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC mirrors provides an opportunity to extend the range of normal-incidence instruments dow to 60 nm. CVD SiC is a highly polishable material yielding low- scattering surfaces. High UV reflectivity and desirable mechanical and thermal properties make CVD SiC an attractive mirror and/or coating material for EUV applications. The EUV performance of SiC mirrors, as well as some strengths and problem areas, is discussed.

  15. Unusual thermopower of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-01-13

    We report on thermopower (TEP) and resistance measurements of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Unlike the conventional resistance of pristine graphene, the gate-dependent TEP shows a large electron-hole asymmetry. This can be accounted for by inhomogeneity of the CVD-graphene where individual graphene regions contribute with different TEPs. At the high magnetic field and low temperature, the TEP has large fluctuations near the Dirac point associated with the disorder in the CVD-graphene. TEP measurements reveal additional characteristics of CVD-graphene, which are difficult to obtain from the measurement of resistance alone.

  16. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-08-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{sup +} fiber preforms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90 %. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher order silanes has been studied for fabricating amorphous hydrogenated silicon thin-film solar cells. Intrinsic and doped a-Si:H films were deposited in a reduced-pressure, tubular-flow reactor, using disilane feed-gas. Conditions for depositing intrinsic films at growth rates up to 10 A/s were identified. Electrical and optical properties, including dark conductivity, photoconductivity, activation energy, optical absorption, band-gap and sub-band-gap absorption properties of CVD intrinsic material were characterized. Parameter space for depositing intrinsic and doped films, suitable for device analysis, was identified.

  18. Advances in modeling of chemical vapor infiltration for tube fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.

    1998-04-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) can be used for fabrication of tube-shaped components of ceramic matrix composites. Recent experimental work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes process and materials development studies using a small tube reactor. Use of FCVI for this geometry involves significant changes in fixturing as compared to disk-shaped preforms previously fabricated. The authors have used their computer model of the CVI process to simulate tube densification and to identify process modifications that will decrease processing time. This report presents recent model developments and applications.

  19. Damping mechanisms in chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Goldsby, Jon C.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluating the damping of reinforcement fibers is important for understanding their microstructures and the vibrational response of their structural composites. In this study the damping capacities of two types of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers were measured from -200 C to as high as 800 C. Measurements were made at frequencies in the range 50 to 15000 Hz on single cantilevered fibers. At least four sources were identified which contribute to fiber damping, the most significant being thermoelastic damping and grain boundary sliding. The mechanisms controlling all sources and their potential influence on fiber and composite performance are discussed.

  20. Spectroscopic Observation of Chemical Interaction Between Impact-induced Vapor Clouds and the Ambient Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugita, S.; Heineck, J. T.; Schultz, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions within impact-induced vapor clouds were observed in laboratory experiments using a spectroscopic method. The results indicate that projectile-derived carbon-rich vapor reacts intensively with atmospheric nitrogen.

  1. Electromagnetic Properties of Impact-Generated Plasma, Vapor and Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.A.; Schultz, P.H.

    1998-11-02

    Plasma, vapor and debris associated with an impact or explosive event have been demonstrated in the laboratory to produce radiofrequency and optical electromagnetic emissions that can be diagnostic of the event. Such effects could potentially interfere with communications or remote sensing equipment if an impact occurred, for example, on a satellite. More seriously, impact generated plasma could end the life of a satellite by mechanisms that are not well understood and not normally taken into account in satellite design. For example, arc/discharge phenomena resulting from highly conductive plasma acting as a current path across normally shielded circuits may have contributed to the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite on August 11, 1993. The possibility of significant storm activity during the Leonid meteor showers of November 1998, 1999 and 2000 (impact velocity, 72 km/s) has heightened awareness of potential vulnerabilities from hypervelocity electromagnetic effects to orbital assets. The concern is justified. The amount of plasma, electrostatic charge and the magnitude of the resulting currents and electric fields scale nearly as the cube of the impact velocity. Even for microscopic Leonid impacts, the amount of plasma approaches levels that could be dangerous to spacecraft electronics. The degree of charge separation that occurs during hypervelocity impacts scales linearly with impactor mass. The resulting magnetic fields increase linearly with impactor radius and could play a significant role in our understanding of the paleomagnetism of planetary surfaces. The electromagnetic properties of plasma produced by hypervelocity impact have been exploited by researchers as a diagnostic tool, invoked to potentially explain the magnetically jumbled state of the lunar surface and blamed for the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite. The production of plasma in and around an impact event can lead to several effects: (1) the

  2. Condensable chemical vapors for sterilization of freeze dryers.

    PubMed

    Bardat, A; Schmitthaeusler, R; Renzi, E

    1996-01-01

    Sterilization of freeze dryers is usually performed by subjecting them to saturated steam under pressure by steam (121 degrees C, 2 bar a., 30 minutes). In order to avoid such stressful conditions, another process was designed on the basis of a strong oxidizing mixture of condensable chemical vapors, consisting of ozone and hydrogen peroxide in acidic conditions. This process works at sub-zero temperatures up to 30 degrees C and under negative pressure. 10(6), inoculum of standard biological indicators as well as wild types of bioburden were easely sterilized from 2 minutes up to 10 minutes. Other parameters were studied, in order to optimize the main process conditions: temperature, pressure, concentration of chemicals, type of micro-organisms and their environmental surroundings. PMID:8935775

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaert, R.J.; Russell, T.W.F.; Klein, M.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rocheleau, R.E.; Baron, B.N. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1989-10-01

    The authors describe hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited at growth rates of 1 to 30 A/s by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane source gas at 24 torr total pressure in a tubular reactor. The effects of substrate temperature and gas holding time (flow rate) on film growth rate and effluent gas composition were measured at temperatures ranging from 360{sup 0} to 485{sup 0}C and gas holding times from 3 to 62s. Effluent gases determined by gas chromatography included silane, disilane and other higher order silanes. A chemical reaction engineering model, based on a silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion gas phase reaction network and film growth from both SiH/sub 2/ and high molecular weight silicon species, Si/sub n/H/sub 2n/, was developed. The model predictions were in good agreement with experimentally determined growth rates and effluent gas compositions.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic silicon carbide. Patent Application

    SciTech Connect

    Addamiano, A.

    1985-07-02

    This invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide crystals. More specifically, this invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). One object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of cubic SiC for high temperature electronic devices. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of highly pure, single crystal cubic SiC that is duplicable. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of large-area single-crystal wafers of cubic SiC. These and other objects of the present invention can be achieved by a method for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic Silicon Carbide (SiC) comprising the steps of etching silicon substrated having one mechanically polished face; depositing a thin buffer layer of cubic SiC formed by reaction between a heated Si substrate and a H2-C3H8 gas mixuture; and depositing SiC on the buffer layer at high temperature using H2+C3HY+SiH4 mixture.

  5. Chemical vapor composite silicon carbide for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, C. T.; Webb, K.

    2006-06-01

    Components for space telescopes using high quality silicon carbide (SiC) produced via the chemical vapor composite (CVC) process are currently under development. This CVC process is a modification of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and results in a dramatic reduction in residual stress of the SiC deposit. The resultant CVC SiC material has high modulus, high thermal conductivity and can be polished to better than 1nm RMS surface roughness, making it ideal for space telescopes requiring lightweight, stiff and thermally stable components. Moreover, due to its lower intrinsic stress, CVC SiC is much more readily scaled to large sizes and manufactured into the complex geometries needed for the telescope assemblies. Results are presented on the optical figure for a lightweight 15cm CVC SiC mirror demonstrating low wavefront error (<30nm peak-to-valley and <5.1nm rms). Theoretical and experimental modal analysis measured the first four resonant modes of the mirror and found a first modal frequency in the vicinity of 2100 Hz, representing a highly stiff mirror.

  6. Sample introduction into a direct current plasma by filament vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation describes sample introduction into a direct current plasma by a tungsten filament vaporizer. The filament heater was designed to resistively heat a 0.1 mm diameter tungsten wire quickly and efficiently. The heating system is under microprocessor control for precise power application to the filament. The cell volume is small, less than 4 mL, and the accessibility of the primary emission zone allowed placement of the filament less than 5 cm from the confluence point of the plasma. The first study describes some of the fundamental design considerations, as well as performance of the interface. The absolute mass detection limits for Ca, Fe, Al, and Cu are 80, 2,000, 90, and 200 fg respectively. The blackbody emission temperature of the filament was measured. The initial heating rate was 50,000{degree}C/s. Observations are reported for optimization of operating parameters, as well as how to locate the region of maximum analyte emission intensity. Finally, the application of this technique to the analysis of a biological sample, swine blood, is reported. The second study examines the sources of noise and their components. Noise is grouped into additive and multiplicative noise occurring in three frequency ranges. The largest contribution, greater than 90%, was shot to shot multiplicative variations in sample vaporization and excitation. The third study examines the effect of addition of concomitant substances to the analyte. The substances were added both as metal salts to the aqueous analyte solution and as dopant gases to the carrier gas. Measured transport efficiencies ranged from 60 to 103% for manganese under various concomitant conditions. A 1% doping of the carrier gas with hydrogen caused significant enhancement of the emission signal of three metals, Fe, Al, and Ca. Enhancement correlated with volatility of the reduced form of the element.

  7. Modeling of InP metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Linda R.; Clark, Ivan O.; Kui, J.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor is being modeled with a commercially available computational fluid dynamics modeling code. The mathematical treatment of the MOCVD process has four primary areas of concern: 1) transport phenomena, 2) chemistry, 3) boundary conditions, and 4) numerical solution methods. The transport processes involved in CVD are described by conservation of total mass, momentum, energy, and atomic species. Momentum conservation is described by a generalized form of the Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid and laminar flow. The effect of Soret diffusion on the transport of particular chemical species and on the predicted deposition rate is examined. Both gas-phase and surface chemical reactions are employed in the model. Boundary conditions are specified at the inlet and walls of the reactor for temperature, fluid flow and chemical species. The coupled set of equations described above is solved by a finite difference method over a nonuniform rectilinear grid in both two and three dimensions. The results of the 2-D computational model is presented for gravity levels of zero- and one-g. The predicted growth rates at one-g are compared to measured growth rates on fused silica substrates.

  8. Minefield edge detection using a novel chemical vapor sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Mark E.; Sikes, John

    2003-09-01

    Nomadics has developed a novel sensing technology that detects the chemical signature of explosives emanating from buried landmines. Canines have demonstrated the ability to detect these signatures, but use of canines for this task presents a number of logistical and physical limitations that can be overcome by use of chemical sensors. Nomadics is the exclusive licensee of novel amplifying fluorescent polymer materials developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). These materials enable detection of ultra-trace concentrations of nitroaromatic compounds such as TNT, the most commonly utilized explosive in the production of landmines. When vapors of nitroaromatics are presented to the sensor, the fluorescent polymers emit light at a greatly reduced intensity, a property that enables rapid detection of trace quantities of explosives using relatively low-cost electronics and optics. Studies performed by Jenkins et al suggest that the chemical signature of a landmine is heterogeneous and can be dispersed a significant distance from the location of the mine. Because the signature is not highly localized and is not characterized by a well-defined concentration gradient, the sensor may have difficulty indicating the exact position of a mine, especially in high-density minefields. Conversely, if the chemical signature extends some distance from the mine position, the sensor may have utility in detecting the edges of minefields. In combat scenarios, this will allow commanders to select safe paths for personnel and vehicles. This paper will present the latest findings related to minefield edge detection at several test sites.

  9. Electrical Properties of (Ba, Sr)TiO3 Films on Ru Bottom Electrodes Prepared by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition at Extremely Low Temperature and Rapid Thermal Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Shuji; Akahane, Reiko; Arita, Koji; Yabuta, Hisato; Yamamichi, Shintaro; Yoshida, Masaji; Kato, Yoshitake

    1999-04-01

    (Ba, Sr)TiO3 (BST) films were prepared on Ru bottom electrodes by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition at extremely low temperature and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Leakage current characteristics were improved by lowering the BST deposition temperature down to 120°C. (Ba+Sr)-rich films with a (Ba+Sr)/Ti ratio of 1.1 1.5 had lower leakage current densities than stoichiometric and Ti-rich films with a ratio of 0.8 0.9. Cross sectional transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the 120°C-deposited and 700°C-RTA-treated (Ba+Sr)-rich film had a granular structure and smooth interfaces with the electrodes. The stoichiometric and Ti-rich films had columnar structures and larger interface roughness. As a result, low leakage current density less than 10-7 A/cm2 at ±1 V were obtained for 30 nm-thick BST films with a (Ba+Sr)/Ti ratio of 1.1 1.5 by combination of 120°C deposition and 700°C RTA.

  10. Investigation of Ru/TiN Bottom Electrodes Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sang Yeol; Kim, Beom Seok; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Kim, Hyeong Joon; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Kwanghee; Lim, Han-Jin; Yoo, Cha-Young; Kim, Sung-Tae

    2004-09-01

    Ru thin films were prepared by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using cyclopentadienyl-propylcyclopentadienlylruthenium(II) [RuCp(i-PrCp)] and the nucleation behaviors of Ru films on Ta2O5, TiN, Si3N4, SiO2, TiO2 substrates were investigated. It appeared that the difference in nucleation behaviors on various substrates is due to the bonding type between atoms in substrate materials. The nucleation property of Ru films on TiN was successfully improved by plasma treatment of the TiN substrate using Ar before film deposition. It was found that the Ar plasma treatment selectively removes N ions from the surface, makes the TiN surface more metallic or ionic (due to the residual Ti-O bonding), and reduces the nucleation barrier. In addition, the oxidation resistance of Ru/TiN layers was improved by H2 annealing, which made the Ru films more dense.

  11. Nanograined WC-Co Composite Powders by Chemical Vapor Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Taegong; Sohn, H. Y.; Han, Gilsoo; Kim, Young-Ugk; Hwang, Kyu Sup; Mena, M.; Fang, Zhigang Z.

    2008-02-01

    Nanograined tungsten carbide (WC) Co composite powders were prepared by a chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) process that has previously been used for preparing the aluminides of titanium and nickel and other metallic and intermetallic powders at the University of Utah. To determine the optimum condition for producing nanograined WC-Co composite powders, the effects of carburization temperature, CH4 to WCl6 ratio, CH4 to H2 ratio, CoCl2 contents, and residence time of WC on the powder composition and particle size were investigated. The reduction and carburization of the vaporized chlorides by CH4-H2 mixtures produced nanograined WC and Co composite powder, which sometimes contained small levels of W2C, W, or the η (Co3W3C) phase. The presence of these incompletely carburized phases can be tolerated because they can be fully carburized during the subsequent sintering process. These phases can also be fully carburized by a separate post-treatment. The products were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). As a result, nanograined WC-Co composite with the particle size less than 30 nm was obtained.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  13. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  14. Optics applications of chemical vapor deposited beta-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Pickering, Michael A.

    1997-09-01

    The fabrication process, properties and optics applications of transparent and opaque chemical vapor deposited (CVD) (beta) -SiC are reviewed. CVD-SiC is produced by the pyrolysis of methyltrichlorosilane, in excess H2, in a low-pressure CVD reactor. The CVD process has been successfully scaled to produce monolithic SiC parts of diameter up to 1.5-m and thickness 2.5-cm. The characterization of CVD-SiC for important physical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties indicates that it is a superior material for optics applications. Important properties of CVD-SiC are compared with those of the other candidate mirror and window materials. The applications of CVD-SiC for lightweight optics, x-ray telescopes, optical buffers, lens molds, optical standards and windows and domes are discussed in detail.

  15. Chemical vapor deposited {beta}-SiC for optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goela, J.S.; Pikcering, M.A.; Taylor, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The fabrication, properties and optics applications of transparent and opaque Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) {beta}-SiC are reviewed. CVD-SiC is fabricated by the pyrolysis of methyltrichlorosilane, in excess H{sub 2}, in a low-pressure CVD reactor. The CVD process has been successfully scaled to produce monolithic SiC parts of diameter up to 1.5 m and thickness 2.5 cm. The characterization of CVD-SiC for important physical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties indicate that it is a superior material for optics applications. CVD-SiC properties are compared with those of the other candidate mirror and window materials. SiC process/property relationships are discussed, emphasizing the differences in process conditions, microstructure, and properties between transparent and opaque CVD-SiC.

  16. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K.

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  17. Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Troppenz, Gerald V. Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H.

    2013-12-07

    The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27 cm{sup −1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

  18. Development and study of chemical vapor deposited tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, G. H.; Bryant, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for the chemical vapor deposition of alloys was developed. The process, termed pulsing, involves the periodic injection of reactant gases into a previously-evacuated reaction chamber where they blanket the substrate almost instantaneously. Formation of alternating layers of the alloy components and subsequent homogenization allows the formation of an alloy of uniform composition with the composition being determined by the duration and relative numbers of the various cycles. The technique has been utilized to produce dense alloys of uniform thickness and composition (Ta- 10 wt % W) by depositing alternating layers of Ta and W by the hydrogen reduction of TaCl5 and WCl6. A similar attempt to deposit a Ta - 8 wt % W - 2 wt% Hf alloy was unsuccessful because of the difficulty in reducing HfCl4 at temperatures below those at which gas phase nucleation of Ta and W occurred.

  19. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  20. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  1. Chemical vapor synthesis and characterization of aluminum nanopowder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Won; Sohn, Hong Yong; Choi, Young Joon; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    Aluminum is a component in many promising hydrogen storage materials such as aluminum hydride and complex aluminum hydrides. In this research, Al and TiAl 3-containing Al nanopowders were prepared by a chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) process using Mg as the reducing agent. XRD and EDS results indicated that the produced powder was composed of Al or Al with TiAl 3. The shape of the powder was spherical with the average size in the range of 10-50 nm measured by SEM, TEM, BET and ZetaPALS compared with the typically larger than 100 nm for commercially available fine Al powders. In addition, the effects of the operating conditions such as Ar flow rate, precursor feed rate and reaction temperature on the properties of the product powder were investigated.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition growth of patterned graphene on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Humberto; Wang, Bei; Zhu, J.

    2010-03-01

    Graphene possesses unique electronic properties and application potentials. However, the synthesis of high-quality, single-layer graphene on large scale remains challenging. Mechanical exfoliation from graphite crystals yields graphene of the highest quality but in an uncontrolled and non-scalable way. Epitaxial growth on SiC has made significant advances in large-scale synthesis, although the cost is relatively high. Very recently, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used to grow graphene on Ni and Cu surfaces and has also produced large-area graphene of reasonably high quality. Cracks and ripples, however, present considerable challenges to the CVD growth and transfer process. We report the CVD growth of single-layer graphene on patterned, micron-size copper templates. Raman spectra of the films show low D-band and relatively narrow 2D peak, suggesting high quality. We present and discuss the transport properties of graphene films transferred onto an insulating substrate.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition fluid flow simulation modelling tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullister, Edward T.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes requires a general purpose computational fluid dynamics package combined with specialized capabilities for high temperature chemistry. In this report, we describe the implementation of these specialized capabilities in the spectral element code NEKTON. The thermal expansion of the gases involved is shown to be accurately approximated by the low Mach number perturbation expansion of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The radiative heat transfer between multiple interacting radiating surfaces is shown to be tractable using the method of Gebhart. The disparate rates of reaction and diffusion in CVD processes are calculated via a point-implicit time integration scheme. We demonstrate the use above capabilities on prototypical CVD applications.

  4. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of low reflective cobalt (II) oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin-Chalhoub, Eliane; Duguet, Thomas; Samélor, Diane; Debieu, Olivier; Ungureanu, Elisabeta; Vahlas, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Low reflective CoO coatings are processed by chemical vapor deposition from Co2(CO)8 at temperatures between 120 °C and 190 °C without additional oxygen source. The optical reflectivity in the visible and near infrared regions stems from 2 to 35% depending on deposition temperature. The combination of specific microstructural features of the coatings, namely a fractal "cauliflower" morphology and a grain size distribution more or less covering the near UV and IR wavelength ranges enhance light scattering and gives rise to a low reflectivity. In addition, the columnar morphology results in a density gradient in the vertical direction that we interpret as a refractive index gradient lowering reflectivity further down. The coating formed at 180 °C shows the lowest average reflectivity (2.9%), and presents an interesting deep black diffuse aspect.

  6. Synthesis of large-size graphene by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruizhe; Ding, Yao; Gan, Lin; Luo, Zhengtang

    2015-09-01

    The requirement for long-range structure coherence and property uniformity for graphene-based electronics are crucial for their applications in electronics. Here, we briefly review our recent progress on synthesis of large-size graphene by seeded growth method. We demonstrate a seeded growth method which allows us to reduce the nucleation density in early stage of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) leading to the production of low density of graphene grains and consequently achieve grain size of sub-centimeter. We further demonstrate that we can amplify the graphene grain size by limiting the second seeded growth only from the graphene seed edges. Moreover, we demonstrate that similar method can be used for the preparation of large-grain bilayer graphene flakes.

  7. Rapid fabrication of ceramic composite tubes using chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.; Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Matlin, W.M.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramic composite tubes can be fabricated with silicon carbide matrix and Nicalon fiber reinforcement using forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI). The process model GTCVI is used to design the equipment configuration and to identify conditions for rapid, uniform densification. The initial injector and mandrel design produced radial and longitudinal temperature gradients too large for uniform densification. Improved designs have been evaluated with the model. The most favorable approach utilizes a free-standing preform and an insulated water-cooled gas injector. Selected process conditions are based on the temperature limit of the fiber, matrix stoichiometry and reagent utilization efficiency. Model runs for a tube 12 inches long, 4 inches OD and 1/4 inch wall thickness show uniform densification in approximately 15 hours.

  8. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and test the materials in a static bath and lab-scale Hall cell.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis F.B. Jr.; Delahoy, A.E.

    1985-07-15

    Deposition conditions and film properties for a variety of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and silicon-carbon films produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are discussed. Deposition gases include monosilane, disilane, trisilane, and acetylene. Two types of optically wide band-gap p layers are obtained. One of these window p layers (without carbon) has been extensively tested in photovoltaic devices. Remarkably, this p layer can be deposited between about 200 to 300 /sup 0/C. A typical open circuit voltage in an all CVD p-i-n device is 0.70--0.72 V, and in a hybrid device where the i and n layers are deposited by glow discharge, 0.8--0.83 V.

  10. Textures and morphologies of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.; Horton, L.L.; Specht, E.D.; Begun, G.M. ); Wang, Z.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The textures, surface morphologies, structural perfection, and properties of diamond films grown by activated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) vary greatly with the growth conditions. The evolution of two commonly observed polycrystalline morphologies, which give rise to <110> textures, will be described as well as the development of four films grown to produce <100>, <111>, and near <100>'' textures with various combinations of growth facets. These films were grown to test models of texture development. Films free of twins, microtwins, and stacking faults are deposited when only (100) facets are permitted to grow. In polycrystalline materials, special conditions must be met to avoid the formation of planar defects at the peripheries of individual crystallites. The planar defects grow from (111) or mixed microfaceted surfaces. Twinning plays an important role in growth of (111) faceted surfaces. The films have been characterized with Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and optical methods. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Joel S.; Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I.

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  12. Chemical and Magnetic Order in Vapor-Deposited Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Peter Wiliam

    1995-01-01

    A stochastic Monte Carlo model of vapor deposition and growth of a crystalline, binary, A_3 B metallic alloy with a negative energy of mixing has been developed which incorporates deposition and surface diffusion in a physically correct manner and allows the simulation of deposition rates that are experimentally realizable. The effects of deposition rate and growth temperature on the development of short range order (SRO) in vapor-deposited films have been examined using this model. SRO in the simulated films increases with growth temperature up to the point at which the temperature corresponds to the energy of mixing, but we see no corresponding development of anisotropic SRO (preferential ordering of A-B pairs along the growth direction). Epitaxial (100) and (111) CoPt_3 films have been deposited over a range of growth temperatures from -50^circ C to 800^circC. Curie temperature (T_{rm c}) and saturation magnetization are dramatically enhanced in those films grown near 400^circ C over the values expected for the chemically homogeneous alloy. Magnetization data indicates that the high T _{rm c} films are inhomogeneous. These phenomena are interpreted as evidence of a previously unobserved magnetically driven miscibility gap in the Co-Pt phase diagram. Films grown near 400^circ C exhibit large uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy that cannot be accounted for by strain. The observed anisotropy coincides with the chemical phase separation and it seems likely that these two phenomena are related. Long range order (LRO) in the as-deposited films peaks at a growth temperature of 630^circC and then decreases with decreasing growth temperature. The decrease in LRO is either due to kinetic frustration or to competition from magnetically induced Co clustering. Theoretical phase diagrams based on the appropriate Blume-Emery-Griffiths Hamiltonian suggest the latter.

  13. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  14. Direct synthesis of large area graphene on insulating substrate by gallium vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Katsuhisa Hiyama, Takaki; Kuwajima, Tomoya; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Hirukawa, Ayaka; Kano, Emi; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2015-03-02

    A single layer of graphene with dimensions of 20 mm × 20 mm was grown directly on an insulating substrate by chemical vapor deposition using Ga vapor catalysts. The graphene layer showed highly homogeneous crystal quality over a large area on the insulating substrate. The crystal quality of the graphene was measured by Raman spectroscopy and was found to improve with increasing Ga vapor density on the reaction area. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the synthesized graphene had a perfect atomic-scale crystal structure within its grains, which ranged in size from 50 nm to 200 nm.

  15. NBI - plasma vaporization hybrid approach in bladder cancer endoscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Stănescu, F; Geavlete, B; Georgescu, D; Jecu, M; Moldoveanu, C; Adou, L; Bulai, C; Ene, C; Geavlete, P

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: A prospective study was performed aiming to evaluate the surgical efficacy, perioperative safety profile, diagnostic accuracy and medium term results of a multi-modal approach consisting in narrow band imaging (NBI) cystoscopy and bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) when compared to the standard protocol represented by white light cystoscopy (WLC) and transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT). Materials & Methods: A total of 260 patients with apparently at least one bladder tumor over 3 cm were included in the trial. In the first group, 130 patients underwent conventional and NBI cystoscopy followed by BPV, while in a similar number of cases of the second arm, classical WLC and TURBT were applied. In all non-muscle invasive bladder tumors’ (NMIBT) pathologically confirmed cases, standard monopolar Re-TUR was performed at 4-6 weeks after the initial intervention, followed by one year’ BCG immunotherapy. The follow-up protocol included abdominal ultrasound, urinary cytology and WLC, performed every 3 months for a period of 2 years. Results: The obturator nerve stimulation, bladder wall perforation, mean hemoglobin level drop, postoperative bleeding, catheterization period and hospital stay were significantly reduced for the plasma vaporization technique by comparison to conventional resection. Concerning tumoral detection, the present data confirmed the NBI superiority when compared to standard WLC regardless of tumor stage (95.3% vs. 65.1% for CIS, 93.3% vs. 82.2% for pTa, 97.4% vs. 94% for pT1, 95% vs. 84.2% overall). During standard Re-TUR the overall (6.3% versus 17.4%) and primary site (3.6% versus 12.8%) residual tumors’ rates were significantly lower for the NBI-BPV group. The 1 (7.2% versus 18.3%) and 2 (11.5% versus 25.8%) years’ recurrence rates were substantially lower for the combined approach. Conclusions: NBI cystoscopy significantly improved diagnostic accuracy, while bipolar technology showed a higher surgical

  16. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures. PMID:27442970

  17. Relevance of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of chemical vapor deposition precursors.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, J; Nagaraja, K S; Sathiyamoorthy, D

    2011-09-01

    We have studied various metallorganic and organometallic compounds by simultaneous nonisothermal thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analyses to confirm their volatility and thermal stability. The equilibrium vapor pressures of the metallorganic and organometallic compounds were determined by horizontal dual arm single furnace thermoanalyzer as transpiration apparatus. Antoine coefficients were calculated from the temperature dependence equilibrium vapor pressure data. The model-fitting solid-state kinetic analyses of Al(acac)3, (acac = acetylacetonato), Cr(CO)6, Fe(Cp)2, (Cp-cyclopentadienyl), Ga(acac)3, Mn(tmhd)3, and Y(tmhd)3 (tmhd = 2,2,6,6,-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) revealed that the processes follow diffusion controlled, contracting area and zero order model sublimation or evaporation kinetics. The activation energy for the sublimation/evaporation processes were calculated by model-free kinetic methods. Thin films of nickel and lanthanum-strontium-manganite (LSM) are grown on silicon substrate at 573 K using selected metallorganic complexes of Ni[(acac)2en], La(tmhd)3, Sr(tmhd)2 and Mn(tmhd)3 as precursors by plasma assisted liquid injection chemical vapor deposition (PA-LICVD). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis for their composition and morphology. PMID:22097553

  18. Correlation of chemical evaporation rate with vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; van Wesenbeeck, Ian

    2014-09-01

    A new one-parameter correlation is developed for the evaporation rate (ER) of chemicals as a function of molar mass (M) and vapor pressure (P) that is simpler than existing correlations. It applies only to liquid surfaces that are unaffected by the underlying solid substrate as occurs in the standard ASTM evaporation rate test and to quiescent liquid pools. The relationship has a sounder theoretical basis than previous correlations because ER is correctly correlated with PM rather than P alone. The inclusion of M increases the slope of previous log ER versus log P regressions to a value close to 1.0 and yields a simpler one-parameter correlation, namely, ER (μg m(-1) h(-1)) = 1464P (Pa) × M (g mol(-1)). Applications are discussed for the screening level assessment and ranking of chemicals for evaporation rate, such as pesticides, fumigants, and hydrocarbon carrier fluids used in pesticide formulations, liquid consumer products used indoors, and accidental spills of liquids. The mechanistic significance of the single parameter as a mass-transfer coefficient or velocity is discussed. PMID:25105222

  19. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  20. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon films from disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaert, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous silicon films for fabrication of solar cells have been deposited by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) using a tubular flow reactor. A mathematical description for the CVD reactor was developed and solved by a numerical procedure. The proposed chemical reaction network for the model is based on silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion in the gas phase and film growth from SiH/sub 2/ and silicon polymers (Si/sub n/N/sub 2n/, n approx. 10). Estimates of the rate constants have been obtained for trisilane decomposition, silicon polymer formation, and polymer dehydrogenation. The silane unimolecular decomposition rate constants were corrected for pressure effects. The model behavior is compared to the experimental results over the range of conditions: reactor temperature (360 to 485/sup 0/C), pressures (2 to 48 torr), and gas holding time (1 to 70 s). Within the above range of conditions, film growth rate varies from 0.01 to 30 A/s. Results indicate that silicon polymers are the main film precursors for gas holding times greater than 3 s. Film growth by silylene only becomes important at short holding times, large inert gas dilution, and positions near the beginning of the reactor hot zone.

  2. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  3. A model of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Kee, R.J. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents a model describing the interacting gas phase and surface chemistry present during the steady-state chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon carbide (SiC). In this work, the authors treat the case of steady-state deposition of SiC from silane (SiH{sub 4}) and propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) mixtures in hydrogen carrier gas at one atmosphere pressure. Epitaxial deposition is assumed to occur on a pre-existing epitaxial silicon carbide crystal. Pyrolysis of SiH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} is modeled by 83 elementary gas-phase reactions. A set of 36 reactions of gas- phase species with the surface is used to simulate the deposition process. Rates for the gas/surface reactions were obtained from experimental measurements of sticking coefficients in the literature and theoretical estimates. The authors' results represent the first simulation of a silicon carbide deposition process that includes detailed description of both the gas phase and surface reactions. The chemical reaction mechanism is also combined with a model of a rotating disk reactor (RDR), which is a convenient way to study the interaction of chemical reactions with fluid mechanics. Transport of species from the gas to the surface is accounted for using multicomponent transport properties. Predictions of deposition rates as a function of susceptor temperature, disk rotation rate, and reactant partial pressure are presented. In addition, velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles normal to the heated disk for 41 gas-phase species are determined using reactor conditions typical of epitaxial silicon carbide deposition on silicon substrates.

  4. Vertically aligned boron nitride nanosheets: chemical vapor synthesis, ultraviolet light emission, and superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qin, Li; Hao, Yufeng; Kuang, Shengyong; Bai, Xuedong; Chong, Yat-Ming; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Enge

    2010-01-26

    Boron nitride (BN) is a promising semiconductor with a wide band gap ( approximately 6 eV). Here, we report the synthesis of vertically aligned BN nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of BF(3)-N(2)-H(2). The size, shape, thickness, density, and alignment of the BNNSs were well-controlled by appropriately changing the growth conditions. With changing the gas flow rates of BF(3) and H(2) as well as their ratio, the BNNSs evolve from three-dimensional with branches to two-dimensional with smooth surface and their thickness changes from 20 to below 5 nm. The growth of the BNNSs rather than uniform granular films is attributed to the particular chemical properties of the gas system, mainly the strong etching effect of fluorine. The alignment of the BNNSs is possibly induced by the electrical field generated in plasma sheath. Strong UV light emission with a broad band ranging from 200 to 400 nm and superhydrophobicity with contact angles over 150 degrees were obtained for the vertically aligned BNNSs. The present BNNSs possess the properties complementary to carbon nanosheets such as intrinsically semiconducting, high temperature stability, and high chemical inertness and may find applications in ultraviolet nanoelectronics, catalyst supports, electron field emission, and self-cleaning coatings, etc., especially those working at high temperature and in harsh environments. PMID:20047271

  5. Graphene by one-step chemical vapor deposition from ferrocene vapors: Properties and electrochemical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatos, George; Perdikaki, Anna V.; Sapalidis, Andreas; Pappas, George S.; Giannakopoulou, Tatiana; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Xenogiannopoulou, Evangelia; Boukos, Nikos; Dimoulas, Athanasios; Trapalis, Christos; Kanellopoulos, Nick K.; Karanikolos, Georgios N.

    2016-02-01

    Growth of few-layer graphene using ferrocene as precursor by chemical vapor deposition is reported. The growth did not involve any additional carbon or catalyst source or external hydrocarbon gases. Parametric investigation was performed using different conditions, namely, varying growth temperature from 600 to1000 °C, and growth duration from 5 min to 3 h, as well as using fast quenching or gradual cooling after the thermal treatment, in order to examine the effect on the quality of the produced graphene. The growth took place on silicon wafers and resulted, under optimal conditions, in formation of graphene with 2-3 layers and high graphitic quality, as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy, with characteristic full width at half maximum of the 2D band of 49.46 cm-1, and I2D/IG and ID/IG intensity ratios of 1.15 and 0.26, respectively. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to further evaluate graphene characteristics and enlighten growth mechanism. Electrochemical evaluation of the developed material was performed using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements.

  6. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-12-08

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  7. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  8. Effects of additional vapors on sterilization of microorganism spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Some fundamental experiments are carried out in order to develop a plasma process that will uniformly sterilize both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Air, oxygen, argon, and nitrogen are each used as the plasma source gas to which mixed vapors of water and ethanol at different ratios are added. The reactor chamber is remotely located from the plasma area and a metal mesh for eliminating charged particles is installed between them. Thus, only reactive neutral particles such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are utilized. As a result, adding vapors to the source gas markedly enhances the sterilization effect. In particular, air with water and/or ethanol vapor and oxygen with ethanol vapor show more than 6-log reduction for Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores.

  9. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-01

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  10. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  11. Model of carrier dynamics in chemical vapor deposition diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Borchi, Emilio; Lagomarsino, Stefano; Mersi, Stefano; Sciortino, Silvio

    2005-03-01

    We propose a quantitative model of electronic transport on the basis of a conductivity characterization of diamond-based sensors exposed to {beta} radiation. Some of the investigated samples have been irradiated with neutron up to a fluence of 2x10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}. Radiation-induced current measurements have been performed to study the trapping and recombination of deep defect levels in the diamond band gap. We present a quantitative analysis of the passivation of deep traps and the release of carriers during thermal fading between consecutive exposures. We determine the density of trap states per unit volume and per unit energy and their capture cross sections. We also evaluate the modification of these parameters after neutron irradiation. Our analysis gives the cross sections of the traps involved in our measurements with an accuracy of 20-50%, which is far better than that attainable with thermal spectroscopy. Our results on the capture cross section of the recombination centers agree with relevant works presented in literature on natural IIa diamond. We propose that some defects are of the same nature in chemical vapor deposition diamond, but their concentration is far lower in the state-of-the-art material. We also study a modification of the trap level distribution after neutron irradiation. Finally we propose a rationale for the improvement obtained in recent years in the performances of top quality polycrystalline diamond sensors.

  12. Thirty Gigahertz Optoelectronic Mixing in Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Alberto; Mzali, Sana; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Bezencenet, Odile; Larat, Christian; Molin, Stephanie; Morvan, Loïc; Legagneux, Pierre; Dolfi, Daniel; Dlubak, Bruno; Seneor, Pierre; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia

    2016-05-11

    The remarkable properties of graphene, such as broadband optical absorption, high carrier mobility, and short photogenerated carrier lifetime, are particularly attractive for high-frequency optoelectronic devices operating at 1.55 μm telecom wavelength. Moreover, the possibility to transfer graphene on a silicon substrate using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible process opens the ability to integrate electronics and optics on a single cost-effective chip. Here, we report an optoelectronic mixer based on chemical vapor-deposited graphene transferred on an oxidized silicon substrate. Our device consists in a coplanar waveguide that integrates a graphene channel, passivated with an atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film. With this new structure, 30 GHz optoelectronic mixing in commercially available graphene is demonstrated for the first time. In particular, using a 30 GHz intensity-modulated optical signal and a 29.9 GHz electrical signal, we show frequency downconversion to 100 MHz. These results open promising perspectives in the domain of optoelectronics for radar and radio-communication systems. PMID:27043922

  13. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB[sub 2] composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A. ); Starr, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB[sub 2] cathode surface. The use of TiB[sub 2], however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB[sub 2] is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB[sub 2]. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB[sub 2] from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000[degrees]C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB[sub 2]THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  14. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A.; Starr, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB{sub 2} cathode surface. The use of TiB{sub 2}, however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB{sub 2} is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB{sub 2}. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB{sub 2} from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000{degrees}C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB{sub 2}THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  15. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  16. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkov, V. I.; Kucherova, O. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Zubkova, A. V.; Butler, J. E.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Vikharev, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120-150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10-13 down to 2 × 10-17 cm2 was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (˜2 × 10-20 cm2). At T > Troom in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  17. nanowires by solid-source chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ning; Wang, Fengyun; Yang, Zaixing; Yip, SenPo; Dong, Guofa; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Hung, TakFu; Ho, Johnny C.

    2014-07-01

    Growing Ga2O3 dielectric materials at a moderately low temperature is important for the further development of high-mobility III-V semiconductor-based nanoelectronics. Here, β-Ga2O3 nanowires are successfully synthesized at a relatively low temperature of 610°C by solid-source chemical vapor deposition employing GaAs powders as the source material, which is in a distinct contrast to the typical synthesis temperature of above 1,000°C as reported by other methods. In this work, the prepared β-Ga2O3 nanowires are mainly composed of Ga and O elements with an atomic ratio of approximately 2:3. Importantly, they are highly crystalline in the monoclinic structure with varied growth orientations in low-index planes. The bandgap of the β-Ga2O3 nanowires is determined to be 251 nm (approximately 4.94 eV), in good accordance with the literature. Also, electrical characterization reveals that the individual nanowire has a resistivity of up to 8.5 × 107 Ω cm, when fabricated in the configuration of parallel arrays, further indicating the promise of growing these highly insulating Ga2O3 materials in this III-V nanowire-compatible growth condition.

  18. Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Organic Magnet, Vanadium Tetracyanoethylene.

    PubMed

    Harberts, Megan; Lu, Yu; Yu, Howard; Epstein, Arthur J; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of organic materials has yielded devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) which have advantages not found in traditional materials, including low cost and mechanical flexibility. In a similar vein, it would be advantageous to expand the use of organics into high frequency electronics and spin-based electronics. This work presents a synthetic process for the growth of thin films of the room temperature organic ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]x, x~2) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The thin film is grown at <60 °C, and can accommodate a wide variety of substrates including, but not limited to, silicon, glass, Teflon and flexible substrates. The conformal deposition is conducive to pre-patterned and three-dimensional structures as well. Additionally this technique can yield films with thicknesses ranging from 30 nm to several microns. Recent progress in optimization of film growth creates a film whose qualities, such as higher Curie temperature (600 K), improved magnetic homogeneity, and narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width (1.5 G) show promise for a variety of applications in spintronics and microwave electronics. PMID:26168285

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of high T sub c superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. W.; Engelhardt, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results are reported of an investigation into the synthesis and properties of high temperature superconducting materials. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was designed and built which is suitable for the preparation of multicomponent metal films This apparatus was used to prepare a series of high T sub c A-15 structure superconducting films in the binary system Nb-Ge. The effect on T sub c of a variety of substrate materials was investigated. An extensive series of ternary alloys were also prepared. Conditions allowing the brittle high T sub c (approximately 18 K) A-15 structure superconductor Nb3A1 to be prepared in a low T sub c but ductile form were found. Some of the ways that the ductile (bcc) form can be cold worked or machined are described. Measurements of rate of transformation of cold worked bcc material to the high T sub c A-15 structure with low temperature annealing are given. Preliminary measurements indicate that this material has attractive high field critical current densities.

  20. Residual metallic contamination of transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    PubMed

    Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Costina, Ioan; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Vaziri, Sam; Östling, Mikael; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Kataria, Satender; Gahoi, Amit; Lemme, Max C; Ruhl, Guenther; Zoth, Guenther; Luxenhofer, Oliver; Mehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-26

    Integration of graphene with Si microelectronics is very appealing by offering a potentially broad range of new functionalities. New materials to be integrated with the Si platform must conform to stringent purity standards. Here, we investigate graphene layers grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to silicon wafers by wet etching and electrochemical delamination methods with respect to residual submonolayer metallic contaminations. Regardless of the transfer method and associated cleaning scheme, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements indicate that the graphene sheets are contaminated with residual metals (copper, iron) with a concentration exceeding 10(13) atoms/cm(2). These metal impurities appear to be partially mobile upon thermal treatment, as shown by depth profiling and reduction of the minority charge carrier diffusion length in the silicon substrate. As residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene and can severely impede the process of integration with silicon microelectronics, these results reveal that further progress in synthesis, handling, and cleaning of graphene is required to advance electronic and optoelectronic applications. PMID:25853630

  1. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun; Ling, D. C.; Li, L. J.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of mesoporous graphene nanoballs for supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Soo; Kim, Sun-I; Yoon, Jong-Chul; Jang, Ji-Hyun

    2013-07-23

    A mass-producible mesoporous graphene nanoball (MGB) was fabricated via a precursor-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique for supercapacitor application. Polystyrene balls and reduced iron created under high temperature and a hydrogen gas environment provide a solid carbon source and a catalyst for graphene growth during the precursor-assisted CVD process, respectively. Carboxylic acid and sulfonic acid functionalization of the polystyrene ball facilitates homogeneous dispersion of the hydrophobic polymer template in the metal precursor solution, thus, resulting in a MGB with a uniform number of graphene layers. The MGB is shown to have a specific surface area of 508 m(2)/g and is mesoporous with a mean mesopore diameter of 4.27 nm. Mesopores are generated by the removal of agglomerated iron domains, permeating down through the soft polystyrene spheres and providing the surface for subsequent graphene growth during the heating process in a hydrogen environment. This technique requires only drop-casting of the precursor/polystyrene solution, allowing for mass-production of multilayer MGBs. The supercapacitor fabricated by the use of the MGB as an electrode demonstrates a specific capacitance of 206 F/g and more than 96% retention of capacitance after 10,000 cycles. The outstanding characteristics of the MGB as an electrode for supercapacitors verify the strong potential for use in energy-related areas. PMID:23782238

  3. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Charlie Johnson, A. T.; Manyala, Ncholu

    2013-11-01

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called "inverted wedding cake" stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  4. Modeling of forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Smith, A.W.

    1992-09-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) has proven to be a successful technique for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. It is particularly attractive for thick components which cannot be fabricated using the conventional, isothermal method (ICVI). Although it offers processing times that are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ICVI, FCVI has not been used to fabricate parts of complex geometry and is perceived by some to be unsuitable for such components. The major concern Is that selection and control of the flow pattern and thermal profile for optimum infiltration can be a difficult and costly exercise. In order to reduce this effort, we are developing a computer model for FCVI that simulates the densification process for given component geometry, reactor configuration and operating parameters. Used by a process engineer, this model can dramatically reduce the experimental effort needed to obtain uniform densification. A one-dimensional process model, described in a previous interim report, has demonstrated good agreement with experimental results in predicting overall densification time and density uniformity during processing and the effect of various fiber architectures and operating parameters on these process issues. This model is fundamentally unsuitable for more complex geometries, however, and extension to two- and three-dimensions is necessary. This interim report summarizes our progress since the previous interim report toward development of a ``finite volume`` model for FCVI.

  5. Modeling of forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Smith, A.W. )

    1992-09-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) has proven to be a successful technique for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. It is particularly attractive for thick components which cannot be fabricated using the conventional, isothermal method (ICVI). Although it offers processing times that are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ICVI, FCVI has not been used to fabricate parts of complex geometry and is perceived by some to be unsuitable for such components. The major concern Is that selection and control of the flow pattern and thermal profile for optimum infiltration can be a difficult and costly exercise. In order to reduce this effort, we are developing a computer model for FCVI that simulates the densification process for given component geometry, reactor configuration and operating parameters. Used by a process engineer, this model can dramatically reduce the experimental effort needed to obtain uniform densification. A one-dimensional process model, described in a previous interim report, has demonstrated good agreement with experimental results in predicting overall densification time and density uniformity during processing and the effect of various fiber architectures and operating parameters on these process issues. This model is fundamentally unsuitable for more complex geometries, however, and extension to two- and three-dimensions is necessary. This interim report summarizes our progress since the previous interim report toward development of a finite volume'' model for FCVI.

  6. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  7. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, V. I. Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Butler, J. E.

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  8. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, I.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  9. Electrical properties of boron-doped MWNTs synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, S.; Nagao, M.; Watanabe, T.; Tsuda, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takano, Y.

    2009-10-01

    We have synthesized a large amount of boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. The synthesis was carried out in a flask using a methanol solution of boric acid as a source material. The scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy were performed to evaluate the structural properties of the obtained MWNTs. In order to evaluate the electrical properties, temperature dependence of resistivity was measured in an individual MWNTs with four metal electrodes. The Raman shifts suggest carrier injection into the boron-doped MWNTs, but the resistivity of the MWNTs was high and increased strongly with decreasing temperature. Defects induced by the plasma may cause this enhanced resistivity.

  10. Generation of Shock-Wave Disturbances at Plasma-Vapor Bubble Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, N. S.; Yudin, A. S.; Voitenko, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    The complex physical and mathematical model describing all steps of plasma-vapor bubble evolution in the system of the water-ground condensed media is presented. Discharge circuit operation, discharge plasma channel expansion, its transformation into the vapor-plasma bubble and its pulsation, pressure wave generation and propagation of the mechanical stress waves in the ground are self-consistently considered in the model. The model allows investigation of the basic laws of stored energy transformation into the discharge plasma channel, next to the plasma-vapor bubble and transformation of this energy to the energy of pressure wave compressing the surrounding ground. Power characteristics of wave disturbances generated by gas-vapor bubble oscillation in liquid depending on the circuit parameters are analyzed for the prediction of the ground boundary displacement. The dynamics of the shock-wave propagation in water-ground condensed media depending on the rate of the plasma channel energy release is investigated. Simulation of the shock-wave phenomena at a plasma-vapor bubble oscillation in condensed media consecutively describes the physical processes underlying technology for producing piles by electro-discharge stuffing. The quantitative model verified by physical experimental tests will allow optimization of pulse generator parameters and electrode system construction of high-voltage equipment.

  11. Artificial plasma experiments. Chemical release observations associated with the CRRES program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, Stephen B.

    1994-01-01

    This report submitted is the final report and covers work performed under the contract for the period Apr. 12, 1985 - Dec. 23, 1993. The CRRES program investigated earth plasma environment by active experiments in which metal vapors were injected into the upper atmosphere and magnetosphere. The vapor clouds perturb the ambient ionospheric / magnetospheric environment and the effects could be monitored by passive observing instruments. Our part of the CRRES program, the Artificial Plasma Experiment program, was a ground based and aircraft based investigation to observe artificial chemical releases by optical techniques.

  12. Photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition of cytocompatible poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) films.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Brian J; Pfluger, Courtney A; Sun, Bing; Ziemer, Katherine S; Burkey, Daniel D; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) is a widely utilized biomaterial due to lack of toxicity and suitable mechanical properties; conformal thin pHEMA films produced via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) would thus have broad biomedical applications. Thin films of pHEMA were deposited using photoinitiated CVD (piCVD). Incorporation of ethylene glycol diacrylate (EGDA) into the pHEMA polymer film as a crosslinker, confirmed via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, resulted in varied swelling and degradation behavior. 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate-only films showed significant thickness loss (up to 40%), possibly due to extraction of low-molecular-weight species or erosion, after 24 h in aqueous solution, whereas films crosslinked with EGDA (9.25-12.4%) were stable for up to 21 days. These results differ significantly from those obtained with plasma-polymerized pHEMA, which degraded steadily over a 21-day period, even with crosslinking. This suggests that the piCVD films differ structurally from those fabricated via plasma polymerization (plasma-enhanced CVD). piCVD pHEMA coatings proved to be good cell culture materials, with Caco-2 cell attachment and viability comparable to results obtained on tissue-culture polystyrene. Thus, thin film CVD pHEMA offers the advantage of enabling conformal coating of a cell culture substrate with tunable properties depending on method of preparation and incorporation of crosslinking agents. PMID:23852714

  13. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  14. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  15. Review of chemical vapor deposition of graphene and related applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Luyao; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-10-15

    Since its debut in 2004, graphene has attracted enormous interest because of its unique properties. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has emerged as an important method for the preparation and production of graphene for various applications since the method was first reported in 2008/2009. In this Account, we review graphene CVD on various metal substrates with an emphasis on Ni and Cu. In addition, we discuss important and representative applications of graphene formed by CVD, including as flexible transparent conductors for organic photovoltaic cells and in field effect transistors. Growth on polycrystalline Ni films leads to both monolayer and few-layer graphene with multiple layers because of the grain boundaries on Ni films. We can greatly increase the percentage of monolayer graphene by using single-crystalline Ni(111) substrates, which have smooth surface and no grain boundaries. Due to the extremely low solubility of carbon in Cu, Cu has emerged as an even better catalyst for the growth of monolayer graphene with a high percentage of single layers. The growth of graphene on Cu is a surface reaction. As a result, only one layer of graphene can form on a Cu surface, in contrast with Ni, where more than one layer can form through carbon segregation and precipitation. We also describe a method for transferring graphene sheets from the metal using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). CVD graphene has electronic properties that are potentially valuable in a number of applications. For example, few-layer graphene grown on Ni can function as flexible transparent conductive electrodes for organic photovoltaic cells. In addition, because we can synthesize large-grain graphene on Cu foil, such large-grain graphene has electronic properties suitable for use in field effect transistors. PMID:23480816

  16. Properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, F.B. Jr.; Gordon, R.G.; Paul, W.; Yacobi, B.G.

    1984-06-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from mixtures of silane, disilane, trisilane, and higher polysilanes in hydrogen carrier gas at 1 atm total pressure, at substrate temperatures from 420--530 /sup 0/C. Experimental parameters are explained and properties as a function of these parameters are shown. The measurements include hydrogen content (by IR), optical, electrical, and photovoltaic properties of the material. In most respects, the CVD material closely resembles the a-Si:H usually prepared by glow discharge. The following differences have been noted: (1) the CVD a-Si:H shows no IR absorption at 840--850 cm/sup -1/, which is consistent with the expected better thermal stability of the CVD material because of the much higher substrate temperatures in the CVD process than in the glow discharge process. (2) The band gap of CVD a-Si:H is lower by about 0.1 eV than glow discharge a-Si:H of the same hydrogen content. Thus, the band gap of CVD a-Si:H is better matched to the solar spectrum than is glow discharge a-Si:H. (3) All three IR absorption bands due to hydrogen are about 20% narrower in the CVD a-Si:H, suggesting a simpler structure. (4) The temperature dependence of the dark conductivity of CVD a-Si:H fits a curve for a single activation energy, in contrast to the more complicated temperature dependence often found in glow discharge a-Si:H, in which two different activation energies are seen at high and low temperatures. This suggests that the conduction mechanism is also simpler in the CVD a-Si:H.

  17. Properties of chemical vapor infiltration diamond deposited in a diamond powder matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Staley, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors have developed two techniques: electrophoretic deposition and screen printing, to form nonmined diamond powder precursors on substrates. They then densify these precursors in a hot filament assisted reactor. Analysis indicated that a hot filament assisted chemical vapor infiltration process forms intergranular diamond deposits with properties that are to some degree different from predominantly hot-filament-assisted CVD material.

  18. Chemical reaction between water vapor and stressed glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soga, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hanada, T.; Kunugi, M.

    1979-01-01

    The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.

  19. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Fluoroalkylsilane Monolayer Films for Adhesion Control in Microelectromechanical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    MAYER,THOMAS M.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; SHINN,NEAL D.; CLEWS,PEGGY J.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.

    2000-01-26

    We have developed a new process for applying a hydrophobic, low adhesion energy coating to microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices. Monolayer films are synthesized from tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) and water vapor in a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature. Film thickness is self-limiting by virtue of the inability of precursors to stick to the fluorocarbon surface of the film once it has formed. We have measured film densities of {approx}3 molecules nm{sup 2} and film thickness of {approx}1 nm. Films are hydrophobic, with a water contact angle >110{sup o}. We have also incorporated an in-situ downstream microwave plasma cleaning process, which provides a clean, reproducible oxide surface prior to film deposition. Adhesion tests on coated and uncoated MEMS test structures demonstrate superior performance of the FOTS coatings. Cleaned, uncoated cantilever beam structures exhibit high adhesion energies in a high humidity environment. An adhesion energy of 100 mJ m{sup -2} is observed after exposure to >90% relative humidity. Fluoroalkylsilane coated beams exhibit negligible adhesion at low humidity and {<=} 20 {micro}J m{sup -2} adhesion energy at >90% relative humidity. No obvious film degradation was observed for films exposed to >90% relative humidity at room temperature for >24 hr.

  20. Spectroscopic elucidation of chemical structure of plasma-polymerized pyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Hozumi, K.; Kitamura, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Hamaoka, T.; Fujisawa, H.; Ishizawa, T.

    1983-05-01

    Chemical structure of the plasma-polymerized pyridine film produced on a glass reactor wall by means of the plasma technique in which the pyridine vapor was electronically excited by high-frequency power under a reduced pressure was elucidated. The polymer was highly hydrophilic and was soluble to some of the polar organic solvents so that nitrogen-containing polar functional groups were predicted to participate in the chemical structure of the polymer molecules. /sup 1/H-NMR, /sup 13/CNMR, and IR spectroscopies, high-resolution mass spectral data, and number-average molecular weight determination with some aid of microelemental analysis revealed the presence of various functional groups such as imine, nitrile, amine, pyridine ring, its N-oxide, and even amide. The oxygen atoms involved in the last two groups were supposedly introduced by contact with ambient air after the plasma process. The hydrophilic nature of the polymer which was essential for preparing reverse osmosis membrane was therefore due to the overall hydration effect of these polar functional groups.

  1. Vaporization Rate of Cesium from Molten Slag in a Plasma Melting Furnace for the Treatment of Simulated Low-Level Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Shinji; Amakawa, Tadashi

    2003-02-15

    The vaporization phenomena of cesium (Cs) from molten slag have been investigated in a plasma melting process for simulated radioactive waste materials. A direct current transfer-type plasma with a maximum output of 50 kW was used to melt carbon steel and granular oxide mixtures (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and MgO) containing nonradioactive cesium nitrate, to measure Cs vaporization. These materials are the main components of low-level miscellaneous solid wastes. The vaporization rate of Cs from the molten slag during the plasma melting was observed and was compared with the vaporization rate obtained in an electric resistance furnace. The apparent vaporization rate of Cs was found to follow the first-order rate equation with respect to the molten slag's Cs content, and its rate constant values varied (3.5 to 21.0) x 10{sup -6} m/s varying with the chemical composition of the miscellaneous solid wastes. These rate constants were about one order larger than those obtained in the electric resistant furnace and also the diffusion coefficients of basic elements in the molten slag. These results suggest that the vaporization rate of Cs is controlled by the vaporization step from the free molten slag furnace to the gas phase and depends predominantly on the thermodynamic properties of the molten slag.

  2. CHEMICALLY VAPOR DEPOSITED YTTRIA-STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (YSZ) FOR THERMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BARRIER COATING

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, V.G.; Besmann, T.M.; Lothian, J.L.; Xu, W.; Starr, T.L.

    2003-04-22

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as a thermal barrier coating (TBC) to protect super-alloy blades such as Mar-M247 or Rene-N5 during engine operation. The current method for YSZ fabrication for TBC applications is by air-plasma spraying (APS) or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) (Haynes 1997). APS gives reasonable deposition rates, but has a limited life and aging effects due to its porous and lamellar structure. The EB-PVD coatings are more stable and can accommodate thermomechanical stresses due to their characteristic strain-tolerant, columnar microstructure. EB-PVD, however, is primarily line-of-sight, which often leaves ''hidden areas'' uncoated, has low throughput, and has high capital cost. The process of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is investigated here as an economical alternative to EB-PVD and APS, with the potential for better overall coverage as well as the ability to produce thick (100-250 {micro}m), strain-tolerant, columnar coatings. MOCVD of YSZ involves the use of zirconium and yttrium organometallic precursors reacting with an oxygen source. Previous researchers have used diketonate or chloride precursors and oxygen (Wahl et al. 2001a, Wahl et al. 2001b, Yamane and Harai 1989). These precursors have low transport rates due to their low carrier solvent solubility (Varanasi et al. 2003). Solvated zirconium and yttrium butoxide precursors were investigated here due to their higher vapor pressures and high solvent solubility. This work uses predictive equilibrium modeling and experiments involving butoxide precursors for tetragonal YSZ fabrication.

  3. Chemical vapor discrimination using a compact and low-power array of piezoresistive microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Loui, Albert; Ratto, Timothy V; Wilson, Thomas S; McCall, Scott K; Mukerjee, Erik V; Love, Adam H; Hart, Bradley R

    2008-05-01

    A compact and low-power microcantilever-based sensor array has been developed and used to detect various chemical vapor analytes. In contrast to earlier micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) array sensors, this device uses the static deflection of piezoresistive cantilevers due to the swelling of glassy polyolefin coatings during sorption of chemical vapors. To maximize the sensor response to a variety of chemical analytes, the polymers are selected based on their Hildebrand solubility parameters to span a wide range of chemical properties. We utilize a novel microcontact spotting method to reproducibly coat a single side of each cantilever in the array with the polymers. To demonstrate the utility of the sensor array we have reproducibly detected 11 chemical vapors, representing a breadth of chemical properties, in real time and over a wide range of vapor concentrations. We also report the detection of the chemical warfare agents (CWAs) VX and sulfur mustard (HD), representing the first published report of CWA vapor detection by a polymer-based, cantilever sensor array. Comparisons of the theoretical polymer/vapor partition coefficient to the experimental cantilever deflection responses show that, while general trends can be reasonably predicted, a simple linear relationship does not exist. PMID:18427681

  4. Application of pulsed-uv laser Raman spectroscopy to chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Raman detection limits obtained with a KrF laser excitation source were comparable to those obtained by laser-induced fluorescence and photofragment emission spectroscopy under chemical vapor deposition conditions.

  5. Plasma Spray-PVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Deposit Out of the Vapor Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, Konstantin; Gindrat, Malko

    2011-06-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland). Even though it is a thermal spray process, it can deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. The basis of PS-PVD is the low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology that has been well established in industry for several years. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) or low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), the new proposed process uses a high energy plasma gun operated at a reduced work pressure of 0.1 kPa (1 mbar). Owing to the high energy plasma and further reduced work pressure, PS-PVD is able to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional physical vapor deposition (PVD) technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. In contrast to EB-PVD, PS-PVD incorporates the vaporized coating material into a supersonic plasma plume. Owing to the forced gas stream of the plasma jet, complex shaped parts such as multi-airfoil turbine vanes can be coated with columnar thermal barrier coatings using PS-PVD. Even shadowed areas and areas which are not in the line of sight of the coating source can be coated homogeneously. This article reports on the progress made by Sulzer Metco in developing a thermal spray process to produce coatings out of the vapor phase. Columnar thermal barrier coatings made of Yttria-stabilized Zircona (YSZ) are optimized to serve in a turbine engine. This process includes not only preferable coating properties such as strain tolerance and erosion

  6. Linearization of calibration curves by aerosol carrier effect of CCl 4 vapor in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2005-03-01

    Carbon tetrachloride vapor as gaseous phase modifier in a graphite furnace electrothermal vaporizer (GFETV) converts heavy volatile analyte forms to volatile and medium volatile chlorides and produces aerosol carrier effect, the latter being a less generally recognized benefit. However, the possible increase of polyatomic interferences in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GFETV-ICP-MS) by chlorine and carbon containing species due to CCl 4 vapor introduction has been discouraging with the use of low resolution, quadrupole type MS equipment. Being aware of this possible handicap, it was aimed at to investigate the feasibility of the use of this halogenating agent in ICP-MS with regard of possible hazards to the instrument, and also to explore the advantages under these specific conditions. With sample gas flow (inner gas flow) rate not higher than 900 ml min -1 Ar in the torch and 3 ml min -1 CCl 4 vapor flow rate in the furnace, the long-term stability of the instrument was ensured and the following benefits by the halocarbon were observed. The non-linearity error (defined in the text) of the calibration curves (signal versus mass functions) with matrix-free solution standards was 30-70% without, and 1-5% with CCl 4 vapor introduction, respectively, at 1 ng mass of Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb analytes. The sensitivity for these elements increased by 2-4-fold with chlorination, while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was essentially the same (2-5%) for the two cases in comparison. A vaporization temperature of 2650 °C was required for Cr in Ar atmosphere, while 2200 °C was sufficient in Ar + CCl 4 atmosphere to attain complete vaporization. Improvements in linear response and sensitivity were the highest for this least volatile element. The pyrolytic graphite layer inside the graphite tube was protected by the halocarbon, and tube life time was further increased by using traces of hydrocarbon vapor in the external sheath gas of the graphite furnace. Details

  7. Chemical vapor deposition of fluorine-doped zinc oxide

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kramer, Keith; Liang, Haifan

    2000-06-06

    Fims of fluorine-doped zinc oxide are deposited from vaporized precursor compounds comprising a chelate of a dialkylzinc, such as an amine chelate, an oxygen source, and a fluorine source. The coatings are highly electrically conductive, transparent to visible light, reflective to infrared radiation, absorbing to ultraviolet light, and free of carbon impurity.

  8. Growth of graphene films by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraton, Laurent; Gangloff, Laurent; Xavier, Stéphane; Cojocaru, Costel S.; Huc, Vincent; Legagneux, Pierre; Lee, Young Hee; Pribat, Didier

    2009-08-01

    Since it was isolated in 2004, graphene, the first known 2D crystal, is the object of a growing interest, due to the range of its possible applications as well as its intrinsic properties. From large scale electronics and photovoltaics to spintronics and fundamental quantum phenomena, graphene films have attracted a large community of researchers. But bringing graphene to industrial applications will require a reliable, low cost and easily scalable synthesis process. In this paper we present a new growth process based on plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Furthermore, we show that, when the substrate is an oxidized silicon wafer covered by a nickel thin film, graphene is formed not only on top of the nickel film, but also at the interface with the supporting SiO2 layer. The films grown using this method were characterized using classical methods (Raman spectroscopy, AFM, SEM) and their conductivity is found to be close to those reported by others.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of B-doped polycrystalline diamond films: Growth rate and incorporation efficiency of dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Deneuville, A.; Fontaine, F.; Gheeraert, E.; Campargue, A.; Chenevier, M.; Rodolphe, S.

    1995-12-01

    The growth rate and the incorporation efficiency of dopants have been studied in the case of chemical vapor deposition of B-doped polycrystalline diamond films. The deposition rate is found to decrease with the addition of diborane in the gas phase. This is correlated with a modification of the plasma chemistry as observed by emission spectroscopy (decrease in the H/H2, CH/H, and C2/H ratios with the addition of diborane). The concentration of boron incorporated in the films is observed to vary with the square of the boron concentration in the gas phase.

  10. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Giannechini, Lucca J.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, we describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS).We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6MR fluids, variations were found inmore » the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.« less

  11. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J; Giannechini, Lucca J; Jacobs, Stephen D; Lambropoulos, John C

    2016-02-20

    We describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS). We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6 MR fluids, variations were found in the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material. PMID:26906603

  12. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs. PMID:26215887

  13. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs. PMID:26215887

  14. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs.

  15. The Dependence of Nucleation Density on the Bias Voltage in the Growth of High Quality Thick Heteroepitaxial Diamond Films on Ir/YSZ/Si(100) Substrates Using Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Murari; More, Karren Leslie; Eres, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    We report nucleation densities on Ir(100) surfaces that exceed 1011 cm-2 and remain roughly unchanged in a narrow bias voltage range of 50 V starting at 125 V. At lower and higher bias voltages outside of this window the nucleation density drops to values near zero within a 25 V step and remains independent of the bias voltage. We attribute this extreme sensitivity to a delicate nanostructured active Ir phase that is both formed and destroyed by ion bombardment with specific energies. The role of this phase is to mediate the formation of chemically specific carbon that is the precursor for diamond crystallite formation in the subsequent bias free growth stage.

  16. MBMS studies of gas-phase kinetics in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C.A.; McMaster, M.C.; Tung, D.M.

    1995-03-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system (MBMS) has been used to determine the near-surface gaseous composition involved in the low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond. With this system, radical and stable species can be detected with a sensitivity better than 10 ppm. Threshold ionization techniques have been employed to distinguish between radical species in the deposition environment from radical species generated by parent molecule cracking. An extensive calibration procedure was used to enable the quantitative determination of H-atom and CH{sub 3} radical mole fractions. Using the MBMS system, the gaseous composition involved in LPCVD of diamond has been measured for a wide variety of deposition conditions, including hot-filament gas activation, microwave-plasma gas activation, and a variety of precursor feed mixtures (ex: CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}). For microwave-plasma activation (MPCVD), the radical concentrations (H-atom and CH{sub 3} radicals) are independent of the identity of the precursor feed gas provided the input carbon mole fraction is constant. However, in hot-filament diamond deposition (HFCVD), the atomic hydrogen concentration decreased by an order of magnitude as the mole fraction of carbon in the precursor mixture is increased to .07; this sharp reduction has been attributed to filament poisoning of the catalytic tungsten surface via hydrocarbon deposition. Additionally, the authors find that the H-atom concentration is independent of the substrate temperature for both hot-filament and microwave plasma deposition; radial H-atom diffusion is invoked to explain this observation.

  17. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  18. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  19. Atom-by-atom simulations of chemical vapor deposition of nanoporous hydrogenated silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houska, J.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J. E.; Martinu, L.

    2010-04-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiNH) materials prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are of high interest because of their suitability for diverse applications including optical coatings, gas/vapor permeation barriers, corrosion resistant, and protective coatings and numerous others. In addition, they are very suitable for structurally graded systems such as those with a graded refractive index. In parallel, modeling the PECVD process of SiN(H) of an a priori given SiN(H) ratio by atomistic calculations represents a challenge due to: (1) different (and far from constant) sticking coefficients of individual elements, and (2) expected formation of N2 (and H2) gas molecules. In the present work, we report molecular-dynamics simulations of particle-by-particle deposition process of SiNH films from SiHx and N radicals. We observe formation of a mixed zone (damaged layer) in the initial stages of film growth, and (under certain conditions) formation of nanopores in the film bulk. We investigate the effect of various PECVD process parameters (ion energy, composition of the SiHx+N particle flux, ion fraction in the particle flux, composition of the SiHx radicals, angle of incidence of the particle flux) on both (1) deposition characteristics, such as sticking coefficients, and (2) material characteristics, such as dimension of the nanopores formed. The results provide detailed insight into the complex relationships between these process parameters and the characteristics of the deposited SiNH materials and exhibit an excellent agreement with the experimentally observed results.

  20. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of gallium nitride on sacrificial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, William Edward

    GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) face several challenges if the technology is to continue to make a significant impact in general illumination, and on technology that has become known as solid state lighting (SSL). Two of the most pressing challenges for the continued penetration of SSL into traditional lighting applications are efficacy and total lumens from the device, and their related cost. The development of alternative substrate technologies is a promising avenue toward addressing both of these challenges, as both GaN-based device technology and the associated metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology are already relatively mature technologies with a well-understood cost base. Zinc oxide (ZnO) and silicon (Si) are among the most promising alternative substrates for GaN epitaxy. These substrates offer the ability to access both higher efficacy and lumen devices (ZnO) at a much reduced cost. This work focuses on the development of MOCVD growth processes to yield high quality GaN-based materials and devices on both ZnO and Si. ZnO is a promising substrate for growth of low defect-density GaN because of its similar lattice constant and thermal expansion coefficient. The major hurdles for GaN growth on ZnO are the instability of the substrate in a hydrogen atmosphere, which is typical of nitride growth conditions, and the inter-diffusion of zinc and oxygen from the substrate into the GaN-based epitaxial layer. A process was developed for the MOCVD growth of GaN and InxGa 1-xN on ZnO that attempted to address these issues. The structural and optical properties of these films were studied using various techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the growth of wurtzite GaN on ZnO, and room-temperature photoluminescence (RT-PL) showed near band-edge luminescence from the GaN and InxGa1-xN layers. However, high zinc and oxygen concentrations due to interdiffusion near the ZnO substrate remained an issue; therefore, the diffusion of zinc and oxygen

  1. A model for chemical and isotopic fractionation in the lunar regolith by impact vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Up until now there has been no complete model of chemical and isotopic fractionation effects which could occur in the lunar regolith as a result of hypervelocity impact vaporization. Previous work on the outlines for such a model are extended and show that impact vaporization could be an efficient mechanism for producing heavy isotope enrichments. Rough qualitative predictions based on the model show a general similarity to the observations on lunar samples.

  2. Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowiresvia Chemical Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    2006-03-13

    We utilized a vapor-liquid-solid growth technique to synthesize indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tin oxide nanowires using chemical vapor transport with gold nanoparticles as the catalyst. Using identical growth parameters we were able to synthesize single crystal nanowires typically 40-100 nm diameter and more than 10-100 microns long. The products were characterized by means of XRD, SEM and HRTEM. All the wires were grown under the same growth conditions with growth rates inversely proportional to the source metal vapor pressure. Initial experiments show that different transparent oxide nanowires can be grown simultaneously on a single substrate with potential application for multi-component gas sensors.

  3. Synthesis of one-dimensional boron-related nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li

    in the submicron range were used to synthesize aligned BNNTs. Fine BN nanostructures with a diameter around 10-20 nm and length up to 10 microns were grown and dispersed in the Ni dots. Nanosized Ni dots were suggested for the growth of the vertically aligned BNNTs. Boron nanowires (BNWs) were also grown by the decomposition of diborane using a thermal CVD process at a temperature of 900°C, a pressure of 20 torr, diborane flow rate (5 vol.% in hydrogen) of 5 sccm, and nitrogen flow rate of 55 sccm. These BNWs had diameters in a range of 20-200 nanometers and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. Repeatable Raman spectra indicated icosahedra B12 to be the basic building units forming the B nanowires. Amorphous BNWs with rough surface were obtained without any catalysts on different substrates, such as Si wafer or ZrB2 powders. A vapor-solid (VS) growth was proposed for the amorphous BNWs, in which the solid phase precipitated directly from the vapor phase reactions. The amorphous BNWs were modified for size and composition using a plasma CVD process containing argon, ammonia and hydrogen. The diameters of these BNWs were reduced from 200 nm to several tens of nanometers, and a small amount of N was incorporated into BNWs after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, the metal catalyst proved to be effective for the growth of crystalline BNWs. Tetragonal BNWs with smooth surface were grown on thin Ni film (1 nm) coated Si substrates. Ni attachment was observed at the tip of the BNW for the first time, which indicated that the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism can be used for synthesis of the BNW. The diameters of these BNWs were strongly dependent on the size of the metal particles encapsulated in the BNWs. In summary, two boron-related nanostructures were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in this work. A new method was successfully developed to decrease the substrate temperature more than 400°C to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes in a

  4. Nonthermal plasma synthesis of metal sulfide nanocrystals from metalorganic vapor and elemental sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thimsen, Elijah; Kortshagen, Uwe R.; Aydil, Eray S.

    2015-08-01

    Nanocrystal synthesis in nonthermal plasmas has been focused on elemental group IV semiconductors such as Si and Ge. In contrast, very little is known about plasma synthesis of compound nanocrystals and the time is ripe to extend this synthesis approach to nanocrystals comprised of two or more elements such as metal sulfides, oxides and nitrides. Towards this end, we studied, in an argon-sulfur plasma, the synthesis of ZnS, Cu2S and SnS nanocrystals from metalorganic precursors diethyl Zn(II), hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) vinyltrimethylsilane, and tetrakis(dimethylamido) Sn(IV), respectively. In situ optical emission spectroscopy was used to observe changes in relative concentrations of various plasma species during synthesis, while ex situ material characterization was used to examine the crystal structure, elemental composition and optical absorption of these nanocrystals. For a constant metalorganic vapor feed rate, the elemental composition of the nanocrystals was found to be independent of the sulfur flow rate into the plasma, above a small threshold value. At constant sulfur flow rate, the nanocrystal composition depended on the metalorganic vapor feed rate. Specifically, the ensemble metal atomic fraction in the nanocrystals was found to increase with increasing metalorganic vapor flow rates, resulting in more metal-rich crystal phases. The metalorganic feed rate can be used to control the composition and crystal phase of the metal-sulfide nanocrystals synthesized using this plasma process.

  5. Plasma polymerization of TEOS for QCM-based VOC vapor sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougharouat, A.; Bellel, A.; Sahli, S.; Ségui, Y.; Raynaud, P.

    2011-11-01

    Plasma polymerized tetraethoxysilane (ppTEOS) thin films deposited on quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) electrode were used as sensitive layer for the detection of a number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as methanol, ethanol, acetone and chloroform molecules. Their sensing properties were examined by measuring the resonance frequency shifts (∆f) of QCM which are due to additional mass loading. The results showed that ∆f of QCM were found to be linearly correlated with different vapor pressure of analyte. The sensor showed good reproducibility and reversibility. The ppTEOS film is found to be highly sensitive to methanol vapor than other vapors. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis showed the presence of CHx peaks around 2962 cm-1 making the elaborated layer more porous and low dense, resulting in the promotion of VOC vapor diffusion into the film.

  6. Modeling CO{sub 2} laser ablation impulse of polymers in vapor and plasma regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.

    2009-09-28

    An improved model for CO{sub 2} laser ablation impulse in polyoxymethylene and similar polymers is presented that describes the transition effects from the onset of vaporization to the plasma regime in a continuous fashion. Several predictions are made for ablation behavior.

  7. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (< 10 microns) single layers to be deposited and multilayer coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  8. Determination of some refractory elements and Pb by fluorination assisted electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with platform and wall vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuefei; Hu, Bin

    2011-02-01

    Platform and wall vaporization for electrothermal vaporization (ETV)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) determination of some refractory elements (Ti, V, Cr, Mo, La and Zr) and Pb were comparatively studied with the use of poly (tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) as fluorinating reagent. The factors affecting the vaporization behaviors of the target analytes in the platform and tube wall vaporization including vaporization temperature and time, pyrolytic temperature and time were studied in detail, and the flow rates of carrier gas/auxiliary carrier gas, were carefully optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the signal profiles, signal intensity, interferences of coexisting ions and analytical reproducibility for wall and platform vaporization ETV-ICP-MS were compared. It was found that both wall and platform vaporization could give very similar detection limits, but the platform vaporization provided higher signal intensity and better precision for some refractory elements and Pb than the wall vaporization. Especially for La, the signal intensity obtained by platform vaporization was 3 times higher than that obtained by wall vaporization. For platform vaporization ETV-ICP-MS, the limits of detection (LODs) of 0.001 μg L -1 (La) ~ 0.09 μg L - 1 (Ti) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.5% (Pb) ~ 15.5% (Zr) were obtained. While for wall vaporization ETV-ICP-MS, LODs of 0.005 μg L - 1 (La) ~ 0.4 μg L - 1 (Pb) with RSDs of 3.2% (Mo) ~ 12.8% (Zr) were obtained. Both platform and tube wall vaporization techniques have been used for slurry sampling fluorination assisted ETV-ICP-MS direct determination of Ti, V, Cr, Mo, La, Zr and Pb in certified reference materials of NIES No. 8 vehicle exhaust particulates and GBW07401 soil, and the analytical results obtained are in good agreement with the certified values.

  9. Application of laser Doppler velocimeter to chemical vapor laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Luther R.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Lee, Ja H.; Fletcher, Mark T.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1993-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was used to measure iodide vapor flow fields inside two different-sized tubes. Typical velocity profiles across the laser tubes were obtained with an estimated +/-1 percent bias and +/-0.3 to 0.5 percent random uncertainty in the mean values and +/-2.5 percent random uncertainty in the turbulence-intensity values. Centerline velocities and turbulence intensities for various longitudinal locations ranged from 13 to 17.5 m/sec and 6 to 20 percent, respectively. In view of these findings, the effects of turbulence should be considered for flow field modeling. The LDV system provided calibration data for pressure and mass flow systems used routinely to monitor the research laser gas flow velocity.

  10. Method and apparatus for detection of chemical vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Caja, Josip

    2007-05-15

    The present invention is a gas detector and method for using the gas detector for detecting and identifying volatile organic and/or volatile inorganic substances present in unknown vapors in an environment. The gas detector comprises a sensing means and a detecting means for detecting electrical capacitance variance of the sensing means and for further identifying the volatile organic and volatile inorganic substances. The sensing means comprises at least one sensing unit and a sensing material allocated therein the sensing unit. The sensing material is an ionic liquid which is exposed to the environment and is capable of dissolving a quantity of said volatile substance upon exposure thereto. The sensing means constitutes an electrochemical capacitor and the detecting means is in electrical communication with the sensing means.

  11. Densification of chemical vapor deposition silicon dioxide film using oxygen radical oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Kazumasa; Uehara, Yasushi; Teramoto, Akinobu; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Takeo; Ohmi, Tadahiro; Umeda, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were treated with oxygen radical oxidation using Ar/O{sub 2} plasma excited by microwave. The mass density depth profiles, carrier trap densities, and current-voltage characteristics of the radical-oxidized CVD-SiO{sub 2} films were investigated. The mass density depth profiles were estimated with x ray reflectivity measurement using synchrotron radiation of SPring-8. The carrier trap densities were estimated with x ray photoelectron spectroscopy time-dependent measurement. The mass densities of the radical-oxidized CVD-SiO{sub 2} films were increased near the SiO{sub 2} surface. The densities of the carrier trap centers in these films were decreased. The leakage currents of the metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors fabricated by using these films were reduced. It is probable that the insulation properties of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} film are improved by the increase in the mass density and the decrease in the carrier trap density caused by the restoration of the Si-O network with the radical oxidation.

  12. Densification of chemical vapor deposition silicon dioxide film using oxygen radical oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kazumasa; Teramoto, Akinobu; Umeda, Hiroshi; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Yasushi; Hattori, Takeo; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2012-02-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were treated with oxygen radical oxidation using Ar/O2 plasma excited by microwave. The mass density depth profiles, carrier trap densities, and current-voltage characteristics of the radical-oxidized CVD-SiO2 films were investigated. The mass density depth profiles were estimated with x ray reflectivity measurement using synchrotron radiation of SPring-8. The carrier trap densities were estimated with x ray photoelectron spectroscopy time-dependent measurement. The mass densities of the radical-oxidized CVD-SiO2 films were increased near the SiO2 surface. The densities of the carrier trap centers in these films were decreased. The leakage currents of the metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors fabricated by using these films were reduced. It is probable that the insulation properties of the CVD-SiO2 film are improved by the increase in the mass density and the decrease in the carrier trap density caused by the restoration of the Si-O network with the radical oxidation.

  13. High pressure studies using two-stage diamond micro-anvils grown by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2015-06-10

    Ultra-high static pressures have been achieved in the laboratory using a two-stage micro-ball nanodiamond anvils as well as a two-stage micro-paired diamond anvils machined using a focused ion-beam system. The two-stage diamond anvils’ designs implemented thus far suffer from a limitation of one diamond anvil sliding past another anvil at extreme conditions. We describe a new method of fabricating two-stage diamond micro-anvils using a tungsten mask on a standard diamond anvil followed by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) homoepitaxial diamond growth. A prototype two stage diamond anvil with 300 μm culet and with a CVD diamond second stage ofmore » 50 μm in diameter was fabricated. We have carried out preliminary high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on a sample of rare-earth metal lutetium sample with a copper pressure standard to 86 GPa. Furthermore, the micro-anvil grown by CVD remained intact during indentation of gasket as well as on decompression from the highest pressure of 86 GPa.« less

  14. High pressure studies using two-stage diamond micro-anvils grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2015-06-10

    Ultra-high static pressures have been achieved in the laboratory using a two-stage micro-ball nanodiamond anvils as well as a two-stage micro-paired diamond anvils machined using a focused ion-beam system. The two-stage diamond anvils’ designs implemented thus far suffer from a limitation of one diamond anvil sliding past another anvil at extreme conditions. We describe a new method of fabricating two-stage diamond micro-anvils using a tungsten mask on a standard diamond anvil followed by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) homoepitaxial diamond growth. A prototype two stage diamond anvil with 300 μm culet and with a CVD diamond second stage of 50 μm in diameter was fabricated. We have carried out preliminary high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on a sample of rare-earth metal lutetium sample with a copper pressure standard to 86 GPa. Furthermore, the micro-anvil grown by CVD remained intact during indentation of gasket as well as on decompression from the highest pressure of 86 GPa.

  15. A new whole-body vapor exposure chamber for protection performance research on chemical protective ensembles.

    PubMed

    Duncan, E J Scott; Dickson, Eva F Gudgin

    2003-01-01

    A chemical vapor exposure chamber was designed to permit the study of whole-body vapor exposure of individuals wearing full protective clothing and equipment systems. A methodology also was developed to quantify the vapor protection performance of chemical protective ensembles (CPE) under safe and validated laboratory procedures. The principal research objectives were to (1) provide a methodology to accurately assess the performance of CPE and equipment under different environmental and chemical vapor challenge conditions; (2) quantify the vapor protection on a per body region basis; (3) have a systems level tool to aid in the research and development of more effective CPE for use in chemical biological environments; and (4) have a safe and reliable means of qualifying new CPE on the basis of vapor protection. Although designed for the evaluation of military-style protective equipment, the procedures apply equally to other styles of CPE used by civilian agencies such as firefighters, police, and hazmat units. The chamber and methodology were specifically designed to examine the vapor protection performance of clothing ensembles, including the details of protection variation over the body. A variety of exposure conditions appropriate to indoor and outdoor scenarios are possible, including the effects of wind, temperature, and relative humidity. Protection performance results from a number of individuals wearing typical military-style CPE are presented. These results demonstrate that there is no such thing as a unique protection performance level obtained for a given CPE. Rather, the individual and the ensemble interact differently in each situation, resulting in a protection performance distribution for individuals, and for groups of wearers, even under a standardized set of exposure conditions. PMID:12688845

  16. Laser scattering diagnostics of an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet in contact with vaporized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.; Seong, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The radial profiles of the electron density, electron temperature, and molecular rotational temperature are investigated in an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet in contact with vaporized water, which is driven by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency by means of the Thomson and Raman laser scattering methods. There is a distinct difference in the radial profiles of the plasma parameters between plasmas in contact with water and those without water contact. In the case of plasmas without vaporized water contact, all the parameters have a single-peak distribution with maximum values at the center of the discharge. In the case of plasmas in contact with vaporized water, all parameters have double-peak distributions; a neighboring peak appears beside the main peak. The new peak may have originated from the ripple of the water surface, which works as a cathode, and the peak of the ripple offers a sharp curvature point, playing the role of a pin. Our experimental results and the underlying physics are described in detail.

  17. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Tracy, C. Edwin; King, David E.; Stanley, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  18. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  19. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding.

    PubMed

    van Eden, G G; Morgan, T W; Aussems, D U B; van den Berg, M A; Bystrov, K; van de Sanden, M C M

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants. PMID:27081983

  20. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eden, G. G.; Morgan, T. W.; Aussems, D. U. B.; van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants.