Science.gov

Sample records for plasma diagnostic applications

  1. Hypervelocity Dust Injection for Plasma Diagnostic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticos, Catalin

    2005-10-01

    Hypervelocity micron-size dust grain injection was proposed for high-temperature magnetized plasma diagnosis. Multiple dust grains are launched simultaneously into high temperature plasmas at several km/s or more. The hypervelocity dust grains are ablated by the electron and ion fluxes. Fast imaging of the resulting luminous plumes attached to each grain is expected to yield local magnetic field vectors. Combination of multiple local magnetic field vectors reproduces 2D or even 3D maps of the internal magnetic field topology. Key features of HDI are: (1) a high spatial resolution, due to a relatively small transverse size of the elongated tail, and (2) a small perturbation level, as the dust grains introduce negligible number of particles compared to the plasma particle inventory. The latter advantage, however, could be seriously compromised if the gas load from the accelerator has an unobstructed access to the diagnosed plasma. Construction of a HDI diagnostic for National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), which includes a coaxial plasma gun for dust grain acceleration, is underway. Hydrogen and deuterium gas discharges inside accelerator are created by a ˜ 1 mF capacitor bank pre-charged up to 10 kV. The diagnostic apparatus also comprises a dust dispenser for pre-loading the accelerator with dust grains, and an imaging system that has a high spatial and temporal resolution.

  2. Diagnostics and biomedical applications of radiofrequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazović, Saša

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we present spatial profiles of ion and atomic oxygen concentrations in a large scale cylindrical 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled plasma low pressure reactor suitable for indirect biomedical applications (like treatment of textile to increase antibacterial properties) and direct (treatment of seeds of rare and protected species). Such reactor can easily be used for the sterilization of medical instruments by removing bacteria, spores, prions and fungi as well. We also discuss electrical properties of the system based on the signals obtained by the derivative probes and show the light emission profiles close to the sample platform. In the case of seeds treatment, the desired effect is to plasma etch the outer shell of the seed which will lead to the easier nutrition and therefore increase of the germination. In the case of textile treatment the functionalization is done by bounding atomic oxygen to the surface. It appears that antibacterial properties of the textile are increased by incorporating nanoparticles to the fibres which can successfully be done after the plasma treatment. From these two examples it is obvious that the balance of ion and atomic oxygen concentrations as well as proper choice of ion energy and power delivered to the plasma direct the nature of the plasma treatment.

  3. Applications of digital processing for noise removal from plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.J.; Candy, J.V.; Casper, T.A.

    1985-11-11

    The use of digital signal techniques for removal of noise components present in plasma diagnostic signals is discussed, particularly with reference to diamagnetic loop signals. These signals contain noise due to power supply ripple in addition to plasma characteristics. The application of noise canceling techniques, such as adaptive noise canceling and model-based estimation, will be discussed. The use of computer codes such as SIG is described. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Burning Plasma Diagnostic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2008-06-18

    Ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS, 200-750 nm) atomic spectroscopy of neutral and ion fuel species (H, D, T, Li) and impurities (e.g. He, Be, C, W) is a key element of plasma control and diagnosis on ITER and future magnetically confined burning plasma experiments (BPX). Spectroscopic diagnostic implementation and performance issues that arise in the BPX harsh nuclear environment in the UV-VIS range, e.g., degradation of first mirror reflectivity under charge-exchange atom bombardment (erosion) and impurity deposition, permanent and dynamic loss of window and optical fiber transmission under intense neutron and {gamma}-ray fluxes, are either absent or not as severe in the near-infrared (NIR, 750-2000 nm) range. An initial survey of NIR diagnostic applications has been undertaken on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. It is demonstrated that NIR spectroscopy can address machine protection and plasma control diagnostic tasks, as well as plasma performance evaluation and physics studies. Emission intensity estimates demonstrate that NIR measurements are possible in the BPX plasma operating parameter range. Complications in the NIR range due to parasitic background emissions are expected to occur at very high plasma densities, low impurity densities, and at high plasma facing component temperatures.

  5. Applications of quantum cascade lasers in plasma diagnostics: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röpcke, J.; Davies, P. B.; Lang, N.; Rousseau, A.; Welzel, S.

    2012-10-01

    Over the past few years mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy based on quantum cascade lasers operating over the region from 3 to 12 µm and called quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy or QCLAS has progressed considerably as a powerful diagnostic technique for in situ studies of the fundamental physics and chemistry of molecular plasmas. The increasing interest in processing plasmas containing hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, nitrogen oxides and organo-silicon compounds has led to further applications of QCLAS because most of these compounds and their decomposition products are infrared active. QCLAS provides a means of determining the absolute concentrations of the ground states of stable and transient molecular species at time resolutions below a microsecond, which is of particular importance for the investigation of reaction kinetics and dynamics. Information about gas temperature and population densities can also be derived from QCLAS measurements. Since plasmas with molecular feed gases are used in many applications such as thin film deposition, semiconductor processing, surface activation and cleaning, and materials and waste treatment, this has stimulated the adaptation of QCLAS techniques to industrial requirements including the development of new diagnostic equipment. The recent availability of external cavity (EC) QCLs offers a further new option for multi-component detection. The aim of this paper is fourfold: (i) to briefly review spectroscopic issues arising from applying pulsed QCLs, (ii) to report on recent achievements in our understanding of molecular phenomena in plasmas and at surfaces, (iii) to describe the current status of industrial process monitoring in the mid-infrared and (iv) to discuss the potential of advanced instrumentation based on EC-QCLs for plasma diagnostics.

  6. Low Temperature Atmospheric Argon Plasma: Diagnostics and Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaeva, Svetlana; Petrov, Oleg; Zigangirova, Nailya; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Sysolyatina, Elena; Antipov, Sergei; Alyapyshev, Maxim; Kolkova, Natalia; Mukhachev, Andrei; Naroditsky, Boris; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Grigoriev, Anatoly; Morfill, Gregor; Fortov, Vladimir; Gintsburg, Alexander

    This study was devoted to diagnostic of low temperature plasma produced by microwave generator and investigation of its bactericidal effect against bacteria in biofilms and within eukaryotic cells. The profile of gas temperature near the torch outlet was measured. The spectrum in a wide range of wavelengths was derived by the method of optical emission spec-troscopy. Probe measurements of the floating potential of plasma were car-ried out. The estimation and adaptation of parameters of plasma flow (tem-perature, velocity, ion number density) according to medico-technical requirements were produced. The model of immersed surface-associated biofilms formed by Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia, and Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, was used to assess bactericidal effects of plasma treatment. Reduction in the concentration of live bacteria in biofilms treated with plasma for 5 min was demonstrated by measuring Live/Dead fluorescent labeling and using direct plating. The intracellular infection model with the pathogenic bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, was used to study the efficacy of microwave argon plasma against intracellular parasites. A 2 min plasma treatment of mouse cells infected with C. trachomatis reduced infectious bacteria by a factor of 2×106. Plasma treatment diminished the number of viable host cells by about 20%. When the samples were covered with MgF2 glass to obstruct active particles and UV alone was applied, the bactericidal effect was re-duced by 5×104 fold compared to the whole plasma.

  7. Development, diagnostic and applications of radio-frequency plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puac, N.

    2008-07-01

    In many areas of the industry, plasma processing of materials is a vital technology. Nonequilibrium plasmas proved to be able to produce chemically reactive species at a low gas temperature while maintaining highly uniform reaction rates over relatively large areas (Makabe and Petrovic 2006). At the same time nonequilibrium plasmas provide means for good and precise control of the properties of active particles that determine the surface modification. Plasma needle is one of the atmospheric pressure sources that can be used for treatment of the living matter which is highly sensitive when it comes to low pressure or high temperatures (above 40 C). Dependent on plasma conditions, several refined cell responses are induced in mammalian cells (Sladek et al. 2005). It appears that plasma treatment may find many biomedical applications. However, there are few data in the literature about plasma effects on plant cells and tissues. So far, only the effect of low pressure plasmas on seeds was investigated. It was shown that short duration pretreatments by non equilibrium low temperature air plasma were stimulative in light induced germination of Paulownia tomentosa seeds (Puac et al. 2005). As membranes of plants have different properties to those of animals and as they show a wide range of properties we have tried to survey some of the effects of typical plasma which is envisaged to be used in biotechnological applications on plant cells. In this paper we will make a comparison between two configurations of plasma needle that we have used in treatment of biological samples (Puac et al. 2006). Difference between these two configurations is in the additional copper ring that we have placed around glass tube at the tip of the needle. We will show some of the electrical characteristics of the plasma needle (with and without additional copper ring) and, also, plasma emission intensity obtained by using fast ICCD camera.

  8. Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology Advancements for Plasma Diagnostics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangyu

    To realize fusion plant, the very first step is to understand the fundamental physics of materials under fusion conditions, i.e. to understand fusion plasmas. Our research group, Plasma Diagnostics Group, focuses on developing advanced tools for physicists to extract as much information as possible from fusion plasmas at millions degrees. The Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics is a very useful tool invented in this group to study fusion plasma electron temperature and it fluctuations. This dissertation presents millimeter wave imaging technology advances recently developed in this group to improve the ECEI system. New technologies made it more powerful to image and visualize magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) activities and micro-turbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis start from development of miniaturized elliptical substrate lens array. This novel substrate lens array replaces the previous generation substrate lens, hyper-hemispherical substrate lens, in terms of geometry. From the optical performance perspective, this substitution not only significantly simplifies the optical system with improved optical coupling, but also enhances the RF/LO coupling efficiency. By the benefit of the mini lens focusing properties, a wideband dual-dipole antenna array is carefully designed and developed. The new antenna array is optimized simultaneously for receiving both RF and LO, with sharp radiation patterns, low side-lobe levels, and less crosstalk between adjacent antennas. In addition, a high frequency antenna is also developed, which extends the frequency limit from 145 GHz to 220 GHz. This type of antenna will be used on high field operation tokamaks with toroidal fields in excess of 3 Tesla. Another important technology advance is so-called extended bandwidth double down-conversion electronics. This new electronics extends the instantaneous IF coverage from 2 to 9.2 GHz to 2 to 16.4 GHz. From the plasma point of view, it means that the

  9. THz Plasma Diagnostics: an evolution from FIR and Millimeter waves historical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombarda, F.; Doria, A.; Galatola Teka, G.; Giovenale, E.; Zerbini, M.

    2016-08-01

    Extremely broadband (100 GHz–30 THz) single cycle THz pulses are routinely generated with femtosecond laser for Time Domain Spectroscopy applications (TDS). The wide frequency range has an unquestionable diagnostic potential for Tokamak plasmas and not surprisingly THz TDS finds a natural field of application in this area, which is an evolution of the FIR and millimeter waves diagnostics, where ENEA Frascati holds historical expertise. By illuminating the plasma with a THz beam, phase, intensity and polarization of both reflected and transmitted beams can be detected, devising a single diagnostic instrument capable of measuring multiple plasma parameters. We will describe and discuss the laboratory work now in progress to realise a tailored THz-TDS spectrometer with design parameters optimised for the requirements of Tokamak plasmas and the tests of optical fibers and quasioptical couplers to optimise access to plasma. ENEA Frascati and the Photonics group of Physics Dept. of Oxford University are collaborating on this subject [1].

  10. Application of coherent lidar to ion measurements in plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A coherent lidar system has been constructed for the measurement of alpha particles in a burning plasma. The lidar system consists of a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser transmitter and a heterodyne receiver. The receiver local oscillator is a cw, sequence-band CO{sub 2} laser operating with a 63.23 GHz offset from the transmitter.

  11. FAR-TECH's Nanoparticle Plasma Jet System and its Application to Disruptions, Deep Fueling, and Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. R.; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    Hyper-velocity plasma jets have potential applications in tokamaks for disruption mitigation, deep fueling and diagnostics. Pulsed power based solid-state sources and plasma accelerators offer advantages of rapid response and mass delivery at high velocities. Fast response is critical for some disruption mitigation scenario needs, while high velocity is especially important for penetration into tokamak plasma and its confining magnetic field, as in the case of deep fueling. FAR-TECH is developing the capability of producing large-mass hyper-velocity plasma jets. The prototype solid-state source has produced: 1) >8.4 mg of H2 gas only, and 2) >25 mg of H2 and >180 mg of C60 in a H2/C60 gas mixture. Using a coaxial plasma gun coupled to the source, we have successfully demonstrated the acceleration of composite H/C60 plasma jets, with momentum as high as 0.6 g.km/s, and containing an estimated C60 mass of ˜75 mg. We present the status of FAR-TECH's nanoparticle plasma jet system and discuss its application to disruptions, deep fueling, and diagnostics. A new TiH2/C60 solid-state source capable of generating significantly higher quantities of H2 and C60 in <0.5 ms will be discussed.

  12. Dust dynamics and diagnostic applications in quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catalin M.; Si, Jiahe; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Gianni; Wurden, Glen

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about dust dynamics in highly ionized quasi-neutral plasmas with ca. 1.0 e+20 per cubic meter density and ion temperature at a few eV and above, including in magnetic fusion. For example, dust motion in fusion, better known as UFO's, has been observed since 1980's but not explained. Solid understanding of dust dynamics is also important to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) because of concerns about safety and dust contamination of fusion core. Compared with well studied strongly-coupled dusty plasma regime, new physics may arise in the higher density quasi-neutral plasma regime because of at least four orders of magnitude higher density and two orders of magnitude hotter ion temperature. Our recent laboratory experiments showed that plasma-flow drag force dominates over other forces in a quasi-neutral flowing plasma. In contrast, delicate balance among different forces in dusty plasma has led to many unique phenomena, in particular, the formation of dust crystal. Based on our experiments, we argue that 1) dust crystal will not form in the highly ionized plasmas with flows; 2) the UFO's are moving dust dragged by plasma flows; 3) dust can be used to measure plasma flow. Two diagnostic applications using dust for laboratory quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion will also be presented.

  13. PREFACE: IX International Conference on Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnostics and their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savjolov, A. S.; Dodulad, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    The IX Conference on ''Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnosis and their Application'' was held on 5 - 7 November, 2014 at National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI). The goal of the conference was an exchange of information on both high-temperature and low-temperature plasma diagnostics as well as deliberation and analysis of various diagnostic techniques and their applicability in science, industry, ecology, medicine and other fields. The Conference also provided young scientists from scientific centres and universities engaged in plasma diagnostics with an opportunity to attend the lectures given by the leading specialists in this field as well as present their own results and findings. The first workshop titled ''Modern problems of plasma diagnostics and their application for control of chemicals and the environment'' took place at Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (MEPhI) in June 1998 with the support of the Section on Diagnostics of the Council of Russian Academic of Science on Plasma Physics and since then these forums have been held at MEPhI every two years. In 2008 the workshop was assigned a conference status. More than 150 specialists on plasma diagnostics and students took part in the last conference. They represented leading Russian scientific centres (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'', Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Belgium and Sweden. About 30 reports were made by young researchers, students and post-graduate students. All presentations during the conference were broadcasted online over the internet with viewers in Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities. The Conference was held within the framework of the Centre of Plasma, Laser Research and Technology supported by MEPhI Academic Excellence Project (Russian

  14. Spectroscopic Challenges in the Modelling and Diagnostics of High Temperature Air Plasma Radiation for Aerospace Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, Christophe O.

    2007-04-06

    State-of-the-art spectroscopic models of the radiative transitions of interest for Earth re-entry and ground-based diagnostic facilities for aerospace applications are reviewed. The spectral range considered extends from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid-infrared range (80 nm to 5.5 {mu}m). The modeling results are compared with absolute intensity measurements of the ultraviolet-visible-infrared emission of a well-characterized high-temperature air plasma produced with a 50 kW inductively coupled radio-frequency plasma torch, and with high-resolution absorption spectra from the Center for Astrophysics in the vacuum ultraviolet. The Spectroscopic data required to better model the spectral features of interest for aerospace applications are discussed.

  15. Application of advanced millimeter/far-infrared sources to collective Thomson scattering plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Woskoboinikow, P.; Cohn, D.R.; Temkin, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The application of advanced millimeter/far infrared sources to substantially improve the effectiveness of collective Thomson scattering plasma diagnostics is discussed. Gyrotrons, CO/sub 2/ lasers and far infrared lasers which are optically pumped with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation can now provide important new capabilities in terms of combined high peak power and high average power, fine frequency tunability and a wide range of operating frequencies. Their capabilities can improve the signal to noise ratio and make possible time dependent scattering measurements. Both thermal level scattering used for determination of ion temperature and low level non-thermal measurements used for the investigation of plasma turbulence and wave phenomena are considered. Rapidly pulsed gyrotrons, CO/sub 2/, and optically pumped lasers can provide a range of combinations of high peak power and high energy during a given time interval. The use of this high peak power - high energy trade off capability to maximize signal to noise ratios is discussed. Dramatic reduction in stray light, using fine frequency source tunability and gas absorption cell technology, is also discussed.

  16. Helium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet: Diagnostics and Application for Burned Wounds Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topala, Ionut; Nastuta, Andrei

    A new field of plasma applications developed in the last years, entitled plasma medicine, has focused the attention of many peoples from plasma ­community on biology and medicine. Subjects that involve plasma physics and technology (e.g. living tissue treatment or wound healing, cancer cell apoptosis, blood coagulation, sterilization and decontamination) are nowadays in study in many laboratories. In this paper we present results on optical and electrical diagnosis of a helium ­atmospheric pressure plasma jet designed for medical use. This type of plasma jet was used for improvement of the wound healing process. We observed a more rapid macroscopic healing of the plasma treated wounds in comparison with the control group.

  17. Tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Natalia

    2009-10-01

    In the previous work [1], we discussed a ``technology'' of tomographic method and relations between the tomographic diagnostics in thermal (equilibrium) and nonthermal (nonequilibrium) plasma sources. The conclusion has been made that tomographic reconstruction in thermal plasma sources is the standard procedure at present, which can provide much useful information on the plasma structure and its evolution in time, while the tomographic reconstruction of nonthermal plasma has a great potential at making a contribution to understanding the fundamental problem of substance behavior in strongly nonequilibrium conditions. Using medical terminology, one could say, that tomographic diagnostics of the equilibrium plasma sources studies their ``anatomic'' structure, while reconstruction of the nonequilibrium plasma is similar to the ``physiological'' examination: it is directed to study the physical mechanisms and processes. The present work is focused on nonthermal plasma research. The tomographic diagnostics is directed to study spatial structures formed in the gas discharge plasmas under the influence of electrical and gravitational fields. The ways of plasma ``self-organization'' in changing and extreme conditions are analyzed. The analysis has been made using some examples from our practical tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasma sources, such as low-pressure capacitive and inductive discharges. [0pt] [1] Denisova N. Plasma diagnostics using computed tomography method // IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 2009 37 4 502.

  18. Application of Gaseous Laser Targets and Optical Diagnostics to Study High Mach Number Unstable Plasma Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J; MacKinnon, A; Robey, H

    2001-04-01

    The information that can be obtained from current laser driven high Mach number (compressible) hydrodynamics experiments using solid targets and foams is limited by the need to use X-ray diagnostics. These do well at providing the shape of gross 2D structures which we model well, but are a long way from being able to reveal detailed information at the smaller spatial scales, or in 3D turbulent flows, where most of the modeling uncertainties exist. Remedying this is, and will continue to be, an ongoing research effort. An alternative approach that is not being considered is to use gaseous targets coupled with optical diagnostics. The lower density of gases compared to solids or foams means we can use much larger targets for a given laser energy. This should significantly improve spatial resolution, and the dynamic range of scales that are resolvable. In addition, it may be possible to adapt powerful techniques, such as LIF, used by the low Mach number (incompressible) fluid/gas community so that they work in the high Mach number plasma regime. This would provide much more detailed information on turbulent flows than could be achieved with current X-ray diagnostics. We propose a small research effort to use established techniques such as optical interferometry (absolute electron density), and Schlieren photography (electron density gradient), to study compressible hydrodynamic instabilities. We also propose to explore whether techniques such as LIF may be adapted to the plasma regime, thus providing detailed information, particularly about turbulent flows, that is not currently obtainable in plasmas using X-ray diagnostics. The setting will be radiating blast waves, which avoids costly target fabrication, while promising a high physics payoff to the astrophysics community just from using the established diagnostics alone. We propose to conduct the work in collaboration with Dr Todd Ditmire at the University of Texas at Austin, principally on the Janus laser, and

  19. Testing and Calibration of Novel Detectors for Nuclear and Plasma Physics Diagnostic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zaheer; Haugh, Mike; Tellinghuisen, Jim; Glebov, Vladimir; Roberts, Sam; Stoeckl, Christian; Sangster, Craig

    2008-10-01

    Calibrated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond diodes, X-ray diodes (XRDs), and PIN diodes are used in nuclear and plasma physics diagnostic experiments, such as those conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Calibrations of these diodes are conducted at the OMEGA Laser at the Lab for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester, as well as at the Titan Laser in the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. The OMEGA Laser is a 30-kilojoule one-nanosecond system designed for inertial confinement fusion and nuclear physics research. The Titan Laser is a picosecond system designed for plasma and X-ray studies. In addition, National Security Technologies, LLC, (NSTec) has built a new hard X-ray calibration facility (the ``HEX Laboratory''), where X-ray detector systems are also calibrated. In this paper we will present our methods of absolute and relative calibration, results of calibration, and the capabilities of the HEX Laboratory.

  20. ON THE ACCURACY OF THE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE DIAGNOSTICS OF SOLAR PLASMAS. APPLICATION TO SDO/AIA. II. MULTITHERMAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Auchere, F.; Soubrie, E.; Bocchialini, K.; Barbey, N.

    2012-12-15

    Differential emission measure (DEM) analysis is one of the most used diagnostic tools for solar and stellar coronae. Being an inverse problem, it has limitations due to the presence of random and systematic errors. We present in this series of papers an analysis of the robustness of the inversion in the case of SDO/AIA observations. We completely characterize the DEM inversion and its statistical properties, providing all the solutions consistent with the data along with their associated probabilities, and a test of the suitability of the assumed DEM model. While Paper I focused on isothermal conditions, we now consider multithermal plasmas and investigate both isothermal and multithermal solutions. We demonstrate how the ambiguity between noises and multithermality fundamentally limits the temperature resolution of the inversion. We show that if the observed plasma is multithermal, isothermal solutions tend to cluster on a constant temperature whatever the number of passbands or spectral lines. The multithermal solutions are also found to be biased toward near-isothermal solutions around 1 MK. This is true even if the residuals support the chosen DEM model, possibly leading to erroneous conclusions on the observed plasma. We propose tools for identifying and quantifying the possible degeneracy of solutions, thus helping the interpretation of DEM inversion.

  1. Diagnostic techniques for thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Snyder, S.C.; Swank, W.D.; Haggard, D.C.; Reynolds, L.D.

    1994-12-31

    The plasma diagnostic techniques discussed are Rayleigh and coherent Thomson scattering, Coherent-Anti-Stokes-Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) and enthalpy probes. The quantities measured are heavy species and electron temperature, ionized fraction, plasma composition, and velocity. Examples of results from both subsonic and supersonic jets are presented and limitations discussed.

  2. Microwave diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David

    Plasma treatment of biological tissues has tremendous potential due to the wide range of applications. Most plasmas have gas temperatures which greatly exceed room temperature. These are often utilized in electro-surgery for cutting and coagulating tissue. Another type of plasma, referred to as cold atmospheric plasma, or CAP, is characterized by heavy particle temperatures which are at or near room temperature. Due to this lack of thermal effect, CAP may provide less invasive medical procedures. Additionally, CAP have been demonstrated to be effective at targeting cancer cells while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissue. A recently fabricated Microwave Electron Density Device (MEDD) utilizes microwave scattering on small atmospheric plasmas to determine the electron plasma density. The MEDD can be utilized on plasmas which range from a fraction of a millimeter to several centimeters at atmospheric pressure when traditional methods cannot be applied. Microwave interferometry fails due to the small size of the plasma relative to the microwave wavelength which leads to diffraction and negligible phase change; electrostatic probes introduce very strong perturbation and are associated with difficulties of application in strongly-collisional atmospheric conditions; and laser Thomson scattering is not sensitive enough to measure plasma densities less than 1012 cm-3. The first part of this dissertation provides an overview of two types of small atmospheric plasma objects namely CAPs and plasmas utilized in the electro-surgery. It then goes on to describe the fabrication, testing and calibration of the MEDD facility. The second part of this dissertation is focused on the application of the MEDD and other diagnostic techniques to both plasma objects. A series of plasma images that illustrate the temporal evolution of a discharge created by an argon electrosurgical device operating in the coagulation mode and its behavior was analyzed. The discharge of the argon

  3. Spectroscopy Diagnostics for Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Balkey, M. M.; Blackburn, M. A.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Scime, E. E.; Spangler, R. S.

    1999-11-01

    Measuring plasma parameters via non-intrusive diagnostics is a matter of necessity in steady-state helicon sources. Contrary to probes, spectroscopy measurements are only weakly affected by RF fields and do not contaminate the plasma. We discuss spectroscopic diagnostics designed to evaluate the different plasma parameters of the HELIX helicon source. The wide range in density that can generated by HELIX (for He, 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3) makes it an ideal source to develop and validate diagnostics that can be used in RF plasmas. For He discharges, a spectroscopy technique based on the relative intensities of He I lines is used to measure Te in the plasma. This diagnostic is based on the fact that the dependence on the electron energy of the excitation rate differs between singlet and triplet lines of the He atom. In addition, using an absolute calibration, the study of specific neutral and ion transitions can predict the population of the different excited levels and the ion density. For Ar plasmas, the possibility of using a line ratio technique to evaluate the electron temperature is investigated. An alternative technique using the ratio of bound-bound radiation versus continuous radiation is also presented. Finally, absolute intensity measurements of specific Ar I and Ar II transitions are used to predict the excited levels populations and the ion density in the plasma, respectively.

  4. Nonequilibrium diagnostics of plasma thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, T.L.; Grandy, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes possible techniques by which the state of plasma thruster operation for space propulsion can be determined from a minimum set of experimental data in the laboratory. The kinetic properties of the nonequilibrium plasma plume usually can not be directly related to the observed radiation; hence, appropriate nonequilibrium diagnostic techniques must be employed. A newly developed multithermal, multichemical equilibrium method is discussed that uses measured line emission intensities and N equations to solve for N unknowns. The effect of arbitrarily changing the number of selected N unknowns and how one determines the optimum (minimum) number to be used for a given composition is also presented. The chemical nonequilibrium aspects and the application to molecular species have not yet been published. The important conclusions are that (1) complete thermodynamic systems in nonequilibrium can be described by relatively few variables if appropriate choices and filtering methods are used, (2) a few radiation measurements can yield valid kinetic properties, and (3) the major question in the relations to be used is in the form of the law of mass action. The results are substantiated in the laboratory by additional alternative methods of measurement of some of the kinetic properties. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  5. ON THE ACCURACY OF THE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE DIAGNOSTICS OF SOLAR PLASMAS. APPLICATION TO SDO/AIA. I. ISOTHERMAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Auchere, F.; Soubrie, E.; Bocchialini, K.; Barbey, N.

    2012-12-15

    Differential emission measure (DEM) analysis is a major diagnostic tool for stellar atmospheres. However, both its derivation and its interpretation are notably difficult because of random and systematic errors, and the inverse nature of the problem. We use simulations with simple thermal distributions to investigate the inversion properties of SDO/AIA observations of the solar corona. This allows a systematic exploration of the parameter space, and using a statistical approach the respective probabilities of all the DEMs compatible with the uncertainties can be computed. Following this methodology, several important properties of the DEM inversion, including new limitations, can be derived and presented in a very synthetic fashion. In this first paper, we describe the formalism and we focus on isothermal plasmas as building blocks to understand the more complex DEMs studied in the second paper. The behavior of the inversion of AIA data being thus quantified, and we provide new tools to properly interpret the DEM. We quantify the improvement of the isothermal inversion with six AIA bands compared to previous EUV imagers. The maximum temperature resolution of AIA is found to be 0.03 log T{sub e} , and we derive a rigorous test to quantify the compatibility of observations with the isothermal hypothesis. However, we demonstrate limitations in the ability of AIA alone to distinguish different physical conditions.

  6. diagnostic in a recombining plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, U.; Goto, M.

    2016-05-01

    In fusion devices the hydrogen Balmer lines are used to measure the neutral flux from the walls into the plasma using the atomic physics factor S/XB. This is a standard diagnostic which can be applied in ionizing plasma using {{H}α} , {{H}β} or {{H}γ} without knowledge of the electron density. We will extend this method to a recombining plasma in front of a surface. {{H}α} can be used in an analogous way to measure the plasma flow to this surface which can be e.g. a divertor target. The other Balmer lines are not suitable because the corresponding atomic physics factor R/YB depends on density due to three-body recombination. An application of this diagnostic method is provided.

  7. Far infrared fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Peebles, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last several years, reflectometry has grown in importance as a diagnostic for both steady-state density Profiles as well as for the investigation of density fluctuations and turbulence. As a diagnostic for density profile measurement, it is generally believed to be well understood in the tokamak environment. However, its use as a fluctuation diagnostic is hampered by a lack of quantitative experimental understanding of its wavenumber sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several researchers, have theoretically investigated these questions. However, prior to the UCLA laboratory investigation, no group has experimentally investigated these questions. Because of the reflectometer's importance to the world effort in understanding plasma turbulence and transport, UCLA has, over the last year, made its primary Task IIIA effort the resolution of these questions. UCLA has taken the lead in a quantitative experimental understanding of reflectometer data as applied to the measurement of density fluctuations. In addition to this, work has proceeded on the design, construction, and installation of a reflectometer system on UCLA's CCT tokamak. This effort will allow a comparison between the improved confinement regimes (H-mode) observed on both the DIII-D and CCT machines with the goal of achieving a physics understanding of the phenomena. Preliminary investigation of a new diagnostic technique to measure density profiles as a function of time has been initiated at UCLA. The technique promises to be a valuable addition to the range of available plasma diagnostics. Work on advanced holographic reflectometry technique as applied to fluctuation diagnostics has awaited a better understanding of the reflectometer signal itself as discussed above. Efforts to ensure the transfer of the diagnostic developments have continued with particular attention devoted to the preliminary design of a multichannel FIR interferometer for MST.

  8. Advanced plasma diagnostics for plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, Mikhail Victorovich

    1999-10-01

    A new, non-intrusive, non-perturbing diagnostic method was developed that can be broadly applied to low pressure, weakly ionized plasmas and glow discharges-trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy (TRG-OES). The method is based on a comparison of intensities of atomic emission from trace amounts of inert gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) that are added to the discharge to intensities calculated from the theoretical model. The model assumes a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF), computes the population of emitting levels both from the ground state and the metastable states of rare gases, and from the best fit between theory and experiment determines electron temperature (Te). Subject to conditions, TRG-OES can also yield electron density or its upper or lower limit. From the comparison of the emission from levels excited predominantly by high energy electrons to that excited by low energy electrons, information about the EEDF can be obtained. The use of TRG-OES also allows a traditionally qualitative actinometry technique (determination of concentration of radical species in plasma through optical emission) to become a precise quantitative method by including Te and rare gases metastables effects. A combination of TRG-OES, advanced actinometry, and Langmuir probe measurements was applied to several different plasma reactors and regimes of operation. Te measurements and experiments to correct excitation cross section were conducted in a laboratory helical resonator. Two chamber configuration of a commercial (Lam Research) metal etcher were studied to determine the effects of plasma parameters on plasma-induced damage. Two different methods (RF inductive coupling and ultra-high frequency coupling) for generating a plasma in a prototype reactor were also studied. Pulsed plasmas, a potential candidate to eliminate the plasma-induced damage to microelectronics devices that occurs in manufacturing due to differential charging of the wafer, have

  9. Application and Continued Development of Thin Faraday Collectors as a Lost Ion Diagnostic for Tokamak Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    F. Ed Cecil

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishment of sixteen years of work toward the development of thin foil Faraday collectors as a lost energetic ion diagnostic for high temperature magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Following initial, proof of principle accelerator based studies, devices have been tested on TFTR, NSTX, ALCATOR, DIII-D, and JET (KA-1 and KA-2). The reference numbers refer to the attached list of publications. The JET diagnostic KA-2 continues in operation and hopefully will provide valuable diagnostic information during a possible d-t campaign on JET in the coming years. A thin Faraday foil spectrometer, by virtue of its radiation hardness, may likewise provide a solution to the very challenging problem of lost alpha particle measurements on ITER and other future burning plasma machines.

  10. On the application of cw external cavity quantum cascade infrared lasers for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatik, D.; Lang, N.; Macherius, U.; Zimmermann, H.; Röpcke, J.

    2012-11-01

    Three continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) operating between 1305 and 2260 cm-1 (4.42-7.66 µm) have been tested as radiation sources for an absorption spectrometer focused on the analysis of physical and chemical phenomena in molecular plasmas. Based on the wide spectral tunability of EC-QCLs, multiple species detection has become feasible and is demonstrated in a study of low-pressure Ar/N2 microwave plasmas containing methane as a hydrocarbon precursor. Using the direct absorption technique, the evolution of the concentrations of CH4, C2H2, HCN and H2O has been monitored depending on the discharge conditions at a pressure of p = 0.5 mbar and at a frequency of f = 2.45 GHz in a planar microwave plasma reactor. The concentrations were found to be in the range of 1011-1014 molecules cm-3. In addition, based on the analysis of the line profile of selected absorption lines, the gas temperature Tg has been calculated in dependence on the discharge power. Tg increased with the power values and was in the range between 400 and 700 K. Further, in a pure He/Ar microwave plasma, the wavelength modulation spectroscopy technique has been applied for the sensitive detection of transient plasma species with absorbencies down to 10-5. The typical spectral line width of an EC-QCL under the study was found to be in the range 24 to 38 MHz depending (i) on the chopping technique used and (ii) on a single or averaged measurement approach. Further, different methods for the modulation and tuning of the laser radiation have been tested. Varying the power values of an EC-QCL between 0.1 and 154 mW for direct absorption measurements under low pressure conditions, no saturation effects in determining the concentrations of methane, acetylene and carbon monoxide could be found under the experimental conditions used, i.e. for lines with line strengths between 10-19 and 10-22 cm molecule-1.

  11. Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina

    2013-06-21

    In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 308 nm and A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p{sup 5}P{yields}3s{sup 5}S{sup 0} at 777.41 nm, and 3p{sup 3}P{yields}3s{sup 3}S{sup 0} at 844.6 nm, N{sub 2}(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{sup {yields}}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}'' in the range of 300-450 nm and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p{sup 3}P{sup 0}{yields}2s{sup 3}S at 388.8 nm, 3p{sup 1}P{sup 0}{yields} 2s{sup 1}S at 501.6 nm, 3d{sup 3}D{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 587.6 nm, 3d{sup 1}D{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 667.8 nm, 3s{sup 3}S{sup 1}{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 706.5 nm, 3s{sup 1}S{sup 0}{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 728.1 nm, and H{sub {alpha}} transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational temperatures

  12. Advanced diagnostics for plasma chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, C.H.

    1994-03-01

    Since July 15, 1992, the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University has been engaged in a four-year research program on Advanced Diagnostics for Plasma Chemistry. The goal of this program is to develop state-of-the-art laser-based diagnostics of molecular species in harsh chemical environments, particularly those encountered in plasma synthesis of new materials. Emphasis has been placed on exploiting a new nonlinear spectroscopy, degenerate four wave mixing, as well as linear laser induced fluorescence to accomplish these goals. The present submittal is a proposal for the continuation funding for the third year of this program, from July 15, 1994, until July 14, 1995. Section 2 summarizes the research accomplished during the first eighteen months of the program. Section 3 discusses the plans for continuing research activities. Publications and presentations to date resulting from this program are listed in Section 4. The proposed budget for the third year is given in Section 5.

  13. Multifunctional laser facility with photoelectric recording for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatnitsky, L.N.; Yakushev, G.G.; Oberman, F.M. )

    1989-01-01

    A laser facility with photoelectric recording is described. It can be used in performing plasma diagnostics by four different measuring techniques. The application of photoelectric recording considerably simplifies the automation of measurements.

  14. Plasma diagnostics of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, Alexey; Scott, David; Keidar, Michael; Shneider, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Intensive development and biomedical application of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jet (NEAPJ) facilitates rapid growth of the plasma medicine field. The NEAPJ facility utilized at the George Washington University (GWU) demonstrated efficacy for treatment of various cancer types (lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin). In this work we review recent advances of the research conducted at GWU concerned with the development of NEAPJ diagnostics including Rayleigh Microwave Scattering setup, method of streamer scattering on DC potential, Rogowski coils, ICCD camera and optical emission spectroscopy. These tools allow conducting temporally-resolved measurements of plasma density, electrical potential, charge and size of the streamer head, electrical currents flowing though the jet, ionization front propagation speed etc. Transient dynamics of plasma and discharge parameters will be considered and physical processes involved in the discharge will be analyzed including streamer breakdown, electrical coupling of the streamer tip with discharge electrodes, factors determining NEAPJ length, cross-sectional shape and propagation path etc.

  15. Optical diagnostics of dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remy, Jerome Alphonse Robert

    The central topic of this thesis is dusty plasmas, in which particles are generated or injected. Such plasmas, when ignited in silane-based gas mixtures, are widely used in the semiconductor industry for depositing silicon layers (amorphous, micro-crystalline or polymorphous). These layers have applications in flat panel displays, sensors, and solar cells for instance. The inclusion of nano-crystallites in the amorphous silicon layer produces cells with enhanced properties but calls at the same time for a better comprehension and control of the particles' formation and growth. The role played by silicon-based radical species in these processes more particularly prompts detailed studies. Dusty plasmas are also a field of enduring interest to the astrophysics community. The interstellar medium can be simulated in a laboratory plasma to identify the carbon-based molecular complexes (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons or PAHs) whose ions are thought to be responsible for unidentified emission and absorption bands seen in the spectra of starlight. This thesis covers some aspects of both industry-oriented and astrophysical dusty plasmas. The experimental study on silane-based plasmas includes optical measurements performed in emission, absorption, and by analyzing the light scattered by particles grown in-situ. The negative charge acquired by the particles while immersed in the plasma disturbs their dynamics but also the electrical properties of the discharge. Based on the monitoring of the plasma impedance, it is shown that the plasma is affected by the particles' presence, independently from the nature of the silane carrier gas. Optical emission spectroscopy performed on SiH, H a and H 2 excited states indicates that the silane dissociation occurs in the vicinity of the RF-powered electrode. A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) time-dependent analysis of the silane consumption after plasma ignition demonstrates that the silane dissociation is actually a slow but

  16. Comparative analyses of plasma probe diagnostics techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Godyak, V. A.; Alexandrovich, B. M.

    2015-12-21

    The subject of this paper is a comparative analysis of the plasma parameters inferred from the classical Langmuir probe procedure, from different theories of the ion current to the probe, and from measured electron energy distribution function (EEDF) obtained by double differentiation of the probe characteristic. We concluded that the plasma parameters inferred from the classical Langmuir procedure can be subjected to significant inaccuracy due to the non-Maxwellian EEDF, uncertainty of locating the plasma potential, and the arbitrariness of the ion current approximation. The plasma densities derived from the ion part of the probe characteristics diverge by as much as an order of magnitude from the density calculated according to Langmuir procedure or calculated as corresponding integral of the measured EEDF. The electron temperature extracted from the ion part is always subjected to uncertainty. Such inaccuracy is attributed to modification of the EEDF for fast electrons due to inelastic electron collisions, and to deficiencies in the existing ion current theories; i.e., unrealistic assumptions about Maxwellian EEDFs, underestimation of the ion collisions and the ion ambipolar drift, and discounting deformation of the one-dimensional structure of the region perturbed by the probe. We concluded that EEDF measurement is the single reliable probe diagnostics for the basic research and industrial applications of highly non-equilibrium gas discharge plasmas. Examples of EEDF measurements point up importance of examining the probe current derivatives in real time and reiterate significance of the equipment technical characteristics, such as high energy resolution and wide dynamic range.

  17. Diagnostics of transient non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a renewed interest in last decades for a variety of applications ranging from environmental remediation, material processing and synthesis to envisioned medical applications such as wound healing. While most low pressure plasmas are diffuse, atmospheric pressure plasmas are often filamentary in nature. The existence of these filaments is correlated with strong gradients in plasma properties both in space and time that can significantly affect the plasma chemistry. As these filaments are often randomly appearing in space and time, it poses great challenges for diagnostics often requiring the stabilization of the filament to study the in situ plasma kinetics. In this contribution, diagnostics of a stabilized nanosecond pulsed plasma filament in a pin-pin geometry and a filament in a nanosecond pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet will be presented. We will focus on electron kinetics and OH and H radical production in water containing plasmas. The extension of these diagnostics to plasmas in liquids will also be discussed. The author acknowledges support from NSF PHYS1500135, Department of Energy Plasma Science Center through the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (Contract No. DE-SC0001939), University of Minnesota and STW (Netherlands).

  18. Laser diagnostics of plasma assisted combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xing

    In this study, a microwave re-entrant cavity discharge system and a direct current (DC) plasmatron are used to investigate flame enhancement and nitric oxide (NO) formation using laser and optical diagnostics. The uniqueness of this study lies in the direct coupling concept, a novel highly efficient strategy used here for the first time. To investigate combustion dynamics of direct microwave coupled combustion, an atmospheric high-Q re-entrant cavity applicator is used to couple microwave (2.45 GHz) electromagnetic energy directly into the reaction zone of a premixed laminar methane-oxygen flame using a compact torch. When microwave energy increases, a transition from electric field enhancement to microwave plasma discharge is observed. At 6 to 10 Watts, ionization and eventually break-down occurs. 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of hydroxyl radicals (OH) and carbon monoxide (CO) is conducted in the reaction zone over this transition, as well as spectrally resolved flame emission measurements. These measurements serve to monitor excited state species and derive rotational temperatures using OH chemiluminescence for a range of equivalence ratios (both rich and lean) and total flow rates. Combustion dynamics is also investigated for plasma enhanced methane-air flames in premixed and nonpremixed configurations using a transient arc DC plasmatron. Results for OH and CO PLIF also indicate the differences in stability mechanism, and energy consumption for premixed and nonpremixed modes. It is shown that both configurations are significantly influenced by in-situ fuel reforming at higher plasma powers. Parametric studies are conducted in a plasma assisted methane/air premixed flame for quantitative NO production using a DC plasmatron with PLIF imaging. Quantitative measurements of NO are reported as a function of gas flow rate (20 to 50 SCFH), plasma power (100 to 900 mA, 150 to 750 W) and equivalence ratio (0.7 to 1.3). NO PLIF images and single point NO

  19. Diagnostics for characterisation of plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsonis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    The popularity of plasma actuators as flow control devices has sparked a flurry of diagnostic efforts towards their characterisation. This review article presents an overview of experimental investigations employing diagnostic techniques specifically aimed at AC dielectric barrier discharge, DC corona and nanosecond pulse plasma actuators. Mechanical, thermal and electrical characterisation techniques are treated. Various techniques for the measurement of induced velocity, body force, heating effects, voltage, current, power and discharge morphology are presented and common issues and challenges are described. The final part of this report addresses the effect of ambient conditions on the performance of plasma actuators.

  20. Tomography as a promising diagnostic tool for plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Inagaki, S.; Onchi, T.; Ohshima, S.; Shimizu, A.

    2016-02-01

    A system for plasma turbulence tomography has been developed in a linear cylindrical plasma as a prototype with aiming at future application on toroidal plasma of higher temperature. This paper describes the diagnostic system in both aspects of the soft- and hardware, and reports the first results of tomographic reconstruction that can successfully produce local emission and its fluctuations. In the reconstruction process, two dimensional view of plasma is obtained for approximately 0.6 ms in every sampling time of 1 μs using parallel processing of 120 cores with 10 personal computers. The results include the steady state analysis of local fluctuation power spectra using fast Fourier transform, analysis of temporal behavior of fluctuation power spectra with wavelet transform, and analyses of the structural deformation or pattern of local plasma emission, demonstrating that the success of tomography as a promising diagnostic tool for plasma turbulence.

  1. Diagnostics of thermal spraying plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchais, P.; Coudert, J.F.; Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.; Denoirjean, A. )

    1992-06-01

    The development of diagnostic techniques for dc plasma spraying is reviewed with attention given to the need for thick highly reproducible coatings of good quality for aeronautic and other uses. Among the techniques examined are fast cameras, laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), enthalpy probes, and emission spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is given to the effect of arc fluctuations on the spectroscopic measurements, and a method is introduced for obtaining temperature and species density of vapor clouds traveling with each particle in flight. Coating properties can be deduced from data on single particles, and statistical approaches are often unreliable without added data on surface temperature and particle velocity. Also presented is a method for deriving the temperature evolution of a cooled splat and successive layers and passes. These methods are of interest to the control of adhesion and cohesion in coatings for critical aerospace applications. 70 refs.

  2. Diagnostics of thermal spraying plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Coudert, J. F.; Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.; Denoirjean, A.

    1992-06-01

    The development of diagnostic techniques for dc plasma spraying is reviewed with attention given to the need for thick highly reproducible coatings of good quality for aeronautic and other uses. Among the techniques examined are fast cameras, laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), enthalpy probes, and emission spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is given to the effect of arc fluctuations on the spectroscopic measurements, and a method is introduced for obtaining temperature and species density of vapor clouds traveling with each particle in flight. Coating properties can be deduced from data on single particles, and statistical approaches are often unreliable without added data on surface temperature and particle velocity. Also presented is a method for deriving the temperature evolution of a cooled splat and successive layers and passes. These methods are of interest to the control of adhesion and cohesion in coatings for critical aerospace applications.

  3. Microwave imaging diagnostics for plasma fluctuation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian

    Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) and Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) combined systems are being investigated by the UC Davis Plasma Diagnostic Group (PDG), in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) researchers, Drs. E. Mazzucato, H.K. Park and T. Munsat, as well as researchers from the FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen,the Netherlands. The goal is to develop the plasma diagnostic systems based on the imaging technology developed in the UC Davis PDG group, for the study of plasma micro-turbulence, which is extremely important for the understanding of anomalous transport behavior of magnetically confined plasmas such as in tokamaks. This dissertation work provides the design of the optical systems, the design of the electronics, the testing of the antenna array and the data analysis of TEXTOR ECEI/MIR combined systems.

  4. THz time-domain spectroscopy for tokamak plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Causa, F.; Zerbini, M.; Buratti, P.; Gabellieri, L.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.; Johnston, M.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.

    2014-08-21

    The technology is now becoming mature for diagnostics using large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum simultaneously, in the form of THz pulses. THz radiation-based techniques have become feasible for a variety of applications, e.g., spectroscopy, imaging for security, medicine and pharmaceutical industry. In particular, time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is now being used also for plasma diagnostics in various fields of application. This technique is promising also for plasmas for fusion applications, where plasma characteristics are non-uniform and/or evolve during the discharge This is because THz pulses produced with femtosecond mode-locked lasers conveniently span the spectrum above and below the plasma frequency and, thus, can be used as very sensitive and versatile probes of widely varying plasma parameters. The short pulse duration permits time resolving plasma characteristics while the large frequency span permits a large dynamic range. The focus of this work is to present preliminary experimental and simulation results demonstrating that THz TDS can be realistically adapted as a versatile tokamak plasma diagnostic technique.

  5. THz time-domain spectroscopy for tokamak plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, F.; Zerbini, M.; Johnston, M.; Buratti, P.; Doria, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2014-08-01

    The technology is now becoming mature for diagnostics using large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum simultaneously, in the form of THz pulses. THz radiation-based techniques have become feasible for a variety of applications, e.g., spectroscopy, imaging for security, medicine and pharmaceutical industry. In particular, time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is now being used also for plasma diagnostics in various fields of application. This technique is promising also for plasmas for fusion applications, where plasma characteristics are non-uniform and/or evolve during the discharge This is because THz pulses produced with femtosecond mode-locked lasers conveniently span the spectrum above and below the plasma frequency and, thus, can be used as very sensitive and versatile probes of widely varying plasma parameters. The short pulse duration permits time resolving plasma characteristics while the large frequency span permits a large dynamic range. The focus of this work is to present preliminary experimental and simulation results demonstrating that THz TDS can be realistically adapted as a versatile tokamak plasma diagnostic technique.

  6. Diagnostics of nonlocal plasmas: advanced techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafaev, Alexander; Grabovskiy, Artiom; Strakhova, Anastasiya; Soukhomlinov, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    This talk generalizes our recent results, obtained in different directions of plasma diagnostics. First-method of flat single-sided probe, based on expansion of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in series of Legendre polynomials. It will be demonstrated, that flat probe, oriented under different angles with respect to the discharge axis, allow to determine full EVDF in nonlocal plasmas. It is also shown, that cylindrical probe is unable to determine full EVDF. We propose the solution of this problem by combined using the kinetic Boltzmann equation and experimental probe data. Second-magnetic diagnostics. This method is implemented in knudsen diode with surface ionization of atoms (KDSI) and based on measurements of the magnetic characteristics of the KDSI in presence of transverse magnetic field. Using magnetic diagnostics we can investigate the wide range of plasma processes: from scattering cross-sections of electrons to plasma-surface interactions. Third-noncontact diagnostics method for direct measurements of EVDF in remote plasma objects by combination of the flat single-sided probe technique and magnetic polarization Hanley method.

  7. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q{sub o} and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry.

  8. Laser Diagnostics for Plasma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, Serguei Victor

    The time transients of vibrational/rotational excitation up to v = 7 vibrational level of the ground electronic state of nitrogen were measured in a positive column during the 1-10 mus pulsed electric discharges, and in the afterglow. Current densities were up to 25 A/cm^2, and pressures up to 6 Torr. It is shown that initially energy is being transferred, primarily into vibrational levels above v = 1, resulting in a highly non Boltzmann distribution. The redistribution between vibrational levels takes place within 100 mus after the discharge pulse. Beyond 100 mus the vibrational populations resemble closely Boltzmann distribution. Significant rotational heating was observed in the afterglow and is attributed to energy transfer from vibration to rotation via collisions with electrons. The rotational temperature was as high as 3500 K and reached maximum values between 80 and 100 mus after the discharge pulse. Standard, Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) was employed in all measurements. A novel laser interferometric system has been developed for real time in situ monitoring of the etch rate during the plasma etching. The two-beam-two-path optical set-up provides continuous etch rate measurements while plasma parameters are changing.

  9. Plasma Diagnostics by Antenna Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, C. M.; Baker, K. D.; Pound, E.; Jensen, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The impedance of an electrically short antenna immersed in a plasma provides an excellent in situ diagnostic tool for electron density and other plasma parameters. By electrically short we mean that the wavelength of the free-space electromagnetic wave that would be excited at the driving frequency is much longer than the physical size of the antenna. Probes using this impedance technique have had a long history with sounding rockets and satellites, stretching back to the early 1960s. This active technique could provide information on composition and temperature of plasmas for comet or planetary missions. Advantages of the impedance probe technique are discussed and two classes of instruments built and flown by SDL-USU for determining electron density (the capacitance and plasma frequency probes) are described.

  10. Diagnostics for the plasma liner experiment.

    PubMed

    Lynn, A G; Merritt, E; Gilmore, M; Hsu, S C; Witherspoon, F D; Cassibry, J T

    2010-10-01

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical "plasma liners" via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of ∼0.1 Mbar using ∼1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n(i)∼10(16) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n(i)>10(19) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed. PMID:21033980

  11. Diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A. G.; Merritt, E.; Gilmore, M.; Hsu, S. C.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2010-10-15

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical ''plasma liners'' via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of {approx}0.1 Mbar using {approx}1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n{sub i}{approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx_equal}T{sub i}{approx}1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n{sub i}>10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx_equal}T{sub i}{approx}0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed.

  12. SPDE: Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    The physics of the Solar corona is studied through the use of high resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy and high resolution ultraviolet imagery. The investigation includes the development and application of a flight instrument, first flown in May, 1992 on NASA sounding rocket 36.048. A second flight, NASA founding rocket 36.123, took place on 25 April 1994. Both flights were successful in recording new observations relevant to the investigation. The effort in this contract covers completion of the modifications to the existing rocket payload, its reflight, and the preliminary day reduction and analysis. Experience gained from flight 36.048 led us to plan several payload design modifications. These were made to improve the sensitivity balance between the UV and EUV spectrographs, to improve the scattered light rejection in the spectrographs, to protect the visible light rejection filter for the Normal Incidence X-ray Imager instrument (NIXI), and to prepare one new multilayer mirror coating to the NIXI. We also investigated the addition of a brassboard CCD camera to the payload to test it as a possible replacement for the Eastman type 101-07 film used by the SPDE instruments. This camera was included in the experimeter's data package for the Project Initiation Conference for the flight of NASA Mission 36.123, held in January, 1994, but for programmatic reasons was deleted from the final payload configuration. The payload was shipped to the White Sands Missile Range on schedule in early April. The launch and successful recovery took place on 25 April, in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite and a supporting ground-based observing campaign.

  13. Plasma diagnostics for the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.

    1988-06-01

    The primary mission of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is to study the physics of alpha-particle heating in an ignited D-T plasma. A burn time of about 10 /tau//sub E/ is projected in a divertor configuration with baseline machine design parameters of R=2.10 m, 1=0.65 m, b=1.30 m, I/sub p/=11 MA, B/sub T/=10 T and 10-20 MW of auxiliary rf heating. Plasma temperatures and density are expected to reach T/sub e/(O) /approximately/20 keV, T/sub i/(O) /approximately/30 keV, and n/sub e/(O) /approximately/ 1 /times/ 10/sup 21/m/sup /minus/3/. The combined effects of restricted port access to the plasma, the presence of severe neutron and gamma radiation backgrounds, and the necessity for remote of in-cell components create challenging design problems for all of the conventional diagnostic associated with tokamak operations. In addition, new techniques must be developed to diagnose the evolution in space, time, and energy of the confined alpha distribution as well as potential plasma instabilities driven by collective alpha-particle effects. The design effort for CIT diagnostics is presently in the conceptual phase with activity being focused on the selection of a viable diagnostic set and the identification of essential research and development projects to support this process. A review of these design issues and other aspects impacting the selection of diagnostic techniques for the CIT experiment will be presented. 28 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Reflectometric measurement of plasma imaging and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, A.; Ito, N.; Oda, M.; Komada, Y.; Nagae, D.; Zhang, D.; Kogi, Y.; Tobimatsu, S.; Maruyama, T.; Shimazu, H.; Sakata, E.; Sakai, F.; Kuwahara, D.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tokuzawa, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G.; Lee, W.; Padhi, S.; Kim, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in microwave and millimeter-wave technologies has made possible advanced diagnostics for application to various fields, such as, plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, alien substance detection, airborne and spaceborne imaging radars called as synthetic aperture radars, living body measurements. Transmission, reflection, scattering, and radiation processes of electromagnetic waves are utilized as diagnostic tools. In this report we focus on the reflectometric measurements and applications to biological signals (vital signal detection and breast cancer detection) as well as plasma diagnostics, specifically by use of imaging technique and ultra-wideband radar technique.

  15. NSTX Diagnostics for Fusion Plasma Science Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; D. Johnson; L. Roquemore; M. Bitter; F. Levinton; F. Paoletti; D. Stutman; and the NSTX Team

    2001-07-05

    This paper will discuss how plasma science issues are addressed by the diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), the newest large-scale machine in the magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) program. The development of new schemes for plasma confinement involves the interplay of experimental results and theoretical interpretations. A fundamental requirement, for example, is a determination of the equilibria for these configurations. For MCF, this is well established in the solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation. While it is simple to state its basis in the balance between the kinetic and magnetic pressures, what they are as functions of space and time are often not easy to obtain. Quantities like the plasma pressure and current density are not directly measurable. They are derived from data that are themselves complex products of more basic parameters. The same difficulties apply to the understanding of plasma instabilities. Not only are the needs for spatial and temporal resolution more stringent, but the wave parameters which characterize the instabilities are difficult to resolve. We will show how solutions to the problems of diagnostic design on NSTX, and the physics insight the data analysis provides, benefits both NSTX and the broader scientific community.

  16. Adaptive Embedded Digital System for Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Angel; Rodríguez, Othoniel; Mangual, Osvaldo; Ponce, Eduardo; Vélez, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    An Adaptive Embedded Digital System to perform plasma diagnostics using electrostatic probes was developed at the Plasma Engineering Laboratory at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. The system will replace the existing instrumentation at the Laboratory, using reconfigurable hardware to minimize the equipment and software needed to perform diagnostics. The adaptability of the design resides on the possibility of replacing the computational algorithm on the fly, allowing to use the same hardware for different probes. The system was prototyped using Very High Speed Integrated Circuits Hardware Description Language (VHDL) into an Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) board. The design of the Embedded Digital System includes a Zero Phase Digital Filter, a Derivative Unit, and a Computational Unit designed using the VHDL-2008 Support Library. The prototype is able to compute the Plasma Electron Temperature and Density from a Single Langmuir probe. The system was tested using real data previously acquired from a single Langmuir probe. The plasma parameters obtained from the embedded system were compared with results computed using matlab yielding excellent matching. The new embedded system operates on 4096 samples versus 500 on the previous system, and completes its computations in 26 milliseconds compared with about 15 seconds on the previous system.

  17. Method of azimuthally stable Mueller-matrix diagnostics of blood plasma polycrystalline films in cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Yu. A.; Prysyazhnyuk, V. P.; Gavrylyak, M. S.; Gorsky, M. P.; Bachinskiy, V. T.; Vanchuliak, O. Ya.

    2015-02-01

    A new information optical technique of diagnostics of the structure of polycrystalline films of blood plasma is proposed. The model of Mueller-matrix description of mechanisms of optical anisotropy of such objects as optical activity, birefringence, as well as linear and circular dichroism is suggested. The ensemble of informationally topical azimuthally stable Mueller-matrix invariants is determined. Within the statistical analysis of such parameters distributions the objective criteria of differentiation of films of blood plasma taken from healthy and patients with liver cirrhosis were determined. From the point of view of probative medicine the operational characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of the information-optical method of Mueller-matrix mapping of polycrystalline films of blood plasma were found and its efficiency in diagnostics of liver cirrhosis was demonstrated. Prospects of application of the method in experimental medicine to differentiate postmortem changes of the myocardial tissue was examined.

  18. Mobile CARS instrument for combustion and plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.J.; Dobbs, G.M.; Eckbreth, A.C.

    1986-11-15

    A compact and easily transportable coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy system for combustion and plasma diagnostics is described. The instrument is readily adaptable to a wide variety, test environments and experiments. The system is capable of withstanding high noise and vibration levels and is remotely operable to protect the operator and delicate components from high noise levels or hazardous environments. It is intended for single-pulse temperature and concentration measurements in practical combustion systems, such as gas turbines, diesel engines, and plasma process applications. The system is operational, and initial measurement demonstrations in a supersonic combusting flow are described.

  19. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

  20. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within ±10%.

  1. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/ps/mm{sup 2}, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within {+-}10%.

  2. Diagnostic Development for ST Plasmas on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Johnson; NSTX Team

    2003-06-16

    Spherical tokamaks (STs) have much lower aspect ratio (a/R) and lower toroidal magnetic field, relative to tokamaks and stellarators. This paper will highlight some of the challenges and opportunities these features pose in the diagnosis of ST plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), and discuss some of the corresponding diagnostic development that is underway. The low aspect ratio necessitates a small center stack, with tight space constraints and large thermal excursions, complicating the design of magnetic sensors in this region. The toroidal magnetic field on NSTX is less than or equal to 0.6 T, making it impossible to use ECE as a good monitor of electron temperature. A promising new development for diagnosing electron temperature is electron Bernstein wave (EBW) radiometry, which is currently being pursued on NSTX. A new high-resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system is being installed. Since non-inductive current initiation and sustainment ar e top-level NSTX research goals, measurements of the current profile J(R) are essential to many planned experiments. On NSTX several modifications are planned to adapt the MSE technique to lower field, and two novel MSE systems are being prototyped. Several high speed 2-D imaging techniques are being developed, for viewing both visible and x-ray emission. The toroidal field is comparable to the poloidal field at the outside plasma edge, producing a large field pitch (>50{sup o}) at the outer mid-plane. The large shear in pitch angle makes some fluctuation diagnostics like beam emission spectroscopy very difficult, while providing a means of achieving spatial localization for microwave scattering investigations of high-k turbulence, which are predicted to be virulent for NSTX plasmas. A brief description of several of these techniques will be given in the context of the current NSTX diagnostic set.

  3. Coronal plasma diagnostics from eclipse observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Habbal, S. R.; Tomczyk, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this talk we will discuss the diagnostic potential of observationsof visible spectral lines formed in the extended solar corona that canbe obtained during eclipses. We will discuss the possible diagnosticapplications of visible eclipse observations to measure the physicalparameters of the extended corona, to understand solar wind origin andacceleration, and to determine the evolution of Coronal Mass Ejectionsduring onset.We will first review the mechanisms of formation of spectral lineintensities, we will then illustrate their diagnostic applications,and show some results from recent eclipse observations. We will alsoreview the spectral lines that are most likely to be observed inthe extended solar corona during the upcoming 2017 eclipse in thecontinental United States.

  4. Diagnostics of expanding mesoplasmas originated from a miniaturized inductively coupled plasma and their application to Si etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Shoichi; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-01-01

    A miniaturized inductively coupled plasma (m-ICP) was generated at atmospheric pressure and introduced into an expansion chamber at a reduced pressure ranging from 10 to 1000 Pa to produce expanded mesoplasmas. The fundamental parameters of the m-ICP and the downstream mesoplasma were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe measurement. When the m-ICP entered the expansion chamber, it diffused into the surrounding area and the electron density decreased from 1013 to 109-1010 cm-3. Furthermore, Si etching in mesoplasmas was performed by adding SF6 to Ar plasmas. By changing the gas pressure, anisotropic etching with a vertical-to-horizontal etch rate ratio of 2.5 was achieved at 60 Pa with a vertical etch rate of 2.7 µm/min. In addition, the anisotropy was improved to 8 by introducing 10 sccm H2 into the Ar/SF6, which is ascribed to the reduction of sidewall undercutting resulting from the scavenging effect of fluorine atoms by atomic H.

  5. Some diagnostic interpretations from railgun plasma profile experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stainsby, D.F.; Bedford, A.J.

    1984-03-01

    Some aspects of a railgun experimental series to investigate plasma profiles are reviewed. Certain diagnostic records clearly show plasma leakage past the projectile, and correspondence between various in-bore events and muzzle voltage. A muzzle flash detector is shown to have a useful role as a plasma diagnostic tool.

  6. Plasma diagnostic techniques using particle beam probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, W C

    1980-07-01

    A brief overview is given of particle beam probing. The fundamental concepts common to all techniques are discussed as well as the design considerations for choosing a particular diagnostic technique. The capabilities of existing and proposed techniques, and the present status of the techniques in major magnetic confinement geometries is also presented. Techniques which involve the injection of a beam of neutral particles into the plasma are then considered. The techniques of beam attenuation, beam scattering, and active charge exchange using a beam of light particles such as hydrogen or helium are first presented. Optical measurements of the Zeeman splitting of the radiation from a neutral lithium beam is then discussed, including a new proposal for significantly improving this technique through the addition of a dye laser. Two techniques involving the injection of heavy neutral particles are then presented, and the section concludes with two proposed techniques for measuring the properties of the alpha particles produced from actual fusion reactions. The diagnostic techniques which are based upon the injection of a beam of charged particles into the plasma are next described. The advantages and limitations of these techniques in comparison with the neutral techniques are discussed, followed by a description of specific techniques.

  7. Diagnostics for first plasma and development plan on KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Na, H. K.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Seo, D. C.; Seo, S. H.; Oh, S. T.; Ko, W. H.; Chung, J.; Nam, Y. U.; Lee, K. D.; Ka, E. M.; Oh, Y. K.; Kwon, M.; Jeong, S. H.

    2010-06-15

    The first plasma with target values of the plasma current and the pulse duration was finally achieved on June 13, 2008 in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The diagnostic systems played an important role in achieving successful first plasma operation for the KSTAR tokamak. The employed plasma diagnostic systems for the KSTAR first plasma including the magnetic diagnostics, millimeter-wave interferometer, inspection illuminator, H{sub {alpha}}, visible spectrometer, filterscope, and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer have provided the main plasma parameters, which are essential for the plasma generation, control, and physics understanding. Improvements to the first diagnostic systems and additional diagnostics including an x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, reflectometer, ECE radiometer, resistive bolometer, and soft x-ray array are scheduled to be added for the next KSTAR experimental campaign in 2009.

  8. Diagnostics for first plasma and development plan on KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Na, H K; Lee, S G; Bak, J G; Seo, D C; Seo, S H; Oh, S T; Ko, W H; Chung, J; Nam, Y U; Lee, K D; Ka, E M; Oh, Y K; Kwon, M; Jeong, S H

    2010-06-01

    The first plasma with target values of the plasma current and the pulse duration was finally achieved on June 13, 2008 in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The diagnostic systems played an important role in achieving successful first plasma operation for the KSTAR tokamak. The employed plasma diagnostic systems for the KSTAR first plasma including the magnetic diagnostics, millimeter-wave interferometer, inspection illuminator, H(alpha), visible spectrometer, filterscope, and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer have provided the main plasma parameters, which are essential for the plasma generation, control, and physics understanding. Improvements to the first diagnostic systems and additional diagnostics including an x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, reflectometer, ECE radiometer, resistive bolometer, and soft x-ray array are scheduled to be added for the next KSTAR experimental campaign in 2009. PMID:20590236

  9. Diagnostics of N2 Ar plasma mixture excited in a 13.56 MHz hollow cathode discharge system: application to remote plasma treatment of polyamide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloum, S.; Naddaf, M.; Alkhaled, B.

    2008-02-01

    N2-x% Ar plasma gas mixture, generated in a hollow cathode RF discharge system, has been characterized by both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and double Langmuir probe, as a function of experimental parameters: total pressure (5-33 Pa), and different fractions of argon (7 <= x <= 80), at a constant applied RF power of 300 W. N2 dissociation degree has been investigated qualitatively by both the actinometry method and the ratio I_N/I_{N_2} of the atomic nitrogen line emission intensity at 672.3 nm to the vibrational band (0-0) of the N2 second positive system at 337.1 nm. Both methods showed that the increase in argon fraction enhances the dissociation of N2, with a maximum at x = 50 for the pressure of 5 Pa, although the two methods give two opposite trends as a function of total pressure. Spectroscopic measurements showed that the vibrational temperature of the N2 second positive system increases with both argon fraction and total pressure increase, it lies between 4900 and 12 300 K. Langmuir probe measurements showed that, in the remote zone, the electron temperature falls in the range 1.57-1.75 eV, the N_{2}^{+} density varies between 5 × 109 and 1.4 × 1010 cm-3 and that both the plasma ionization degree and electron temperature increase towards the source. In addition, the process of plasma-polyamide (PA) surface interaction, in the remote plasma zone, has been studied through OES analysis during plasma treatment of PA to monitor the possible emissions due to the polymer etching. An increase in atomic nitrogen line (672.3 nm) intensity is obtained, atomic carbon line (833.52 nm) and the band emission (0-0) from the CN (B 2Σ+-X 2Σ+) violet system were observed. The PA surface modification has been confirmed through the improvement of its hydrophilic character as the water contact angle measured after the plasma treatment significantly decreased.

  10. Study of the SEE decay processes in application to mechanisms of dissipation of the HF plasma turbulence and diagnostics of the ionospheric plasma parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Evgeny

    Results of the investigations of the decay process for different stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) features at the SURA heating facility (Russia) are presented. The data of the measurements are used to analyze the nonlinear energy transformation through the spectra of the Langmuir and upper hybrid plasma turbulence as well as to determine a relationship between the electron collision frequency and the collisionless decay rate of the plasma waves under different ionospheric conditions. In particular, due to the SEE decay time measurements at the upper hybrid turbulence development stage it is found an increase of the decay rate γ of the emission from the collision values γ = τ -1 = 300 - 400 s-1 to the collisionless values γ = 2000 - 10000 s-1 in a wide frequency band (up to 600 kHz) near the 4th - 7th cyclotron electron gyroharmonics. On the other hand, the SEE decay times didn't found any dependence on the pump power but they slightly increase under change from day to night condition. The results of the daily SEE decay rate monitoring in dependence on the pumping frequency (re- flection altitude) are presented. The work was supported by RFBR grants 07-02-00464 and 06-02-17334.

  11. Signal processing methods for MFE plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Casper, T.; Kane, R.

    1985-02-01

    The application of various signal processing methods to extract energy storage information from plasma diamagnetism sensors occurring during physics experiments on the Tandom Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) is discussed. We show how these processing techniques can be used to decrease the uncertainty in the corresponding sensor measurements. The algorithms suggested are implemented using SIG, an interactive signal processing package developed at LLNL.

  12. Plasma Diagnostics Development for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Timothy; Kittrell, Carter; Chan, Anthony; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    2000-10-01

    The VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) engine is a next-generation rocket engine under development at the Johnson Space Center's Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory. With an exhaust velocity up to 50 times that of chemical rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine, the VASIMR concept promises fast, efficient interplanetary flight. Rice University has participated in VASIMR research since 1996 and at present is developing two new diagnostic probes: a retarding potential analyzer to measure the velocity of ions in the rocket's exhaust, and a moveable optical probe to examine the spectrum of the rocket's helicon plasma source. In support of the probe development, a test facility is under construction at Rice, consisting of a small electric rocket engine firing into a 2-m vacuum chamber. This engine, the MPD (magnetoplasmadynamic) thruster, dates from the 1960's and provides a well-characterized source plasma for testing of the probes under development. We present details of the ion energy analyzer and the facility under construction at Rice.

  13. X-ray lasers for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.; Kalantar, D.H.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.E.; Wan, A.S.; Weber, F.

    1997-12-31

    Soft x-ray lasers have evolved from the early demonstration phase to becoming reliable xuv sources. They operate over a wide wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ns pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup {minus}4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this talk the authors describe their use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beam splitters they have constructed and sued a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {angstrom} to probe 1--3 mm size laser produced plasmas. They have also used x-ray lasers and a multilayer mirror imaging system to study hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1--2 {micro}m spatial resolution. They are now planning a moire deflectometry to measure the electron density profile in ICF hohlraums. The results of these experiments and the limitations of these techniques will be presented. The prospects for short wavelength (10 {angstrom}) x-ray lasers which are better suited to higher density probing will also be discussed.

  14. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V.; Solberg, J. M.; Ferriera, T. J.; Tully, L. K.; Stephan, P. L.

    2009-01-15

    We developed and tested a compact collimated 16 channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with approximately millimeter spatial and submicrosecond temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore fixed hybrid armature experiment are presented and compared with one-dimensional simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  15. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  16. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, V.; Solberg, J. M.; Ferriera, T. J.; Tully, L. K.; Stephan, P. L.

    2009-01-01

    We developed and tested a compact collimated 16 channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with approximately millimeter spatial and submicrosecond temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore fixed hybrid armature experiment are presented and compared with one-dimensional simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  17. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasmas.

    PubMed

    Tang, V; Solberg, J M; Ferriera, T J; Tully, L K; Stephan, P L

    2009-01-01

    We developed and tested a compact collimated 16 channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with approximately millimeter spatial and submicrosecond temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore fixed hybrid armature experiment are presented and compared with one-dimensional simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments. PMID:19191464

  18. The ion acoustic decay instability, and anomalous laser light absorption for the OMEGA upgrade, large scale hot plasma application to a critical surface diagnostic, and instability at the quarter critical density. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Seka, W.

    1996-11-01

    It is shown that laser light can be anomalously absorbed with a moderate intensity laster (I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}-{mu}m{sup 2}) in a large scale, laser produced plasma. The heating regime, which is characterized by a relatively weak instability in a large region, is different from the regime studied previously, which is characterized by a strong instability in a narrow region. The two dimensional geometrical effect (lateral heating) has an important consequence on the anomalous electron heating. The characteristics of the IADI, and the anomalous absorption of the laser light were studied in a large scale, hot plasma applicable to OMEGA upgrade plasma. These results are important for the diagnostic application of the IADI.

  19. Plasma-driven ultrashort bunch diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornmair, I.; Schroeder, C. B.; Floettmann, K.; Marchetti, B.; Maier, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrashort electron bunches are crucial for an increasing number of applications, however, diagnosing their longitudinal phase space remains a challenge. We propose a new method that harnesses the strong electric fields present in a laser driven plasma wakefield. By transversely displacing driver laser and witness bunch, a streaking field is applied to the bunch. This field maps the time information to a transverse momentum change and, consequently, to a change of transverse position. We illustrate our method with simulations where we achieve a time resolution in the attosecond range.

  20. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  1. Efficient EUV transmission gratings for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braig, Christoph; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    We report on a theoretical study of binary phase transmission gratings for high-resolution EUV and soft X-ray spectroscopy and investigate their optical properties. Designed for wavelengths between about 2 and 40 nm, the devices may provide a first order diffraction efficiency beyond 30%. We use RCWA methods in order to optimize the grating design parameters and discuss special features of segmented grating arrays. Several elemental as well as compound materials like Be, Mo, LiF and PMMA are considered with respect to their potential and practical limitations in terms of feasibility and sensitivity to radiation damage. Simulations are performed for several samples on the radiation produced by a table-top EUV plasma source and applications to astrophysical problems are considered.

  2. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  3. Fusion gamma diagnostics for D-T and D-/sup 3/He plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Hendel, H.

    1982-11-01

    Nuclear reactions of interest in controlled thermonuclear fusion research often possess a branch yielding prompt emission of gamma radiation. In principle, the gamma emission can be exploited to provide a new fusion diagnostic offering measurements comparable to those obtained by the well established neutron diagnostics methods. The conceptual aspects for a fusion gamma diagnostic are discussed in this paper and the feasibility for application to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor during deuterium neutral beam heating of a D-T plasma and minority ion cyclotron resonance heating of a D-/sup 3/He plasma is examined.

  4. Thomson Scattering Lineshape Fitting for Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-02-04

    HFIT30 is used for interpreting lineshape (intensity versus frequency) data from Thomson and Rayleigh light scattering from a plasma, to obtain temperatures and number densities of the component species in the plasma.

  5. Laser scattering for temporal and spatial diagnostic of low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares Linares, Jose Maria

    2012-10-01

    Many recent industrial and technological applications like surface etching, inorganic films deposition, polymerization of surfaces or sterilization are developed within the field of low temperature plasmas. To study, monitor and model plasma processes is of great importance to have diagnostic tools that can provide reliable information on different plasma parameters. In general, laser scattering techniques provide a direct and accurate method for plasma diagnostic with spatial and temporal resolution. Laser Thomson scattering is used for the diagnostic of electron density and temperature, two of the most important parameters in low temperature discharges. With a similar setup Rayleigh and Raman scattering techniques are used for the diagnostic of gas density and temperature. In this contribution we deal with the different technical and theoretical aspects that are required for the application of these laser scattering techniques. Of special importance are the detection limit, laser stray light rejection and laser perturbations of the plasma. The present study is performed on different low temperature microwave discharges, both at low and atmospheric pressure. The laser scattering techniques provide information on the spatial distribution of the mentioned plasma parameters over different discharge conditions, including small micro-plasmas. Similarly, the temporal evolution of pulsed plasmas is studied, unraveling the features of the switching on and off phases of the discharges.

  6. The ion acoustic decay instability in a large scale, hot plasma relevant to direct drive laser fusion -- Application to a critical surface diagnostic. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have studied the ion acoustic decay instability in a large ({approximately} 1 mm) scale, hot ({approximately} 1 keV) plasma, which is relevant to a laser fusion reactor target. They have shown that the instability threshold is low. They have developed a novel collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at a 90{degree} scattering angle. The scattering is nonetheless coherent, because of the modest ratio of the frequency of the probe laser to that of the pump laser, such that even for such a large angle, (k{lambda}{sub De}){sup 2} is much less than one. With this system they have measured the electron plasma wave excited by the ion acoustic decay instability near the critical density (n{sub e} {approximately} 0.86 n{sub c}). This allows them to use the frequency of the detected wave to measure the electron temperature in the interaction region, obtaining a result reasonably close to that predicted by the SAGE computer code.

  7. Mechanical considerations for MFTF-B plasma-diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.; Wells, C.W.

    1981-10-19

    The reconfiguration of MFTF to a tandem mirror machine with thermal barriers has caused a significant expansion in the physical scope of plasma diagnostics. From a mechanical perspective, it complicates the plasma access, system interfaces, growth and environmental considerations. Conceptual designs characterize the general scope of the design and fabrication which remains to be done.

  8. Challenges for Plasma Diagnostics in a Next Step Device (FIRE)

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2002-01-28

    The physics program of any next-step tokamak such as FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] sets demands for plasma measurement which are at least as comprehensive as on present tokamaks, with the additional capabilities needed for control of the plasma and for understanding the effects of the alpha-particles. The diagnostic instrumentation must be able to provide the fine spatial and temporal resolution required for the advanced tokamak plasma scenarios. It must also be able to overcome the effects of neutron- and gamma-induced electrical noise in ceramic components or detectors, and fluorescence and absorption in optical components. There are practical engineering issues of minimizing radiation streaming while providing essential diagnostic access to the plasma. Many diagnostics will require components at or close to the first wall, e.g., ceramics and MI cable for magnetic diagnostics and mirrors for optical diagnostics; these components must be mounted to operate, and survive, i n fluxes which require special material selection. A better set of diagnostics of alpha-particles than that available for the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] is essential; it must be qualified well before moving into D-T [deuterim-tritium] experiments. A start has been made to assessing the potential implementation of key diagnostics for the FIRE device. The present status is described.

  9. Magnetic Diagnostics for Plasma Control on ET.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvreau, J.-L.; Carter, T. A.; Gourdain, P. A.; Grossman, A.; Lafonteese, D. J.; Pace, D. C.; Schmitz, L. W.; Taylor, R. J.; Yates, T. F.

    2003-10-01

    In order to operate ET successfully in high beta regimes, the present Langmuir probe based feedback system on plasma position needs to be upgraded with a system based on magnetic measurements. The vertical and horizontal field coil currents as well as the elongation coil current will be controlled in real-time, based on the evaluation of the average plasma radius, plasma height and elongation factor respectively. For that effect, the poloidal fluxes and poloidal fields of ET are measured outside the vessel to define the shape and position of the last flux surface of the plasma. The present system has one array distributed in 6 poloidal locations. After calibration, this information will be compared with the outputs from our different MHD codes and also used for magnetic reconstruction. In addition, a compensated toroidal flux loop around the vessel is used to measure the plasma poloidal beta. Finally, magnetic fluctuations are monitored in several poloidal and toroidal locations in order to identify the n and m modes responsible for loss of confinement during the giant saw-teeth crashes. Results from these measurements will be presented.

  10. New Electron Temperature Diagnostic for Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Loch, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    A new line ratio diagnostic design to measure electron temperature in plasma is presented. Unlike previous diagnostics, this new technique features emission lines originating from levels with different principal quantum numbers. A significant advantage of this approach is that the line ratio varies considerably with temperature in the 1 to 20 eV range. Another advantage is that both transitions are optically thin even for plasma density up to 1 E 14 cm-3. The drawbacks are: a large difference in the line intensities and the significant difference in wavelength. The event of high sensitivity CCD camera combine with precise calibration can to a large extent minimize these latest two issues. The diagnostic is tested on the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source. ASTRAL is a 2.3 m long helicon source designed to investigate basic plasma and space plasma processes. The device produces plasmas with the following typical parameters ne = 1 E9 to 1 E13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 20 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.3 eV. A series of 8 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.2 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr. A water cooled fractional helix antenna is used to introduce RF power up to 2 kwatt through a standard matching circuit. The line ratio temperatures are measured by means of a 0.33 m McPherson Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator instrumented with a SPH5 Apogee CCD camera. The line ratio temperatures are compared to electron temperatures measured by a rf compensated Langmuir Probe. To validate the diagnostic, a new collisional radiative model that makes use of the latest excitation cross-section values is presented. The model is also used to predict the potential range of this new diagnostic both in terms of electron temperature and plasma density.

  11. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, W.

    1990-12-31

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q{sub o} and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry.

  12. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  13. Radio stimulation and diagnostics of space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Min-Chang

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the small-scale topside ionospheric plasma structures first observed at Millstone Hill, Massachusetts with the 440 MHz incoherent scatter radar. These small-scale obliquely propagating plasma modes occurring in the vicinity of the midlatitude ionospheric trough, have large radar cross-sections and narrow spectral widths. They have, until recently, been dismissed solely as hard target contamination of the incoherent scatter radar. The geophysical conditions associated with the ionospheric trough, such as the field-aligned current activity and steep plasma density gradients, suggest that these recently discovered small-scale topside ionospheric plasmas may also appear in the auroral and polar ionosphere. In fact, this speculation has been corroborated by the preliminary experiments and data analyses at Tromso, Norway and Sondrestromfjord, Greenland. The primary research results are highlighted. Described in Section 3 are the experiments conducted at Arecibo, Puerto Rico in the past summer for simulating the geophysical conditions of generating these topside ionospheric plasma structures. Recommendation for the future research is finally given. Attached as the appendix of this report are several chapters which present the detailed results of research in the concerned topside ionospheric clutter. Highlights of the research results include: (1) causes of the enhanced radar backscatter (ERB) phenomenon; (2) occurrence of the ERB phenomenon; (3) altitudes of the ERB phenomenon; (4) strength of the ERB returns; (5) range of altitudes of the ERB returns; (6) occurrence frequency of the ERB phenomenon; (7) Doppler effect of the ERB phenomenon; (8) persistency of the ERB; and (9) distinction between ERB phenomenon and space object signatures.

  14. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  15. Flush-mounted probe diagnostics for argon glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liang Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Du, Yinchang; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jin; Li, Xiao; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-09-15

    A comparison is made between plasma parameters measured by a flush-mounted probe (FP) and a cylindrical probe (CP) in argon glow discharge plasma. Parameters compared include the space potential, the plasma density, and the effective electron temperature. It is found that the ion density determined by the FP agrees well with the electron density determined by the CP in the quasi-neutral plasma to better than 10%. Moreover, the space potential and effective electron temperature calculated from electron energy distribution function measured by the FP is consistent with that measured by the CP over the operated discharge current and pressure ranges. These results present the FP can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool in the stable laboratory plasma and also be anticipated to be applied in other complicated plasmas, such as tokamaks, the region of boundary-layer, and so on.

  16. Fast frequency-step-tunable gyrotrons for plasma heating and fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Heikkinen, J.

    1994-11-01

    Usefulness of frequency tunable sources for plasma heating and fusion diagnostics is studied. Applicability of fast frequency-step-tunable gyrotrons for these purposes is examined. A gyrotron based on a coaxial cavity with impedance rod is considered as an example.

  17. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masherov, P. E.; Riaby, V. A.; Abgaryan, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination.

  18. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination. PMID:27587177

  19. Hydrogen alpha laser ablation plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Parigger, C G; Surmick, D M; Gautam, G; El Sherbini, A M

    2015-08-01

    Spectral measurements of the H(α) Balmer series line and the continuum radiation are applied to draw inferences of electron density, temperature, and the level of self-absorption in laser ablation of a solid ice target in ambient air. Electron densities of 17 to 3.2×10(24) m(-3) are determined from absolute calibrated emission coefficients for time delays of 100-650 ns after generation of laser plasma using Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation. The corresponding temperatures of 4.5-0.95 eV were evaluated from the absolute spectral radiance of the continuum at the longer wavelengths. The redshifted, Stark-broadened hydrogen alpha line emerges from the continuum radiation after a time delay of 300 ns. The electron densities inferred from power law formulas agree with the values obtained from the plasma emission coefficients. PMID:26258326

  20. A transmission grating spectrometer for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, R.J.; Hockaday, R.G.; Gallegos, C.H.; Gonzales, J.M.; Mitton, V.

    1995-09-01

    Radiation temperature is an important parameter in characterizing the properties of hot plasmas. In most cases this temperature is time varying caused by the short lived and/or time dependent nature of the plasma. Thus, a measurement of the radiation flux as a function of time is quite valuable. To this end the authors have developed a spectrometer that can acquire spectra with a time resolution of less than 1 ns and covers the spectral energy range from {approximately} 60 to 1,000 eV. The spectrometer consists of an entrance slit placed relatively near the plasma, a thin gold film transmission grating with aperture, a micro channel plate (MCP) detector with a gold cathode placed at the dispersion plane and an electron lens to focus the electrons from the MCP onto a phosphor coated fiber optic plug. The phosphor (In:CdS) has a response time of {approximately} 500 ps. This detector system, including the fast phosphor is similar to one that has been previously described. The spectrometer is in a vacuum chamber that is turbo pumped to a base pressure of {approximately} 5 x 10{sup 7} torr. The light from the phosphor is coupled to two streak cameras through 100 m long fiber optic cables. The streak cameras with their CCD readouts provide the time resolution of the spectrum. The spectrometer has a built in alignment system that uses an alignment telescope and retractable prism.

  1. A transmission grating spectrometer for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Roger J.; Hockaday, Robert G.; Gallegos, Cenobio H.; Gonzales, Joseph M.; Mitton, Vance

    Radiation temperature is an important parameter in characterizing the properties of hot plasmas. In most cases this temperature is time varying caused by the short lived and/or time dependent nature of the plasma. Thus, a measurement of the radiation flux as a function of time is quite valuable. To this end the authors have developed a spectrometer that can acquire spectra with a time resolution of less than 1 ns and covers the spectral energy range from approximately 60 to 1,000 eV. The spectrometer consists of an entrance slit placed relatively near the plasma, a thin gold film transmission grating with aperture, a micro channel plate (MCP) detector with a gold cathode placed at the dispersion plane and an electron lens to focus the electrons from the MCP onto a phosphor coated fiber optic plug. The phosphor (In:CdS) has a response time of (approximately) 500 ps. This detector system, including the fast phosphor is similar to one that has been previously described. The spectrometer is in a vacuum chamber that is turbo pumped to a base pressure of approximately 5 x 10(exp 7) torr. The light from the phosphor is coupled to two streak cameras through 100 m long fiber optic cables. The streak cameras with their CCD readouts provide the time resolution of the spectrum. The spectrometer has a built in alignment system that uses an alignment telescope and retractable prism.

  2. Positron plasma diagnostics and temperature control for antihydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P D; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lindelöf, D; Rizzini, E Lodi; Macrí, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; van der Werf, D P

    2003-08-01

    Production of antihydrogen atoms by mixing antiprotons with a cold, confined, positron plasma depends critically on parameters such as the plasma density and temperature. We discuss nondestructive measurements, based on a novel, real-time analysis of excited, low-order plasma modes, that provide comprehensive characterization of the positron plasma in the ATHENA antihydrogen apparatus. The plasma length, radius, density, and total particle number are obtained. Measurement and control of plasma temperature variations, and the application to antihydrogen production experiments are discussed. PMID:12906600

  3. The Diagnostics of the External Plasma for the Plasma Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1997-01-01

    The plasma rocket is located at NASA Johnson Space Center. To produce a thrust in space. an inert gas is ionized into a plasma and heated in the linear section of a tokamak fusion device to 1 x 10(exp 4) - 1.16 x 10(exp 6)K(p= 10(exp 10) - 10(exp 14)/cu cm ). The magnetic field used to contain the plasma has a magnitude of 2 - 10k Gauss. The plasma plume has a variable thrust and specific impulse. A high temperature retarding potential analyzer (RPA) is being developed to characterize the plasma in the plume and at the edge of the magnetically contained plasma. The RPA measures the energy and density of ions or electrons entering into its solid angle of collection. An oscilloscope displays the ion flux versus the collected current. All measurements are made relative to the facility ground. A RPA is being developed in a process which involves the investigation of several prototypes. The first prototype has been tested on a thermal plasma. The knowledge gained from its development and testing were applied to the development of a RPA for collimated plasma. The prototypes consist of four equally spaced grids and an ion collector. The outermost grid is a ground. The second grid acts as a bias to repel electrons. The third is a variable v voltage ion suppressor. Grid four (inner grid) acts to repel secondary electrons, being biased equal to the first. Knowledge gained during these two stages are being applied to the development of a high temperature RPA Testing of this device involves the determination of its output parameters. sensitivity, and responses to a wide range of energies and densities. Each grid will be tested individually by changing only its voltage and observing the output from the RPA. To verify that the RPA is providing proper output. it is compared to the output from a Langmuir or Faraday probe.

  4. The Diagnostics of the External Plasma for the Plasma Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1997-01-01

    Three regions of plasma temperature/energy are being investigated to understand fully the behavior of the plasma created by the propulsion device and the operation of the RPA. Each type of plasma has a RPA associated with it; i.e. a thermal RPA, a collimated RPA, and a high temperature RPA. Through the process of developing the thermal and collimated RPAs, the proper knowledge and experience has been gained to not only design a high temperature RPA for the plasma rocket, but to understand its operation, results, and uncertainty. After completing a literature search for, reading published papers on, and discussing the operation of the RPA with electric propulsion researchers, I applied the knowledge gained to the development of a RPA for thermal plasma. A design of a thermal RPA was made which compensates for a large Debye length and low ionized plasma. From this design a thermal RPA was constructed. It consists of an outer stainless steel casing, a phenolic insulator (outgases slightly), and stainless steel mesh for the voltage screens. From the experience and knowledge gained in the development of the thermal RPA, a RPA for collimated plasma was developed. A collimated RPA has been designed and constructed. It compensate for a smaller Debye length and much higher ionization than that existing in the thermal plasma. It is 17% of the size of the thermal RPA. A stainless steel casing shields the detector from impinging electrons and ions. An insulating material, epoxy resin, was utilized which has a negligible outgassing. This material can be molded in styrofoam and machined quite nicely. It is capable of withstanding moderately high temperatures. Attached to this resin insulator are inconel screens attached by silver plated copper wire to a voltage supply. All the work on the RPAs and thermal ion source, I performed in the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) engineering machine shop.

  5. A Recoverable Plasma Diagnostics Package (RPDP) for Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.; Ackerson, K. L.; Anderson, R. R.; Craven, J. D.; Dangelo, N.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Shaw, R. R.; Block, L. P.; Falthammar, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    The RPDP is a fully instrumented, ejectable and recoverable unit with flight and ground support systems so that it can be utilized attached to the orbiter remote manipulator system, tethered from the orbiter, or as an orbiter subsatellite. Core instruments on the RPDP are flight proven hardware which provide diagnostics measurements of energetic particles, AC electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, vector magnetic field signatures of current systems, vector electric field signatures associated with plasma flow and particle acceleration, thermal plasma ion composition and density, thermal plasma electron density and temperature, and images of optical emissions regions in UV or visible wavelengths.

  6. Whispering Gallery Mode Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, G.; Basner, R.; Ehlbeck, J.; Roepcke, J.; Maurer, H.; Kersten, H.; Davies, P. B.

    2008-09-07

    Whispering-gallery-mode spectroscopy is being assessed as a diagnostic method for the characterisation of size and chemical composition of spherical particles levitated in a plasma. With a pulsed laser whispering gallery modes (cavity resonances) are excited in individual microspheres leading to enhanced Raman scattering or fluorescence at characteristic wavelengths. This method can be used to gain specific information from the particle surface and is thus of great interest for the characterisation of layers deposited on microparticles, e.g. in molecular plasmas. We present investigations of different microparticles in air and results from fluorescent particles levitated in an Argon rf plasma.

  7. Plasma erosion rate diagnostics using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, C. J.; Turley, R. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    An optical technique for measuring the sputtering rate of a molybdenum surface immersed in a xenon plasma has been developed and demonstrated. This approach, which may be useful in real-time wear diagnostics for ion thrusters, relies on laser-induced fluorescence to determine the density of sputtered molybdenum atoms.

  8. A comparative study of electrical probe techniques for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    Techniques for using electrical probes for plasma diagnostics are reviewed. Specific consideration is given to the simple Langmuir probe, the symmetric double probe of Johnson and Malter, the variable-area probe of Fetz and Oeschsner, and a floating probe technique. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed.

  9. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  10. Micro-Particles as Electrostatic Probes for Plasma Sheath Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Haass, Moritz; Ockenga, Taalke; Kersten, Holger; Blazec, Joseph; Basner, Ralf

    2008-09-07

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles of different sizes with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purpose. In the plasma micro-disperse particles are negatively charged and confined in the sheath. The particles are trapped by an equilibrium of gravity, electric field force and ion drag force. From the behavior, local electric fields can be determined, e.g. particles are used as electrostatic probes. In combination with additional measurements of the plasma parameters with Langmuir probes and thermal probes as well as by comparison with an analytical sheath model, the structure of the sheath can be described. In the present work we focus on the behavior of micro-particles of different sizes and several plasma parameters e.g. the gas pressure and the rf-power.

  11. Arrayed Diagnostic Development on the HyperV Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2008-11-01

    The sparkgap injected plasma accelerator is one of several coaxial railguns constructed at HyperV to accelerate dense plasmas to high velocities. A circumferential array of 112 high voltage tungsten electrodes ablates polyethylene to form and inject a toroidally shaped plasma into the annular breech at the rear of the accelerator. A pulse forming network then applies several hundred kiloamps to the coaxial electrodes to accelerate the plasma. A 4-chord laser deflectometer and a 32-sensor fast photodiode array are being developed to help resolve the structure, density, and velocity of the accelerated plasma jet for different accelerator parameters. We present details of the diagnostic designs and initial data. Work supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences.

  12. ICTP-IAEA Workshop on Dense Magnetized Plasma and Plasma Diagnostics: an executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Mank, G.; Markowicz, A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Tuniz, C.; Crespo, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Workshop on Dense Magnetized Plasma and Plasma Diagnostics was held from 15 to 26 November 2010 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. It was attended by 60 participants, including 15 lecturers, 2 tutors and 37 trainees, representing 25 countries.

  13. Sequential quadrature measurements for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Hidalgo, Julio

    The study of the ionosphere has been very important due to its effects on terrestrial and satellite communications. This thesis presents an introduction of the ionosphere effects, its modeling and measurement methods that have been used along the history. The Sweeping Impedance Probe (SIP) has proven over the years to be a reliable method based on the radio frequency (RF) behavior of the plasma. A new SIP architecture is presented based on the latest techniques available, using a Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) detection and employing dynamic correction of errors with Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) and a reference channel. The design will be detailed showing the component selection based on their performance parameters. In this sense, several analyses have been made to ensure that the sweep rate and accuracy requirements can be met. The testing and calibration methodology is developed to further increase the final accuracy of the instrument. Lastly, the main conclusions of the project are summarized and new and exciting lines of work are presented for what is expected to be the next generation of SIP instruments.

  14. Neutral Beam Injection for Plasma and Magnetic FieldDiagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton,Fred

    2007-08-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) adiagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasma parameters,flow velocity, and local magnetic field is being developed. High protonfraction and small divergence is essential for diagnostic neutral beams.In our design, a neutral hydrogen beam with an 8 cm x 11 cm (or smaller)elliptical beam spot at 2.5 m from the end of the extraction column isproduced. The beam will deliver up to 5 A of hydrogen beam to the targetwith a pulse width of ~;1 s, once every 1 - 2 min. The H1+ ion species ofthe hydrogen beamwill be over 90 percent. For this application, we havecompared two types of RF driven multicusp ion sources operating at 13.56MHz. The first one is an ion source with an external spiral antennabehind a dielectric RF-window. The second one uses an internal antenna insimilar ion source geometry. The source needs to generate uniform plasmaover a large (8 cm x 5 cm) extraction area. We expect that the ion sourcewith internal antenna will be more efficient at producing the desiredplasma density but might have the issue of limited antenna lifetime,depending on the duty factor. For both approaches there is a need forextra shielding to protect the dielectric materials from the backstreaming electrons. The source walls will be made of insulator materialsuch as quartz that has been observed to generate plasma with higheratomic fraction than sources with metal walls. The ion beam will beextracted and accelerated by a set of grids with slits, thus forming anarray of 6 sheet-shaped beamlets. The multiple grid extraction will beoptimized using computer simulation programs. Neutralization of the beamwill be done in neutralization chamber, which has over 70 percentneutralization efficiency.

  15. A limited-view-tomography for plasma diagnostics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Natalja

    2001-10-01

    In recent years progress in plasma diagnostics has led to the wide use of techniques and algorithms of computerized tomography. An important problem in the diagnostics of a plasma as a spectroscopic source is the determination of spatial distributions of the coefficients of emission (or absorption), which are directly related to the temperature and particle density. There are several methods for the reconstruction of the spatial distributions of the emission (absorption) coefficients from the integrated intensities. This paper describes a Maximum Entropy (ME) algorithm which seems especially attractive in the experimental situations when the number of views is strongly limited.The researcher should have enough justifications for reconstruction from a few views. This problem is discussed with reference to the reconstruction from two views of soft x-ray emissivity profiles in W7-AS stellarator.On the other hand, in experiments of this type there is usually some additional information which can be incorporated into the ME reconstruction algorithm. The crucial role of prior information is illustrated in reconstruction of a spatial distribution of electron density in a laser-produced plasma in a strong transverse magnetic field. References 1.Denisova N.V.Maximum-entropy-based tomography for gas and plasma diagnostics J.Phys.D:Appl.Phys. 31 (1998) 1888-1895. 1.Denisova N.V.Two-view tomography J.Phys.D.:Appl.Phys. 33 (2000) 313-319.

  16. Quantitative diagnostics of reactive, multicomponent low-temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The special emphasis in this work is put on the quantitative determination of the plasma composition of an inductively coupled low temperature plasma (ICP). Several standard plasma diagnostic techniques were applied. As a test case for a multi-component low-temperature plasma argon-hydrogen as well as argon-hydrogen-nitrogen mixed plasmas were investigated. For steady-state plasma operation the ion density and electron temperature were determined with a single tip Langmuir probe. A multi-grid miniature retarding-field analyzer was used to measure the mass integrated ion flux. An energy-dispersive mass spectrometer - a so-called plasma monitor (PM) - was applied to sample ions from the plasma to derive the ion composition. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen and the gas temperature were derived from optical emission spectroscopy. The gas temperature was estimated by the rotational distribution of the Q-branch lines of the hydrogen Fulcher- α diagonal band for the argon-hydrogen mixed plasmas and from the second positive system of N2 in argon-hydrogen-nitrogen mixed plasmas. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen was measured by actinometry. The influence of the substrate material of the counter electrode (stainless steel, copper, tungsten, Macor, and aluminium) on the atomic hydrogen concentration was investigated by OES. In addition, ionization-threshold mass spectrometry (ITMS) was used to determine the densities of atomic nitrogen (N) and atomic hydrogen (H and D). Pulsed plasma operation was applied to directly measure the loss rate of H, D and N in the afterglow from the temporal decay of the ITMS signal. From these data the wall loss probability of atomic hydrogen was determined. Furthermore, a zero-dimensional rate equation model was devised to explain the ion composition in these mixed plasmas with different admixture ratios. In addition to the experimental data on electron density, gas temperature, total pressure, atomic hydrogen density, and Ar, H2

  17. A two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Boivin, R. L.; Brooks, N. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N.; Porter, G. D.

    2012-10-15

    The quality of plasma produced in a magnetic confinement fusion device is influenced to a large extent by the neutral gas surrounding the plasma. The plasma is fueled by the ionization of neutrals, and charge exchange interactions between edge neutrals and plasma ions are a sink of energy and momentum. Here we describe a diagnostic capable of measuring the spatial distribution of neutral gas in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. A high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup -1}) laser is injected into a hydrogen plasma to excite the Lyman {beta} transition via the simultaneous absorption of two 205 nm photons. The absorption rate, determined by measurement of subsequent Balmer {alpha} emission, is proportional to the number of particles with a given velocity. Calibration is performed in situ by filling the chamber to a known pressure of neutral krypton and exciting a transition close in wavelength to that used in hydrogen. We present details of the calibration procedure, including a technique for identifying saturation broadening, measurements of the neutral density profile in a hydrogen helicon plasma, and discuss the application of the diagnostic to plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak.

  18. Spectroscopic Analysis and Thomson Scattering Diagnostics of Wire Produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechaty, Christopher; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel; Caplinger, James; Wallerstein, Austin; Kim, Tony

    2014-10-01

    The Lower Hybrid Drift Instability (LHDI) in plasma is driven by the presence of inhomogeneities in density, temperature, or magnetic field (Krall 1971, Davidson 1977), and occurs in systems where the electrons are magnetized and the ions are effectively unmagnetized. The LHDI is thought to occur in magnetic reconnection (Huba 1977), and has also been investigated as a mitigation technique which can allow for communications to take place through the plasma formed around hypersonic aircraft (Sotnikov 2010). To further understand the phenomenology of the LHDI, we plan to carry out experiments at the Air Force Research Laboratory, in the newly formed Plasma Physics Sensors Laboratory. In experiment, a pulsed power generator is employed to produce plasma by passing current through single, or dual-wire configurations. To characterize the plasma, a Thomson scattering diagnostic is employed, along with a visible spectroscopy diagnostic. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Defense by Riverside Research under Contract BAA-FA8650-13-C-1539.

  19. Evaluation of two-beam spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    A two-beam spectroscopy (TBS) system is evaluated theoretically and experimentally. This new spectroscopic technique uses correlations between components of emitted light separated by a small difference in angle of propagation. It is thus a non-perturbing plasma diagnostic which is shown to provide local (as opposed to line-of-sight averaged) information about fluctuations in the density of light sources within a plasma - information not obtainable by the usual spectroscopic methods. The present design is an improvement on earlier systems proposed in a thesis by Rostler.

  20. Transverse laser cooled Lithium atomic beam for plasma edge diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthwal, S.; Ajmathulla; Mahender, N.; Vudayagiri, A.; Kumar, A.

    2016-05-01

    We have built a set up to achieve a collimated atomic Lithium beam to be used for plasma edge diagnostics. The collimation is achieved by two-dimensional laser cooling, and such a beam could be very useful to obtain electron density at the edge of a plasma with very high spatial resolution. We present in this manuscript the details of this setup, including details of the oven we designed for the Lithium source. We present the metrics of the beam, including the transverse velocity profile of the atomic beam.

  1. SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, Dan

    2014-09-10

    The present report summarizes the results obtained during a one-year extension of DoE grant “SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas”, at Johns Hopkins University, aimed at completing the development of a new type of magnetic fusion plasma diagnostic, the XUV Transmission Grating Imaging Radiometer (TGIR). The TGIR enables simultaneous spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of the XUV/VUV radiated power from impurities in fusion plasmas, with high speed. The instrument was successfully developed and qualified in the laboratory and in experiments on a tokamak. Its future applications will be diagnostic of the impurity content and transport in the divertor and edge of advanced magnetic fusion experiments, such as NSTX Upgrade.

  2. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Laura; Jäkel, Jörg; Dahl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients. Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC). Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53) as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  3. Edge plasma and current profile diagnostic development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McChesney, J.M.

    1997-05-01

    This is the final report covering the research conducted under DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150 entitled ``Edge Plasma and Current Profile Diagnostic Development.`` It is intended to summarize the investigation and will go into somewhat more detail regarding the aims, techniques, and results of the project research than the standard technical progress reports submitted previously. During the course of this work the authors developed and implemented an atomic beam-based diagnostic technique for investigating edge plasma density behavior on the TEXT Tokamak. The project required the modification of the existing 100 keV TEXT lithium beam to operate at 20--30 keV and the addition of a new 20 detector chain to collect the fluorescence emissions. The modifications were completed and experimental density profiles were unfolded using a new inversion technique.

  4. Charge resolved electrostatic diagnostic of colliding copper laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Fallon, C.; Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    The collision of two laser generated plasma plumes can result, under appropriate conditions, in the formation of a ''stagnation layer.'' The processes underlying this phenomenon are complex and time dependent. The majority of experiments over the last few decades have focused upon spectroscopic diagnostic of colliding plasmas. We have performed electrostatic diagnosis of multiply charged copper ions (Cu{sup +} to Cu{sup 5+}) generated via Q-switched pulsed laser ({lambda} = 1.06 {mu}m, {tau} = 6 ns, and E{sub L} = 52-525 mJ) generation of copper plasma plumes from a planar target. Time dependent current traces, charge yields, and kinetic energy (K{sub e}) distributions are obtained for single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) and colliding plasma plumes (C{sub p}). The charge yield from a C{sub p} relative to twice that from a S{sub p} is characterized by a charge yield ratio (CYR) parameter. Superior ion yields for all charge states occur for a discrete range of fluences (F) from colliding plasma plumes leading to a CYR parameter exceeding unity. The kinetic energy distributions from colliding plasma plumes display well defined energy compression via narrowing of the distributions for all fluences and charge states. The extent of this energy compression is charge dependent. Space charge forces within the stagnation layer and the resulting charge dependent acceleration of ions are proposed to account for the transfer of ion kinetic energy in favour of collisional ionization mechanisms.

  5. Laser Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the ASTRAL Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Munoz, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    A Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic is presented in this poster. The ion temperature measurements are made in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source using a diode laser based LIF diagnostic. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device (Langmuir Probe, Spectrometer, LIF system). The LIF diagnostic makes use of a diode laser with the following characteristics: 1.5 MHz bandwidth, Littrow external cavity, mode-hop free tuning range up to 16 GHz, total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a precision wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, a new LIF scheme has been developed. The laser tuned at 686.354 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F5/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 state. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 terms (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT.

  6. Nonintrusive microwave diagnostics of collisional plasmas in Hall thrusters and dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stults, Joshua

    This research presents a numerical framework for diagnosing electron properties in collisional plasmas. Microwave diagnostics achieved a significant level of development during the middle part of the last century due to work in nuclear weapons and fusion plasma research. With the growing use of plasma-based devices in fields as diverse as space propulsion, materials processing and fluid flow control, there is a need for improved, flexible diagnostic techniques suitable for use under the practical constraints imposed by plasma fields generated in a wide variety of aerospace devices. Much of the current diagnostic methodology in the engineering literature is based on analytical diagnostic, or forward, models. The Appleton-Hartree formula is an oft-used analytical relation for the refractive index of a cold, collisional plasma. Most of the assumptions underlying the model are applicable to diagnostics for plasma fields such as those found in Hall Thrusters and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators. Among the assumptions is uniform material properties, this assumption is relaxed in the present research by introducing a flexible, numerical model of diagnostic wave propagation that can capture the effects of spatial gradients in the plasma state. The numerical approach is chosen for its flexibility in handling future extensions such as multiple spatial dimensions to account for scattering effects when the spatial extent of the plasma is small relative to the probing beam's width, and velocity dependent collision frequency for situations where the constant collision frequency assumption is not justified. The numerical wave propagation model (forward model) is incorporated into a general tomographic reconstruction framework that enables the combination of multiple interferometry measurements. The combined measurements provide a quantitative picture of the spatial variation in the plasma properties. The benefit of combining multiple measurements in a coherent

  7. Low pressure plasma diagnostics by cars and other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, N. )

    1989-01-01

    Within the past several years, intensive research activities relating amorphous-silicon technology have stimulated plasma-chemical-vapor-deposition (plasma-CVD) diagnostics by laser-spectroscopic techniques. Among them, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has attracted much attention because of its great success in combustion diagnostics, and has been employed for low-pressure-plasma studies. Gas-phase species such as SiH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}, SiH{sub 2}, and GeH{sub 4} have been detected, time dependences of their concentration and spatial profiles of their concentration and rotational temperature have been determined, and the gas-phase mechanisms have been discussed. This talk will employ those results as examples, and discuss (1) the potential of CARS for gas-phase analysis in CVD (including (i) what species are monitored, (ii) what information is obtained, and (iii) what are the advantages and limitations), and (2) some other diagnostic techniques that provide additional information for better understandings of CVD mechanisms.

  8. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets for Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Thio, Y. C. Francis

    2005-10-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are being developed for a variety of fusion applications, including refueling, disruption mitigation, High Energy Density Plasmas, magnetized target/magneto-inertial fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, and others. The technical goal is to accelerate plasma blobs of density >10^17 cm-3 and total mass >100 micrograms to velocities >200 km/s. The approach utilizes symmetrical injection of very high density plasma into a coaxial EM accelerator having a tailored cross-section that prevents formation of the blow-by instability. AFRL MACH2 modeling identified 2 electrode configurations that produce the desired plasma jet parameters. The injected plasma is generated by up to 64 radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of an angled annular injection section. Initial experimental results are presented in which 8 capillaries are fired in parallel with jitter of ˜100 ns. Current focus is on higher voltage operation to reduce jitter to a few 10's of ns, and development of a suite of optical and spectroscopic plasma diagnostics.

  9. Magnetic Diagnostics at the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ethan; Clark, Michael; Egedal, Jan; Wallace, John; Weisberg, David; Forest, Cary

    2015-11-01

    A flexible suite of magnetic diagnostics is being developed to measure low and high frequency magnetic fields, the 3-D magnetic field structure throughout the plasma volume, and the 2-D structure (polar and azimuthal fields) on the surface of the sphere. The internal 3-D structure is ascertained by scanning insertion probes with high sensitivity, high bandwidth, 3-axis hall effect sensors. Careful engineering of these insertion probes is required to effectively remove the heat load while simultaneously maintaining high performance (hot, dense, steady state) plasmas. A surface array of 3-axis hall-effect sensors and 2-axis flux loops will provide 3-D, low frequency magnetic field measurements as well as high frequency fluctuations in the polar and azimuthal directions due to plasma waves. This surface array can be used to observe the spatial structure of global modes such as spherical ion acoustic waves and can provide insight into the structure and magnitude of internal plasma flows. The engineering and capabilities of these diagnostics is the focus of this poster.

  10. Wavelet analysis as a nonstationary plasma fluctuation diagnostic tool

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, S.; Powers, E.J.; Ouroua, A.; Heard, J.W.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Analysis of nonstationary plasma fluctuation data has been a long-time challenge for the plasma diagnostic community. For this reason, in this paper the authors present and apply wavelet transforms as a new diagnostic tool to analyze nonstationary plasma fluctuation data. Unlike the Fourier transform, which represents a given signal globally without temporal resolution, the wavelet transform provides a local representation of the given signal in the time-scale domain. The fundamental concepts and multiresolution properties of wavelet transforms, along with a brief comparison with the short-time Fourier transform, are presented in this paper. The selection of a prototype wavelet or a mother wavelet is also discussed. Digital implementation of wavelet spectral analysis, which include time-scale power spectra and scale power spectra are described. The efficacy of the wavelet approach is demonstrated by analyzing transient broadband electrostatic potential fluctuations inside the inversion radius of sawtoothing TEXT-U plasmas during electron cyclotron resonance heating. The potential signals are collected using a 2 MeV heavy ion beam probe.

  11. Filterscope edge plasma diagnostic for the W7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jeffrey; Unterberg, Ezekial; Lore, Jeremy; Stephey, Laurie; Schmitz, Oliver; Wurden, Glen; Biedermann, Christoph; Krychowiak, Maciej; Koenig, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    W7-X is a large (R = 5.5m, a = 0.5m, B <3T, P>10 MW) superconducting stellarator at the Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald, Germany, which will begin plasma operations in the last quarter of 2015. We describe here the first measurements with a 24-channel filterscope diagnostic [E. A. Unterberg et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D722, (2012)] of edge plasma characteristics and spectral emission from impurities near the test limiters installed for initial plasma experiments. These measurements, together with high resolution IR thermography imaging of the limiter, will be used as inputs for edge transport modeling using the EMC3 code [J. D. Lore et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 0540 (2012)]. This work is sponsored by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05- 00OR22725 with UT-Battelle.

  12. Laser Thomson Scattering Diagnostics in the Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun

    2008-10-01

    Laser Thomson Scattering (LTS) is the non-invasive method for measuring the electron temperature and its density, which can be used for the calibrations of electric probes within collisional and magnetized plasmas. For LTS diagnostics in the low-temperature plasmas, one need to special optics for detection of the scattered light with restricting the Rayleigh and Stray lights. For this, one uses the Triple Grating Spectrometer (TGS), which is composed of Rayleigh block (notch filter for Rayleigh light) and double grating filter (DGF). All focusing lenses are used with achromatic doublet configuration for reducing the non-linear optical effects such as spherical aberration, coma, etc. The specifications of the grating and achromatic doublet lens are 1800 gr/mm with the dimensions of 84 mm x 84 mm and 400 mm of focal length with the diameter of 100 mm, respectively. In this configurations, the linear dispersion is given as 1.006 nm/mm. Considering the dimension of Charged Coupled Device (CCD) with the linear dispersion, the LTS system can be measure the electron temperatures of less than 10 eV (in most laboratory plasmas). The initial measurement of LTS measurement and comparative study with single probe are done in Divertor Plasma Simulator (DiPS) with the following plasma parameters; plasma density of 10^11-10^13 cm-3, electron temperature of 1-4 eV, and the magnetic field of 0.2-1 kG, respectively.

  13. Diagnostic techniques in thermal plasma processing (Part II). Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boulos, M.; Fauchais, P.; Pfender, E.

    1986-02-01

    Techniques for diagnostics for thermal plasmas are discussed. These include both optical techniques and in-flight measurements of particulate matter. In the core of the plasma, collisional excitation of the various chemical species is so strong that the population of the corresponding quantum levels becomes high enough for net emission from the plasma. In that case, the classical methods of emission spectroscopy may be applied. But in the regions where the temperatures are below 4000/sup 0/K (these regions are of primary importance for plasma processing), the emission from the plasma is no longer sufficient for emission spectroscopy. In this situation, the population of excited levels must be increased by the absorption of the light from an external source. Such sources, as for example pulsed tunable dye lasers, are now commercially available. The use of such new devices leads to various techniques such as laser induced fluorescence (LIF) or Coherent Anti Stockes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) that can be used for analyzing plasmas. Particle velocity measurements can be achieved by photography and laser Doppler anemometry. Particle flux measurements are typically achieved by collecting particles on a substrate. Particle size measurements are based on intensity of scattered light. (WRF)

  14. Plasma synthesis of silicon nanocrystals: Development and diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapat, Ameya

    Single-crystal semiconductor nanoparticles are suitable for single nanoparticle electronic devices. Low-pressure silane-argon plasmas are interesting due to their ability to synthesize silicon nanoparticles. The plasma described here is a capacitively-coupled, rotating filamentary plasma instability, composed of a number of plasma globules each ˜3mm in diameter. The 13.56 MHz, 200W RF plasma is operated at ˜2Torr in 5% silane diluted in helium and argon. This discharge can reproducibly synthesize monodisperse, single-crystal, cube-shaped silicon nanoparticles ˜35nm in size. These particles are used to fabricate a single nanoparticle transistor device. Process diagnostics are reported which help understand particle nucleation and growth in this unique plasma. Particle extraction studies are done along the length of the reactor. It is shown that particles nucleate and quickly form ˜300nm, amorphous, cauliflower-shape particles 50mm upstream of the RF electrode. These undergo crystallization in the plasma to form ˜90nm single crystalline spheres which undergo further reduction in size to 35nm cubes collected downstream. The plasma instability is characterized by plasma density and electron temperature measurements. Measurements are reported inside and outside the globules of the filamentary plasma. Density measurements are done using an electrostatic capacitance probe. Electron temperature measurements are done using optical emission spectroscopy. Experimentally measured emission line intensities are compared to those calculated using a model that accounts for ground-state excitation as well as excitation from metastable states. Using measured density and temperature it is found that particles get close to the melting point but do not melt. Low-temperature hydrogen-mediated crystallization as observed in a:Si-H thin films is proposed as a likely mechanism for particle crystallization. Polarization-sensitive light scattering diagnostics are reported. Scattering

  15. Diagnostic application of magnetic islands rotation in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, P.; Alessi, E.; Baruzzo, M.; Casolari, A.; Giovannozzi, E.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Menmuir, S.; Pucella, G.; Contributors, JET

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of the propagation frequency of magnetic islands in JET are compared with diamagnetic drift frequencies, in view of a possible diagnostic application to the determination of markers for the safety factor profile. Statistical analysis is performed for a database including many well-diagnosed plasma discharges. Propagation in the plasma frame, i.e. with subtracted E  ×  B Doppler shift, results to be in the ion diamagnetic drift direction, with values ranging from 0.8 (for islands at the q  =  2 resonant surface) to 1.8 (for more internal islands) times the ion diamagnetic drift frequency. The diagnostic potential of the assumption of island propagation at exactly the ion diamagnetic frequency is scrutinised. Rational-q locations obtained on the basis of this assumption are compared with the ones measured by equilibrium reconstruction including motional Stark effect measurements as constraints. Systematic shifts and standard deviations are determined for islands with (poloidal, toroidal) periodicity indexes of (2, 1), (3, 2), (4, 3) and (5, 3) and possible diagnostic applications are indicated.

  16. High density plasmas and new diagnostics: An overview (invited).

    PubMed

    Celona, L; Gammino, S; Mascali, D

    2016-02-01

    One of the limiting factors for the full understanding of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) fundamental mechanisms consists of few types of diagnostic tools so far available for such compact machines. Microwave-to-plasma coupling optimisation, new methods of density overboost provided by plasma wave generation, and magnetostatic field tailoring for generating a proper electron energy distribution function, suitable for optimal ion beams formation, require diagnostic tools spanning across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from microwave interferometry to X-ray spectroscopy; these methods are going to be implemented including high resolution and spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy made by quasi-optical methods (pin-hole cameras). The ion confinement optimisation also requires a complete control of cold electrons displacement, which can be performed by optical emission spectroscopy. Several diagnostic tools have been recently developed at INFN-LNS, including "volume-integrated" X-ray spectroscopy in low energy domain (2-30 keV, by using silicon drift detectors) or high energy regime (>30 keV, by using high purity germanium detectors). For the direct detection of the spatially resolved spectral distribution of X-rays produced by the electronic motion, a "pin-hole camera" has been developed also taking profit from previous experiences in the ECRIS field. The paper will give an overview of INFN-LNS strategy in terms of new microwave-to-plasma coupling schemes and advanced diagnostics supporting the design of new ion sources and for optimizing the performances of the existing ones, with the goal of a microwave-absorption oriented design of future machines. PMID:26931960

  17. High density plasmas and new diagnostics: An overview (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.

    2016-02-01

    One of the limiting factors for the full understanding of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) fundamental mechanisms consists of few types of diagnostic tools so far available for such compact machines. Microwave-to-plasma coupling optimisation, new methods of density overboost provided by plasma wave generation, and magnetostatic field tailoring for generating a proper electron energy distribution function, suitable for optimal ion beams formation, require diagnostic tools spanning across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from microwave interferometry to X-ray spectroscopy; these methods are going to be implemented including high resolution and spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy made by quasi-optical methods (pin-hole cameras). The ion confinement optimisation also requires a complete control of cold electrons displacement, which can be performed by optical emission spectroscopy. Several diagnostic tools have been recently developed at INFN-LNS, including "volume-integrated" X-ray spectroscopy in low energy domain (2-30 keV, by using silicon drift detectors) or high energy regime (>30 keV, by using high purity germanium detectors). For the direct detection of the spatially resolved spectral distribution of X-rays produced by the electronic motion, a "pin-hole camera" has been developed also taking profit from previous experiences in the ECRIS field. The paper will give an overview of INFN-LNS strategy in terms of new microwave-to-plasma coupling schemes and advanced diagnostics supporting the design of new ion sources and for optimizing the performances of the existing ones, with the goal of a microwave-absorption oriented design of future machines.

  18. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    concentration, temperature, ion energy distribution, and electron number density. A wide variety of diagnostic techniques are under development through this consortium grant to measure these parameters. including molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, broadband ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy, a compensated Langmuir probe. Additional diagnostics. Such as microwave interferometry and microwave absorption for measurements of plasma density and radical concentrations are also planned.

  19. Laser assisted works for pulsed ion sources: Plasma productions, diagnostics and related computations

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Watanabe, M.; Matsuno, S.; Kamiya, T.; Suzuki, T.; Hushiki, T.; Horioka, K.; Kawakita, Y.; Kuwahara, T.; Shioda, K.; Kanazawa, H.; Okuda, H. )

    1994-10-05

    Recent laser assisted works for pulsed ion beam drivers are described in this paper. The first one is a plasma production by a KrF laser light which may be applicable to an ion source. The second item is a transverse-mode-diagnostic of a discharge-pumped laser. The third one is a one-dimensional computation of the latter laser. [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

  20. PROMINENCE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS THROUGH EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Reale, F.

    2013-07-20

    In this paper, we introduce a new diagnostic technique that uses EUV and UV absorption to determine the electron temperature and column emission measure, as well as the He/H relative abundance of the absorbing plasma. If a realistic assumption on the geometry of the latter can be made and a spectral code such as CHIANTI is used, then this technique can also yield the absorbing plasma hydrogen and electron density. This technique capitalizes on the absorption properties of hydrogen and helium at different wavelength ranges and temperature regimes. Several cases where this technique can be successfully applied are described. This technique works best when the absorbing plasma is hotter than 15,000 K. We demonstrate this technique on AIA observations of plasma absorption during a coronal mass ejection eruption. This technique can be easily applied to existing observations of prominences and cold plasmas in the Sun from almost all space missions devoted to the study of the solar atmosphere, which we list.

  1. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy as a Plasma Diagnostic Tool: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Stefan; Hempel, Frank; Hübner, Marko; Lang, Norbert; Davies, Paul B.; Röpcke, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    The recent availability of thermoelectrically cooled pulsed and continuous wave quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region has led to significant improvements and new developments in chemical sensing techniques using in-situ laser absorption spectroscopy for plasma diagnostic purposes. The aim of this article is therefore two-fold: (i) to summarize the challenges which arise in the application of quantum cascade lasers in such environments, and, (ii) to provide an overview of recent spectroscopic results (encompassing cavity enhanced methods) obtained in different kinds of plasma used in both research and industry. PMID:22163581

  2. Predictive Gyrokinetic Transport Simulations and Application of Synthetic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, J.

    2009-11-01

    In this work we make use of the gyrokinetic transport solver TGYRO [1] to predict kinetic plasma profiles consistent with energy and particle fluxes in the DIII-D tokamak. TGYRO uses direct nonlinear and neoclassical fluxes calculated by the GYRO and NEO codes, respectively, to solve for global, self-consistent temperature and density profiles via Newton iteration. Previous work has shown that gyrokinetic simulation results for DIII-D discharge 128913 match experimental data rather well in the plasma core, but with a discrepancy in both fluxes and fluctuation levels emerging closer to the edge (r/a > 0.8). The present work will expand on previous results by generating model predictions across the entire plasma core, rather than at isolated test radii. We show that TGYRO predicts temperature and density profiles in good agreement with experimental observations which simultaneously yield near-exact (to within experimental uncertainties) agreement with power balance calculations of the particle and energy fluxes for r/a <=0.8. Moreover, we use recently developed synthetic diagnostic algorithms [2] to show that TGYRO also predicts density and electron temperature fluctuation levels in close agreement with experimental measurements across the simulated plasma volume. 8pt [1] J. Candy, C. Holland, R.E. Waltz, M.R. Fahey, and E. Belli, ``Tokamak profile prediction using direct gyrokinetic and neoclassical simulation," Phys. Plasmas 16, 060704 (2009). [2] C. Holland, A.E. White, G.R. McKee, M.W. Shafer, J. Candy, R.E. Waltz, L. Schmitz, and G.R. Tynan, ``Implementation and application of two synthetic diagnostics for validating simulations of core tokamak turbulence," Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009).

  3. Diagnostics for real-time plasma control in PBX-M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaita, R.; Batha, S.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S.; Hatcher, R.; Kozub, T.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Okabayashi, M.; Sesnic, S.; von Goeler, S.; Zolfaghari, A.; PBX-M Group

    1995-01-01

    An important issue for future tokamaks is real-time plasma control for the avoidance of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other applications that require detailed plasma profile and fluctuation data. Although measurements from diagnostics providing this information require significantly more processing than magnetic flux data, recent advancements could make them practical for adjusting operational settings for plasma heating and current drive systems as well as field coil currents. On the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M), the lower hybrid current drive phasing can be varied during a plasma shot using digitally programmable ferrite phase shifters, and neural beam functions can be fully computer controlled. PBX-M diagnostics that may be used for control purposes include motional Stark-effect polarimetry for magnetic field pitch angle profiles, soft x-ray arrays for plasma position control and the separation of βp from li, hard x-ray detectors for energetic electron distributions, a multichannel electron cyclotron emission radiometer for ballooning mode identification, and passive plate eddy current monitors for kink stabilization. We will describe the present status of these systems on PBX-M, and discuss their suitability for feedback applications.

  4. Electron beam charge diagnostics for laser plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Byrne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160pC/mm2 and 0.4pC/(psmm2), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within ±8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  5. Aerospace applications of pulsed plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    The use of a thermal equilibrium plasma for combustion control dates back more than a hundred years to the advent of internal combustion (IC) engines and spark ignition systems. The same principles are still applied today to achieve high efficiency in various applications. Recently, the potential use of nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion control has garnered increasing interest due to the possibility of plasma-assisted approaches for ignition and flame stabilization. During the past decade, significant progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of plasma chemistry interactions, energy redistribution and the nonequilibrium initiation of combustion. In addition, a wide variety of fuels have been examined using various types of discharge plasmas. Plasma application has been shown to provide additional combustion control, which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine (GTE) relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines (PDE) and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition (HCCI) engines, among others. The present paper describes the current understanding of the nonequilibrium excitation of combustible mixtures by electrical discharges and plasma-assisted ignition and combustion. Nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates an ability to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and appears to be an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation GTEs, piston engines, ramjets, scramjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. To use nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion in real energetic systems, one must understand the mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion and be able to numerically simulate the discharge and combustion processes under various conditions.

  6. Thomson scattering diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas - Pulsed filament discharges and plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    Recently, non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas have received much attention. Because the characteristics of the plasmas are governed by free electrons, measurements of the electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te) are a prerequisite for understanding plasma behavior. To contribute to the understanding of non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas, we have been developing a laser Thomson scattering (LTS) technique as a diagnostic method for measuring ne and Te of two types of plasmas; a pulsed-filament discharge and He flow plasma jet. The pulsed filament discharge has a short current width (a few tens of ns) and a small size. In order to apply LTS to such plasmas, reproducibility of time and space of the plasmas were improved using a high-speed semiconductor switch. Spatiotemporal evolutions of ne and Te of a main discharge have been obtained. Now we try to apply LTS at a time of primary streamer. Regarding to the He flow plasma jet, the discharge was generated with He gas flow with N2/O2(20%) or N2 shielding gas. It was confirmed that the ne at the center of the plasma with N2/O2 shielding gas was around 50% higher than that with the N2 shielding gas. In collaboration with Keiichiro Urabe, The University of Tokyo; Naoki Shirai, Tokyo Metropolitan University; Safwat Hassaballa, Al-Azhar University; Nima Bolouki, Munehiro Yoneda, Takahiro Shimizu, Yuta Sato, and Kiichiro Uchino, Kyushu University.

  7. Polarizer design for millimeter-wave plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, F.; Salewski, M.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jessen, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Michelsen, P. K.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.

    2013-08-15

    Radiation from magnetized plasmas is in general elliptically polarized. In order to convert the elliptical polarization to linear polarization, mirrors with grooved surfaces are currently employed in our collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade. If these mirrors can be substituted by birefringent windows, the microwave receivers can be designed to be more compact at lower cost. Sapphire windows (a-cut) as well as grooved high density polyethylene windows can serve this purpose. The sapphire window can be designed such that the calculated transmission of the wave energy is better than 99%, and that of the high density polyethylene can be better than 97%.

  8. Development of laser-aided plasma diagnostics and related technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahata, K.; Akiyama, T.; Pavlichenko, R.; Tanaka, K.; Nakayama, K.; Okajima, S.

    2008-03-12

    Laser-aided plasma diagnostics, aiming for establishment of reliable density measurement in next step magnetically confined fusion devices, are under development at the National Institute for Fusion Science. A new type of two color laser (57.2/47.6-{mu}m CH{sub 3}OD) interferometer has been developed and its original function, vibration subtraction, was confirmed in a test stand. The line integrated density measurements by the polarimeter were demonstrated at Compact Helical System by the Cotton-Mouton polarimeter and at the LHD by the Faraday rotation polarimeter.

  9. Polarizer design for millimeter-wave plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Leipold, F; Salewski, M; Jacobsen, A S; Jessen, M; Korsholm, S B; Michelsen, P K; Nielsen, S K; Stejner, M

    2013-08-01

    Radiation from magnetized plasmas is in general elliptically polarized. In order to convert the elliptical polarization to linear polarization, mirrors with grooved surfaces are currently employed in our collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade. If these mirrors can be substituted by birefringent windows, the microwave receivers can be designed to be more compact at lower cost. Sapphire windows (a-cut) as well as grooved high density polyethylene windows can serve this purpose. The sapphire window can be designed such that the calculated transmission of the wave energy is better than 99%, and that of the high density polyethylene can be better than 97%. PMID:24007082

  10. Short recovery time, multianode, microchannel plate photomultiplier for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Bassan, M.; Sardella, A.; Perdon, E.

    1989-12-01

    Laser scattering-based plasma diagnostics are presently undertaken by means of a multianode microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier (PM) whose recovery time is two orders of magnitude shorter than that typical of conventional MCP devices. This PM is suitable for detection of fast light-pulse bursts whose repetition rate is sufficiently low for heat dissipation between successive bursts. Attention is given to the device's thermal behavior, measuring the temperature increase of the Z-plate due to a single, high-voltage square pulse as a function of pulse energy. The Z-plate recovers from the maximum linear pulse in about 50 microsec.

  11. Spectroscopic investigations of tungsten EUV spectra for fusion plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementson, Joel; Lennartsson, Thomas; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Safronova, Ulyana; Brage, Tomas; Grumer, Jon

    2011-10-01

    The Livermore WOLFRAM spectroscopy project consists of experimental and theoretical investigations of tungsten ions of relevance to the diagnostics of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A recent effort has focused on the complex extreme ultraviolet spectra of few-times ionized tungsten atoms that are expected to be abundant in ITER divertor plasmas. The tungsten ions were produced and excited in the Livermore EBIT-I electron beam ion trap by scanning the electron-beam energy between 30 and 300 eV. The emission was studied using a broad-band grazing-incidence spectrometer covering 150 - 300 Å and a high-resolution spectrometer covering the 180 - 220 Å region. Experimental spectra are presented together with analysis based on calculations using the FAC, GRASP, Cowan, HULLAC, and RMBPT codes. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA-27344.

  12. Measurements by the plasma diagnostics package on STS-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.; Murphy, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive set of measurements about the orbiter environment are provided by the plasma diagnostics package (PDP). Ion and electron particle densities, energies, and spatial distribution functions; ion mass for identification of particular molecular ion species; and magnetic fields, electric fields and electromagnetic waves over a broad frequency range are studied. Shuttle environmental measurements will be made both on the pallet and, by use of the remote manipulator system (RMS), the PDP will be maneuvered in and external to the bay area to continue environmental measurements and to carry on a joint plasma experiment with the Utah State University fast-pulsed electron generator. Results of orbiter environment EMI measurements and S-band field strengths as well as preliminary results from wake search operations indicating wake boundary identifiers are reported.

  13. Development of neutron spectrometer toward deuterium plasma diagnostics in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, H.; Iwai, H.; Iguchi, T.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Isobe, M.; Konno, C.

    2010-10-15

    Neutron spectrometer based on coincident counting of associated particles has been developed for deuterium plasma diagnostics on Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. Efficient detection of 2.5 MeV neutron with high energy resolution would be achievable by coincident detection of a scattered neutron and a recoiled proton associated with an elastic scattering of incident neutron in a plastic scintillator as a radiator. The calculated neutron spectra from deuterium plasma heated by neutral beam injection indicate that the energy resolution of better than 7% is required for the spectrometer to evaluate energetic deuterium confinement. By using a prototype of the proposed spectrometer, the energy resolution of 6.3% and the detection efficiency of 3.3x10{sup -7} count/neutron were experimentally demonstrated for 2.5 MeV monoenergetic neutron, respectively.

  14. Development of neutron spectrometer toward deuterium plasma diagnostics in LHD.

    PubMed

    Tomita, H; Iwai, H; Iguchi, T; Isobe, M; Kawarabayashi, J; Konno, C

    2010-10-01

    Neutron spectrometer based on coincident counting of associated particles has been developed for deuterium plasma diagnostics on Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. Efficient detection of 2.5 MeV neutron with high energy resolution would be achievable by coincident detection of a scattered neutron and a recoiled proton associated with an elastic scattering of incident neutron in a plastic scintillator as a radiator. The calculated neutron spectra from deuterium plasma heated by neutral beam injection indicate that the energy resolution of better than 7% is required for the spectrometer to evaluate energetic deuterium confinement. By using a prototype of the proposed spectrometer, the energy resolution of 6.3% and the detection efficiency of 3.3×10(-7) count/neutron were experimentally demonstrated for 2.5 MeV monoenergetic neutron, respectively. PMID:21033835

  15. Investigation of plasma diagnostics using a dual frequency harmonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Young-Do; Cho, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-09-07

    Plasma diagnostic methods using harmonic currents analysis of electrostatic probes were experimentally investigated to understand the differences in their measurement of the plasma parameters. When dual frequency voltage (ω{sub 1},ω{sub 2}) was applied to a probe, various harmonic currents (ω{sub 1}, 2ω{sub 1},ω{sub 2}, 2ω{sub 2},ω{sub 2}±ω{sub 1},ω{sub 2}±2ω{sub 1}) were generated due to the non-linearity of the probe sheath. The electron temperature can be obtained from the ratio of the two harmonics of the probe currents. According to the combinations of the two harmonics, the sensitivities in the measurement of the electron temperature differed, and this results in a difference of the electron temperature. From experiments and simulation, it is shown that this difference is caused by the systematic and random noise.

  16. Atomic Processes and Diagnostics of Low Pressure Krypton Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rajesh; Goyal, Dipti; Gangwar, Reetesh; Stafford, Luc

    2015-03-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy along with suitable collisional-radiative (CR) model is used in plasma diagnostics. Importance of reliable cross-sections for various atomic processes is shown for low pressure argon plasma. In the present work, radially-averaged Kr emission lines from the 2pi --> 1sj were recorded as a function of pressure from 1 to 50mTorr. We have developed a CR model using our fine-structure relativistic-distorted wave cross sections. The various processes considered are electron-impact excitation, ionization and their reverse processes. The required rate coefficients have been calculated from these cross-sections assuming Maxwellian energy distribution. Electron temperature obtained from the CR model is found to be in good agreement with the probe measurements. Work is supported by IAEA Vienna, DAE-BRNS Mumbai and CSIR, New Delhi.

  17. Electromagnetic Analysis of ITER Diagnostic Equatorial Port Plugs During Plasma Disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Zhai, R. Feder, A. Brooks, M. Ulrickson, C.S. Pitcher and G.D. Loesser

    2012-08-27

    ITER diagnostic port plugs perform many functionsincluding structural support of diagnostic systems under high electromagnetic loads while allowing for diagnostic access to the plasma. The design of diagnostic equatorial port plugs (EPP) are largely driven by electromagnetic loads and associate responses of EPP structure during plasma disruptions and VDEs. This paper summarizes results of transient electromagnetic analysis using Opera 3d in support of the design activities for ITER diagnostic EPP. A complete distribution of disruption loads on the Diagnostic First Walls (DFWs), Diagnostic Shield Modules (DSMs) and the EPP structure, as well as impact on the system design integration due to electrical contact among various EPP structural components are discussed.

  18. Laser erosion diagnostics of plasma facing materials with displacement sensors and their application to safeguard monitors to protect nuclear fusion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Koichi; Motokoshi, Shinji; Taniguchi, Seiji; Nakai, Mitsuo; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Mroz, Waldemar; Budner, Boguslaw; Korczyc, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Tungsten and SiC are candidates for the structural materials of the nuclear fusion reactor walls, while CVD poly-crystal diamond is candidate for the window material under the hazardous fusion stresses. We measured the surface endurance strength of such materials with commercial displacement sensors and our recent evaluation method. The pulsed high thermal input was put into the material surfaces by UV lasers, and the surface erosions were diagnosed. With the increase of the total number of the laser shots per position, the crater depth increased gradually. The 3D and 2D pictures of the craters were gathered and compared under various experimental conditions. For example, the maximum crater depths were plotted as a function of shot accumulated numbers, from which we evaluated the threshold thermal input for the surface erosions to be induced. The simple comparison-result showed that tungsten was stronger roughly two times than SiC. Then we proposed how to monitor the surface conditions of combined samples with such diamonds coated with thin tungsten layers, when we use such samples as parts of divertor inner walls, fusion chamber first walls, and various diagnostic windows. We investigated how we might be able to measure the inner surface erosions with the same kinds of displacement sensors. We found out the measurable maximum thickness of such diamond which is useful to monitor the erosion. Additionally we showed a new scheme of fusion reactor systems with injectors for anisotropic pellets and heating lasers under the probable use of W and/or SiC.

  19. Application and Analysis of the Isoelectronic Line Ratio Temperature Diagnostic in a Planar Ablating-Plasma Experiment at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Hohenberger, M.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The Mn/Co isoelectronic emission-line ratio from a microdot source in planar CH foil targets was measured to infer the electron temperature (Te) in the ablating plasma during two-plasmon-decay experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We examine the systematic uncertainty in the Te estimate based on the temperature and density sensitivities of the line ratio in conjunction with plausible density constraints, and its contribution to the total Te estimate uncertainty. The potential advantages of alternative microdot elements (e.g., Ti/Cr and Sc/V) are considered. The microdot mass was selected to provide ample line strength while minimizing the effect of self-absorption on the line emission, which is of particular concern, given the narrow linewidths of mid- Z emitters at subcritical electron densities. Atomic line-formation theory and detailed atomic-radiative simulations show that the straight forward interpretation of the isoelectronic ratio solely in terms of its temperature independence remains valid with lines of moderate optical thickness (up to ~ 10) at line center. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Laser diagnostics of welding plasma by polarization spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Owen; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Linton, Valerie; Meeuwissen, Karel

    2007-05-01

    The application of polarization spectroscopy (PS) to detect atomic species in an atmospheric pressure welding plasma has been demonstrated. PS spectra of Na atoms, seeded in the shielding gas flow of a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) plasma, are presented at different pump beam energies. The nature of the PS technique was found to be very efficient in suppressing the high background emission associated with the welding plasma. The PS spectral profiles appear to be Lorentzian and Lorentzian cubed for high and low pump beam energy, respectively. The effect of beam steering, due to the thermal gradient in the interaction plasma zone, was addressed. It was found that there is 2% unavoidable error in the detectable PS signal. PMID:17555627

  1. Diagnostics of Nano-Particle Formation in Process Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, Holger

    2015-09-01

    The main sources of particle generation during plasma surface processing and the formation of nano-composite materials are (i) the formation of large molecules, mesoscopic clusters and particles in the plasma bulk by chemically reactive gases, and (ii) the formation and incorporation of particles at surfaces (target, substrate) by means of plasma-wall interaction. The plasma process promotes the particle formation by excitation, dissociation and reaction of the involved species in the gas phase. The different stages of the particle growth in the gas phase can be observed by various plasma diagnostics as mass spectrometry, laser induced evaporation, photo-detachment, IR absorption, microwave cavity measurements, Mie scattering and self-excited electron resonance spectroscopy (SEERS). Common diagnostics of particle formation also use the observation and analysis of harmonics and other discharge characteristics. Especially the early stages of the particle growth are not well investigated since they are experimentally inaccessible by standard methods as mentioned above. A novel collection method based on neutral drag was tested in order to get a better insight into the early stages of particle growth. The experiments were performed in an asymmetric, capacitively coupled rf-discharge, where multiple growth cycles can be obtained. Making use of the correlation between the particle growth cycles and the bias voltage as well as the phase angle between discharge current and voltage it was possible to monitor each growth process in-situ. This allowed to collect particles at any desired stage of the growth cycle via the neutral drag method. Size distributions of the nanoparticles at the different stages of the growth cycle were determined ex-situ by transmission electron microscopy. The observed correlations of particle size and bias voltage, which can be used for prediction of the particle growth, are qualitatively explained. Furthermore, the change of the electron density

  2. X-ray diodes for laser fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.H.; Lee, P.; Saloman, E.B.; Nagel, D.J.

    1981-02-01

    Photodiodes with x-ray sensitive photocathodes are commonly used as broadband x-ray detectors in fusion plasma diagnostics. We have measured the risetime of the detector system and have measured the quantum efficiency between 1 to 500 A of numerous photocathode materials of practical interest. The materials studied include aluminum, copper, nickel, gold, three forms of carbon, chromium, and cesium iodide. The results of the measurements are compared with Henke's semiempirical model of photoyield. We have studied the effects of long-term cathode aging and use as a plasma diagnostic on cathode quantum efficiency. In addition, we have measured the x-ray mass-absorption coefficient of several ultrasoft x-ray windows in energy regions where data were unavailable. Windows studied were made of aluminum, Formvar, polypropylene, and Kimfoil. Measurements between 1 to 50 A were performed with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's low-energy x-ray calibration facility, and the measurements between 50 to 550 A were performed at the National Bureau of Standard's synchrotron ultraviolet radiation facility.

  3. Plasma diagnostics in a PVD triode ion plating installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Stan Lambert Maria

    1998-12-01

    In this thesis, two diagnostics tools are combined to relate the plasma process parameters in the triode ion plating system (BAI 640) to the film microstructure of wear resistant coatings. As diagnostics tools, the energy-resolved mass analyzer of Balzers (PPM 421) and self-constructed Langmuir probes are used. The PPM 421 detects ion fluxes from the whole plasma volume, with its highest sensitivity along the axis of the ion optics while the probe measures electron and ion fluxes in the proximity of the probe. It is important to know which ions and which neutrals, with how much energy or speed, impinge on the surface of the substrates. An ion mass scan and a neutral mass scan, performed by the PPM 421 inserted next to the substrate table, can give information on the most important species, while the energy scan gives information on the energy distribution of these species. These so called energy spectra of neutrals and ions are a convolution of different energy distributions. This indicates that there are potential hills in the plasma were the ions can accelerate. The fast neutrals mostly originate from a charge exchange collision with the ions. The Langmuir probe can help to locate the potential hills in the plasma. Moreover, a simple current-voltage measurement, performed by this type of collecting probe, can give the value of the plasma parameters with some reasonable accuracy. In combination with the results of the film microstructure, performed by X-ray diffraction, the process parameters of a deposition can be optimized to obtain films with controlled adhesion properties, friction protection and microhardness. The configuration of the triode ion plating installation is given in its different modes used in this thesis, e.g. heating, etching and ion plating/evaporation mode. Finally, film properties, such as the macroscopic residual stress, the stress free lattice parameter, the preferred orientation, the Vickers microhardness and film thickness is discussed

  4. Interpretation of STS-3/plasma diagnostics package results in terms of large space structure plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    The Plasma Diagnostics Package, which was flown aboard STS-3 recorded various chemical releases from the Orbiter. Changes in the plasma environment were observed to occur during Flash Evaporator System (FES) releases, water dumps and maneuvering thruster operations. During flash evaporator operations, broadband Orbiter-generated electro-static noise is enhanced and plasma density irregularity (delta n/N) is observed to increase by as much as 4 times and is strongly peaked below 6 Hz. In the case of water dumps, background electrostatic noise is enhanced or suppressed depending on frequency and Delta N/N is also seen to increase by as much as 4 times. Various changes in the plasma environment are effected by primary and vernier thruster operations. In addition, thruster activity stimulates electrostatic noise with a spectrum which is most intense at frequencies below 10 kHz.

  5. Diagnostics for transport phenomena in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, J.; Liu, Bin; Feng, Yan

    2013-12-01

    Experimental methods are described for determining transport coefficients in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. A dusty plasma is a mixture of electrons, ions and highly charged microspheres. Due to their large charges, the microspheres are a strongly coupled plasma, and they arrange themselves like atoms in a crystal or liquid. Using a video microscopy diagnostic, with laser illumination and a high speed video camera, the microspheres are imaged. Moment-method image analysis then yields the microspheres' positions and velocities. In one approach, these data in the particle paradigm are converted into the continuum paradigm by binning, yielding hydrodynamic quantities like number density, flow velocity and temperature that are recorded on a grid. To analyze continuum data for two-dimensional laboratory experiments, they are fit to the hydrodynamic equations, yielding the transport coefficients for shear viscosity and thermal conductivity. In another approach, the original particle data can be used to obtain the diffusion and viscosity coefficients, as is discussed in the context of future three-dimensional microgravity experiments.

  6. Diagnostic techniques for measuring suprathermal electron dynamics in plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Coda, S.

    2008-10-15

    Plasmas, both in the laboratory and in space, are often not in thermodynamic equilibrium, and the plasma electron distribution function is accordingly non-Maxwellian. Suprathermal electron tails can be generated by external drives, such as rf waves and electric fields, or internal ones, such as instabilities and magnetic reconnection. The variety and importance of the phenomena in which suprathermal electrons play a significant role explains an enduring interest in diagnostic techniques to investigate their properties and dynamics. X-ray bremsstrahlung emission has been studied in hot magnetized plasmas for well over two decades, flanked progressively by electron-cyclotron emission in geometries favoring the high-energy end of the distribution function (high-field-side, vertical, oblique emission), by electron-cyclotron absorption, by spectroscopic techniques, and at lower temperatures, by Langmuir probes and electrostatic analyzers. Continuous progress in detector technology and in measurement and analysis techniques, increasingly sophisticated layouts (multichannel and tomographic systems, imaging geometries), and highly controlled suprathermal generation methods (e.g., perturbative rf modulation) have all been brought to bear in recent years on an increasingly detailed, although far from complete, understanding of suprathermal electron dynamics.

  7. Electromagnetic Analysis For The Design Of ITER Diagnostic Port Plugs During Plasma Disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y

    2014-03-03

    ITER diagnostic port plugs perform many functions including structural support of diagnostic systems under high electromagnetic loads while allowing for diagnostic access to plasma. The design of diagnotic equatorial port plugs (EPP) are largely driven by electromagnetic loads and associate response of EPP structure during plasma disruptions and VDEs. This paper summarizes results of transient electromagnetic analysis using Opera 3d in support of the design activities for ITER diagnostic EPP. A complete distribution of disruption loads on the Diagnostic First Walls (DFWs). Diagnostic Shield Modules (DSMs) and the EPP structure, as well as impact on the system design integration due to electrical contact among various EPP structural components are discussed.

  8. Establishing isokinetic flow for a plasma torch exhaust gas diagnostic for a plasma hearth furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, B.R.

    1996-05-01

    Real time monitoring of toxic metallic effluents in confined gas streams can be accomplished through use of Microwave Induced Plasmas to perform atomic emission spectroscopy, For this diagnostic to be viable it is necessary that it sample from the flowstream of interest in an isokinetic manner. A method of isokinetic sampling was established for this device for use in the exhaust system of a plasma hearth vitrification furnace. The flow and entrained particulate environment were simulated in the laboratory setting using a variable flow duct of the same dimensions (8-inch diameter, schedule 40) as that in the field and was loaded with similar particulate (less than 10 {mu}m in diameter) of lake bed soil typically used in the vitrification process. The flow from the furnace was assumed to be straight flow. To reproduce this effect a flow straightener was installed in the device. An isokinetic sampling train was designed to include the plasma torch, with microwave power input operating at 2.45 GHz, to match local freestream velocities between 800 and 2400 ft/sec. The isokinetic sampling system worked as planned and the plasma torch had no difficulty operating at the required flowrates. Simulation of the particulate suspension was also successful. Steady particle feeds were maintained over long periods of time and the plasma diagnostic responded as expected.

  9. Papers presented at the Tenth Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Effects of limited spatial resolution on fluctuation measurements; vertical viewing of electron-cyclotron radiation in Text-U; measurement of temperature fluctuations from electron-cyclotron emission; a varying cross section magnetic coil diagnostic used in digital feedback control of plasma position in Text-Upgrade; high-sensitivity, high resolution measurements of radiated power on Text-U; wave launching as a diagnostic tool to investigate plasma turbulence; edge parameters from an energy analyzer and particle transport on Text-U; initial results from a charge exchange q-Diagnostic on Text-U; a method for neutral spectra analysis taking ripple-trapped particle losses into account; application of a three sample volume{sup S(k,{omega}}) estimate to optical measurements of turbulence on Text; initial operation of the 2D Firsis on Text-Upgrade; horizontal-view interferometer on Text-Upgrade; plasma potential measurements on Text-Upgrade with A 2 MeV heavy ion beam; fluctuation measurements using the 2 MeV heavy ion beam probe on Text-U; the time domain triple probe method; a phase contrast imaging system for Text-U; and development of rugged corner cube detectors for the Text-U-Fir interferometer. These papers have been placed on the database elsewhere.

  10. Application of modern diagnostic methods to environmental improvement. Annual progress report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL), an interdisciplinary research department in the College of Engineering at Mississippi State University (MSU), is under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and apply advanced diagnostic instrumentation and analysis techniques to aid in solving DOE`s nuclear waste problem. The program is a comprehensive effort which includes five focus areas: advanced diagnostic systems; development/application; torch operation and test facilities; process development; on-site field measurement and analysis; technology transfer/commercialization. As part of this program, diagnostic methods will be developed and evaluated for characterization, monitoring and process control. Also, the measured parameters, will be employed to improve, optimize and control the operation of the plasma torch and the overall plasma treatment process. Moreover, on-site field measurements at various DOE facilities are carried out to aid in the rapid demonstration and implementation of modern fieldable diagnostic methods. Such efforts also provide a basis for technology transfer.

  11. Development of High-Resolution UV-VIS Diagnostics for Space Plasma Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Andrew; Batishchev, Oleg

    2012-10-01

    Non-invasive far-UV-VIS plasma emission allows remote diagnostics of plasma, which is particularly important for space application. Accurate vacuum tank space plasma simulations require monochromators with high spectral resolution (better than 0.01A) to capture important details of atomic and ionic lines, such as Ly-alpha, etc. We are building a new system based on the previous work [1], and will discuss the development of a spectrometry system that combines a single-pass vacuum far-UV-NIR spectrometer and a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev and J.L. Cambier, Experimental Study of the Mini-Helicon Thruster, Air Force Research Laboratory Report, AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2009-0020, 2009.

  12. Doppler spectroscopy and D-alpha emission diagnostics for the C-2 FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Paganini, E.; Bonelli, L.; Deng, B. H.; Gornostaeva, O.; Hayashi, R.; Knapp, K.; McKenzie, M.; Pousa-Hijos, R.; Primavera, S.; Schroeder, J.; Tuszewski, M.; Balvis, A.; Giammanco, F.; Marsili, P.

    2010-10-15

    Two Doppler spectroscopy diagnostics with complementary capabilities are developed to measure the ion temperatures and velocities of FRC plasmas in the C-2 device. First, the multichord ion doppler diagnostic can simultaneously measure 15 chords of the plasma using an image intensified camera. Second, a single-chord fast-response ion Doppler diagnostic provides much higher faster time response by using a 16-channel photo-multiplier tube array. To study the neutral density of deuterium under different wall and plasma conditions, a highly sensitive eight-channel D-alpha diagnostic has been developed and calibrated for absolute radiance measurements. These spectroscopic diagnostics capabilities, combined with other plasma diagnostics, are helping to understand and improve the field reversed configuration plasmas in the C-2 device.

  13. Capabilities of Imaging Interferometry for Plasma Diagnostics in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Sanin, A.L.; Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K.

    2005-01-15

    Two modifications of imaging interferometry: heterodyne (HI) and phase contrast interferometers (PCI) are designed for observation of plasma density profiles and density fluctuations respectively. Besides, spatial distributions of plasma velocities, velocities fluctuations and related electrical fields can be obtained from the analysis of HI and PCI data. New sensitive phase counters, developed at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, enable HI to include some capabilities of the PCI. In addition to well recognized transversal spatial resolution of imaging technique, progress in deconvolution of line-of-sight-integrated data was recently made. Computer simulation, bench-test experiments and recent experimental results from the Large Helical Device illustrate the potentials of the imaging interferometry for investigation of plasma. Application of the imaging interferometry with spatial resolution along the viewing line to mirror machines is finally considered.

  14. Plasma Sterilization Technology for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, S. J.; Olson, R. L.; Leavens, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The application of plasma gas technology to sterilization and decontamination of spacecraft components is considered. Areas investigated include: effective sterilizing ranges of four separate gases; lethal constituents of a plasma environment; effectiveness of plasma against a diverse group of microorganisms; penetrating efficiency of plasmas for sterilization; and compatibility of spacecraft materials with plasma environments. Results demonstrated that plasma gas, specifically helium plasma, is a highly effective sterilant and is compatible with spacecraft materials.

  15. Z-pinch diagnostics, plasma and liner instabilities and new x-ray techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Oona, H.; Anderson, B.; Benage, J.

    1996-09-01

    Pulse power experiments of the last several decades have contributed greatly to the understanding of high temperature and high density plasmas and, more recently, to the study of hydrodynamic effects in thick imploding cylinders. Common to all these experiments is the application of a large current pulse to a cylindrically symmetric load, with the resulting Lorenz force compressing the load to produce hydrodynamic motion and/or high temperature, high density plasma. In Los Alamos, Pulsed power experiments are carried out at two facilities. Experiments at low current (from several million to ten million Amperes) are conducted on the Pegasus II capacitor bank. Experiments with higher currents (10`s to 100`s MA range) are performed in Ancho Canyon with the explosively driven Procyon and MAGO magnetic flux compression generator systems. In this paper, the authors present a survey of diagnostic capabilities and results from several sets of experiments. First, they discuss the initiation and growth of instabilities in plasmas generated from the implosion of hollow z-pinches in the pegasus and Procyon experiments. Next they discuss spectroscopic data from the plasmas produced by the MAGO system. They also show time resolved imaging data from thick ({approximately} .4 mm) liner implosions. Finally, the authors discuss improvements to x-ray and visible light imaging and spectrographic diagnostic techniques. The emphasis of this paper is not so much a detailed discussion of the experiments, but a presentation of imaging and spectroscopic results and the implications of these observations to the experiments.

  16. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  17. Plasma diagnostics package. Volume 1: OSS-1 section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, Jolene S. (Compiler); Frank, L. A. (Compiler); Kurth, W. S. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    This volume (1) of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) final science report contains a summary of all of the data reduction and scientific analyses which were performed using PDP data obtained on STS-3 as a part of the Office of Space Science first payload (OSS-1). This work was performed during the period of launch, March 22, l982, through June 30, l983. During this period the primary data reduction effort consisted of processing summary plots of the data received by the 14 instruments located on the PDP and submitting these data to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). The scientific analyses during the performance period consisted of general studies which incorporated the results of several of the PDP's instruments, detailed studies which concentrated on data from only one or two of the instruments, and joint studies of beam-plasma interactions with the OSS-1 Fast Pulse Electron Generator (FPEG) of the Vehicle Charging and Potential Investigation (VCAP). Internal reports, published papers and oral presentations which involve PDP/OSS-1 data are listed in Sections 3 and 4. A PDP/OSS-1 scientific results meeting was held at the University of Iowa on April 19-20, 1983. This meeting was attended by most of the PDP and VCAP investigators and provided a forum for discussing and comparing the various results, particularly with regard to the shuttle orbiter environment. One of the most important functional objectives of the PDP on OSS-1 was to characterize the orbiter environment.

  18. Diagnostic applications of nucleic acid circuits.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cheulhee; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: While the field of DNA computing and molecular programming was engendered in large measure as a curiosity-driven exercise, it has taken on increasing importance for analytical applications. This is in large measure because of the modularity of DNA circuitry, which can serve as a programmable intermediate between inputs and outputs. These qualities may make nucleic acid circuits useful for making decisions relevant to diagnostic applications. This is especially true given that nucleic acid circuits can potentially directly interact with and be triggered by diagnostic nucleic acids and other analytes. Chemists are, by and large, unaware of many of these advances, and this Account provides a means of touching on what might seem to be an arcane field. We begin by explaining nucleic acid amplification reactions that can lead to signal amplification, such as catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) and the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). In these circuits, a single-stranded input acts on kinetically trapped substrates via exposed toeholds and strand exchange reactions, refolding the substrates and allowing them to interact with one another. As multiple duplexes (CHA) or concatemers of increasing length (HCR) are generated, there are opportunities to couple these outputs to different analytical modalities, including transduction to fluorescent, electrochemical, and colorimetric signals. Because both amplification and transduction are at their root dependent on the programmability of Waston-Crick base pairing, nucleic acid circuits can be much more readily tuned and adapted to new applications than can many other biomolecular amplifiers. As an example, robust methods for real-time monitoring of isothermal amplification reactions have been developed recently. Beyond amplification, nucleic acid circuits can include logic gates and thresholding components that allow them to be used for analysis and decision making. Scalable and complex DNA circuits (seesaw gates

  19. Interpretation of plasma diagnostics package results in terms of large space structure plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, William S.

    1991-01-01

    The Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) is a spacecraft which was designed and built at The University of Iowa and which contained several scientific instruments. These instruments were used for measuring Space Shuttle Orbiter environmental parameters and plasma parameters. The PDP flew on two Space Shuttle flights. The first flight of the PDP was on Space Shuttle Mission STS-3 and was a part of the NASA/Office of Space Science payload (OSS-1). The second flight of the PDP was on Space Shuttle Mission STS/51F and was a part of Spacelab 2. The interpretation of both the OSS-1 and Spacelab 2 PDP results in terms of large space structure plasma interactions is emphasized.

  20. Suprathermal plasma observed on STS-3 Mission by plasma diagnostics package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, W.; Frank, L. A.; Owens, H.; Pickett, J. S.; Murphy, G. B.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    Artificially produced electron beams were used extensively during the past decade as a means of probing the magnetosphere, and more recently as a means of actively controlling spacecraft potential. Experimentation in these areas has proven valuable, yet at times confusing, due to the interaction of the electron beam with the ambient plasma. The OSS-1/STS-3 Mission in March 1982 provided a unique opportunity to study beam-plasma interactions at an altitude of 240 km. On board for this mission was a Fast Pulse Electron Generator (FPEG). Measurements made by the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) while extended on the Orbiter RMS show modifications of the ion and electron energy distributions during electron beam injection. Observations made by charged particle detectors are discussed and related to measurements of Orbiter potential. Several of the PDP instruments, the joint PDP/FPEG experiment, and observations made during electron beam injection are described.

  1. A solar tornado observed by EIS. Plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levens, P. J.; Labrosse, N.; Fletcher, L.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The term "solar tornadoes" has been used to describe apparently rotating magnetic structures above the solar limb, as seen in high resolution images and movies from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). These often form part of the larger magnetic structure of a prominence, however the links between them remain unclear. Here we present plasma diagnostics on a tornado-like structure and its surroundings, seen above the limb by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard the Hinode satellite. Aims: We aim to extend our view of the velocity patterns seen in tornado-like structures with EIS to a wider range of temperatures and to use density diagnostics, non-thermal line widths, and differential emission measures to provide insight into the physical characteristics of the plasma. Methods: Using Gaussian fitting to fit and de-blend the spectral lines seen by EIS, we calculated line-of-sight velocities and non-thermal line widths. Along with information from the CHIANTI database, we used line intensity ratios to calculate electron densities at each pixel. Using a regularised inversion code we also calculated the differential emission measure (DEM) at different locations in the prominence. Results: The split Doppler-shift pattern is found to be visible down to a temperature of around log T = 6.0. At temperatures lower than this, the pattern is unclear in this data set. We obtain an electron density of log ne = 8.5 when looking towards the centre of the tornado structure at a plasma temperature of log T = 6.2, as compared to the surroundings of the tornado structure where we find log ne to be nearer 9. Non-thermal line widths show broader profiles at the tornado location when compared to the surrounding corona. We discuss the differential emission measure in both the tornado and the prominence body, which suggests that there is more contribution in the tornado at temperatures below log T = 6.0 than in the

  2. Plasma diagnostics package. Volume 2: Spacelab 2 section, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, Jolene S. (Compiler); Frank, L. A. (Compiler); Kurth, W. S. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    This volume (2), which consists of two parts (A and B), of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) Final Science Report contains a summary of all of the data reduction and scientific analyses which were performed using PDP data obtained on STS-51F as a part of the Spacelab 2 (SL-2) payload. This work was performed during the period of launch, July 29, l985, through June 30, l988. During this period the primary data reduction effort consisted of processing summary plots of the data received by 12 of the 14 instruments located on the PDP and submitting these data to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). The scientific analyses during the performance period consisted of follow-up studies of shuttle orbiter environment and orbiter/ionosphere interactions and various plasma particle and wave studies which dealt with data taken when the PDP was on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm and when the PDP was in free flight. Of particular interest during the RMS operations and free flight were the orbiter wake studies and joint studies of beam/plasma interactions with the SL-2 Fast Pulse Electron Generator (FPEG) of the Vehicle Charging and Potential Investigation (VCAP). Internal reports, published papers and presentations which involve PDP/SL-2 data are listed in Sections 3 and 4. A PDP/SL-2 scientific results meeting was held at the University of Iowa on June 10, l986. This meeting was attended by most of the PDP and VCAP investigators and provided a forum for discussing and comparing the various results, particularly with regard to the PDP free flight.

  3. Atherosclerosis and Nanotechnology: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Jeremy D; Chaddha, Ashish; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Goonewardena, Sascha N

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several decades, tremendous advances have been made in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, with shifting demographics and evolving risk factors we now face new challenges that must be met in order to further advance are management of patients with CAD. In parallel with advances in our mechanistic appreciation of CAD and atherosclerosis, nanotechnology approaches have greatly expanded, offering the potential for significant improvements in our diagnostic and therapeutic management of CAD. To realize this potential we must go beyond to recognize new frontiers including knowledge gaps between understanding atherosclerosis to the translation of targeted molecular tools. This review highlights nanotechnology applications for imaging and therapeutic advancements in CAD. PMID:26809711

  4. Plasma propulsion for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchtman, Amnon

    2000-04-01

    The various mechanisms for plasma acceleration employed in electric propulsion of space vehicles will be described. Special attention will be given to the Hall thruster. Electric propulsion utilizes electric and magnetic fields to accelerate a propellant to a much higher velocity than chemical propulsion does, and, as a result, the required propellant mass is reduced. Because of limitations on electric power density, electric thrusters will be low thrust engines compared with chemical rockets. The large jet velocity and small thrust of electric thrusters make them most suitable for space applications such as station keeping of GEO communication satellites, low orbit drag compensation, orbit raising and interplanetary missions. The acceleration in the thruster is either thermal, electrostatic or electromagnetic. The arcjet is an electrothermal device in which the propellant is heated by an electric arc and accelerated while passing through a supersonic nozzle to a relatively low velocity. In the Pulsed Plasma Thruster a solid propellant is accelerated by a magnetic field pressure in a way that is similar in principle to pulsed acceleration of plasmas in other, very different devices, such as the railgun or the plasma opening switch. Magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters also employ magnetic field pressure for the acceleration but with a reasonable efficiency at high power only. In an ion thruster ions are extracted from a plasma through a double grid structure. Ion thrusters provide a high jet velocity but the thrust density is low due to space-charge limitations. The Hall thruster, which in recent years has enjoyed impressive progress, employs a quasi-neutral plasma, and therefore is not subject to a space-charge limit on the current. An applied radial magnetic field impedes the mobility of the electrons so that the applied potential drops across a large region inside the plasma. Methods for separately controlling the profiles of the electric and the magnetic fields will

  5. TPX diagnostics for tokamak operation, plasma control and machine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, P.H.; Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The diagnostics for TPX are at an early design phase, with emphasis on the diagnostic access interface with the major tokamak components. Account has to be taken of the very severe environment for diagnostic components located inside the vacuum vessel. The placement of subcontracts for the design and fabrication of the diagnostic systems is in process.

  6. Diagnostic characteristics and application of alcohol biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Topic, Aleksandra; Djukic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol biomarkers play a significant role in the early diagnosis of alcohol intoxication/abuse, alcohol-related organ damages, assessment of alcoholism therapy outcomes, and in forensic medicine. Laboratory detection of excessive alcohol consumption can be carried out by direct measuring of the ethanol and/or metabolites in biological samples which is of particular importance in the cases of acute ethanol intoxication/controlling and/or monitoring of alcohol consumption, or indirectly, by using biomarkers. Preferred diagnostic characteristics of alcohol biomarkers, specificity and sensitivity dependent on the particular demands such as: prevention and treatment of alcoholism in primary and social care, criminal justice, workplace health and safety screening, trafficking control, etc. Alcohol biomarkers traditionally used in clinical practice [blood alcohol concentration (BAC), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), the ratio GGT/CDT, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), the rati. AST/ALT, mean cbrpuscular volume (MCV), phosphatidylethanol (PEth)] are well validated. They are used as screening/monitoring markers of acute/chronic excessive alcohol intake, alcoholism in pregnancy, and other disorders/conditions related to alcohol abuse. Numerous potential alcohol biomarkers have been discovered, but few are validated. Potential alcohol biomarkers (ethanol and serotonin metabolites, sialic acids, etc.) have good diagnostic characteristics, but their application in clinical practice is limited due to the costly equipment necessary for their measurement. Significant progress has been made in the development of sensitive and practical alcohol transdermal devices that can instantly/continuously measure BAC through human skin. Transdermal sensing of alcohol may become a valuable method for monitoring abstinence. A special aspect of alcoholism is genetic predisposition to alcohol abuse and alcoholism, or

  7. Diagnostics of silane and germane radio frequency plasmas by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Joseph W.; Shing, Y. H.; Allevato, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    In situ plasma diagnostics using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy have shown different dissociation characteristics for GeH4 and SiH4 in radio frequency (rf) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) thin films. The GeH4 dissociation rate in rf plasmas is a factor of about 3 larger than that of SiH4. Plasma diagnostics have revealed that the hydrogen dilution of the SiH4 and GeH4 mixed plasma plays a critical role in suppressing the gas phase polymerization and enhancing the GeH4 dissociation.

  8. Diagnostics of silane and germane radio frequency plasmas by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Joseph W.; Shing, Y. H.; Allevato, C. E.

    1988-06-01

    In situ plasma diagnostics using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy have shown different dissociation characteristics for GeH4 and SiH4 in radio frequency (rf) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) thin films. The GeH4 dissociation rate in rf plasmas is a factor of about 3 larger than that of SiH4. Plasma diagnostics have revealed that the hydrogen dilution of the SiH4 and GeH4 mixed plasma plays a critical role in suppressing the gas phase polymerization and enhancing the GeH4 dissociation.

  9. Ion source for neutral beam injection meant for plasma and magnetic field diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton, Fred

    2008-02-15

    At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory a diagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasma parameters, flow velocity, and local magnetic field is being developed. The system is designed to have a 90% proton fraction and small divergence with beam current at 5-6 A and a pulse length of {approx}1 s occurring once every 1-2 min. The ion source needs to generate uniform plasma over a large (8x5 cm{sup 2}) extraction area. For this application, we have compared rf driven multicusp ion sources operating with either an external or an internal antenna in similar ion source geometry. The ion beam will be made of an array of six sheet-shaped beamlets. The design is optimized using computer simulation programs.

  10. Ion Source for Neutral beam injection meant for plasma and magnetic field diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton, Fred

    2007-06-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) a diagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasma parameters, flow velocity, and local magnetic field is being developed. The systems is designed to have a 90 % proton fraction and small divergence with beam current at 5-6 A and a pulse length of {approx}1 s occurring once every 1-2 min. The ion source needs to generate uniform plasma over a large (8 cm x 5 cm) extraction area. For this application, we have compared RF driven multicusp ion sources operating with either an external or an internal antenna in similar ion source geometry. The ion beam will be made of an array of six sheet-shaped beamlets. The design is optimized using computer simulation programs.

  11. Process diagnostics and monitoring using the multipole resonance probe in an inhomogeneous plasma for ion-assisted deposition of optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styrnoll, T.; Harhausen, J.; Lapke, M.; Storch, R.; Brinkmann, R. P.; Foest, R.; Ohl, A.; Awakowicz, P.

    2013-08-01

    The application of a multipole resonance probe (MRP) for diagnostic and monitoring purposes in a plasma ion-assisted deposition (PIAD) process is reported. Recently, the MRP was proposed as an economical and industry compatible plasma diagnostic device (Lapke et al 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 042001). The major advantages of the MRP are its robustness against dielectric coating and its high sensitivity to measure the electron density. The PIAD process investigated is driven by the advanced plasma source (APS), which generates an ion beam in the deposition chamber for the production of high performance optical coatings. With a background neutral pressure of p0 ˜ 20 mPa the plasma expands from the source region into the recipient, leading to an inhomogeneous spatial distribution. Electron density and electron temperature vary over the distance from substrate (ne ˜ 109 cm-3 and Te,eff ˜ 2 eV) to the APS (ne ≳ 1012 cm-3 and Te,eff ˜ 20 eV) (Harhausen et al 2012 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21 035012). This huge variation of the plasma parameters represents a big challenge for plasma diagnostics to operate precisely for all plasma conditions. The results obtained by the MRP are compared to those from a Langmuir probe chosen as reference diagnostics. It is demonstrated that the MRP is suited for the characterization of the PIAD plasma as well as for electron density monitoring. The latter aspect offers the possibility to develop new control schemes for complex industrial plasma environments.

  12. Meningioma Genomics: Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wenya Linda; Zhang, Michael; Wu, Winona W.; Mei, Yu; Dunn, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a recent revolution in our understanding of the genetic factors that drive meningioma, punctuating an equilibrium that has existed since Cushing’s germinal studies nearly a century ago. A growing appreciation that meningiomas share similar biologic features with other malignancies has allowed extrapolation of management strategies and lessons from intra-axial central nervous system neoplasms and systemic cancers to meningiomas. These features include a natural proclivity for invasion, frequent intratumoral heterogeneity, and correlation between biologic profile and clinical behavior. Next-generation sequencing has characterized recurrent somatic mutations in NF2, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, SMO, and PIK3CA, which are collectively present in ~80% of sporadic meningiomas. Genomic features of meningioma further associate with tumor location, histologic subtype, and possibly clinical behavior. Such genomic decryption, along with advances in targeted pharmacotherapy, provides a maturing integrated view of meningiomas. We review recent advances in meningioma genomics and probe their potential applications in diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic frontiers. PMID:27458586

  13. Neural network application to comprehensive engine diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marko, Kenneth A.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously reported on the use of neural networks for detection and identification of faults in complex microprocessor controlled powertrain systems. The data analyzed in those studies consisted of the full spectrum of signals passing between the engine and the real-time microprocessor controller. The specific task of the classification system was to classify system operation as nominal or abnormal and to identify the fault present. The primary concern in earlier work was the identification of faults, in sensors or actuators in the powertrain system as it was exercised over its full operating range. The use of data from a variety of sources, each contributing some potentially useful information to the classification task, is commonly referred to as sensor fusion and typifies the type of problems successfully addressed using neural networks. In this work we explore the application of neural networks to a different diagnostic problem, the diagnosis of faults in newly manufactured engines and the utility of neural networks for process control.

  14. Laser ablation plasmas for diagnostics of structured electronic and optical materials during or after laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; González, Jhanis J.

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced plasma can be used for rapid optical diagnostics of electronic, optical, electro-optical, electromechanical and other structures. Plasma monitoring and diagnostics can be realized during laser processing in real time by means of measuring optical emission that originates from the pulsed laser-material interaction. In post-process applications, e.g., quality assurance and quality control, surface raster scanning and depth profiling can be realized with high spatial resolution (~10 nm in depth and ~3 μm lateral). Commercial instruments based on laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) are available for these purposes. Since only a laser beam comes in direct contact with the sample, such diagnostics are sterile and non-disruptive, and can be performed at a distance, e.g. through a window. The technique enables rapid micro-localized chemical analysis without a need for sample preparation, dissolution or evacuation of samples, thus it is particularly beneficial in fabrication of thin films and structures, such as electronic, photovoltaic and electro-optical devices or circuits of devices. Spectrum acquisition from a single laser shot provides detection limits for metal traces of ~10 μg/g, which can be further improved by accumulating signal from multiple laser pulses. LIBS detection limit for Br in polyethylene is 90 μg/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation (halogen detection is a requirement for semiconductor package materials). Three to four orders of magnitude lower detection limits can be obtained with a femtosecond laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS), which is also provided on commercial basis. Laser repetition rate is currently up to 20 Hz in LIBS instruments and up to 100 kHz in LA-ICP-MS.

  15. Serial data acquisition for the X-ray plasma diagnostics with selected GEM detector structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, T.; Chernyshova, M.; Pozniak, K. T.; Kasprowicz, G.; Zabolotny, W.; Kolasinski, P.; Krawczyk, R.; Wojenski, A.; Zienkiewicz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The measurement system based on GEM—Gas Electron Multiplier detector is developed for X-ray diagnostics of magnetic confinement tokamak plasmas. The paper is focused on the measurement subject and describes the fundamental data processing to obtain reliable characteristics (histograms) useful for physicists. The required data processing have two steps: 1—processing in the time domain, i.e. events selections for bunches of coinciding clusters, 2—processing in the planar space domain, i.e. cluster identification for the given detector structure. So, it is the software part of the project between the electronic hardware and physics applications. The whole project is original and it was developed by the paper authors. The previous version based on 1-D GEM detector was applied for the high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer KX1 in the JET tokamak. The current version considers 2-D detector structures for the new data acquisition system. The fast and accurate mode of data acquisition implemented in the hardware in real time can be applied for the dynamic plasma diagnostics. Several detector structures with single-pixel sensors and multi-pixel (directional) sensors are considered for two-dimensional X-ray imaging. Final data processing is presented by histograms for selected range of position, time interval and cluster charge values. Exemplary radiation source properties are measured by the basic cumulative characteristics: the cluster position distribution and cluster charge value distribution corresponding to the energy spectra. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  16. Diagnostics for a waste processing plasma arc furnace (invited) (abstract)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    Maintaining the quality of our environment has become an important goal of society. As part of this goal new technologies are being sought to clean up hazardous waste sites and to treat ongoing waste streams. A 1 MW pilot scale dc graphite electrode plasma arc furnace (Mark II) has been constructed at MIT under a joint program among Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), MIT, and Electro-Pyrolysis, Inc. (EPI)c) for the remediation of buried wastes in the DOE complex. A key part of this program is the development of new and improved diagnostics to study, monitor, and control the entire waste remediation process for the optimization of this technology and to safeguard the environment. Continuous, real time diagnostics are needed for a variety of the waste process parameters. These parameters include internal furnace temperatures, slag fill levels, trace metals content in the off-gas stream, off-gas molecular content, feed and slag characterization, and off-gas particulate size, density, and velocity distributions. Diagnostics are currently being tested at MIT for the first three parameters. An active millimeter-wave radiometer with a novel, rotatable graphite waveguide/mirror antenna system has been implemented on Mark II for the measurement of surface emission and emissivity which can be used to determine internal furnace temperatures and fill levels. A microwave torch plasma is being evaluated for use as a excitation source in the furnace off-gas stream for continuous atomic emission spectroscopy of trace metals. These diagnostics should find applicability not only to waste remediation, but also to other high temperature processes such as incinerators, power plants, and steel plants.

  17. Spectroscopy of Z-pinch plasmas: how atomic and plasma physics merge and unfold new applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, Alla

    2012-06-01

    Recent advances in theoretical and experimental work on plasma spectroscopy of Z-pinches are presented. We have shown that the University-scale Z-pinch generators are able to produce plasmas within a broad range of temperatures, densities, opacity, and radiative properties depending on the type, geometry, size, and mass of wire array loads and wire material. The full x-ray and EUV diagnostic set for detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of such a plasma together with relativistic atomic and non-LTE kinetic codes create a very useful and productive environment for the study of atomic and plasma spectroscopy features and development of their applications. A variety of examples of K-shell low-Z (such as Mg and Al), L-shell mid-Z (such as Ni, Cu, and Ag), and M- and L-shell high-Z (W) will be considered and their specific features and applications to fusion and astrophysics will be highlighted.

  18. Dust accelerators and their applications in high-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catakin M

    2010-01-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Much effort has been devoted to gening rid of the dust nuisance. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  19. Dust Accelerators And Their Applications In High-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticoş, Cǎtǎlin M.; Wang, Zhehui

    2011-06-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Although much effort has been devoted to getting rid of the dust nuisance, there are instances where a controlled use of dust can be beneficial. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  20. Analysis of plasma wave interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 PDP data. [PDP (Plasma Diagnostics Package)

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei.

    1992-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) explored the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms of plasma waves were obtained from the PDP at frequencies from 0 to 30 kHz up to 400 m from the shuttle. These spectrograms frequently showed interference patterns caused by waves with wavelengths short compared to the antenna length (3.89 meters). Two types of interference patterns were observed in the wideband data: associated with the ejection of an electron beam from the space shuttle; associated with lower hybrid waves generated by an interaction between the neutral gas cloud around shuttle and the ambient ionospheric plasma. Analysis of these antenna interference patterns permits a determination of the wavelength, the plasma rest frame frequency, the direction of propagation, the power spectrum and in some cases the location of the source. The electric field noise associated with the electron beam was observed in the wideband data for two periods during which an electron frequency range at low frequencies (below 10 kHz) and shows clear evidence of interference patterns. The broadband low frequency noise was the dominant type of noise produced by the electron beam. The waves have a linear dispersion relation very similar to ion acoustic waves. The returning to the shuttle in response to the ejected electron beam. The waves associated with the lower hybrid resonance have rest frame frequencies near the lower hybrid frequency and propagate perpendicular to the magnetic field. The occurrence of these waves depends strongly on the PDP's position relative to the shuttle and the magnetic field direction. The authors results confirm previous identifications of these waves as lower hybrid waves and suggest they are driven by pick-up ions (H[sub 2]O[sup +]) produced by a charge exchange interaction between a water cloud around the shuttle and the ambient ionosphere.

  1. Multiple diagnostics in a high-pressure hydrogen microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.; Mullen, J. J. A. M. van der; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present an experimental study of a hydrogen plasma produced by a microwave axial injection torch, launching the plasma in a helium-filled chamber. Three different diagnostic methods have been used to obtain the electron density and temperature as follows: The Stark intersection method of Balmer spectral lines (already tested in argon and helium plasmas); the modified Boltzmann-plot showing that the plasma is far from the local thermodynamic equilibrium but ruled by the excitation-saturation balance; and a study by the disturbed bilateral relations theory. All of these diagnostic techniques show a good agreement.

  2. Efficient extreme ultraviolet transmission gratings for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braig, Christoph; Predehl, Peter; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    We report on a theoretical study of free-standing phase transmission gratings for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopy and investigate their properties. Designed for wavelengths between about 2 and 40 nm, the devices may provide a first order diffraction efficiency beyond 30%. We use rigorous coupled wave analysis methods in order to optimize the grating design parameters and discuss features of segmented grating arrays. Elemental, as well as compound, materials such as Be, Mo, LiF, and poly-(methylmethacrylate) are considered with respect to their potential and practical limitations in terms of feasibility and sensitivity to radiation damage. Simulations are performed for several samples on the radiation produced by a table-top EUV plasma source and applications to astrophysical problems are considered.

  3. Development of diffractive XUV-VUV light extractors for fusion plasma diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Caravelli, G.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.

    2009-11-01

    The diagnostic and control of next generation MFE and ICF fusion experiments will require optical light extractors capable of withstanding intense plasma and radiation exposure. A solution applicable from the XUV to the infrared is to use free-standing diffractive optics such as transmission gratings or zone plates. Here we present results on XUV-VUV diffractive extractors for the diagnostic of boundary MFE plasmas. For the VUV range we developed Si transmission gratings having 1 μm period, 5 μm thickness, 40% open fraction, 1x2 mm active area, and coated with Ni, while for the XUV range we use SiN gratings having 0.2 μm period, 0.3 μm thickness, 1x1 mm area, and coated with Ta. The grating extractors are spectrally and spatially calibrated in the laboratory using a newly developed extended XUV-VUV source and will be employed for imaging spectrometry on the NSTX experiment. The operational characteristics of the extended source and first space resolved XUV-VUV spectra will be presented. Work supported by DoE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54523 at JHU and Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 at PU.

  4. A fluctuation-induced plasma transport diagnostic based upon fast-Fourier transform spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, J. Y.; Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A diagnostic, based on fast Fourier-transform spectral analysis techniques, that provides experimental insight into the relationship between the experimentally observable spectral characteristics of the fluctuations and the fluctuation-induced plasma transport is described. The model upon which the diagnostic technique is based and its experimental implementation is discussed. Some characteristic results obtained during the course of an experimental study of fluctuation-induced transport in the electric field dominated NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma are presented.

  5. STS-3/OSS-1 Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) measurements of the temperature pressure and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.; Murphy, G.

    1983-01-01

    Designed to withstand the thermal extremes of the STS-3 mission through the use of heaters and thermal blankets, the plasma diagnostics package sat on the release/engagement mechanism on the OSS-1 payload pallet without a coldplate and was attached to the RMS for two extended periods. Plots show temperature versus mission elapsed time for two temperature sensors. Pressure in the range of 10 to the -3 power torr and 10 to the -7 power torr, measured 3 inches from the skin of the package is plotted against GMT during the mission. The most distinctive feature of the pressure profile is the modulation at the obit period. It was found that pressure peaks when the atmospheric gas is rammed into the cargo bay. Electric and magnetic noise spectra and time variability due to orbiter systems, UHF and S-band transmitter field strengths, and measurements of the ion spectra obtained both in the cargo bay and during experiments are plotted.

  6. Physics and medical applications of cold atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were applied in a quest to understand physics of cold plasmas. In particular it was established that the streamer head charge is about 108 electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 107 V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 1019 m3. We have demonstrated the efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types (lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin). Both in-vitro andin-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. We showed that: (a) cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in vitro without damaging normal cells. (b) Significantly reduced tumor size in vivo. Cold plasma treatment led to tumor ablation with neighbouring tumors unaffected. These experiments were performed on more than 10 mice with the same outcome. We found that tumors of about 5mm in diameter were ablated after 2 min of single time plasma treatment. The two best known cold plasma effects, plasma-induced apoptosis and the decrease of cell migration velocity can have important implications in cancer treatment by localizing the affected area of the tissue and by decreasing metastasic development. In addition, cold plasma treatment has affected the cell cycle of cancer cells. In particular, cold plasmainduces a 2-fold increase in cells at the G2/M-checkpoint in both papilloma and carcinoma cells at ~24 hours after treatment, while normal epithelial cells (WTK) did not show significant differences. It was shown that reactive oxygen species metabolism and oxidative stress responsive genes are deregulated. We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with cold plasma treatment as a potential mechanism for the tumor ablation observed.

  7. Practical applications of plasma surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    Radio frequency activated gas plasma is an environmentally conscious manufacturing process which provides surface treatments for improved product quality. Plasma processing offers significant potential for reducing the use of solvents and other wet processing chemicals now used in surface treatments such as cleaning, activation for bonding, and moisture removal. Plasma treatments are generally accomplished without creating hazardous waste streams to dispose of. Plasma process development and application is ongoing at Allied Signal Inc., Kansas City Division.

  8. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  9. Plasma diagnostics approach to welding heat source/molten pool interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Key, J.F.; McIlwain, M.E.; Isaacson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic techniques show that weld fusion zone profile and loss of metal vapors from the molten pool are strongly dependent on both the intensity and distribution of the heat source. These plasma properties, are functions of cathode vertex angle and thermal conductivity of the shielding gas, especially near the anode.

  10. Magnetic Diagnostics For Equilibrium Reconstruction And Realtime Plasma Control In NSTX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Erickson, Keith; Kaita, Robert; Lawson, John; Mozulay, Robert; Mueller, Dennis; Que, Weiguo; Rahman, Nabidur; Schneider, Hans; Smalley, Gustav; Tresemer, Kelsey

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes aspects of magnetic diagnostics for realtime control in NSTX-U. The sensor arrangement on the upgraded center column is described. New analog and digital circuitry for processing the plasma current rogowski data are presented. An improved algorithm for estimating the plasma vertical velocity for feedback control is presented.

  11. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G.; El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A.; El Disoki, T. M.

    2013-08-15

    emigration to a preferred electrode direction. Regardless of plasma electrodes positions and plasma shape, ions can be departed from one electrode to deposit on the other one. In consequence, as an application the AF plasma type can enhance the metal deposition from one electrode to the other.

  12. Modeling of imaging diagnostics for laser plasma interaction experiments with the code PARAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Riazuelo, G.; Labaune, C.

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a diagnostic simulation tool for the code PARAX to interpret recent measurements of far-field images of the laser light transmitted through a preformed plasma. This includes the complete treatment of the propagation of the light coming from a well-defined region of plasma through the rest of the plasma and all the optics of the imaging system. We have modeled the whole light path, as well as the spatio-temporal integration of the instruments, and the limited collecting aperture for the light emerging out of the plasma. The convolution of computed magnitudes with the plasma and diagnostics transfer functions is indispensable to enable the comparison between experiments and simulations. This tool is essential in the study of the propagation of intense laser beams in plasma media.

  13. Design of the plasma current sensor diagnostic for MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D.A.; House, P.A.; Wells, C.W.

    1983-11-23

    The Plasma Current Sensor (PCS) diagnostic includes large diamagnetic loops (DL) that fully encircle the plasma as well as small multi-turn pickup coils (PCs) located between the plasma and the superconducting magnets. Both types of sensors respond to changing magnetic flux linkages caused by plasma currents and are used to measure plasma diamagnetism, from which estimates of temperature and density can be made. The DLs are used in the central cell and Axicell regions, while the PCs are used in the Yin-yang regions where DLs are impractical. Other PCs are used in the central cell to detect axial plasma currents, to help tune trim coils in the transition cell and confirm theoretical estimates of radial diffusion limits. This paper describes the PCS diagnostic and presents the detailed mechanical and electrical designs.

  14. Diagnostics of reactive pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, Gilles

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas are promising for etching applications in the microelectronic industry. However, many new phenomena are involved when a high density discharge is pulsed. To better understand these processes it is necessary to probe the radicals' kinetics with a microsecond resolution. We have developed several diagnostics to reach this goal including broad band absorption spectroscopy with UV LEDs to detect small polyatomic radicals and with a deuterium VUV source to detect larger closed shell molecules and the modulated mass spectrometry to monitor atomic species. We will discuss the impact of the plasma pulsing frequency and duty cycle on the radical densities in Cl2 based plasmas, and the consequences on plasma processes. Work done in collaboration with Paul Bodart, Melisa Brihoum, Maxime Darnon, Erwin Pargon, Olivier Joubert, and Nader Sadeghi, CNRS/LTM.

  15. Hilbert-Huang Transform in MHD Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kakurin, A.M.; Orlovsky, I.I.

    2005-12-15

    A new method for processing experimental data from MHD diagnostics is discussed that provides a more detailed study of the dynamics of large-scale MHD instabilities. The method is based on the Hilbert-Huang transform method and includes an empirical mode decomposition algorithm, which is used to decompose the experimental MHD diagnostic signals into a set of frequency- and amplitude-modulated harmonics in order to construct the time evolutions of the amplitudes and frequencies of these harmonics with the help of the Hilbert transform. The method can also be applied to analyze data from other diagnostics that measure unsteady oscillating signals.

  16. Optical diagnostics for plasma physics and accelerator science: commonalities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    Optical diagnostics are widely used both for experiments of plasma physics and for measurements of parameters of electron/positron beams in accelerators. The approaches applied for these often have the same methodological basis explained by the similarity of the properties of the studied phenomena. Nevertheless, these branches of physics are very specific and require special diagnostics. The possibility of closed contacts and cooperation between scientists solving similar problems in different areas of physics helps to overcome these problems. It is especially typical for BINP SB RAS known by pioneering works on electron-positron colliders and nuclear fusion. This paper describes the diagnostics that are used in plasma physics experiments, especially for plasma heating by a high-current electron beam, and contains a comparison with optical diagnostics which are recognized tools in colliders and storage rings.

  17. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  18. Applications of laser diagnostics in energy conservation research

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1985-02-01

    During the past decade, intensive research and development has demonstrated the feasibility, checked the accuracy, and extended the sensitivity of laser diagnostics for combustion systems. Combinations of diagnostics can now provide in-situ, time-, and space-resolved measurements of temperature, velocity, and species concentration. Although these tools are powerful, they also can be exceedingly difficult to use, and their application remains largely in the hands of specialized instrument developers rather than problem-oriented researchers. This report outlines a variety of applications for existing diagnostics that may interest both instrument developers and researchers in particular fields.

  19. Plasma chemistry and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozumi, K.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between discharge phenomena and plasma chemistry, as well as the equipment and mechanisms of plasma chemical reactions are described. Various areas in which plasma chemistry is applied are surveyed, such as: manufacturing of semiconductor integrated circuits; synthetic fibers; high polymer materials for medical uses; optical lenses; and membrane filters (reverse penetration films).

  20. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-15

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot ({approx}10 min) time scale with {approx}1 {mu}m depth and {approx}1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic - nuclear scattering of MeV ions - to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  2. Application of Statistics in Establishing Diagnostic Certainty

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Cordova, Mitchell L.

    2012-01-01

    The examination and assessment of injured and ill patients leads to the establishment of a diagnosis. However, the tests and procedures used in health care, including procedures performed by certified athletic trainers, are individually and collectively imperfect in confirming or ruling out a condition of concern. Thus, research into the utility of diagnostic tests is needed to identify the procedures that are most helpful and to indicate the confidence one should place in the results of the test. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of selected statistical procedures and the interpretation of data appropriate for assessing the utility of diagnostic tests with dichotomous (positive or negative) outcomes, with particular attention to the interpretation of sensitivity and specificity estimates and the reporting of confidence intervals around likelihood ratio estimates. PMID:22488292

  3. Diagnostic Applications of Saliva in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    AR, Prabhakar; Gulati, Akanksha; Mehta, Deepak; Sugandhan, S

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of saliva to identify individuals with disease and to follow the progress of the affected individual has attracted the attention of numerous investigators. Its noninvasive method of collection, simplicity, and cost effectiveness make it a useful tool not only to the general practitioner but also to the pediatric dentist. Aim: The aim of this paper is to provide the clinician with a comprehensive review of the diagnostic uses of saliva in dentistry. PMID:25206116

  4. Optical Spectroscopic Diagnostics Of Dusty Plasma In RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Orazbayev, S. A.; Jumagulov, M. N.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Silamiya, M.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Boufendi, L.

    2011-11-29

    The parameters of the buffer plasma containing dust particles were measured by means of spectroscopic methods. The change in the emission spectrum of the buffer plasma with addition of dust was observed. It seems to relate to changing in temperature and number density of electrons due to the influence of dusts.

  5. Quantum cascade laser: a compact, low cost, solid-state source for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, L.; Tredicucci, A.; Vitiello, M. S.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) are unipolar injection lasers based on intersubband transitions in a modular semiconductor heterostructure. The first THz QCL, operating at 67 μm (4.3 THz), was demonstrated in 2002; the wavelength range now extends beyond 250 μm (1.2 THz) and is entering the sub-terahertz frequency range for devices operated in external magnetic field. Although a number of different quantum designs have been demonstrated, increasing the operating temperature remains a major challenge: the maximum temperature is still ~ 195 K, and recently approached 225 K in high magnetic fields. Nevertheless, compact continuous wave systems operating within Sterling coolers already ensure ample portability and turn-key operation and QCLs represent then the THz solid-state radiation source that actually shows the best performance in terms of optical output power, which can reach more than 100 mW average, and linewidth, typically in the tens of kHz for single mode devices. THz QCLs have then a realistic chance to deeply impact technological applications such as process monitoring, security controls, and bio-medical diagnostics. They are ideally suited though for plasma polarimetry and interferometry, thanks to their high polarization selectivity, excellent stability and ruggedness, and ease of high-speed modulation. Their compact size and monolithic cavity arrangement allows placement in the very proximity of the plasma to be monitored, easing requirements of stability against vibrations etc. Furthermore, the long coherence lengths should be easily compatible with interferometric arms of even very different lengths, a geometry ideal for coupling to a plasma reactor. The possibility of direct current modulation at MHz if not GHz frequencies ensures then an excellent temporal resolution of the meaurements, and a large low-frequency noise rejection. New analysis schemes also become feasible, for instance employing two-color lasers, operating at the same time at two

  6. Optical diagnostic instrument for monitoring etch uniformity during plasma etching of polysilicon in a chlorine-helium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hareland, W.A.; Buss, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    Nonuniform etching is a serious problem in plasma processing of semiconductor materials and has important consequences in the quality and yield of microelectronic components. In many plasmas, etching occurs at a faster rate near the periphery of the wafer, resulting in nonuniform removal of specific materials over the wafer surface. This research was to investigate in situ optical diagnostic techniques for monitoring etch uniformity during plasma processing of microelectronic components. We measured 2-D images of atomic chlorine at 726 nm in a chlorine-helium plasma during plasma etching of polysilicon in a parallel-plate plasma etching reactor. The 3-D distribution of atomic chlorine was determined by Abel inversion of the plasma image. The experimental results showed that the chlorine atomic emission intensity is at a maximum near the outer radius of the plasma and decreases toward the center. Likewise, the actual etch rate, as determined by profilometry on the processed wafer, was approximately 20% greater near the edge of the wafer than at its center. There was a direct correlation between the atomic chlorine emission intensity and the etch rate of polysilicon over the wafer surface. Based on these analyses, 3-D imaging would be a useful diagnostic technique for in situ monitoring of etch uniformity on wafers.

  7. The diverse applications of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mukul; Dubey, Shivani; Darwhekar, Gajanan; Jain, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  8. The diverse applications of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mukul Darwhekar, Gajanan; Dubey, Shivani; Jain, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-07-31

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  9. Dark-ground illumination: a quantitative diagnostic for plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    Radial electron density profiles of a toroidal belt pinch plasma have been obtained by a single measurement. Collimated ruby laser light, incident on the plasma, is focused to a diffraction limited spot (100 ..mu..m). The technique, a variation of the dark-ground microscope, involves masking the center of the plasma diffraction pattern with a thin wire. Undiffracted light is blocked by a thin wire, whereas light diffracted by the plasma passes around the wire and onto a photoplate. The resulting interference generates a high contrast fringe pattern whose intensity varies as 1-cos..delta.. phi, where ..delta.. phi is the phase shift induced by the plasma. The fringes are recorded on Polaroid type 46L transparency film. Using this technique, radial density profiles of the plasma produced in the Columbia Torus I belt pinch have been measured. The plasma minor cross section is elliptical with a approx. 2 cm, b approx. 30 cm and approx. 3 x 10/sup 16//cm/sup 3/. Average densities as low as 2 x 10/sup 15//cm/sup 3/ have been measured.

  10. A transmission line bridge for the diagnostics of plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechacek, R. E.; Raleigh, M.; Greig, J. R.; Dwyer, T.; Ehrlich, J.

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes a device for measuring the average electrical conductivity of a long, narrow, cylindrical plasma. Interest in plasmas of this shape originates from two areas of study: the study of electron beam propagation through neutral gas, and the study of long straight electrical discharges for use as a communication antenna. Propagation of an electron beam through a neutral gas produces an ionized channel whose properties and evolution are very important to the propagation of the beam itself. Long straight electrical discharges are created in a channel that is ionized by a pulsed laser beam focused with a long focal length lens, and the properties of the plasma in this channel are important to the propagation of the electrical discharge along with channel. The properties of these plasmas are inferred from changes in the transmission properties of a transmission line placed close to and parallel to the plasma. In this paper an analysis is made of the relation between the bridge output voltage and the conductivity of the perturbing plasma for the case in which the conductivity is very low. In this case all perturbations on the bridge parameters are small, and linear approximations are appropriate. The usefulness of the bridge, however, extends to plasma well above this low conductivity range, although a different set of approximations may be necessary to make the analysis of the experiment tractable. A transmission line bridge is a device for measuring very small changes in the properties of transmission lines.

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), part I: review of basic diagnostics and plasma-particle interactions: still-challenging issues within the analytical plasma community.

    PubMed

    Hahn, David W; Omenetto, Nicoló

    2010-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become a very popular analytical method in the last decade in view of some of its unique features such as applicability to any type of sample, practically no sample preparation, remote sensing capability, and speed of analysis. The technique has a remarkably wide applicability in many fields, and the number of applications is still growing. From an analytical point of view, the quantitative aspects of LIBS may be considered its Achilles' heel, first due to the complex nature of the laser-sample interaction processes, which depend upon both the laser characteristics and the sample material properties, and second due to the plasma-particle interaction processes, which are space and time dependent. Together, these may cause undesirable matrix effects. Ways of alleviating these problems rely upon the description of the plasma excitation-ionization processes through the use of classical equilibrium relations and therefore on the assumption that the laser-induced plasma is in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Even in this case, the transient nature of the plasma and its spatial inhomogeneity need to be considered and overcome in order to justify the theoretical assumptions made. This first article focuses on the basic diagnostics aspects and presents a review of the past and recent LIBS literature pertinent to this topic. Previous research on non-laser-based plasma literature, and the resulting knowledge, is also emphasized. The aim is, on one hand, to make the readers aware of such knowledge and on the other hand to trigger the interest of the LIBS community, as well as the larger analytical plasma community, in attempting some diagnostic approaches that have not yet been fully exploited in LIBS. PMID:21144145

  12. Recent Progress and Future Plans for Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Kramer, Gerrit; Tang, William; Tobias, Benjamin; Valeo, Ernest; Churchill, Randy; Hausammann, Loic

    2015-11-01

    The Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (FPSDP) is a Python package developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It is dedicated to providing an integrated programmable environment for applying a modern ensemble of synthetic diagnostics to the experimental validation of fusion plasma simulation codes. The FPSDP will allow physicists to directly compare key laboratory measurements to simulation results. This enables deeper understanding of experimental data, more realistic validation of simulation codes, quantitative assessment of existing diagnostics, and new capabilities for the design and optimization of future diagnostics. The Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform now has data interfaces for the GTS and XGC-1 global particle-in-cell simulation codes with synthetic diagnostic modules including: (i) 2D and 3D Reflectometry; (ii) Beam Emission Spectroscopy; and (iii) 1D Electron Cyclotron Emission. Results will be reported on the delivery of interfaces for the global electromagnetic PIC code GTC, the extended MHD M3D-C1 code, and the electromagnetic hybrid NOVAK eigenmode code. Progress toward development of a more comprehensive 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission module will also be discussed. This work is supported by DOE contract #DEAC02-09CH11466.

  13. Laser-induced incandescence diagnostic for in situ monitoring of nanoparticle synthesis in an atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrani, James; Patel, Shane; Shneider, Mikhail; Stratton, Brent; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    A DC arc discharge with a consumed graphite electrode is commonly used for synthesis of carbon nanoaparticles in a low temperature (0.1-1 eV), atmospheric pressure plasma. The formation of nanoparticles in this plasma is poorly understood; it is not clear where nanoparticles nucleate and grow in the arc discharge. Therefore, a laser-induced incandescence (LII) diagnostic for in situ monitoring of the nanoparticles' spatial distribution in the plasma is currently being constructed. The LII diagnostic involves heating the particles with a short-pulsed laser, and measuring the induced spatiotemporal incandescence profiles on longer timescales. By appropriately modeling the induced spatiotemporal incandescence profiles, one can measure particle diameters and volume fraction. LII diagnostics have been extensively used to study soot particles in flames. However, they have never been applied in a strongly coupled plasma background. Even though the spatial dimensions for soot and nanoparticles are similar, great care is needed in developing an LII diagnostic for monitoring nanoparticles in a plasma background. Therefore, we will calibrate our LII diagnostic by measuring spatiotemporal incandescence profiles of known, research grade soot and nanoparticles. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Development of laser-based diagnostics for 1-MA z-pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Wiewior, P.; Presura, R.; Kindel, J. M.; Shevelko, A. P.; Chalyy, O.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Haboub, A.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; Durmaz, T.

    2009-11-01

    The 50 TW Leopard laser coupled with the 1-MA Zebra generator was used for development of new diagnostics of z-pinch plasmas. Two plasma diagnostics are presented: an x-ray broadband backlighting for z-pinch absorption spectroscopy and parametric two-plasmon decay of the laser beam in dense z-pinch plasma. Implementation of new diagnostics on the Zebra generator and the first results are discussed. The absorption spectroscopy is based on backlighting of z-pinch plasma with a broadband x-ray radiation from a Sm laser plasma. Detailed analysis of the absorption spectra yields the electron temperature and density of z-pinch plasma at the non-radiative stage. The parametric two-plasmon decay of intensive laser radiation generates 3/2φ and 1/2φ harmonics. These harmonics can be used to derive a temperature of z-pinch plasma with the electron density near the quarter of critical plasma density.

  15. Application of Raman diagnostics to combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederman, S.; Posillico, C.; Celentano, A.

    1980-01-01

    The use of laser Raman diagnostic techniques to measure the specie concentrations and their temperatures in combustion flow fields is discussed. The system designed to measure the specie concentrations, which included a ruby laser and a photodiode to trip the laser at the maximum light and heat output of the combustion process, is described and problems encountered in developing the system are reported. Photographs of the combustion process are presented and analyzed detailing the evolution of the combustion in terms of the photodiode and the lack of a noticeable Raman-Stokes signal. The absence of the Raman-Stokes signal is discussed.

  16. Cesium control and diagnostics in surface plasma negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Chapovsky, Pavel; Dudnikov, Andrei

    2010-02-15

    For efficient and reliable negative ion generation it is very important to improve a cesium control and diagnostics. Laser beam attenuation and resonance fluorescence can be used for measurement of cesium distribution and cesium control. Resonant laser excitation and two-photon excitation can be used for improved cesium ionization and cesium trapping in the discharge chamber. Simple and inexpensive diode lasers can be used for cesium diagnostics and control. Cesium migration along the surface is an important mechanism of cesium escaping. It is important to develop a suppression of cesium migration and cesium accumulation on the extraction system.

  17. ECE diagnostic of high temperature ECRH heated plasmas on FTU

    SciTech Connect

    Zerbini, M; Buratti, P; Tudisco, O; Giruzzi, G; Bruschi, A; Cirant, S; Granucci, G; Simonetto, A; Sozzi, C; Gandini, F; Pacella, D; Fournier, K B; Finkenthal, M

    2000-01-31

    The Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostic on FTU tokamak is routinely performed with a Michelson interferometer with spectral range extending up to 1300 GHz. The diagnostic allowed accurate electron temperature measurements during the recent 140 Ghz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) experiments on FTU. Very accurate measurements have been performed on a wide range of electron temperatures and profile peaking. The ECE measurements have been compared with Thomson Scattering and with observations of X-ray spectra from highly stripped molybdenum ions. The suprathermal emission in these conditions has been studied.

  18. Plasma Channel Diagnostic Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-09-09

    A technique has been developed for measuring the properties of discharge-based plasma channels by monitoring the centroid location of a laser beam exiting the channel as a function of input alignment offset between the laser and the channel. The centroid position of low-intensity (<10{sup 14}Wcm{sup -2}) laser pulses focused at the input of a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide was scanned and the exit positions recorded to determine the channel shape and depth with an accuracy of a few %. In addition, accurate alignment of the laser beam through the plasma channel can be provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel depth is scanned either by scanning the plasma density or the discharge timing. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique will be crucial for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  19. Diagnostics of DC plasma jets generated with Laval anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmane, M.; Soucy, G.; Boulos, M.I.; Henne, R.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma jets originating from d.c. torches equipped with Laval nozzles are considered to be more efficient for both vacuum and atmospheric plasma spraying than those generated with the standard cylindrical anodes. The present study is devoted to the measurement of the temperature and velocity fields in plasma jets resulting from three different nozzles: a cylindrical and two Laval anodes with nominal Mach numbers of 2.5 and 3. The enthalpy probe and emission spectroscopy techniques are used for this purpose. Attention is given to the effect of the chamber pressure on the distribution of the temperature and velocity fields. The results show that when Laval nozzles are used at reduced chamber pressure (200 torr), the jets are wider, with higher temperature and velocity values in the central regions, compared to those obtained using cylindrical anodes. These characteristics are expected to improve the results of plasma spraying processes with respect to the layer quality and deposition efficiency.

  20. Submillimeter laser interferometer for high density plasma diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Yu. E.; Kiselyev, V. K.; Kuleshov, E. M.; Knyaz'kov, B. N.; Kononenko, V. K.; Nesterov, P. K.; Yanovsky, M. S.

    1995-06-01

    There are presented the results of investigation of the one-channel homodyne laser interferometer λ=119 µm made on the basis of the hollow dielectric beamguide and quasioptical functional devices. The interferometer is designed for determination of the plasma electron density of the TOKAMAK-7. The density response threshold is 0.7% from the expected plasma density and the phase difference measurement total error is 5°

  1. Application of modern diagnostic methods to environmental improvement. Annual progress report, January--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.S.

    1994-12-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL), a research department in the College of Engineering at Mississippi State University (MSU), is under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and apply advanced diagnostic instrumentation and analysis techniques to real world processes; measurements are made in hot, highly corrosive atmospheres in which conventional measurement devices are ineffective. Task 1 of this agreement is concerned with the development and application of various diagnostic methods to characterize the plasma properties, the melt properties and the downstream emissions from a plasma torch facility designed to vitrify mixed waste. Correlation of the measured properties with the operating parameters of the torch will be sought to improve, optimize and control the overall operation of the plasma treatment process. As part of this program, diagnostic methods will be developed and evaluated for characterization, monitoring and control purposes of treatment processes in general. Task 2 of this agreement is concerned with the development of a system to monitor and control the combustion stoichiometry in real time in order to minimize environmental impact and maximize process efficiency. Staged fuel injection is also being studied to minimize NO{sub x} formation.

  2. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Gota, H; Thompson, M C; Tuszewski, M; Binderbauer, M W

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs. PMID:25430249

  3. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gota, H. Thompson, M. C.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. W.

    2014-11-15

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  4. Diagnostics and required R&D for control of DEMO grade plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeon K.

    2014-08-01

    Even if the diagnostics of ITER performs as expected, installation and operation of the diagnostic systems in Demo device will be much harsher than those of the present ITER device. In order to operate the Demo grade plasmas, which may have a higher beta limit, safely with very limited number of simple diagnostic system, it requires a well defined predictable plasma modelling in conjunction with the reliable control system for burn control and potential harmful instabilities. Development of such modelling in ITER is too risky and the logical choice would be utilization of the present day steady state capable devices such as KSTAR and EAST. In order to fulfill this mission, sophisticated diagnostic systems such as 2D/3D imaging systems can validate the physics in the theoretical modeling and challenge the predictable capability.

  5. Diagnostics and required R and D for control of DEMO grade plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyeon K.

    2014-08-21

    Even if the diagnostics of ITER performs as expected, installation and operation of the diagnostic systems in Demo device will be much harsher than those of the present ITER device. In order to operate the Demo grade plasmas, which may have a higher beta limit, safely with very limited number of simple diagnostic system, it requires a well defined predictable plasma modelling in conjunction with the reliable control system for burn control and potential harmful instabilities. Development of such modelling in ITER is too risky and the logical choice would be utilization of the present day steady state capable devices such as KSTAR and EAST. In order to fulfill this mission, sophisticated diagnostic systems such as 2D/3D imaging systems can validate the physics in the theoretical modeling and challenge the predictable capability.

  6. Optical Diagnostics of Electron Energy Distributions in Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Amy

    2011-05-01

    Passive, non-invasive optical emission measurements provide a means of probing important plasma parameters without introducing contaminants into plasma systems. We investigate the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in argon containing inductively-coupled plasmas due to dominant role in rates of gas-phase reactions for processing plasmas. EEDFs are determined using measurements of 3p5 4 p --> 3p5 4 s emissions in the 650-1150 nm wavelength range and measured metastable and resonant level concentrations, in conjunction with a radiation model that includes contributions from often neglected but critical processes such as radiation trapping and electron-impact excitation from metastable and resonant levels. Measurements over a wide range of operating conditions (pressure, RF power, Ar/Ne/N2 gas mixtures) show a depletion of the EEDF relative to the Maxwell- Boltzmann form at higher electron energy, in good agreement with measurements made with Langmuir probes and predictions of a global discharge model. This result is consistent with predictions of electron kinetics and can be explained in terms of reduced life times for energetic electrons due to wall losses and inelastic collisions. This example highlights the potential utility of this method as a tool for probing kinetics of many types of low-temperature plasma systems, which are typically characterized by non-Maxwellian EEDFs. This work was supported by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) and by NSF Grant CBET 0714600.

  7. EDITORIAL: The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS--> Nader Sadeghi,