Science.gov

Sample records for plasma engineering analysis

  1. Plasma engineering for MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Baldwin, D.E.; Barr, W.L.

    1983-03-24

    The two-year Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in the conceptual design of a commercial, electricity-producing fusion reactor based on tandem mirror confinement. The physics basis for the MARS reactor was developed through work in two highly coupled areas of plasma engineering: magnetics and plasma performance.

  2. Magnetic Lens For Plasma Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel C.

    1992-01-01

    Low-field electromagnet coils placed downstream of plasma engine, polarized oppositely to higher-field but smaller radius coil in nozzle of engine, reduces divergence of plasma jet, thereby increasing efficiency of engine. Concept tested by computer simulation based on simplified mathematical model of plasma, engine, and coils.

  3. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  4. Analysis of apolipoprotein A5, C3 and plasma triglyceride concentrations in genetically engineered mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baroukh, Nadine; Bauge, Eric; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chang, Jessie; Afzal, Veena; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Rubin, Edward M.; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-03-11

    To address the relationship between the apolipoprotein A5 and C3 genes, we generated independent lines of mice that either over-expressed or completely lacked both genes. We report both lines display normal triglyceride concentrations compared to over-expression or deletion of either gene alone. Together, these data support that APOA5 and APOC3 independently influence plasma triglyceride concentrations but in an opposing manner.

  5. Impulse Plasma In Surface Engineering - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunek, K.; Nowakowska-Langier, K.; Chodun, R.; Okrasa, S.; Rabinski, M.; Dora, J.; Domanowski, P.; Halarowicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    The article describes the view of the plasma surface engineering, assuming the role of non-thermal energy effects in the synthesis of materials and coatings deposition. In the following study it was underlined that the vapor excitation through the application of an electric field during coatings deposition gives new possibilities for coatings formation. As an example the IPD method was chosen. During the IPD (Impulse Plasma Deposition) the impulse plasma is generated in the coaxial accelerator by strong periodic electrical pulses. The impulse plasma is distributed in the form of energetic plasma pockets. Due to the almost completely ionization of gas, the nucleation of new phases takes place on ions directly in the plasma itself. As a result the coatings of metastable materials with nano-amorphous structure and excellent adhesion to the non-heated intentionally substrates could be deposited. Recently the novel way of impulse plasma generation during the coatings deposition was proposed and developed by our group. An efficient tool for plasma process control, the plasma forming gas injection to the interelectrode space was used. Periodic changing the gas pressure results in increasing both the degree of dispersion and the dynamics of the plasma pulses. The advantage of the new technique in deposition of coatings with exceptionally good properties has been demonstrated in the industrial scale not only in the case of the IPD method but also in the case of very well known magnetron sputtering method.

  6. Argonne Plasma Engineering Experiment (APEX) Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.H.; Balka, L.J.; Kulovitz, E.E.; Magill, S.R.; McGhee, D.G.; Moretti, A.; Praeg, W.F.

    1981-03-01

    The Argonne Plasma Engineering Experiment (APEX) Tokamak was designed to provide hot plasmas for reactor-relevant experiments with rf heating (current drive) and plasma wall experiments, principally in-situ low-Z wall coating and maintenance. The device, sized to produce energetic plasmas at minimum cost, is small (R = 51 cm, r = 15 cm) but capable of high currents (100 kA) and long pulse durations (100 ms). A design using an iron central core with no return legs, pure tension tapewound toroidal field coils, digital radial position control, and UHV vacuum technology was used. Diagnostics include monochrometers, x-ray detectors, and a microwave interferometer and radiometer for density and temperature measurements. Stable 100 ms shots were produced with electron temperatures in the range 500 to 1000 eV. Initial results included studies of thermal desorption and recoating of wall materials.

  7. Plasma Diagnostics Development for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Timothy; Kittrell, Carter; Chan, Anthony; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    2000-10-01

    The VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) engine is a next-generation rocket engine under development at the Johnson Space Center's Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory. With an exhaust velocity up to 50 times that of chemical rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine, the VASIMR concept promises fast, efficient interplanetary flight. Rice University has participated in VASIMR research since 1996 and at present is developing two new diagnostic probes: a retarding potential analyzer to measure the velocity of ions in the rocket's exhaust, and a moveable optical probe to examine the spectrum of the rocket's helicon plasma source. In support of the probe development, a test facility is under construction at Rice, consisting of a small electric rocket engine firing into a 2-m vacuum chamber. This engine, the MPD (magnetoplasmadynamic) thruster, dates from the 1960's and provides a well-characterized source plasma for testing of the probes under development. We present details of the ion energy analyzer and the facility under construction at Rice.

  8. Plasma igniter for internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.; Breshears, R. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An igniter for the air/fuel mixture used in the cylinders of an internal combustion engine is described. A conventional spark is used to initiate the discharge of a large amount of energy stored in a capacitor. A high current discharge of the energy in the capacitor switched on by a spark discharge produces a plasma and a magnetic field. The resultant combined electromagnetic current and magnetic field force accelerates the plasma deep into the combustion chamber thereby providing an improved ignition of the air/fuel mixture in the chamber.

  9. Plasma heat pump and heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2010-08-15

    A model system where cold charged particles are locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of volume V (V{sub P}<plasma heat and vice versa. Two applications of this theory are, first we propose a pumping device which heats plasmas by an adiabatic/isothermal compression of fields. Heating power ranging from a few hundred watts to a few kilowatts is possible with the present day technology. Second, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an electrostatic heat engine which converts plasma heat into mechanical work via plasma electric fields. Effects of P{sub E} are shown to be observable in colloidal solutions.

  10. SSC Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Harry; Junell, Justin; Albasini, Colby; O'Rourke, William; Le, Thang; Strain, Ted; Stiglets, Tim

    2011-01-01

    A package for the automation of the Engineering Analysis (EA) process at the Stennis Space Center has been customized. It provides the ability to assign and track analysis tasks electronically, and electronically route a task for approval. It now provides a mechanism to keep these analyses under configuration management. It also allows the analysis to be stored and linked to the engineering data that is needed to perform the analysis (drawings, etc.). PTC s (Parametric Technology Corp o ration) Windchill product was customized to allow the EA to be created, routed, and maintained under configuration management. Using Infoengine Tasks, JSP (JavaServer Pages), Javascript, a user interface was created within the Windchill product that allows users to create EAs. Not only does this interface allow users to create and track EAs, but it plugs directly into the out-ofthe- box ability to associate these analyses with other relevant engineering data such as drawings. Also, using the Windchill workflow tool, the Design and Data Management System (DDMS) team created an electronic routing process based on the manual/informal approval process. The team also added the ability for users to notify and track notifications to individuals about the EA. Prior to the Engineering Analysis creation, there was no electronic way of creating and tracking these analyses. There was also a feature that was added that would allow users to track/log e-mail notifications of the EA.

  11. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  12. Systems engineering and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, B.S.; Fabrycky, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    An introduction to systems is provided and tools for systems analysis are considered, taking into account system definitions and concepts, approaches for bringing systems into being, models in systems analysis, economic analysis techniques, mathematical modeling and optimization, probability and statistics, queuing theory and analysis, and control concepts and techniques. The system design process is discussed along with the design for operational feasibility, systems engineering management, and system design case studies. Attention is given to conceptual design, preliminary system design, detail design and development, system test and evaluation, design for reliability, design for maintainability, design for supportability, design for economic feasibility, communication system design, finite population system design, energy storage system design, and procurement-inventory system design.

  13. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  14. Plasma Sensor Measurements in Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlis, Eric; Marshall, Curtis; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2014-11-01

    Measurements have been conducted in a pulse detonation and rotating detonation engine using a newly developed plasma sensor. This sensor relies on the novel approach of using an ac-driven, weakly-ionized electrical discharge as the main sensing element. The advantages of this approach include a native high bandwidth of 1 MHz without the need for electronic frequency compensation, a dual-mode capability that provides sensitivity to multiple flow parameters, including velocity, pressure, temperature, and gas-species, and a simple and robust design making it very cost effective. The sensor design is installation-compatible with conventional sensors commonly used in gas-turbine research such as the Kulite dynamic pressure sensor while providing much better longevity. Developmental work was performed in high temperature facilities that are relevant to the propulsion and high-speed research community. This includes tests performed in a J85 augmentor at full afterburner and pulse-detonation engines at the University of Cincinnati (UC) at temperatures approaching 2760°C (5000°F).

  15. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  16. Analysis of plasma nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  17. Numerical analysis of engine instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiballah, M.; Dubois, I.

    Following a literature review on numerical analyses of combustion instability, to give the state of the art in the area, the paper describes the ONERA methodology used to analyze the combustion instability in liquid propellant engines. Attention is also given to a model (named Phedre) which describes the unsteady turbulent two-phase reacting flow in a liquid rocket engine combustion chamber. The model formulation includes axial or radial propellant injection, baffles, and acoustic resonators modeling, and makes it possible to treat different engine types. A numerical analysis of a cryogenic engine stability is presented, and the results of the analysis are compared with results of tests of the Viking engine and the gas generator of the Vulcain engine, showing good qualitative agreement and some general trends between experiments and numerical analysis.

  18. System safety engineering analysis handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ijams, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    The basic requirements and guidelines for the preparation of System Safety Engineering Analysis are presented. The philosophy of System Safety and the various analytic methods available to the engineering profession are discussed. A text-book description of each of the methods is included.

  19. Space Flight Plasma Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method to analyze the plasma data that is reported on board the International Space station (ISS). The Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), the role of which is to obtain floating potential and ionosphere plasma measurements for validation of the ISS charging model, assess photo voltaic array variability and interpreting IRI predictions, is composed of four probes: Floating Potential Probe (FPP), Wide-sweep Langmuir Probe (WLP), Narrow-sweep Langmuir Probe (NLP) and the Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP). This gives redundant measurements of each parameter. There are also many 'boxes' that the data must pass through before being captured by the ground station, which leads to telemetry noise. Methods of analysis for the various signals from the different sets are reviewed. There is also a brief discussion of LP analysis of Low Earth Orbit plasma simulation source.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M. (Compiler); Haftka, Raphael T. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    The symposium proceedings presented focused primarily on sensitivity analysis of structural response. However, the first session, entitled, General and Multidisciplinary Sensitivity, focused on areas such as physics, chemistry, controls, and aerodynamics. The other four sessions were concerned with the sensitivity of structural systems modeled by finite elements. Session 2 dealt with Static Sensitivity Analysis and Applications; Session 3 with Eigenproblem Sensitivity Methods; Session 4 with Transient Sensitivity Analysis; and Session 5 with Shape Sensitivity Analysis.

  1. Engine Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKnight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schrantz, S.; Hartle, M. S.; Bechtel, G. S.; Lewis, K.; Ridgway, M.; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the technical effort to develop: (1) geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts in finite element form, (2) component design tools for nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts which utilize the recipes and (3) an integrated design tool which combines the simulations of the nozzles, inlets, disks, frames, shafts, and ducts with the previously developed combustor, turbine blade, and turbine vane models for a total engine representation. These developments will be accomplished in cooperation and in conjunction with comparable efforts of NASA Glenn Research Center.

  2. Plasma deposition of thin film multilayers for surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Kumar, Sushil

    2012-06-01

    Plasma surface Engineering for enhancing optical and tribological behaviour of a surface is discussed. Specifically, it is shown how optimized PECVD processing can produce sophisticated Rugate filters and AR coatings on plastic lenses. It is found that multilayer Diamond Like Carbon coatings (DLC), in a functionally graded geometry, obtained by a combination of plasma intensive processing, not only can impart high value of hardness to a surface but also wear protection at high contact loads.

  3. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  4. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  5. Environmentally friendly plasma-based surface engineering technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenik, A.; Mozetic, M.; Vesel, A.; Cvelbar, U.

    2010-01-01

    Weakly ionised reactive plasmas are characterised by a very low degree of ionization, which rarely exceeds the order of 10-4, and by a very high degree of dissociation, which often reaches values above 50%. Thus the most numerous plasma species are free neutral atoms originated from the dissociation of the source gas molecules. Neutral atoms are chemically very reactive species, which makes such plasma suitable for material processing. At the same time the neutral atoms have a low kinetic energy and therefore they cannot penetrate into the bulk material, so their effect is restricted to the topmost atomic layers of the material surface hence weakly ionised, reactive plasmas are suitable for surface engineering. Here we present examples of weakly ionised plasma applications as environmentally friendly alternatives to processes that otherwise utilise aggressive chemicals and produce toxic waste.

  6. Plasma engineered surfaces for orthopedic devices.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Susan; Gilliam, Mary; Samaniego, Cheryl; Dwarshuis, Nate; Carson, Julia; Peterson, Benjamin; Zand, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma was used to graft various biocompatible polymers to the surface of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Polymers used as grafts in this study were poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). A significant decrease in contact angle was noted for grafted surfaces, indicating increased hydrophilicity. Surface functionalities were verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear properties of the coatings were determined by weight loss under conditions of a random motion pin-on-plate apparatus with the coated polyethylene plaques immersed in DI water. Based on these tests, the grafted surfaces exhibited an improved resistance to wear, compared to UHMWPE. Cell viability studies were used to confirm that the plasma treatment had no negative effects on the surface bio-toxicity. Based on the results, it is anticipated that the incorporation of these biocompatible polymer-grafted UHMWPE surfaces in metal-on-plastic orthopedic implants should improve their performance and longevity. PMID:26999407

  7. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation releases more energy per unit mass than any other method of energy production, making it an attractive energy source for spacecraft propulsion. In the magnetically confined plasma engine, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas. The resulting charged annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies for a low number density (10(14)/cu cm) hydrogen propellant are insufficient to warrant operating the engine in this mode. Efficiencies are improved using moderate propellant number densities (10(16)/cu cm), but the energy transferred to the plasma in a realistic magnetic mirror system is generally limited to less than 2 percent of the initial proton-antiproton annihilation energy. The energy transfer efficiencies are highest for high number density (10(18)/cu cm) propellants, but plasma temperatures are reduced by excessive radiation losses. Low to moderate thrust over a wide range of specific impulse can be generated with moderate propellant number densities, while higher thrust but lower specific impulse may be generated using high propellant number densities. Significant mass will be required to shield the superconducting magnet coils from the high energy gamma radiation emitted by neutral pion decay. The mass of such a radiation shield may dominate the total engine mass, and could severely diminish the performance of antiproton powered engines which utilize magnetic confinement. The problem is compounded in the antiproton powered plasma engine, where lower energy plasma bremsstrahlung radiation may cause shield surface ablation and degradation.

  8. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, M.R.

    1989-08-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation releases more energy per unit mass than any other method of energy production, making it an attractive energy source for spacecraft propulsion. In the magnetically confined plasma engine, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas. The resulting charged annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies for a low number density (10(14)/cu cm) hydrogen propellant are insufficient to warrant operating the engine in this mode. Efficiencies are improved using moderate propellant number densities (10(16)/cu cm), but the energy transferred to the plasma in a realistic magnetic mirror system is generally limited to less than 2 percent of the initial proton-antiproton annihilation energy. The energy transfer efficiencies are highest for high number density (10(18)/cu cm) propellants, but plasma temperatures are reduced by excessive radiation losses. Low to moderate thrust over a wide range of specific impulse can be generated with moderate propellant number densities, while higher thrust but lower specific impulse may be generated using high propellant number densities. Significant mass will be required to shield the superconducting magnet coils from the high energy gamma radiation emitted by neutral pion decay. The mass of such a radiation shield may dominate the total engine mass, and could severely diminish the performance of antiproton powered engines which utilize magnetic confinement. The problem is compounded in the antiproton powered plasma engine, where lower energy plasma bremsstrahlung radiation may cause shield surface ablation and degradation.

  9. Characterization of the human plasma phosphoproteome using linear ion trap mass spectrometry and multiple search engines.

    PubMed

    Carrascal, Montserrat; Gay, Marina; Ovelleiro, David; Casas, Vanessa; Gelpí, Emilio; Abian, Joaquin

    2010-02-01

    Major plasma protein families play different roles in blood physiology and hemostasis and in immunodefense. Other proteins in plasma can be involved in signaling as chemical messengers or constitute biological markers of the status of distant tissues. In this respect, the plasma phosphoproteome holds potentially relevant information on the mechanisms modulating these processes through the regulation of protein activity. In this work we describe for the first time a collection of phosphopeptides identified in human plasma using immunoaffinity separation of the seven major serum protein families from other plasma proteins, SCX fractionation, and TiO(2) purification prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. One-hundred and twenty-seven phosphosites in 138 phosphopeptides mapping 70 phosphoproteins were identified with FDR < 1%. A high-confidence collection of phosphosites was obtained using a combined search with the OMSSA, SEQUEST, and Phenyx search engines. PMID:19941383

  10. Plasma Propulsion Testing Capabilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Dawbarn, Albert; Moeller, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a series of experiments aimed at quantifying the plasma propulsion testing capabilities of a 12-ft diameter vacuum facility (12V) at USAF-Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC). Vacuum is maintained in the 12V facility by cryogenic panels lining the interior of the chamber. The pumping capability of these panels was shown to be great enough to support plasma thrusters operating at input electrical power >20 kW. In addition, a series of plasma diagnostics inside the chamber allowed for measurement of plasma parameters at different spatial locations, providing information regarding the chamber's effect on the global plasma thruster flowfield. The plasma source used in this experiment was Hall thruster manufactured by Busek Co. The thruster was operated at up to 20 kW steady-state power in both a lower current and higher current mode. The vacuum level in the chamber never rose above 9 x 10(exp -6) torr during the course of testing. Langmuir probes, ion flux probes, and Faraday cups were used to quantify the plasma parameters in the chamber. We present the results of these measurements and estimates of pumping speed based on the background pressure level and thruster propellant mass flow rate.

  11. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-12-31

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels.

  12. Numerical analysis of Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroshi

    1992-11-01

    A simulation model of the Stirling engine based on the third order method of analysis is presented. The fundamental equations are derived by applying conservation laws of physics to the machine model, the characteristic equations for heat transfer and gas flow are represented, and a numerical calculation technique using these equations is discussed. A numerical model of the system for balancing pressure in four cylinders is included in the simulation model. Calculations results from the model are compared with experimental results. A comparable study of engine performance using helium and hydrogen as working gas is conducted, clarifying the heat transfer and gas flow characteristics, and the effects of temperature conditions in the hot and cold engine sections on driving conditions. The design optimization of the heat exchanger is addressed.

  13. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Fundamental Studies and Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K.

    Successful and efficient ignition in short residence time environments or ultra-lean mixtures is a key technological challenge for the evolution of advanced combustion devices in terms of both performance and efficiency. To meet this challenge, interest in plasma assisted combustion (PAC) has expanded over the past 20 years. However, understanding of the underlying physical processes of ignition by plasma discharge remains elementary. In order to shed light on the key processes involved, two main thrusts of research were undertaken in this dissertation. First, demonstration of the applicability of plasma discharges in engines and engine-like environments was carried out using a microwave discharge and a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in an internal combustion engine and a pulsed detonation engine, respectively. Major conclusions include the extension of lean ignition limits for both engines, significant reduction of ignition time for mixtures with large minimum ignition energy, and the discovery of the inter-pulse coupling effect of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges at high frequency. In order to understand the kinetic processes that led to these improvements, the second thrust of research directly explored the chemical kinetic processes of plasma discharges with hydrocarbon fuels. For this purpose, a low pressure flow reactor with a NRP dielectric barrier discharge cell was assembled. The discharge cell was fitted with a Herriott type multipass mirror arrangement, which allowed quantitative laser absorption spectroscopy to be performed in situ during the plasma discharge. Experiments on methane and ethylene mixtures with oxygen, argon, and helium revealed the importance of low temperature oxidation pathways in PAC. In particular, oxygen addition reactions were shown to be of primary importance in the oxidation of these small hydrocarbons in the temperature range of 300-600 K. Kinetic modeling tools, including both a coupled plasma and

  14. Analysis of ISS Plasma Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, Brandon; Alred, John; Kramer, Leonard; Mikatarian, Ron; Minow, Joe; Koontz, Steve

    2006-01-01

    To date, the International Space Station (ISS) has been one of the largest objects flown in lower earth orbit (LEO). The ISS utilizes high voltage solar arrays (160V) that are negatively grounded leading to pressurized elements that can float negatively with respect to the plasma. Because laboratory measurements indicate a dielectric breakdown potential difference of 80V, arcing could occur on the ISS structure. To overcome the possibility of arcing and clamp the potential of the structure, two Plasma Contactor Units (PCUs) were designed, built, and flown. Also a limited amount of measurements of the floating potential for the present ISS configuration were made by a Floating Potential Probe (FPP), indicating a minimum potential of 24 Volts at the measurement location. A predictive tool, the ISS Plasma Interaction Model (PIM) has been developed accounting for the solar array electron collection, solar array mast wire and effective conductive area on the structure. The model has been used for predictions of the present ISS configuration. The conductive area has been inferred based on available floating potential measurements. Analysis of FPP and PCU data indicated distribution of the conductive area along the Russian segment of the ISS structure. A significant input to PIM is the plasma environment. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI 2001) was initially used to obtain plasma temperature and density values. However, IRI provides mean parameters, leading to difficulties in interpretation of on-orbit data, especially at eclipse exit where maximum charging can occur. This limits our predicative capability. Satellite and Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) data of plasma parameters have also been collected. Approximately 130,000 electron temperature (Te) and density (Ne) pairs for typical ISS eclipse exit conditions have been extracted from the reduced Langmuir probe data flown aboard the NASA DE-2 satellite. Additionally, another 18,000 Te and Ne pairs of ISR data

  15. Proteomic analysis of engineered cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xinzhu; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tissue engineering holds promise for the treatment of damaged and diseased tissues, especially for those tissues that do not undergo repair and regeneration readily in situ. Many techniques are available for cell and tissue culturing and differentiation of chondrocytes using a variety of cell types, differentiation methods, and scaffolds. In each case, it is critical to demonstrate the cellular phenotype and tissue composition, with particular attention to the extracellular matrix molecules that play a structural role and that contribute to the mechanical properties of the resulting tissue construct. Mass spectrometry provides an ideal analytical method with which to characterize the full spectrum of proteins produced by tissue engineered cartilage. Using normal cartilage tissue as a standard, tissue engineered cartilage can be optimized according to the entire proteome. Proteomic analysis is a complementary approach to biochemical, immunohistochemical, and mechanical testing of cartilage constructs. Proteomics is applicable as an analysis approach to most cartilage constructs generated from a variety of cellular sources including primary chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, proteomics can be used to optimize novel scaffolds and bioreactor applications, yielding cartilage tissue with the proteomic profile of natural cartilage. PMID:26445845

  16. Plasma Igniter for Reliable Ignition of Combustion in Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam; Eskridge, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A plasma igniter has been developed for initiating combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. The device propels a hot, dense plasma jet, consisting of elemental fluorine and fluorine compounds, into the combustion chamber to ignite the cold propellant mixture. The igniter consists of two coaxial, cylindrical electrodes with a cylindrical bar of solid Teflon plastic in the region between them. The outer electrode is a metal (stainless steel) tube; the inner electrode is a metal pin (mild steel, stainless steel, tungsten, or thoriated-tungsten). The Teflon bar fits snugly between the two electrodes and provides electrical insulation between them. The Teflon bar may have either a flat surface, or a concave, conical surface at the open, down-stream end of the igniter (the igniter face). The igniter would be mounted on the combustion chamber of the rocket engine, either on the injector-plate at the upstream side of the engine, or on the sidewalls of the chamber. It also might sit behind a valve that would be opened just prior to ignition, and closed just after, in order to prevent the Teflon from melting due to heating from the combustion chamber.

  17. Analysis of pedestal plasma transport

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J. D.; Groebner, R.; Osborne, T.H.; Canik, John; Owen, Larry W; Pankin, A. Y.; Rafiq, T.; Rognlien, T. D.; Stacey, W. M.

    2010-01-01

    diffusive outward radial density flux. The inward ion pinch velocity and density diffusion coefficient are determined by a new interpretive analysis technique that uses information from the force balance (momentum conservation) equations; the paleoclassical transport model provides a plausible explanation of these new results. Finally, the measurements and additional modelling needed to facilitate better pedestal plasma transport modelling are discussed.

  18. Engine systems analysis results of the Space Shuttle Main Engine redesigned powerhead initial engine level testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Erik J.; Gosdin, Dennis R.

    1992-07-01

    Engineers regularly analyze SSME ground test and flight data with respect to engine systems performance. Recently, a redesigned SSME powerhead was introduced to engine-level testing in part to increase engine operational margins through optimization of the engine internal environment. This paper presents an overview of the MSFC personnel engine systems analysis results and conclusions reached from initial engine level testing of the redesigned powerhead, and further redesigns incorporated to eliminate accelerated main injector baffle and main combustion chamber hot gas wall degradation. The conclusions are drawn from instrumented engine ground test data and hardware integrity analysis reports and address initial engine test results with respect to the apparent design change effects on engine system and component operation.

  19. Analysis of plasma-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  20. Analysis of nuclear induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deese, J. E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic model is developed for a plasma generated by fission fragments, and the results are employed to study He plasma generated in a tube coated with fissionable material. Because both the heavy particles and electrons play important roles in creating the plasma, their effects are considered simultaneously. The calculations are carried out for a range of neutron fluxes and pressures. In general, the predictions of the theory are in good agreement with available intensity measurements. Moreover, the theory predicts the experimentally measured inversions. However, the calculated gain coefficients are such that lasing is not expected to take place in a helium plasma generated by fission fragments.

  1. Homogenous demineralized dentin matrix and platelet-rich plasma for bone tissue engineering in cranioplasty of diabetic rabbits: biochemical, radiographic, and histological analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, M F; Valva, V N; Vieira, E M M; Giannasi, L C; Salgado, M A C; Vilela-Goulart, M G

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of homogenous demineralized dentin matrix (HDDM) slices and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in surgical defects created in the parietal bones of alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits, treated with a guided bone regeneration technique. Biochemical, radiographic, and histological analyses were performed. Sixty adult New Zealand rabbits were divided into five groups of 12: normoglycaemic (control, C), diabetic (D), diabetic with a PTFE membrane (DM), diabetic with a PTFE membrane and HDDM slices (DM-HDDM), and diabetic with PTFE membrane and PRP (DM-PRP). The quantity and quality of bone mass was greatest in the DM-HDDM group (respective radiographic and histological analyses: at 15 days, 71.70 ± 16.50 and 50.80 ± 1.52; 30 days, 62.73 ± 16.51 and 54.20 ± 1.23; 60 days, 63.03 ± 11.04 and 59.91 ± 3.32; 90 days, 103.60 ± 24.86 and 78.99 ± 1.34), followed by the DM-PRP group (respective radiographic and histological analyses: at 15 days 23.00 ± 2.74 and 20.66 ± 7.45; 30 days 31.92 ± 6.06 and 25.31 ± 5.59; 60 days 25.29 ± 16.30 and 46.73 ± 2.07; 90 days 38.10 ± 14.04 and 53.38 ± 9.20). PRP greatly enhanced vascularization during the bone repair process. Abnormal calcium metabolism was statistically significant in the DM-PRP group (P<0.001) for all four time intervals studied, especially when compared to the DM-HDDM group. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly higher in the DM-HDDM group (P<0.001) in comparison to the C, D, and DM-PRP groups, confirming the findings of intense osteoblastic activity and increased bone mineralization. Thus, HDDM promoted superior bone architectural microstructure in bone defects in diabetic rabbits due to its effective osteoinductive and osteoconductive activity, whereas PRP stimulated angiogenesis and red bone marrow formation. PMID:26482638

  2. Particle based plasma simulation for an ion engine discharge chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    Design of the next generation of ion engines can benefit from detailed computer simulations of the plasma in the discharge chamber. In this work a complete particle based approach has been taken to model the discharge chamber plasma. This is the first time that simplifying continuum assumptions on the particle motion have not been made in a discharge chamber model. Because of the long mean free paths of the particles in the discharge chamber continuum models are questionable. The PIC-MCC model developed in this work tracks following particles: neutrals, singly charged ions, doubly charged ions, secondary electrons, and primary electrons. The trajectories of these particles are determined using the Newton-Lorentz's equation of motion including the effects of magnetic and electric fields. Particle collisions are determined using an MCC statistical technique. A large number of collision processes and particle wall interactions are included in the model. The magnetic fields produced by the permanent magnets are determined using Maxwell's equations. The electric fields are determined using an approximate input electric field coupled with a dynamic determination of the electric fields caused by the charged particles. In this work inclusion of the dynamic electric field calculation is made possible by using an inflated plasma permittivity value in the Poisson solver. This allows dynamic electric field calculation with minimal computational requirements in terms of both computer memory and run time. In addition, a number of other numerical procedures such as parallel processing have been implemented to shorten the computational time. The primary results are those modeling the discharge chamber of NASA's NSTAR ion engine at its full operating power. Convergence of numerical results such as total number of particles inside the discharge chamber, average energy of the plasma particles, discharge current, beam current and beam efficiency are obtained. Steady state results for

  3. Launch Deployment Assembly Human Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the human engineering analysis performed by the Systems Branch in support of the 6A cargo element design. The human engineering analysis is limited to the extra vehicular activities (EVA) which are involved in removal of various cargo items from the LDA and specific activities concerning deployment of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS).

  4. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of the matter-antimatter annihilation, with its specific energy being over 250 times the specific energy released in nuclear fusion, is considered as an energy source for spacecraft propulsion. A concept of a magnetically confined pulsed plasma engine is described. In this concept, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas; the resulting charge annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. Numerical simulations were developed to calculate the annihilation rate of antiprotons in hydrogen and to follow the resulting ion, muon, and electron/positron number density evolutions.

  5. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of the matter-antimatter annihilation, with its specific energy being over 250 times the specific energy released in nuclear fusion, is considered as an energy source for spacecraft propulsion. A concept of a magnetically confined pulsed plasma engine is described. In this concept, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas; the resulting charge annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. Numerical simulations were developed to calculate the annihilation rate of antiprotons in hydrogen and to follow the resulting ion, muon, and electron/positron number density evolutions. 22 refs.

  6. An overview of the VASIMR engine: High power space propulsion with RF plasma generation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F. R. Chang

    2001-10-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) is a high power, radio frequency-driven magnetoplasma rocket, capable of exhaust modulation at constant power. While the plasma is produced by a helicon discharge, the bulk of the energy is added in a separate downstream stage by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Axial momentum is obtained by the adiabatic expansion of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle. Exhaust variation in the VASIMR is primarily achieved by the selective partitioning of the RF power to the helicon and ICRH systems, with the proper adjustment of the propellant flow. However, other complementary techniques are also being studied. Operational and performance considerations favor the light gases. The physics and engineering of this device have been under study since the late 1970s. A NASA-led, research effort, involving several terms in the United States, continues to explore the scientific and technological foundations of this concept. The research involves theory, experiment, engineering design, mission analysis, and technology development. Experimentally, high density, stable plasma discharges have been generated in Helium, Hydrogen and Deuterium, as well as mixtures of these gases. Key issues involve the optimization of the helicon discharge for high-density operation and the efficient coupling of ICRH to the plasma, prior to acceleration by the magnetic nozzle. Theoretically, the dynamics of the magnetized plasma are being studied from kinetic and fluid perspectives. Plasma acceleration by the magnetic nozzle and subsequent detachment has been demonstrated in numerical simulations. These results are presently undergoing experimental verification. A brisk technology development effort for space-qualified, compact, solid-state RF equipment, and high temperature superconducting magnets is under way in support of this project. A conceptual point design for an early space demonstrator on the International Space Station has been defined

  7. Bridging Resilience Engineering and Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring

    2010-06-01

    There has been strong interest in the new and emerging field called resilience engineering. This field has been quick to align itself with many existing safety disciplines, but it has also distanced itself from the field of human reliability analysis. To date, the discussion has been somewhat one-sided, with much discussion about the new insights afforded by resilience engineering. This paper presents an attempt to address resilience engineering from the perspective of human reliability analysis (HRA). It is argued that HRA shares much in common with resilience engineering and that, in fact, it can help strengthen nascent ideas in resilience engineering. This paper seeks to clarify and ultimately refute the arguments that have served to divide HRA and resilience engineering.

  8. Analysis of the plasma sweeper

    SciTech Connect

    Glanz, J.; Motley, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    The coupling of lower hybrid waves to a plasma can be modified by placing potentials on electrodes near the mouth of a phased array. Positive potentials on the electrodes create an electric field that sweeps the plasma away at a velocity c anti E x anti B/B/sup 2/. In this paper we derive the electric field created by the applied potential from the nondivergent character of the current flow and the ion momentum equation, in which ion-neutral charge-exchange collisions are retained, and we compare the predictions with experimental data.

  9. Analysis of engineered nanomaterials in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Robert Bruce

    With increasing incorporation of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) into consumer products, there is concern that these materials will be released to the environment with unknown ecological effects. Methods for detection and characterization of these materials at environmentally relevant concentrations are crucial to understanding this potential risk. A relatively new method, single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICPMS), was applied to analysis of metal oxide NPs such as ZnO, CeO2, and TiO2, as well as silver nanowires and carbon nanotubes. A lack of nanoparticulate "pulses" in spICPMS analysis of nano-ZnO led to a study on ZnO NP solubility in a variety of matrices. Dissolution of nano-ZnO was observed in nanopure water (7.18 - 7.40 mg/L dissolved Zn, as measured by filtration) and Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium (RPMI-1640) (~5 mg/L), but much more dissolution was observed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM), where the dissolved Zn concentration exceeded 34 mg/L. These results suggest that solution chemistry exerts a strong influence on ZnO NP dissolution and can result in limits on zinc solubility due to precipitation of less soluble solid phases. Detection and sizing of metal-containing NPs was achieved at concentrations predicted for environmental samples (part-per trillion levels) using spICPMS. Sizing of silver nanowires, titanium dioxide and cerium oxide NPs was done by correlating ICP-MS response (pulses) from NPs entering the plasma to mass of metal in dissolved standards. The ratio of NP pulse detections to the total number of readings during analysis was optimized at 2.5% or less to minimize coincident pulses while still allowing definition of a size distribution. Detection of single walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was performed using spICPMS. This study focuses on using trace catalytic metal nanoparticles intercalated in the CNT structure as proxies for the nanotubes. The small, variable, amount of trace metal in

  10. A Bibliometric Analysis of Climate Engineering Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belter, C. W.; Seidel, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The past five years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of media and scientific publications on the topic of climate engineering, or geoengineering, and some scientists are increasingly calling for more research on climate engineering as a possible supplement to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. In this context, understanding the current state of climate engineering research can help inform policy discussions and guide future research directions. Bibliometric analysis - the quantitative analysis of publications - is particularly applicable to fields with large bodies of literature that are difficult to summarize by traditional review methods. The multidisciplinary nature of the published literature on climate engineering makes it an ideal candidate for bibliometric analysis. Publications on climate engineering are found to be relatively recent (more than half of all articles during 1988-2011 were published since 2008), include a higher than average percentage of non-research articles (30% compared with 8-15% in related scientific disciplines), and be predominately produced by countries located in the Northern Hemisphere and speaking English. The majority of this literature focuses on land-based methods of carbon sequestration, ocean iron fertilization, and solar radiation management and is produced with little collaboration among research groups. This study provides a summary of existing publications on climate engineering, a perspective on the scientific underpinnings of the global dialogue on climate engineering, and a baseline for quantitatively monitoring the development of climate engineering research in the future.

  11. Langmuir probe analysis of highly electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bredin, Jerome; Chabert, Pascal; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-04-15

    A Langmuir probe analysis of highly electronegative plasmas is proposed. Analytical models are used to fit the IV-characteristics and their second derivatives above and below the plasma potential. Ion and electron densities are obtained for {alpha} (negative ion to electron density ratio) up to 3000, and the temperature of negative and positive ions is obtained for {alpha} ranging from 100 to 3000. The transport across a localized magnetic barrier is studied using this technique. It is shown that an ion-ion (electron free) plasma is formed downstream from the barrier at the highest magnetic field.

  12. The CPS Plasma Award at the Intel Science and Engineering Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2012-10-01

    For the past eight years, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has presented an award for a plasma project at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). We reported on the first five years of this award at the 2009 DPP Symposium. Pulsed neutron-producing experiments are a recurring topic, with the efforts now turning to applications. The most recent award at the Pittsburgh ISEF this past May was given for analysis of data from Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The effort had the goal of understanding the fluid properties of the quark-gluon plasma. All of the CPS award-winning projects so far have been based on experiments, with four awards going to women students and four to men. In 2009 we noted that the number and quality of projects was improving. Since then, as we we predicted (hoped for), that trend has continued. The CPS looks forward to continuing its work with students who are excited about the possibilities of plasma. You too can share this excitement by judging at the 2013 fair in Phoenix on May 12-17. Information may be obtained by emailing cps@plasmacoalition.org.

  13. DEAN: A program for dynamic engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, G. G.; Melcher, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Dynamic Engine Analysis program, DEAN, is a FORTRAN code implemented on the IBM/370 mainframe at NASA Lewis Research Center for digital simulation of turbofan engine dynamics. DEAN is an interactive program which allows the user to simulate engine subsystems as well as a full engine systems with relative ease. The nonlinear first order ordinary differential equations which define the engine model may be solved by one of four integration schemes, a second order Runge-Kutta, a fourth order Runge-Kutta, an Adams Predictor-Corrector, or Gear's method for still systems. The numerical data generated by the model equations are displayed at specified intervals between which the user may choose to modify various parameters affecting the model equations and transient execution. Following the transient run, versatile graphics capabilities allow close examination of the data. DEAN's modeling procedure and capabilities are demonstrated by generating a model of simple compressor rig.

  14. Symbolic vector analysis in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W. M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1999-01-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the underlying coordinate systems. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. Besides the basic vector analysis functions, the package provides asymptotic capabilities, 2D vector analysis notation, and a simple interface for users to define their own coordinate systems. These features will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis in complicated coordinate systems is required. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  15. Mathematical Model For Engineering Analysis And Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1992-01-01

    Computational support for engineering design process reveals behavior of designed system in response to external stimuli; and finds out how behavior modified by changing physical attributes of system. System-sensitivity analysis combined with extrapolation forms model of design complementary to model of behavior, capable of direct simulation of effects of changes in design variables. Algorithms developed for this method applicable to design of large engineering systems, especially those consisting of several subsystems involving many disciplines.

  16. Application of pulsed plasma NO{sub x} reduction to diesel engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Hsiao, M.C.

    1993-10-11

    We have studied the effect of pulsed plasma discharges on gas mixtures simulating diesel engine exhaust by modeling and by experiment. Our modeling results have shown that the pulsed plasma can convert NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} using the nitrogen itself as a reductant. However, this process is energetically unfavorable for the plasma regime of our measurements. In our experiments we found that addition of hydrocarbons improves substantially the energy efficiency of pulsed plasma NO{sub x} reduction. Real exhaust gas contains some gaseous hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide that may prove sufficient for improving the energy efficiency of the ``right`` pulsed plasma reduction process.

  17. Intervention analysis in environmental engineering.

    PubMed

    Hipel, K W; McLeod, A I

    1989-11-01

    Intervention analysis techniques are described for identifying and statistically modelling trends which may be present in water quality time series. At the exploratory data analysis stage, simple graphical and modelling methods can be employed for visually detecting and examining trends in a time series caused by one or more external interventions. For instance, a plot of a robust locally weighted regression smooth through a graph of the observations over time may reveal trends and other interesting statistical properties contained in the time series. In addition, statistical tests, such as different versions of the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test, can be used to detect the presence of trends caused by unknown or known external interventions. To characterize rigorously and estimate trends which may be known in advance or else detected using exploratory data analysis studies, different parametric methods can be utilized at the confirmatory data analysis stage. Specifically, the time series modelling approach to intervention analysis can be employed to estimate the magnitudes of the changes in the mean level of the series due to the interventions. Particular types of regression models can also be used for estimating trends, especially when there are many missing observations. To demonstrate how intervention analysis methods can be effectively used in environmental impact assessment, representative applications to water quality time series are presented. PMID:24243172

  18. Spectral and Instability Analysis of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dum, C. T.

    2003-12-01

    Despite an abundance of data on plasma turbulence, obtained either by direct space observations or from computer simulation, most of the data are interpreted only in a qualitative way, rather than by a detailed analysis that would allow a quantitative comparison with theory. For such a comparison one needs to obtain, as a key ingredient, reliable wave spectra as a function of wave number and frequency. The free energy sources, linear instability mechanisms and nonlinear coupling mechanisms that generate these wave spectra should also be identified. In the case of micro turbulence these mechanisms depend on details of the particle distribution functions. Even the nature of wave modes, not only wave growth rates, may change as the plasma evolves. A particle simulation in which an electron beam excites a variety of wave modes is used as an example for such an analysis. The model corresponds to proposed mechanisms for ion conic generation on auroral field lines. The rather rapid evolution of plasma and turbulence requires that the spectral analysis is carried out over time intervals that are sufficiently short compared to time scales for spectral changes, whereas for statistical reasons and good frequency resolution long sampling intervals would be desirable. Straightforward periodograms are unsatisfactory under these conditions, even when applying windows (tapers) to the wave trains, in order to reduce spectral leakage. Modern spectral analysis methods which were mostly developed in the geophysics context, such as the maximum entropy method and the multiple taper method, can yield far better results. They are adopted for the analysis of plasma turbulence, in particular in connection with particle simulation codes, although, with other data limitations, the considerations mostly apply also to observations. Particular attention is paid to statistical tests for spectral lines which may correspond to eigenmodes (instabilities) of the plasma. For reliable results it is

  19. ISEE/ICE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed for the period 1 Jan. 1985 to 30 Oct. 1989 is presented. The objective was to provide reduction and analysis of data from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE-3)/International Cometary Explorer (ICE) missions.

  20. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  1. Potato Phytonutrient Analysis and Engineering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes have the highest per capita consumption of any vegetable, a fact which emphasizes their potential to be a key dietary source of health-promoting compounds. Only a fraction of the genetic diversity available in potato wild-species has been incorporated into modern cultivars. LCMS analysis of...

  2. Reusable Rocket Engine Operability Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, R. L.; Komar, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology, model, input data, and analysis results of a reusable launch vehicle engine operability study conducted with the goal of supporting design from an operations perspective. Paralleling performance analyses in schedule and method, this requires the use of metrics in a validated operations model useful for design, sensitivity, and trade studies. Operations analysis in this view is one of several design functions. An operations concept was developed given an engine concept and the predicted operations and maintenance processes incorporated into simulation models. Historical operations data at a level of detail suitable to model objectives were collected, analyzed, and formatted for use with the models, the simulations were run, and results collected and presented. The input data used included scheduled and unscheduled timeline and resource information collected into a Space Transportation System (STS) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) historical launch operations database. Results reflect upon the importance not only of reliable hardware but upon operations and corrective maintenance process improvements.

  3. Operations of the ATS-6 ion engine and plasma bridge neutralizer at geosynchronous altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The ion engine on ATS-6 has been operated in daylight and eclipse. The effect on particle fluxes to the spacecraft was monitored. This data provides information on the potential of the spacecraft with respect to the ambient plasma and the local electric fields caused by the charge distribution on the spacecraft. Operation of the ion engine and/or the neutralizer clamps the spacecraft within a few volts of the ambient plasma potential. Operation of only the neutralizer tends to reduce the differential charge on the satellite, whereas operation of the ion engine reduces it below the sensitivity limit of the detectors.

  4. Review: engineering particles using the aerosol-through-plasma method

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jonathan; Luhrs, Claudia C; Richard, Monique

    2009-01-01

    For decades, plasma processing of materials on the nanoscale has been an underlying enabling technology for many 'planar' technologies, particularly virtually every aspect of modern electronics from integrated-circuit fabrication with nanoscale elements to the newest generation of photovoltaics. However, it is only recent developments that suggest that plasma processing can be used to make 'particulate' structures of value in fields, including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, higher energy density batteries, and other forms of energy storage. In this paper, the development of the science and technology of one class of plasma production of particulates, namely, aerosol-through-plasma (A-T-P), is reviewed. Various plasma systems, particularly RF and microwave, have been used to create nanoparticles of metals and ceramics, as well as supported metal catalysts. Gradually, the complexity of the nanoparticles, and concomitantly their potential value, has increased. First, unique two-layer particles were generated. These were postprocessed to create unique three-layer nanoscale particles. Also, the technique has been successfully employed to make other high-value materials, including carbon nanotubes, unsupported graphene, and spherical boron nitride. Some interesting plasma science has also emerged from efforts to characterize and map aerosol-containing plasmas. For example, it is clear that even a very low concentration of particles dramatically changes plasma characteristics. Some have also argued that the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium approach is inappropriate to these systems. Instead, it has been suggested that charged- and neutral-species models must be independently developed and allowed to 'interact' only in generation terms.

  5. IPD -The Use of Impulse Plasma in Surface Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunek, Krzysztof

    2008-10-01

    It is evident that impulse plasma ensures both the highest level of nonequilibrity and highest level of vapour ionisation. These conditions seemed to be especially suitable for synthetizing the phases with high energetic barrier of nucleation process. In our methods, called by us as the Impulse Plasma Deposition (IPD) the impulse plasma is generated and accelerated in a coaxial accelerator. The only source of electric energy in the plasma process is condenser battery charged to the voltage of order of kVs. During the discharge of condensers individual plasmoids are being accelerated in the coaxial generator by the Ampere force to the speed of the order of 10^4 ms-1 and directed to the non-heated substrate. The most characteristic feature of the is that the synthesis proceeds in the impulse plasma itself, with the participation of ions. The crystallization on ions (ionization degree of the impulse plasma is equal to 100%) makes individual plasmoids to be strongly enriched rather in clusters or particles agglomerates with dimensions of order of single nms than the atoms. Because of the very short life time of plasmoids (approx. 10-4 sec each) the surface coalescence of particles delivered to the substrate has a limited character. As a consequence the material of the layer has nanocrystalline, globular morphology.

  6. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A general engine dynamic analysis as a standard design study computational tool is described for the prediction and understanding of complex engine dynamic behavior. Improved definition of engine dynamic response provides valuable information and insights leading to reduced maintenance and overhaul costs on existing engine configurations. Application of advanced engine dynamic simulation methods provides a considerable cost reduction in the development of new engine designs by eliminating some of the trial and error process done with engine hardware development.

  7. Thermal Analysis of the MCI Engine Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Jose

    2002-01-01

    The MCI Engine turbopump supplied the propellants to the main injector. The turbopump consisted of four parts; lox pump, interpropellant seal package (IPS), RP pump and turbine. The thermal analysis was divided into two 2D finite element models; Housing or stationary parts and rotor or rotating parts. Both models were analyzed at the same boundary conditions using SINDA. The housing model consisted of; lox pump housing, ips housing, RP housing, turbine inlet housing, turbine housing, exit guide vane, heat shield and both bearing outer races. The rotor model consisted of the lox impeller; lox end bearing and id race, RP impeller, and RP bearing and id race, shaft and turbine disk. The objectives of the analysis were to (1) verified the original design and recommend modifications to it, (2) submitted a thermal environment to support the structural analysis, (3) support the component and engine test program and (4) to support the X34 vehicle program.

  8. Prume Heating Analysis of Clustered Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maemura, Takashi; Igarashi, Iwao

    The H-IIB launch vehicle is an upgraded version of the current H-IIA launch capacity, which has two liquid rocket engines (LE-7A) in the first-stage, instead of one for the H-IIA. It has four SRB-As attached to the body, while the standard version of H-IIA had two SRB-As. One of the major design issue of H-IIB launch vehicle is increased prume heating due to clustering two LE-7A engines and four SRB-As, especially the interaction of engine prumes at high altitude. This paper describes the prume analysys method of H-IIB launch vehicle which is based on the flight proven method of the current H-IIA launch.

  9. Deformation analysis of rotary combustion engine housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilmann, Carl

    1991-01-01

    This analysis of the deformation of rotary combustion engine housings targeted the following objectives: (1) the development and verification of a finite element model of the trochoid housing, (2) the prediction of the stress and deformation fields present within the trochoid housing during operating conditions, and (3) the development of a specialized preprocessor which would shorten the time necessary for mesh generation of a trochoid housing's FEM model from roughly one month to approximately two man hours. Executable finite element models were developed for both the Mazda and the Outboard Marine Corporation trochoid housings. It was also demonstrated that a preprocessor which would hasten the generation of finite element models of a rotary engine was possible to develop. The above objectives are treated in detail in the attached appendices. The first deals with finite element modeling of a Wankel engine center housing, and the second with the development of a preprocessor that generates finite element models of rotary combustion engine center housings. A computer program, designed to generate finite element models of user defined rotary combustion engine center housing geometries, is also included.

  10. Engineering the Microstructure of Solution Precursor Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolissi, G.; Chazelas, C.; Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the fundamental reactions that occur in-flight during the solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) of solutions containing Zr- and Y-based salts in water or ethanol solvent. The effect of plasma jet composition (pure Ar, Ar-H2 and Ar-He-H2 mixtures) on the mechanical break-up and thermal treatment of the solution, mechanically injected in the form of a liquid stream, was investigated. Observation of the size evolution of the solution droplets in the plasma flow by means of a laser shadowgraphy technique, showed that droplet break-up was more effective and solvent evaporation was faster when the ethanol-based solution was injected into binary or ternary plasma gas mixtures. In contrast with water-based solutions, residual liquid droplets were always detected at the substrate location. The morphology and structure of the material deposited onto stainless steel substrates during single-scan experiments were characterised by SEM, XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy and were shown to be closely related to in-flight droplet behaviour. In-flight pyrolysis and melting of the precursor led to well-flattened splats, whereas residual liquid droplets at the substrate location turned into non pyrolysed inclusions. The latter, although subsequently pyrolysed by the plasma heat during the deposition of entire coatings, resulted in porous "sponge-like" structures in the deposit.

  11. Plasma physics analysis of SERT-2 operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the major plasma processes involved in the SERT 2 spacecraft experiments was conducted to aid in the interpretation of recent data. A plume penetration model was developed for neutralization electron conduction to the ion beam and showed qualitative agreement with flight data. In the SERT 2 configuration conduction of neutralization electrons between thrusters was experimentally demonstrated in space. The analysis of this configuration suggests that the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields was an important factor in the observed results. Specifically, the opposed field orientation appeared to provide a high conductivity channel between thrusters and a barrier to the ambient low energy electrons in space. The SERT 2 neutralizer currents with negative neutralizer biases were up to about twice the theoretical prediction for electron collection by the ground screen. An explanation for the higher experimental values was a possible conductive path from the neutralizer plume to a nearby part of the ground screen. Plasma probe measurements of SERT 2 gave the clearest indication of plasma electron temperature, with normal operation being near 5 eV and discharge only operation near 2 eV.

  12. Description of MSFC engineering photographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earle, Jim; Williams, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Utilizing a background that includes development of basic launch and test photographic coverage and analysis procedures, the MSFC Photographic Evaluation Group has built a body of experience that enables it to effectively satisfy MSFC's engineering photographic analysis needs. Combining the basic soundness of reliable, proven techniques of the past with the newer technical advances of computers and computer-related devices, the MSFC Photo Evaluation Group is in a position to continue to provide photo and video analysis service center-wide and NASA-wide to supply an improving photo analysis product to meet the photo evaluation needs of the future; and to provide new standards in the state-of-the-art of photo analysis of dynamic events.

  13. Tests of engines have stationary plasma in simulated space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentian, Dominique

    1995-03-01

    The SEP (European Company of Propulsion) developed a testing facility making it possible to carry out the acceptance tests of engines SPT 100 and the tests of development of an engine of second generation SPT MK 2. This installation results from the modification of an existing vacuum chamber. It is fitted with a cryogenic pump of great capacity making it possible to pump Xenon effectively, of a balance of measurement of pushed and an automatic system of control of test. The results obtained are compared favorably with those recorded on bulkier installations with the USA and in Russia.

  14. Analysis of rocket engine injection combustion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A critique is given of the JANNAF sub-critical propellant injection/combustion process analysis computer models and application of the models to correlation of well documented hot fire engine data bases. These programs are the distributed energy release (DER) model for conventional liquid propellants injectors and the coaxial injection combustion model (CICM) for gaseous annulus/liquid core coaxial injectors. The critique identifies model inconsistencies while the computer analyses provide quantitative data on predictive accuracy. The program is comprised of three tasks: (1) computer program review and operations; (2) analysis and data correlations; and (3) documentation.

  15. Preliminary engineering analysis for clothes washers

    SciTech Connect

    Biermayer, Peter J.

    1996-10-01

    The Engineering Analysis provides information on efficiencies, manufacturer costs, and other characteristics of the appliance class being analyzed. For clothes washers, there are two classes: standard and compact. Since data were not available to analyze the compact class, only clothes washers were analyzed in this report. For this analysis, individual design options were combined and ordered in a manner that resulted in the lowest cumulative cost/savings ratio. The cost/savings ratio is the increase in manufacturer cost for a design option divided by the reduction in operating costs due to fuel and water savings.

  16. Engineering Analysis in the Chem-E-Car Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Randy S.; Moshfeghian, Aliakbar; Madihally, Sundararajan V.

    2006-01-01

    The AIChE Chem-E-Car competition provides students an opportunity to demonstrate their design and teamwork skills. Engineering analysis is not required at the national competition and is often not applied. This work describes an engineering analysis of a Chem-E-Car to predict the distance traveled by the car. Engineering analysis is advantageous…

  17. Numerical analysis of flows in reciprocating engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, H.; Kojima, M.

    1986-07-01

    A numerical method of the analysis for three-dimensional turbulent flow in cylinders of reciprocating engines with arbitrary geometry is described. A scheme of the finite volume/finite element methods is used, employing a large number of small elements of arbitrary shapes to form a cylinder. The fluid dynamic equations are expressed in integral form for each element, taking into account the deformation of the element shape according to the piston movements, and are solved in the physical space using rectangular coordinates. The conventional k-epsilon two-equation model is employed to describe the flow turbulence. Example calculations are presented for simple pancake-type combustion chambers having an annular intake port at either center or asymmetric position of the cylinder head. The suction inflow direction is also changed in several ways. The results show a good simulation of overall fluid movements within the engine cylinder.

  18. Analysis of pulse detonation turbojet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutthivithayarak, Ronnachai

    2011-12-01

    Research over the last two decades has shown the potential advantages of pulse detonation engines (PDEs) over existing aero-engines in terms of improved thermodynamics efficiency, improved thrust performance, simplicity of design, and flexibility to operate over a wide speed range. The inherently unsteady characteristic of PDEs makes it difficulty to analyze and evaluate their performance. The conventional method that relies on steady-state assumptions cannot be directly applied. PDE studies have to employ unsteady gasdynamics behavior. In this study, the thermodynamic cycle of a PDE, which can be called the ZND cycle, is theoretically analyzed. A parametric analysis of turbojet PDEs is considered for both ideal and non-ideal cases. The conventional turbojet with a Brayton cycle is brought in the comparison to verify that PDEs can provide better performance.

  19. Pulse Detonation Engine Air Induction System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, R. J.; Hunter, L. G.; Couch, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    A preliminary mixed-compression inlet design concept for potential pulse-detonation engine (PDE) powered supersonic aircraft was defined and analyzed. The objectives of this research were to conceptually design and integrate an inlet/PDE propulsion system into a supersonic aircraft, perform time-dependent CFD analysis of the inlet flowfield, and to estimate the installed PDE cycle performance. The study was baselined to a NASA Mach 5 Waverider study vehicle in which the baseline over/under turboramjet engines were replaced with a single flowpath PDE propulsion system. As much commonality as possible was maintained with the baseline configuration, including the engine location and forebody lines. Modifications were made to the inlet system's external ramp angles and a rotating cowl lip was incorporated to improve off-design inlet operability and performance. Engines were sized to match the baseline vehicle study's ascent trajectory thrust requirement at Mach 1.2. The majority of this study was focused on a flight Mach number of 3.0. The time-dependent Navier Stokes CFD analyses of a two-dimensional approximation of the inlet was conducted for the Mach 3.0 condition. The Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems-developed FALCON CFD code with a two equation 'k-1' turbulence model was used. The downstream PDE was simulated by an array of four sonic nozzles in which the flow areas were rapidly varied in various opening/closing combinations. Results of the CFD study indicated that the inlet design concept operated successfully at the Mach 3.0 condition, satisfying mass capture, total pressure recovery, and operability requirements. Time-dependent analysis indicated that pressure and expansion waves from the simulated valve perturbations did not effect the inlet's operability or performance.

  20. Engineering genders: A spatial analysis of engineering, gender, and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidler-Lewis, Joanna R.

    This three article dissertation is an investigation into the ontology of learning insofar as learning is a process of becoming. In each article I explore the general questions of who is learning, in what ways, and with what consequences. The context for this research is undergraduate engineering education with particular attention to the construction of gender in this context. The first article is an examination of the organization of freshman engineering design. The second article draws on Lefebvre's spatial triad as both a theory and method for studying learning. The third article is an interview study of LGBTQA students creating their futures as engineers.

  1. Analysis of Apex Seal Friction Power Loss in Rotary Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Owen, A. Karl

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of the frictional losses from the apex seals in a rotary engine was developed. The modeling was initiated with a kinematic analysis of the rotary engine. Next a modern internal combustion engine analysis code was altered for use in a rotary engine to allow the calculation of the internal combustion pressure as a function of rotor rotation. Finally the forces from the spring, inertial, and combustion pressure on the seal were combined to provide the frictional horsepower assessment.

  2. T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housing refurbishment-plasma spray project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissler, George W.; Yuhas, John S.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of reclaiming T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housings with an 88 wt percent aluminum to 12 wt percent silicon alloy applied by a plasma spray process. Tensile strength testing was conducted on as-sprayed and thermally cycled test specimens which were plasma sprayed with 0.020 to 0.100 in. coating thicknesses. Satisfactory tensile strength values were observed in the as-sprayed tensile specimens. There was essentially no decrease in tensile strength after thermally cycling the tensile specimens. Furthermore, compressor housings were plasma sprayed and thermally cycled in a 150-hr engine test and a 200-hr actual flight test during which the turbine engine was operated at a variety of loads, speeds and torques. The plasma sprayed coating system showed no evidence of degradation or delamination from the compressor housings. As a result of these tests, a procedure was designed and developed for the application of an aluminum-silicon alloy in order to reclaim T55-L-712 turbine engine compressor housings.

  3. Plasma technology for increase of operating high pressure fuel pump diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovev, R. Y.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Adigamov, N. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a change in the service life of high pressure fuel pumps of diesel engines on the working surface of the plunger which a wear resistant dielectric plasma coatings based on silicon oxycarbonitride. Such coatings possess high wear resistance, chemical inertness and low friction.

  4. Engineered plasma interactions for geomagnetic propulsion of ultra small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy A.; Boerner, Jeremiah J.; Hughes, Thomas P.; Bennett, Guy R.

    2013-05-01

    Previous astrophysical studies have explained the orbital dynamics of particles that acquire a high electrostatic charge. In low Earth orbit, the charge collected by a microscopic particle or an ultra-small, low-mass satellite interacts with the geomagnetic field to induce the Lorentz force which, in the ideal case, may be exploited as a form of propellantless propulsion. Efficient mechanisms for negative and positive electrostatic charging of a so-called attosatellite are proposed considering material, geometry, and emission interactions with the ionosphere's neutral plasma with characteristic Debye length. A novel model-based plasma physics study was undertaken to optimize the positive charge mechanism quantified by the system charge-to-mass ratio. In the context of the practical system design considered, a positive charge-to-mass ratio on the order of 1.9x10-9 C/kg is possible with maximum spacecraft potential equal to the sum of the kinetic energy of electrons from active field emission (+43V) and less than +5V from passive elements. The maximum positive potential is less than what is possible with negative electrostatic charging due to differences in thermal velocity and number density of electronic and ionic species. These insights are the foundation of a practical system design.

  5. Stability analysis of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégot, Sylvie; Layes, Guillaume; Lanzetta, François; Nika, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of a free piston Stirling engine. The model and the detailed calculation of pressures losses are exposed. Stability of the machine is studied by the observation of the eigenvalues of the model matrix. Model validation based on the comparison with NASA experimental results is described. The influence of operational and construction parameters on performance and stability issues is exposed. The results show that most parameters that are beneficial for machine power seem to induce irregular mechanical characteristics with load, suggesting that self-sustained oscillations could be difficult to maintain and control.

  6. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to reduce fuel consumption of current commercial aircraft engines, methods were investigated for improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for use on vane platforms in the JT9D turbofan engine. Increased durability concepts under evaluation include use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application. Initial burner rig tests conducted at temperatures of 1010 C (1850 F) indicate that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coating systems were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 100-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  7. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation is reported of improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for the vane platforms in the JT9d turbofan engine. The program aims for reduced fuel consumption of commercial aircraft engines; the use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application are being evaluated. The initial burner rig tests at temperatures up to 1010 C indicated that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coatings were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 1000-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  8. External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP) Analysis Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joesph A.; Morton, P. Jeff; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP) systems are at the stage of engineering infancy with evolving paradigms for application. performance and general characteristics. Recent efforts have focused on an approach that employs existing technologies with near term EPPP development for usage in interplanetary exploration and asteroid/comet deflection. if mandated. The inherent advantages of EPPP are discussed and its application to a variety of propulsion concepts is explored. These include, but are not limited to, utilizing energy sources such as fission. fusion and antimatter, as well as, improved chemical explosives. A mars mission scenario is presented as a demonstration of its capability using existing technologies. A suggested alternate means to improve EPPP efficiencies could also lead to a heavy lift (non-nuclear) launch vehicle capability. Conceivably, true low-cost, access to space is possible using advanced explosive propellants and/or coupling the EPPP vehicle to a "beam propellant" concept. EPPP systems appear to offer an approach that can potentially cover ETO through interstellar transportation capability. A technology roadmap is presented that shows mutual benefits pertaining to a substantial number of existing space propulsion and research areas.

  9. Pair Plasmas in the Central Engine of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.; Tritz, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    As the most promising model for the X-ray emission from a class of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) represented by radio-quiet quasars and Seyfert nuclei, here we introduce the non-thermal pair cascade model, where soft photons are Comptonized by non-thermal electron-positron pair plasmas produced by (gamma)-rays. After summarizing the simplest model of this kind, the "homogeneous spherical cascade model", our most recent work on the "surface cascade model" is presented, where a geometrical effect is introduced. Many characteristics of this model are qualitatively similar to the homogeneous cascade model. However, an important difference is that (gamma)-ray depletion is much more efficient in the surface cascade, and consequently this model naturally satisfies the severe observational constraint imposed by the (gamma)-ray background radiation.

  10. Langmuir probe analysis in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bredin, Jerome Chabert, Pascal; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-12-15

    This paper compares two methods to analyze Langmuir probe data obtained in electronegative plasmas. The techniques are developed to allow investigations in plasmas, where the electronegativity α{sub 0} = n{sub –}/n{sub e} (the ratio between the negative ion and electron densities) varies strongly. The first technique uses an analytical model to express the Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic and its second derivative as a function of the electron and ion densities (n{sub e}, n{sub +}, n{sub –}), temperatures (T{sub e}, T{sub +}, T{sub –}), and masses (m{sub e}, m{sub +}, m{sub –}). The analytical curves are fitted to the experimental data by adjusting these variables and parameters. To reduce the number of fitted parameters, the ion masses are assumed constant within the source volume, and quasi-neutrality is assumed everywhere. In this theory, Maxwellian distributions are assumed for all charged species. We show that this data analysis can predict the various plasma parameters within 5–10%, including the ion temperatures when α{sub 0} > 100. However, the method is tedious, time consuming, and requires a precise measurement of the energy distribution function. A second technique is therefore developed for easier access to the electron and ion densities, but does not give access to the ion temperatures. Here, only the measured I-V characteristic is needed. The electron density, temperature, and ion saturation current for positive ions are determined by classical probe techniques. The electronegativity α{sub 0} and the ion densities are deduced via an iterative method since these variables are coupled via the modified Bohm velocity. For both techniques, a Child-Law sheath model for cylindrical probes has been developed and is presented to emphasize the importance of this model for small cylindrical Langmuir probes.

  11. Langmuir probe analysis in electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredin, Jerome; Chabert, Pascal; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-12-01

    This paper compares two methods to analyze Langmuir probe data obtained in electronegative plasmas. The techniques are developed to allow investigations in plasmas, where the electronegativity α0 = n-/ne (the ratio between the negative ion and electron densities) varies strongly. The first technique uses an analytical model to express the Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic and its second derivative as a function of the electron and ion densities (ne, n+, n-), temperatures (Te, T+, T-), and masses (me, m+, m-). The analytical curves are fitted to the experimental data by adjusting these variables and parameters. To reduce the number of fitted parameters, the ion masses are assumed constant within the source volume, and quasi-neutrality is assumed everywhere. In this theory, Maxwellian distributions are assumed for all charged species. We show that this data analysis can predict the various plasma parameters within 5-10%, including the ion temperatures when α0 > 100. However, the method is tedious, time consuming, and requires a precise measurement of the energy distribution function. A second technique is therefore developed for easier access to the electron and ion densities, but does not give access to the ion temperatures. Here, only the measured I-V characteristic is needed. The electron density, temperature, and ion saturation current for positive ions are determined by classical probe techniques. The electronegativity α0 and the ion densities are deduced via an iterative method since these variables are coupled via the modified Bohm velocity. For both techniques, a Child-Law sheath model for cylindrical probes has been developed and is presented to emphasize the importance of this model for small cylindrical Langmuir probes.

  12. Reduction of NOx and PM in marine diesel engine exhaust gas using microwave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, W.; FInst, P.; Manivannan, N.; Beleca, R.; Abbod, M.

    2015-10-01

    Abatement of NOx and particulate matters (PM) of marine diesel exhaust gas using microwave (MW) non-thermal plasma is presented in this paper. NOx mainly consist of NO and less concentration of NO2 in a typical two stoke marine diesel engine and microwave plasma generation can completely remove NO. MW was generated using two 2kW microwave sources and a saw tooth passive electrode. Passive electrode was used to generate high electric field region within microwave environment where high energetic electrons (1-3eV) are produced for the generation of non-thermal plasma (NTP). 2kW gen-set diesel exhaust gas was used to test our pilot-scale MW plasma reactor. The experimental results show that almost 100% removal of NO is possible for the exhaust gas flow rate of 60l/s. It was also shown that MW can significantly remove soot particles (PM, 10nm to 365nm) entrained in the exhaust gas of 200kW marine diesel engine with 40% engine load and gas flow rate of 130l/s. MW without generating plasma showed reduction up to 50% reduction of PM and with the plasma up to 90% reduction. The major challenge in these experiments was that igniting the desired plasma and sustaining it with passive electrodes for longer period (10s of minutes) as it required fine tuning of electrode position, which was influenced by many factors such as gas flow rate, geometry of reactor and MW power.

  13. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotk, Robert; Jasiński, Mariusz; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the tuning characteristics of waveguide-supplied metal-cylinder-based nozzleless microwave plasma source. This analysis has enabled to estimate the electron concentration ne and electron frequency collisions ν in the plasma generated in nitrogen and in a mixture of nitrogen and ethanol vapour. The parameters ne and ν are the basic quantities that characterize the plasma. The presented new plasma diagnostic method is particularly useful, when spectroscopic methods are useless. The presented plasma source is currently used in research of a hydrogen production from liquids.

  14. Analysis of 16 plasma vortex events in the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Bame, S. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of 16 plasma vortex occurrences in the magnetotail plasma sheet of Hones et al. (1983) is extended. Two- and three-dimensional plasma measurements and three-dimensional magnetic field measurements were used to study phase relations, energy propagation, and polarization properties. The results point toward an interpretation as a slow strongly damped MHD eigenmode which is generated by tailward traveling perturbations at the low-latitude interface between plasma sheet and magnetosheath.

  15. GRETINA commissioning and engineering run resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, Thomas; Beausang, Con; Ross, Tim; Hughes, Richard; Gell, Kristen; Good, Erin

    2012-10-01

    GRETINA, the first stage in the full Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA), consists of seven modules covering approximately 1 solid angle. Each module is made up of four large, highly-segmented germanium detectors capable of measuring the interaction points of individual gamma-rays. GRETINA has recently been assembled and commissioned in LBNL via a series of engineering and commissioning runs. Here we report on an analysis of data from the first engineering run (ER01) which was intended to probe the response of the data acquisition system to high multiplicity gamma-ray cascades. For this experiment the 122Sn(40Ar, 4n) reaction at a beam energy of 210 MeV was utilized to populate high spin states in 158Er. A variety of beam currents, targets and trigger conditions were utilized to test the acquisition. Here we report on the measured energy resolution, both with calibration and in-beam sources as well as a gamma-gamma coincidence analysis to confirm the known level scheme and the capability of the data acquisition system for high fold coincidence measurements. This work was partly supported by the US Department of Energy via grant numbers DE-FG52-09NA29454 and DE-FG02-05-ER41379.

  16. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2005-10-01

    The Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has established a plasma prize at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). This year's prize was awarded for projects in simulated ball lightning and plasma thrusters. The CPS is a broadly-based group of institutions and individuals whose goal is to increase the understanding of plasmas for non-technical audiences. In addition to the ISEF plasma award, CPS activities include maintaining a website, http://www.plasmacoalition.org; developing educational literature; organizing educational luncheon presentations for Members of Congress and their staffs; and responding to questions about plasmas that are received by the CPS e-mail or toll-free number. The success of these activities depend on the voluntary labor of CPS members and associates. These volunteers include the ISEF judges, whom the APS/DPP and the IEEE/PSAC helped identify. Please send an e-mail to the CPS at CPS@plasmacoalition.org for information if you would like to become involved in spreading the good word about plasmas.

  17. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    SciTech Connect

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P.

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  18. Geotail MCA plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-2346 supports the data analysis effort at The University of Iowa for the GEOTAIL Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA) which is a part of the GEOTAIL Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI). At the beginning of this reporting period we had just begun to receive our GEOTAIL Sirius data on CD-ROMs. Much programming effort went into adapting and refining the data analysis programs to include the CD-ROM inputs. Programs were also developed to display the high-frequency-resolution PWI Sweep Frequency Analyzer (SFA) data and to include in all the various plot products the electron cyclotron frequency derived from the magnitude of the magnetic field extracted from the GEOTAIL Magnetic Field (MGF) data included in the GEOTAIL Sirius data. We also developed programs to use the MGF data residing in the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) GEOTAIL Scientific Data Base (SDB). Our programmers also developed programs and provided technical support for the GEOTAIL data analysis efforts of Co-lnvestigator William W. L. Taylor at Nichols Research Corporation (NRC). At the end of this report we have included brief summaries of the NRC effort and the progress being made.

  19. Analysis of radiofrequency discharges in plasma

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, D.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1992-08-04

    Separation of laser optogalvanic signals in plasma into two components: (1) an ionization rate change component, and (2) a photoacoustic mediated component. This separation of components may be performed even when the two components overlap in time, by measuring time-resolved laser optogalvanic signals in an rf discharge plasma as the rf frequency is varied near the electrical resonance peak of the plasma and associated driving/detecting circuits. A novel spectrometer may be constructed to make these measurements. Such a spectrometer would be useful in better understanding and controlling such processes as plasma etching and plasma deposition. 15 figs.

  20. Analysis of radiofrequency discharges in plasma

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Devendra; McGlynn, Sean P.

    1992-01-01

    Separation of laser optogalvanic signals in plasma into two components: (1) an ionization rate change component, and (2) a photoacoustic mediated component. This separation of components may be performed even when the two components overlap in time, by measuring time-resolved laser optogalvanic signals in an rf discharge plasma as the rf frequency is varied near the electrical resonance peak of the plasma and associated driving/detecting circuits. A novel spectrometer may be constructed to make these measurements. Such a spectrometer would be useful in better understanding and controlling such processes as plasma etching and plasma deposition.

  1. Ferrographic and spectrographic analysis of oil sampled before and after failure of a jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental gas turbine engine was destroyed as a result of the combustion of its titanium components. Several engine oil samples (before and after the failure) were analyzed with a Ferrograph as well as plasma, atomic absorption, and emission spectrometers. The analyses indicated that a lubrication system failure was not a causative factor in the engine failure. Neither an abnormal wear mechanism, nor a high level of wear debris was detected in the oil sample from the engine just prior to the test in which the failure occurred. However, low concentrations of titanium were evident in this sample and samples taken earlier. After the failure, higher titanium concentrations were detected in oil samples taken from different engine locations. Ferrographic analysis indicated that most of the titanium was contained in spherical metallic debris after the failure.

  2. Cross correlation analysis of plasma perturbation in amplitude modulated reactive dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Teppei; Soejima, Masahiro; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Shigeru

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between plasmas and nano-interface are one of the most important issues in plasma processing. We have studied effects of plasma perturbation on growth of nanoparticles in amplitude modulated reactive dusty plasmas and have clarified that amplitude modulation (AM) leads to suppression of growth of nanoparticles [1]. Here we report results of cross correlation analysis of time evolution of laser light scattering intensity from nanoparticles in reactive plasmas. Experiments were carried out using a capacitively-coupled rf discharge reactor with a two-dimensional laser light scattering (LLS) system. We employed Ar +DM-DMOS discharge plasmas to generate nanoparticles. The peaks at higher harmonics and subharmonics in spectra of laser light scattering intensity were detected, suggesting nonlinear coupling between plasma and nanoparticle amount. We found high cross correlation t between waves at AM frequency and its higher harmonics. Namely, perturbation at fAM closely correlates with those at higher harmonics.

  3. Plasma lithography--thin-film patterning of polymeric biomaterials by RF plasma polymerization I: Surface preparation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Goessl, A; Garrison, M D; Lhoest, J B; Hoffman, A S

    2001-01-01

    Plasma lithography, combining plasma deposition with photolithography, is described as a versatile method to manufacture all-polymeric substrates with thin-film patterns for applications in biomedical engineering. Patterns of a hydrophobic fluorocarbon plasma polymer with feature sizes between 5 and 100 microm were deposited on a base substrate in a lift-off process: an intermediate tetraglyme plasma polymer layer provides non-fouling properties to the base substrate. Careful analysis of critical process parameters identified the narrow window of process conditions that led to the formation of functional surface patterns. High pattern fidelity, aspect ratios, and resolution of the patterns are demonstrated by atomic force microscopy. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) were used to characterize the surfaces, showing good retention of the original chemical structure of the pattern components throughout the process. SIMS imaging was used for specific chemical imaging of the components. Potential applications for the patterned polymer films, e.g., for studying cell behavior in vitro in dependence of shape and size of adhering cells, are discussed. PMID:11587037

  4. Instabilities in uranium plasma and the gas-core nuclear rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of unstable sound waves in a uranium plasma has been calculated using a multiple time-scale asymptotic expansion scheme. The fluid equations used include the fission power density, radiation diffusion, and the effects of the changing degree of ionization of the uranium atoms. The nonlinear growth of unstable waves is shown to be limited by mode coupling to shorter wavelength waves which are damped by radiation diffusion. This mechanism limits the wave pressure fluctuations to values of order delta P/P approximates 0.00001 in the plasma of a typical gas-core nuclear rocket engine. The instability is thus not expected to present a control problem for this engine.

  5. Engineering Analysis Using a Web-based Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, James D.; Claus, Russell W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of a web-based framework for engineering analysis. A one-dimensional, high-speed analysis code called LAPIN was used in this study, but the approach can be generalized to any engineering analysis tool. The web-based framework enables users to store, retrieve, and execute an engineering analysis from a standard web-browser. We review the encapsulation of the engineering data into the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and various design considerations in the storage and retrieval of application data.

  6. Diesel engine coolant analysis, new application for established instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Lukas, M.; Lynch, B.K.

    1998-09-01

    Rotating disk electrode (RDE) arc emission spectrometers are used in many commercial, industrial and military laboratories throughout the world to analyze millions of oil and fuel samples each year. In fact, RDE spectrometers have been used exclusively for oil and fuel analysis for so long, that most practitioners have probably forgotten that when RDE spectrometers were first introduced more than 40 years ago, they were also routinely used for aqueous samples. This paper describes recent work to calibrate and modify RDE arc emission spectrometers for the analysis of engine coolant samples; a mixture of approximately 50% water and 50% glycol. The technique has been shown to be effective for the analysis of wear metals, contamination and supplemental coolant additives in ethylene and propylene glycol. A comparison of results for coolant samples measured by both inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and RDE spectrometers will be presented. The data correlates extremely well on new and relatively clean coolants. However, not surprisingly, RDE results are sometimes higher for samples containing particles larger than a few micrometers. This paper suggests that RDE spectrometers are appropriate, and sometimes preferred, for most types of coolants and certain types of aqueous samples. Actual field data is be presented to support the arguments.

  7. Analysis of automobile engine cylinder pressure and rotation speed from engine body vibration signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhua; Cheng, Xiang; Tan, Haishu

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the engine vibration signal process method for the engine cylinder pressure and engine revolution speed measurement instrument, the engine cylinder pressure varying with the engine working cycle process has been regarded as the main exciting force for the engine block forced vibration. The forced vibration caused by the engine cylinder pressure presents as a low frequency waveform which varies with the cylinder pressure synchronously and steadily in time domain and presents as low frequency high energy discrete humorous spectrum lines in frequency domain. The engine cylinder pressure and the rotation speed can been extract form the measured engine block vibration signal by low-pass filtering analysis in time domain or by FFT analysis in frequency domain, the low-pass filtering analysis in time domain is not only suitable for the engine in uniform revolution condition but also suitable for the engine in uneven revolution condition. That provides a practical and convenient way to design motor revolution rate and cylinder pressure measurement instrument.

  8. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  9. Control of magnetohydrodynamic stability by phase space engineering of energetic ions in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Graves, J P; Chapman, I T; Coda, S; Lennholm, M; Albergante, M; Jucker, M

    2012-01-01

    Virtually collisionless magnetic mirror-trapped energetic ion populations often partially stabilize internally driven magnetohydrodynamic disturbances in the magnetosphere and in toroidal laboratory plasma devices such as the tokamak. This results in less frequent but dangerously enlarged plasma reorganization. Unique to the toroidal magnetic configuration are confined 'circulating' energetic particles that are not mirror trapped. Here we show that a newly discovered effect from hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic theory has been exploited in sophisticated phase space engineering techniques for controlling stability in the tokamak. These theoretical predictions have been confirmed, and the technique successfully applied in the Joint European Torus. Manipulation of auxiliary ion heating systems can create an asymmetry in the distribution of energetic circulating ions in the velocity orientated along magnetic field lines. We show the first experiments in which large sawtooth collapses have been controlled by this technique, and neoclassical tearing modes avoided, in high-performance reactor-relevant plasmas. PMID:22233634

  10. Space Shuttle Main Engine performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. Michael

    1993-01-01

    For a number of years, NASA has relied primarily upon periodically updated versions of Rocketdyne's power balance model (PBM) to provide space shuttle main engine (SSME) steady-state performance prediction. A recent computational study indicated that PBM predictions do not satisfy fundamental energy conservation principles. More recently, SSME test results provided by the Technology Test Bed (TTB) program have indicated significant discrepancies between PBM flow and temperature predictions and TTB observations. Results of these investigations have diminished confidence in the predictions provided by PBM, and motivated the development of new computational tools for supporting SSME performance analysis. A multivariate least squares regression algorithm was developed and implemented during this effort in order to efficiently characterize TTB data. This procedure, called the 'gains model,' was used to approximate the variation of SSME performance parameters such as flow rate, pressure, temperature, speed, and assorted hardware characteristics in terms of six assumed independent influences. These six influences were engine power level, mixture ratio, fuel inlet pressure and temperature, and oxidizer inlet pressure and temperature. A BFGS optimization algorithm provided the base procedure for determining regression coefficients for both linear and full quadratic approximations of parameter variation. Statistical information relative to data deviation from regression derived relations was also computed. A new strategy for integrating test data with theoretical performance prediction was also investigated. The current integration procedure employed by PBM treats test data as pristine and adjusts hardware characteristics in a heuristic manner to achieve engine balance. Within PBM, this integration procedure is called 'data reduction.' By contrast, the new data integration procedure, termed 'reconciliation,' uses mathematical optimization techniques, and requires both

  11. Space Shuttle Main Engine performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santi, L. Michael

    1993-11-01

    For a number of years, NASA has relied primarily upon periodically updated versions of Rocketdyne's power balance model (PBM) to provide space shuttle main engine (SSME) steady-state performance prediction. A recent computational study indicated that PBM predictions do not satisfy fundamental energy conservation principles. More recently, SSME test results provided by the Technology Test Bed (TTB) program have indicated significant discrepancies between PBM flow and temperature predictions and TTB observations. Results of these investigations have diminished confidence in the predictions provided by PBM, and motivated the development of new computational tools for supporting SSME performance analysis. A multivariate least squares regression algorithm was developed and implemented during this effort in order to efficiently characterize TTB data. This procedure, called the 'gains model,' was used to approximate the variation of SSME performance parameters such as flow rate, pressure, temperature, speed, and assorted hardware characteristics in terms of six assumed independent influences. These six influences were engine power level, mixture ratio, fuel inlet pressure and temperature, and oxidizer inlet pressure and temperature. A BFGS optimization algorithm provided the base procedure for determining regression coefficients for both linear and full quadratic approximations of parameter variation. Statistical information relative to data deviation from regression derived relations was also computed. A new strategy for integrating test data with theoretical performance prediction was also investigated. The current integration procedure employed by PBM treats test data as pristine and adjusts hardware characteristics in a heuristic manner to achieve engine balance. Within PBM, this integration procedure is called 'data reduction.' By contrast, the new data integration procedure, termed 'reconciliation,' uses mathematical optimization techniques, and requires both

  12. Pulsed plasma processing for control of diesel engine emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogtlin, G. E.; Freytag, E. K.; Bardsley, J. N.; Wallman, H.

    1993-02-01

    Electrical discharges can be used as an after treatment for diesel exhaust. We are presently involved in research to determine the feasibility of this process. These discharges have been shown to remove nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, particulates, and many organic compounds. A key issue is the efficiency of this removal since it effects both capital and operating costs. These discharges must be of short duration, less than one microsecond, to avoid energy losses due to heating of bulk gas molecules. The voltage must be kept below the voltage breakdown limit where ion heating creates an arc discharge. The basic process is the acceleration of electrons which then collide with gas molecules to form radicals such as O and OH. These radicals then react with and eliminate pollutants. Two basic electrode geometries are used to generate these discharges. The barrier discharge is when one or both of the electrodes is insulated and the pulse length is limited by charging of the insulator. This discharge must be driven by alternating current to permit alternating charging of the insulator. The other geometry is when one electrode has a peak voltage stress five or more times the average stress. We have been investigating the high stress geometry which uses a small wire inside a pipe. The principal experimental apparatus utilized by this effort uses a closed loop gas system. This system permits the production of various gas combinations prior to testing. Analysis can be conducted during or after these tests. The recirculated gas can be heated up to 400 F. This system can measure the energy used and the pollutant removal to determine efficiency. Our primary goal is the simultaneous removal of nitric oxide and particulates typical of diesel exhaust.

  13. Space Shuttle Main Engine real time stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, F. Y.

    1993-06-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is a reusable, high performance, liquid rocket engine with variable thrust. The engine control system continuously monitors the engine parameters and issues propellant valve control signals in accordance with the thrust and mixture ratio commands. A real time engine simulation lab was installed at MSFC to verify flight software and to perform engine dynamic analysis. A real time engine model was developed on the AD100 computer system. This model provides sufficient fidelity on the dynamics of major engine components and yet simplified enough to be executed in real time. The hardware-in-the-loop type simulation and analysis becomes necessary as NASA is continuously improving the SSME technology, some with significant changes in the dynamics of the engine. The many issues of interfaces between new components and the engine can be better understood and be resolved prior to the firing of the engine. In this paper, the SSME real time simulation Lab at the MSFC, the SSME real time model, SSME engine and control system stability analysis, both in real time and non-real time is presented.

  14. ICE/ISEE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    This report is one of the final processing of ICE plasma wave (pw) data and analysis of late ISEE 3, ICE cometary, and ICE cruise trajectory data, where coronal mass ejections (CME's) were the first locus of attention. Interest in CME's inspired an effort to represent our pw data in a condensed spectrogram format that facilitated rapid digestion of interplanetary phenomena on long (greater than 1 day) time scales. The format serendipitously allowed us to also examine earth-orbiting data from a new perspective, invigorating older areas of investigation in Earth's immediate environment. We, therefore, continued to examine with great interest the last year of ISEE 3's precomet phase, when it spent considerable time far downwind from Earth, recording for days on end conditions upstream, downstream, and across the very weak, distant flank bow shock. Among other motivations has been the apparent similarity of some shock and post shock structures to the signatures of the bow wave surrounding comet Giacobini-Zinner, whose ICE-phase data we revisited.

  15. ICE/ISEE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    The interval reported on, from Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1991, has been one of continued processing and archiving of ICE plasma wave (pw) data and transition from analysis of ISEE 3 and ICE cometary data to ICE data taken along its cruise trajectory, where coronal mass ejections are the focus of attention. We have continued to examine with great interest the last year of ISEE 3's precomet phase, when it spent considerable time far downwind from Earth, recording conditions upstream, downstream, and across the very weak, distant flank bow shock. Among other motivations was the apparent similarity of some shock and post shock structures to the signatures of the bow wave surrounding comet Giacobini-Zinner, whose ICE-phase data was revisited. While pursuing detailed, second-order scientific inquiries still pending from the late ISEE 3 recordings, we have also sought to position ourselves for study of CME's by instituting a data processing format new to the ISEE 3/ICE pw detector. Processed detector output has always been summarized and archived in 24-hour segments, with all pw channels individually plotted and stacked one above the next down in frequency, with each channel calibrated separately to keep all data patterns equally visible in the plots, regardless of gross differences in energy content at the various frequencies. Since CME's, with their preceding and following solar wind plasmas, can take more than one day to pass by the spacecraft, a more condensed synoptic view of the pw data is required to identify, let alone assess, CME characteristics than has been afforded by the traditional routines. This requirement is addressed in a major new processing initiative in the past two years. Besides our own ongoing and fresh investigations, we have cooperated, within our resources, with studies conducted extramurally by distant colleagues irrespective of the phase of the ISEE 3/ICE mission under scrutiny. The remainder of this report summarizes our processing activities, our

  16. Sensitivity analysis of Stirling engine design parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Naso, V.; Dong, W.; Lucentini, M.; Capata, R.

    1998-07-01

    In the preliminary Stirling engine design process, the values of some design parameters (temperature ratio, swept volume ratio, phase angle and dead volume ratio) have to be assumed; as a matter of fact it can be difficult to determine the best values of these parameters for a particular engine design. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to analyze the sensitivity of engine's performance variations corresponding to variations of these parameters.

  17. Analysis of noise emitted from diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work combustion noise produced in diesel engines has been investigated. In order to reduce the exhaust emissions various injection parameters need to be studied and optimized. The noise has been investigated by mean of data obtained from cylinder pressure measurements using piezo electric transducers and microphones on a dual cylinder diesel engine test rig. The engine was run under various operating conditions varying various injection parameters to investigate the effects of noise emissions under various testing conditions.

  18. Data engineering systems: Computerized modeling and data bank capabilities for engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopp, H.; Trettau, R.; Zolotar, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Data Engineering System (DES) is a computer-based system that organizes technical data and provides automated mechanisms for storage, retrieval, and engineering analysis. The DES combines the benefits of a structured data base system with automated links to large-scale analysis codes. While the DES provides the user with many of the capabilities of a computer-aided design (CAD) system, the systems are actually quite different in several respects. A typical CAD system emphasizes interactive graphics capabilities and organizes data in a manner that optimizes these graphics. On the other hand, the DES is a computer-aided engineering system intended for the engineer who must operationally understand an existing or planned design or who desires to carry out additional technical analysis based on a particular design. The DES emphasizes data retrieval in a form that not only provides the engineer access to search and display the data but also links the data automatically with the computer analysis codes.

  19. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2007-11-01

    Three years ago, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) established a plasma prize at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. The APS/DPP and the IEEE/PSAC have helped make this effort a success by helping to identify judges. Each year since then, the number of plasma-related projects has increased. This year's prize was awarded for an instrument that, based on the ratio of spectral emission in two bands, detects when a high-pressure street light is about to fail. This allows time for an, efficient, scheduled replacement rather that an emergency service call. The CPS is a broadly-based group of institutions and individuals whose goal is to increase the understanding of plasmas for non-technical audiences. CPS activities include maintaining a website, http://www.plasmacoalition.org, developing educational literature, organizing educational luncheon presentations for Members of Congress and their staffs, and responding to questions about plasmas that are received by the CPS e-mail or toll-free number. The science fair prize and other CPS activities depend on the voluntary labor of CPS members and associates. New participants are needed to expand CPS activities and reach a larger audience. Send an e-mail to the CPS at CPS@plasmacoalition.org for information.

  20. System analysis of plasma centrifuges and sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    System analyses of cylindrical plasma centrifuges are presented, for which the velocity field and electromagnetic fields are calculated. The effects of different electrode geometrics, induced magnetic fields, Hall-effect, and secondary flows are discussed. It is shown that speeds of 10000 m/sec can be achieved in plasma centrifuges, and that an efficient separation of U238 and U235 in uranium plasmas is feasible. The external boundary-value problem for the deposition of sputtering products is reduced to a Fredholm integral equation, which is solved analytically by means of the method of successive approximations.

  1. Electrostatic analysis of the tokamak edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1981-07-01

    The intrusion of an equipotential poloidal limiter into the edge plasma of a circular tokamak discharge distorts the axisymmetry in two ways: (1) it (partially) shorts out the top-to-bottom Pfirsch-Schlueter driving potentials, and (2) it creates zones of back current flow into the limiter. The resulting boundary mismatch between the outer layers and the inner axisymmetric Pfirsch-Schlueter layer provides free energy to drive the edge plasma unstable. Special limiters are proposed to symmetrize the edge plasma and thereby reduce the electrical and MHD activity in the boundary layer.

  2. Parametric analysis of a magnetized cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, Eduardo

    2009-11-15

    The relevant macroscopic model, the spatial structure, and the parametric regimes of a low-pressure plasma confined by a cylinder and an axial magnetic field is discussed for the small-Debye length limit, making use of asymptotic techniques. The plasma response is fully characterized by three-dimensionless parameters, related to the electron gyroradius, and the electron and ion collision mean-free-paths. There are the unmagnetized regime, the main magnetized regime, and, for a low electron-collisionality plasma, an intermediate-magnetization regime. In the magnetized regimes, electron azimuthal inertia is shown to be a dominant phenomenon in part of the quasineutral plasma region and to set up before ion radial inertia. In the main magnetized regime, the plasma structure consists of a bulk diffusive region, a thin layer governed by electron inertia, a thinner sublayer controlled by ion inertia, and the non-neutral Debye sheath. The solution of the main inertial layer yields that the electron azimuthal energy near the wall is larger than the electron thermal energy, making electron resistivity effects non-negligible. The electron Boltzmann relation is satisfied only in the very vicinity of the Debye sheath edge. Ion collisionality effects are irrelevant in the magnetized regime. Simple scaling laws for plasma production and particle and energy fluxes to the wall are derived.

  3. Numerical analysis of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, T.; Sakata, N.; Kato, S.; Nagayama, T.; Fujita, K.

    1999-07-01

    For this study, the Arcjet Plasmodynamic Analysis Code (APAC) developed by Fujita has been significantly modified in order to investigate the physical phenomena of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system. For self-consistent determination of the heating process of working gas, plasma flow, which contains complicated physical phenomena, is obtained by interconnecting flow field analysis with electric field analysis. The main conclusions obtained are summarized as follows: (1) Discharge voltage decreased with discharge current significantly. On the other hand, it increases slightly with hydrogen flow rate. (2) Current density distribution governs physical phenomena in plasma flow. (3) Temperature and velocity distribution at the nozzle exit depend on the discharge current.

  4. Tomographic Analysis of SRF Cavities as Asymmetric Plasma Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    M. Nikolić, A.L. Godunov, S. Popović, A. Samolov, J. Upadhyay, L. Vušković, H.L. Phillips, A-M. Valente-Feliciano

    2010-05-01

    The tomographic reconstruction of local plasma parameters for nonequilibrium plasma sources is a developing approach, which has a great potential in understanding the fundamental processes and phenomena during plasma processing of SRF cavity walls. Any type of SRF cavity presents a plasma rector with limited or distorted symmetry and possible presence of high gradients. Development of the tomographic method for SRF plasma analysis consists of several steps. First, we define the method based on the inversion of the Abel integral equation for a hollow spherical reactor. Second step is application of the method for the actual elliptical cavity shape. Third step consists of study of the effects of various shapes of the driven electrode. Final step consists of testing the observed line-integrated optical emission data. We will show the typical results in each step and the final result will be presented in the form of correlation between local plasma parameter distributions and local etching characteristics.

  5. Systems Analysis of a Compact Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; D. Meade; C. Neumeyer

    2002-02-06

    A new burning plasma systems code (BPSC) has been developed for analysis of a next step compact burning plasma experiment with copper-alloy magnet technology. We consider two classes of configurations: Type A, with the toroidal field (TF) coils and ohmic heating (OH) coils unlinked, and Type B, with the TF and OH coils linked. We obtain curves of the minimizing major radius as a function of aspect ratio R(A) for each configuration type for typical parameters. These curves represent, to first order, cost minimizing curves, assuming that device cost is a function of major radius. The Type B curves always lie below the Type A curves for the same physics parameters, indicating that they lead to a more compact design. This follows from that fact that a high fraction of the inner region, r < R-a, contains electrical conductor material. However, the fact that the Type A OH and TF magnets are not linked presents fewer engineering challenges and should lead to a more reliable design. Both the Type A and Type B curves have a minimum in major radius R at a minimizing aspect ratio A typically above 2.8 and at high values of magnetic field B above 10 T. The minimizing A occurs at larger values for longer pulse and higher performance devices. The larger A and higher B design points also have the feature that the ratio of the discharge time to the current redistribution time is largest so that steady-state operation can be more realistically prototyped. A sensitivity study is presented for the baseline Type A configuration showing the dependence of the results on the parameters held fixed for the minimization study.

  6. EVALUATION OF AN INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA, MULTICHANNEL SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inductively coupled plasma, multielement atomic emission spectrometric analysis system has been evaluated with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency's need for a rapid method for determination of trace elemental concentrations in water. Data are presented on detection...

  7. Analysis and test of insulated components for rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badgley, Patrick R.; Doup, Douglas; Kamo, Roy

    1989-01-01

    The direct-injection stratified-charge (DISC) rotary engine, while attractive for aviation applications due to its light weight, multifuel capability, and potentially low fuel consumption, has until now required a bulky and heavy liquid-cooling system. NASA-Lewis has undertaken the development of a cooling system-obviating, thermodynamically superior adiabatic rotary engine employing state-of-the-art thermal barrier coatings to thermally insulate engine components. The thermal barrier coating material for the cast aluminum, stainless steel, and ductile cast iron components was plasma-sprayed zirconia. DISC engine tests indicate effective thermal barrier-based heat loss reduction, but call for superior coefficient-of-thermal-expansion matching of materials and better tribological properties in the coatings used.

  8. WAIKIKI: Analysis of an Engineered Shoreline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. L.; Fletcher, C. H.; Rooney, J.

    2002-12-01

    Waikiki Beach is world famous, yet major segments of the Waikiki stretch have little to no sand at high tide. Despite the fact that the beach is largely of human construction, much of what the world perceives as "classic Hawaii" is derived from the experiences of visitors on the sands of Waikiki Beach. Current research in Waikiki is a cooperative effort between the State Department of Land and Natural Resources and the University of Hawaii to produce a quantitative data set at the highest possible resolution and accuracy to describe beach change at Waikiki. The monitoring effort takes advantage of aerial photogrammetry and beach profile techniques to observe long-term and short-term shoreline variations. The engineering history of Waikiki is described as a major component of the historical shoreline analysis. Historical aerial photographs and topographic survey sheets are used to establish a 75-year shoreline history (1926-2001) for Waikiki Beach. A reweighted least squares regression is applied to the most recent trend in the data to calculate shoreline change rates. Shoreline change trends are highly variable, operating on a littoral cell level. While 2 of 7 littoral cells have experienced accretion over the period, the remainder of the shoreline is characterized by erosion with an overall mean erosion rate of 0.3 m/yr. Bi-monthly beach profile surveys (2000-2002) at 22 transects reveal short-term variations of the shoreline. A relationship between beach width and corresponding sand volume change, established from the beach profile data, is applied to historical shoreline change data to establish a history of sand volume fluctuations. A net increase in beach volume since 1951 reflects the magnitude of human intervention in Waikiki. However, we observe significant losses over more recent time scales. Overall, historical results show narrow and narrowing beaches. There is a great need for maintenance.

  9. Fast Whole-Engine Stirling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Tew, Roy C.; Demko, Rikako

    2006-01-01

    This presentation discusses the simulation approach to whole-engine for physical consistency, REV regenerator modeling, grid layering for smoothness, and quality, conjugate heat transfer method adjustment, high-speed low cost parallel cluster, and debugging.

  10. Fast Whole-Engine Stirling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Tew, Roy C.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-01-01

    An experimentally validated approach is described for fast axisymmetric Stirling engine simulations. These simulations include the entire displacer interior and demonstrate it is possible to model a complete engine cycle in less than an hour. The focus of this effort was to demonstrate it is possible to produce useful Stirling engine performance results in a time-frame short enough to impact design decisions. The combination of utilizing the latest 64-bit Opteron computer processors, fiber-optical Myrinet communications, dynamic meshing, and across zone partitioning has enabled solution times at least 240 times faster than previous attempts at simulating the axisymmetric Stirling engine. A comparison of the multidimensional results, calibrated one-dimensional results, and known experimental results is shown. This preliminary comparison demonstrates that axisymmetric simulations can be very accurate, but more work remains to improve the simulations through such means as modifying the thermal equilibrium regenerator models, adding fluid-structure interactions, including radiation effects, and incorporating mechanodynamics.

  11. Fast Whole-Engine Stirling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Tew, Roy C.; Demko, Rikako

    2007-01-01

    An experimentally validated approach is described for fast axisymmetric Stirling engine simulations. These simulations include the entire displacer interior and demonstrate it is possible to model a complete engine cycle in less than an hour. The focus of this effort was to demonstrate it is possible to produce useful Stirling engine performance results in a time-frame short enough to impact design decisions. The combination of utilizing the latest 64-bit Opteron computer processors, fiber-optical Myrinet communications, dynamic meshing, and across zone partitioning has enabled solution times at least 240 times faster than previous attempts at simulating the axisymmetric Stirling engine. A comparison of the multidimensional results, calibrated one-dimensional results, and known experimental results is shown. This preliminary comparison demonstrates that axisymmetric simulations can be very accurate, but more work remains to improve the simulations through such means as modifying the thermal equilibrium regenerator models, adding fluid-structure interactions, including radiation effects, and incorporating mechanodynamics.

  12. Usability engineering: domain analysis activities for augmented-reality systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbard, Joseph; Swan, J. E., II; Hix, Deborah; Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Livingston, Mark; Brown, Dennis B.; Julier, Simon J.

    2002-05-01

    This paper discusses our usability engineering process for the Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS). Usability engineering is a structured, iterative, stepwise development process. Like the related disciplines of software and systems engineering, usability engineering is a combination of management principals and techniques, formal and semi- formal evaluation techniques, and computerized tools. BARS is an outdoor augmented reality system that displays heads- up battlefield intelligence information to a dismounted warrior. The paper discusses our general usability engineering process. We originally developed the process in the context of virtual reality applications, but in this work we are adapting the procedures to an augmented reality system. The focus of this paper is our work on domain analysis, the first activity of the usability engineering process. We describe our plans for and our progress to date on our domain analysis for BARS. We give results in terms of a specific urban battlefield use case we have designed.

  13. Ion-plasma protective coatings for gas-turbine engine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablov, E. N.; Muboyadzhyan, S. A.; Budinovskii, S. A.; Lutsenko, A. N.

    2007-10-01

    Evaporated, diffusion, and evaporation—diffusion protective and hardening multicomponent ionplasma coatings for turbine and compressor blades and other gas-turbine engine parts are considered. The processes of ion surface treatment (ion etching and ion saturation of a surface in the metallic plasma of a vacuum arc) and commercial equipment for the deposition of coatings and ion surface treatment are analyzed. The specific features of the ion-plasma coatings deposited from the metallic plasma of a vacuum arc are described, and the effect of the ion energy on the phase composition of the coatings and the processes occurring in the surface layer of an article to be treated are discussed. Some properties of ion-plasma coatings designed for various purposes are presented. The ion surface saturation of articles made from structural materials is shown to change the structural and phase states of their surfaces and, correspondingly, the related properties of these materials (i.e., their heat resistance, corrosion resistance, fatigue strength, and so on).

  14. Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid aftertreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Masaaki

    2015-10-01

    One of important and successful environmental applications of atmospheric-pressure corona discharge or plasma is electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which have been widely used for coal- or oil-fired boilers in electric power plants and particulate matter control emitted from industries such as glass melting furnace system, etc. In the ESPs, steady high voltage is usually applied to a pair of electrodes (at least, one of these has sharp edge). Unsteady pulsed high voltage is often applied for the collection of high-resistivity particulate matter (PM) to avoid reverse corona phenomena which reduce the collection efficiency of the ESPs. It was found that unsteady high voltage can treat hazardous gaseous components (NOx, SOx, hydrocarbon, and CO, etc.) in the exhaust gas, and researches were shifted from PM removal to hazardous gases aftertreatment with unsteady corona discharge induced plasmas. In the paper, recent results on diesel engine and industrial boiler emission controls are mainly reviewed among these our research topics.

  15. Analysis of new diesel engine and component design

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Contents of this book include: A root cause investigation of cylinder heat cracking in large diesel engine standby power generators; Predictive analysis of lube oil consumption for a diesel engine; Development of a new engine piston incorporating heat pipe cooling technology; Development of new torsional vibration rubber damper of compression type; Novel approach to reduce the time from concept-to-finished piston; and more.

  16. Electric propulsion. [pulsed plasma thruster and electron bombardment ion engine for MSAT attitude control and stationkeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An alternative propulsion subsystem for MSAT is presented which has a potential of reducing the satellite weight by more than 15%. The characteristics of pulsed plasma and ion engines are described and used to estimate of the mass of the propellant and thrusters for attitude control and stationkeeping functions for MSAT. Preliminary estimates indicate that the electric propulsion systems could also replace the large momentum wheels necessary to counteract the solar pressure; however, the fine pointing wheels would be retained. Estimates also show that either electric propulsion system can save approximately 18% to 20% of the initial 4,000 kg mass. The issues that require further experimentation are mentioned.

  17. Plasma engineering models of tandem mirror devices with high-field test-cell inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Campbell, R.B.

    1985-04-03

    Plasma physics and engineering models of tandem mirror devices operated with a high-field technology test-cell insert in the central cell, which have been incorporated recently in the TMRBAR tandem mirror reactor physics code, are described. The models include particle and energy balance in the test-cell region as well as the interactions between the test-cell particles and those flowing through the entire device. The code calculations yield consistent operating parameters for the test-cell, central cell, and end cell systems. A benchmark case for the MFTF-..cap alpha..+T configuration is presented which shows good agreement between the code results and previous calculations.

  18. Teaching ethics in engineering education through historical analysis.

    PubMed

    Billington, David P

    2006-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to stress the significance of ethics for engineering education and to illustrate how it can be brought into the mainstream of higher education in a natural way that is integrated with the teaching objectives of enriching the core meaning of engineering. Everyone will agree that the practicing engineer should be virtuous, should be a good colleague, and should use professional understanding for the common good. But these injunctions to virtue do not reach closely enough the ethic of the engineer as engineer, as someone acting in a uniquely engineering situation, and it is to such conditions that I wish to speak through a set of specific examples from recent history. I shall briefly refer to four controversies between engineers. Then, in some detail I shall narrate three historical cases that directly involve the actions of one engineer, and finally I would like to address some common contemporary issues. The first section, Engineering Ethics and the History of Innovation, includes four cases involving professional controversy. Each controversy sets two people against each other in disputes over who invented the telegraph, the radio, the automobile, and the airplane. In each dispute, it is possible to identify ethical and unethical behavior or ambiguous ethical behavior that serves as a basis for educational discussion. The first two historical cases described in "Crises and the Engineer" involve the primary closure dam systems in The Netherlands, each one the result of the actions of one engineer. The third tells of an American engineer who took his political boss, a big city mayor, to court over the illegal use of a watershed. The challenges these engineers faced required, in the deepest sense, a commitment to ethical behavior that is unique to engineering and instructive to our students. Finally, the cases in "Professors and Comparative Critical Analysis" illuminate the behavior of engineers in the design of structures and also how

  19. Removal of Nitrogen Oxides in Diesel Engine Exhaust by Plasma Assisted Molecular Sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajanikanth, B. S.; Ravi, V.

    2002-08-01

    This paper reports the studies conducted on removal of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from diesel engine exhaust using electrical discharge plasma combined with adsorbing materials such as molecular sieves. This study is being reported for the first time. The exhaust is taken from a diesel engine of 6 kW under no load conditions. The characteristic behavior of a pulse energized dielectric barrier discharge reactor in the diesel exhaust treatment is reported. The NOx removal was not significant (36%) when the reactor without any packing was used. However, when the reactor was packed with molecular sieves (MS -3A, -4A & -13X), the NOx removal efficiency was increased to 78% particularly at a temperature of 200 °C. The studies were conducted at different temperatures and the results were discussed.

  20. Battery/Heat Engine Vehicle Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-03-01

    MARVEL performs least-life-cycle-cost analyses of battery/heat engine/hybrid vehicle systems to determine the combination of battery and heat engine characteristics for different vehicle types and missions. Simplified models are used for the transmission, motor/generator, controller, and other vehicle components, while a rather comprehensive model is used for the battery. Battery relationships available include the Ragone curve, peak power versus specific energy and depth-of-discharge (DOD), cycle life versus DOD, effects of battery scale, and capacity recuperation duemore » to intermittent driving patterns. Energy management in the operation of the vehicle is based on the specified mission requirements, type and size of the battery, allowable DOD, size of the heat engine, and the management strategy employed. Several optional management strategies are available in MARVEL. The program can be used to analyze a pure electric vehicle, a pure heat engine vehicle, or a hybrid vehicle that employs batteries as well as a heat engine. Cost comparisons for these vehicles can be made on the same basis. Input data for MARVEL are contained in three files generated by the user using three preprocessors which are included. MVDATA processes vehicle specification and mission requirements information, while MBDATA creates a file containing specific peak power as a function of specific energy and DOD, and MPDATA produces the file containing vehicle velocity specification data based on driving cycle information.« less

  1. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT: RETECH PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) and its applicability as a treatment for soils contaminated with organic and/or inorganic compounds. Both the technical and economic aspectsof the technology were examined. A...

  2. The JPL Cost Risk Analysis Approach that Incorporates Engineering Realism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Corey C.; Warfield, Keith R.; Rosenberg, Leigh S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the JPL Cost Engineering Group (CEG) cost risk analysis approach that accounts for all three types of cost risk. It will also describe the evaluation of historical cost data upon which this method is based. This investigation is essential in developing a method that is rooted in engineering realism and produces credible, dependable results to aid decision makers.

  3. Ferrographic and spectrometer oil analysis from a failed gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental gas turbine engine was destroyed as a result of the combustion of its titanium components. It was concluded that a severe surge may have caused interference between rotating and stationary compressor that either directly or indirectly ignited the titanium components. Several engine oil samples (before and after the failure) were analyzed with a Ferrograph, a plasma, an atomic absorption, and an emission spectrometer to see if this information would aid in the engine failure diagnosis. The analyses indicated that a lubrication system failure was not a causative factor in the engine failure. Neither an abnormal wear mechanism nor a high level of wear debris was detected in the engine oil sample taken just prior to the test in which the failure occurred. However, low concentrations (0.2 to 0.5 ppm) of titanium were evident in this sample and samples taken earlier. After the failure, higher titanium concentrations ( 2 ppm) were detected in oil samples taken from different engine locations. Ferrographic analysis indicated that most of the titanium was contained in spherical metallic debris after the failure. The oil analyses eliminated a lubrication system bearing or shaft seal failure as the cause of the engine failure.

  4. Ferrographic and spectrometer oil analysis from a failed gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental gas turbine engine was destroyed as a result of the combustion of its titanium components. It was concluded that a severe surge may have caused interference between rotating and stationary compressor parts that either directly or indirectly ignited the titanium components. Several engine oil samples (before and after the failure) were analyzed with a Ferrograph, and with plasma, atomic absorption, and emission spectrometers to see if this information would aid in the engine failure diagnosis. The analyses indicated that a lubrication system failure was not a causative factor in the engine failure. Neither an abnormal wear mechanism nor a high level of wear debris was detected in the engine oil sample taken just prior to the test in which the failure occurred. However, low concentrations (0.2 to 0.5 ppm) of titanium were evident in this sample and samples taken earlier. After the failure, higher titanium concentrations (2 ppm) were detected in oil samples taken from different engine locations. Ferrographic analysis indicated that most of the titanium was contained in spherical metallic debris after the failure. The oil analyses eliminated a lubrication system bearing or shaft seal failure as the cause of the engine failure. Previously announced in STAR as N83-12433

  5. Analysis of plasma measurements for the Geotail mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Louis A.

    1995-01-01

    The first phase of the Geotail mission, an exploration of the distant magnetotail, was successfully concluded in October 1994. Geotail is currently engaged in a survey of plasmas at distances from Earth approximately 10 to 30 R(sub E). Throughout the mission the Comprehensive Plasma Instrumentation has functioned well with successful return of data. The analysis of the CPI measurements has resulted in a series of publications, and research efforts are ongoing. Research topics include interaction of the magnetotail with the fields and plasmas of the solar wind, steady-state magnetic reconnection in the distant magnetotail at a neutral line bounded by a pair of slow-mode magnetohydrodynamic shocks, development and evolution of plasmoids in magnetotail and magnetospheric substorms, and cold ion beams coexisting as distinct components in the presence of hot plasma-sheet plasmas.

  6. Advanced nuclear rocket engine mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.; Farbman, G.; Sulmeisters, T.; Buden, D.; Harris, P.

    1987-12-01

    The use of a derivative of the NERVA engine developed from 1955 to 1973 was evluated for potential application to Air Force orbital transfer and maneuvering missions in the time period 1995 to 2020. The NERVA stge was found to have lower life cycle costs (LCC) than an advanced chemical stage for performing low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO0 missions at any level of activity greater than three missions per year. It had lower life cycle costs than a high performance nuclear electric engine at any level of LEO to GEO mission activity. An examination of all unmanned orbital transfer and maneuvering missions from the Space Transportation Architecture study (STAS 111-3) indicated a LCC advantage for the NERVA stage over the advanced chemical stage of fifteen million dollars. The cost advanced accured from both the orbital transfer and maneuvering missions. Parametric analyses showed that the specific impulse of the NERVA stage and the cost of delivering material to low earth orbit were the most significant factors in the LCC advantage over the chemical stage. Lower development costs and a higher thrust gave the NERVA engine an LCC advantage over the nuclear electric stage. An examination of technical data from the Rover/NERVA program indicated that development of the NERVA stage has a low technical risk, and the potential for high reliability and safe operation. The data indicated the NERVA engine had a great flexibility which would permit a single stage to perform all Air Force missions.

  7. Behavior analysis and training-a methodology for behavior engineering.

    PubMed

    Colombetti, M; Dorigo, M; Borghi, G

    1996-01-01

    We propose Behavior Engineering as a new technological area whose aim is to provide methodologies and tools for developing autonomous robots. Building robots is a very complex engineering enterprise that requires the exact definition and scheduling of the activities which a designer, or a team of designers, should follow. Behavior Engineering is, within the autonomous robotics realm, the equivalent of more established disciplines like Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering. In this article we first give a detailed presentation of a Behavior Engineering methodology, which we call Behavior Analysis and Training (BAT), where we stress the role of learning and training. Then we illustrate the application of the BAT methodology to three cases involving different robots: two mobile robots and a manipulator. Results show the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:18263040

  8. Commissioning and Performance Analysis of WhisperGen Stirling Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradip, Prashant Kaliram

    Stirling engine based cogeneration systems have potential to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission, due to their high cogeneration efficiency and emission control due to steady external combustion. To date, most studies on this unit have focused on performance based on both experimentation and computer models, and lack experimental data for diversified operating ranges. This thesis starts with the commissioning of a WhisperGen Stirling engine with components and instrumentation to evaluate power and thermal performance of the system. Next, a parametric study on primary engine variables, including air, diesel, and coolant flowrate and temperature were carried out to further understand their effect on engine power and efficiency. Then, this trend was validated with the thermodynamic model developed for the energy analysis of a Stirling cycle. Finally, the energy balance of the Stirling engine was compared without and with heat recovery from the engine block and the combustion chamber exhaust.

  9. Geotail MCA Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1997-01-01

    The primary goals of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics/Global Geospace Science (ISTP/GGS) program are identifying, studying, and understanding the source, movement, and dissipation of plasma mass, momentum, and energy between the Sun and the Earth. The GEOTAIL spacecraft was built by the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and has provided extensive measurements of entry, storage, acceleration, and transport in the geomagnetic tail and throughout the Earth's outer magnetosphere. GEOTAIL was launched on July 24, 1992, and began its scientific mission with eighteen extensions into the deep-tail region with apogees ranging from around 60 R(sub e) to more than 208 R(sub e) in the period up to late 1994. Due to the nature of the GEOTAIL trajectory which kept the spacecraft passing into the deep tail, GEOTAIL also made 'magnetopause skimming passes' which allowed measurements in the outer magnetosphere, magnetopause, magnetosheath, bow shock, and upstream solar wind regions as well as in the lobe, magnetosheath, boundary layers, and central plasma sheet regions of the tail. In late 1994, after spending nearly 30 months primarily traversing the deep tail region, GEOTAIL began its near-Earth phase. Perigee was reduced to 10 R(sub e) and apogee first to 50 R(sub e) and finally to 30 R(sub e) in early 1995. This orbit provides many more opportunities for GEOTAIL to explore the upstream solar wind, bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere as well as the near-Earth tail regions. The WIND spacecraft was launched on November 1, 1994 and the POLAR spacecraft was launched on February 24, 1996. These successful launches have dramatically increased the opportunities for GEOTAIL and the GGS spacecraft to be used to conduct the global research for which the ISTP program was designed. The measurement and study of plasma waves have made and will continue to make important contributions to reaching the ISTP/GGS goals and solving the

  10. Analysis of blood plasma at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, O. P.; Nazarov, M. M.; Angeluts, A. A.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the 0.05-2.5 THz frequency range was employed to analyze blood plasma samples obtained from laboratory animals with experimental diabetes and from healthy controls. It was found that transmission and reflection coefficients of samples from rats with diabetes differed significantly from control values in both amplitude and phase. The cause of the detected differences is discussed with respect to variation in the terahertz response of water.

  11. Perspective of laser-induced plasma ignition of hydrocarbon fuel in Scramjet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Leichao; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Jianhan; Yu, Xin; Li, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    Laser-induced plasma ignition of an ethylene fuelled cavity was successfully conducted in a model scramjet engine combustor. The ethylene was injected 10mm upstream of cavity flameholder from 3 orifices 60 degree inclined relative to freestream direction. The 1064nm laser beam, from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source running at 3Hz and 200mJ per pulse, was focused into cavity for ignition. High speed photography was used to capture the transient ignition process. The laser-induced gas breakdown, flame kernel generation and propagation were all recorded and ensuing stable supersonic combustion was established in cavity. The flame kernel is found rotating anti-clockwise and gradually moves upwards as the entrainment of circulation flow in cavity. The flame is then stretched from leading edge to trailing edge to fully fill the entire cavity. Eventually, a stable combustion is achieved roughly 900μs after the laser pulse. The results show promising potentials for practical application. The perspective of laser-induced plasma ignition of hydrocarbon fuel in scramjet engine is outlined.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis in Complex Plasma Chemistry Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Miles

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of a plasma chemistry model is prediction of chemical species densities, including understanding the mechanisms by which such species are formed. These aims are compromised by an uncertain knowledge of the rate constants included in the model, which directly causes uncertainty in the model predictions. We recently showed that this predictive uncertainty can be large--a factor of ten or more in some cases. There is probably no context in which a plasma chemistry model might be used where the existence of uncertainty on this scale could not be a matter of concern. A question that at once follows is: Which rate constants cause such uncertainty? In the present paper we show how this question can be answered by applying a systematic screening procedure--the so-called Morris method--to identify sensitive rate constants. We investigate the topical example of the helium-oxygen chemistry. Beginning with a model with almost four hundred reactions, we show that only about fifty rate constants materially affect the model results, and as few as ten cause most of the uncertainty. This means that the model can be improved, and the uncertainty substantially reduced, by focussing attention on this tractably small set of rate constants. Work supported by Science Foundation Ireland under grant08/SRC/I1411, and by COST Action MP1101 ``Biomedical Applications of Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas.''

  13. UCLA/FNPL Underdense Plasma Lens Experiment: Results and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M C; Badakov, H; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G; Fliller, R; Kazakevich, G M; Piot, P; Santucci, J; Li, J; Tikhoplav, R

    2006-08-04

    Focusing of a 15 MeV, 16 nC electron bunch by a gaussian underdense plasma lens operated just beyond the threshold of the underdense condition has been demonstrated. The strong 1.9 cm focal length plasma lens focused both transverse directions simultaneously and reduced the minimum area of the beam spot by a factor of 23. Analysis of the beam envelope evolution observed near the beam waist shows that the spherical aberrations of this underdense lens are lower than those of an overdense plasma lens, as predicted by theory. Time resolved measurements of the focused electron bunch are also reported and compared to simulations.

  14. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in MPCVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, Gayathri

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model that can predict the plasma properties of hydrogen plasmas inside a Seki Technotron Corp. AX5200S MPCVD system so that it may be used to understand and optimize the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D model of the system is used in the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and heat trasfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics, where the solvers are coupled with user defined functions to analyze the plasma. A simplified chemistry model is formulated in order to determine the electron temperature in the plasma. This is used in the UDFs which calculate the electron number density as well as electron temperature. A Boltzmann equation solver for electrons in weakly ionized gases under uniform electric fields, called BOLSIG+, is used to obtain certain input parameters required for these UDFs. The system is modeled for several reactor geometries at pressures of 10 Torr and 30 Torr and powers ranging from 300 W to 700 W. The variation of plasma characteristics with changes in input conditions is studied and the electric field, electron number density, electron temperature and gas temperature are seen to increase with increasing power. Electric field, electron number density and electron temperature decrease and gas temperature increases with increasing pressure. The modeling results are compared with experimental measurements and a good agreement is found after calibrating the parameter gamma in Funer's model to match experimental electron number densities. The gas temperature is seen to have a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. On an average, the gas temperature at a point 5 mm above the center of the puck increases from about 1000 K at a pressure of 10 Torr to about 1500 K at 30 Torr. The inclusion of the pillar produces an increase in the maximum electron number density of approximately 50%; it is higher under some conditions. It increases the maximum electron

  15. Structural dynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, L. P.; Jamison, G. T.; Mccutcheon, W. A.; Price, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    This structural dynamic analysis supports development of the SSME by evaluating components subjected to critical dynamic loads, identifying significant parameters, and evaluating solution methods. Engine operating parameters at both rated and full power levels are considered. Detailed structural dynamic analyses of operationally critical and life limited components support the assessment of engine design modifications and environmental changes. Engine system test results are utilized to verify analytic model simulations. The SSME main chamber injector assembly is an assembly of 600 injector elements which are called LOX posts. The overall LOX post analysis procedure is shown.

  16. Spectroscopic modeling and analysis of plasma conditions in implosion cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor E.

    In this dissertation we discuss the effects of opacity and plasma gradients on the analysis and interpretation of Ar K-shell line emission from Ar-doped inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and introduce a spectroscopic technique for the determination of core plasma gradients. In particular, the Ar Heβ composite spectral feature is used for core plasma temperature and density diagnostics. We present a versatile, spectroscopic-quality Non-Local-Thermodynamic- Equilibrium radiation transport model that takes into account the effects of collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, plasma gradients, Stark-broadened line shapes and radiation transport. The code computes the radiative properties of the plasma, and it can be easily adapted to treat different problems of spectra formation. We discuss the importance of high-order satellite emission in the formation of Heβ spectral feature, and the interpretation of core averaged electron temperatures and densities extracted from space integrated spectra of non- uniform plasmas. We also present an application of Genetic Algorithms to the analysis of experimental X-ray spectra. This algorithm drives the search for plasma parameters that yield the best fits to experimental spectra. We discuss the applicability of Case Injected Genetic Algorithms to accelerate analysis of spectra. Furthermore, we introduce a novel method for the determination of plasma temperature and density gradients in imploded cores. The gradients are extracted from the self-consistent analysis of time-resolved X-ray spectra and spatial emissivity distributions obtained from X-ray monochromatic images. In this case, the search in the complex parameter space of gradient functions is driven by a multi-objective Niched Pareto Genetic Algorithm. We discuss the analysis of time resolved spectra recorded during Ar-doped ICF implosions at the NOVA laser facility. Time histories of core averaged electron densities and temperatures during the collapse of the

  17. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, Louis; Litchford, Ron; Jeng, San-Mou

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the variable thrust engine (VTE) in the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N2O4 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  18. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, L.; Litchford, R.; Jeng, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) in the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two-phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N204 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  19. Plasma Surface Interactions and Life-Limiting Phenomena in Ion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James

    2000-10-01

    Ion propulsion is entering an age of application in NASA's planetary program as a key technology being demonstrated on Deep Space 1 (DS1). The single ion thruster on DS1 propelled it to an encounter with the asteroid Braille in July 1999 and is now used to provide the Delta-V for a flyby of the comet Borrelly in 2001. It will deliver a total Delta-V of 4.5 km/s to the 486 kg spacecraft in this mission while consuming less than 81 kg of xenon. With this demonstration, ion propulsion is now being considered for a range of future planetary missions. The high specific impulse capability of ion thrusters makes it possible to perform demanding outer planet and sample return missions with smaller, less expensive launch vehicles and shorter trip times. However, the low thrust levels that ion engines provide necessitate long burn times, typically thousands of hours per engine. Many of the potential failure modes that limit ion engine life are driven by plasma-surface interactions. The experimental characterization of wear processes from ground testing and current theoretical understanding of the erosion mechanisms will be discussed in this presentation.

  20. Ion Dynamics and ICRH Heating in the Exhaust Plasma of The VASIMR Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, E. A., III; Chang-Díaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Jacobson, V.; Ilin, A.; Winter, D. S.; Bengtson, R. D.; Gibson, J. N.; Glober, T. W.; Brukardt, M.; Rodriguez, W.

    2002-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) is a high power, radio frequency-driven magnetoplasma rocket, capable of Isp/thrust modulation at constant power. The plasma is produced by an integrated helicon discharge. However, the bulk of the plasma energy is added in a separate downstream stage by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH.) Axial momentum is obtained by the adiabatic expansion of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle. Exhaust variation in the VASIMR is primarily achieved by the selective partitioning of the RF power to the helicon and ICRH systems, with the proper adjustment of the propellant flow. A laboratory simulation of the 25 kW proof of concept VASIMIR engine has been under development and test at NASA-JSC for several years. Experimentally, high density, stable plasma discharges have been generated in Helium, Hydrogen, Deuterium, Argon and Xenon. This paper will review the plasma diagnostic results obtained in 2000-2002 in a continuing series of performance optimization and design development studies. Available plasma diagnostics include a triple probe, a Mach probe, a bolometer, a television monitor, an H- photometer, a spectrometer, neutral gas pressure and flow measurements, several gridded energy analyzers (retarding potential analyzer or RPA), a surface recombination probe system, an emission probe, a directional, steerable RPA and other diagnostics. Reciprocating Langmuir and Mach probes are the primary plasma diagnostics. The Langmuir probe measures electron density and temperature profiles while the Mach probe measures flow profiles. Together this gives total plasma particle flux. An array of thermocouples provides a temperature map of the system. Ion flow velocities are estimated through three techniques: Mach probes, retarding potential analyzer, and spectroscopic measurements. During 2000-2002, we have performed a series of experiments on the VASIMR apparatus with several objectives, to explore the parameter space that

  1. Equilibrium and Stability Analysis of PEGASUS Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontag, Aaron

    2001-10-01

    Magnetic equilibrium analyses of low-A discharges in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment have been performed using EFIT and a locally developed code which incorporates a nonlinear least-squares fitting routine coupled to a Grad-Shafranov solver. Induced currents in the continuous, resistive vessel wall are estimated using a time-evolving current filament model and are constrained during the reconstruction by wall-mounted flux loops and B-dot coils. With I_wall/Ip up to 2, the poloidal field due to the walls often dominates early in the discharge. A recent upgrade of the internal magnetics set to include 20 poloidal flux loops, a poloidal array of 20 B-dot coils, and a diamagnetic loop has increased the accuracy of equilibrium reconstructions. Plasmas with A < 1.3, Ip on the order of 0.15 MA, 0.2 < li < 0.8, and betat < 25% have been analyzed. The presence of a broad q ~ 2 region inside the plasma corresponds to the growth of a large 2/1 internal mode. Ideal stability analyses have been performed using DCON.

  2. Geotail MCA Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1996-01-01

    The goals of this program include identifying, studying, and understanding the source, movement, and dissipation of plasma mass, momentum, and energy between the Sun and Earth. The GEOTAIL spacecraft was built by the Japanese Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science and has provided extensive measurements of entry, storage, acceleration, and transport in the geomagnetic tail. Due to the GEOTAIL trajectory, which kept the spacecraft passing into the deep tail, GEOTAIL also made 'magnetopause skimming passes' which allowed measurements in the outer magnetosphere, magnetopause, bow shock, and upstream solar wind regions as well as in the lobe, magnetosheath, boundary layers, and central plasma sheet regions of the tail. In late 1994, after spending nearly 30 months primarily traversing the deep tail region, GEOTAIL began its near Earth phase where apogee was reduced first to about 50 Re and later to 30 Re and perigee was decreased to about 10 Re. The WIND spacecraft was launched on November 1, 1994, and the POLAR spacecraft was launched on February 24, 1996. These successful launches have dramatically increased the opportunities for GEOTAIL and the GGS spacecraft to conduct global research.

  3. GEOTAIL MCA Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1996-08-01

    The goals of this program include identifying, studying, and understanding the source, movement, and dissipation of plasma mass, momentum, and energy between the Sun and Earth. The GEOTAIL spacecraft was built by the Japanese Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science and has provided extensive measurements of entry, storage, acceleration, and transport in the geomagnetic tail. Due to the GEOTAIL trajectory, which kept the spacecraft passing into the deep tail, GEOTAIL also made 'magnetopause skimming passes' which allowed measurements in the outer magnetosphere, magnetopause, bow shock, and upstream solar wind regions as well as in the lobe, magnetosheath, boundary layers, and central plasma sheet regions of the tail. In late 1994, after spending nearly 30 months primarily traversing the deep tail region, GEOTAIL began its near Earth phase where apogee was reduced first to about 50 Re and later to 30 Re and perigee was decreased to about 10 Re. The WIND spacecraft was launched on November 1, 1994, and the POLAR spacecraft was launched on February 24, 1996. These successful launches have dramatically increased the opportunities for GEOTAIL and the GGS spacecraft to conduct global research.

  4. Analysis of Power Model for Linear Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Deng, Baiquan; Zuo, Haoyi; Zheng, Xianjun; Cao, Xiaogang; Xue, Xiaoyan; Ou, Wei; Cao, Zhi; Gou, Fujun

    2016-08-01

    A single cathode linear plasma device has been designed and constructed to investigate the interactions between plasma and materials at the Sichuan University. In order to further investigate the Ohmic power of the device, the output heat load on the specimen and electric potential difference (between cathode and anode) have been tested under different discharge currents. This special power distribution in the radial direction of the plasma discharge channel has also been discussed and described by some improved integral equations in this paper; it can be further simplified as P ∝ α‑2 in one-parameter. Besides, we have measured the power loss of the channel under different discharge currents by the calorimetric method, calculated the effective power of the device and evaluated the performances of the plasma device through the power efficiency analysis. supported by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Program (No. 2013GB114003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11275135 and 11475122)

  5. Hybrid Analysis of Engine Core Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Kim, Jeonglae; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Core noise, or the noise generated within an aircraft engine, is becoming an increasing concern for the aviation industry as other noise sources are progressively reduced. The prediction of core noise generation and propagation is especially challenging for computationalists since it involves extensive multiphysics including chemical reaction and moving blades in addition to the aerothermochemical effects of heated jets. In this work, a representative engine flow path is constructed using experimentally verified geometries to simulate the physics of core noise. A combustor, single-stage turbine, nozzle and jet are modeled in separate calculations using appropriate high fidelity techniques including LES, actuator disk theory and Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings surfaces. A one way coupling procedure is developed for passing fluctuations downstream through the flowpath. This method effectively isolates the core noise from other acoustic sources, enables straightforward study of the interaction between core noise and jet exhaust, and allows for simple distinction between direct and indirect noise. The impact of core noise on the farfield jet acoustics is studied extensively and the relative efficiency of different disturbance types and shapes is examined in detail.

  6. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

  7. Novel 3D Tissue Engineered Bone Model, Biomimetic Nanomaterials, and Cold Atmospheric Plasma Technique for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mian

    This thesis research is consist of four chapters, including biomimetic three-dimensional tissue engineered nanostructured bone model for breast cancer bone metastasis study (Chapter one), cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer (Chapter two), design of biomimetic and bioactive cold plasma modified nanostructured scaffolds for enhanced osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (Chapter three), and enhanced osteoblast and mesenchymal stem cell functions on titanium with hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite/magnetically treated carbon nanotubes for orthopedic applications (Chapter four). All the thesis research is focused on nanomaterials and the use of cold plasma technique for various biomedical applications.

  8. Fusing Quantitative Requirements Analysis with Model-based Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Heron, Vance A.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    A vision is presented for fusing quantitative requirements analysis with model-based systems engineering. This vision draws upon and combines emergent themes in the engineering milieu. "Requirements engineering" provides means to explicitly represent requirements (both functional and non-functional) as constraints and preferences on acceptable solutions, and emphasizes early-lifecycle review, analysis and verification of design and development plans. "Design by shopping" emphasizes revealing the space of options available from which to choose (without presuming that all selection criteria have previously been elicited), and provides means to make understandable the range of choices and their ramifications. "Model-based engineering" emphasizes the goal of utilizing a formal representation of all aspects of system design, from development through operations, and provides powerful tool suites that support the practical application of these principles. A first step prototype towards this vision is described, embodying the key capabilities. Illustrations, implications, further challenges and opportunities are outlined.

  9. Integrating computer programs for engineering analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, A. W.; Crisp, V. K.; Johnson, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    The design of a third-generation system for integrating computer programs for engineering and design has been developed for the Aerospace Vehicle Interactive Design (AVID) system. This system consists of an engineering data management system, program interface software, a user interface, and a geometry system. A relational information system (ARIS) was developed specifically for the computer-aided engineering system. It is used for a repository of design data that are communicated between analysis programs, for a dictionary that describes these design data, for a directory that describes the analysis programs, and for other system functions. A method is described for interfacing independent analysis programs into a loosely-coupled design system. This method emphasizes an interactive extension of analysis techniques and manipulation of design data. Also, integrity mechanisms exist to maintain database correctness for multidisciplinary design tasks by an individual or a team of specialists. Finally, a prototype user interface program has been developed to aid in system utilization.

  10. State analysis requirements database for engineering complex embedded systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Matthew B.; Rasmussen, Robert D.; Ingham, Michel D.

    2004-01-01

    It has become clear that spacecraft system complexity is reaching a threshold where customary methods of control are no longer affordable or sufficiently reliable. At the heart of this problem are the conventional approaches to systems and software engineering based on subsystem-level functional decomposition, which fail to scale in the tangled web of interactions typically encountered in complex spacecraft designs. Furthermore, there is a fundamental gap between the requirements on software specified by systems engineers and the implementation of these requirements by software engineers. Software engineers must perform the translation of requirements into software code, hoping to accurately capture the systems engineer's understanding of the system behavior, which is not always explicitly specified. This gap opens up the possibility for misinterpretation of the systems engineer's intent, potentially leading to software errors. This problem is addressed by a systems engineering tool called the State Analysis Database, which provides a tool for capturing system and software requirements in the form of explicit models. This paper describes how requirements for complex aerospace systems can be developed using the State Analysis Database.

  11. Finite-time thermodynamic analysis of the Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, O.M.; Ladas, H.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a finite-time thermodynamic analysis of the Stirling engine cycle. A lumped-parameter thermodynamic model is used to describe the dynamic behavior of the Stirling engine. The mathematical formulation of this model is based on mass and energy balances with associated heat transfer rate equations. These governing equations are formulated into a set of ordinary differential equations, which are then solved numerically to obtain the dynamic behavior of the Stirling engine. Close inspection of the governing equations reveals that the time to complete on cycle, {tau} and the engine time constant, {tau}{sub c} always appear together in a dimensionless ratio. This ratio, {tau}/{tau}{sub c}, is defined here as the Finite-Time Parameter, FTP. The effects of FTP upon power output and efficiency, are studied. The results show that there exists an optimum power output for a given engine design, based on engine speed and heat-transfer contact time. The results also provide an engineering evaluation procedure to improve the efficiency and power output of Stirling engines.

  12. Computational analysis of liquid hypergolic propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, K. W.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion process in liquid rocket engines depends on a number of complex phenomena such as atomization, vaporization, spray dynamics, mixing, and reaction mechanisms. A computational tool to study their mutual interactions is developed to help analyze these processes with a view of improving existing designs and optimizing future designs of the thrust chamber. The focus of the article is on the analysis of the Variable Thrust Engine for the Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle. This engine uses a hypergolic liquid bipropellant combination of monomethyl hydrazine as fuel and nitrogen tetroxide as oxidizer.

  13. Product Lifecycle Management Architecture: A Model Based Systems Engineering Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, Nicholas James

    2015-07-01

    This report is an analysis of the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) program. The analysis is centered on a need statement generated by a Nuclear Weapons (NW) customer. The need statement captured in this report creates an opportunity for the PLM to provide a robust service as a solution. Lifecycles for both the NW and PLM are analyzed using Model Based System Engineering (MBSE).

  14. Pretest uncertainty analysis for chemical rocket engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1987-01-01

    A parametric pretest uncertainty analysis has been performed for a chemical rocket engine test at a unique 1000:1 area ratio altitude test facility. Results from the parametric study provide the error limits required in order to maintain a maximum uncertainty of 1 percent on specific impulse. Equations used in the uncertainty analysis are presented.

  15. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S. K.

    1991-10-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequence of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  16. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequences of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  17. The discharge plasma in ion engine neutralizers: Numerical simulations and comparisons with laboratory data

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.; Snyder, John Steven; Katz, Ira; Herman, Daniel A.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical simulations of neutralizer hollow cathodes at various operating conditions and orifice sizes are presented. The simulations were performed using a two-dimensional axisymmetric model that solves numerically an extensive system of conservation laws for the partially ionized gas in these devices. The results for the plasma are compared directly with Langmuir probe measurements. The computed keeper voltages are also compared with the observed values. Whenever model inputs and/or specific physics of the cathode discharge were uncertain or unknown additional sensitivity calculations have been performed to quantify the uncertainties. The model has also been employed to provide insight into recent ground test observations of the neutralizer cathode in NASA's evolutionary xenon thruster. It is found that a likely cause of the observed keeper voltage drop in a long duration test of the engine is cathode orifice erosion.

  18. Analysis of plasma measurements for the Geotail mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Louis A.

    1994-01-01

    Data processing and research efforts for the period October 1993 to September 1994 are reported. Routine data processing includes the production of color spectrograms and computing of quantitative plasma parameters such as the plasma number density, bulk flow velocity, temperature, and pressure. In addition, specialized analysis software is being developed for specific and general applications. Research activities include the measurement of plasmas from the Geotail spacecraft; the processing of the measurements from a hot plasma analyzer to compute one minute averages of plasma densities, temperatures, and velocities for a substantial part of the Geotail deep tail mission; and, a preliminary survey of the magnetotail for geocentric radial distances of 10 to 210 earth radii. The topology of the magnetotail with its various regions and boundaries is determined by a complex interaction with the fields and plasmas of the solar wind. Observations of the rotation of the magnetic field in the solar wind show that it is well correlated with repeated transitions at Geotail from the magnetotail lobe to a magnetosheath-like boundary layer.

  19. Initial results of systems analysis of the ETR/ITER (Engineering Test Reactor/International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) design space

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Galambos, J.D.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Kalsi, S.; Deleanu, L.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary versions of the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) systems code TETRA (Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Analysis), which determines design solutions by the method of constrained optimization, are used to characterize the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and its design parameter space. We find that the physics objectives of high ignition margin and high plasma current lead to minimum size at relatively low aspect ratios (A = 2.5-3.0), while the engineering objective of high neutron wall load (W/sub L/ /approx gt/ 1.0 MW/m/sup 2/) leads to minimum size at higher A (/approximately/3.5). For minimum-size ITERs, the optimal toroidal field coil (TFC) designs fall within a narrow range of maximum fields (10-11 T) with R varying over only a few percent despite a factor of two change in the winding pack current density J/sub wp/. The major radius of the design is found to be sensitive to changes in elongation, inboard distances (such as plasma scrape-off), inductive flux capability, plasma temperature, beta limit, and ignition margin. A preliminary characterization of the US ITER designs with plasma current I/sub p/ > 15 MA and R < 4.5 m has been obtained by combining the engineering assumptions for devices such as the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER) with the physics assumptions for devices such as the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) and the Next European Torus (NET). These devices can accommodate a range of full- to reduced-bore, driven (Q < 10), steady-state plasmas for the engineering phase that produces high neutron wall load and fluence. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Thrombin detection in murine plasma using engineered fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptadimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapaidze, Ana; Brut, Marie; Mazères, Serge; Estève, Daniel; Gué, Anne-Marie; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2015-12-01

    Biodetection strategies, in which two sides of one target protein are targeted simultaneously, have been shown to increase specificity, selectivity, and affinity, and it has been suggested that they constitute excellent candidates for protein sensing in complex media. In this study we propose a method to engineer the sequence of a DNA construct dedicated to reversible thrombin detection. This construct, called Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) aptadimer, is assembled with two aptamers, which target different epitopes of thrombin, interconnected with a DNA linker that contains a FRET couple and a reversible double helix stem. In the absence of target, the stem is stable maintaining a FRET couple in close proximity, and fluorescence is unquenched upon thrombin addition due to the dehybridization of the stem. We define design rules for the conception of FRET aptadimers, and develop a software to optimize their functionality. One engineered FRET aptadimer sequence is subsequently characterized experimentally by temperature scanning fluorimetry, demonstrating the relevance of our technology for thrombin sensing in bulk and diluted murine plasma.

  1. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures at Lewis Research Center is presented. Three elements of the research program are: (1) composite load spectra methodology; (2) probabilistic structural analysis methodology; and (3) probabilistic structural analysis application. Recent progress includes: (1) quantification of the effects of uncertainties for several variables on high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFT) turbine blade temperature, pressure, and torque of the space shuttle main engine (SSME); (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function for various structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties in primitive structural variables; and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the structural durability of hot engine structural components can be effectively evaluated in a formal probabilistic/reliability framework.

  2. Parametric analysis of the thermal effects on the divertor in tokamaks during plasma disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, M.L.

    1988-04-01

    Plasma disruptions are an ever present danger to the plasma-facing components in today's tokamak fusion reactors. This threat results from our lack of understanding and limited ability to control this complex phenomenon. In particular, severe energy deposition occurs on the divertor component of the double-null configured tokamak reactor during such disruptions. A hybrid computational model developed to estimate and graphically illustrate global thermal effects of disruptions on the divertor plates is described in detail. The quasi-two-dimensional computer code, TADDPAK (Thermal Analysis Divertor during Disruptions PAcKage), is used to conduct parametric analysis for the TIBER II Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Design. The dependence of these thermal effects on divertor material choice, disruption pulse length, disruption pulse shape, and the characteristic thickness of the plasma scrape-off layer is investigated for this reactor design. Results and conclusions from this analysis are presented. Improvements to this model and issues that require further investigation are discussed. Cursory analysis for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is also presented in the appendix. 75 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Simultaneous analysis and design. [in structural engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optimization techniques are increasingly being used for performing nonlinear structural analysis. The development of element by element (EBE) preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) techniques is expected to extend this trend to linear analysis. Under these circumstances the structural design problem can be viewed as a nested optimization problem. There are computational benefits to treating this nested problem as a large single optimization problem. The response variables (such as displacements) and the structural parameters are all treated as design variables in a unified formulation which performs simultaneously the design and analysis. Two examples are used for demonstration. A seventy-two bar truss is optimized subject to linear stress constraints and a wing box structure is optimized subject to nonlinear collapse constraints. Both examples show substantial computational savings with the unified approach as compared to the traditional nested approach.

  4. A Stirling engine analysis method based upon moving gas nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    A Lagrangian nodal analysis method for Stirling engines (SEs) is described, validated, and applied to a conventional SE and an isothermalized SE (with fins in the hot and cold spaces). The analysis employs a constant-mass gas node (which moves with respect to the solid nodes during each time step) instead of the fixed gas nodes of Eulerian analysis. The isothermalized SE is found to have efficiency only slightly greater than that of a conventional SE.

  5. Advanced Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) for a Robust, Longlife and Safe Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Elam, Sandra K.; McKechnie, Timothy N.; Power, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    In 1984, the Vacuum Plasma Spray Lab was built at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center for applying durable, protective coatings to turbine blades for the space shuttle main engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbopump. Existing turbine blades were cracking and breaking off after five hot fire tests while VPS coated turbine blades showed no wear or cracking after 40 hot fire tests. Following that, a major manufacturing problem of copper coatings peeling off the SSME Titanium Main Fuel Valve Housing was corrected with a tenacious VPS copper coating. A patented VPS process utilizing Functional Gradient Material (FGM) application was developed to build ceramic lined metallic cartridges for space furnace experiments, safely containing gallium arsenide at 1260 degrees centigrade. The VPS/FGM process was then translated to build robust, long life, liquid rocket combustion chambers for the space shuttle main engine. A 5K (5,000 Lb. thrust) thruster with the VPS/FGM protective coating experienced 220 hot firing tests in pristine condition with no wear compared to the SSME which showed blanching (surface pulverization) and cooling channel cracks in less than 30 of the same hot firing tests. After 35 of the hot firing tests, the injector face plates disintegrated. The VPS/FGM process was then applied to spraying protective thermal barrier coatings on the face plates which showed 50% cooler operating temperature, with no wear after 50 hot fire tests. Cooling channels were closed out in two weeks, compared to one year for the SSME. Working up the TRL (Technology Readiness Level) to establish the VPS/FGM process as viable technology, a 40K thruster was built and is currently being tested. Proposed is to build a J-2X size liquid rocket engine as the final step in establishing the VPS/FGM process TRL for space flight.

  6. 1-D Numerical Analysis of RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1998-01-01

    An RBCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engines into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Considerable research pertaining to RBCC propulsion was performed during the 1960's and these engines were revisited recently as a candidate propulsion system for either a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) or two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. There are a variety of RBCC configurations that had been evaluated and new designs are currently under development. However, the basic configuration of all RBCC systems is built around the ejector scramjet engine originally developed for the hypersonic airplane. In this configuration, a rocket engine plays as an ejector in the air-augmented initial acceleration mode, as a fuel injector in scramjet mode and the rocket in all rocket mode for orbital insertion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in RBCC propulsion systems. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic RBCC engine following a flight path.

  7. Engine System Loads Analysis Compared to Hot-Fire Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Jennings, John M.; Mims, Katherine; Brunty, Joseph; Christensen, Eric R.; McConnaughey, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Early implementation of structural dynamics finite element analyses for calculation of design loads is considered common design practice for high volume manufacturing industries such as automotive and aeronautical industries. However with the rarity of rocket engine development programs starts, these tools are relatively new to the design of rocket engines. In the NASA MC-1 engine program, the focus was to reduce the cost-to-weight ratio. The techniques for structural dynamics analysis practices, were tailored in this program to meet both production and structural design goals. Perturbation of rocket engine design parameters resulted in a number of MC-1 load cycles necessary to characterize the impact due to mass and stiffness changes. Evolution of loads and load extraction methodologies, parametric considerations and a discussion of load path sensitivities are important during the design and integration of a new engine system. During the final stages of development, it is important to verify the results of an engine system model to determine the validity of the results. During the final stages of the MC-1 program, hot-fire test results were obtained and compared to the structural design loads calculated by the engine system model. These comparisons are presented in this paper.

  8. Thirteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Fluid/thermal processes, systems analysis and control

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are: (1) to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, for prolonging useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and for developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing with emphasis on reducing costs with improved industrial production and performance quality; and (2) to expand the store of fundamental concepts for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in the energy technologies. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) fluid mechanics 1--fundamental properties; (2) fluid mechanics 2--two phase flow; (3) thermal processes; (4) fluid mechanics 3; (5) process analysis and control; (6) fluid mechanics 4--turbulence; (7) fluid mechanics 5--chaos; (8) materials issues; and (9) plasma processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Dynamic simulation of kinematic Stirling engines: Coupled and decoupled analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.; Lemrani, H.; Stouffs, P.

    1995-12-31

    A coupled analysis modelling method of Stirling engines is presented. The main feature of this modelling method is the use of a software package combining the capabilities of a pre-/post-processor with a differential algebraic equations solver. As a result, modelling is merely a matter of linking appropriate objects from a model library and the outcoming tool is very flexible and powerful. Some simulation results are presented and compared with those obtained from a decoupled analysis. It clearly appears that the main imperfection of the model does not come from the modelling process itself but from their incomplete knowledge of the physics behind the Stirling engine operation.

  10. Analysis of Performance of Jet Engine from Characteristics of Components II : Interaction of Components as Determined from Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Alpert, Sumner; Beede, William; Kovach, Karl

    1949-01-01

    In order to understand the operation and the interaction of jet-engine components during engine operation and to determine how component characteristics may be used to compute engine performance, a method to analyze and to estimate performance of such engines was devised and applied to the study of the characteristics of a research turbojet engine built for this investigation. An attempt was made to correlate turbine performance obtained from engine experiments with that obtained by the simpler procedure of separately calibrating the turbine with cold air as a driving fluid in order to investigate the applicability of component calibration. The system of analysis was also applied to prediction of the engine and component performance with assumed modifications of the burner and bearing characteristics, to prediction of component and engine operation during engine acceleration, and to estimates of the performance of the engine and the components when the exhaust gas was used to drive a power turbine.

  11. An analysis of Ph.D. examiners' reports in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003 and 2010 for a total of 1220 Australian Ph.D. theses by analysing examiner reports. Our analysis indicates that Ph.D. theses in engineering, N = 106, differ considerably from those in other fields in areas such as gender of candidates and examiners and the examiners' geographical location. We also found that assessment areas such as significance and contribution of the thesis, publications arising from the thesis, breadth, depth and recency of the literature review and communication and editorial correctness are areas in which the proportion of text of engineering examiners' comments differs significantly from other fields.

  12. An expert system for spectroscopic analysis of rocket engine plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, Greg; Valenti, Elizabeth; Alphonso, Keith; Holladay, Wendy

    1991-01-01

    The expert system described in this paper analyzes spectral emissions of rocket engine exhaust plumes and shows major promise for use in engine health diagnostics. Plume emission spectroscopy is an important tool for diagnosing engine anomalies, but it is time-consuming and requires highly skilled personnel. The expert system was created to alleviate such problems. The system accepts a spectral plot in the form of wavelength vs intensity pairs and finds the emission peaks in the spectrum, lists the elemental emitters present in the data and deduces the emitter that produced each peak. The system consists of a conventional language component and a commercially available inference engine that runs on an Apple Macintosh computer. The expert system has undergone limited preliminary testing. It detects elements well and significantly decreases analysis time.

  13. Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Berndt, C. C.; Herman, H.

    1983-01-01

    Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed 8 wt pct-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings and powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction. Step scanning was used for increased peak resolution. Plasma spraying of the YSZ powder into water or onto a steel substrate to form a coating reduced the cubic and monoclinic phases with a simultaneous increase in the tetragonal phase. Heat treatment of the coating at 1150 C for 10 h in an Ar atmosphere increased the amount of cubic and monoclinic phases. The implications of these transformations on coating performance and integrity are discussed.

  14. Adaptive Analysis Engine v 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Adam; Peacock, Daniel; Ashcraft, Gary; Sumulong, Michael; Nguyen, Tram; Wells, Randall; Bochev, Simeon; Shah, Samit; Kast, Brian; Pinto, David; Garcia, Belinda; Jing, Ting Yu; McDaneial, Brian; Teague, & Bick

    2010-08-05

    This software provides an adaptable framework for performing comprehensive analyses of digital data streams. This software can be used to acquire and analyze raw digital data streams, as well as define, extract, and analyze data channels embedded in digital data streams.This software serves as a foundational framework for developing comprehensive software-based data acquisition, extraction, and analysis tools for ground-based, airborne, and space-based data stream sources. This software serves as a foundational framework for developing comprehensive software-based data acquisition, extraction, and analysis tools for data stream sources from ground-based, airborne, and space-based data stream sources – primarily radio-frequency (RF) data links. Potential applications include state-of-health data links from communication satellites, aircraft, and vehicles, as well as stationary data collection platforms such as well monitors and weather stations. The software was developed with an abstract and extensible architecture which allows it to be easily configured to support any of these diverse data analysis applications

  15. Adaptive Analysis Engine v 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-08-05

    This software provides an adaptable framework for performing comprehensive analyses of digital data streams. This software can be used to acquire and analyze raw digital data streams, as well as define, extract, and analyze data channels embedded in digital data streams.This software serves as a foundational framework for developing comprehensive software-based data acquisition, extraction, and analysis tools for ground-based, airborne, and space-based data stream sources. This software serves as a foundational framework for developing comprehensivemore » software-based data acquisition, extraction, and analysis tools for data stream sources from ground-based, airborne, and space-based data stream sources – primarily radio-frequency (RF) data links. Potential applications include state-of-health data links from communication satellites, aircraft, and vehicles, as well as stationary data collection platforms such as well monitors and weather stations. The software was developed with an abstract and extensible architecture which allows it to be easily configured to support any of these diverse data analysis applications« less

  16. Classification and individualization of used engine oils using elemental composition and discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuna; Kim, Nam Yee; Park, Seh Youn; Lee, Dong-Kye; Lee, Jin Hoon

    2013-07-10

    The six most common commercial automotive gasoline and diesel engine oils in the Republic of Korea, ZIC A, ZIC XQ RV/SUV, Kixx G1, Kixx RV, and the brand name products HD Premium gasoline and HD Premium diesel, were randomly used in nineteen different vehicles. Samples of seventy-six used engine oils, which were withdrawn from the sumps of those vehicles at different intervals, were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and statistically compared. Two data analysis strategies were used to interpret and understand the elemental profiles in the multi-dimensional data. Macro (additive elements of Ca, Zn and P) and trace (wear metal elements of Ag, Al, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb and Sn) elements were used as potential markers to determine the brand of oil used and the engine type in which the oil was used, and to trace the individual vehicle for forensic purposes. The discriminant analysis statistical technique was applied, and its prediction ability was assessed. In this study, 92.1%, 82.9% and 92.1% of the cross-validated grouped cases correctly predicted the brand of oil, the engine type and the vehicle that was the source of the oil, respectively. PMID:23806831

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of femtosecond laser plasma filament in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, J.; Liu, W.; Théberge, F.; Xu, H. L.; Daigle, J. F.; Châteauneuf, M.; Dubois, J.; Chin, S. L.

    2008-03-01

    We report a spectroscopic analysis of a filament generated by a femtosecond laser pulse in air. In the filament spectra, the characteristic Stark broadened atomic oxygen triplet centered at 777.4 nm has been observed. The measured electron impact Stark broadening parameter of the triplet is larger than the theoretical value by Griem [H.R. Griem, Plasma Spectroscopy, McGraw Hill, New York, 1964] by a factor 6.7 . Using the experimental value 0.0166nm , the plasma densities derived from Stark broadening agree well with those most recently obtained from Théberge et al.'s measurement of the nitrogen fluorescence calibrated by longitudinal diffraction [F. Théberge, W. Liu, P.T. Simard, A. Becker, S. L. Chin, Phys. Rev. E 74 (2006) 036406]. However, the Stark broadening approach is much simpler and can be used to non-invasively measure the filament plasma density distribution in air under different propagation conditions.

  18. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, M.G.

    1997-07-22

    A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

  19. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, Michel G.

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  20. Toward the automated analysis of plasma physics problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1989-04-01

    A program (CALC) is described, which carries out nontrivial plasma physics calculations, in a manner intended to emulate the approach of a human theorist. This includes the initial process of gathering the relevant equations from a plasma knowledge base, and then determining how to solve them. Solution of the sets of equations governing physics problems, which in general have a nonuniform,irregular structure, not amenable to solution by standardized algorithmic procedures, is facilitated by an analysis of the structure of the equations and the relations among them. This often permits decompositions of the full problem into subproblems, and other simplifications in form, which renders the resultant subsystems soluble by more standardized tools. CALC's operation is illustrated by a detailed description of its treatment of a sample plasma calculation. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Comparative plasma proteome analysis of lymphoma-bearing SJL mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vadiraja B; Choi, Man Ho; Wishnok, John S; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    In SJL mice, growth of RcsX lymphoma cells induces an inflammatory response by stimulating V(beta)16+ T cells. During inflammation, various serum protein levels can increase (e.g., acute phase reactants) or decrease (e.g., albumin), and most of these altered proteins are thus potential biomarkers. Although blood plasma is a valuable and promising sample for biomarker discovery for diseases or for novel drug targets, its proteome is complex. To address this, we have focused on a comprehensive comparison of the plasma proteomes from normal and RcsX-tumor-bearing SJL mice using the 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS method after removing albumin and immunoglobulins. This analysis resulted in the identification of a total of 1079 nonredundant mouse plasma proteins; more than 480 in normal and 790 in RcsX-tumor-bearing SJL mouse plasma. Of these, only 191 proteins were found in common. The molecular weights ranged from 2 to 876 kDa, covering the pI values between 4.22 and 12.09, and included proteins with predicted transmembrane domains. By comparing the plasma proteomic profile of normal and RcsX-tumor-bearing SJL mice, we found significant changes in the levels of many proteins in RcsX-tumor-bearing mouse plasma. Most of the up-regulated proteins were identified as acute-phase proteins (APPs). Also, several unique proteins i.e., haptoglobin, proteosome subunits, fetuin-B, 14-3-3 zeta, MAGE-B4 antigen, etc, were found only in the tumor-bearing mouse plasma; either secreted, shed by membrane vesicles, or externalized due to cell death. These results affirm the effectiveness of this approach for protein identification from small samples, and for comparative proteomics in potential animal models of human disorders. PMID:16212437

  2. FTIR analysis and monitoring of synthetic aviation engine oils.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mike J; Romeo, Melissa J; Rawson, Paul

    2007-10-15

    Synthetic turbine oils from military aircraft engines were analysed for antioxidant content and total acid number using infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR correlation analysis was employed to investigate and interpret observed trends in the spectra, as acid was formed and antioxidant species were depleted in the oils, as a function of aging and engine wear. Principal components and partial least squares algorithms were used and compared for the development of calibration and prediction models. Transmission IR spectrometry is demonstrated to be effective for the analysis and monitoring of synthetic aviation turbine engine oils and shown to provide rapid and accurate information as compared with traditional analytical techniques and methods. PMID:19073081

  3. Plasma prolactin and breast cancer risk: a meta- analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghao; Wu, Xiujuan; Chai, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and its incidence is on a constant rise. Previous studies suggest that higher levels of plasma prolactin are associated with escalated risk of breast cancer, however, these results are contradictory and inconclusive. PubMed and Medline were used to search and identify published observational studies that assessed the relationship between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer. The pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model. A total of 7 studies were included in our analysis. For the highest versus lowest levels of plasma prolactin, the pooled RR (95% CI) of breast cancer were 1.16 (1.04, 1.29). In subgroup analyses, we found a positive association between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer among the patients who were postmenopausal, ER+/PR+ or in situ and invasive carcinoma. However, this positive association was not detected in the premenopausal and ER-/PR- patients. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence supporting a significantly positive association between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer. PMID:27184120

  4. Plasma prolactin and breast cancer risk: a meta- analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghao; Wu, Xiujuan; Chai, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and its incidence is on a constant rise. Previous studies suggest that higher levels of plasma prolactin are associated with escalated risk of breast cancer, however, these results are contradictory and inconclusive. PubMed and Medline were used to search and identify published observational studies that assessed the relationship between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer. The pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model. A total of 7 studies were included in our analysis. For the highest versus lowest levels of plasma prolactin, the pooled RR (95% CI) of breast cancer were 1.16 (1.04, 1.29). In subgroup analyses, we found a positive association between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer among the patients who were postmenopausal, ER(+)/PR(+) or in situ and invasive carcinoma. However, this positive association was not detected in the premenopausal and ER(-)/PR(-) patients. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence supporting a significantly positive association between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer. PMID:27184120

  5. Plasma Vehicle Charging Analysis for Orion Flight Test 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, B.; Norgard, J.

    2015-01-01

    In preparation for the upcoming experimental test flight for the Orion crew module, considerable interest was raised over the possibility of exposure to elevated levels of plasma activity and vehicle charging both externally on surfaces and internally on dielectrics during the flight test orbital operations. Initial analysis using NASCAP-2K indicated very high levels of exposure, and this generated additional interest in refining/defining the plasma and spacecraft models used in the analysis. This refinement was pursued, resulting in the use of specific AE8 and AP8 models, rather than SCATHA models, as well as consideration of flight trajectory, time duration, and other parameters possibly affecting the levels of exposure and the magnitude of charge deposition. Analysis using these refined models strongly indicated that, for flight test operations, no special surface coatings were necessary for the Thermal Protection System (TPS), but would definitely be required for future GEO, trans-lunar, and extra-lunar missions.

  6. Plasma Vehicle Charging Analysis for Orion Flight Test 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallement, L.; McDonald, T.; Norgard, J.; Scully, B.

    2014-01-01

    In preparation for the upcoming experimental test flight for the Orion crew module, considerable interest was raised over the possibility of exposure to elevated levels of plasma activity and vehicle charging both externally on surfaces and internally on dielectrics during the flight test orbital operations. Initial analysis using NASCAP-2K indicated very high levels of exposure, and this generated additional interest in refining/defining the plasma and spacecraft models used in the analysis. This refinement was pursued, resulting in the use of specific AE8 and AP8 models, rather than SCATHA models, as well as consideration of flight trajectory, time duration, and other parameters possibly affecting the levels of exposure and the magnitude of charge deposition. Analysis using these refined models strongly indicated that, for flight test operations, no special surface coatings were necessary for the thermal protection system, but would definitely be required for future GEO, trans-lunar, and extra-lunar missions...

  7. Multifunctional Collaborative Modeling and Analysis Methods in Engineering Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Engineers are challenged to produce better designs in less time and for less cost. Hence, to investigate novel and revolutionary design concepts, accurate, high-fidelity results must be assimilated rapidly into the design, analysis, and simulation process. This assimilation should consider diverse mathematical modeling and multi-discipline interactions necessitated by concepts exploiting advanced materials and structures. Integrated high-fidelity methods with diverse engineering applications provide the enabling technologies to assimilate these high-fidelity, multi-disciplinary results rapidly at an early stage in the design. These integrated methods must be multifunctional, collaborative, and applicable to the general field of engineering science and mechanics. Multifunctional methodologies and analysis procedures are formulated for interfacing diverse subdomain idealizations including multi-fidelity modeling methods and multi-discipline analysis methods. These methods, based on the method of weighted residuals, ensure accurate compatibility of primary and secondary variables across the subdomain interfaces. Methods are developed using diverse mathematical modeling (i.e., finite difference and finite element methods) and multi-fidelity modeling among the subdomains. Several benchmark scalar-field and vector-field problems in engineering science are presented with extensions to multidisciplinary problems. Results for all problems presented are in overall good agreement with the exact analytical solution or the reference numerical solution. Based on the results, the integrated modeling approach using the finite element method for multi-fidelity discretization among the subdomains is identified as most robust. The multiple-method approach is advantageous when interfacing diverse disciplines in which each of the method's strengths are utilized. The multifunctional methodology presented provides an effective mechanism by which domains with diverse idealizations are

  8. The Boeing plastic analysis capability for engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The current BOPACE program is described as a nonlinear stress analysis program, which is based on a family of isoparametric finite elements. The theoretical, user, programmer, preprocessing aspects are discussed, and example problems are included. New features in the current program version include substructuring, an out-of-core Gauss wavefront equation solver, multipoint constraints, combined material and geometric nonlinearities, automatic calculation of inertia effects, provision for distributed as well as concentrated mechanical loads, follower forces, singular crack-tip elements, the SAIL automatic generation capability, and expanded user control over input quantity definition, output selection, and program execution. BOPACE is written in FORTRAN 4 and is currently available for both the IBM 360/370 and the UNIVAC 1108 machines.

  9. Asphaltene Erosion Process in Air Plasma: Emission Spectroscopy and Surface Analysis for Air-Plasma Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, H.; Flores, O.; C. Poveda, J.; Campillo, B.

    2012-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was applied for plasma characterization during the erosion of asphaltene substrates. An amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air-plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an ac generator at a frequency of 60 Hz, output power of 50 W and a gas flow rate of 1.8 L/min. The electron temperature and ion density were estimated to be 2.15±0.11 eV and (1.24±0.05) × 1016 m-3, respectively, using a double Langmuir probe. OES was employed to observe the emission from the asphaltene exposed to air plasma. Both molecular band emission from N2, N+2, OH, CH, NH, O2 as well as CN, and atomic light emission from V and Hγ were observed and used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene erosion was analyzed with the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The EDX analysis showed that the time evolution of elements C, O, S and V were similar; and the chemical composition of the exposed asphaltenes remained constant. Particle size evolution was measured, showing a maximum size of 2307 μm after 60 min. This behavior is most likely related to particle agglomeration as a function of time.

  10. Jet Engine hot parts IR Analysis Procedure (J-EIRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal radiation analysis method called Jet Engine IR Analysis Procedure (J-EIRP) was developed to evaluate jet engine cavity hot parts source radiation. The objectives behind J-EIRP were to achieve the greatest accuracy in model representation and solution, while minimizing computer resources and computational time. The computer programs that comprise J-EIRP were selected on the basis of their performance, accuracy, and flexibility to solve both simple and complex problems. These programs were intended for use on a personal computer, but include the ability to solve large problems on a mainframe or supercomputer. J-EIRP also provides the user with a tool for developing thermal design experience and engineering judgment through analysis experimentation, while using minimal computer resources. A sample jet engine cavity analysis demonstrates the procedure and capabilities within J-EIRP, and is compared to a simplified method for approximating cavity radiation. The goal is to introduce the terminology and solution process used in J-EIRP and to provide insight into the radiation heat transfer principles used in this procedure.

  11. An Analysis of the Small Engine Repair Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salsbury, Robert C.; Kline, Charles R.

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the small engine repair occupation. The document opens with a brief introduction followed by a job description. The bulk of the document is presented in table form. Sixteen duties are broken down into a…

  12. STEM: Science Technology Engineering Mathematics. State-Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Melton, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) state-level analysis provides policymakers, educators, state government officials, and others with details on the projections of STEM jobs through 2018. This report delivers a state-by-state snapshot of the demand for STEM jobs, including: (1) The number of forecast net new and…

  13. Wavelet analysis as a nonstationary plasma fluctuation diagnostic tool

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, S.; Powers, E.J.; Ouroua, A.; Heard, J.W.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Analysis of nonstationary plasma fluctuation data has been a long-time challenge for the plasma diagnostic community. For this reason, in this paper the authors present and apply wavelet transforms as a new diagnostic tool to analyze nonstationary plasma fluctuation data. Unlike the Fourier transform, which represents a given signal globally without temporal resolution, the wavelet transform provides a local representation of the given signal in the time-scale domain. The fundamental concepts and multiresolution properties of wavelet transforms, along with a brief comparison with the short-time Fourier transform, are presented in this paper. The selection of a prototype wavelet or a mother wavelet is also discussed. Digital implementation of wavelet spectral analysis, which include time-scale power spectra and scale power spectra are described. The efficacy of the wavelet approach is demonstrated by analyzing transient broadband electrostatic potential fluctuations inside the inversion radius of sawtoothing TEXT-U plasmas during electron cyclotron resonance heating. The potential signals are collected using a 2 MeV heavy ion beam probe.

  14. Linear harmonic analysis of free-piston Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Griffin, F.P.

    1986-06-01

    The equations that govern the behavior of free-piston Stirling engines are nonlinear differential equations. Traditional solution methods have been time-stepping integrations that can be plagued by numerical instabilities and can use large amounts of computer time. Closed-form analytical solutions are possible if the working gas behaves isothermally or if the nonlinear terms in the governing equations are replaced with accurate approximations. An almost closed-form solution method, called the linear harmonic analysis (LHA), has been developed for free-piston Stirling engine applications by representing all of the periodic variables with harmonic functions. The solution method accounts for the important thermodynamic losses that are coupled together in free-piston engines, yet it is efficient enough for optimization studies. The LHA method was compared with a standard numerical integration method to verify its mathematical accuracy. The LHA and numerical predictions for a sample free-piston Stirling engine configuration differed by <5% for all important parameters. Sensitivity studies using the LHA method have also shown that the thermodynamic loss assumptions used in an analysis can have a significant impact on the predicted dynamic behavior of a free-piston Stirling engine.

  15. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  16. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures is a major activity at Lewis Research Center. Recent activities have focused on extending the methods to include the combined uncertainties in several factors on structural response. This paper briefly describes recent progress on composite load spectra models, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic strength degradation modeling. Progress is described in terms of fundamental concepts, computer code development, and representative numerical results.

  17. Near Discharge Cathode Assembly Plasma Potential Measurements in a 30-cm NSTAR Type Ion Engine During Beam Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-01

    Floating emissive probe plasma potential data are presented over a two-dimensional array of locations in the near Discharge Cathode Assembly (DCA) region of a 30-cm diameter ring-cusp ion thruster. Discharge plasma data are presented with beam extraction at throttling conditions comparable to the NASA TH Levels 8, 12, and 15. The operating conditions of the Extended Life Test (ELT) of the Deep Space One (DS1) flight spare ion engine, where anomalous discharge keeper erosion occurred, were TH 8 and TH 12 consequently they are of specific interest in investigating discharge keeper erosion phenomena. The data do not validate the presence of a potential hill plasma structure downstream of the DCA, which has been proposed as a possible erosion mechanism. The data are comparable in magnitude to data taken by other researchers in ring-cusp electron-bombardment ion thrusters. The plasma potential structures are insensitive to thruster throttling level with a minimum as low as 14 V measured at the DCA exit plane and increasing gradually in the axial direction. A sharp increase in plasma potential to the bulk discharge value of 26 to 28 volts, roughly 10 mm radially from DCA centerline, was observed. Plasma potential measurements indicate a low-potential plume structure that is roughly 20 mm in diameter emanating from the discharge cathode that may be attributed to a free-standing plasma double layer.

  18. Turbine blade structural dynamic analysis. [for space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents structural dynamic analysis and test results for the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine blades. Athough these blades are designed to avoid coincidence of natural frequencies with harmonic excitation forces, the complexity of the turbine hardware, its nonlinearities and lack of information regarding the forcing function have led to fatigue failures. A comparison of single-blade analysis and test modal frequencies, shapes, and stresses is given; analysis techniques to describe the forcing function, compute dynamic responses, and incorporate the nonlinearities of Coulomb-friction dampers are presented. Recommendations are made for new research to improve forcing function computations and structural damping estimates used in the analysis.

  19. Bird impact analysis package for turbine engine fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to analyze the gross structural response of turbine engine fan blades subjected to bird strikes. The program couples a NASTRAN finite element model and modal analysis of a fan blade with a multi-mode bird impact analysis computer program. The impact analysis uses the NASTRAN blade model and a fluid jet model of the bird to interactively calculate blade loading during a bird strike event. The analysis package is computationaly efficient, easy to use and provides a comprehensive history of the gross structual blade response. Example cases are presented for a representative fan blade.

  20. Analysis of plasma wave interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 PDP data. [PDP (Plasma Diagnostics Package)

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei.

    1992-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) explored the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms of plasma waves were obtained from the PDP at frequencies from 0 to 30 kHz up to 400 m from the shuttle. These spectrograms frequently showed interference patterns caused by waves with wavelengths short compared to the antenna length (3.89 meters). Two types of interference patterns were observed in the wideband data: associated with the ejection of an electron beam from the space shuttle; associated with lower hybrid waves generated by an interaction between the neutral gas cloud around shuttle and the ambient ionospheric plasma. Analysis of these antenna interference patterns permits a determination of the wavelength, the plasma rest frame frequency, the direction of propagation, the power spectrum and in some cases the location of the source. The electric field noise associated with the electron beam was observed in the wideband data for two periods during which an electron frequency range at low frequencies (below 10 kHz) and shows clear evidence of interference patterns. The broadband low frequency noise was the dominant type of noise produced by the electron beam. The waves have a linear dispersion relation very similar to ion acoustic waves. The returning to the shuttle in response to the ejected electron beam. The waves associated with the lower hybrid resonance have rest frame frequencies near the lower hybrid frequency and propagate perpendicular to the magnetic field. The occurrence of these waves depends strongly on the PDP's position relative to the shuttle and the magnetic field direction. The authors results confirm previous identifications of these waves as lower hybrid waves and suggest they are driven by pick-up ions (H[sub 2]O[sup +]) produced by a charge exchange interaction between a water cloud around the shuttle and the ambient ionosphere.

  1. Interactive Finite Elements for General Engine Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    General nonlinear finite element codes were adapted for the purpose of analyzing the dynamics of gas turbine engines. In particular, this adaptation required the development of a squeeze-film damper element software package and its implantation into a representative current generation code. The ADINA code was selected because of prior use of it and familiarity with its internal structure and logic. This objective was met and the results indicate that such use of general purpose codes is viable alternative to specialized codes for general dynamics analysis of engines.

  2. Computational neutronic analysis of the nuclear vapor thermal rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, E.T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kuras, S.; Maya, I.; Diaz, N.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Calculational procedures and results are presented for the neutronic analysis of the Nuclear Vapor Thermal Reactor (NVTR) rocket engine. The NVTR, in a rocket engine, uses modified NERVA geometry and systems with the solid fuel replaced by highly enriched (>85%) uranium tetrafluoride (UF[sub 4]) vapor. In the NVTR, the hydrogen propellant is the primary coolant, is physically separated from the UF[sub 4] vapor (which is not circulated), is maintained at high pressure (50 to 100 atm), and exits the core at 3100 to 3500 K.

  3. Multi-source Geospatial Data Analysis with Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a cloud computing environment for data analysis that combines a public data catalog with a large-scale computational facility optimized for parallel processing of geospatial data. The data catalog is a multi-petabyte archive of georeferenced datasets that include images from Earth observing satellite and airborne sensors (examples: USGS Landsat, NASA MODIS, USDA NAIP), weather and climate datasets, and digital elevation models. Earth Engine supports both a just-in-time computation model that enables real-time preview and debugging during algorithm development for open-ended data exploration, and a batch computation mode for applying algorithms over large spatial and temporal extents. The platform automatically handles many traditionally-onerous data management tasks, such as data format conversion, reprojection, and resampling, which facilitates writing algorithms that combine data from multiple sensors and/or models. Although the primary use of Earth Engine, to date, has been the analysis of large Earth observing satellite datasets, the computational platform is generally applicable to a wide variety of use cases that require large-scale geospatial data analyses. This presentation will focus on how Earth Engine facilitates the analysis of geospatial data streams that originate from multiple separate sources (and often communities) and how it enables collaboration during algorithm development and data exploration. The talk will highlight current projects/analyses that are enabled by this functionality.https://earthengine.google.org

  4. A risk analysis model in concurrent engineering product development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Desheng Dash; Kefan, Xie; Gang, Chen; Ping, Gui

    2010-09-01

    Concurrent engineering has been widely accepted as a viable strategy for companies to reduce time to market and achieve overall cost savings. This article analyzes various risks and challenges in product development under the concurrent engineering environment. A three-dimensional early warning approach for product development risk management is proposed by integrating graphical evaluation and review technique (GERT) and failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA). Simulation models are created to solve our proposed concurrent engineering product development risk management model. Solutions lead to identification of key risk controlling points. This article demonstrates the value of our approach to risk analysis as a means to monitor various risks typical in the manufacturing sector. This article has three main contributions. First, we establish a conceptual framework to classify various risks in concurrent engineering (CE) product development (PD). Second, we propose use of existing quantitative approaches for PD risk analysis purposes: GERT, FMEA, and product database management (PDM). Based on quantitative tools, we create our approach for risk management of CE PD and discuss solutions of the models. Third, we demonstrate the value of applying our approach using data from a typical Chinese motor company. PMID:20840492

  5. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Culp

    2006-10-01

    Preparation of this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA) process as an approach for decommissioning.

  6. Wear Protection of AJ62 Mg Engine Blocks using Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng

    2011-12-01

    In order to reduce the fuel consumption and pollution, automotive companies are developing magnesium-intensive components. However, due to the low wear resistance of the magnesium (Mg) alloys, Mg cylinder bores are vulnerable to the sliding wear attack. In this thesis, two approaches were used to protect the cylinder bores, made of a new developed Mg engine alloy AJ62 (MgA16Mn0.34Sr2). The first one was to use a Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process to produce oxide coatings on the Mg bores. The wear properties of the PEO coatings were evaluated by sliding wear tests under the boundary lubrication condition at the room and elevated temperatures. It was found that due to the substrate softening and the vaporization loss of the lubricant, the tribological properties of the PEO coatings were deteriorated at the elevated temperature. In order to optimize the PEO process, a statistical method (Response surface method) was used to analyze the effects of the 4 main PEO process parameters with 2 levels for each and their interactions on the tribological properties of the PEO coatings at the room and elevated temperatures, individually. A cylinder liner made of an economical metal-matrix composite (MMC) was another approach to improve the wear resistance of the Mg cylinder bore. In this thesis, an A1383/SiO2 MMC was designed to replace the expensive Alusil alloy used in the BMW Mg/Al composite engine to build the cylinder liner. To further increase the wear resistance of the MMC, PEO process was also used to form an oxide coating on the MMC. The effects of the SiO 2 content and coating thickness on the tribological properties of the MMC were studied. To evaluate the wear properties of the optimal PEO coated Mg coupons and the MMC with the oxide coatings, Alusil and cast iron, currently used on the cylinder bores of the commercial aluminum engines, were used as reference materials. The optimal PEO coated Mg coupons and the oxidized MMC showed their advantages over the

  7. Summary of NGNP Engineering Analysis Progress in Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip M. Mills

    2010-09-01

    The Engineering Analysis work package accomplished a number of activities in FY2010 that will help to inform Licensing, R&D, and detailed design activities that will be performed during the preliminary design phase in Phase 2 of the NGNP Project. These activities were in the following areas: • Fission Product Transport • DDN Update and Consolidation • Gas Reactor Lessons Learned Review • Reactor Coolant Chemistry Control • Resilient Control Systems for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors • Water-ingress Analysis In total, the efforts associated with the Engineering Analysis work package accomplished four (4) Level 2 milestones and two (2) internal (Level 4) milestones. Details of the activities and milestones are included in the attached report.

  8. A Semantic Analysis Method for Scientific and Engineering Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a procedure to statically analyze aspects of the meaning or semantics of scientific and engineering code. The analysis involves adding semantic declarations to a user's code and parsing this semantic knowledge with the original code using multiple expert parsers. These semantic parsers are designed to recognize formulae in different disciplines including physical and mathematical formulae and geometrical position in a numerical scheme. In practice, a user would submit code with semantic declarations of primitive variables to the analysis procedure, and its semantic parsers would automatically recognize and document some static, semantic concepts and locate some program semantic errors. A prototype implementation of this analysis procedure is demonstrated. Further, the relationship between the fundamental algebraic manipulations of equations and the parsing of expressions is explained. This ability to locate some semantic errors and document semantic concepts in scientific and engineering code should reduce the time, risk, and effort of developing and using these codes.

  9. Dietary zinc depletion and repletion affects plasma proteins: an analysis of the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Wickwire, Kathie; Ho, Emily; Chung, Carolyn S.; King, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a problem worldwide. Current methods for assessing Zn status are limited to measuring plasma or serum Zn within populations suspected of deficiency. Despite the high prevalence of Zn deficiency in the human population there are no methods currently available for sensitively assessing Zn status among individuals. The purpose of this research was to utilize a proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry to identify protein biomarkers that were sensitive to changes in dietary Zn levels in humans. Proteomic analysis was performed in human plasma samples (n = 6) obtained from healthy adult male subjects that completed a dietary Zn depletion/repletion protocol, current dietary zinc intake has a greater effect on fractional zinc absorption than does longer term zinc consumption in healthy adult men. Chung et al. (Am J Clin Nutr 87 (5):1224–1229, 2008). After a 13 day Zn acclimatization period where subjects consumed a Zn-adequate diet, the male subjects consumed a marginal Zn-depleted diet for 42 days followed by consumption of a Zn-repleted diet for 28 days. The samples at baseline, end of depletion and end of repletion were pre-fractionated through immuno-affinity columns to remove 14 highly abundant proteins, and each fraction separated by 2DE. Following staining by colloidal Coomassie blue and densitometric analysis, three proteins were identified by mass spectrometry as affected by changes in dietary Zn. Fibrin β and chain E, fragment double D were observed in the plasma protein fraction that remained bound to the immuno-affinity column. An unnamed protein that was related to immunoglobulins was observed in the immunode-pleted plasma fraction. Fibrin β increased two-fold following the Zn depletion period and decreased to baseline values following the Zn repletion period; this protein may serve as a viable biomarker for Zn status in the future. PMID:23255060

  10. Platelet-rich plasma in bone regeneration: engineering the delivery for improved clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Isaac A; Growney Kalaf, Emily A; Bowlin, Gary L; Sell, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Human bone is a tissue with a fairly remarkable inherent capacity for regeneration; however, this regenerative capacity has its limitations, and defects larger than a critical size lack the ability to spontaneously heal. As such, the development and clinical translation of effective bone regeneration modalities are paramount. One regenerative medicine approach that is beginning to gain momentum in the clinical setting is the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). PRP therapy is essentially a method for concentrating platelets and their intrinsic growth factors to stimulate and accelerate a healing response. While PRP has shown some efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo scenarios, to date its use and delivery have not been optimized for bone regeneration. Issues remain with the effective delivery of the platelet-derived growth factors to a localized site of injury, the activation and temporal release of the growth factors, and the rate of growth factor clearance. This review will briefly describe the physiological principles behind PRP use and then discuss how engineering its method of delivery may ultimately impact its ability to successfully translate to widespread clinical use. PMID:25050347

  11. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Bone Regeneration: Engineering the Delivery for Improved Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Isaac A.; Growney Kalaf, Emily A.; Bowlin, Gary L.; Sell, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Human bone is a tissue with a fairly remarkable inherent capacity for regeneration; however, this regenerative capacity has its limitations, and defects larger than a critical size lack the ability to spontaneously heal. As such, the development and clinical translation of effective bone regeneration modalities are paramount. One regenerative medicine approach that is beginning to gain momentum in the clinical setting is the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). PRP therapy is essentially a method for concentrating platelets and their intrinsic growth factors to stimulate and accelerate a healing response. While PRP has shown some efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo scenarios, to date its use and delivery have not been optimized for bone regeneration. Issues remain with the effective delivery of the platelet-derived growth factors to a localized site of injury, the activation and temporal release of the growth factors, and the rate of growth factor clearance. This review will briefly describe the physiological principles behind PRP use and then discuss how engineering its method of delivery may ultimately impact its ability to successfully translate to widespread clinical use. PMID:25050347

  12. Analysis of simulated engine sounds using a psychoacoustic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvigneau, Fabian; Liefold, Steffen; Höchstetter, Marius; Verhey, Jesko L.; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is the evaluation and the prediction of the perceived quality of engine sounds, which is predicted in the design process by numerical simulations. Periodic combustion sounds of the operating engine are synthesized with the help of an overall numerical simulation approach before a real prototype exists. The perceived quality of the sound is rated in hearing tests using the method of relative comparison and absolute judgment. Results are transferred into an interval scaled ranking of the stimuli. Based on the data, a psychoacoustic model for sound quality is developed using psychoacoustic parameters. Predictions of this model are used to evaluate the sound quality of several technical design modifications, for example, different engine encapsulations. The results are visualized to allow a simple qualitative analysis of the sound perception. This results in an impartial and objective decision regarding the final design of an acoustic encapsulation with a higher perceived sound quality.

  13. Analysis of airframe/engine interactions - An integrated control perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, David K.; Schierman, John D.; Garg, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Techniques for the analysis of the dynamic interactions between airframe/engine dynamical systems are presented. Critical coupling terms are developed that determine the significance of these interactions with regard to the closed loop stability and performance of the feedback systems. A conceptual model is first used to indicate the potential sources of the coupling, how the coupling manifests itself, and how the magnitudes of these critical coupling terms are used to quantify the effects of the airframe/engine interactions. A case study is also presented involving an unstable airframe with thrust vectoring for attitude control. It is shown for this system with classical, decentralized control laws that there is little airframe/engine interaction, and the stability and performance with those control laws is not affected. Implications of parameter uncertainty in the coupling dynamics is also discussed, and effects of these parameter variations are also demonstrated to be small for this vehicle configuration.

  14. Key Reliability Drivers of Liquid Propulsion Engines and A Reliability Model for Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhao-Feng; Fint, Jeffry A.; Kuck, Frederick M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is to address the in-flight reliability of a liquid propulsion engine system for a launch vehicle. We first establish a comprehensive list of system and sub-system reliability drivers for any liquid propulsion engine system. We then build a reliability model to parametrically analyze the impact of some reliability parameters. We present sensitivity analysis results for a selected subset of the key reliability drivers using the model. Reliability drivers identified include: number of engines for the liquid propulsion stage, single engine total reliability, engine operation duration, engine thrust size, reusability, engine de-rating or up-rating, engine-out design (including engine-out switching reliability, catastrophic fraction, preventable failure fraction, unnecessary shutdown fraction), propellant specific hazards, engine start and cutoff transient hazards, engine combustion cycles, vehicle and engine interface and interaction hazards, engine health management system, engine modification, engine ground start hold down with launch commit criteria, engine altitude start (1 in. start), Multiple altitude restart (less than 1 restart), component, subsystem and system design, manufacturing/ground operation support/pre and post flight check outs and inspection, extensiveness of the development program. We present some sensitivity analysis results for the following subset of the drivers: number of engines for the propulsion stage, single engine total reliability, engine operation duration, engine de-rating or up-rating requirements, engine-out design, catastrophic fraction, preventable failure fraction, unnecessary shutdown fraction, and engine health management system implementation (basic redlines and more advanced health management systems).

  15. Analysis of a microwave-heated planar propagating hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, J.P.; Micci, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    The heating of a gas to high temperatures by absorption of microwave radiation has been proposed as a potential electrothermal rocket propulsion system. One possible mode of microwave energy absorption is by means of a planar plasma region propagating toward the source of the microwave radiation. Such a planar propagating plasma can be spatially stabilized by a gas stream flowing in the same direction as the microwave radiation with a velocity equal to the plasma propagation velocity. A one-dimensional analysis of the microwave-heated planar propagating plasma for hydrogen gas was developed to predict maximum gas temperatures and propagation velocities. The governing electromagnetic and energy equations were numerically integrated with temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of equilibrium hydrogen. The propagation velocity eigenvalue was solved by means of an iterative technique. Temperature distribution in the gas, propagation velocities, and percent power absorbed, reflected and transmitted, were obtained as a function of incident microwave power at a frequency of 2.45 GHza for hydrogen gas pressures of 1 and 10 atm. 19 references.

  16. Tiling analysis of melting in strongly-coupled dusty plasma*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suranga Ruhunusiri, W. D.; Feng, Yan; Liu, Bin; Goree, John

    2010-11-01

    A dusty plasma is an ionized gas containing micron-size particles of solid matter, which collect electrons and ions and become negatively charged. Due to large Coulomb interparticle potential energies, the microparticles represent a strongly-coupled plasma. In the absence of an external disturbance, the microparticles self-organize, arranging themselves in a crystalline lattice, due to their Coulomb interaction. If kinetic energy is added, the arrangement of microparticles becomes disordered, like atoms in a liquid. This melting process can be characterized by a proliferation of defects, which previous experimenters measured using Voronoi analysis. Here we use another method, tiling [1] to quantify defects. We demonstrate this method, which until now has been used only in simulations, in a dusty plasma experiment. A single layer of 4.83 μm polymer microparticles was electrically levitated in a glow discharge argon plasma. The lattice was melted by applying random kicks to the micoparticles from rastered laser beams. We imaged the particle positions and computed the corresponding tiling for both the crystalline lattice and liquid states. [1] Matthew A. Glaser, Phys. Rev A 41, 4585 (1990) ^*Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  17. Engineering considerations for the self-energizing magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) - type fusion plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chan K.; Cox, Larry T., Jr.

    1994-08-01

    With a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) device as the central concept, studies have been done to determine its feasibility as a propulsion system for space. In this report, past work in the areas of propulsion system code development is discussed, as well as the recent work dealing with stability analysis and scaling laws in the pinch region. A modeling based on a tokamak-like m=O instability relating to the electron drift velocity wavelength is established. Magnetic field and kinetic temperature profiles are calculated based in certain assumptions about the plasma. It is found that the results of the pinch equilibrium profiles agree with the assumed current-squared scaling of kinetic temperature density, and that the total fusion power released from the pinch scales as: Pf Ip(5.4). This is found to correlate well with the reaction rate parameter data for the utilized fuel of deuterium and helium -3. The resulting profile shape for kinetic temperature agrees in form with the proposed modeling. Using the more detailed pinch calculations in the already existent DPF propulsion code, it is found that for optimal performance a current range of 30 to 40 (MA) is needed to obtain results found in earlier work.

  18. Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic-Bypass Hypersonic Airbreathing Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Cole, J. W.; Bityurin, V. A.; Lineberry, J. T.

    2000-01-01

    The prospects for realizing a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) bypass hypersonic airbreathing engine are examined from the standpoint of fundamental thermodynamic feasibility. The MHD-bypass engine, first proposed as part of the Russian AJAX vehicle concept, is based on the idea of redistributing energy between various stages of the propulsion system flow train. The system uses an MHD generator to extract a portion of the aerodynamic heating energy from the inlet and an MHD accelerator to reintroduce this power as kinetic energy in the exhaust stream. In this way, the combustor entrance Mach number can be limited to a specified value even as the flight Mach number increases. Thus, the fuel and air can be efficiently mixed and burned within a practical combustor length, and the flight Mach number operating envelope can be extended. In this paper, we quantitatively assess the performance potential and scientific feasibility of MHD-bypass engines using a simplified thermodynamic analysis. This cycle analysis, based on a thermally and calorically perfect gas, incorporates a coupled MHD generator-accelerator system and accounts for aerodynamic losses and thermodynamic process efficiencies in the various engin components. It is found that the flight Mach number range can be significantly extended; however, overall performance is hampered by non-isentropic losses in the MHD devices.

  19. Analysis of Particle Detectors in Plasma Sheaths on Sounding Rockets and in Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lisa; Lynch, Kristina

    2013-10-01

    The influence of plasma sheaths on particle measurements is a well-known problem. Improvements in computational speed and memory have made the use of particle-in-cell codes, attainable on a laptop. These codes can calculate complex sheath structures and include most of the relevant physics. We will discuss how the use of one such code, SPIS, has been integrated into our data processing for the MICA sounding rocket. This inclusion of sheath physics has allowed us to describe the current-voltage signature of an ion retarding potential analyzer, called the PIP, to measure the ambient ionospheric temperature, as well as to examine the possibility of ion upflow. These results will be compared with the other instrumentation on MICA, which use traditional thin-sheath approximations. This comparison will emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of these other data analysis methods and call attention to the need to include sheath physics when measuring very low energy populations. Additionally, these instruments have also been tested in the Dartmouth College plasma facility. This provides another set of plasma conditions for testing and extrapolating our method to a future low-orbit mission.

  20. Analysis of plasma and urinary tea polyphenols in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Wang, Z Y; Li, H; Chen, L; Sun, Y; Gobbo, S; Balentine, D A; Yang, C S

    1995-06-01

    Tea has been shown to inhibit chemically induced tumorigenesis in many animal models, but the effects of tea consumption on human carcinogenesis are not conclusive. In order to develop biomarkers for tea consumption, we developed methods for the analysis of tea polyphenols in human plasma and urine samples using HPLC with the coulochem electrode array detection system. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), and (-)-epicatechin (EC) are the major polyphenols in green tea. Most of the tea polyphenols were in their conjugated forms in the plasma and urine. The samples were incubated with a mixture of beta-glucuronidase and sulfatase to generate the free form of tea polyphenols. After extraction into ethyl acetate and separation by reversed-phase chromatography, EGCG, EGC, and EC were identified on the basis of their retention times and electrochemical characteristics. Due to the high selectivity of the detection mode, interference was minimized. Good quantitative relationships were established for a large concentration range of tea polyphenols. The limits of detection for EGCG, EGC, ECG, and EC were from 0.5 to 1.5 ng/ml of plasma or urine sample. After ingestion of 1.2 g of decaffeinated green tea in warm water, the plasma samples collected at 1 h from 4 human volunteers contained 46-268 ng/ml of EGCG, 82-206 ng/ml of EGC, and 48-80 ng/ml of EC. ECG was not detected in plasma samples. The maximum urinary excretion of EGC and EC occurred at 3-6 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7655336

  1. Reverse engineering for biologically inspired cognitive architectures: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Schierwagen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Research initiatives on both sides of the Atlantic try to utilize the operational principles of organisms and brains to develop biologically inspired, artificial cognitive systems. This paper describes the standard way bio-inspiration is gained, i.e. decompositional analysis or reverse engineering. The indisputable complexity of brain and mind raise the issue of whether they can be understood by applying the standard method. Using Robert Rosen's modeling relation, the scientific analysis method itself is made a subject of discussion. It is concluded that the fundamental assumption of cognitive science, i.e. complex cognitive systems are decomposable, must be abandoned. Implications for investigations of organisms and behavior as well as for engineering artificial cognitive systems are discussed. PMID:21744214

  2. Theory and application of experimental model analysis in earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncarz, P. D.

    The feasibility and limitations of small-scale model studies in earthquake engineering research and practice is considered with emphasis on dynamic modeling theory, a study of the mechanical properties of model materials, the development of suitable model construction techniques and an evaluation of the accuracy of prototype response prediction through model case studies on components and simple steel and reinforced concrete structures. It is demonstrated that model analysis can be used in many cases to obtain quantitative information on the seismic behavior of complex structures which cannot be analyzed confidently by conventional techniques. Methodologies for model testing and response evaluation are developed in the project and applications of model analysis in seismic response studies on various types of civil engineering structures (buildings, bridges, dams, etc.) are evaluated.

  3. Experimental Evaluation of SI Engine Operation Supplemented by Hydrogen Rich Gas from a Compact Plasma Boosted Reformer

    SciTech Connect

    J. B. Green, Jr.; N. Domingo; J. M. E. Storey; R.M. Wagner; J.S. Armfield; L. Bromberg; D. R. Cohn; A. Rabinovich; N. Alexeev

    2000-06-19

    It is well known that hydrogen addition to spark-ignited (SI) engines can reduce exhaust emissions and increase efficiency. Micro plasmatron fuel converters can be used for onboard generation of hydrogen-rich gas by partial oxidation of a wide range of fuels. These plasma-boosted microreformers are compact, rugged, and provide rapid response. With hydrogen supplement to the main fuel, SI engines can run very lean resulting in a large reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions relative to stoichiometric combustion without a catalytic converter. This paper presents experimental results from a microplasmatron fuel converter operating under variable oxygen to carbon ratios. Tests have also been carried out to evaluate the effect of the addition of a microplasmatron fuel converter generated gas in a 1995 2.3-L four-cylinder SI production engine. The tests were performed with and without hydrogen-rich gas produced by the plasma boosted fuel converter with gasoline. A one hundred fold reduction in NO x due to very lean operation was obtained under certain conditions. An advantage of onboard plasma-boosted generation of hydrogen-rich gas is that it is used only when required and can be readily turned on and off. Substantial NO x reduction should also be obtainable by heavy exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) facilitated by use of hydrogen-rich gas with stoichiometric operation.

  4. Satellite power system: Engineering and economic analysis summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A system engineering and economic analysis was conducted to establish typical reference baselines for the photovoltaic, solar thermal, and nuclear satellite power systems. Tentative conclusions indicate that feasibility and economic viability are characteristic of the Satellite Power System. Anticipated technology related to manufacturing, construction, and maintenance operations is described. Fuel consumption, environmental effects, and orbital transfer are investigated. Space shuttles, local space transportation, and the heavy lift launch vehicle required are also discussed.

  5. Failure analysis of a Stirling engine heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Cairelli, James E.; Khalili, Kaveh

    1989-01-01

    Failure analysis was conducted on a heat pipe from a Stirling Engine test rig which was designed to operate at 1073 K. Premature failure had occurred due to localized overheating at the leading edge of the evaporator fin. It was found that a crack had allowed air to enter the fin and react with the sodium coolant. The origin of the crack was found to be located at the inner surface of the Inconel 600 fin where severe intergranular corrosion had taken place.

  6. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  7. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  8. A CAD/CAE analysis of photographic and engineering data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. Michael; Peterson, Wayne L.

    1987-01-01

    In the investigation of the STS 51L accident, NASA engineers were given the task of visual analysis of photographic data extracted from the tracking cameras located at the launch pad. An analysis of the rotations associated with the right Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) was also performed. The visual analysis involved pinpointing coordinates of specific areas on the photographs. The objective of the analysis on the right SRB was to duplicate the rotations provided by the SRB rate gyros and to determine the effects of the rotations on the launch configuration. To accomplish the objectives, computer aided design and engineering was employed. The solid modeler, GEOMOD, inside the Structural Dynamics Research Corp. I-DEAS package, proved invaluable. The problem areas that were encountered and the corresponding solutions that were obtained are discussed. A brief description detailing the construction of the computer generated solid model of the STS launch configuration is given. A discussion of the coordinate systems used in the analysis is provided for the purpose of positioning the model in coordinate space. The techniques and theory used in the model analysis are described.

  9. Advanced Vibration Analysis Tool Developed for Robust Engine Rotor Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to develop vibration analysis tools, design tools, and design strategies to significantly improve the safety and robustness of turbine engine rotors. Bladed disks in turbine engines always feature small, random blade-to-blade differences, or mistuning. Mistuning can lead to a dramatic increase in blade forced-response amplitudes and stresses. Ultimately, this results in high-cycle fatigue, which is a major safety and cost concern. In this research program, the necessary steps will be taken to transform a state-of-the-art vibration analysis tool, the Turbo- Reduce forced-response prediction code, into an effective design tool by enhancing and extending the underlying modeling and analysis methods. Furthermore, novel techniques will be developed to assess the safety of a given design. In particular, a procedure will be established for using natural-frequency curve veerings to identify ranges of operating conditions (rotational speeds and engine orders) in which there is a great risk that the rotor blades will suffer high stresses. This work also will aid statistical studies of the forced response by reducing the necessary number of simulations. Finally, new strategies for improving the design of rotors will be pursued.

  10. Scaling of Microcavity Plasmas Toward 1 µm. Science and Engineering of Spatially-Confined, Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, J. G.

    2012-03-07

    The DOE has provided, by means of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), $146,400 in funding for the purchase of scientific equipment. Specifically, these funds have enabled the purchase of two scientific cameras that have already been applied to the research in microcavity plasmas at the University of Illinois (Urbana). The first camera system that was purchased with these funds is a gated ICCD system that allows events as short as 5 ns in time to be captured. It is difficult to express the impact that this equipment has already had on our research. Despite having arrived just 6 - 7 months ago, this camera system has already been used by five graduate students and several undergraduates to capture phenomena that we simply could not see in the past. As an example, the low temperature plasma confined to a spiral structure we fabricate in the Al/Al₂O₃ materials system appears, on long time scales such as those we see with our eyes, to be spatially uniform. However, when captured with the new camera system, the plasma actually is formed initially at the center of the spiral and then moves radially (literally, "jumping" over channels as it goes) at a velocity of a few km/sec. This is an exciting result and I should add that the camera shows that plasma standing waves are produced in some of the structures as well. We do not currently understand all of the phenomena we are witnessing but it is obvious that this new system has quite literally opened new areas of plasma research and application. The second system purchased under this ARRA grant is an infrared system that is far more sensitive than anything our laboratory (or the University of Illinois, for that matter) has had previously. Although fewer experiments have been completed to date with this second camera, it is already clear that it is, indeed, extremely sensitive and it is slated for several experiments in the near future in which we will be measuring the infrared spectra of several arrays of

  11. Covalent immobilisation of VEGF on plasma-coated electrospun scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Guex, A G; Hegemann, D; Giraud, M N; Tevaearai, H T; Popa, A M; Rossi, R M; Fortunato, G

    2014-11-01

    Recent findings in the field of biomaterials and tissue engineering provide evidence that surface immobilised growth factors display enhanced stability and induce prolonged function. Cell response can be regulated by material properties and at the site of interest. To this end, we developed scaffolds with covalently bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and evaluated their mitogenic effect on endothelial cells in vitro. Nano- (254±133 nm) or micro-fibrous (4.0±0.4 μm) poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) non-wovens were produced by electrospinning and coated in a radio frequency (RF) plasma process to induce an oxygen functional hydrocarbon layer. Implemented carboxylic acid groups were converted into amine-reactive esters and covalently coupled to VEGF by forming stable amide bonds (standard EDC/NHS chemistry). Substrates were analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), enzyme-linked immuno-assays (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry (anti-VEGF antibody and VEGF-R2 binding). Depending on the reaction conditions, immobilised VEGF was present at 127±47 ng to 941±199 ng per substrate (6mm diameter; concentrations of 4.5 ng mm(-2) or 33.3 ng mm(-2), respectively). Immunohistochemistry provided evidence for biological integrity of immobilised VEGF. Endothelial cell number of primary endothelial cells or immortalised endothelial cells were significantly enhanced on VEGF-functionalised scaffolds compared to native PCL scaffolds. This indicates a sustained activity of immobilised VEGF over a culture period of nine days. We present a versatile method for the fabrication of growth factor-loaded scaffolds at specific concentrations. PMID:25454657

  12. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The following tasks on the study of advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are described: (1) constructions of special elements which contain traction-free circular boundaries; (2) formulation of new version of mixed variational principles and new version of hybrid stress elements; (3) establishment of methods for suppression of kinematic deformation modes; (4) construction of semiLoof plate and shell elements by assumed stress hybrid method; and (5) elastic-plastic analysis by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  13. Engineering approach for elastic-plastic fracture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V; German, M D; Shih, C F

    1981-07-01

    This report for RP1237-1 presents formulas, charts, and background material that allow calculation of safety margins in ductile structures containing flaws. It is intended as a reference book for engineers who are concerned with design and analysis of flawed structures. The work extends the analysis procedures already available for brittle elastic materials to the tough and ductile steels used in the construction of pressure-boundary components. These new elastic-plastic methods more accurately describe the behavior of ductile materials and show more tolerance to flaws than the elastic methods contained in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and the Code of Federal Regulations.

  14. Multi-Level Analysis of Pulsed Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present study explores some issues concerning the operational performance of pulsed detonation engines. Zero-, one- and two-dimensional, transient models are employed in a synergistic manner to elucidate the various characteristics that can be expected from each level of analysis. The zero-dimensional model provides rapid parametric trends that help to identify the global characteristics of pulsed detonation engines. The one-dimensional model adds key wave propagation issues that are omitted in the zero-dimensional model and helps to assess its limitations. Finally, the two-dimensional model allows estimates of the first-order multi-dimensional effects and provides an initial multi-dimensional end-correction for the one-dimensional model. The zero-dimensional results indicate that the pulsed detonation engine is competitive with a rocket engine when exhausting to vacuum conditions. At finite back pressures, the PDE out-performs the rocket if the combustion pressure rise from the detonation is added to the chamber pressure in the rocket. If the two peak pressures are the same, the rocket performance is higher. Two-dimensional corrections added to the one-dimensional model result in a modest improvement in predicted specific impulse over the constant pressure boundary condition.

  15. Performance analysis for second-design space Stirling engine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Sachio; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Eguchi, Kunihisa; Nakamura, Yoshihiro

    A hybrid free-piston Stirling research engine, called NALSEM 125, has been tested since 1988 as part of a solar dynamic power technology program. It is a gamma-type Stirling driven linear-alternator machine with helium as a working fluid. The objective of the experimental program is to understand the thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms of the free piston engine integrated with a magnet-moving alternator. After the first phase engine experiments of NALSEM 125, a second design Stirling engine of NALSEM 125 R has been tested. By using a second-order analytical tool, some design modifications were performed to provide much more stable dynamic operations over a required operating range, as well as to incorporate an electric heater head simulating a hot interface of 12 sodium heat pipes. Describes in this paper are thermodynamic performance data of NALSEM 125R operations, which are also compared with the computational analysis, considering the power losses resulting from pressure drop and gas leakage.

  16. [Application of PCA to diesel engine oil spectrometric analysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Tian, Hong-Xiang; Guo, Wen-Yong

    2010-03-01

    In order to study wear characteristics of a 6-cylinder diesel engine, six different working statuses were arranged by altering the clearance between cylinder and piston. Sixty-nine oil samples were taken from engine at different loads under 6 working statuses and analyzed by Spectroil M Instrument made in US. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to analyzing spectrometric data of sixty-nine oil samples and clustering those data according to elements and oil samples separately based on the weighted coefficient and principal component scores. All 21 elements were used in element clustering and only 6 wear-related elements, namely iron, chromium, aluminum, copper, plumbum and silicon, were used in sample clustering. It is shown that PCA effectively clustered oil spectrometric data into three different principal components according to elements. The projection of two different principal components exhibited five types of elements combinations, namely wear elements (Fe, Cr, Cu, Al and Pb), high concentration additives elements (Na, Zn, P, Ca and Mg), low concentration additives elements (Ba and B), base constituent of lubricating oils (C and H) and interferential elements (Ni, Ti, Mo, V, Ag and Sn). Furthermore, PCA clearly clustered oil samples according to different clearance between cylinder and piston in the diesel engine. The study suggests that analyzing oil spectrographic data by PCA could find the sources of different elements, monitor engine conditions and diagnose wear faults. PMID:20496708

  17. Probabilistic Analysis of International Space Station Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddell, B.; Alred, J.; Kramer, L.; Mikatarian, R.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2005-12-01

    To date, the International Space Station (ISS) has been one of the largest objects flown in lower earth orbit (LEO). The ISS utilizes high voltage solar arrays (160V) that are negatively grounded leading to pressurized elements that can float negatively with respect to the plasma. Because laboratory measurements indicate a dielectric breakdown potential difference of 80V, arcing could occur on the ISS structure. To overcome the possibility of arcing and clamp the potential of the structure, two Plasma Contactor Units (PCUs) were designed, built, and flown. Also a limited amount of measurements of the floating potential for the present ISS configuration were made by a Floating Potential Probe (FPP), indicating a minimum potential of -24 Volts at the measurement location. A predictive tool, the ISS Plasma Interaction Model (PIM) has been developed accounting for the solar array electron collection, solar array mast wire and effective conductive area on the structure. The model has been used for predictions of the present ISS configuration. The conductive area has been inferred based on available floating potential measurements. Analysis of FPP and PCU data indicated distribution of the conductive area along the Russian segment of the ISS structure. A significant input to PIM is the plasma environment. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI 2001) was initially used to obtain plasma temperature and density values. However, IRI provides mean parameters, leading to difficulties in interpretation of on-orbit data, especially at eclipse exit where maximum charging can occur. This limits our predicative capability. Satellite and Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) data of plasma parameters have also been collected. Approximately 130,000 electron temperature (Te) and density (Ne) pairs for typical ISS eclipse exit conditions have been extracted from the reduced Langmuir probe data flown aboard the NASA DE-2 satellite. Additionally, another 18,000 Te and Ne pairs of ISR data

  18. Systems analysis in environmental engineering: how far should we go?

    PubMed

    Gujer, W

    2004-01-01

    Systems analysis is identified as a unifying topic of environmental engineering. Based on a questionnaire sent out to peers and based on the experience with an advanced systems analysis course the possible content and association of the content with bachelor and master's programs is discussed. At the bachelor's level it is concluded that an array of topics should be introduced more in an inductive way, going along with the discussion of examples. At the master's level it is suggested that a substantial course, which systematically introduces a broad variety of systems analysis tools, is provided. Such a course should go along with the introduction of a simulation tool, which supports application of systems analysis methods. PMID:15193092

  19. A conceptual design tool for RBCC engine performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, John R.; Saks, Greg

    1997-01-01

    Future reusable launch vehicles will depend on new propulsion technologies to lower system operational costs while maintaining adequate performance. Recently, a number of vehicle systems utilizing rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion have been proposed as possible low-cost space launch solutions. Vehicles using RBCC propulsion have the potential to combine the best aspects of airbreathing propulsion (high average Isp) with the best aspects of rocket propulsion (high propellant bulk density and engine T/W). Proper conceptual assessment of each proposed vehicle will require computer-based tools that allow for quick and cheap, yet sufficiently accurate disciplinary analyses. At Georgia Tech, a spreadsheet-based tool has been developed that uses quasi-1D flow analysis with component efficiencies to parametrically model RBCC engine performance in ejector, fan-ramjet, ramjet and pure rocket modes. The technique is similar to an earlier RBCC modeling technique developed by the Marquardt Corporation in the mid-1960's. For a given sea-level static thrust requirement, the current tool generates engine weight and size data, as well as Isp and thrust data vs. altitude and Mach number. The latter is output in tabular form for use in a trajectory optimization program. This paper reviews the current state of the RBCC analysis tool and the effort to upgrade it from a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet to a design-oriented UNIX program in C suitable for integration into a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) framework.

  20. A conceptual design tool for RBCC engine performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Olds, J.R.; Saks, G.

    1997-01-01

    Future reusable launch vehicles will depend on new propulsion technologies to lower system operational costs while maintaining adequate performance. Recently, a number of vehicle systems utilizing rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion have been proposed as possible low-cost space launch solutions. Vehicles using RBCC propulsion have the potential to combine the best aspects of airbreathing propulsion (high average Isp) with the best aspects of rocket propulsion (high propellant bulk density and engine T/W). Proper conceptual assessment of each proposed vehicle will require computer-based tools that allow for quick and cheap, yet sufficiently accurate disciplinary analyses. At Georgia Tech, a spreadsheet-based tool has been developed that uses quasi-1D flow analysis with component efficiencies to parametrically model RBCC engine performance in ejector, fan-ramjet, ramjet and pure rocket modes. The technique is similar to an earlier RBCC modeling technique developed by the Marquardt Corporation in the mid-1960{close_quote}s. For a given sea-level static thrust requirement, the current tool generates engine weight and size data, as well as Isp and thrust data vs. altitude and Mach number. The latter is output in tabular form for use in a trajectory optimization program. This paper reviews the current state of the RBCC analysis tool and the effort to upgrade it from a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet to a design-oriented UNIX program in C suitable for integration into a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) framework. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Thought analysis on self-organization theories of MHD plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Sato, Tetsuya

    1992-08-01

    A thought analysis on the self-organization theories of dissipative MHD plasmas is presented to lead to three groups of theories that lead to the same relaxed state of del x B = lambda(B), in order to find an essential physical picture embedded in the self-organization phenomena due to nonlinear and dissipative processes. The self-organized relaxed state due to the dissipation by the Ohm loss is shown to be formulated generally as the state such that yields the minimum dissipation rate of global auto- and/or cross-correlations between two quantities in j, B, and A for their own instantaneous values of the global correlations.

  2. Engine cyclic durability by analysis and material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Halford, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of calculating turbine engine component durability is addressed. Nonlinear, finite-element structural analyses, cyclic constitutive behavior models, and an advanced creep-fatigue life prediction method called strainrange partitioning were assessed for their applicability to the solution of durability problems in hot-section components of gas turbine engines. Three different component or subcomponent geometries are examined: a stress concentration in a turbine disk; a louver lip of a half-scale combustor liner; and a squealer tip of a first-stage high-pressure turbine blade. Cyclic structural analyses were performed for all three problems. The computed strain-temperature histories at the critical locations of the combustor linear and turbine blade components were imposed on smooth specimens in uniaxial, strain-controlled, thermomechanical fatigue tests of evaluate the structural and life analysis methods.

  3. Qualitative and temporal reasoning in engine behavior analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, W. E.; Stamps, M. E.; Ali, M.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulation models, engine experts, and experimental data are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of abnormal engine behavior. Engine parameters monitored during operation are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of actual engine behavior. Similarities between the representations of failure scenarios and the actual engine behavior are used to diagnose fault conditions which have already occurred, or are about to occur; to increase the surveillance by the monitoring system of relevant engine parameters; and to predict likely future engine behavior.

  4. Plasma-assisted heterogeneous catalysis for NOx reduction in lean-burn engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wan, C.Z.; Rice, G.W.; Voss, K.E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the combination of a plasma with a catalyst to improve the reduction of NO{sub x} under lean-burn conditions. The authors have been investigating the effects of a plasma on the NO{sub x} reduction activity and temperature operating window of various catalytic materials. One of the goals is to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between the gas-phase plasma chemistry and the heterogeneous chemistry on the catalyst surface. The authors have observed that plasma assisted heterogeneous catalysis can facilitate NO{sub x} reduction under conditions that normally make it difficult for either the plasma or the catalyst to function by itself. By systematically varying the plasma electrode and catalyst configuration, they have been able to elucidate the process by which the plasma chemistry affects the chemical reduction of NO{sub x} on the catalyst surface. They have discovered that the main effect of the plasma is to induce the gas-phase oxidation of NO to NO{sub 21}. The reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} is then accomplished by heterogeneous reaction of O with activated hydrocarbons on the catalyst surface. The use of a plasma opens the opportunity for a new class of catalysts that are potentially more durable, more active, more selective and more sulfur-tolerant compared to conventional lean-NO{sub x} catalysts.

  5. The engine design engine. A clustered computer platform for the aerodynamic inverse design and analysis of a full engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, J.; Pischel, K.; Hubler, D.

    1992-01-01

    An application for parallel computation on a combined cluster of powerful workstations and supercomputers was developed. A Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) is used as message passage language on a macro-tasking parallelization of the Aerodynamic Inverse Design and Analysis for a Full Engine computer code. The heterogeneous nature of the cluster is perfectly handled by the controlling host machine. Communication is established via Ethernet with the TCP/IP protocol over an open network. A reasonable overhead is imposed for internode communication, rendering an efficient utilization of the engaged processors. Perhaps one of the most interesting features of the system is its versatile nature, that permits the usage of the computational resources available that are experiencing less use at a given point in time.

  6. Multiphysics Engineering Analysis for an Integrated Design of ITER Diagnostic First Wall and Diagnostic Shield Module Design

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; Loesser, G.; Smith, M.; Udintsev, V.; Giacomin, T., T.; Khodak, A.; Johnson, D,; Feder, R,

    2015-07-01

    ITER diagnostic first walls (DFWs) and diagnostic shield modules (DSMs) inside the port plugs (PPs) are designed to protect diagnostic instrument and components from a harsh plasma environment and provide structural support while allowing for diagnostic access to the plasma. The design of DFWs and DSMs are driven by 1) plasma radiation and nuclear heating during normal operation 2) electromagnetic loads during plasma events and associate component structural responses. A multi-physics engineering analysis protocol for the design has been established at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and it was used for the design of ITER DFWs and DSMs. The analyses were performed to address challenging design issues based on resultant stresses and deflections of the DFW-DSM-PP assembly for the main load cases. ITER Structural Design Criteria for In-Vessel Components (SDC-IC) required for design by analysis and three major issues driving the mechanical design of ITER DFWs are discussed. The general guidelines for the DSM design have been established as a result of design parametric studies.

  7. Ice Particle Analysis of the Honeywell AL502 Engine Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Rigby, David L.

    2015-01-01

    A flow and ice particle trajectory analysis was performed for the booster of the Honeywell ALF502 engine. The analysis focused on two closely related conditions one of which produced an icing event and another which did not during testing of the ALF502 engine in the Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The flow analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn GlennHT flow solver and the particle analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D v3.63 ice accretion software. The inflow conditions for the two conditions were similar with the main differences being that the condition that produced the icing event was 6.8 K colder than the non-icing event case and the inflow ice water content (IWC) for the non-icing event case was 50% less than for the icing event case. The particle analysis, which considered sublimation, evaporation and phase change, was generated for a 5 micron ice particle with a sticky impact model and for a 24 micron median volume diameter (MVD), 7 bin ice particle distribution with a supercooled large droplet (SLD) splash model used to simulate ice particle breakup. The particle analysis did not consider the effect of the runback and re-impingement of water resulting from the heated spinner and anti-icing system. The results from the analysis showed that the amount of impingement for the components were similar for the same particle size and impact model for the icing and non-icing event conditions. This was attributed to the similar aerodynamic conditions in the booster for the two cases. The particle temperature and melt fraction were higher at the same location and particle size for the non-icing event than for the icing event case due to the higher incoming inflow temperature for the non-event case. The 5 micron ice particle case produced higher impact temperatures and higher melt fractions on the components downstream of the fan than the 24 micron MVD case because the average particle size generated by the particle

  8. Dependence of LTX plasma performance on surface conditions as determined by in situ analysis of plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.; Abrams, T.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Jaworski, M. A.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) diagnostic has been implemented on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at PPPL, providing the first in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface characterization of tokamak plasma facing components (PFCs). MAPP samples were exposed to argon glow discharge conditioning (GDC), lithium evaporations, and hydrogen tokamak discharges inside LTX. Samples were analyzed with XPS, and alterations to surface conditions were correlated against observed LTX plasma performance changes. Argon GDC caused the accumulation of nm-scale metal oxide layers on the PFC surface, which appeared to bury surface carbon and oxygen contamination and thus improve plasma performance. Lithium evaporation led to the rapid formation of a lithium oxide (Li2O) surface; plasma performance was strongly improved for sufficiently thick evaporative coatings. Results indicate that a 5 h argon GDC or a 50 nm evaporative lithium coating will both significantly improve LTX plasma performance.

  9. Engineering Education Research in "European Journal of Engineering Education" and "Journal of Engineering Education": Citation and Reference Discipline Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.; Williams, Bill; Neto, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The authors, citations and content of "European Journal of Engineering Education" ("EJEE") and "Journal of Engineering Education" ("JEE") in 1973 ("JEE," 1975 "EJEE"), 1983, 1993, 2003, and available 2013 issues were analysed. Both journals transitioned from house organs to become…

  10. Linear Analysis of Drift Ballooning Modes in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangri, Varun; Kritz, Arnold; Rafiq, Tariq; Pankin, Alexei

    2012-10-01

    The H-mode pedestal structure depends on the linear stability of drift ballooning modes (DBMs) in many H-mode pedestal models. Integrated modeling that uses these pedestal models requires fast evaluation of linear stability of DBMs. Linear analysis of DBMs is also needed in the computations of effective diffusivities associated with anomalous transport that is driven by the DBMs in tokamak edge plasmas. In this study several numerical techniques of linear analysis of the DBMs are investigated. Differentiation matrix based spectral methods are used to compute the physical eigenvalues of the DBMs. The model for DBMs used here consists of six differential equations [T. Rafiq et al. Phys. Plasmas, 17, 082511, (2010)]. It is important to differentiate among non-physical (numerical) modes and physical modes. The determination of the number of eigenvalues is solved by a computation of the `nearest' and `ordinal' distances. The Finite Difference, Hermite and Sinc based differentiation matrices are used. It is shown that spectral collocation methods are more accurate than finite difference methods. The technique that has been developed for calculating eigenvalues is quite general and is relevant in the computation of other modes that utilize the ballooning mode formalism.

  11. DBD Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in Air Vehicles and Jet Engines - Simulation of Flight Conditions in Test Chambers by Density Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma actuators for active flow control in aircraft and jet engines need to be tested in the laboratory to characterize their performance at flight operating conditions. DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet electronically by creating weakly ionized plasma, therefore their performance is affected by gas discharge properties, which, in turn, depend on the pressure and temperature at the actuator placement location. Characterization of actuators is initially performed in a laboratory chamber without external flow. The pressure and temperature at the actuator flight operation conditions need to be simultaneously set in the chamber. A simplified approach is desired. It is assumed that the plasma discharge depends only on the gas density, while other temperature effects are assumed to be negligible. Therefore, tests can be performed at room temperature with chamber pressure set to yield the same density as in operating flight conditions. The needed chamber pressures are shown for altitude flight of an air vehicle and for jet engines at sea-level takeoff and altitude cruise conditions. Atmospheric flight conditions are calculated from standard atmosphere with and without shock waves. The engine data was obtained from four generic engine models; 300-, 150-, and 50-passenger (PAX) aircraft engines, and a military jet-fighter engine. The static and total pressure, temperature, and density distributions along the engine were calculated for sea-level takeoff and for altitude cruise conditions. The corresponding chamber pressures needed to test the actuators were calculated. The results show that, to simulate engine component flows at in-flight conditions, plasma actuator should be tested over a wide range of pressures. For the four model engines the range is from 12.4 to 0.03 atm, depending on the placement of the actuator in the engine. For example, if a DBD plasma actuator is to be placed at the compressor exit of a 300 PAX engine, it

  12. High-throughput analysis and protein engineering using microcapillary arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bob; Lim, Sungwon; Kannan, Arvind; Alford, Spencer C; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel; Dimov, Ivan K; Baer, Thomas M; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    We describe a multipurpose technology platform, termed μSCALE (microcapillary single-cell analysis and laser extraction), that enables massively parallel, quantitative biochemical and biophysical measurements on millions of protein variants expressed from yeast or bacteria. μSCALE spatially segregates single cells within a microcapillary array, enabling repeated imaging, cell growth and protein expression. We performed high-throughput analysis of cells and their protein products using a range of fluorescent assays, including binding-affinity measurements and dynamic enzymatic assays. A precise laser-based extraction method allows rapid recovery of live clones and their genetic material from microcapillaries for further study. With μSCALE, we discovered a new antibody against a clinical cancer target, evolved a fluorescent protein biosensor and engineered an enzyme to reduce its sensitivity to its inhibitor. These protein analysis and engineering applications each have unique assay requirements and different host organisms, highlighting the flexibility and technical capabilities of the μSCALE platform. PMID:26641932

  13. Analysis of hydrocarbon emissions from conventional spark-ignition engines

    SciTech Connect

    Shyy, W.

    1982-01-01

    The quench layer on the cylinder wall of a spark-ignition engine is modeled for the case where a tangential or swirl velocity exists. Both asymptotic and numerical methods of solution are used. The usual two layer structure is employed for the turbulent boundary layer and Crocco's integral is used to relate the temperature and velocity fields. The quench layer is defined as the region in which the temperature is less than an ignition temperature. In the first analysis only quenching is considered, and it is shown that the resulting concentration of hydrocarbons is much too high compared ot experimental results. Next, the model is extended to allow diffusion, and it is shown that in one stroke time the majority of the mass of unburned mixture in the original quench layer has diffused out and burned. Finally, tow means of replenishing the unburned mixture in the quench layer, consisting of the desorbing of fuel from the oil film and outgassing from the first ring crevice, are included in the model. Calculations are carried out using parameters associated with a typical production engine. Variations of unburned HC in the exhaust with several important engine parameters are presented. In eahc case, the trends of the calculated data agree with those found experimentally.

  14. Engineering Aerothermal Analysis for X-34 Thermal Protection System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, Kathryn E.; Riley, Christopher J.; Zoby, E. Vincent

    1998-01-01

    Design of the thermal protection system for any hypersonic flight vehicle requires determination of both the peak temperatures over the surface and the heating-rate history along the flight profile. In this paper, the process used to generate the aerothermal environments required for the X-34 Testbed Technology Demonstrator thermal protection system design is described as it has evolved from a relatively simplistic approach based on engineering methods applied to critical areas to one of detailed analyses over the entire vehicle. A brief description of the trajectory development leading to the selection of the thermal protection system design trajectory is included. Comparisons of engineering heating predictions with wind-tunnel test data and with results obtained using a Navier- Stokes flowfield code and an inviscid/boundary layer method are shown. Good agreement is demonstrated among all these methods for both the ground-test condition and the peak heating flight condition. Finally, the detailed analysis using engineering methods to interpolate the surface-heating-rate results from the inviscid/boundary layer method to predict the required thermal environments is described and results presented.

  15. Engineering Aerothermal Analysis for X-34 Thermal Protection System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, Kathryn E.; Riley, Christopher J.; Zoby, E. Vincent

    1998-01-01

    Design of the thermal protection system for any hypersonic flight vehicle requires determination of both the peak temperatures over the surface and the heating-rate history along the flight profile. In this paper, the process used to generate the aerothermal environments required for the X-34 Testbed Technology Demonstrator thermal protection system design is described as it has evolved from a relatively simplistic approach based on engineering methods applied to critical areas to one of detailed analyses over the entire vehicle. A brief description of the trajectory development leading to the selection of the thermal protection system design trajectory is included. Comparisons of engineering heating predictions with wind-tunnel test data and with results obtained using a Navier-Stokes flowfield code and an inviscid/boundary layer method are shown. Good agreement is demonstrated among all these methods for both the ground-test condition and the peak heating flight condition. Finally, the detailed analysis using engineering methods to interpolate the surface-heating-rate results from the inviscid/boundary layer method to predict the required thermal environments is described and results presented.

  16. A Cognitive Engineering Analysis of the Vertical Navigation (VNAV) Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherry, Lance; Feary, Michael; Polson, Peter; Mumaw, Randall; Palmer, Everett

    2001-01-01

    A cognitive engineering analysis of the Flight Management System (FMS) Vertical Navigation (VNAV) function has identified overloading of the VNAV button and overloading of the Flight Mode Annunciator (FMA) used by the VNAV function. These two types of overloading, resulting in modal input devices and ambiguous feedback, are well known sources of operator confusion, and explain, in part, the operational issues experienced by airline pilots using VNAV in descent and approach. A proposal to modify the existing VNAV design to eliminate the overloading is discussed. The proposed design improves pilot's situational awareness of the VNAV function, and potentially reduces the cost of software development and improves safety.

  17. Open source data analysis and visualization software for optical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg A.; Lewis, Benjamin J.; Palmer, Michael; Kim, Dae Wook; Loeff, Adrian R.; Burge, James H.

    2012-10-01

    SAGUARO is open-source software developed to simplify data assimilation, analysis, and visualization by providing a single framework for disparate data sources from raw hardware measurements to optical simulation output. Developed with a user-friendly graphical interface in the MATLABTM environment, SAGUARO is intended to be easy for the enduser in search of useful optical information as well as the developer wanting to add new modules and functionalities. We present here the flexibility of the SAGUARO software and discuss how it can be applied to the wider optical engineering community.

  18. Engineering education research in European Journal of Engineering Education and Journal of Engineering Education: citation and reference discipline analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankat, Phillip C.; Williams, Bill; Neto, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The authors, citations and content of European Journal of Engineering Education (EJEE) and Journal of Engineering Education (JEE) in 1973 (JEE, 1975 EJEE), 1983, 1993, 2003, and available 2013 issues were analysed. Both journals transitioned from house organs to become engineering education research (EER) journals, although JEE transitioned first. In this process the number of citations rose, particularly of education and psychology sources; the percentage of research articles increased markedly as did the number of reference disciplines. The number of papers per issue, the number of single author papers, and the citations of science and engineering sources decreased. EJEE has a very broad geographic spread of authors while JEE authors are mainly US based. A 'silo' mentality where general engineering education researchers do not communicate with EER researchers in different engineering disciplines is evident. There is some danger that EER may develop into a silo that does not communicate with technically oriented engineering professors.

  19. Materials analysis and particle probe: A compact diagnostic system for in situ analysis of plasma-facing components (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. N.; Heim, B.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.; Yang, Z.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.; Ellis, R. A.

    2012-10-15

    The objective of the materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) in NSTX is to enable prompt and direct analysis of plasma-facing components exposed to plasma discharges. MAPP allows multiple samples to be introduced to the level of the plasma-facing surface without breaking vacuum and analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ion-scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) immediately following the plasma discharge. MAPP is designed to operate as a diagnostic within the {approx}12 min NSTX minimum between-shot time window to reveal fundamental plasma-surface interactions. Initial calibration demonstrates MAPP's XPS and TDS capabilities.

  20. Materials analysis and particle probe: a compact diagnostic system for in situ analysis of plasma-facing components (invited).

    PubMed

    Taylor, C N; Heim, B; Gonderman, S; Allain, J P; Yang, Z; Kaita, R; Roquemore, A L; Skinner, C H; Ellis, R A

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) in NSTX is to enable prompt and direct analysis of plasma-facing components exposed to plasma discharges. MAPP allows multiple samples to be introduced to the level of the plasma-facing surface without breaking vacuum and analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ion-scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) immediately following the plasma discharge. MAPP is designed to operate as a diagnostic within the ∼12 min NSTX minimum between-shot time window to reveal fundamental plasma-surface interactions. Initial calibration demonstrates MAPP's XPS and TDS capabilities. PMID:23126877

  1. A new perspective on diesel engine evaluation based on Second Law analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, P.F.; Hoag, K.L.; Kamel, M.M.; Primus, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A Second Law analysis of the processes within a diesel engine is presented and compared with the traditional First Law analysis. The analysis technique is described and its assumptions outlined. Available energy additions, extractions, and destructions are examined and quantified for the various processes. Alternative approaches are presented for engine systems with or without secondary heat recovery devices to further quantify the relative importance of thermodynamic loss mechanisms. The technique is applied to a turbocharged diesel engine and used to track available energy throughout the engine cycle. The methods of analysis are applied to some simplified cases to demonstrate their usefulness in analyzing various engine processes.

  2. Further analysis of plasma bursts in the earth's boundary layer at high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, O.M.; Rassel, K.T.; Vaisberg, O.L.

    1984-05-01

    This article shows that during times when no plasma mantle has developed, plasma bursts are observed in the tail of the magnetosphere. The plasma penetrates out of the transition region in the neighborhood of the magnetopause as a result of reconnection of magnetic lines of force in the interplanetary magnetic field with tail lines of earth's dipole. The analysis presented provides evidence in favor of nonstationary reconnection in plasma flow near the front part of the magnetospheric tail.

  3. Research and Development of the Pulsed Plasma Rocket Engine System onboard Osaka Institute of Technology Micro Artificial Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Hirokazu; Naka, Masamichi; Takagi, Hiroki; Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Yosuke

    The Project of Osaka Institute of Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship (PROITERES) was started at Osaka Institute of Technology in 2007. In PROITERES, a micro satellite with electrothermal pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs) will be launched in 2010. The main mission is the first powered flight of micro satellite by electric thruster all over the world. This study aims at improvement in performance by changing configuration of PPTs. The total impulse of about 5 Ns was achieved with a teflon cylindrical discharge chamber 9.0 mm in length and 1.0 mm in diameter in 53,000-shot operation with 2.43 J/shot. Finally, the engineering model of PPT system was developed, and it is under operation as final test.

  4. Space Operations Analysis Using the Synergistic Engineering Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angster, Scott; Brewer, Laura

    2002-01-01

    The Synergistic Engineering Environment has been under development at the NASA Langley Research Center to aid in the understanding of the operations of spacecraft. This is accomplished through the integration of multiple data sets, analysis tools, spacecraft geometric models, and a visualization environment to create an interactive virtual simulation of the spacecraft. Initially designed to support the needs of the International Space Station, the SEE has broadened the scope to include spacecraft ranging from low-earth orbit to deep space missions. Analysis capabilities within the SEE include rigid body dynamics, kinematics, orbital mechanics, and payload operations. This provides the user the ability to perform real-time interactive engineering analyses in areas including flight attitudes and maneuvers, visiting vehicle docking scenarios, robotic operations, plume impingement, field of view obscuration, and alternative assembly configurations. The SEE has been used to aid in the understanding of several operational procedures related to the International Space Station. This paper will address the capabilities of the first build of the SEE, present several use cases of the SEE, and discuss the next build of the SEE.

  5. Nonlinear constitutive theory for turbine engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A number of viscoplastic constitutive theories and a conventional constitutive theory are evaluated and compared in their ability to predict nonlinear stress-strain behavior in gas turbine engine components at elevated temperatures. Specific application of these theories is directed towards the structural analysis of combustor liners undergoing transient, cyclic, thermomechanical load histories. The combustor liner material considered in this study is Hastelloy X. The material constants for each of the theories (as a function of temperature) are obtained from existing, published experimental data. The viscoplastic theories and a conventional theory are incorporated into a general purpose, nonlinear, finite element computer program. Several numerical examples of combustor liner structural analysis using these theories are given to demonstrate their capabilities. Based on the numerical stress-strain results, the theories are evaluated and compared.

  6. Pixel Analysis and Plasma Dynamics Characterized by Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolutions show small dynamic features at the resolving limit during emerging flux events. However, line-of-sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. A new pixel dynamics method uses spectrographic images to characterize photospheric absorption line profiles by variations in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness and is applied to quiet-sun regions, active regions with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from SOLIS/VSM on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe I 6301.5 Å are shown to have a strong spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare originating from NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as a flattening in the line profile as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity and was not present in area scans of a non-eruptive active region on 2011 April 14. These results are used to estimate dynamic plasma properties on sub-pixel scales and provide both spatial and temporal information of sub-pixel activity at the photosphere. The analysis can be extended to include the full Stokes parameters and study signatures of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  7. Ion Beam Analysis applied to laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Macková, A.; Havranek, V.; Malinsky, P.; Torrisi, L.; Kormunda, M.; Barchuk, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudzak, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the research activity on Ion Beam Analysis methods performed at Tandetron Laboratory (LT) of the Institute of Nuclear Physics AS CR, Rez, Czech Republic. Recently, many groups are paying attention to implantation by laser generated plasma. This process allows to insert a controllable amount of energetic ions into the surface layers of different materials modifying the physical and chemical properties of the surface material. Different substrates are implanted by accelerated ions from plasma through terawatt iodine laser, at nominal intensity of 1015 W/cm2, at the PALS Research Infrastructure AS CR, in the Czech Republic. This regime of the laser matter interaction generates, multi-MeV proton beams, and multi-charged ions that are tightly confined in time (hundreds ps) and space (source radius of a few microns). These ion beams have a much lower transverse temperature, a much shorter duration and a much higher current than those obtainable from conventional accelerators. The implementation of protons and ions acceleration driven by ultra-short high intensity lasers is exhibited by adopting suitable irradiation conditions as well as tailored targets. An overview of implanted targets and their morphological and structural characterizations is presented and discussed.

  8. Lie Group Analysis of Plasma-Fluid Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Raul

    1995-01-01

    Lie group methods for nonlinear partial differential equations are implemented to study, analytically, a subset of the full solution space of a family of plasma-fluid models. The solutions obtained by this method are known as group invariant solutions. The basic set of equations considered comprise the three-field fluid model due to Hazeltine (HTFM), which was obtained to describe nonlinear large aspect ratio tokamak physics. This model contains as particular limits the physics of the Charney-Hasegawa -Mima equation (CHM) and reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD), which are two other models known to describe some features of nonlinear behavior of tokamak plasmas. Lie's method requires a large number of systematic calculations to determine the Lie point symmetries of the system of differential equations. These symmetries form a Lie group and describe the geometrical invariance of the equations. The Lie symmetries have been calculated for the systems mentioned above by using a symbolic manipulation program. A detailed analysis of the physical meaning of these symmetries is given. Using the Lie algebraic properties of the generators of the symmetries, a reduction of the number of independent variables for the full nonlinear systems of equations is calculated, which in turn yields simplified equations that sometimes can be solved analytically. A discussion of some of the reductions and solutions generated by this technique is presented. The results show the feasibility of using Lie methods to obtain analytical results for complicated nonlinear systems of partial differential equations that describe physically interesting situations.

  9. Two dimensional kinetic analysis of electrostatic harmonic plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca-Pongutá, E. C.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    Electrostatic harmonic Langmuir waves are virtual modes excited in weakly turbulent plasmas, first observed in early laboratory beam-plasma experiments as well as in rocket-borne active experiments in space. However, their unequivocal presence was confirmed through computer simulated experiments and subsequently theoretically explained. The peculiarity of harmonic Langmuir waves is that while their existence requires nonlinear response, their excitation mechanism and subsequent early time evolution are governed by essentially linear process. One of the unresolved theoretical issues regards the role of nonlinear wave-particle interaction process over longer evolution time period. Another outstanding issue is that existing theories for these modes are limited to one-dimensional space. The present paper carries out two dimensional theoretical analysis of fundamental and (first) harmonic Langmuir waves for the first time. The result shows that harmonic Langmuir wave is essentially governed by (quasi)linear process and that nonlinear wave-particle interaction plays no significant role in the time evolution of the wave spectrum. The numerical solutions of the two-dimensional wave spectra for fundamental and harmonic Langmuir waves are also found to be consistent with those obtained by direct particle-in-cell simulation method reported in the literature.

  10. Adaptive Modeling, Engineering Analysis and Design of Advanced Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hsu, Su-Yuen; Mason, Brian H.; Hicks, Mike D.; Jones, William T.; Sleight, David W.; Chun, Julio; Spangler, Jan L.; Kamhawi, Hilmi; Dahl, Jorgen L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes initial progress towards the development and enhancement of a set of software tools for rapid adaptive modeling, and conceptual design of advanced aerospace vehicle concepts. With demanding structural and aerodynamic performance requirements, these high fidelity geometry based modeling tools are essential for rapid and accurate engineering analysis at the early concept development stage. This adaptive modeling tool was used for generating vehicle parametric geometry, outer mold line and detailed internal structural layout of wing, fuselage, skin, spars, ribs, control surfaces, frames, bulkheads, floors, etc., that facilitated rapid finite element analysis, sizing study and weight optimization. The high quality outer mold line enabled rapid aerodynamic analysis in order to provide reliable design data at critical flight conditions. Example application for structural design of a conventional aircraft and a high altitude long endurance vehicle configuration are presented. This work was performed under the Conceptual Design Shop sub-project within the Efficient Aerodynamic Shape and Integration project, under the former Vehicle Systems Program. The project objective was to design and assess unconventional atmospheric vehicle concepts efficiently and confidently. The implementation may also dramatically facilitate physics-based systems analysis for the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Mission. In addition to providing technology for design and development of unconventional aircraft, the techniques for generation of accurate geometry and internal sub-structure and the automated interface with the high fidelity analysis codes could also be applied towards the design of vehicles for the NASA Exploration and Space Science Mission projects.

  11. Exploring Complex Engineering Learning over Time with Epistemic Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svarovsky, Gina Navoa

    2011-01-01

    Recently, K-12 engineering education has received increased attention as a pathway to building stronger foundations in math and science and introducing young people to the profession. However, the National Academy of Engineering found that many K-12 engineering programs focus heavily on engineering design and science and math learning while…

  12. Microwave engineering of plasma-assisted CVD reactors for diamond deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F.; Hassouni, K.; Bonnin, X.; Gicquel, A.

    2009-09-01

    The unique properties of CVD diamond make it a compelling choice for high power electronics. In order to achieve industrial use of CVD diamond, one must simultaneously obtain an excellent control of the film purity, very low defect content and a sufficiently rapid growth rate. Currently, only microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPACVD) processes making use of resonant cavity systems provide enough atomic hydrogen to satisfy these requirements. We show in this paper that the use of high microwave power density (MWPD) plasmas is necessary to promote atomic hydrogen concentrations that are high enough to ensure the deposition of high purity diamond films at large growth rates. Moreover, the deposition of homogeneous films on large surfaces calls for the production of plasma with appropriate shapes and large volumes. The production of such plasmas needs generating a fairly high electric field over extended regions and requires a careful design of the MW coupling system, especially the cavity. As far as MW coupling efficiency is concerned, the presence of a plasma load represents a mismatching perturbation to the cavity. This perturbation is especially important at high MWPD where the reflected fraction of the input power may be quite high. This mismatch can lead to a pronounced heating of the reactor walls. It must therefore be taken into account from the very beginning of the reactor design. This requires the implementation of plasma modelling tools coupled to detailed electromagnetic simulations. This is discussed in section 3. We also briefly discuss the operating principles of the main commercial plasma reactors before introducing the reactor design methodology we have developed. Modelling results for a new generation of reactors developed at LIMHP, working at very high power density, will be presented. Lastly, we show that scaling up this type of reactor to lower frequencies (915 MHz) can result in high density plasmas allowing for fast and

  13. Microwave engineering of plasma-assisted CVD reactors for diamond deposition.

    PubMed

    Silva, F; Hassouni, K; Bonnin, X; Gicquel, A

    2009-09-01

    The unique properties of CVD diamond make it a compelling choice for high power electronics. In order to achieve industrial use of CVD diamond, one must simultaneously obtain an excellent control of the film purity, very low defect content and a sufficiently rapid growth rate. Currently, only microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPACVD) processes making use of resonant cavity systems provide enough atomic hydrogen to satisfy these requirements. We show in this paper that the use of high microwave power density (MWPD) plasmas is necessary to promote atomic hydrogen concentrations that are high enough to ensure the deposition of high purity diamond films at large growth rates. Moreover, the deposition of homogeneous films on large surfaces calls for the production of plasma with appropriate shapes and large volumes. The production of such plasmas needs generating a fairly high electric field over extended regions and requires a careful design of the MW coupling system, especially the cavity. As far as MW coupling efficiency is concerned, the presence of a plasma load represents a mismatching perturbation to the cavity. This perturbation is especially important at high MWPD where the reflected fraction of the input power may be quite high. This mismatch can lead to a pronounced heating of the reactor walls. It must therefore be taken into account from the very beginning of the reactor design. This requires the implementation of plasma modelling tools coupled to detailed electromagnetic simulations. This is discussed in section 3. We also briefly discuss the operating principles of the main commercial plasma reactors before introducing the reactor design methodology we have developed. Modelling results for a new generation of reactors developed at LIMHP, working at very high power density, will be presented. Lastly, we show that scaling up this type of reactor to lower frequencies (915 MHz) can result in high density plasmas allowing for fast and

  14. Two-dimensional lateral heterojunction through bandgap engineering of MoS2 via oxygen plasma.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Nitin; Islam, Muhammad R; Kang, Narae; Tetard, Laurene; Jung, Yeonwoong; Khondaker, Saiful I

    2016-09-14

    The present study explores the structural, optical (photoluminescence (PL)), and electrical properties of lateral heterojunctions fabricated by selective exposure of mechanically exfoliated few layer two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) flakes under oxygen (O2)-plasma. Raman spectra of the plasma exposed MoS2 flakes show a significant loss in the structural quality due to lattice distortion and creation of oxygen-containing domains in comparison to the pristine part of the same flake. The PL mapping evidences the complete quenching of peak A and B consistent with a change in the exciton states of MoS2 after the plasma treatment, indicating a significant change in its band gap properties. The electrical transport measurements performed across the pristine and the plasma-exposed MoS2 flake exhibit a gate tunable current rectification behavior with a rectification ratio up to 1.3  ×  10(3) due to the band-offset at the pristine and plasma-exposed MoS2 interface. Our Raman, PL, and electrical transport data confirm the formation of an excellent lateral heterojunction in 2D MoS2 through its bandgap modulation via oxygen plasma. PMID:27392099

  15. Two-dimensional lateral heterojunction through bandgap engineering of MoS2 via oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Nitin; Islam, Muhammad R.; Kang, Narae; Tetard, Laurene; Jung, Yeonwoong; Khondaker, Saiful I.

    2016-09-01

    The present study explores the structural, optical (photoluminescence (PL)), and electrical properties of lateral heterojunctions fabricated by selective exposure of mechanically exfoliated few layer two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) flakes under oxygen (O2)-plasma. Raman spectra of the plasma exposed MoS2 flakes show a significant loss in the structural quality due to lattice distortion and creation of oxygen-containing domains in comparison to the pristine part of the same flake. The PL mapping evidences the complete quenching of peak A and B consistent with a change in the exciton states of MoS2 after the plasma treatment, indicating a significant change in its band gap properties. The electrical transport measurements performed across the pristine and the plasma-exposed MoS2 flake exhibit a gate tunable current rectification behavior with a rectification ratio up to 1.3  ×  103 due to the band-offset at the pristine and plasma-exposed MoS2 interface. Our Raman, PL, and electrical transport data confirm the formation of an excellent lateral heterojunction in 2D MoS2 through its bandgap modulation via oxygen plasma.

  16. Analysis of Sterilization Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ekem, N.; Akan, T.; Pat, S.; Akgun, Y.; Kiremitci, A.; Musa, G.

    2007-04-23

    We have developed a new technology, the High Voltage Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma (HVAPPP), for bacteria killing. The aim of this paper is to present a simple device to generate plasma able to kill efficiently bacteria.

  17. Performance analysis of charge plasma based dual electrode tunnel FET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sunny; Intekhab Amin, S.; Sarin, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes the charge plasma based dual electrode doping-less tunnel FET (DEDLTFET). The paper compares the device performance of the conventional doping-less TFET (DLTFET) and doped TFET (DGTFET). DEDLTEFT gives the superior results with high ON state current (ION ∼ 0.56 mA/μm), ION/IOFF ratio ∼ 9.12 × 1013 and an average subthreshold swing (AV-SS ∼ 48 mV/dec). The variation of different device parameters such as channel length, gate oxide material, gate oxide thickness, silicon thickness, gate work function and temperature variation are done and compared with DLTFET and DGTFET. Through the extensive analysis it is found that DEDLTFET shows the better performance than the other two devices, which gives the indication for an excellent future in low power applications.

  18. Emission analysis of a laser-produced barium plasma plume.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Joshi, H C; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-09-01

    In the present work we report the characteristic emission features of a laser-produced barium plasma plume. The time-resolved analysis for the different spectral lines of neutral and singly charged ionic barium has been carried out. It has been observed that the temporal evolution of electron temperature and density shows a peculiar behavior which is significantly different from the reported results of laser ablation of materials. The electron density increases with increase in delay time but the temperature does not change to any significant extent. Strong self-reversal in the emission of a resonant singly charged barium ionic line (455.4 nm) with time delay indicates the increase of population of singly charged barium ion with time. The results are explained on the basis of the increased population of barium metastables and subsequent ionization (Penning type). PMID:26368891

  19. Analysis of multifrequency interferometry in a cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, D. J.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, B. N.; Chavers, D. G.; Dobson, C. C.; Jones, J. E.; Jacobson, V. T.

    2006-10-15

    A microwave interferometer operating simultaneously at 70, 90, and 110 GHz is used to measure line integrated electron density in a plasma column in the VX-20 experiment. Interferometer beam sizes are a significant part of the plasma radius at some locations. We model the wave propagation through the plasma using a scalar wave approximation with assumptions of a Gaussian beam profile and plasma spatial profile. The phase shifts obtained from this model are compared with standard thin beam calculations and experimental data.

  20. Analysis of transfer processes through plasma boundaries of the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Liudmyla; Savin, Sergey; Lui, Anthony Tat Yin; Prokhorenkov, Andrew

    Studying the fundamental properties of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere found superdiffusion processes in the boundary layers space plasma and 'distant' transfer mechanism (the influence of local microprocesses to global, and vice versa). Since the developed turbulence is characterized by a great number of degrees of freedom, nonlinearly interacting modes, multi-scale structure and random fluctuations of velocities so that the methods of statistical physics and theory of probability are most suitable for its description. In this study based on the mission Cluster measurements the characteristic turbulent regions in the boundary layers of Earth’s magnetosphere are being separated and the statistical characteristics are being obtained, which determine the transfer processes through plasma boundaries. Meanwhile, the set of different techniques was used which are based on the analysis of fluctuation distribution function and its moments. For the analysis of the turbulent processes we have carried out an investigation of structure functions for different orders and studied diffusion processes in different regions determined by a character of the dependence of the generalized diffusion coefficient on time. Basing on the results of studying structural functions of various orders, the conclusion is drawn that small scale turbulence in the foreshock, magnetosheath, turbulent boundary layer is described by different phenomenological models. Besides, we have obtained an increase of diffusion coefficient with time for the regions of magnetosheath. The work is done in the frame of complex program of NAS of Ukraine on space researches for 2012-1016, within the framework of the educational program No.2201250 “Education, Training of students, PhD students, scientific and pedagogical staff abroad” launched by the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine and under a partial support of the grant No. F 53.2/039.

  1. Analysis of plasma instabilities and verification of the BOUT code for the Large Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, P.; Carter, T. A.; Friedman, B.; Umansky, M. V.

    2010-10-15

    The properties of linear instabilities in the Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] are studied both through analytic calculations and solving numerically a system of linearized collisional plasma fluid equations using the three-dimensional fluid code BOUT[M. Umansky et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 180, 887 (2009)], which has been successfully modified to treat cylindrical geometry. Instability drive from plasma pressure gradients and flows is considered, focusing on resistive drift waves and the Kelvin-Helmholtz and rotational interchange instabilities. A general linear dispersion relation for partially ionized collisional plasmas including these modes is derived and analyzed. For Large Plasma Device relevant profiles including strongly driven flows, it is found that all three modes can have comparable growth rates and frequencies. Detailed comparison with solutions of the analytic dispersion relation demonstrates that BOUT accurately reproduces all characteristics of linear modes in this system.

  2. Additional challenges for uncertainty analysis in river engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berends, Koen; Warmink, Jord; Hulscher, Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    the proposed intervention. The implicit assumption underlying such analysis is that both models are commensurable. We hypothesize that they are commensurable only to a certain extent. In an idealised study we have demonstrated that prediction performance loss should be expected with increasingly large engineering works. When accounting for parametric uncertainty of floodplain roughness in model identification, we see uncertainty bounds for predicted effects of interventions increase with increasing intervention scale. Calibration of these types of models therefore seems to have a shelf-life, beyond which calibration does not longer improves prediction. Therefore a qualification scheme for model use is required that can be linked to model validity. In this study, we characterize model use along three dimensions: extrapolation (using the model with different external drivers), extension (using the model for different output or indicators) and modification (using modified models). Such use of models is expected to have implications for the applicability of surrogating modelling for efficient uncertainty analysis as well, which is recommended for future research. Warmink, J. J.; Straatsma, M. W.; Huthoff, F.; Booij, M. J. & Hulscher, S. J. M. H. 2013. Uncertainty of design water levels due to combined bed form and vegetation roughness in the Dutch river Waal. Journal of Flood Risk Management 6, 302-318 . DOI: 10.1111/jfr3.12014

  3. Analysis of plasma channels in mm-scale plasmas formed by high intensity laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, R.; Habara, H.; Ivancic, S.; Anderson, K.; Haberberger, D.; Iwawaki, T.; Sakagami, H.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Uematsu, Y.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    A plasma channel created by a high intensity infrared laser beam was observed in a long scale-length plasma (L ∼ 240 μm) with the angular filter refractometry technique, which indicated a stable channel formation up to the critical density. We analyzed the observed plasma channel using a rigorous ray-tracing technique, which provides a deep understanding of the evolution of the channel formation.

  4. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for improving Space Shuttle engine reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, L.

    1989-01-01

    Probabilistic structural analysis methods are particularly useful in the design and analysis of critical structural components and systems that operate in very severe and uncertain environments. These methods have recently found application in space propulsion systems to improve the structural reliability of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) components. A computer program, NESSUS, based on a deterministic finite-element program and a method of probabilistic analysis (fast probability integration) provides probabilistic structural analysis for selected SSME components. While computationally efficient, it considers both correlated and nonnormal random variables as well as an implicit functional relationship between independent and dependent variables. The program is used to determine the response of a nickel-based superalloy SSME turbopump blade. Results include blade tip displacement statistics due to the variability in blade thickness, modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio or density. Modulus of elasticity significantly contributed to blade tip variability while Poisson's ratio did not. Thus, a rational method for choosing parameters to be modeled as random is provided.

  5. Three-dimensional volume analysis of vasculature in engineered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YousefHussien, Mohammed; Garvin, Kelley; Dalecki, Diane; Saber, Eli; Helguera, María.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional textural and volumetric image analysis holds great potential in understanding the image data produced by multi-photon microscopy. In this paper, an algorithm that quantitatively analyzes the texture and the morphology of vasculature in engineered tissues is proposed. The investigated 3D artificial tissues consist of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) embedded in collagen exposed to two regimes of ultrasound standing wave fields under different pressure conditions. Textural features were evaluated using the normalized Gray-Scale Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) combined with Gray-Level Run Length Matrix (GLRLM) analysis. To minimize error resulting from any possible volume rotation and to provide a comprehensive textural analysis, an averaged version of nine GLCM and GLRLM orientations is used. To evaluate volumetric features, an automatic threshold using the gray level mean value is utilized. Results show that our analysis is able to differentiate among the exposed samples, due to morphological changes induced by the standing wave fields. Furthermore, we demonstrate that providing more textural parameters than what is currently being reported in the literature, enhances the quantitative understanding of the heterogeneity of artificial tissues.

  6. X-ray-spectroscopy analysis of electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J. P.; Martins, M. C.; Parente, F.; Costa, A. M.; Marques, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2010-12-15

    Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted by highly charged ions in an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) may be used as a tool to estimate the charge-state distribution (CSD) in the source plasma. For that purpose, knowledge of the electron energy distribution in the plasma, as well as the most important processes leading to the creation and de-excitation of ionic excited states are needed. In this work we present a method to estimate the ion CSD in an ECRIS through the analysis of the x-ray spectra emitted by the plasma. The method is applied to the analysis of a sulfur ECRIS plasma.

  7. Cost Risk Analysis Based on Perception of the Engineering Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.; Wood, Darrell A.; Moore, Arlene A.; Bogart, Edward H.

    1986-01-01

    In most cost estimating applications at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), it is desirable to present predicted cost as a range of possible costs rather than a single predicted cost. A cost risk analysis generates a range of cost for a project and assigns a probability level to each cost value in the range. Constructing a cost risk curve requires a good estimate of the expected cost of a project. It must also include a good estimate of expected variance of the cost. Many cost risk analyses are based upon an expert's knowledge of the cost of similar projects in the past. In a common scenario, a manager or engineer, asked to estimate the cost of a project in his area of expertise, will gather historical cost data from a similar completed project. The cost of the completed project is adjusted using the perceived technical and economic differences between the two projects. This allows errors from at least three sources. The historical cost data may be in error by some unknown amount. The managers' evaluation of the new project and its similarity to the old project may be in error. The factors used to adjust the cost of the old project may not correctly reflect the differences. Some risk analyses are based on untested hypotheses about the form of the statistical distribution that underlies the distribution of possible cost. The usual problem is not just to come up with an estimate of the cost of a project, but to predict the range of values into which the cost may fall and with what level of confidence the prediction is made. Risk analysis techniques that assume the shape of the underlying cost distribution and derive the risk curve from a single estimate plus and minus some amount usually fail to take into account the actual magnitude of the uncertainty in cost due to technical factors in the project itself. This paper addresses a cost risk method that is based on parametric estimates of the technical factors involved in the project being costed. The engineering

  8. Analysis and Engineering of Metabolic Pathway Fluxes in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Christoph

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was discovered as a natural overproducer of glutamate about 50 years ago. Linked to the steadily increasing economical importance of this microorganism for production of glutamate and other amino acids, the quest for efficient production strains has been an intense area of research during the past few decades. Efficient production strains were created by applying classical mutagenesis and selection and especially metabolic engineering strategies with the advent of recombinant DNA technology. Hereby experimental and computational approaches have provided fascinating insights into the metabolism of this microorganism and directed strain engineering. Today, C. glutamicum is applied to the industrial production of more than 2 million tons of amino acids per year. The huge achievements in recent years, including the sequencing of the complete genome and efficient post genomic approaches, now provide the basis for a new, fascinating era of research - analysis of metabolic and regulatory properties of C. glutamicum on a global scale towards novel and superior bioprocesses.

  9. Electrochemical analysis of Shewanella oneidensis engineered to bind gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kane, Aunica L; Bond, Daniel R; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2013-02-15

    Growth in three-electrode electrochemical cells allows quantitative analysis of mechanisms involved in electron flow from dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria to insoluble electron acceptors. In these systems, gold electrodes are a desirable surface to study the electrophysiology of extracellular respiration, yet previous research has shown that certain Shewanella species are unable to form productive biofilms on gold electrodes. To engineer attachment of Shewanella oneidensis to gold, five repeating units of a synthetic gold-binding peptide (5rGBP) were integrated within an Escherichia coli outer membrane protein, LamB, and displayed on the outer surface of S. oneidensis. Expression of LamB-5rGBP increased cellular attachment of S. oneidensis to unpoised gold surfaces but was also associated with the loss of certain outer membrane proteins required for extracellular respiration. Loss of these outer membrane proteins during expression of LamB-5rGBP decreased the rate at which S. oneidensis was able to reduce insoluble iron, riboflavin, and electrodes. Moreover, poising the gold electrode resulted in repulsion of the engineered cells. This study provides a strategy to specifically immobilize bacteria to electrodes while also outlining challenges involved in merging synthetic biology approaches with native cellular pathways and cell surface charge. PMID:23656372

  10. An investigation of the treatment of particulate matter from gasoline engine exhaust using non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dan; Gao, Dengshan; Yu, Gang; Shen, Xianglin; Gu, Fan

    2005-12-01

    A plasma reactor with catalysts was used to treat exhaust gas from a gasoline engine in order to decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. The effect of non-thermal plasma (NTP) of the dielectric discharges on the removal of PM from the exhaust gas was investigated experimentally. The removal efficiency of PM was based on the concentration difference in PM for particle diameters ranging from 0.3 to 5.0 microm as measured by a particle counter. Several factors affecting PM conversion, including the density of plasma energy, reaction temperature, flow rate of exhaust gas, were investigated in the experiment. The results indicate that PM removal efficiency ranged approximately from 25 to 57% and increased with increasing energy input in the reactor, reaction temperature and residence time of the exhaust gas in the reactor. Enhanced removal of the PM was achieved by filling the discharge gap of the reactor with Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst pellets. In addition, the removal of unburned hydrocarbons was studied. Finally, available approaches for PM conversion were analyzed involving the interactions between discharge and catalytic reactions. PMID:16129557

  11. Computational analysis of Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) uses a hypergolic propellant combination of Monomethyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The performance of the VTE depends on a number of complex interacting phenomena such as atomization, spray dynamics, vaporization, turbulent mixing, convective/radiative heat transfer, and hypergolic combustion. This study involved the development of a comprehensive numerical methodology to facilitate detailed analysis of the VTE. An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was extensively modified to include the following models: a two-liquid, two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian spray model; a chemical equilibrium model; and a discrete ordinate radiation heat transfer model. The modified code was used to conduct a series of simulations to assess the effects of various physical phenomena and boundary conditions on the VTE performance. The details of the models and the results of the simulations are presented.

  12. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Lynn, Sean R.; Veres, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). Detailed analyses were performed using three- dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off- design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component acro/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  13. Systems analysis of solid fuel nuclear engines in cislunar space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, U.; Koelle, H. H.; Balzer-Sieb, R.; Bernau, D.; Czarnitzki, J.; Floete, A.; Goericke, D.; Lindenthal, A.; Protsch, R.; Teschner, O.

    1984-12-01

    The use of nuclear engines in cislunar space was studied and the restrictions imposed on nuclear ferries by the chemical Earth to lower Earth orbit (LEO) transportation system were analyzed. The operating conditions are best met by tungsten-water-moderated reactors due to a high specific impulse and long durability. Specific transportation cost for LEO to geostationary orbit (GEO) and LEO to lunar orbit flights were calculated for a transportation system life of 50 yr. Average transportation costs are estimated to be 141 $/kg. No difference is made for both routes. An additional analysis of smaller and larger flight units shows only small cost reductions by employing larger ferries but a significant cost increase in case smaller flight units are used.

  14. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Feasibility analyses and systems engineering studies for a 20,000 tons per day medium Btu (MBG) coal gasification plant to be built by TVA in Northern Alabama were conducted. Major objectives were as follows: (1) provide design and cost data to support the selection of a gasifier technology and other major plant design parameters, (2) provide design and cost data to support alternate product evaluation, (3) prepare a technology development plan to address areas of high technical risk, and (4) develop schedules, PERT charts, and a work breakdown structure to aid in preliminary project planning. Volume one contains a summary of gasification system characterizations. Five gasification technologies were selected for evaluation: Koppers-Totzek, Texaco, Lurgi Dry Ash, Slagging Lurgi, and Babcock and Wilcox. A summary of the trade studies and cost sensitivity analysis is included.

  15. An engineering analysis of a closed cycle plant growth module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickford, G. H., Jr.; Jakob, F. E.; Landstrom, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The SOLGEM model is a numerical engineering model which solves the flow and energy balance equations for the air flowing through a growing environment, assuming quasi-steady state conditions within the system. SOLGEM provides a dynamic simulation of the controlled environment system in that the temperature and flow conditions of the growing environment are estimated on an hourly basis in response to the weather data and the plant growth parameters. The flow energy balance considers the incident solar flux; incoming air temperature, humidity, and flow rate; heat exchange with the roof and floor; and heat and moisture exchange with the plants. A plant transpiration subroutine was developed based plant growth research facility, intended for the study of bioregenerative life support theories. The results of a performance analysis of the plant growth module are given. The estimated energy requirements of the module components and the total energy are given.

  16. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Lynn, Sean R.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). The analyses were performed using three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off-design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component aero/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  17. Analysis of the Space Shuttle main engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deabreu-Garcia, J. Alex; Welch, John T.

    1993-01-01

    This is a final report on an analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Program, a digital simulator code written in Fortran. The research was undertaken in ultimate support of future design studies of a shuttle life-extending Intelligent Control System (ICS). These studies are to be conducted by NASA Lewis Space Research Center. The primary purpose of the analysis was to define the means to achieve a faster running simulation, and to determine if additional hardware would be necessary for speeding up simulations for the ICS project. In particular, the analysis was to consider the use of custom integrators based on the Matrix Stability Region Placement (MSRP) method. In addition to speed of execution, other qualities of the software were to be examined. Among these are the accuracy of computations, the useability of the simulation system, and the maintainability of the program and data files. Accuracy involves control of truncation error of the methods, and roundoff error induced by floating point operations. It also involves the requirement that the user be fully aware of the model that the simulator is implementing.

  18. Hydrogen engine performance analysis project. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Adt, Jr., R. R.; Swain, M. R.; Pappas, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in a 3 year research program to evaluate the performance and emission characteristics of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines is reported. Fifteen hydrogen engine configurations will be subjected to performance and emissions characterization tests. During the first two years, baseline data for throttled and unthrottled, carburetted and timed hydrogen induction, Pre IVC hydrogen-fueled engine configurations, with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and water injection, were obtained. These data, along with descriptions of the test engine and its components, the test apparatus, experimental techniques, experiments performed and the results obtained, are given. Analyses of other hydrogen-engine project data are also presented and compared with the results of the present effort. The unthrottled engine vis-a-vis the throttled engine is found, in general, to exhibit higher brake thermal efficiency. The unthrottled engine also yields lower NO/sub x/ emissions, which were found to be a strong function of fuel-air equivalence ratio. (LCL)

  19. Life cycle cost analysis for the Plasma Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes-Smith, P.

    1994-03-01

    This document is a draft version. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program requested that the Systems Analysis Group investigate the cost effectiveness of using the Plasma Arc Furnace (PAF) module in place of specified thermal and final forms treatment equipment in the baseline Mixed Waste Treatment Project (MWTP) study as performed by Bechtel Corporation, September 1992. The attached estimates are based on the process equipment and facilities cost data contained in the Bechtel study. The PAF process equipment and facilities cost data were developed using independent cost estimates for the equipment list provided by SAIC, Waste Management and Technology Division, in cooperation with the Pollution Prevention and Systems Analysis Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Chemical Technology Division. In order to develop the total life cycle cost estimate comparison for this study, it was necessary to use a common base for comparison. Although it was felt that the Bechtel MWTP study did not fully reflect the optimum size for the thermal and final forms treatment equipment, it was the best available data at the time.

  20. Coating Bores of Light Metal Engine Blocks with a Nanocomposite Material using the Plasma Transferred Wire Arc Thermal Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Ernst, F.; Zwick, J.; Schlaefer, T.; Cook, D.; Nassenstein, K.; Schwenk, A.; Schreiber, F.; Wenz, T.; Flores, G.; Hahn, M.

    2008-09-01

    Engine blocks of modern passenger car engines are generally made of light metal alloys, mostly hypoeutectic AlSi-alloys. Due to their low hardness, these alloys do not meet the tribological requirements of the system cylinder running surface—piston rings—lubricating oil. In order to provide a suitable cylinder running surface, nowadays cylinder liners made of gray cast iron are pressed in or cast into the engine block. A newer approach is to apply thermal spray coatings onto the cylinder bore walls. Due to the geometric conditions, the coatings are applied with specifically designed internal diameter thermal spray systems. With these processes a broad variety of feedstock can be applied, whereas mostly low-alloyed carbon steel feedstock is being used for this application. In the context of this work, an iron-based wire feedstock has been developed, which leads to a nanocrystalline coating. The application of this material was carried out with the Plasma Transferred Wire Arc system. AlMgSi0.5 liners were used as substrates. The coating microstructure and the properties of the coatings were analyzed.

  1. Ion Engine Service Life Validation by Analysis and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Polk, James E.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1997-01-01

    Assessment of the NSTAR ion engine service life is being accomplished through a combination of long duration testing and probabilistic analyses of the credible failure modes. A literature review that examined 65 ion engine endurance tests perfromed over the past 35 years was conducted to compile a list of possible ion engine failure modes.

  2. Ion Engine Service Life Validation by Analysis and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Polk, James E.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of the NSTAR ion engine service life is being accomplished through a combination of long duration testing and probabilistic analyses of the credible failure modes. A literature review that examined 65 ion engine endurance tests perfromed over the past 35 years was conducted to compile a list of possible ion engine failure modes.

  3. Statistical Analysis Tools for Learning in Engineering Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Carolyn A.

    1990-01-01

    Described are engineering programs that have used automated data acquisition systems to implement data collection and analyze experiments. Applications include a biochemical engineering laboratory, heat transfer performance, engineering materials testing, mechanical system reliability, statistical control laboratory, thermo-fluid laboratory, and a…

  4. Teaching Green Engineering: The Case of Ethanol Lifecycle Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallero, Daniel A.; Braiser, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Lifecycle assessment (LCA) is a valuable tool in teaching green engineering and has been used to assess biofuels, including ethanol. An undergraduate engineering course at Duke University has integrated LCA with other interactive teaching techniques to enhance awareness and to inform engineering decision making related to societal issues, such as…

  5. Analysis of Engineering Content within Technology Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantz, Todd D.; Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to effectively teach engineering, technology teachers need to be taught engineering content, concepts, and related pedagogy. Some researchers posit that technology education programs may not have enough content to prepare technology teachers to teach engineering design. Certain technology teacher education programs have responded by…

  6. Near Real Time Tools for ISS Plasma Science and Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Parker, Linda Neergaard; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti, A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program utilizes a plasma environment forecast for estimating electrical charging hazards for crews during extravehicular activity (EVA). The process uses ionospheric electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) measurements from the ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) instrument suite with the assumption that the plasma conditions will remain constant for one to fourteen days with a low probability for a space weather event which would significantly change the environment before an EVA. FPMU data is typically not available during EVA's, therefore, the most recent FPMU data available for characterizing the state of the ionosphere during EVA is typically a day or two before the start of an EVA or after the EVA has been completed. Three near real time space weather tools under development for ISS applications are described here including: (a) Ne from ground based ionosonde measurements of foF2 (b) Ne from near real time satellite radio occultation measurements of electron density profiles (c) Ne, Te from a physics based ionosphere model These applications are used to characterize the ISS space plasma environment during EVA periods when FPMU data is not available, monitor for large changes in ionosphere density that could render the ionosphere forecast and plasma hazard assessment invalid, and validate the "persistence of conditions" forecast assumption. In addition, the tools are useful for providing space environment input to science payloads on ISS and anomaly investigations during periods the FPMU is not operating.

  7. Control of electrical transport mechanisms at metal-zinc oxide interfaces by subsurface defect engineering with remote plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbacker, Howard Lee, IV

    ZnO has received renewed attention in recent years due its exciting properties as a wide band gap semiconductor. ZnO has several advantages over GaN including the availability of substrates, a room temperature excitonic emission, and an environmentally benign chemistry. ZnO applications include efficient blue light emitters, surface acoustic wave devices, transparent conductors, high power transistors, and solid state white lighting. Despite this versatility, several hurdles remain before device realization. Firstly, ZnO is almost always p-type. Although high quality n-type ZnO is abundant, there is no stable and reliable p-type doping scheme. Secondly, research into high quality Ohmic and Schottky contacts has been limited. Although there is an abundance of literature, there has yet to be an attempt to understand the physical and chemical mechanisms at metal- ZnO interfaces. In this work, plasma processing techniques are adopted to ZnO. These cold plasmas allow for room temperature modification of the subsurface. Implanting hydrogen has identified it as a primary n-type dopant responsible for a large fraction of the n-type conductivity. Oxygen plasma treatment has yielded an Ohmic to Schottky conversion by reducing oxygen defects at the near surface. Deposition of metals on clean and ordered surfaces reveal the importance that defects play at the metal-semiconductor interface. Higher concentrations of defects promote reactions. This increased reaction eutectic forming and oxide forming. Understanding the nature of the metal allows for engineering of high quality blocking contacts. These contacts can provide added thermal stability to devices. Subsurface introduction of hydrogen and nitrogen provide a potential roadmap to p-type doping and high quality Schottky contacts. Overall, control of transport properties and contact integrity is achieved by remote plasma processing.

  8. PREWATE: An interactive preprocessing computer code to the Weight Analysis of Turbine Engines (WATE) computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1983-01-01

    The Weight Analysis of Turbine Engines (WATE) computer code was developed by Boeing under contract to NASA Lewis. It was designed to function as an adjunct to the Navy/NASA Engine Program (NNEP). NNEP calculates the design and off-design thrust and sfc performance of User defined engine cycles. The thermodynamic parameters throughout the engine as generated by NNEP are then combined with input parameters defining the component characteristics in WATE to calculate the bare engine weight of this User defined engine. Preprocessor programs for NNEP were previously developed to simplify the task of creating input datasets. This report describes a similar preprocessor for the WATE code.

  9. Analysis of benzoquinone decomposition in solution plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratescu, M. A.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    The decomposition of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in Solution Plasma Processing (SPP) was analyzed by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) by monitoring the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity of the vibrational transitions of the molecule, during and after SPP. Just in the beginning of the SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensities of the ring vibrational molecular transitions increased under the influence of the electric field of plasma. The results show that plasma influences the p-BQ molecules in two ways: (i) plasma produces a polarization and an orientation of the molecules in the local electric field of plasma and (ii) the gas phase plasma supplies, in the liquid phase, hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which reduce or oxidize the molecules, respectively, generating different carboxylic acids. The decomposition of p-BQ after SPP was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography.

  10. Numerical analysis of plasma evolution on dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hiroyuki; Abe, Takashi

    2011-07-01

    Time evolution of the discharge plasma in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator was simulated by the simple fluid model in which the electron and single positive ion species were considered. The characteristics of the discharge plasma evolution were investigated in detail, and the following results were obtained. When the positive-going voltage is applied, the streamer discharge is formed periodically. The periodically formed streamer expands from the exposed electrode, and its length becomes longer than the previous one. Periodic breakdown of the gas and step-by-step plasma expansion are also observed during the negative-going voltage; however, the streamer is not formed and the breakdown frequency is much higher. The simulation results with a triangular applied voltage waveform show the same characteristics as observed in the experiment; large discharge current spikes are observed during both the positive- and negative-going voltage phase, and the plasma in the negative-going voltage phase expands more smoothly than that in the positive phase because of its higher breakdown frequency. It was shown that even the simple numerical model could provide valuable insights into the physics of DBD plasma actuator; this indicates that the positive ions and electrons play a prominent role in determining the general characteristics of the plasma evolution.

  11. Decision Engines for Software Analysis Using Satisfiability Modulo Theories Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorner, Nikolaj

    2010-01-01

    The area of software analysis, testing and verification is now undergoing a revolution thanks to the use of automated and scalable support for logical methods. A well-recognized premise is that at the core of software analysis engines is invariably a component using logical formulas for describing states and transformations between system states. The process of using this information for discovering and checking program properties (including such important properties as safety and security) amounts to automatic theorem proving. In particular, theorem provers that directly support common software constructs offer a compelling basis. Such provers are commonly called satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) solvers. Z3 is a state-of-the-art SMT solver. It is developed at Microsoft Research. It can be used to check the satisfiability of logical formulas over one or more theories such as arithmetic, bit-vectors, lists, records and arrays. The talk describes some of the technology behind modern SMT solvers, including the solver Z3. Z3 is currently mainly targeted at solving problems that arise in software analysis and verification. It has been applied to various contexts, such as systems for dynamic symbolic simulation (Pex, SAGE, Vigilante), for program verification and extended static checking (Spec#/Boggie, VCC, HAVOC), for software model checking (Yogi, SLAM), model-based design (FORMULA), security protocol code (F7), program run-time analysis and invariant generation (VS3). We will describe how it integrates support for a variety of theories that arise naturally in the context of the applications. There are several new promising avenues and the talk will touch on some of these and the challenges related to SMT solvers. Proceedings

  12. Proteome Analysis of the Plasma Membrane of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shalini; Kosalai, K.; Namane, Abdelkader; Pym, Alex S.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is likely to contain proteins that could serve as novel drug targets, diagnostic probes or even components of a vaccine against tuberculosis. With this in mind, we have undertaken proteome analysis of the membrane of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Isolated membrane vesicles were extracted with either a detergent (Triton X114) or an alkaline buffer (carbonate) following two of the protocols recommended for membrane protein enrichment. Proteins were resolved by 2D-GE using immobilized pH gradient (IPG) strips, and identified by peptide mass mapping utilizing the M. tuberculosis genome database. The two extraction procedures yielded patterns with minimal overlap. Only two proteins, both HSPs, showed a common presence. MALDI–MS analysis of 61 spots led to the identification of 32 proteins, 17 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome database. We classified 19 of the identified proteins as ‘membrane-associated’; 14 of these were further classified as ‘membrane-bound’, three of which were lipoproteins. The remaining proteins included four heat-shock proteins and several enzymes involved in energy or lipid metabolism. Extraction with Triton X114 was found to be more effective than carbonate for detecting ‘putative’ M. tuberculosis membrane proteins. The protocol was also found to be suitable for comparing BCG and M. tuberculosis membranes, identifying ESAT-6 as being expressed selectively in M. tuberculosis. While this study demonstrates for the first time some of the membrane proteins of M. tuberculosis, it also underscores the problems associated with proteomic analysis of a complex membrane such as that of a mycobacterium. PMID:18629250

  13. Terahertz Systems Engineering: Detectors, Sources, Propagation, Phenomenology, Design and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, Jonathan Ying-Yan

    The terahertz (THz) band, from 300 GHz to 20 THz, is the last remaining frontier of the electromagnetic spectrum. Fundamentally, the frequency is too high to use current electronic technologies, yet the photon energy is too low for optical systems. However, there is a rich set of phenomenology, science, and applications, which are only available with THz radiation. In order to exploit this, the THz engineer who is designing systems must be adept at integrating components with very limited performance into a system. This requires understanding and knowledge of a wide range of fields, including microwaves, infrared optics, material science, software development, atmospheric science, and the overall analysis and design of a system. Any THz system involves the sensing of some phenomena, which can be under the direct control of the engineer, such as in a communication system, or set by the laws of physics, such as in an astronomical telescope, or some variant in between. Thus, the design of such a system is fundamentally related to sensing science. Here, we have to consider detector and source technology, the propagation of radiation, target phenomenology, and the overall design and analysis of the system. This dissertation presents research in all of these areas. Specifically, in the field of THz phenomenology, I conducted a study to show the primary contrast mechanism in reflective biomedical imaging is water concentration. For source technology, I detail the development and characterization of photoconductive switches with record-breaking optical efficiency. In a separate study I developed a model which explains the complex photocarrier dynamics in fast-trapping THz photoconductive materials and show that high-frequency THz generation (>1 THz) is caused by beaching saturation. My work in detectors shows the design of a quasi-optical radar that exploits low 1/f noise Schottky diodes for detection of slow moving objects, useful for biomedical sensing of respiration and

  14. Limitations of threshold voltage engineering of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures by dielectric interface charge density and manipulation by oxygen plasma surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lükens, G.; Yacoub, H.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.

    2016-05-01

    The interface charge density between the gate dielectric and an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has a significant impact on the absolute value and stability of the threshold voltage Vth of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) heterostructure field effect transistor. It is shown that a dry-etching step (as typically necessary for normally off devices engineered by gate-recessing) before the Al2O3 gate dielectric deposition introduces a high positive interface charge density. Its origin is most likely donor-type trap states shifting Vth to large negative values, which is detrimental for normally off devices. We investigate the influence of oxygen plasma annealing techniques of the dry-etched AlGaN/GaN surface by capacitance-voltage measurements and demonstrate that the positive interface charge density can be effectively compensated. Furthermore, only a low Vth hysteresis is observable making this approach suitable for threshold voltage engineering. Analysis of the electrostatics in the investigated MIS structures reveals that the maximum Vth shift to positive voltages achievable is fundamentally limited by the onset of accumulation of holes at the dielectric/barrier interface. In the case of the Al2O3/Al0.26Ga0.74N/GaN material system, this maximum threshold voltage shift is limited to 2.3 V.

  15. Human Engineered Heart Tissue: Analysis of Contractile Force.

    PubMed

    Mannhardt, Ingra; Breckwoldt, Kaja; Letuffe-Brenière, David; Schaaf, Sebastian; Schulz, Herbert; Neuber, Christiane; Benzin, Anika; Werner, Tessa; Eder, Alexandra; Schulze, Thomas; Klampe, Birgit; Christ, Torsten; Hirt, Marc N; Huebner, Norbert; Moretti, Alessandra; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Hansen, Arne

    2016-07-12

    Analyzing contractile force, the most important and best understood function of cardiomyocytes in vivo is not established in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM). This study describes the generation of 3D, strip-format, force-generating engineered heart tissues (EHT) from hiPSC-CM and their physiological and pharmacological properties. CM were differentiated from hiPSC by a growth factor-based three-stage protocol. EHTs were generated and analyzed histologically and functionally. HiPSC-CM in EHTs showed well-developed sarcomeric organization and alignment, and frequent mitochondria. Systematic contractility analysis (26 concentration-response curves) reveals that EHTs replicated canonical response to physiological and pharmacological regulators of inotropy, membrane- and calcium-clock mediators of pacemaking, modulators of ion-channel currents, and proarrhythmic compounds with unprecedented precision. The analysis demonstrates a high degree of similarity between hiPSC-CM in EHT format and native human heart tissue, indicating that human EHTs are useful for preclinical drug testing and disease modeling. PMID:27211213

  16. Space Human Factors Engineering Gap Analysis Project Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudy, Cynthia; Woolford, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Humans perform critical functions throughout each phase of every space mission, beginning with the mission concept and continuing to post-mission analysis (Life Sciences Division, 1996). Space missions present humans with many challenges - the microgravity environment, relative isolation, and inherent dangers of the mission all present unique issues. As mission duration and distance from Earth increases, in-flight crew autonomy will increase along with increased complexity. As efforts for exploring the moon and Mars advance, there is a need for space human factors research and technology development to play a significant role in both on-orbit human-system interaction, as well as the development of mission requirements and needs before and after the mission. As part of the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project within the Human Research Program (HRP), a six-month Gap Analysis Project (GAP) was funded to identify any human factors research gaps or knowledge needs. The overall aim of the project was to review the current state of human factors topic areas and requirements to determine what data, processes, or tools are needed to aid in the planning and development of future exploration missions, and also to prioritize proposals for future research and technology development.

  17. Space vehicle engine and heat shield environment review. Volume 1: Engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcanelly, W. B.; Young, C. T. K.

    1973-01-01

    Methods for predicting the base heating characteristics of a multiple rocket engine installation are discussed. The environmental data is applied to the design of adequate protection system for the engine components. The methods for predicting the base region thermal environment are categorized as: (1) scale model testing, (2) extrapolation of previous and related flight test results, and (3) semiempirical analytical techniques.

  18. Citation Analysis: A Case Study of Korean Scientists and Engineers in Electrical and Electronics Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieh, Hae-young

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated the citation patterns of publications by scientists and engineers in electrical and electronics engineering in Korea. Citation behavior of personnel in government, universities, and industry is compared; and citation patterns from articles in Korean and non-Korean publications are contrasted. (Contains 27…

  19. Observation and numerical analysis of plasma parameters in a capillary discharge-produced plasma channel waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bobrova, Nadezhda; Sasorov, Pavel; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sasaki, Toru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2011-03-01

    We observed the parameters of the discharge-produced plasma in cylindrical capillary. Plasma parameters of the waveguide were investigated by use of both a Normarski laser interferometer and a hydrogen plasma line spectrum. A space-averaged maximum temperature of 3.3 eV with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed at a discharge time of 150 ns and a maximum discharge current of 200 A. One-dimensional dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code was used to analyze the discharge dynamics in the gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-intensity laser pulses. Simulations were performed for the conditions of the experiment. We compared the temporal behavior of the electron temperature and the radial electron density profiles, measured in the experiment with the results of the numerical simulations. They occurred to be in a good agreement. An ultrashort, intense laser pulse was guided by use of this plasma channel.

  20. Analysis of plasmas generated by fission fragments. [nuclear pumped lasers and helium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deese, J. E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    A kinetic model is developed for a plasma generated by fission fragments and the results are employed to study helium plasma generated in a tube coated with fissionable material. Because both the heavy particles and electrons play important roles in creating the plasma, their effects are considered simultaneously. The calculations are carried out for a range of neutron fluxes and pressures. In general, the predictions of the theory are in good agreement with available intensity measurements. Moreover, the theory predicts the experimentally measured inversions. However, the calculated gain coefficients are such that lasing is not expected to take place in a helium plasma generated by fission fragments. The effects of an externally applied electric field are also considered.

  1. Gas engine heat pump cycle analysis. Volume 1: Model description and generic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. D.

    1986-10-01

    The task has prepared performance and cost information to assist in evaluating the selection of high voltage alternating current components, values for component design variables, and system configurations and operating strategy. A steady-state computer model for performance simulation of engine-driven and electrically driven heat pumps was prepared and effectively used for parametric and seasonal performance analyses. Parametric analysis showed the effect of variables associated with design of recuperators, brine coils, domestic hot water heat exchanger, compressor size, engine efficiency, insulation on exhaust and brine piping. Seasonal performance data were prepared for residential and commercial units in six cities with system configurations closely related to existing or contemplated hardware of the five GRI engine contractors. Similar data were prepared for an advanced variable-speed electric unit for comparison purposes. The effect of domestic hot water production on operating costs was determined. Four fan-operating strategies and two brine loop configurations were explored.

  2. Detailed analysis of low energy plasma data under the Voyager Uranus data analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Belcher, John W.; Bagenal, Frances; Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Research effort included the PLS data analysis program where modifications to the data fitting procedure and elimination of possible noise and electron contamination were made. The analysis code corrections were used in checking the Neptune data gathered during the Voyager 2 encounter and for analyzing selected plasma spectra from the warm Io torus. A major task accomplished was the summary of Uranus-related research in the U.S. National Report to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics for the 1987 - 1990 quadrennium. A limited amount of work was accomplished on assessing the Pedersen conductivity of the ionosphere and comparing it with inferred values from shielding by the Uranian ring current. Under this grant there has been a great deal of effort expended on identifying and classifying plasma waves and oscillations in the magnetosheath and solar wind downstream from Uranus. Large amplitude oscillations in plasma parameters are found in the magnetosheath, with density changes of up to a factor of ten occurring on times scales of minutes. New algorithms developed for analyzing the inbound bow shock crossing of Neptune will probably be applied to a more detailed analysis of the Uranus shock in the near future.

  3. In situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Analysis of Aromatic Polyester Surface Treated with Argon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Kazuo; Okamoto, Nanami

    2013-10-01

    Effects of surface modification treatment by argon plasma processing of two types of aromatic polyester, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(oxybenzonate-co-oxynaphthoate) (POCO), were investigated. This paper presents a description of our experiment and a discussion of the surface modification mechanism, which uses a simple and inexpensive procedure to conduct analysis without breaking vacuum after plasma processing. In situ analysis of the chemical composition of a polymer surface was attempted without exposing the sample to air after argon plasma processing. In particular, the respective actions of each active species were investigated for electrons and ions in argon plasma. Electrons and ions in argon plasma break some polymer bonds. Specifically, ester groups are broken and oxygen atoms are kicked out in PET and POCO. No oxygen functional group is formed after argon plasma processing, but such groups are formed if the sample is exposed to air.

  4. Near Real Time Tools for ISS Plasma Science and Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Parker, Linda Neergaard; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria; Pulkkinen, Antti A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program utilizes a plasma environment forecast for estimating electrical charging hazards for crews during extravehicular activity (EVA). The process uses ionospheric electron density and temperature measurements from the ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) instrument suite with the assumption that the plasma conditions will remain constant for one to fourteen days with a low probability for a space weather event which would significantly change the environment before an EVA. FPMU data is typically not available during EVA's, therefore, the most recent FPMU data available for characterizing the state of the ionosphere during EVA is typically a day or two before the start of an EVA or after the EVA has been completed. In addition to EVA support, information on ionospheric plasma densities is often needed for support of ISS science payloads and anomaly investigations during periods when the FPMU is not operating. This presentation describes the application of space weather tools developed by MSFC using data from near real time satellite radio occultation and ground based ionosonde measurements of ionospheric electron density and a first principle ionosphere model providing electron density and temperature run in a real time mode by GSFC. These applications are used to characterize the space environment during EVA periods when FPMU data is not available, monitor for large charges in ionosphere density that could render the ionosphere forecast and plasma hazard assessment invalid, and validate the assumption of "persistence of conditions" used in deriving the hazard forecast. In addition, the tools are used to provide space environment input to science payloads on ISS and anomaly investigations during periods the FPMU is not operating.

  5. Near Real Time Tools for ISS Plasma Science and Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minow, J. I.; Willis, E. M.; Parker, L. N.; Shim, J.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program utilizes a plasma environment forecast for estimating electrical charging hazards for crews during extravehicular activity (EVA). The process uses ionospheric electron density and temperature measurements from the ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) instrument suite with the assumption that the plasma conditions will remain constant for one to fourteen days with a low probability for a space weather event which would significantly change the environment before an EVA. FPMU data is typically not available during EVA's, therefore, the most recent FPMU data available for characterizing the state of the ionosphere during EVA is typically a day or two before the start of an EVA or after the EVA has been completed. In addition to EVA support, information on ionospheric plasma densities is often needed for support of ISS science payloads and anomaly investigations during periods when the FPMU is not operating. This presentation describes the application of space weather tools developed by MSFC using data from near real time satellite radio occultation and ground based ionosonde measurements of ionospheric electron density and a first principle ionosphere model providing electron density and temperature run in a real time mode by GSFC. These applications are used to characterize the space environment during EVA periods when FPMU data is not available, monitor for large charges in ionosphere density that could render the ionosphere forecast and plasma hazard assessment invalid, and validate the assumption of 'persistence of conditions' used in deriving the hazard forecast. In addition, the tools are used to provide space environment input to science payloads on ISS and anomaly investigations during periods the FPMU is not operating.

  6. Analysis of magnetic field plasma interactions using microparticles as probes.

    PubMed

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2015-08-01

    The interaction between a magnetic field and plasma close to a nonconductive surface is of interest for both science and technology. In space, crustal magnetic fields on celestial bodies without atmosphere can interact with the solar wind. In advanced technologies such as those used in fusion or spaceflight, magnetic fields can be used to either control a plasma or protect surfaces exposed to the high heat loads produced by plasma. In this paper, a method will be discussed for investigating magnetic field plasma interactions close to a nonconductive surface inside a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell employing dust particles as probes. To accomplish this, a magnet covered by a glass plate was exposed to a low power argon plasma. The magnetic field was strong enough to magnetize the electrons, while not directly impacting the dynamics of the ions or the dust particles used for diagnostics. In order to investigate the interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field and the nonconductive surface, micron-sized dust particles were introduced into the plasma and their trajectories were recorded with a high-speed camera. Based on the resulting particle trajectories, the accelerations of the dust particles were determined and acceleration maps over the field of view were generated which are representative of the forces acting on the particles. The results show that the magnetic field is responsible for the development of strong electric fields in the plasma, in both horizontal and vertical directions, leading to complex motion of the dust particles. PMID:26382535

  7. Analysis of magnetic field plasma interactions using microparticles as probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2015-08-01

    The interaction between a magnetic field and plasma close to a nonconductive surface is of interest for both science and technology. In space, crustal magnetic fields on celestial bodies without atmosphere can interact with the solar wind. In advanced technologies such as those used in fusion or spaceflight, magnetic fields can be used to either control a plasma or protect surfaces exposed to the high heat loads produced by plasma. In this paper, a method will be discussed for investigating magnetic field plasma interactions close to a nonconductive surface inside a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell employing dust particles as probes. To accomplish this, a magnet covered by a glass plate was exposed to a low power argon plasma. The magnetic field was strong enough to magnetize the electrons, while not directly impacting the dynamics of the ions or the dust particles used for diagnostics. In order to investigate the interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field and the nonconductive surface, micron-sized dust particles were introduced into the plasma and their trajectories were recorded with a high-speed camera. Based on the resulting particle trajectories, the accelerations of the dust particles were determined and acceleration maps over the field of view were generated which are representative of the forces acting on the particles. The results show that the magnetic field is responsible for the development of strong electric fields in the plasma, in both horizontal and vertical directions, leading to complex motion of the dust particles.

  8. Growth curve analysis for plasma profiles using smoothing splines

    SciTech Connect

    Imre, K.

    1993-05-01

    We are developing a profile analysis code for the statistical estimation of the parametric dependencies of the temperature and density profiles in tokamaks. Our code uses advanced statistical techniques to determine the optimal fit, i.e. the fit which minimized the predictive error. For a forty TFTR Ohmic profile dataset, our preliminary results indicate that the profile shape depends almost exclusively on q[sub a][prime] but that the shape dependencies are not Gaussian. We are now comparing various shape models on the TFTR data. In the first six months, we have completed the core modules of the code, including a B-spline package for variable knot locations, a data-based method to determine the optimal smoothing parameters, self-consistent estimation of the bias errors, and adaptive fitting near the plasma edge. Visualization graphics already include three dimensional surface plots, and discharge by discharge plots of the predicted curves with error bars together with the actual measurements values, and plots of the basis functions with errors.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of a seeded magnetogasdynamic combustion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, T. K.

    1986-06-01

    A Faraday type magnetogasdynamic (MGD) seeded combustion gas plasma generated by burning fuel gas in air with up to 50 percent oxygen enrichment in stoichiometric ratio to determine the sources of thermodynamic irreversibility has been studied. For preliminary determination of the adiabatic flame temperature at one bar, five different fuel gases are studied, out of which four are derivatives of coal: water gas, Lurgi gas, Koppers-Totzek gas, producer gas, and methane. As seed, cesium, potassium and sodium in seed to fuel gas mass ratio of 0.01 to 0.03 in appropriate compound form are used and the equilibrium composition is calculated at 1 bar and temperature from 1500 to 3000 K by considering 14 species in the mixture. Subsequently, a Mollier enthalpy-entropy chart is produced for water gas burning with 50 percent oxygen enriched air and one percent potassium seed to fuel gas mass ratio in the above temperature range and in the pressure range of 0.01 to 100 bars. Finally, from the thermodynamic analysis it is shown that the electrical power generation per unit length is more and irreversibility due to the ohmic heating is less if the temperature is high.

  10. Development of Electrothermal Pulsed Plasma Thrusters for Osaka-Institute-of-Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Yushuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Minetsugu; Tahara, Hirokazu

    2008-12-31

    The Project of Osaka-Institute-of-Technology Electric-Rocket-Engine onboard Small Space Ship (PROITERES) was started at Osaka Institute of Technology. In PROITERES, a 10-kg small satellite with electrothermal pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs), named JOSHO, will be launched in 2010. The main mission is powered flight of small satellite by electric thruster itself. Electrothermal PPTs were studied with both experiments and numerical simulations. An electrothermal PPT with a side-fed propellant feeding mechanism achieved a total impulse of 3.6 Ns with a repetitive 10000-shot operation. An unsteady numerical simulation showed the existence of considerable amount of ablation delaying to the discharge. However, it was also shown that this phenomenon should not be regarded as the 'late time ablation' for electrothermal PPTs.

  11. Energy Efficient Engine: Flight propulsion system final design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald Y.; Stearns, E. Marshall

    1985-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) is a NASA program to create fuel saving technology for future transport engines. The Flight Propulsion System (FPS) is the engine designed to achieve E3 goals. Achieving these goals required aerodynamic, mechanical and system technologies advanced beyond that of current production engines. These technologies were successfully demonstrated in component rigs, a core engine and a turbofan ground test engine. The design and benefits of the FPS are presented. All goals for efficiency, environmental considerations, and economic payoff were met. The FPS has, at maximum cruise, 10.67 km (35,000 ft), M0.8, standard day, a 16.9 percent lower installed specific fuel consumption than a CF6-50C. It provides an 8.6 percent reduction in direct operating cost for a short haul domestic transport and a 16.2 percent reduction for an international long distance transport.

  12. Analysis of thermoelastohydrodynamic performance of journal misaligned engine main bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Fengrong; Shao, Kang; Liu, Changwen; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Jian

    2015-05-01

    To understand the engine main bearings' working condition is important in order to improve the performance of engine. However, thermal effects and thermal effect deformations of engine main bearings are rarely considered simultaneously in most studies. A typical finite element model is selected and the effect of thermoelastohydrodynamic(TEHD) reaction on engine main bearings is investigated. The calculated method of main bearing's thermal hydrodynamic reaction and journal misalignment effect is finite difference method, and its deformation reaction is calculated by using finite element method. The oil film pressure is solved numerically with Reynolds boundary conditions when various bearing characteristics are calculated. The whole model considers a temperature-pressure-viscosity relationship for the lubricant, surface roughness effect, and also an angular misalignment between the journal and the bearing. Numerical simulations of operation of a typical I6 diesel engine main bearing is conducted and importance of several contributing factors in mixed lubrication is discussed. The performance characteristics of journal misaligned main bearings under elastohydrodynamic(EHD) and TEHD loads of an I6 diesel engine are received, and then the journal center orbit movement, minimum oil film thickness and maximum oil film pressure of main bearings are estimated over a wide range of engine operation. The model is verified through the comparison with other present models. The TEHD performance of engine main bearings with various effects under the influences of journal misalignment is revealed, this is helpful to understand EHD and TEHD effect of misaligned engine main bearings.

  13. Poly (ethylene terephthalate) decomposition process in oxygen plasma; emission spectroscopic and surface analysis for oxygen-plasma reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Hiroki, Denbo; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2004-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy was applied to observe the reaction process of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) in an oxygen (O2) plasma generated by a microwave discharge. As the PET was exposed in the O2 plasma flow, light emitted from the PET surface was monitored. In the diagnosis measurement, several emission peaks assigned to the Hα atomic line at 652 nm, Hβ at 486 nm, OH (2Σ-->2Π) transition near 244-343 nm and CO (b3 Σ-->a3 Σ) near 283-370 nm were observed and measured at various discharge times. These results indicated that after the plasma etching, the PET sample was decomposed by the oxygen plasma reaction, and then, hydrogen abstraction and carbon oxidation processes. We also observed the time profile of oxygen atom, as the atom-emission intensity at 777 nm was monitored. As Hβ atomic and OH molecule lines appeared in the presence of PET, the O atom intensity was significantly reduced. In the surface analysis on Fourier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, it was found that for the PET surface treated by O2 plasma containing excited atomic oxygen species, ester bands were broken and carbonization formed on the PET surface. .

  14. Quantitative lipidomic analysis of plasma and plasma lipoproteins using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Serna, Jorge; García-Seisdedos, David; Alcázar, Alberto; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Pastor, Óscar

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the plasma lipid composition is essential to clarify the specific roles of different lipid species in various pathophysiological processes. In this study, we developed an analytical strategy combining high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) and off-line coupling with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to determine the composition of plasma and major lipoproteins at two levels, lipid classes and lipid species. We confirmed the suitability of MALDI-TOF/MS as a quantitative measurement tool studying the linearity and repeatability for triglycerides (TG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC). Moreover, data obtained with this method were correlated with other lipid classes and species measurements using currently available technologies. To establish the potential utility of our approach, human plasma very low density- (VLDL), low density- (LDL) and high density- (HDL) lipoproteins from 10 healthy donors were separated using ultracentrifugation, and compositions of nine lipid classes, cholesteryl esters (CE), TG, free cholesterol (FC), PE, phosphatidylinositol (PI), sulfatides (S), PC, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and sphingomyelin (SM), analyzed. In total, 157 lipid species in plasma, 182 in LDL, 171 in HDL, and 148 in VLDL were quantified. The lipidomic profile was consistent with known differences in lipid classes, but also revealed unexpected differences in lipid species distribution of lipoproteins, particularly for LPC and SM. In summary, the methodology developed in this study constitutes a valid approach to determine the lipidomic composition of plasma and lipoproteins. PMID:26004846

  15. Engineering computer graphics in gas turbine engine design, analysis and manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopatka, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A time-sharing and computer graphics facility designed to provide effective interactive tools to a large number of engineering users with varied requirements was described. The application of computer graphics displays at several levels of hardware complexity and capability is discussed, with examples of graphics systems tracing gas turbine product development, beginning with preliminary design through manufacture. Highlights of an operating system stylized for interactive engineering graphics is described.

  16. Going South: Analysis of an Historic Project Engineering Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's successful conduct of the Apollo Program greatly enhanced the prestige of the United States and remains broadly accepted as America's gift to all Mankind. NASA's accomplishments continue to amaze the world. With the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) Americans once again tasked NASA to carry out a project that is expected to provide inspiration and economic stimulus to the United States and to the world. In preparation NASA has thoroughly examined space program precedents. There is, however, another precedent which has not been examined in this context but whose scope and environment in many ways parallel the VSE. This project was initiated by a team that had, ten years before, successfully completed an effort that, at a cost of $173 billion (in 2008 dollars), had pushed the envelope of technology, brought economic growth, established their country as the world leader in engineering, and been broadly accepted as that country's gift to all Mankind. The new project was again inspired by popular desire to enhance national prestige and make yet another major contribution to Humanity. This effort was predicted to require eight years and $156 billion (2008 dollars). However, after nine years and expenditures of 96% beyond the baseline, the project collapsed amid bankruptcy, political scandal, and criminal prosecution. This paper applies current project management metrics, such as earned value analysis, to review the strategic decisions in this historic failure and describe its ultimate collapse. Key mistakes are identified, and lessons are drawn which may prove useful in guiding the VSE.

  17. Lipidomic analysis of Arabidopsis seed genetically engineered to contain DHA

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xue-Rong; Callahan, Damien L.; Shrestha, Pushkar; Liu, Qing; Petrie, James R.; Singh, Surinder P.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineering of omega-3 long-chain (≥C20) polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 LC-PUFA) in oilseeds has been one of the key targets in recent years. By expressing a transgenic pathway for enhancing the synthesis of the ω3 LC-PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from endogenous α-linolenic acid (ALA), we obtained the production of fish oil-like proportions of DHA in Arabidopsis seed oil. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used to characterize the triacylglycerol (TAG), diacylglycerol (DAG) and phospholipid (PL) lipid classes in the transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis seeds at both developing and mature stages. The analysis identified the appearance of several abundant DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC), DAG and TAG molecular species in mature seeds. The relative abundances of PL, DAG, and TAG species showed a preferred combination of LC-PUFA with ALA in the transgenic seeds, where LC-PUFA were esterified in positions usually occupied by 20:1ω9. Trace amounts of di-DHA PC and tri-DHA TAG were identified and confirmed by high resolution MS/MS. Studying the lipidome in transgenic seeds provided insights into where DHA accumulated and combined with other fatty acids of neutral and phospholipids from the developing and mature seeds. PMID:25225497

  18. Photon Sail History, Engineering, and Mission Analysis. Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matloff, Gregory L.; Taylor, Travis; Powell, Conley

    2004-01-01

    This Appendix summarizes the results of a Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc. report to the In-Space propulsion research group of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that was authored by Taylor et al. in 2003. The subject of this report is the technological maturity, readiness, and capability of the photon solar sail to support space-exploration missions. Technological maturity for solar photon sail concepts is extremely high high for rectangular (or square) solar sail configurations due to the historical development of the rectangular design by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). L'Garde Inc., ILC Dover Inc., DLR, and many other corporations and agencies. However, future missions and mission analysis may prove that the rectangular sail design is not the best architecture for achieving mission goals. Due to the historical focus on rectangular solar sail spacecraft designs, the maturity of other architectures such as hoop-supported disks, multiple small disk arrays, parachute sails, heliogyro sails, perforated sails, multiple vane sails (such as the Planetary Society's Cosmos 1), inflated pillow sails, etc., have not reached a high level of technological readiness. (Some sail architectures are shown in Fig. A.1.) The possibilities of different sail architectures and some possible mission concepts are discussed in this Appendix.

  19. Nonlinear rotordynamics analysis. [Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noah, Sherif T.

    1991-01-01

    Effective analysis tools were developed for predicting the nonlinear rotordynamic behavior of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps under steady and transient operating conditions. Using these methods, preliminary parametric studies were conducted on both generic and actual HPOTP (high pressure oxygen turbopump) models. In particular, a novel modified harmonic balance/alternating Fourier transform (HB/AFT) method was developed and used to conduct a preliminary study of the effects of fluid, bearing and seal forces on the unbalanced response of a multi-disk rotor in the presence of bearing clearances. The method makes it possible to determine periodic, sub-, super-synchronous and chaotic responses of a rotor system. The method also yields information about the stability of the obtained response, thus allowing bifurcation analyses. This provides a more effective capability for predicting the response under transient conditions by searching in proximity of resonance peaks. Preliminary results were also obtained for the nonlinear transient response of an actual HPOTP model using an efficient, newly developed numerical method based on convolution integration. Currently, the HB/AFT is being extended for determining the aperiodic response of nonlinear systems. Initial results show the method to be promising.

  20. Citation Patterns of Engineering, Statistics, and Computer Science Researchers: An Internal and External Citation Analysis across Multiple Engineering Subfields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Madeline

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a multidimensional approach to citation analysis, examining citations in multiple subfields of engineering, from both scholarly journals and doctoral dissertations. The three major goals of the study are to determine whether there are differences between citations drawn from dissertations and those drawn from journal articles; to…

  1. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hodačová, Petra; Kučková, Štěpánka; Švorčík, Václav

    2014-04-01

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  2. Variational analysis of railgun plasma-arc-armature for acceleration of solid hydrogen pellets for fusion reactor refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, W.H.; Kim, K.

    1988-12-01

    This paper discusses fueling magnetically confined plasmas using a railgun plasma-arc-armature. The topics covered are: the Plasma model; Variational analysis; Current density in the plasma arc and arc voltage; and Magnetic field and the net railgun force. 5 refs., 5 figs. (LSP)

  3. Spacelab data analysis using the space plasma computer analysis network (SCAN) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The Space-plasma Computer Analysis Network (SCAN) currently connects a large number of U.S. Spacelab investigators into a common computer network. Used primarily by plasma physics researchers at present, SCAN provides access to Spacelab investigators in other areas of space science, to Spacelab and non-Spacelab correlative data bases, and to large Class VI computational facilities for modeling. SCAN links computers together at remote institutions used by space researchers, utilizing commercially available software for computer-to-computer communications. Started by the NASA's Office of Space Science in mid 1980, SCAN presently contains ten system nodes located at major universities and space research laboratories, with fourteen new nodes projected for the near future. The Stanford University computer gateways allow SCAN users to connect onto the ARPANET and TELENET overseas networks.

  4. An Analysis of Ph.D. Examiners' Reports in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003…

  5. SI Engine Trends: A Historical Analysis with Future Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, Alexander; Splitter, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that spark ignited engine performance and efficiency is closely coupled to fuel octane number. The present work combines historical and recent trends in spark ignition engines to build a database of engine design, performance, and fuel octane requirements over the past 80 years. The database consists of engine compression ratio, required fuel octane number, peak mean effective pressure, specific output, and combined unadjusted fuel economy for passenger vehicles and light trucks. Recent trends in engine performance, efficiency, and fuel octane number requirement were used to develop correlations of fuel octane number utilization, performance, specific output. The results show that historically, engine compression ratio and specific output have been strongly coupled to fuel octane number. However, over the last 15 years the sales weighted averages of compression ratios, specific output, and fuel economy have increased, while the fuel octane number requirement has remained largely unchanged. Using the developed correlations, 10-year-out projections of engine performance, design, and fuel economy are estimated for various fuel octane numbers, both with and without turbocharging. The 10-year-out projection shows that only by keeping power neutral while using 105 RON fuel will allow the vehicle fleet to meet CAFE targets if only the engine is relied upon to decrease fuel consumption. If 98 RON fuel is used, a power neutral fleet will have to reduce vehicle weight by 5%.

  6. Engineers Involved in Continuing Education: A Survey Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klus, John P.; Jones, Judy A.

    This work is one of a series of monographs on the improvement of engineering education. This particular study was designed to determine: (1) the extent of individual engineers' involvement in continuing education; (2) factors pertaining to job success; and (3) what relationships may exist between the two. The population surveyed included all…

  7. Performance (Off-Design) Cycle Analysis for a Turbofan Engine With Interstage Turbine Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Mattingly, J. D.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the performance of a steady-state, dual-spool, separate-exhaust turbofan engine, with an interstage turbine burner (ITB) serving as a secondary combustor. The ITB, which is located in the transition duct between the high- and the low-pressure turbines, is a relatively new concept for increasing specific thrust and lowering pollutant emissions in modern jet-engine propulsion. A detailed off-design performance analysis of ITB engines is written in Microsoft(Registered Trademark) Excel (Redmond, Washington) macrocode with Visual Basic Application to calculate engine performances over the entire operating envelope. Several design-point engine cases are pre-selected using a parametric cycle-analysis code developed previously in Microsoft(Registered Trademark) Excel, for off-design analysis. The off-design code calculates engine performances (i.e. thrust and thrust-specific-fuel-consumption) at various flight conditions and throttle settings.

  8. A membrane-separator interface for mass-spectrometric analysis of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Gerasimov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of rapid mass-spectrometric determination of the content of anesthetic agents in blood plasma with the aid of a membrane-separator interface. The interface employs a hydrophobic selective membrane that is capable of separating various anesthetic drugs (including inhalation anesthetic sevofluran, noninhalation anesthetic thiopental, hypnotic propofol, and opioid analgesic fentanyl) from the blood plasma and introducing samples into a mass spectrometer. Analysis of the blood plasma was not accompanied by the memory effect and did not lead to membrane degradation. Results of clinical investigation of the concentration of anesthetics in the blood plasma of patients are presented.

  9. Combustion analysis and its optimization in two-stroke engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibe, Noriaki; Ohira, Tetsuya

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to show cycle-to-cycle combustion variation in transient conditions of quick throttle opening and to control the combustion fluctuation and improve acceleration in a two-stroke motorcycle engine. Two phases of engine operation were focused on: the low-load condition before quick throttle opening, and the transient condition after quick throttle opening. The time-series variation of the heat release rate based on the in-cylinder pressure, the engine-speed and the exhaust pressure variation were measured simultaneously, in an engine with a new multiple-timing-ignition-system, and in an engine with a modified exhaust port. Stable ignition performance and fast burning velocity were the keys to attaining smooth acceleration.

  10. Structural Analysis of Dusty Plasma Formations Based on Spatial Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Khakhaev, A. D.; Luizova, L. A.; Piskunov, A. A.; Podryadchikov, S. F.; Soloviev, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    Some advantages of studying the structure of dusty plasma formations using spatial spectra are illustrated by simulated experiments and by processing actual images of dusty structures in dc glow discharge in inert and molecular gases.

  11. Plasma sheath multipath analysis and its effect on GNSS navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yongxing; Xi, Xiaoli; Song, Zhongguo; Liu, Jiangfan

    2015-11-01

    When hypersonic vehicle reenters the Earth's atmosphere, the plasma sheath will be generated by its collision with ambient air that would affect global navigation satellite system (GNSS). In order to understand such effects, the transmission coefficient of the plasma sheath has been investigated using the numerical method before. But this is found to be insufficient, for besides the attenuation on the signal energy, the multipath effect between the plasma sheath and the vehicle surface is also a serious factor, which may result in errors in pseudorange measurement and carrier phase measurement of GNSS receiver and finally affect the positioning accuracy. The multipath of the plasma sheath is analyzed by finite-difference time-domain method combined with further signal processing, and a simulation platform is established to verify this effects on positioning performance. Simulation results indicate the degradation of positioning performance when these multipath signals were present, causing position error with several meters to tens of meters.

  12. Evaluation of a Stirling engine heater bypass with the NASA Lewis nodal-analysis performance code

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    In support of the US Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems program, the NASA Lewis Research Center investigated whether bypassing the P-40 Stirling engine heater during regenerative cooling would improve the engine thermal efficiency. The investigation was accomplished by using the Lewis nodal-analysis Stirling engine computer model. Bypassing the P-40 Stirling engine heater at full power resulted in a rise in the indicated thermal efficiency from 40.6 to 41.0 percent. For the idealized (some losses not included) heater bypass that was analyzed, this benefit is not considered significant.

  13. Evaluation of a Stirling engine heater bypass with the NASA Lewis nodal-analysis performance code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems program, the NASA Lewis Research Center investigated whether bypassing the P-40 Stirling engine heater during regenerative cooling would improve engine performance. The Lewis nodal-analysis Stirling engine computer simulation was used for this investigation. Results for the heater-bypass concept showed no significant improvement in the indicated thermal efficiency for the P-40 Stirling engine operating at full-power and part-power conditions. Optimizing the heater tube length produced a small increase in the indicated thermal efficiency with the heater-bypass concept.

  14. Neoclassical Tearing Mode Analysis in Spherical Tokamak Burning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Daiki; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Shoji, Tatsuo

    For stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM), non-resonant helical field (NRHF) is investigated. The time variation of magnetic island is described by modified Rutherford equation. In this work, plasma parameter change due to NTM is analyzed using 1.5-dimensional transport code TOTAL. In ST plasma, magnetic island at 3/2 mode grows by bootstrap current and the central temperature decreases. If NRHF is added, the effect of bootstrap current decreases and NTM is stabilized.

  15. Flow cytometric analysis of circulating microparticles in plasma.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Aaron F; Lewis, Dorothy E

    2010-06-01

    Microparticles, which include exosomes, micro-vesicles, apoptotic bodies and apoptotic microparticles, are small (0.05 - 3 mum in diameter), membranous vesicles that can contain DNA, RNA, miRNA, intracellular proteins and express extracellular surface markers from the parental cells. They can be secreted from intracellular multivesicular bodies or released from the surface of blebbing membranes. Circulating microparticles are abundant in the plasma of normal individuals and can be derived from circulating blood cells such as platelets, red blood cells and leukocytes as well as from tissue sources, such as endothelial and placental tissues. Elevated levels of microparticles are associated with various diseases such as thrombosis (platelet microparticles), congestive heart failure (endothelial microparticles), breast cancer patients (leukocyte microparticles) and women with preeclampsia (syncytiotrophoblast microparticles). Although microparticles can be detected by microscopy, enzyme-linked immunoassays and functional assays, flow cytometry is the preferred method because of the ability to quantitate (fluorescent bead- or flow rate-based method) and because of polychromatic capabilities. However, standardization of pre-analytical and analytical modus operandi for isolating, enumerating and fluorescent labeling of microparticles remains a challenge. The primary focus of this article is to review the preliminary steps required to optimally study circulating in vivo microparticles which include: 1) centrifugation speed used, 2) quantitation of microparticles before antibody labeling, 3) levels of fluorescence intensity of antibody-labeled microparticles, 4) polychromatic flow cytometric analysis of microparticle sub-populations and 5) use of polyclonal antibodies designed for Western blotting for flow cytometry. These studies determine a roadmap to develop microparticles as biomarkers for a variety of conditions. PMID:20235276

  16. Comparative Analysis of Techniques to Purify Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Michael P.; Antrobus, Robin; Lill, Jennie R.; Duncan, Lidia M.; Hör, Simon; Lehner, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this project was to identify the best method for the enrichment of plasma membrane (PM) proteins for proteomics experiments. Following tryptic digestion and extended liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry acquisitions, data were processed using MaxQuant and Gene Ontology (GO) terms used to determine protein subcellular localization. The following techniques were examined for the total number and percentage purity of PM proteins identified: (a) whole cell lysate (total number, 84–112; percentage purity, 9–13%); (b) crude membrane preparation (104–111; 17–20%); (c) biotinylation of surface proteins with N-hydroxysulfosuccinimydyl-S,S-biotin and streptavidin pulldown (78–115; 27–31%); (d) biotinylation of surface glycoproteins with biocytin hydrazide and streptavidin pulldown (41–54; 59–85%); or (e) biotinylation of surface glycoproteins with amino-oxy-biotin (which labels the sialylated fraction of PM glycoproteins) and streptavidin pulldown (120; 65%). A two- to threefold increase in the overall number of proteins identified was achieved by using stop and go extraction tip (StageTip)-based anion exchange (SAX) fractionation. Combining technique (e) with SAX fractionation increased the number of proteins identified to 281 (54%). Analysis of GO terms describing these proteins identified a large subset of proteins integral to the membrane with no subcellular assignment. These are likely to be of PM location and bring the total PM protein identifications to 364 (68%). This study suggests that selective biotinylation of the cell surface using amino-oxy-biotin in combination with SAX fractionation is a useful method for identification of sialylated PM proteins. PMID:20808639

  17. Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.B.

    1984-02-28

    An internal combustion engine has a piston rack depending from each piston. This rack is connected to a power output shaft through a mechanical rectifier so that the power output shaft rotates in only one direction. A connecting rod is pivotally connected at one end to the rack and at the other end to the crank of a reduced function crankshaft so that the crankshaft rotates at the same angular velocity as the power output shaft and at the same frequency as the pistons. The crankshaft has a size, weight and shape sufficient to return the pistons back into the cylinders in position for the next power stroke.

  18. Phenomenology of plasma engine cathodes at high current rates and low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegel, H.; Kruelle, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of low surrounding pressures on cathodes of arc jet engines with electromagnetic acceleration are investigated for pressure and current energies of 20 to 100 Torr. and 400 to 1000 A. Experiments with 50 mm long and 8 mm diameter tungsten-thorium cathode in a coaxial gas flow show that pre-heating of the cathode reduces the duration of the instable arc discharge and thus material loss. The use of lighter gases also reduces instability effects, as well as the use of increased pressures and a massive gas influx.

  19. TOPICA/TORIC integration for self-consistent antenna and plasma analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, Riccardo; Lancellotti, Vito; Milanesio, Daniele; Kyrytsya, Volodymyr; Vecchi, Giuseppe; Bonoli, Paul T.; Wright, John C.

    2006-10-01

    TOPICA [1] is a numerical suite conceived for prediction and analysis of plasma-facing antennas. It can handle real-life 3D antenna geometries (with housing, Faraday screen, etc.) as well as a realistic plasma model, including measured density and temperature profiles. TORIC [2] solves the finite Larmor radius wave equations in the ICRF regime in arbitrary axisymmetric toroidal plasmas. Due to the approach followed in developing TOPICA (i.e. the formal splitting of the problem in the vacuum region around the antenna and the plasma region inside the toroidal chamber), the code lends itself to handle toroidal plasmas, provided TORIC is run independently to yield the plasma surface admittance tensorsY (m,m',n). The latter enter directly into the integral equations solved by TOPICA, thus allowing a far more accurate plasma description that accounts for curvature effects. TOPICA outputs comprise, among others, the EM fields in front of the plasma: these can in turn be input to TORIC, in order to self-consistently determine the EM field propagation in the plasma. In this work, we report on the theory underlying the TOPICA/TORIC integration and the ongoing evolution of the two codes. [1] V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476 [2] M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion (1999) 41 1

  20. Analysis and design of ICRF antennas for cylindrical plasmas with TOPCYL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, Saul; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2010-11-01

    On recent years TOPICA[1] has shown its capabilities as a designing and predicting tool for ICRF antennas on tokamaks, handling at the same time realistic geometrical detail of the structure as well as a complete description of the plasma region. Now, expanding these capabilities, the TOrino POlitecnico CYLindrical (TOPCYL) code has been released in order to give a full wave simulation of ICRF antennas in front of cylindrical plasma columns, thus inheriting from TOPICA the geometrical accuracy and keeping the completeness of the specific plasma model. This feature allows the analysis and design of RF heating systems for specific applications as plasma thrusters and plasma-surface-interaction experiments; nevertheless in general the only requirement is for the plasma to be cylindrical. In the present work, the theoretical basis, the implementation and validation of TOPCYL is presented.[4pt] [1] Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476.

  1. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, G.; Tholeti, S. S.; Alrefae, M. A.; Fisher, T. S.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model of hydrogen plasma inside a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. This model will help in understanding and optimizing the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D axisymmetric model of the system is implemented using the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and the heat transfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics. The system is modeled to study variation in parameters with reactor geometry, microwave power, and gas pressure. The results are compared with experimental measurements from the Q-branch of the H2 Fulcher band of hydrogen using an optical emission spectroscopy technique. The parameter γ in Füner's model is calibrated to match experimental observations at a power of 500 W and 30 Torr. Good agreement is found between the modeling and experimental results for a wide range of powers and pressures. The gas temperature exhibits a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. The inclusion of a vertical dielectric pillar that concentrates the plasma increases the maximum electron temperature by 70%, the maximum gas temperature by 50%, and the maximum electron number density by 70% when compared to conditions without the pillar at 500 W and 30 Torr. Experimental observations also indicate intensified plasma with the inclusion of a pillar.

  2. Criticism of Feynman's analysis of the ratchet as an engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrondo, Juan M. R.; Español, Pep

    1996-09-01

    The well-known discussion on an engine consisting of a ratchet and a pawl in [R. P. Feynman, R. B. Leighton, and M. Sands, The Feynman Lectures on Physics (Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1963), Vol. 1, pp. 46.1-46.9] is shown to contain some misguided aspects: Since the engine is simultaneously in contact with reservoirs at different temperatures, it can never work in a reversible way. As a consequence, the engine can never achieve the efficiency of a Carnot cycle, not even in the limit of zero power (infinitely slow motion), in contradiction with the conclusion reached in the Lectures.

  3. Engineering support for magnetohydrodynamic power plant analysis and design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Marchmont, G.; Rogali, R.; Shikar, D.

    1980-01-01

    The major factors which influence the economic engineering selection of stack inlet temperatures in combined cycle MHD powerplants are identified and the range of suitable stack inlet temperatures under typical operating conditions is indicated. Engineering data and cost estimates are provided for four separately fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) system designs for HTAH system thermal capacity levels of 100, 250, 500 and 1000 MWt. An engineering survey of coal drying and pulverizing equipment for MHD powerplant application is presented as well as capital and operating cost estimates for varying degrees of coal pulverization.

  4. Engineering support for magnetohydrodynamic power plant analysis and design studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Marchmont, G.; Rogali, R.; Shikar, D.

    1980-08-01

    The major factors which influence the economic engineering selection of stack inlet temperatures in combined cycle MHD powerplants are identified and the range of suitable stack inlet temperatures under typical operating conditions is indicated. Engineering data and cost estimates are provided for four separately fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) system designs for HTAH system thermal capacity levels of 100, 250, 500 and 1000 MWt. An engineering survey of coal drying and pulverizing equipment for MHD powerplant application is presented as well as capital and operating cost estimates for varying degrees of coal pulverization.

  5. Electromagnetic analysis of forces and torques on the ITER shield modules due to plasma disruption.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Pasik, Michael Francis; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2009-06-01

    An electromagnetic analysis is performed on the ITER shield modules under different plasma disruption scenarios using the OPERA-3d software. The modeling procedure is explained, electromagnetic torques are presented, and results of the modeling are discussed.

  6. Analysis of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines for Cogeneration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S; Martinez-Frias, J; Reistad, G

    2004-04-30

    This paper presents an evaluation of the applicability of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines (HCCI) for small-scale cogeneration (less than 1 MWe) in comparison to five previously analyzed prime movers. The five comparator prime movers include stoichiometric spark-ignited (SI) engines, lean burn SI engines, diesel engines, microturbines and fuel cells. The investigated option, HCCI engines, is a relatively new type of engine that has some fundamental differences with respect to other prime movers. Here, the prime movers are compared by calculating electric and heating efficiency, fuel consumption, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and capital and fuel cost. Two cases are analyzed. In Case 1, the cogeneration facility requires combined power and heating. In Case 2, the requirement is for power and chilling. The results show that the HCCI engines closely approach the very high fuel utilization efficiency of diesel engines without the high emissions of NOx and the expensive diesel fuel. HCCI engines offer a new alternative for cogeneration that provides a unique combination of low cost, high efficiency, low emissions and flexibility in operating temperatures that can be optimally tuned for cogeneration systems. HCCI engines are the most efficient technology that meets the oncoming 2007 CARB NOx standards for cogeneration engines. The HCCI engine appears to be a good option for cogeneration systems and merits more detailed analysis and experimental demonstration.

  7. Generalized simulation technique for turbojet engine system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seldner, K.; Mihaloew, J. R.; Blaha, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A nonlinear analog simulation of a turbojet engine was developed. The purpose of the study was to establish simulation techniques applicable to propulsion system dynamics and controls research. A schematic model was derived from a physical description of a J85-13 turbojet engine. Basic conservation equations were applied to each component along with their individual performance characteristics to derive a mathematical representation. The simulation was mechanized on an analog computer. The simulation was verified in both steady-state and dynamic modes by comparing analytical results with experimental data obtained from tests performed at the Lewis Research Center with a J85-13 engine. In addition, comparison was also made with performance data obtained from the engine manufacturer. The comparisons established the validity of the simulation technique.

  8. The Ruptured Pipeline: Analysis of the Mining Engineering Faculty Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulton, M.

    2011-12-01

    The booming commodities markets of the past seven years have created an enormous demand for economic geologists, mining engineers, and extractive metallurgists. The mining sector has largely been recession proof due to demand drivers coming from developing rather than developed nations. The strong demand for new hires as well as mid-career hires has exposed the weakness of the U.S. university supply pipeline for these career fields. A survey of mining and metallurgical engineering faculty and graduate students was conducted in 2010 at the request of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration. The goals of the surveys were to determine the demographics of the U.S. faculty in mining and metallurgical engineering, the expected faculty turn over by 2010 and the potential supply of graduate students as the future professorate. All Mining Engineering and Metallurgical Engineering degrees in the U.S. are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) and the specific courses required are set by the sponsoring professional society, Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration. There are 13 universities in the U.S. that offer a degree in Mining Engineering accredited as Mining Engineering and 1 university that grants a Mining Engineering degree accredited under general engineering program requirements. Faculty numbers are approximately 87 tenure track positions with a total undergraduate enrollment of slightly over 1,000 in the 2008-2009 academic year. There are approximately 262 graduate students in mining engineering in the U.S. including 87 Ph.D. students. Mining Engineering department heads have identified 14 positions open in 2010 and 18 positions expected to be open in the next 5 years and an additional 21 positions open by 2020. The current survey predicts a 56% turn over in mining faculty ranks over the next 10 years but a retirement of 100% of senior faculty over 10 years. 63% of graduate students say they are interested in

  9. Statistical Analysis of Variation in the Human Plasma Proteome

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Corzett, Todd H.; Fodor, Imola K.; Choi, Megan W.; Walsworth, Vicki L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.; Chromy, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the variation in the human plasma proteome is an essential prerequisite for disease-specific biomarker detection. We report here on the longitudinal and individual variation in human plasma characterized by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) using plasma samples from eleven healthy subjects collected three times over a two week period. Fixed-effects modeling was used to remove dye and gel variability. Mixed-effects modeling was then used to quantitate the sources of proteomic variation. The subject-to-subject variation represented the largest variance component, while the time-within-subject variation was comparable to the experimental variation found in a previous technical variability study where onemore » human plasma sample was processed eight times in parallel and each was then analyzed by 2-D DIGE in triplicate. Here, 21 protein spots had larger than 50% CV, suggesting that these proteins may not be appropriate as biomarkers and should be carefully scrutinized in future studies. Seventy-eight protein spots showing differential protein levels between different individuals or individual collections were identified by mass spectrometry and further characterized using hierarchical clustering. The results present a first step toward understanding the complexity of longitudinal and individual variation in the human plasma proteome, and provide a baseline for improved biomarker discovery.« less

  10. Analysis of reconfigurable line pattern of capillary plasma antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Noor Fadhilah; Dagang, Ahmad Nazri; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-04-01

    Simulations by applying Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio have been done towards Hg-Ar (10 Torr and 20 Torr) capillary tubes. These capillary tubes which are 5 mm in diameter are designed as plasma antenna monopole antenna and antenna arrays (four line array, six line array and nine line array). They have been arranged in the two different dimensions, 4mm × 4mm and 8mm × 8mm. Their performance as an antenna have been analyzed and compared. The reconfigurable characteristics of these kinds of plasma antenna such as gain, directivity and return loss are calculated. The results of gain and directivity of 10 Torr of plasma antenna are stronger than 20 Torr in the 4mm × 4mm dimension. Return loss of these kinds of plasma antenna significantly dropped in different operating frequencies of microwave ranges make them suitable to be applied for multiple applications in antennas or telecommunications field. Gas pressure of plasma antenna and array distance between the capillary tubes give a significant effect to the antenna performance in range of 10 GHz and below.

  11. Spectroscopic Analysis and Thomson Scattering Diagnostics of Wire Produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechaty, Christopher; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel; Caplinger, James; Wallerstein, Austin; Kim, Tony

    2014-10-01

    The Lower Hybrid Drift Instability (LHDI) in plasma is driven by the presence of inhomogeneities in density, temperature, or magnetic field (Krall 1971, Davidson 1977), and occurs in systems where the electrons are magnetized and the ions are effectively unmagnetized. The LHDI is thought to occur in magnetic reconnection (Huba 1977), and has also been investigated as a mitigation technique which can allow for communications to take place through the plasma formed around hypersonic aircraft (Sotnikov 2010). To further understand the phenomenology of the LHDI, we plan to carry out experiments at the Air Force Research Laboratory, in the newly formed Plasma Physics Sensors Laboratory. In experiment, a pulsed power generator is employed to produce plasma by passing current through single, or dual-wire configurations. To characterize the plasma, a Thomson scattering diagnostic is employed, along with a visible spectroscopy diagnostic. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Defense by Riverside Research under Contract BAA-FA8650-13-C-1539.

  12. Analysis of radiation performances of plasma sheet antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bo; Zhang, Zu-Fan; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    A novel concept of plasma sheet antennas is presented in this paper, and the radiation performances of plasma sheet antennas are investigated in detail. Firstly, a model of planar plasma antenna (PPA) fed by a microstrip line is developed, and its reflection coefficient is computed by the JE convolution finite-difference time-domain method and compared with that of the metallic patch antenna. It is found that the design of PPA can learn from the theory of the metallic patch antenna, and the impedance matching and reconstruction of resonant frequency can be expediently realized by adjusting the parameters of plasma. Then the PPA is mounted on a metallic cylindrical surface, and the reflection coefficient of the conformal plasma antenna (CPA) is also computed. At the same time, the influence of conformal cylinder radius on the reflection coefficient is also analyzed. Finally, the radiation pattern of a CPA is given, the results show that the pattern agrees well with the one of PPA in the main radiation direction, but its side lobe level has deteriorated significantly.

  13. Statistical analysis of variation in the human plasma proteome.

    PubMed

    Corzett, Todd H; Fodor, Imola K; Choi, Megan W; Walsworth, Vicki L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L; Chromy, Brett A

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the variation in the human plasma proteome is an essential prerequisite for disease-specific biomarker detection. We report here on the longitudinal and individual variation in human plasma characterized by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) using plasma samples from eleven healthy subjects collected three times over a two week period. Fixed-effects modeling was used to remove dye and gel variability. Mixed-effects modeling was then used to quantitate the sources of proteomic variation. The subject-to-subject variation represented the largest variance component, while the time-within-subject variation was comparable to the experimental variation found in a previous technical variability study where one human plasma sample was processed eight times in parallel and each was then analyzed by 2-D DIGE in triplicate. Here, 21 protein spots had larger than 50% CV, suggesting that these proteins may not be appropriate as biomarkers and should be carefully scrutinized in future studies. Seventy-eight protein spots showing differential protein levels between different individuals or individual collections were identified by mass spectrometry and further characterized using hierarchical clustering. The results present a first step toward understanding the complexity of longitudinal and individual variation in the human plasma proteome, and provide a baseline for improved biomarker discovery. PMID:20130815

  14. Edge Plasma Analysis for Liquid-wall MFE Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W; Rensink, M; Rognlien, T D

    2000-09-21

    A thick flowing layer of liquid (e.g., flibe-a molten salt, or Sn{sub 80}Li{sub 20}--a liquid metal) protects the structural walls of the magnetic fusion configuration so that they can last the life of the plant even with intense 14 MeV neutron bombardment from the D-T fusion reaction, The surface temperature of the liquid rises as it passes from the inlet nozzles to the exit nozzles due to absorption of line and bremsstrahlung radiation, and neutrons. The surface temperature can be reduced by enhanced turbulent convection of hot surface liquid into the cooler interior. This surface temperature is affected by the temperature of liquid from a heat transport and energy recovery system. The evaporative flux from the wall driven by the surface temperature must also result in an acceptable impurity level in the core plasma. The shielding of the core by the edge plasma is modeled with a 2D-transport code for the DT and impurity ions; these impurity ions are either swept out to the divertor, or diffuse to the hot plasma core. An auxiliary plasma between the edge plasma and the liquid wall may further attenuate evaporating flux of atoms and molecules by ionization near the wall.

  15. Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  16. [Comparison Analysis of Economic and Engineering Control of Industrial VOCs].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-fei; Liu, Chang-xin; Cheng, Jie; Hao, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollutant has become China's major air pollutant in key urban areas like sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. It is mainly produced from industry sectors, and engineering control is one of the most important reduction measures. During the 12th Five-Year Plan, China decides to invest 40 billion RMB to build pollution control projects in key industry sectors with annual emission reduction of 605 000 t x a(-1). It shows that China attaches a great importance to emission reduction by engineering projects and highlights the awareness of engineering reduction technologies. In this paper, a macroeconomic model, namely computable general equilibrium model, (CGE model) was employed to simulate engineering control and economic control (imposing environmental tax). We aim to compare the pros and cons of the two reduction policies. Considering the economic loss of the whole country, the environmental tax has more impacts on the economy system than engineering reduction measures. We suggest that the central government provides 7 500 RMB x t(-1) as subsidy for enterprises in industry sectors to encourage engineering reduction. PMID:26164933

  17. Surface analysis of polymers treated by remote atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Eleazar; Hicks, Robert F

    2010-03-01

    The surfaces of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and polyethersulfone (PES) were treated with a low-temperature, atmospheric pressure oxygen and helium plasma. The polymers were exposed to the downstream afterglow of the plasma, which contained primarily oxygen atoms and metastable oxygen molecules ((1)Delta(g) O(2)), and no ions or electrons. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of HDPE revealed that 20% of the carbon atoms were converted into oxidized functional groups, with about half of these being carboxylic acids. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of all three polymers was obtained in order to determine the types of functional groups formed by atmospheric plasma exposure. It was found that the polymers were rapidly oxidized with addition of alcohols, ketones, and carboxylic acids to the carbon backbone. Chain scission occurred on HDPE and PMMA, while on PES the aromatic groups underwent ring-opening and insertion of carboxylic acid. PMID:19950952

  18. PIXE analysis of human spermatozoa isolated from seminal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, K.; Sasa, Y.; Kusuyama, H.; Yoshida, K.; Uda, M.

    1990-04-01

    PIXE has been applied to the multielemental and microanalysis of human spermatozoa. This is the first attempt to determine the chemical compositions of the motile spermatozoa free from contaminations of seminal plasma without loss of component elements during washing. The spermatozoa were isolated from semen by letting them swim into a kind of physiological saline, Tyrode's solution. Relative concentrations of P, K, Ca, Ti, Fe, Zn and Br in motile spermatozoa were determined by the use of the chlorine K X-ray peak intensity for evaluating the amount of Tyrode's solution contained in the sample targets. The concentrations of calcium and iron in spermatozoa were considerably higher than in seminal plasma. The concentrations of P, K, Zn and Br in spermatozoa were not so different from those in seminal plasma.

  19. Thermodynamics analysis of aluminum plasma transition induced by hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Zhang, Qingming; Ju, Yuanyuan

    2016-02-01

    The production of plasmas during hypervelocity meteoroid and space debris impact has been proposed to explain the presence of paleomagnetic fields on the lunar surface, and also the electromagnetic damage to spacecraft electronic devices. Based on Gibbs' ensemble theory, we deduce Saha equation of state and figure out the ionization degree; further, by using the derivation of Clausius-Clapeyron equation, we obtain the entropy increase and latent heat of plasma transition after vaporization; finally, we analyze the conversion efficiency of kinetic energy into internal energy, present two key contradictions, and revise them with the entropy increase, latent heat, and conversion efficiency. We analyze the aluminum plasma transition from multiple perspectives of the equation of state, latent heat of phase transition, and conversion efficiency and propose the internal energy and impact velocity criterion, based on the laws of thermodynamics.

  20. The IDEAL (Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis Languages) modeling methodology: Capabilities and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evers, Ken H.; Bachert, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    The IDEAL (Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis Languages) modeling methodology has been formulated and applied over a five-year period. It has proven to be a unique, integrated approach utilizing a top-down, structured technique to define and document the system of interest; a knowledge engineering technique to collect and organize system descriptive information; a rapid prototyping technique to perform preliminary system performance analysis; and a sophisticated simulation technique to perform in-depth system performance analysis.

  1. Helicon Plasma Source Configuration Analysis by Means of Density Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Angrilli, F.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.; Maggiora, R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D.O.

    1999-11-13

    Initial results have been obtained from operation of a helicon plasma source built to conduct optimization studies for space propulsion applications. The source features an easily reconfigurable antenna to test different geometries. Operating with He as the source gas, peak densities >= 1.6X10{sup 19} m{sup -3} have been achieved. Radial and axial plasma profiles have been obtained using a microwave interferometer that can be scanned axially and a Langmuir probe. The source will be used to investigate operation at high magnetic field, frequency, and input power.

  2. Analysis of stability of a homogeneous state of anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V. Yu. Chernova, T. G. Stepanov, S. E.

    2015-04-15

    Small-amplitude waves in collisionless magnetized plasma are considered in the framework of one-fluid anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics with allowance for the anisotropy of the pressure and thermal flux. Stability of a homogeneous plasma state is analyzed using an eighth-order dispersion relation. Restrictions on the parameters of the homogeneous state at which the dispersion relation has no complex roots at any value of the angle between the wave vector and the unperturbed magnetic field are obtained. The applied method also makes it possible to determine the types of unstable waves.

  3. Quantitative Plasma Biomarker Analysis in HDI Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Flack, Sheila L.; Fent, Kenneth W.; Trelles Gaines, Linda G.; Thomasen, Jennifer M.; Whittaker, Steve; Ball, Louise M.; Nylander-French, Leena A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of amines in biological samples is important for evaluating occupational exposure to diisocyanates. In this study, we describe the quantification of 1,6-hexamethylene diamine (HDA) levels in hydrolyzed plasma of 46 spray painters applying 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)-containing paint in vehicle repair shops collected during repeated visits to their workplace and their relationship with dermal and inhalation exposure to HDI monomer. HDA was detected in 76% of plasma samples, as heptafluorobutyryl derivatives, and the range of HDA concentrations was ≤0.02–0.92 μg l−1. After log-transformation of the data, the correlation between plasma HDA levels and HDI inhalation exposure measured on the same workday was low (N = 108, r = 0.22, P = 0.026) compared with the correlation between plasma HDA levels and inhalation exposure occurring ∼20 to 60 days before blood collection (N = 29, r = 0.57, P = 0.0014). The correlation between plasma HDA levels and HDI dermal exposure measured on the same workday, although statistically significant, was low (N = 108, r = 0.22, P = 0.040) while the correlation between HDA and dermal exposure occurring ∼20 to 60 days before blood collection was slightly improved (N = 29, r = 0.36, P = 0.053). We evaluated various workplace factors and controls (i.e. location, personal protective equipment use and paint booth type) as modifiers of plasma HDA levels. Workers using a downdraft-ventilated booth had significantly lower plasma HDA levels relative to semi-downdraft and crossdraft booth types (P = 0.0108); this trend was comparable to HDI inhalation and dermal exposure levels stratified by booth type. These findings indicate that HDA concentration in hydrolyzed plasma may be used as a biomarker of cumulative inhalation and dermal exposure to HDI and for investigating the effectiveness of exposure controls in the workplace. PMID:19805392

  4. Discharge Chamber Plasma Structure of a 30-cm NSTAR-Type Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-01

    Single Langmuir probe measurements are presented over a two-dimensional array of locations in the near Discharge Cathode Assembly (DCA) region of a 30-cm diameter ring cusp ion thruster over a range of thruster operating conditions encompassing the high-power half of the NASA throttling table. The Langmuir probe data were analyzed with two separate methods. All data were analyzed initially assuming an electron population consisting of Maxwellian electrons only. The on-axis data were then analyzed assuming both Maxwellian and primary electrons. Discharge plasma data taken with beam extraction exhibit a broadening of the higher electron temperature plume boundary compared to similar discharge conditions without beam extraction. The opposite effect is evident with the electron/ion number density as the data without began, extraction appears to be more collimated than the corresponding data with beam extraction. Primary electron energy and number densities are presented for one operating condition giving an order of magnitude of their value and the error associated with this calculation.

  5. Use of Clotted Human Plasma and Aprotinin in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Novel Approach to Engineering Composite Skin on a Porous Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Paul, Michelle; Kaur, Pritinder; Herson, Marisa; Cheshire, Perdita; Cleland, Heather; Akbarzadeh, Shiva

    2015-10-01

    Tissue-engineered composite skin is a promising therapy for the treatment of chronic and acute wounds, including burns. Providing the wound bed with a dermal scaffold populated by autologous dermal and epidermal cellular components can further entice host cell infiltration and vascularization to achieve permanent wound closure in a single stage. However, the high porosity and the lack of a supportive basement membrane in most commercially available dermal scaffolds hinders organized keratinocyte proliferation and stratification in vitro and may delay re-epithelization in vivo. The objective of this study was to develop a method to enable the in vitro production of a human skin equivalent (HSE) that included a porous scaffold and dermal and epidermal cells expanded ex vivo, with the potential to be used for definitive treatment of skin defects in a single procedure. A collagen-glycosaminoglycan dermal scaffold (Integra(®)) was populated with adult fibroblasts. A near-normal skin architecture was achieved by the addition of coagulated human plasma to the fibroblast-populated scaffold before seeding cultured keratinocytes. This resulted in reducing scaffold pore size and improving contact surfaces. Skin architecture and basement membrane formation was further improved by the addition of aprotinin (a serine protease inhibitor) to the culture media to inhibit premature clot digestion. Histological assessment of the novel HSE revealed expression of keratin 14 and keratin 10 similar to native skin, with a multilayered neoepidermis morphologically comparable to human skin. Furthermore, deposition of collagen IV and laminin-511 were detected by immunofluorescence, indicating the formation of a continuous basement membrane at the dermal-epidermal junction. The proposed method was efficient in producing an in vitro near native HSE using the chosen off-the-shelf porous scaffold (Integra). The same principles and promising outcomes should be applicable to other biodegradable

  6. Analysis of dry cylinder liner behavior during engine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Mizutani, Kazunori; Murata, Katsuhiro; Suzawa, Takashi; Niitsu, Yasuhiko

    1996-09-01

    Engine manufacturers are continuing to develop new engine designs that provide higher power output, lower fuel consumption and lower engine weight. In order to achieve significant engine weight reduction, the light weight cylinder block structure employs dry cylinder liners rather than wet cylinder liners. The cast iron dry liner structure is utilized because of the superior wear and scuff resistance of the cast iron. Thin wall dry cast iron liners are being employed in both gasoline and diesel engines. Dry cylinder liners with wall thickness of 1.5 mm are in production for Japanese automotive diesel engines. In the case of the dry thin wall cast iron liners, 2 design configurations are employed: loose-fit type having a specified clearance between the outer liner surface and the cylinder bore surface; press-in type having an interference fit between the outer surface of liner and the cylinder bore surface. The physical properties of cast iron must be considered during the design phase if successful production designs are to be provided. In addition the operating stress caused by piston slap, combustion pressure variation and resultant effect on operating stress in the liner must be considered during the design. This paper summarizes the results of a series of studies undertaken to determine the effect of piston slap, combustion pressure and initial stress on resultant behavior of thin wall cylinder liners under engine operating conditions. The resultant data may be utilized to improve the overall design of thin wall dry cylinder liners, especially for loose-fit liners.

  7. An analysis of a highly compounded two-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauschek, Max J; Sather, Bernard I; Biermann, Arnold E

    1949-01-01

    Presents an analysis of a compound engine operating with manifold pressures ranging from 60 to 110 lb/sq in. absolute. The effects of engine limits (peak cylinder pressure and turbine-inlet temperature) and component efficiency are discussed. A range analysis is used to evaluate the merit of the engine. The analysis indicates that specific-fuel-consumption values of 0.32 lb/bhp-hr and specific weights of 0.8 lb/bhp are obtainable at high manifold pressures.

  8. Closed form analysis of a gamma, back-to-back free displacer Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.L.; Kilgour, D.B.; Lazarides, Y.G.; Rallis, C.J.

    1983-08-01

    A back-to-back, free displacer, gamma type Stirling engine has been designed and is currently under manufacture and development at the University of the Witwatersrand. This paper presents a simple idealized analysis for such an engine. It involves the coupling together of the thermodynamic and mechanical equations, and by the use of classical control and vibration theory, closed form solutions are obtained. This work follows up on previous methods of analysis developed by Berchowitz, WyattMair and Goldberg for similar types of engines. A numerical application of the analysis has been carried out for the design in order to evaluate the operating frequency, phase displacements, amplitude of oscillation and basic output power. Performance characteristics are obtained and detailed in the paper. The analysis has provided analytic proof of the viability of the proposed engine configuration, highlighted weak areas and provided a background to higher order analysis. A programme of experimental validation is under way.

  9. Application of the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-Loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) for Dynamic Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Zinnecker, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    The aircraft engine design process seeks to achieve the best overall system-level performance, weight, and cost for a given engine design. This is achieved by a complex process known as systems analysis, where steady-state simulations are used to identify trade-offs that should be balanced to optimize the system. The steady-state simulations and data on which systems analysis relies may not adequately capture the true performance trade-offs that exist during transient operation. Dynamic Systems Analysis provides the capability for assessing these trade-offs at an earlier stage of the engine design process. The concept of dynamic systems analysis and the type of information available from this analysis are presented in this paper. To provide this capability, the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) was developed. This tool aids a user in the design of a power management controller to regulate thrust, and a transient limiter to protect the engine model from surge at a single flight condition (defined by an altitude and Mach number). Results from simulation of the closed-loop system may be used to estimate the dynamic performance of the model. This enables evaluation of the trade-off between performance and operability, or safety, in the engine, which could not be done with steady-state data alone. A design study is presented to compare the dynamic performance of two different engine models integrated with the TTECTrA software.

  10. Engineering technology and behavior analysis for interdisciplinary environmental protection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard P.; Geller, E. Scott

    1980-01-01

    Engineering strategies for saving environmental resources have been widespread. However, many of those engineering advances have not been widely accepted nor generally applied by large segments of the general population. This paper considers the need to examine behavioral/environmental variables in the application of engineering technology, with particular reference to specific behavioral strategies for encouraging the use of engineering technology from an interdisciplinary perspective. A model for the study of factors contributing to the solution of ecological/environmental problems is presented and examples of interdisciplinary research are described. The model implies a need for the examination of the effects of antecedent and consequent manipulation of a variety of variables including: behavioral, physiological, environmental, technical and legal conditions. It is concluded that while interdisciplinary research efforts between engineering technologists and behavioral analysts are necessary, they have not received sufficient attention in the literature nor have they focused on the comprehensive study of antecedents and consequences as they relate to ecological/environmental problems. Thus, an extended “family” of research efforts is important for the success of these efforts. PMID:22478473

  11. Magnetic Reconstruction and Stability Analysis of PEGASUS Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, S. J.; Fonck, R. J.; Garstka, G. D.; Sontag, A. C.; Tritz, K. L.

    2001-10-01

    Reconstruction of the magnetic equilibrium for recent discharges in Pegasus are obtained with a locally developed code. This code employs a nonlinear least-squares fitting routine combined with a Grad-Shafranov solver, and has been compared to TokaMak and EFIT analyses. A newly installed, comprehensive set of equilibrium magnetics diagnostics, including a poloidal array of 20 magnetic pick-up coils, 20 poloidal flux loops on the outboard, 6 center stack flux loops, a Rogowski coil for the toroidal plasma current, and a diamagnetic loop are used as constraints. Typical plasmas exhibit broad/flat central q(R) profiles with q(0)< = 2 corresponding to the onset of a large 2/1 mode. The ideal stability limits in q(a) and beta to be expected for Pegasus are under study using the DCON code applied to model equilibria. Plasmas with high edge current gradients are unstable to edge kink modes as expected; a constraint on the edge current gradients was implemented to access more realistic plasmas. A systematic mapping of stability space (e.g. li vs q(0), li vs q(98), etc.) is in progress.

  12. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR HYBRID NON-THERMAL PLASMA REACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for DoD air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile o...

  13. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to 10(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross-diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  14. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to l0(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross- diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  15. Tribological Study on Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Treatment in Al-Si Alloys for Engine Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiliat, Hoda

    Automotive industry strives to reach an optimum level of fuel economy. This can be achieved by overcoming two impacting factors on fuel consumption: weight and friction force. This research contributes to reduce both. The proposed surface treatment can replace cylinder liners of hypoeutectic aluminum silicon alloy engine blocks with a thin layer of ceramic oxide composed of alpha and gamma phases of Al2O3 and mullite. The coatings are achieved in an aqueous electrolytic bath with current densities of 0.1 to 0.2 A/cm2. Coatings produced in silicate based solutions have shown good adaptability to the counter surface with an average 0.12 coefficient of friction. Coatings produced in phosphate and aluminate solution have shown signs of delamination, and excessive porosity and roughness respectively. Coatings produced under Bipolar Pulsed Direct Current mode has up to 12% higher hardness values compared to unipolar coatings. For each increment of 0.2 A/cm2 current density, there is a 30% of increase in coating growth rate. Higher pH values of the solution creates faster growth rate up to 1.5 mu/min. These coatings are 20% more susceptible to wear. Samples treated in MoS2 solution showed 22% lower average roughness values and 37% of reduction in coefficient of friction. Mild wear scars on the piston rings were detected for the optimized coatings.

  16. Male Engineers: An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis of the Experiences of Persistence in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecklund, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    More and more engineering programs have become concerned with retention and persistence in their degrees, because about half of their students either change majors or do not graduate at all (Center for Institutional Data Exchange and Analysis, 2000). Male students were chosen for this study because they make up 92.9% of all civil engineers, 90.6%…

  17. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part II: Analysis of ITER plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, Gianfranco; Raffray, A. René

    1997-04-01

    The transient thermal model RACLETTE (acronym of Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation) described in part I of this paper is applied here to analyse the heat transfer and erosion effects of various slow (100 ms-10 s) high power energy transients on the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These have a strong bearing on the PFC design and need careful analysis. The relevant parameters affecting the heat transfer during the plasma excursions are established. The temperature variation with time and space is evaluated together with the extent of vaporisation and melting (the latter only for metals) for the different candidate armour materials considered for the design (i.e., Be for the primary first wall, Be and CFCs for the limiter, Be, W, and CFCs for the divertor plates) and including for certain cases low-density vapour shielding effects. The critical heat flux, the change of the coolant parameters and the possible severe degradation of the coolant heat removal capability that could result under certain conditions during these transients, for example for the limiter, are also evaluated. Based on the results, the design implications on the heat removal performance and erosion damage of the variuos ITER PFCs are critically discussed and some recommendations are made for the selection of the most adequate protection materials and optimum armour thickness.

  18. Energy efficient engine: Flight propulsion system preliminary analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. P.; Beitler, R. S.; Bobinger, R. O.; Broman, C. L.; Gravitt, R. D.; Heineke, H.; Holloway, P. R.; Klem, J. S.; Nash, D. O.; Ortiz, P.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of an advanced flight propulsion system (FPS), suitable for introduction in the late 1980's to early 1990's, was more fully defined. It was determined that all goals for efficiency, environmental considerations, and economics could be met or exceeded with the possible exception of NOx emission. In evaluating the FPS, all aspects were considered including component design, performance, weight, initial cost, maintenance cost, engine system integration (including nacelle), and aircraft integration considerations. The current FPS installed specific fuel consumption was reduced 14.2% from that of the CF6-50C reference engine. When integrated into an advanced, subsonic, study transport, the FPS produced a fuel burn savings of 15 to 23% and a direct operating cost reduction of 5 to 12% depending on the mission and study aircraft characteristics relative to the reference engine.

  19. Experimental analysis of IMEP in a rotary combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, H. J.; Rice, W. J.; Meng, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    A real time indicated mean effective pressure measurement system is described which is used to judge proposed improvements in cycle efficiency of a rotary combustion engine. This is the first self-contained instrument that is capable of making real time measurements of IMEP in a rotary engine. Previous methods used require data recording and later processing using a digital computer. The unique features of this instrumentation include its ability to measure IMEP on a cycle by cycle, real time basis and the elimination of the need to differentiate volume function in real time. Measurements at two engine speeds (2000 and 3000 rpm) and a full range of loads are presented, although the instrument was designed to operate to speeds of 9000 rpm.

  20. Energy efficient engine. Flight propulsion system preliminary analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    The characteristics of an advanced Flight Propulsion System (FPS) suitable for introduction in the late 1980's to early 1990's, were defined. It was determined that NASA goals for efficiency, environmental considerations, and economics could be met or exceeded with the possible exception of NOx emission. In evaluating the FPS, all aspects were considered including component design, performance, weight, initial cost, maintenance cost, engine-system integration (including nacelle), and aircraft integration considerations. In terms of the NASA goals, the current FPS installed specific fuel consumption was reduced 14.2% from that of the CF6-50C reference engine. When integrated into an advanced, subsonic, study transport, the FPS produced a fuel-burn savings of 15 to 23% and a direct operating cost reduction of 5 to 12% depending on the mission and study-aircraft characteristics relative to the reference engine.

  1. Analysis of integral lift-fan engine dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An integral lift-fan engine being considered for VTOL applications was simulated using the hybrid computer. A contractor-proposed fuel control and a simple model of the roll dynamics of a hovering VTOL airplane were used in the simulation. Both steady-state and transient data were generated. The desired engine time constant of 0.20 second was achieved for thrust increments less than 10 precent of the design thrust. For roll angle demands less than 10 deg, roll angle overshoot was acceptable with more than 84 percent of the demand achieved in 1 second.

  2. Integrated Network Analysis Reveals an Association between Plasma Mannose Levels and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunjae; Zhang, Cheng; Kilicarslan, Murat; Piening, Brian D; Bjornson, Elias; Hallström, Björn M; Groen, Albert K; Ferrannini, Ele; Laakso, Markku; Snyder, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens; Smith, Ulf; Serlie, Mireille J; Boren, Jan; Mardinoglu, Adil

    2016-07-12

    To investigate the biological processes that are altered in obese subjects, we generated cell-specific integrated networks (INs) by merging genome-scale metabolic, transcriptional regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks. We performed genome-wide transcriptomics analysis to determine the global gene expression changes in the liver and three adipose tissues from obese subjects undergoing bariatric surgery and integrated these data into the cell-specific INs. We found dysregulations in mannose metabolism in obese subjects and validated our predictions by detecting mannose levels in the plasma of the lean and obese subjects. We observed significant correlations between plasma mannose levels, BMI, and insulin resistance (IR). We also measured plasma mannose levels of the subjects in two additional different cohorts and observed that an increased plasma mannose level was associated with IR and insulin secretion. We finally identified mannose as one of the best plasma metabolites in explaining the variance in obesity-independent IR. PMID:27345421

  3. Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-Loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Zinnecker, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    The tool for turbine engine closed-loop transient analysis (TTECTrA) is a semi-automated control design tool for subsonic aircraft engine simulations. At a specific flight condition, TTECTrA produces a basic controller designed to meet user-defined goals and containing only the fundamental limiters that affect the transient performance of the engine. The purpose of this tool is to provide the user a preliminary estimate of the transient performance of an engine model without the need to design a full nonlinear controller.

  4. Success in Undergraduate Engineering Programs: A Comparative Analysis by Race and Gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, Susan

    2010-03-01

    Interest in increasing the number of engineering graduates in the United States and promoting gender equality and diversification of the profession has encouraged considerable research on women and minorities in engineering programs. Drawing on a framework of intersectionality theory, this work recognizes that women of different ethnic backgrounds warrant disaggregated analysis because they do not necessarily share a common experience in engineering education. Using a longitudinal, comprehensive data set of more than 79,000 students who matriculated in engineering at nine universities in the Southeastern United States, this research examines how the six-year graduation rates of engineering students vary by disaggregated combinations of gender and race/ethnicity. Contrary to the popular opinion that women drop out of engineering at higher rates, our results show that Asian, Black, Hispanic, Native American, and White women who matriculate in engineering are as likely as men to graduate in engineering in six years. In fact, Asian, Black, Hispanic, and Native American women engineering matriculants graduate at higher rates than men and there is a small difference for white students. 54 percent of White women engineering matriculants graduate in six-years compared with 53 percent of white men. For male and female engineering matriculants of all races, the most likely destination six years after entering college is graduation within engineering. This work underscores the importance of research disaggregated by race and gender and points to the critical need for more recruitment of women into engineering as the low representation of women in engineering education is primarily a reflection of their low representation at matriculation.

  5. Plasma analysis for the plasma immersion ion implantation processing by a PIC-MCC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Y.; Ikeyama, M.; Miyagawa, S.; Tanaka, M.; Nakadate, H.

    2007-07-01

    In order to analyze the plasma behavior during PIII processing, a computer simulation has been carried out using the simulation software "PEGASUS". The software uses a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method for the movement of charged particles in the electromagnetic field and a Monte Carlo method for collisions of ions, electrons, and neutrals in the plasma and also a Monte Carlo method to analyze the background gas behavior for a low density gas system. This approach is based on the weighting collision simulation scheme allowing for disparate number densities of different species. The spatial distributions of potential and densities of ions, electrons and radicals in the coating system were calculated together with the flux of ions and electrons on the surface of the object. The gas pressure was 0.01 to 50 Pa and a negative and/or a positive pulse voltage ( V=0.1 to 20 kV) was applied to the object. The calculation is fully self-consistent. A two-dimensional Cartesian and a cylindrical coordinate system were used. The effects of gas pressure, applied voltage, and secondary electron emission coefficient by ion impact ( γ) on the sheath thickness, the spatial distribution of densities of electron, ion, and neutral atoms, the ion flux and its spatial distribution, etc. were studied for PIII processing of a trench shaped object, inner wall of a pipe and a PET bottle.

  6. Use of a biological reactor and platelet-rich plasma for the construction of tissue-engineered bone to repair articular cartilage defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huibo; Sun, Shui; Liu, Haili; Chen, Hua; Rong, Xin; Lou, Jigang; Yang, Yunbei; Yang, Yi; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects are a major clinical burden worldwide. Current methods to repair bone defects include bone autografts, allografts and external fixation. In recent years, the repair of bone defects by tissue engineering has emerged as a promising approach. The present study aimed to assess a novel method using a biological reactor with platelet-rich plasma to construct tissue-engineered bone. Beagle bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and differentiated into osteoblasts and chondroblasts using platelet-rich plasma and tricalcium phosphate scaffolds cultured in a bioreactor for 3 weeks. The cell scaffold composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and implanted into beagles with articular cartilage defects. The expression of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase and bone γ-carboxyglutamate protein (BGLAP) were assessed using polymerase chain reaction after 3 months. Articular cartilage specimens were observed histologically. Adhesion and distribution of BMSCs on the β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold were confirmed by SEM. Histological examination revealed that in vivo bone defects were largely repaired 12 weeks following implantation. The expression levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and BGLAP in the experimental groups were significantly elevated compared with the negative controls. BMSCs may be optimum seed cells for tissue engineering in bone repair. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) provides a rich source of cytokines to promote BMSC function. The β-TCP scaffold is advantageous for tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and 3D structure that promotes cell adhesion, growth and differentiation. The tissue-engineered bone was constructed in a bioreactor using BMSCs, β-TCP scaffolds and PRP and displayed appropriate morphology and biological function. The present study provides an efficient method for the generation of tissue-engineered bone for cartilage repair, compared with previously used

  7. On Analysis of Electrical Engineering Programme in GCC Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Qurban A.

    2007-01-01

    Electrical engineering (EE) curricula in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region have gone through an evolutionary process, and are now approaching a maturity level. In order to address academic and local industrial needs in a unified way, a need has been felt to investigate EE curricula in a way that highlights theoretical understanding, design…

  8. Engineering Maintenance. Occupational Analysis. UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas D.; And Others

    The report has described the results of a questionnaire survey covering task performance in the occupational area of hospital engineering and maintenance and the implications for curriculum development in personnel training. Survey respondents were selected from among personnel of 48 health care facilities in six cities, representing various sized…

  9. Teaching Sustainability Analysis in Electrical Engineering Lab Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, D.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory courses represent an incompletely tapped opportunity to teach sustainability concepts. This work introduces and evaluates a simple strategy used to teach sustainability concepts in electrical engineering laboratory courses. The technique would readily adapt to other disciplines. The paper presents assessment data and a wiki containing…

  10. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Reliability and Analysis Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Walter E.; Rogers, James H.; Biggs, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is a large thrust class, reusable, staged combustion cycle rocket engine employing liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants. A cluster of three SSMEs is used on every space shuttle mission to propel the space shuttle orbiter vehicle into low earth orbit. Development of the SSME began in the early 70 s and the first flight of the space shuttle occurred in 1981. Today, the SSME has accrued over one million seconds of ground test and flight operational time, launching 129 space shuttle missions. Given that the SSME is used to launch a manned vehicle, its reliability must be commensurate for the task. At the same time, the SSME is a high performance, high power density engine which traditionally does not lend itself towards high reliability. Furthermore, throughout its history, the SSME operational envelope has been explored and expanded leading to several major test failures. Hence, assessing the reliability of the SSME throughout its history has been a challenging undertaking. This paper provides a review and discussion of SSME reliability assessment techniques and results over its history. Basic reliability drivers such as engine design, test program, major failures, redesigns and upgrades will also be discussed.

  11. Hydrogen engine performance analysis project. First quarterly report, March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Adt, Jr, R R; Swain, M R; Pappas, J M

    1980-01-01

    Progress in a program aimed at obtaining operational and performance data on a prototype pre intake valve closing fuel ingestion (PreIVC) hydrogen-fueled automotive engine is reported. Information is included on the construction and testing of an unthrottled hydrogen delivery system and on flashback during starting. It was determined that the flashback was caused by runaway surface ignition. (LCL)

  12. Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic-Bypass Airbreathing Hypersonic Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Bityurin, Valentine A.; Lineberry, John T.

    1999-01-01

    Established analyses of conventional ramjet/scramjet performance characteristics indicate that a considerable decrease in efficiency can be expected at off-design flight conditions. This can be explained, in large part, by the deterioration of intake mass flow and limited inlet compression at low flight speeds and by the onset of thrust degradation effects associated with increased burner entry temperature at high flight speeds. In combination, these effects tend to impose lower and upper Mach number limits for practical flight. It has been noted, however, that Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy management techniques represent a possible means for extending the flight Mach number envelope of conventional engines. By transferring enthalpy between different stages of the engine cycle, it appears that the onset of thrust degradation may be delayed to higher flight speeds. Obviously, the introduction of additional process inefficiencies is inevitable with this approach, but it is believed that these losses are more than compensated through optimization of the combustion process. The fundamental idea is to use MHD energy conversion processes to extract and bypass a portion of the intake kinetic energy around the burner. We refer to this general class of propulsion system as an MHD-bypass engine. In this paper, we quantitatively assess the performance potential and scientific feasibility of MHD-bypass airbreathing hypersonic engines using ideal gasdynamics and fundamental thermodynamic principles.

  13. Engineering graduates' skill sets in the MENA region: a gap analysis of industry expectations and satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadi, Eric; Ramadi, Serge; Nasr, Karim

    2016-01-01

    This study explored gaps between industry expectations and perceptions of engineering graduates' skill sets in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. This study measured the importance that managers of engineers placed on 36 skills relevant to engineers. Also measured was managers' satisfaction with engineering graduates' skill sets. Importance and satisfaction were used to calculate skill gaps for each skill. A principal components analysis was then performed, consolidating the 36 skills into 8 categories. The means of importance, satisfaction, and skill gaps were ranked to determine the areas in which graduates needed improvement. Results showed significant gaps between managers' expectations of and satisfaction with all 36 skills. The areas in which managers felt that graduates needed most improvement were communication, time management, and continuous learning. Managers reported that recent engineering graduates exhibited low overall preparedness for employment. These findings may help to inform curricular reform in engineering education.

  14. Tools to Support Human Factors and Systems Engineering Interactions During Early Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronesbery, Carroll; Malin, Jane T.; Holden, Kritina; Smith, Danielle Paige

    2006-01-01

    We describe an approach and existing software tool support for effective interactions between human factors engineers and systems engineers in early analysis activities during system acquisition. We examine the tasks performed during this stage, emphasizing those tasks where system engineers and human engineers interact. The Concept of Operations (ConOps) document is an important product during this phase, and particular attention is paid to its influences on subsequent acquisition activities. Understanding this influence helps ConOps authors describe a complete system concept that guides subsequent acquisition activities. We identify commonly used system engineering and human engineering tools and examine how they can support the specific tasks associated with system definition. We identify possible gaps in the support of these tasks, the largest of which appears to be creating the ConOps document itself. Finally, we outline the goals of our future empirical investigations of tools to support system concept definition.

  15. Tools to Support Human Factors and Systems Engineering Interactions During Early Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronesbery, Carroll; Malin, Jane T.; Holden, Kritina; Smith, Danielle Paige

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach and existing software tool support for effective interactions between human factors engineers and systems engineers in early analysis activities during system acquisition. We examine the tasks performed during this stage, emphasizing those tasks where system engineers and human engineers interact. The Concept of Operations (ConOps) document is an important product during this phase, and particular attention is paid to its influences on subsequent acquisition activities. Understanding this influence helps ConOps authors describe a complete system concept that guides subsequent acquisition activities. We identify commonly used system engineering and human engineering tools and examine how they can support the specific tasks associated with system definition. We identify possible gaps in the support of these tasks, the largest of which appears to be creating the ConOps document itself. Finally, we outline the goals of our future empirical investigations of tools to support system concept definition.

  16. System analysis of a piston steam engine employing the uniflow principle, a study in optimized performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported which were obtained from a mathematical model of a generalized piston steam engine configuration employing the uniflow principal. The model accounted for the effects of clearance volume, compression work, and release volume. A simple solution is presented which characterizes optimum performance of the steam engine, based on miles per gallon. Development of the mathematical model is presented. The relationship between efficiency and miles per gallon is developed. An approach to steam car analysis and design is presented which has purpose rather than lucky hopefulness. A practical engine design is proposed which correlates to the definition of the type engine used. This engine integrates several system components into the engine structure. All conclusions relate to the classical Rankine Cycle.

  17. Composite hubs for low cost turbine engines. [stress analysis using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed stress analysis is performed using NASTRAN to demonstrate theoretically the adequacy of composite hubs for low cost turbine engine applications. The results show that composite hubs are adequate for this application from the steady state stress viewpoint.

  18. Overview of Engineering Design and Analysis at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congiardo, Jared; Junell, Justin; Kirkpatrick, Richard; Ryan, Harry

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a general overview of the design and analysis division of NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. This division develops and maintains propulsion test systems and facilities for engineering competencies.

  19. Scale analysis of equatorial plasma irregularities derived from Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Stolle, Claudia; Lühr, Hermann; Park, Jaeheung; Fejer, Bela G.; Kervalishvili, Guram N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the scale sizes of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs) using measurements from the Swarm satellites during its early mission and final constellation phases. We found that with longitudinal separation between Swarm satellites larger than 0.4°, no significant correlation was found any more. This result suggests that EPI structures include plasma density scale sizes less than 44 km in the zonal direction. During the Swarm earlier mission phase, clearly better EPI correlations are obtained in the northern hemisphere, implying more fragmented irregularities in the southern hemisphere where the ambient magnetic field is low. The previously reported inverted-C shell structure of EPIs is generally confirmed by the Swarm observations in the northern hemisphere, but with various tilt angles. From the Swarm spacecrafts with zonal separations of about 150 km, we conclude that larger zonal scale sizes of irregularities exist during the early evening hours (around 1900 LT).

  20. Analysis of Plasma microRNA Associated with Hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Shkurnikov, M Yu; Knyazev, E N; Fomicheva, K A; Mikhailenko, D S; Nyushko, K M; Saribekyan, E K; Samatov, T R; Alekseev, B Ya

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the effect of hemolysis on microRNA profi le of blood plasma. It was found that hemolysis of ~0.05% erythrocytes in a sample signifi cantly affected the concentration of 9 microRNA: hsa-miR-486-5p, hsa-miR-16-5p, hsa-miR-451a, hsa-miR-106a-5p, hsa-miR-17-5p, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-107, and hsa-miR-20b-5p. The effect of hemolysis on plasma content of miR-17 family microRNA was demonstrated. PMID:27165077

  1. Energy level offset analysis of lead atom in laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. M.; Chen, C. S.; Man, B. Y.; Guo, J.; Wang, J.

    2009-08-01

    The optical emission spectra of the plasma generated by a 1064 nm laser irradiation of lead target in air were recorded and analyzed. Temporal evolvement trait of spectral lines was investigated. The Stark width and line shift were measured at different delay time and laser energies. The electron densities were determined using Stark-broadening parameters of spectral lines. The atomic energy level offset in plasma surroundings was explored by analyzing the line shift. The experimental data of Stark widths and line shifts were analyzed using the regularity of the Stark parameters’ dependence on effective ionization potential. However an inverse experimental result was found compared with the theoretical calculation. In addition, the change of the Stark widths and line shifts with the delay time and laser energies was discussed.

  2. [Immunodiffusion analysis of plasma proteins in the canine family].

    PubMed

    Baranov, O K; Iurishina, N A; Savina, M A

    1976-01-01

    Immunodiffusion studies have been made on the plasma of 9 species (Vulpes vulpes, V. corsak, Alopex lagopus, Canis aureus, C. lupus, C. familiaris, C. dingo, Nyctereutes procynoides, Fennecus zerde) from the family of Canidae using milk antisera. Unlike rabbit antisera used earlier, milk antisera make it possible to detect more significant antigenic divergency with respect to 5 alpha- and beta-globulins. These globulins seem to have a higher evolution rate of antigenic mosaics as compared to other plasma proteins in the family investigated. The family Canidae serologically may be divided into two main groups: 1) the genus Canis which includes the wolf, domestic dog, dingo, jackal and 2) species which significantly differ from the former (the fox, polar fox, dog fox, fennec). In relation to these two groups, the raccoon dog occupies special position. PMID:62473

  3. Converting spatial to pseudotemporal resolution in laser plasma analysis by simultaneous multifiber spectroscopy

    PubMed

    Bulatov; Krasniker; Schechter

    2000-07-01

    Traditional chemical analysis based on laser plasma spectroscopy (LPS) requires time-gated detectors, to avoid the initial signal from the hot plasma. These detectors are expensive and often need to be cooled and protected against vapor condensation. We suggest a low-cost setup that may replace these gated detectors, while maintaining acceptable analytical performance. The proposed setup is a result of investigation of plasma-front propagation in LPS analysis. It is known that the LPS plasma propagation is similar to the shock wave propagation after a strong explosion in the atmosphere. We found that the propagation of the plasma fits well the Sedov blast wave theory, providing a good agreement between the theoretical and experimental figures. A proper observation geometry, which is perpendicular to the plasma expansion vector, enables converting spatial to temporal resolution. We take advantage of the fact that the plasma reaches a given distance above the analyzed surface at a certain time delay. Therefore, a single optical fiber, positioned at a well-defined geometry, can provide spectral information corresponding to a certain time delay. A multifiber imaging spectrometer provides information corresponding to a series of delay times, which is adequate for analysis of a variety of matrixes. It was found that the performance of the nongated detector observing a narrow solid angle is similar to that of a gated one observing the whole plasma. For one particular example, observing the plasma from a distance of 4.5 mm is equivalent to a delay of 4 micros and integration time of 2 mircos. The ratio of spectral lines of two elements was investigated using the spatially resolved (nongated) setup, and it was found that this mode is advantageous when internal calibration is applied. It was concluded that sensitive LPS analyses can be carried out by less expensive (nongated) detectors. PMID:10905339

  4. [Spectra and thermal analysis of the arc in activating flux plasma arc welding].

    PubMed

    Chai, Guo-Ming; Zhu, Yi-Feng

    2010-04-01

    In activating flux plasma arc welding the welding arc was analyzed by spectra analysis technique, and the welding arc temperature field was measured by the infrared sensing and computer image technique. The distribution models of welding arc heat flow density of activating flux PAW welding were developed. The composition of welding arc affected by activated flux was studied, and the welding arc temperature field was studied. The results show that the spectral lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are the main spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The spectra lines of weld metal are inappreciable in the spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The gas particle is the main in the conventional plasma welding arc. The conventional plasma welding arc is gas welding arc. The spectra lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are intensified in the activating flux plasma welding arc, and the spectra lines of Ti, Cr and Fe elements are found in the activating flux plasma welding arc. The welding arc temperature distribution in activating flux plasma arc welding is compact, the outline of the welding arc temperature field is narrow, the range of the welding arc temperature distribution is concentrated, the welding arc radial temperature gradient is large, and the welding arc radial temperature gradient shows normal Gauss distribution. PMID:20545181

  5. Analysis of extreme ultraviolet spectra from laser produced rhenium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Liu, Luning; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly-charged rhenium ions were observed in the 1-7 nm region using two Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths of 150 ps and 10 ns, respectively, operating at a number of laser power densities. The maximum focused peak power density was 2.6 × 1014 W cm-2 for the former and 5.5 × 1012 W cm-2 for the latter. The Cowan suite of atomic structure codes and unresolved transition array (UTA) approach were used to calculate and interpret the emission properties of the different spectra obtained. The results show that n = 4-n = 4 and n = 4-n = 5 UTAs lead to two intense quasi-continuous emission bands in the 4.3-6.3 nm and 1.5-4.3 nm spectral regions. As a result of the different ion stage distributions in the plasmas induced by ps and ns laser irradiation the 1.5-4.3 nm UTA peak moves to shorter wavelength in the ps laser produced plasma spectra. For the ns spectrum, the most populated ion stage during the lifetime of this plasma that could be identified from the n = 4-n = 5 transitions was Re23+ while for the ps plasma the presence of significantly higher stages was demonstrated. For the n = 4-n = 4 4p64dN-4p54dN+1 + 4p64dN-14f transitions, the 4d-4f transitions contribute mainly in the most intense 4.7-5.5 nm region while the 4p-4d subgroup gives rise to a weaker feature in the 4.3-4.7 nm region. A number of previously unidentified spectral features produced by n = 4-n = 5 transitions in the spectra of Re XVI to Re XXXIX are identified.

  6. Analysis of plasma membrane phosphoinositides from fusogenic carrot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J.J.; Boss, W.F.

    1987-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) were found to be associated with the plasma membrane-rich fractions isolated by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning from fusogenic cells. They represented at least 5% and 0.7% of the total inositol-labeled lipids in the plasma membrane-rich fractions, respectively, and were present in a ratio of about 7:1 (PIP:PIP/sub 2/). In addition, two unidentified inositol-labeled compounds, which together were approximately 3% of the inositol-labeled lipids, were found predominantly in the plasma membrane-rich fractions and migrated between PIP/sub 2/ and PIP. The R/sub f/s of these compounds were approximately 0.31 and 0.34 in the solvent system CHCl/sub 3/:MeOH:15N NH/sub 4/OH:H/sub 2/O (90:90:7:22) using LK5 plates presoaked in 1% potassium oxalate. These compounds incorporated /sup 32/P/sub i/, (/sup 3/H)inositol and were hydrolyzed in mild base. These data suggested that they were glycero-phospholipids. Although the compounds did not comigrate with lysoPIP obtained from bovine brain (R/sub f/ approx. 0.35), when endogenous PIP was hydrolyzed to lysoPIP, the breakdown product migrated in the region of the unidentified inositol lipids.

  7. Analysis of Electron Trajectories in Magnetized High Power Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Dennis; Gallian, Sara; Trieschmann, Jan; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2015-09-01

    High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) is an important example of magnetized technological plasmas. With HiPIMS the focus lies on the generation of a high density plasma with a remarkably high degree of ionization. It can be used for the deposition of thin films with superior density and quality. Theoretical approaches to the regime of magnetized low temperature plasmas encounter some fundamental difficulties, for example concerning the details of the magnetic field configuration, the strongly varying degree of magnetization, and the frequent wall interactions. A kinetic single particle model is used for the investigations. Single electron trajectories are analyzed with the widely used Boris algorithm within the magnetized zone above the target (racetrack). We further examine a configuration where symmetry breaking occurs due to a potential bump, which is rotating azimuthally around the racetrack (spoke). Observing the effects of this structure on the single electron motion may allow us to obtain further insight into this phenomenon. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  8. Electrostatic wave structures and their stability analysis in nonextensive magnetised electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, T. S.; Bala, Parveen; Bains, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    A rigorous theoretical study based on Zakharov Kuznetsov (ZK) equation of ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs), their stability analysis in a magnetized e- p- i plasma is presented. The plasma model consists of inertial ions, magnetic field, electrons and positrons obeying q-nonextensive velocity distribution. Reductive perturbation method is used to derive ZK equation. The solitary wave structures are dependent on chosen plasma model, whose parameters influence the solitary characteristics. Particularly, nonextensivity, proportion of positron concentration, magnetic field and difference between electron and positron temperatures play crucial role in the solitary structures. The present work is also extended to give stability analysis and parametric ranges for the existence of stable and unstable solitons. This research work may be useful to understand the physics of nonlinear electrostatic excitations in different astrophysical and cosmic scenarios like stellar polytropes, hadron matter and quark-gluon plasma.

  9. Analysis of plasma coupling with the prototype DIII-D ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.M.; Hoffman, D.J.; Bigelow, T.S.; Baity, F.W.; Gardner, W.L.; Mayberry, M.J.; Rothe, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    Coupling to plasma in the H-mode is essential to the success of future ignited machines such as CIT. To ascertain voltage and current requirements for high-power second harmonic heating (2 MW in a 35- by 50-cm port), coupling to the DIII-D tokamak with a prototype compact loop antenna has been measured. The results show good loading for L-mode and limiter plasmas, but coupling 2 MW to an H-mode plasma demands voltages and currents near the limit of present technology. We report the technological analysis and progress that allow coupling of these power densities. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  10. On the thermal stability of a radiating plasma subject to nonlocal thermal conduction. I - Linear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, E.; Rosner, R.

    1993-01-01

    We study the linear stability of an optically thin uniform radiating plasma subject to nonlocal heat transport. We derive the dispersion relation appropriate to this problem, and the marginal wavenumbers for instability. Our analysis indicates that nonlocal heat transport acts to reduce the stabilizing influence of thermal conduction, and that there are critical values for the electron mean free path such that the plasma is always unstable. Our results may be applied to a number of astrophysical plasmas, one such example being the halos of clusters of galaxies.

  11. Optical Analysis Of The Vacuum Arc Plasma Generated In Cup-Shape Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelescu, G.; Gherendi, F.; Pavelescu, D.; Dumitrescu, G.; Anghelita, P.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper are presented the results of the optical analysis on the rotating arc plasma, generated in the vacuum low voltage circuit breaker with cup-shaped contacts. An adequate experimental setup was used for single shot time and spatial resolved spectroscopy in order to analyze the evolution of the vacuum arc plasma. Different current interruption situations are correlated with plasma spectral diagnosis. The study is aimed to contribute to a better understanding of the complex phenomena that take place in the interruption process of high currents that appears in the short-circuit regime of electrical networks.

  12. Applications of a d.c. plasma emission spectrometer (DCP) to the analysis of envrionmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, W. C.

    A direct current plasma spectrometer system has been used to determine specific trace elements in samples collected during several marine monitoring surveys. The data is currently being used to assess the impact on the environment of North Sea oil exploitation. The trace elements are routinely monitored in sediment and shellfish extracts and in oil terminal water effluents. The techniques used in conjunction with the d.c. plasma system are evaluated. Stray light and spectral interference problems from calcium and magnesium emissions are identified. Compensation for the interferences using simple linear corrections are described. Analysis of standard reference materials indicates that the direct current plasma system yields results comparable to other analytical techniques.

  13. PIV analysis of the homogeneity of energy deposition during development of a plasma actuator channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazyrin, F. N.; Znamenskaya, I. A.; Mursenkova, I. V.; Naumov, D. S.; Sysoev, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nonstationary velocity fields that arise during the development of flows behind shock (blast) waves initiated by pulsed surface sliding discharge in air at a pressure of (2-4) × 104 Pa have been experimentally studied by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Plasma sheets (nanosecond discharges slipping over a dielectric surface) were initiated on walls of a rectangular chamber. Spatial analysis of the shape of shock-wave fronts and the distribution of flow velocities behind these waves showed that the pulsed energy deposition is homogeneous along discharge channels of a plasma sheet, while the integral visible plasma glow intensity decreases in the direction of channel propagation.

  14. Architecture, modeling, and analysis of a plasma impedance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, Magathi

    Variations in ionospheric plasma density can cause large amplitude and phase changes in the radio waves passing through this region. Ionospheric weather can have detrimental effects on several communication systems, including radars, navigation systems such as the Global Positioning Sytem (GPS), and high-frequency communications. As a result, creating models of the ionospheric density is of paramount interest to scientists working in the field of satellite communication. Numerous empirical and theoretical models have been developed to study the upper atmosphere climatology and weather. Multiple measurements of plasma density over a region are of marked importance while creating these models. The lack of spatially distributed observations in the upper atmosphere is currently a major limitation in space weather research. A constellation of CubeSat platforms would be ideal to take such distributed measurements. The use of miniaturized instruments that can be accommodated on small satellites, such as CubeSats, would be key to achieving these science goals for space weather. The accepted instrumentation techniques for measuring the electron density are the Langmuir probes and the Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP). While Langmuir probes are able to provide higher resolution measurements of relative electron density, the Plasma Impedance Probes provide absolute electron density measurements irrespective of spacecraft charging. The central goal of this dissertation is to develop an integrated architecture for the PIP that will enable space weather research from CubeSat platforms. The proposed PIP chip integrates all of the major analog and mixed-signal components needed to perform swept-frequency impedance measurements. The design's primary innovation is the integration of matched Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC) on a single chip for sampling the probes current and voltage signals. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is performed by an off-chip Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA

  15. Analysis of space shuttle main engine data using Beacon-based exception analysis for multi-missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Mackey, R.; James, M.; Zak, M.; Kynard, M.; Sebghati, J.; Greene, W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) sensor data using Beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions (BEAM), a new technology developed for sensor analysis and diagnostics in autonomous space systems by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  16. Software Engineering as Seen through Its Research Literature: A Study in Co-Word Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulter, Neal; Monarch, Ira; Konda, Suresh

    1998-01-01

    This empirical research demonstrates the effectiveness of content analysis to map the research literature of the software engineering discipline. Co-word analysis, which is related to cocitation analysis, is used to identify associations among indexing terms from the AMC (Association for Computing Machinery) Computing Classification System and to…

  17. Coherent optical analysis of crystal-like patterns induced by human blood plasma desiccation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyabina, Tatyana V.; Drajevsky, Roman A.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Zimnyakov, Dmitry A.

    2001-05-01

    The comparative investigation of blood plasma and serum polycrystal layers properties was executed. Formation of microcrystals by desiccation of blood plasma is shown. Such crystals are absent in serum layers. The formation of thrombus at blood serum preparation and, as a result, lack of protein molecules is the reason of the difference. The possibility of Wiener spectra application for analysis of formed crystal structure disorder is shown.

  18. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis and radial immunodiffusion assay using plasminogen purified from fresh human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Magoon, E. H.; Austen, K. F.; Spragg, Jocelyn

    1974-01-01

    Plasminogen was purified from fresh human plasma by affinity chromatography and gel filtration and was characterized functionally, electrophoretically and on a weight basis. After antibody raised against this material was demonstrated to be monospecific for plasminogen/plasmin, it was employed in an immunoelectrophoretic analysis of plasminogen activated in several ways and in a radial immunodiffusion assay of human plasma plasminogen, where the mean level found was 476 μg/ml. ImagesFIG. 5FIG. 8 PMID:4143118

  19. A fluctuation-induced plasma transport diagnostic based upon fast-Fourier transform spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, J. Y.; Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A diagnostic, based on fast Fourier-transform spectral analysis techniques, that provides experimental insight into the relationship between the experimentally observable spectral characteristics of the fluctuations and the fluctuation-induced plasma transport is described. The model upon which the diagnostic technique is based and its experimental implementation is discussed. Some characteristic results obtained during the course of an experimental study of fluctuation-induced transport in the electric field dominated NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma are presented.

  20. Study of plasma environments for the integrated Space Station electromagnetic analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1992-01-01

    The final report includes an analysis of various plasma effects on the electromagnetic environment of the Space Station Freedom. Effects of arcing are presented. Concerns of control of arcing by a plasma contactor are highlighted. Generation of waves by contaminant ions are studied and amplitude levels of the waves are estimated. Generation of electromagnetic waves by currents in the structure of the space station, driven by motional EMF, is analyzed and the radiation level is estimated.

  1. Blade loss transient dynamics analysis, volume 1. Task 1: Survey and perspective. [aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallardo, V. C.; Gaffney, E. F.; Bach, L. J.; Stallone, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed to predict the behavior of a rotor system subjected to sudden unbalance. The technique is implemented in the Turbine Engine Transient Rotor Analysis (TETRA) computer program using the component element method. The analysis was particularly aimed toward blade-loss phenomena in gas turbine engines. A dual-rotor, casing, and pylon structure can be modeled by the computer program. Blade tip rubs, Coriolis forces, and mechanical clearances are included. The analytical system was verified by modeling and simulating actual test conditions for a rig test as well as a full-engine, blade-release demonstration.

  2. LC-MS/MS analysis of carboxymethylated and carboxyethylated phosphatidylethanolamines in human erythrocytes and blood plasma[S

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Naoki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Asai, Akira; Fujita, Ikuko; Hashiura, Aya; Nakajima, Yasushi; Oikawa, Shinichi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    An amino group of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is considered as a target for nonenzymatic glycation, and the potential involvement of lipid glycation in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications has generated interest. However, unlike an early glycation product of PE (Amadori-PE), the occurrence and roles of advanced glycation end products of PE (AGE-PE) in vivo have been unclear. Here, we developed an LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of AGE-PE [carboxymethyl-PE (CM-PE) and carboxyethyl-PE (CE-PE)]. Collision-induced dissociation of CM-PE and CE-PE produced characteristic ions, permitting neutral loss scanning (NLS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of AGE-PE. By NLS analysis, a series of AGE-PE molecular species was detected in human erythrocytes and blood plasma. In LC-MS/MS analysis, MRM enabled the separation and determination of the predominant AGE-PE species. Between healthy subjects and diabetic patients, no significant differences were observed in AGE-PE concentrations in erythrocytes and plasma, whereas Amadori-PE concentrations were higher in diabetic patients. These results provide direct evidence for the presence of AGE-PE in human blood, and indicated that, compared with Amadori-PE, AGE-PE is less likely to be accumulated in diabetic blood. The presently developed LC-MS/MS method appears to be a powerful tool for understanding in vivo lipid glycation and its pathophysiological consequence. PMID:20386060

  3. LC-MS analysis of the plasma metabolome--a novel sample preparation strategy.

    PubMed

    Skov, Kasper; Hadrup, Niels; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Frandsen, Henrik

    2015-01-26

    Blood plasma is a well-known body fluid often analyzed in studies on the effects of toxic compounds as physiological or chemical induced changes in the mammalian body are reflected in the plasma metabolome. Sample preparation prior to LC-MS based analysis of the plasma metabolome is a challenge as plasma contains compounds with very different properties. Besides, proteins, which usually are precipitated with organic solvent, phospholipids, are known to cause ion suppression in electrospray mass spectrometry. We have compared two different sample preparation techniques prior to LC-qTOF analysis of plasma samples: the first is protein precipitation; the second is protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction with sub-fractionation into three sub-samples: a phospholipid, a lipid and a polar sub-fraction. Molecular feature extraction of the data files from LC-qTOF analysis of the samples revealed 1792 molecular features from the protein precipitation procedure. The protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction procedure with three sub-samples gave a total of 4234 molecular features. This suggests that sub-sampling into polar, lipid and phospholipid fractions enables extraction of more metabolomic information as compared to protein precipitation alone. Chromatography showed good separation of the metabolites with little retention time drift (<1s) and a mass accuracy below 3 ppm was observed. The performance of the method was investigated using plasma samples from rats administered the environmental pollutant perfluorononanoic acid. PMID:25531874

  4. Large deviation analysis of a simple information engine.

    PubMed

    Maitland, Michael; Grosskinsky, Stefan; Harris, Rosemary J

    2015-11-01

    Information thermodynamics provides a framework for studying the effect of feedback loops on entropy production. It has enabled the understanding of novel thermodynamic systems such as the information engine, which can be seen as a modern version of "Maxwell's Dæmon," whereby a feedback controller processes information gained by measurements in order to extract work. Here, we analyze a simple model of such an engine that uses feedback control based on measurements to obtain negative entropy production. We focus on the distribution and fluctuations of the information obtained by the feedback controller. Significantly, our model allows an analytic treatment for a two-state system with exact calculation of the large deviation rate function. These results suggest an approximate technique for larger systems, which is corroborated by simulation data. PMID:26651675

  5. Hazard Analysis for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Robin S.; Geeting, John GH; Lawrence, Wesley E.; Young, Jonathan

    2008-07-10

    The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is designed to perform a demonstration on an engineering scale to confirm the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and filtration process equipment design and sludge treatment process. The system will use scaled prototypic equipment to demonstrate sludge water wash, caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, and filtration. Unit operations to be tested include pumping, solids washing, chemical reagent addition and blending, heating, cooling, leaching, filtration, and filter cleaning. In addition, the PEP will evaluate potential design changes to the ultrafiltration process system equipment to potentially enhance leaching and filtration performance as well as overall pretreatment throughput. The skid-mounted system will be installed and operated in the Processing Development Laboratory-West at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

  6. Analysis of Aurora's Performance Simulation Engine for Three Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Janine; Simon, Joseph

    2015-07-07

    Aurora Solar Inc. is building a cloud-based optimization platform to automate the design, engineering, and permit generation process of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. They requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validate the performance of the PV system performance simulation engine of Aurora Solar’s solar design platform, Aurora. In previous work, NREL performed a validation of multiple other PV modeling tools 1, so this study builds upon that work by examining all of the same fixed-tilt systems with available module datasheets that NREL selected and used in the aforementioned study. Aurora Solar set up these three operating PV systems in their modeling platform using NREL-provided system specifications and concurrent weather data. NREL then verified the setup of these systems, ran the simulations, and compared the Aurora-predicted performance data to measured performance data for those three systems, as well as to performance data predicted by other PV modeling tools.

  7. Carrageenan analysis. Part 3: Quantification in swine plasma.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, William R; Brant, Ashley F; Bissland, Jonathan G; Bissland, Natalie D

    2014-01-01

    Development and validation of this method was conducted to support a 28-day piglet feeding study of swine-adapted infant formulations stabilised with carrageenan. The validation was performed in accordance with USFDA Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) Regulations and associated current bioanalytical guidelines. Separation of carrageenan from plasma protein was unsuccessful using saturated sodium chloride due to the extremely strong cross-linking interactions between carrageenan and protein. Poligeenan is the deliberately acid-hydrolysed low molecular weight polygalactan non-food product produced from carrageenan. Poligeenan molecules are nearly identical to carrageenan molecules with respect to molecular structure, the primary difference being molecular weight. These poligeenan molecules have similar molecular weight when compared with the lowest molecular weight fraction of carrageenan called the low molecular-weight tail (LMT). Poligeenan was separated from plasma protein using the salting procedure, this being due to the significantly weaker interaction with protein caused by its shorter molecular chain length. Thus, poligeenan was applied as a chemical analyte surrogate for the LMT of carrageenan solely for the development and validation of the method. This method was used to try to detect the LMT of the carrageenan test material during the 28-day piglet feeding study, and if such was absorbed into the bloodstream. Successful development and validation of the method was achieved using LC-MS/MS coupled with ESI in negative-ion mode. A standard curve of instrument response versus poligeenan concentration was developed using swine plasma spiked with a range of poligeenan concentrations. The lower level of quantification (LLOQ) of poligeenan was 10.0 µg ml⁻¹, and the quantification range was 10.0-100.0 µg ml⁻¹. No animals were fed poligeenan. PMID:25164307

  8. Sub-micron retarding field energy analyzer for plasma analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Matthew

    1997-10-01

    A retarding field energy analyzer with sub-micron apertures for measurement of ion energy distributions in processing plasmas has been built. The analyzer was fabricated using standard Si integrated circuit materials and processing techniques and consists of a shielding grid, an electron repeller grid, and a collector plate, all made of 400 nm thick polycrystalline silicon thin films. The grids are supported and insulated from each other by 1 μm and 2 μm of SiO_2. The apertures in the grids are nominally 0.8 μm in diameter and are self-aligned, thereby minimizing field leakage and optimizing energy resolution. Ion trajectory modeling using SIMION predicts analyzer dispersion to be less than 0.1 eV for 20 eV incident ions. The analyzer can be operated on the wafer on which it was fabricated or can be separated into 1.6 x 1.2 cm^2 die for use as a discrete probe. The basic functionality of the analyzer has been demonstrated in inductively coupled argon plasmas and measurements show energy spreads of 3-5 eV which are consistent with the expected presheath voltage drops and agree well with measurements made with differentially pumped, macroscopic ion energy analyzers. Changes in mean ion energy as a function of power and pressure agree with the expected scaling trends. Efforts to passivate the Si surfaces with Ni to allow for operation of the analyzer in reactive gas plasmas are also reported.

  9. Computational analysis of turbine engine test cell flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prufert, Matthew Brian

    1998-11-01

    Turbine engine altitude test cells must incorporate an exhaust system collector to remove hot exhaust gases from the vicinity of the jet engine and to provide additional pumping to simulate the reduced pressure which would be encountered in flight. For economic reasons, it is desirable to utilize the same test configuration to simulate as much of the engine operating envelope as possible. To extend the test envelope, a cut-and-try approach is usually taken using available test data, one-dimensional analyses, and past experience. In this study, a computational approach was used to model some of the recognized operational problems which are commonly encountered. Specifically, computational models were used to evaluate the performance of an altitude test cell at low altitude conditions. Particular emphasis was placed on potential test section over-heating and the reduction of diffuser pumping to achieve near sea-level test conditions. A computational model which utilizes the NPARC Navier-Stokes code was applied to several test configurations operating at steady-state and to a single diffuser configuration in the presence of unsteady pressure fluctuations. During 1997/1998, the author developed two-dimensional and three-dimensional NPARC Navier-Stokes flow models and procedures for use in predicting test cell and engine surface cooling effectiveness for a military engine installation in an altitude test chamber. The predicted model flowfields for both steady-state and time variant flows were used to qualitatively verify limited infrared imaging camera data and quantitatively compare numerical results with test cell and diffuser pressure and temperature data. Prediction of surface convention heat transfer rates are currently beyond the capabilities of the NPARC CFD code. To quantify localized wall heat transfer rates, the BLAYER boundary layer code also was utilized. The BLAYER code is capable of quantifying boundary layer convection heat transfer rates based on near

  10. Technical information report: Plasma melter operation, reliability, and maintenance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1995-03-14

    This document provides a technical report of operability, reliability, and maintenance of a plasma melter for low-level waste vitrification, in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. A process description is provided that minimizes maintenance and downtime and includes material and energy balances, equipment sizes and arrangement, startup/operation/maintence/shutdown cycle descriptions, and basis for scale-up to a 200 metric ton/day production facility. Operational requirements are provided including utilities, feeds, labor, and maintenance. Equipment reliability estimates and maintenance requirements are provided which includes a list of failure modes, responses, and consequences.

  11. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Hoffman, Robert A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This Summary of Research is being submitted to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in fulfillment of the final reporting requirement under Grant NAG5-7943, which terminated on March 31, 2002. The following contains a summary of the significant accomplishments of the Polar Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) team during the period of the grant, April 1, 1999 through March 31, 2002, and a listing of all of the publications that resulted from work carried out under the grant. Also included below is a listing of the numerous public outreach activities that took place during the period of the grant in which the Polar mission and Polar PWI science were discussed.

  12. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Ding, Shun-Liang; Litak, Grzegorz; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  13. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li-Ping Ding, Shun-Liang; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen; Litak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-15

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  14. Linear analysis of ion cyclotron interaction in a multicomponent plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendrin, R.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Omura, Y.; Quest, K.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which hot anisotropic protons generate electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in a plasma containing cold H(+) and He(+) ions is quantitatively studied. Linear growth rates (both temporal and spatial) are computed for different plasma parameters: concentration, temperature,and anisotropy of cold He(+) ions and of hot protons. It is shown that: (1) for parameters typical of the geostationary altitude the maximum growth rates are not drastically changed when a small proportion (about 1 to 20 percent) of cold He(+) ions is present; (2) because of the important cyclotron absorption by thermal He(+) ions in the vicinity of the He(+) gyrofrequency, waves which could resonate with the bulk of the He(+) distribution cannot be generated. Therefore quasi-linear effects, in a homogeneous medium at least, cannot be responsible for the heating of He(+) ions which is often observed in conjunction with ion cyclotron waves. The variation of growth rate versus wave number is also studied for its importance in selecting suitable parameters in numerical simulation experiments.

  15. High voltage plasma sheath analysis related to TSS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1990-01-01

    On the first mission of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1), a 1.8 m diameter spherical satellite will be deployed a distance of 20 km above the Space Shuttle Orbiter on an insulated conducting tether. The satellite will be held at electric potentials up to 5000 volts positive with respect to the ambient plasma. Due to the passage of the conducting tether through the Earth's magnetic field, an electromagnetic field (EMF) will be created, driving electrons down the tether to the Orbiter, out through an electron gun into the ionosphere and back into the positive-biased satellite. The main problem addressed here is the current-voltage characteristics of the ionospheric interaction with the satellite. The first problem is that while the satellite will be capable of measuring charged particle flow to the surface at several locations, the detectors have a limited range of acceptance angle. The second problem is that the angle of incidence of the incoming electrons will have to be relative to the local normal. This will be important in order to predict the magnitude of the detectable current at each detector location so the detector gain can be pre-set to the correct range. The plasma sheath was analyzed mathematically, and subroutines were written to solve relevant finite element, Taylor-Vlasov, and Poisson equations.

  16. Permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Weck, P J; Schaffner, D A; Brown, M R; Wicks, R T

    2015-02-01

    The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different turbulent plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD), and fully developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the Wind spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting that these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge I(sat). The CH plane coordinates are compared to the shape and distribution of a spectral decomposition of the wave forms. These results suggest that fully developed turbulence (solar wind) occupies the lower-right region of the CH plane, and that other plasma systems considered to be turbulent have less permutation entropy and more statistical complexity. This paper presents use of this statistical analysis tool on solar wind plasma, as well as on an MHD turbulent experimental plasma. PMID:25768612

  17. On-line elemental analysis of fossil fuel process streams by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    METC is continuing development of a real-time, multi-element plasma based spectrometer system for application to high temperature and high pressure fossil fuel process streams. Two versions are under consideration for development. One is an Inductively Coupled Plasma system that has been described previously, and the other is a high power microwave system. The ICP torch operates on a mixture of argon and helium with a conventional annular swirl flow plasma gas, no auxiliary gas, and a conventional sample stream injection through the base of the plasma plume. A new, demountable torch design comprising three ceramic sections allows bolts passing the length of the torch to compress a double O-ring seal. This improves the reliability of the torch. The microwave system will use the same data acquisition and reduction components as the ICP system; only the plasma source itself is different. It will operate with a 750-Watt, 2.45 gigahertz microwave generator. The plasma discharge will be contained within a narrow quartz tube one quarter wavelength from a shorted waveguide termination. The plasma source will be observed via fiber optics and a battery of computer controlled monochromators. To extract more information from the raw spectral data, a neural net computer program is being developed. This program will calculate analyte concentrations from data that includes analyte and interferant spectral emission intensity. Matrix effects and spectral overlaps can be treated more effectively by this method than by conventional spectral analysis.

  18. Technoeconomic analysis for the destruction of toxic liquid wastes using induction plasma technology

    SciTech Connect

    Soucy, G.; Bergeron, E.; Boulos, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    During the past decade, thermal plasma technology has been pointed out as one of the most promising innovative technologies for the thermal destruction of hazardous wastes and for this role, it has been supported by the EPA. In this field, many process alternatives have been developed but insufficient attention have been given to the details of their economic viability. The objective of this paper is to carry out an economic analysis of a particular thermal induction plasma technology for toxic liquid waste destruction. This work is presented in three parts. The first part presents a description of the conceptual design for a process using high frequency (HF) induction plasma. The second part, based on an order-of-magnitude factored estimate, provides an analysis of the capital investment cost of this process. The third part presents an estimation of the operating costs and a discounted cash flow analysis of this conceptual project using a HF plasma generator. The analysis of the economic viability is discussed with reference to the net present worth and the internal rate of return. The discussion examines those variables that significantly affect the viability of such technology by exploring its advantages towards minimizing impacts on the global environment and economic situation. Finally, a comparison is drawn up between the induction plasma technology and other alternative competitive processes.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis and Stochastic Simulations of Non-equilibrium Plasma Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Karniadakis, George E.

    2009-11-05

    We study parametric uncertainties involved in plasma flows and apply stochastic sensitivity analysis to rank the importance of all inputs to guide large-scale stochastic simulations. Specifically, we employ different gradient-based sensitivity methods, namely Morris, multi-element probabilistic collocation method (ME-PCM) on sparse grids, Quasi-Monte Carlo, and Monte Carlo methods. These approaches go beyond the standard ``One-At-a-Time" sensitivity analysis and provide a measure of the nonlinear interaction effects for the uncertain inputs. The objective is to perform systematic stochastic simulations of plasma flows treating only as {\\em stochastic processes} the inputs with the highest sensitivity index, hence reducing substantially the computational cost. Two plasma flow examples are presented to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the stochastic sensitivity analysis. The first one is a two-fluid model in a shock tube while the second one is a one-fluid/two-temperature model in flow past a cylinder.

  20. Distribution analysis for F100(3) engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, W. A.; Shaw, M.

    1980-01-01

    The F100(3) compression system response to inlet circumferential distortion was investigated using an analytical compressor flow model. Compression system response to several types of distortion, including pressure, temperature, and combined pressure/temperature distortions, was investigated. The predicted response trends were used in planning future F100(3) distortion tests. Results show that compression system response to combined temperature and pressure distortions depends upon the relative orientation, as well as the individual amplitudes and circumferential extents of the distortions. Also the usefulness of the analytical predictions in planning engine distortion tests is indicated.

  1. Performance issues for engineering analysis on MIMD parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Vaughan, C.T.; Gardner, D.R.

    1994-08-01

    We discuss how engineering analysts can obtain greater computational resolution in a more timely manner from applications codes running on MIMD parallel computers. Both processor speed and memory capacity are important to achieving better performance than a serial vector supercomputer. To obtain good performance, a parallel applications code must be scalable. In addition, the aspect ratios of the subdomains in the decomposition of the simulation domain onto the parallel computer should be of order 1. We demonstrate these conclusions using simulations conducted with the PCTH shock wave physics code running on a Cray Y-MP, a 1024-node nCUBE 2, and an 1840-node Paragon.

  2. Raman scattering analysis of silicon dioxide single crystal treated by direct current plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, D. M.; Zekic, A.; Milosavljevic, V.; Romcevic, N.; Daniels, S.

    2011-01-31

    Low-k materials such as silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) play an important role in the semiconductor industry. Plasma has become indispensable for advanced materials processing. In this work a treatment of SiO{sub 2} single crystal by direct current plasma discharge is studied in detail. Offline metrology is conducted for silicon dioxide wafers by Raman scattering, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. Broad Raman peak at around 2800 cm{sup -1} is observed for the treated SiO{sub 2} wafers. Effects of plasma treatment on position of this peak are reported in the paper. An analysis of this correlation could be a framework for creating virtual etch rate sensors, which might be of importance in managing plasma etching processes.

  3. Analysis And Design Of Antennas Facing Cylindrical Plasma Columns With TOPCYL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, S.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Koch, R.; Maggiora, R.; Van De Pol, M.; Vietti, G.; Van Rooij, G.

    2011-12-01

    On recent years TOPICA[1] has shown its capabilities as a designing tool for ICRF antennas on tokamaks, handling both the realistic geometrical detail of the structure as well as a complete description of the plasma region behavior. Now, expanding these capabilities, the TOrino Polythecnic CYLindrical code (TOPCYL) has been added in order to simulate antennas facing cylindrical plasma columns. This feature allows the analysis and design of RF heating systems for applications as VASIMR-like plasma thrusters and plasma-surface-interaction (PSI) experiments. In the present work, the theoretical basis and implementation of TOPCYL is presented, as well as the results obtained on simulating antennas for the ICRF and 2,45 GHz regimes.

  4. Simple model analysis on the negative-ion extraction from a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2009-12-01

    Extraction of negative hydrogen ions from a plasma is analyzed with a view to the description of the extraction region of the negative hydrogen ion-beam sources developed for additional heating of fusion plasmas. The numerical procedure introduced in the study is a modification of the indirect Poisson-Vlasov method. It uses a condition for the plasma meniscus and employs analogy with the particle-in-cell model simulation. The analysis of the results shows that the charged particle velocity distribution at the entrance of the extraction region influences the properties of the extracted beams and its effect should be considered when conditions for well converged beams are looked for through variation in the plasma density and in the potentials of the electrodes of the extraction system.

  5. Analysis of whole blood samples with low gas flow inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Sascha; Künnemeyer, Jens; Terborg, Lydia; Trümpler, Stefan; Günsel, Andreas; Wiesmüller, Gerhard A; Karst, Uwe; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Low gas flow ICP-OES with a total argon consumption below 0.7 L/min is introduced for the analysis of trace elements in blood samples to investigate the influence of samples containing an organic solvent in a demanding matrix on the performance of this plasma for the first time. Therefore, gadolinium was determined in human plasma samples and mercury in red blood cells, human plasma, and precipitated plasma protein fraction. Limits of detection (LOD) were determined to be in the low microgram per liter range for the analytes and the accuracy of the method was assessed by comparison with a conventional Fassel-type torch-based ICP-OES. It was proven that the low gas flow ICP-OES leads to comparable results with the instrument based on the Fassel-type torch. PMID:25240935

  6. Calibration and analysis of spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectra from a nonuniform plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2012-07-15

    We report here the calibration and analysis techniques used to obtain spatially resolved density and temperature measurements of a pair of imploding aluminum wires from x-ray absorption spectra. A step wedge is used to measure backlighter fluence at the film, allowing transmission through the sample to be measured with an accuracy of {+-}14% or better. A genetic algorithm is used to search the allowed plasma parameter space and fit synthetic spectra with 20 {mu}m spatial resolution to the measured spectra, taking into account that the object plasma nonuniformity must be physically reasonable. The inferred plasma conditions must be allowed to vary along the absorption path in order to obtain a fit to the spectral data. The temperature is estimated to be accurate to within {+-}25% and the density to within a factor of two. This information is used to construct two-dimensional maps of the density and temperature of the object plasma.

  7. Calibration and analysis of spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectra from a nonuniform plasma.

    PubMed

    Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Pikuz, S A; Shelkovenko, T A; Hammer, D A

    2012-07-01

    We report here the calibration and analysis techniques used to obtain spatially resolved density and temperature measurements of a pair of imploding aluminum wires from x-ray absorption spectra. A step wedge is used to measure backlighter fluence at the film, allowing transmission through the sample to be measured with an accuracy of ±14% or better. A genetic algorithm is used to search the allowed plasma parameter space and fit synthetic spectra with 20 μm spatial resolution to the measured spectra, taking into account that the object plasma nonuniformity must be physically reasonable. The inferred plasma conditions must be allowed to vary along the absorption path in order to obtain a fit to the spectral data. The temperature is estimated to be accurate to within ±25% and the density to within a factor of two. This information is used to construct two-dimensional maps of the density and temperature of the object plasma. PMID:22852690

  8. Dimension reduction of non-equilibrium plasma kinetic models using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerenboom, Kim; Parente, Alessandro; Kozák, Tomáš; Bogaerts, Annemie; Degrez, Gérard

    2015-04-01

    The chemical complexity of non-equilibrium plasmas poses a challenge for plasma modeling because of the computational load. This paper presents a dimension reduction method for such chemically complex plasmas based on principal component analysis (PCA). PCA is used to identify a low-dimensional manifold in chemical state space that is described by a small number of parameters: the principal components. Reduction is obtained since continuity equations only need to be solved for these principal components and not for all the species. Application of the presented method to a CO2 plasma model including state-to-state vibrational kinetics of CO2 and CO demonstrates the potential of the PCA method for dimension reduction. A manifold described by only two principal components is able to predict the CO2 to CO conversion at varying ionization degrees very accurately.

  9. Analysis on laser plasma emission for characterization of colloids by video-based computer program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Kirana Yuniati; Lumbantoruan, Hendra Damos; Isnaeni

    2016-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) is a sensitive technique for characterization of colloids with small size and low concentration. There are two types of detection, optical and acoustic. Optical LIBD employs CCD camera to capture the plasma emission and uses the information to quantify the colloids. This technique requires sophisticated technology which is often pricey. In order to build a simple, home-made LIBD system, a dedicated computer program based on MATLAB™ for analyzing laser plasma emission was developed. The analysis was conducted by counting the number of plasma emissions (breakdowns) during a certain period of time. Breakdown probability provided information on colloid size and concentration. Validation experiment showed that the computer program performed well on analyzing the plasma emissions. Optical LIBD has A graphical user interface (GUI) was also developed to make the program more user-friendly.

  10. Fatigue Life Analysis of Turbine Disks Based on Load Spectra of Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Feng; Lv, Zhiqiang; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Load spectra of aero-engines reflect the process of operating aircrafts as well as the changes of parameters of aircrafts. According to flight hours and speed cycle numbers of the aero-engines, the relationship between load spectra and the fatigue life of main components of the aero-engines is obtained. Based on distribution function and a generalized stress-strength interference model, the cumulative fatigue damage of aero-engines is then calculated. After applying the analysis of load spectra and the cumulative fatigue damage theory, the fatigue life of the first-stage turbine disks of the aero-engines is evaluated by using the S-N curve and Miner's rule in this paper.

  11. Energy Efficient Engine Flight Propulsion System Preliminary Analysis and Design Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisset, J. W.; Howe, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    The final design and analysis of the flight propulsion system is presented. This system is the conceptual study engine defined to meet the performance, economic and environmental goals established for the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The design effort included a final definition of the engine, major components, internal subsystems, and nacelle. Various analytical representations and results from component technology programs are used to verify aerodynamic and structural design concepts and to predict performance. Specific design goals and specifications, reflecting future commercial aircraft propulsion system requirements for the mid-1980's, are detailed by NASA and used as guidelines during engine definition. Information is also included which details salient results from a separate study to define a turbofan propulsion system, known as the maximum efficiency engine, which reoptimized the advanced fuel saving technologies for improved fuel economy and direct operating costs relative to the flight propulsion system.

  12. Tissue engineered skin for diabetic foot ulcers: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuedong; Xu, Geliang; Chen, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of tissue engineered skin in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and ISI Web of Science database in order to obtain the randomized controlled trial with interventions of tissue engineered skin. A meta-analysis was used to compare the effectiveness between tissue engineered skin and conventional treatment in the patients with diabetic foot ulcer. This meta-analysis was performed by STATA 11 software. The risk factor was analyzed by random effect model pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Moreover, the funnel plot was used to assess the published bias of articles. Eight studies were included, and a total of 1060 cases were involved for this meta-analysis. The OR of tissue engineered skin for diabetic foot ulcers was 1.76 (95% CI: 1.35-2.30). A subgroup analysis was conducted for different types of tissue engineering skin, combined OR was 1.91 (95% CI: 1.12-3.27) for Derma graft, 2.05 (95% CI: 1.20-3.50) for Graft skin and 1.57 (95% CI: 0.91-2.70) for Hyalo graft 3D. Applying tissue engineered skin is more effective in the improvement of wound closure in patients with diabetic foot ulcers, compared with conventional treatment. PMID:26770419

  13. A development environment for operational concepts and systems engineering analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Raybourn, Elaine Marie; Senglaub, Michael E.

    2004-03-01

    The work reported in this document involves a development effort to provide combat commanders and systems engineers with a capability to explore and optimize system concepts that include operational concepts as part of the design effort. An infrastructure and analytic framework has been designed and partially developed that meets a gap in systems engineering design for combat related complex systems. The system consists of three major components: The first component consists of a design environment that permits the combat commander to perform 'what-if' types of analyses in which parts of a course of action (COA) can be automated by generic system constructs. The second component consists of suites of optimization tools designed to integrate into the analytical architecture to explore the massive design space of an integrated design and operational space. These optimization tools have been selected for their utility in requirements development and operational concept development. The third component involves the design of a modeling paradigm for the complex system that takes advantage of functional definitions and the coupled state space representations, generic measures of effectiveness and performance, and a number of modeling constructs to maximize the efficiency of computer simulations. The system architecture has been developed to allow for a future extension in which the operational concept development aspects can be performed in a co-evolutionary process to ensure the most robust designs may be gleaned from the design space(s).

  14. Application and Analysis of Biological Electrospray in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yunmin, Ma; Yuanyuan, Liu; Haiping, Chen; Qingxi, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Nan-fiber scaffolds are suitable tools for tissue engineering. Electro spinning materials together with cells presents not adequate to obtain a high cellular zing tissue constructs as the shear force, tensile force, and other physical effects excited in the electro spinning process, which are harmful to cellular differentiation, development and function. However, this limitation has been overcome by a micro integration system of simultaneously bio-electro spraying human adipose stem cells (ASCs) and electro spinning Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Then it was compared to the single electro spinning nan-fiber scaffolds in relation to cell viability, which showed that the scaffolds by micro integration approach has a larger number of surviving cells and more suitable for cell growth and proliferation. In addition, the relationship between different parameters of biological electrospray (voltage, flow rate and distance of the needle from the collecting board) and droplet size of cell suspension was elucidated and the droplets with a near-mono distribution (<50um) could be generated to deposit a single living cell within a droplet. The association of bio-electro spraying with electro spinning (a scaffold preparation technique) has been demonstrated to be a promising and suitable tissue engineering approach in producing nan-fiber based three-dimensional (3-D) cell seeded scaffolds. PMID:26089992

  15. Intake flow analysis of a pulsed detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strafaccia, Joshua A.

    A CFD program is converted and modified to explore unsteady flow within the intake system of a pulse detonation engine (PDE). Using a quasi-one-dimensional approach the program provides insight into the unsteady nature of localized equivalence ratios to include their effects on PDE performance. The original FORTRAN program is converted into the MATLAB architecture, taking full advantage of user availability and post processing convenience. The converted program was validated against the original program and modified to include a primitive intake manifold system with a single fuel injector located approximately 10 feet upstream of the primary intake valve. Constant fuel mass flow rate at the injector end creates local variations in equivalence ratio throughout the PDE that may have significant impact on overall engine performance. The results of the current thesis research suggest that performance effects of up to 21% can be attributed to non-uniform fuel distribution throughout the detonation process and are most prevalent at lower frequencies and fill ratios.

  16. Numerical analysis of thermonuclear detonation in dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avronin, Y. N.; Bunatyan, A. A.; Gadzhiyev, A. D.; Mustafin, K. A.; Nurbakov, A. S.; Pisarev, V. N.; Feoktistov, L. P.; Frolov, V. D.; Shibarshov, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of thermonuclear combustion from the region heated to thermonuclear temperatures by an external source to the remaining part of the target was investigated. The target was a tube of inert material (gold, lead, beryllium, etc.) filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. It was determined analytically that thermonuclear combustion can propagate from a small portion of a nonspherical target to the remainder of the target and that a steady-state thermonuclear detonation wave can be formed. The role of various physical processes in thermonuclear detonation was investigated. Shock wave is the main mechanism underlying detonation propagation. The detonation rate and intensity of the thermonuclear reaction is influenced by the leakage of heat due to transvere heat conductivity. The critical diameter for thermonuclear detonation was determined approximately for a plasma filament encased in a housing with twice the density of the fuel.

  17. High voltage plasma sheath analysis related to TSS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1991-01-01

    On the first mission of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1), a 1.8 m diameter spherical satellite will be deployed a distance of 20 km above the space shuttle Orbiter on an insulated conducting tether. The satellite will be held at electric potentials up to 5000 volts positive with respect to the ambient plasma. Due to the passage of the conducting tether through the Earth's magnetic field, an emf will be created, driving electrons down the tether to the orbiter, out through an electron gun into the ionosphere and back into the positive biased satellite. Instrumentation on the satellite will measure electron flow to the surface at several locations, but these detectors have a limited range of acceptance angle. The problem addressed herein is the determination of the electron current distribution over the satellite surface and the angle of incidence of the incoming electrons relative to the surface normal.

  18. Statistical analysis of sparse data: Space plasma measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, Edmond C.

    2012-05-01

    Some operating space plasma instruments, e.g., ACE/SWICS, can have low counting rates (<1 count/sample). A novel approach has been suggested [1] that estimates counting rates (x) from ``strings'' of samples with (k) zeros followed by a non-zero count (n>=1) using x' = n/(k+1) for each string. We apply Poisson statistics to obtain the ensemble-averaged expectation value of R' and its standard deviation (s.d.) as a function of the (unknown) true rate (x). We find that x'>x for all true rates (particularly for x<1), but interestingly that the s.d. of x' can be less than that of the usual Poisson s.d. from (k+1) samples. We suggest a statistical theoretical ``correction'' for each bin rate that will, on average, compensate for this sampling bias.

  19. Relativistic and non-relativistic analysis of whistler-mode waves in a hot anisotropic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, S. S.; Sumner, A. E.; Temme, N. M.

    1992-02-01

    The dispersion equation for parallel whistler-mode propagation in a hot anisotropic plasma is analysed numerically in both weakly relativistic and nonrelativistic approximations under the assumption that wave growth or damping does not influence the wave refractive index. The results of this analysis are compared with the results of an asymptotic analysis of the same equation, and the range of applicability of the latter results is specified. It is pointed out that relativistic effects lead to a decrease in the range of frequencies for which instability occurs. For a moderately anisotropic plasma (T/T = 2) relativistic effects lead to an increase in the maximum value of the increment of instability.

  20. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, B; Ruiz, C L

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution. PMID:23902066