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Sample records for plasma initiation produced

  1. Breakdown voltages for discharges initiated from plasma pulses produced by high-frequency excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2006-06-19

    The triggering ability under the different electric field was investigated using a KrF excimer laser with a high repetition rate of kilohertz order. Measurements were made of the magnitude of impulse voltages that were required to initiate a discharge from plasmas produced by a high-frequency excimer laser. Breakdown voltages were found to be reduced by 50% through the production of plasmas in the discharge gap by a high-frequency excimer laser. However, under direct-current electric field, triggering ability decreased drastically due to low plasma density. It is considered that such laser operation applied for laser-triggered lightning due to the produced location of plasma channel is formed under the impulse electric field since an electric field of the location drastically reduces temporary when the downward leader from thunderclouds propagates to the plasma channel.

  2. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Loisel, G.; Yahia, V.; Rafelski, J.

    2013-10-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  3. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Labaune, C; Baccou, C; Depierreux, S; Goyon, C; Loisel, G; Yahia, V; Rafelski, J

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments. PMID:24104859

  4. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shao-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Hu, Guang-yue; Miao, Wen-yong; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2016-01-01

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions.

  5. Plasma Properties of Microwave Produced Plasma in a Toroidal Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajay; Edwards, W. F.; Held, Eric

    2011-10-01

    We have modified a small tokamak, STOR-1M, on loan from University of Saskatchewan, to operate as a low-temperature (~5 eV) toroidal plasma machine with externally induced toroidal magnetic fields ranging from zero to ~50 G. The plasma is produced using microwave discharges at relatively high pressures. Microwaves are produced by a kitchen microwave-oven magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz in continuous operating mode, resulting in pulses ~0.5 s in duration. Initial measurements of plasma formation in this device with and without applied magnetic fields are presented. Plasma density and temperature profiles have been measured using Langmuir probes and the magnetic field profile inside the plasma has been obtained using Hall probes. When the discharge is created with no applied toroidal magnetic field, the plasma does not fill the entire torus due to high background pressure. However, when a toroidal magnetic field is applied, the plasma flows along the applied field, filling the torus. Increasing the applied magnetic field seems to aid plasma formation - the peak density increases and the density gradient becomes steeper. Above a threshold magnetic field, the plasma develops low-frequency density oscillations due to probable excitation of flute modes in the plasma.

  6. Laser Initiated, RF Sustained Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, John; Giar, Ryan; Hummelt, Jason; Way, Jesse

    2009-11-01

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes by focusing 193 nm, 260 mJ, 10 MW high power UV laser radiation to 18 cm and 1.3 cm zones are examined. Quantum resonant multi-photon (REMPI) and collisional cascade ionization processes affect the breakdown and plasma formation. Our spectroscopic measurements show that REMPI (2+1) processes on nitrogen play a substantial role at lower pressures due to the high photon energy (6.4 eV). The REMPI process yields high density air plasmas (5 x 10^16/cc) for the 18 cm focus with the laser flux three orders of magnitude below the classical breakdown threshold intensity. Measurements of the f = 1.3 cm core laser plasma density (8x10^17/cc) and electron temperature decay via two color laser interferometry are made. The 18 cm focal length lens and its ionizing shock wave front are utilized to produce air seed plasma to initiate a large volume (500 cc) RF sustainment discharge coupled by means of a 6 cm diameter helical coil at up to 10 kW power levels.

  7. APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING AND MANIPULATING PLASMAS

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.; Ferguson, J.P.; Furth, H.P.; Wright, R.E.

    1960-07-26

    An electrical pinch discharge apparatus is described for producing and manipulating high-temperature plasmas. The apparatus may be of either the linear or toroidal pinch discharge type. Arrangements are provided whereby stabilizing fields may be trapped in the plasma external to the main pinch discharge path and the boundary condition of the stabilizing field programed so as to stabilize the discharge or to promote instabilities in the discharge as desired. The produced plasmas may be employed for various purposes, and fusion neutrons have been produced with the apparatus.

  8. High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John F.

    1978-01-01

    A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results.

  9. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, Steven J.; Jones, Roger D.

    1990-06-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper, we examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g. lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g. kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g. laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  10. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, S. J.; Jones, R. D.

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. Those areas of laser medicine are examined in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. Examples are examined for the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  11. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.J. ); Jones, R.D. . Applied Theoretical Physics Div.)

    1991-12-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photodynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper the authors examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation), and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented, along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  12. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.J.; Jones, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper, we examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included. 63 refs.

  13. Parametric instabilities in helicon-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Yu.M.; Kraemer, M.

    2005-07-15

    Parametric instabilities arising in the pump field of a helicon wave are analyzed for typical parameters of helicon-produced plasmas. The pump wavenumber parallel to the magnetic field is assumed to be finite according to recent experimental findings obtained on a high-density helicon discharge. The parametric decay of the helicon pump wave into ion-sound and Trivelpiece-Gould waves is investigated. The approach takes into account that the damping rate of the Trivelpiece-Gould wave is generally much higher than the ion-sound frequency. The theoretical results are in agreement with the growth rates and thresholds of this instability, as well as the dispersion properties of the decay waves observed in helicon experiments. Estimates of the level of the decay parametric turbulence turn out to be sufficiently high to account for the strong absorption observed in helicon-produced plasmas.

  14. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  15. Producing Hydrogen by Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James; Akse, James; Wheeler, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Plasma pyrolysis of methane has been investigated for utility as a process for producing hydrogen. This process was conceived as a means of recovering hydrogen from methane produced as a byproduct of operation of a life-support system aboard a spacecraft. On Earth, this process, when fully developed, could be a means of producing hydrogen (for use as a fuel) from methane in natural gas. The most closely related prior competing process - catalytic pyrolysis of methane - has several disadvantages: a) The reactor used in the process is highly susceptible to fouling and deactivation of the catalyst by carbon deposits, necessitating frequent regeneration or replacement of the catalyst. b) The reactor is highly susceptible to plugging by deposition of carbon within fixed beds, with consequent channeling of flow, high pressure drops, and severe limitations on mass transfer, all contributing to reductions in reactor efficiency. c) Reaction rates are intrinsically low. d) The energy demand of the process is high.

  16. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  17. Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don Mayo; Walter, Kevin Carl

    2001-01-01

    Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

  18. Laser produced plasma light source for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomenkov, Igor V.; Ershov, Alex I.; Partlo, William N.; Myers, David W.; Brown, Daniel; Sandstrom, Richard L.; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Das, Palash; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Kevin; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rajyaguru, Chirag; De Dea, Silvia; Hou, Richard R.; Dunstan, Wayne J.; Baumgart, Peter; Ishihara, Toshihiko; Simmons, Rod D.; Jacques, Robert N.; Bergstedt, Robert A.; Brandt, David C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the development of laser-produced-plasma (LPP) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) source architecture for advanced lithography applications in high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is expected to succeed 193 nm immersion technology for sub-22 nm critical layer patterning. In this paper we discuss the most recent results from high qualification testing of sources in production. Subsystem performance will be shown including collector protection, out-of-band (OOB) radiation measurements, and intermediate-focus (IF) protection as well as experience in system use. This presentation reviews the experimental results obtained on systems with a focus on the topics most critical for an HVM source.

  19. Initial Plasma Experiment in the Levitated Ring Trap RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Ogawa, Y.; Morikawa, J.; Watanabe, S.; Yano, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-10-01

    Studies on toroidal flowing plasma have started in a superconductor levitated coil device, Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) [1]. RT-1 generates a magnetosphere-like dipole magnetic field configuration that enables various kinds of experiments related to flowing plasmas. The main purpose of the Ring Trap Experiment is to explore a new high-b relaxation state of plasmas predicted by two-fluid relaxation theory of flowing plasmas [2]. Magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 also enables stable pure-magnetic trap of non-neutral plasmas [3], which is potentially suitable for the confinement of charged particles including anti-matters. As an initial experiment, hydrogen plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating using 8.2GHz microwave generated by a klystron with the maximum power of 100kW for 1s pulse operation. The high-Tc superconductor (Bi-2223) ring with a total coil current of 250kAT is magnetically levitated in a vacuum chamber using a PID feedback control system. The field strength in the trap region is 0.03T to 0.3T. Diagnostics for the RT-1 experiment includes spectroscopy, soft X-ray pulse-height analysis with Si (Li) detector, magnetic probes, and Langmuir probes for edge plasma measurement. The initial experimental results and basic plasma parameters of RT-1 will be presented in the meeting. 1. Z. Yoshida et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 1, 008 (2006). 2. Z. Yoshida and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 095001 (2002). 3. Z. Yoshida, et al., in Nonneutral Plasma Physics III, IV.

  20. Doppler spectroscopy on plasma discharges produced in Proto-MPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaliwal, Runpal; Biewer, Theodore; Klepper, Chris; Martin, Elijah; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear machine that produces pulsed plasma discharges, and is intended to study plasma-material interactions in conditions similar to those found in future fusion reactors. A high-resolution McPherson Czerny-Turner visible range spectrometer has been installed to study the behavior of ions in the plasma. Together with a Princeton Instruments EMCCD camera and an external trigger box, this system provides excellent spectral and temporal resolution for viewing the emission spectra of the discharges. Around 100 lines of sight have been established for use by this and other diagnostics in the lab. Initial data from recent experiments validate the utility of this setup. Analysis of spectral lines in helium and deuterium plasmas yields valuable information regarding the temperature and density of plasma ions at various locations in the machine as the various RF heating sources are implemented. Differentiating the thermal width of lines from other sources of broadening is an ongoing process. In addition to He I lines, data indicates the presence of the He II line at 468.5 nm, which corresponds to emission from singly ionized atoms at higher temperatures.

  1. Initial Results from the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edward; Konopka, Uwe; Lynch, Brian; Adams, Stephen; Leblanc, Spencer; Artis, Darrick; Dubois, Ami; Merlino, Robert; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2014-10-01

    The MDPX device is envisioned as a flexible, multi-user, research instrument that can perform a wide range of studies in fundamental and applied plasma physics. The MDPX device consists of two main components. The first is a four-coil, open bore, superconducting magnet system that is designed to produce uniform magnetic fields of up to 4 Tesla and non-uniform magnetic fields with gradients up to up to 2 T/m configurations. Within the warm bore of the magnet is placed an octagonal vacuum chamber that has a 46 cm outer diameter and is 22 cm tall. The primary missions of the MDPX device are to: (1) investigate the structural, thermal, charging, and collective properties of a plasma as the electrons, ions, and finally charged microparticles become magnetized; (2) study the evolution of a dusty plasma containing magnetic particles (paramagnetic, super-paramagnetic, or ferromagnetic particles) in the presence of uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields; and, (3) explore the fundamental properties of strongly magnetized plasmas (``i.e., dust-free'' plasmas). This presentation will summarize the initial characterization of the magnetic field structure, initial plasma parameter measurements, and the development of in-situ and optical diagnostics. This work is supported by funding from the NSF and the DOE.

  2. Molybdenum disilicide composites produced by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.; Bartlett, A.H.

    1998-05-25

    The intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) is being considered for high temperature structural applications because of its high melting point and superior oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. The lack of high temperature strength, creep resistance and low temperature ductility has hindered its progress for structural applications. Plasma spraying of coatings and structural components of MoSi{sub 2}-based composites offers an exciting processing alternative to conventional powder processing methods due to superior flexibility and the ability to tailor properties. Laminate, discontinuous and in situ reinforced composites have been produced with secondary reinforcements of Ta, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Laminate composites, in particular, have been shown to improve the damage tolerance of MoSi{sub 2} during high temperature melting operations. A review of research which as been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory on plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based composites to improve low temperature fracture toughness, thermal shock resistance, high temperature strength and creep resistance will be discussed.

  3. Measurement of Debye length in laser-produced plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Debye length of an expanded plasma created by placing an evacuated chamber with an entrance slit in the path of a freely expanding laser produced plasma was measured, using the slab geometry. An independent measurement of electron density together with the observed value for the Debye length also provided a means for evaluating the plasma electron temperature. This temperature has applications in ascertaining plasma conductivity and magnetic field necessary for confinement of the laser produced plasma. Also, the temperature obtained would be useful in analyzing electron-ion recombination rates in the expanded plasma and the dynamics of the cooling process of the plasma expansion.

  4. Plasma Bragg density gratings produced by optical-field ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lule; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2009-11-15

    Plasma Bragg density gratings produced by optical-field ionization in underdense gas under the irradiation of two counterpropagating laser pulses at laser intensities around 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} are investigated by particle-in-cell simulation. The grating is composed of interlacing layers of neutral gas and plasma (or partially ionized gas) with its density and period controlled by the initial gas density, laser wavelengths, and intersecting angles of the two laser pulses. The study shows that such gratings have a longer lifetime, about nanoseconds, as compared with those driven by the laser ponderomotive force at higher laser intensities around 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. They may be used for phase-matched high-harmonic generation, laser self-guiding, laser pulse compression and stretching, etc.

  5. Temporal Behaviour of ECR Plasmas Produced by a Lisitano Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Yusuke; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1984-02-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of production of a plasma produced by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) using a Lisitano coil, the temporal behaviour of the plasma was measured in detail by a sampling method. It was found that the plasma is produced not only around the Lisitano coil but also near the center. The plasma density was also confirmed to attain a value above the cutoff density by measuring the field intensities of the microwaves.

  6. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  7. Storage of ions from laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    A method of storing large numbers of metal ions created in laser-produced plasmas is presented. The outer electrode of the electrostatic ion trap is designed to give a harmonic axial potential. The ions trapped by the technique included Be(+), C(+), Al(+), Fe(+), and Pb(+). The initial number of ions stored (2 x 10 to the 8th) appeared to be the trap maximum since increasing the laser power beyond 2-3 MW did not change the ion number. An initial rapid decay in the 30-50 msec range was generally followed by a long tail at the 10% level with times greater than 100 msec. The technique should be valuable for refractory elements which cannot be easily vaporized for electron impact ionization.

  8. METHOD OF INITIATING AND SUSTAINING AN ENERGETIC PLASMA FOR NEUTRON PRODUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Mackin, R.J. Jr.; Simon, A.

    1961-08-22

    A method for producing an energetic plasma for neutron production and for faeling this plasma once it is formed is described. The plasma is initially fonmed as set forth in U. S. Patent No. 2,969,308. After the plasma is formed, cold neutral particles with an energy of at least 1 Kev are injected in a radial directinn and transverse to the axis of the device. These cold particles are substituted for the molecular ion injection and are used for fueling the plasma device on a continuous regulated basis in order to maintain a reaction temperature of about 60 Kev for producing neutrons. (AE C)

  9. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  10. Simulations of electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin plasma by a continuously injected electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin beam-plasma system are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, the problem of emission generation in such a system is considered in a realistic formulation allowing for the continuous injection of a relativistic electron beam through a plasma boundary. Specific attention is given to the thin plasma case in which the transverse plasma size is comparable to the typical wavelength of beam-driven oscillations. Such a case is often implemented in laboratory beam-plasma experiments and has a number of peculiarities. Emission from a thin plasma does not require intermediate generation of the electromagnetic plasma eigenmodes, as in an infinite case, and is more similar to the regular antenna radiation. In this work, we determine how efficiently the fundamental and the second harmonic emissions can be generated in previously modulated and initially homogeneous plasmas.

  11. Laser produced plasma for efficient extreme ultraviolet light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Tony; Cummins, Thomas; O' Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Harte, Colm S.; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2012-05-25

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasma and their relevance to EUV source development is discussed. The current state of the field for Sn LPP sources operating at 13.5 nm is described and initial results are given for EUV emission from CO{sub 2} laser irradiation of a bulk Sn target. A maximum conversion efficiency of 1.7% has been measured and the influence of the CO{sub 2} laser temporal profile on the CE is discussed. A double pulse irradiation scheme is shown to increase CE up to a maximum value of 2.1% for an optimum prepulse - pulse delay of 150 ns. The emergence of a new EUVL source wavelength at 6.7 nm based on Gd and Tb LPPs has been outlined. An initial experiment investigating picosecond laser irradiation as a means to produce strong 6.7 nm emission from a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} target has been performed and verified.

  12. Enhanced line emission from laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmer, C.; Srivastava, S. K.; Hall, T. E.; Fucaloro, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    This communication reports the first systematic study on background gas-induced spectral-line-emission enhancement from laser-produced plasmas. Line emission from aluminum plasmas was enhanced by factors of up to 35 by the introduction of He, Ne, Xe, or N2. The enhancement has been attributed to three-body recombination.

  13. Origin of 'energetic' ions from laser-produced plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.; Linlor, W. I.

    1973-01-01

    A fast-ion current peak, measured with an ion collector placed in the path of an expanding laser-produced plasma, was identified as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen contaminants which originated from a tungsten target surface.

  14. Reinjection of transmitted laser light into laser-produced plasma for efficient laser ignition.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takuma; Takenaka, Yuhei; Sako, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Tomohisa; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Namba, Shinichi

    2016-02-10

    For improving the laser absorption efficiency in laser ignition, the transmitted laser light was returned to the laser-produced plasma by using a corner cube. In the experiments, the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma at different times. The laser absorption efficiency was found to be substantially improved when the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma after adequate plasma expansion. Furthermore, through visualization experiments on gas-dynamics phenomena, it was found that the reinjection of the transmitted light affected not only the laser absorption efficiency but also the gas dynamics after breakdown, and thereby the initial flame kernel development. PMID:26906388

  15. Attenuated APC alleles produce functional protein from internal translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Trzepacz, Chris; Tuohy, Thérèse M. F.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Some truncating mutations of the APC tumor suppressor gene are associated with an attenuated phenotype of familial adenomatous polyposis coli (AAPC). This work demonstrates that APC alleles with 5′ mutations produce APC protein that down-regulates β-catenin, inhibits β-catenin/T cell factor-mediated transactivation, and induces cell-cycle arrest. Transfection studies demonstrate that cap-independent translation is initiated internally at an AUG at codon 184 of APC. Furthermore, APC coding sequence between AAPC mutations and AUG 184 permits internal ribosome entry in a bicistronic vector. These data suggest that AAPC alleles in vivo may produce functional APC by internal initiation and establish a functional correlation between 5′ APC mutations and their associated clinical phenotype. PMID:12034871

  16. Plasma waves near Venus - Initial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Green, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus electric field detector was used to observe significant effects of the interaction of the solar wind with the ionosphere of Venus all along the orbiter trajectory. Information on sharp and diffuse shock structures and on plasma oscillations emitted by suprathermal electrons beyond the bow shock is considered, and wave particle interaction phenomena important near the boundary of the dayside ionosphere are noted.

  17. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  18. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  19. Clarification of THz Electromagnetic Radiation mechanism from the Laser Produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hideta, Masataka; Hyuga, Yusuke; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Yugami, Noboru

    2015-11-01

    Conical forward Terahertz radiation from ultra-short pulse laser produced plasma has been observed. The radiation frequency is smaller than the plasma frequency that is estimated by the initial gas density and laser intensity. This radiation mechanism has not been clarified. To study the radiation mechanism, 2D PIC code is used. The radiation is described by the following equation, ∇2 -1/c2∂2/∂t2 +ωp2/c2 B =μ0 e∇n × v where, ωp, n and v represent the plasma frequency, the plasma density and the electron velocity, respectively. The right hand side is considered as the radiation source which strongly depend on the gradient of the plasma density and the electron velocity. In the experiment, the laser propagates with creating the plasma, the plasma density profile is a function of the radial direction. Therefore, the strong gradient is at the edge of the plasma column, not the center of the plasma, the radiation is expected to generate there and its frequency is also equal to the local plasma frequency. The 2D calculation shows the EM wave is generated around the edge of the plasma column and its frequency is lower than the plasma frequency.

  20. Railgun using plasma initiation separated from the projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H.; Yamada, T.; Eguchi, N.; Maeda, S.; Sato, K.N.

    1993-12-01

    Preacceleration of a projectile is quite important to reduce the erosion of the bore surface in a railgun. Gas guns, electrothermal guns and other railguns have been used to preaccelerate the projectile. Here, the new method using Plasma Initiation Separated from the Projectile (PISP method) is proposed, and its effectiveness is confirmed experimentally. A thin copper is placed near the edge of the railgun, which explodes and forms a plasma that has a fast flow velocity due to the Lorentz force. This fast flowing plasma collides with the projectile which obtains an initial velocity mainly by the momentum transfer. Since the current increases while only the plasma is accelerated, the driving force of the projectile just after the collision of the plasma with the projectile is large. In other words, the PISP method works as an inductive energy storage circuit with an opening switch.

  1. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  2. Collisional coupling in counterstreaming laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, D. W.; Goforth, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The collisional processes which transfer momentum between counterstreaming plasmas are reviewed and applied to the example of a laser-produced plasma expanding into a partially ionized background. Experimental measurements of the dependence of the ion flow field on collisional momentum transfer demonstrate the validity of the simplified treatment of collision processes which have been adopted. A numerical model which simulates the laser-plasma interaction with the background confirms the importance of collisions in previous experimental studies of momentum coupling, and provides some insight into the distinction between collisional and collisionless flow regimes.

  3. METHOD OF PRODUCING ENERGETIC PLASMA FOR NEUTRON PRODUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Simon, A.; Mackin, R.J. Jr.

    1961-01-24

    A method is given for producing an energetic plasma for neutron production. An energetic plasma is produced in a small magnetically confined subvolume of the device by providing a selected current of energetic molecular ions at least greater than that required for producing a current of atomic ions sufficient to achieve "burnout" of neutral particles in the subvolume. The atomic ions are provided by dissociation of the molecular ions by an energetic arc discharge within the subvolume. After burnout, the arc discharge is terminated, the magnetic fields increased, and cold fuel feed is substituted for the molecular ions. After the subvolume is filled with an energetic plasma, the size of the magnetically confined subvolume is gradually increased until the entire device is filled with an energetic neutron producing plasma. The reactions which take place in the device to produce neutrons will generate a certain amount of heat energy which may be converted by the use of a conventional heat cycle to produce electrical energy.

  4. Ramp-up of CHI Initiated Plasmas on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D; Bell, R E; LeBlanc, B; Roquemore, A L; Raman, R; Jarboe, T R; Nelson, B A; Soukhanovskii, V

    2009-10-29

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus (NSTX) have now demonstrated flux savings using transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI). In these discharges, the discharges initiated by CHI are ramped up with an inductive transformer and exhibit higher plasma current than discharges without the benefit of CHI initiation.

  5. Plasma puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Choi, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for the azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide range of fill gas pressure of Ar, He and N2. The optimal fill gas pressure for the azimuthally uniform plasma-puff was about 120 mTorr and 450 Torr for He and N2, and between 120 mTorr and 5 Torr for Ar. The inverse pinch switch was triggered with the plasma-puff and the switching capability under various electrical parameters and working gas pressures of Ar, He and N2 was determined. It was also shown that the azimuthally uniform switching discharges were dependent on the type of fill gas and its fill pressure. A new concept of plasma-focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of inverse pinch switch with plasma-focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr.

  6. Studies of Magnetic Reconnection in Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Novel images of magnetic fields and measurements of electron and ion temperatures have been obtained in the magnetic reconnection region of high- β, laser-produced plasmas. Experiments using laser-irradiated foils produce expanding, hemispherical plasma plumes carrying MG Biermann-battery magnetic fields, which can be driven to interact and reconnect. Thomson-scattering measurements of electron and ion temperatures in the interaction region of two colliding, magnetized plasmas show no thermal enhancement due to reconnection, as expected for β ~ 8 plasmas. Two different proton radiography techniques used to image the magnetic field structures show deformation, pileup, and annihilation of magnetic flux. High-resolution images reveal unambiguously reconnection-induced jets emerging from the interaction region and show instabilities in the expanding plasma plumes and supersonic, hydrodynamic jets due to the plasma collision. Quantitative magnetic flux data show that reconnection in experiments with asymmetry in the scale size, density, temperature, and plasma flow across the reconnection region occurs less efficiently than in similar, symmetric experiments. This result is attributed to disruption of the Hall mechanism mediating collisionless reconnection. The collision of plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields has also been probed, illustrating the deformation of magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas in the absence of reconnection. These experiments are particularly relevant to high- β reconnection environments, such as the magnetopause. This work was performed in collaboration with C. Li, F. Séguin, A. Zylstra, H. Rinderknecht, H. Sio, J. Frenje, and R. Petrasso (MIT), I. Igumenshchev, V. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, and D. Froula (LLE), J. Ross and R. Town (LLNL), W. Fox (UNH), and A. Nikroo (GA), and was supported in part by the NLUF, FSC/UR, U.S. DOE, LLNL, and LLE.

  7. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassan, Syed M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Hassanein, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expansion dynamics of laser-produced plasmas expanding into an axial magnetic field. Plasmas were generated by focusing 1.064 µm Nd:YAG laser pulses onto a planar tin target in vacuum and allowed to expand into a 0.5 T magnetic-filed where field lines were aligned along the plume expansion direction. Gated images employing intensified CCD showed focusing of the plasma plume, which were also compared with results obtained using particle-in-cell modelling methods. The estimated density and temperature of the plasma plumes employing emission spectroscopy revealed significant changes in the presence and absence of the 0.5T magnetic field. In the presence of the field, the electron temperature is increased with distance from the target, while the density showed opposite effects.

  8. Collision dynamics of laser produced carbon plasma plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, M.; Ruiz, H. M.; Cortés, D.; Merello, F.; Bhuyan, H.; Veloso, F.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present preliminary experimental observations of the collision processes between two orthogonal laser produced plasmas in a low pressure neutral gas background. A Nd:YAG laser, 340 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, operating at 10 Hz, is used in the experiments. The main laser beam is divided in two beams by a 50% beam splitter, and then focused over two rotating graphite targets, with characteristic fluence 3.5 J/cm2. Experiments are conducted in a range from a base pressure of 0.3 mTorr, up to 50 mTorr argon. The dynamics of the laser plasmas is characterized by time resolved and time integrated optical emission spectroscopy (OES), with 20 ns and 10 ms time resolution, and 50 ns time resolved plasma imaging of visible plasma emission. Clear effects of the neutral gas background on the postcollision plasma dynamics are identified. The overall dynamics of the post-collision plasma is found to be consistent with high collisionality of the carbon plasma plumes, which results in full stagnation on collisioning.

  9. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron–positron pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron–positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 1016 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 1018 cm-3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  10. Interaction of plasma clouds produced from two laser targets

    SciTech Connect

    Annenkov, V. I.; Bessarab, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. A.; Dolgoleva, G. V.; Zhmailo, V. A.; Krotov, V. A.; Kovalenko, V. P.; Kunin, A. V.; Nikitin, I. N.; Novikiova, E. A.; Panov, A. I.; Sobolev, I. V.; Sokolov, S. S.; Starodubtsev, V. A.; Sungatullin, R. R.; Shirokov, A. E.

    2007-05-15

    Results are presented from studies of the interaction of two plasma clouds produced from two different-type laser targets in an ambient gas in the MKV-4 stand of the Iskra-5 facility. The experimental data are compared with the results of numerical simulations.

  11. Effect of transverse magnetic field on laser produced plasma expansion into vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D.; Djebli, M.

    2011-08-15

    A one-dimensional time-dependent magneto-hydrodynamic ideal model is used to investigate the dynamics of initially magnetized laser produced plasma expansion into vacuum, in the context of inertial fusion. The plasma is assumed to be fully ionized and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), allowing all charged particles to have the same temperatures. Self-similar solution shows that the density, velocity, and temperature increase with the strength of the magnetic field. The transverse magnetic field causes significant changes in the plasma expansion dynamics, including the plasma confinement. The plasma velocity increasing is also observed and the temperature is found to be larger compared to temperature in un-magnetized case.

  12. Cavitations induced by plasmas, plasmas induced by cavitations, and plasmas produced in cavitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation bubbles are not static bubbles but have dynamics of expansion, shrinkage, and collapse. Since the collapse of a cavitation bubble is roughly an adiabatic process, the inside of the bubble at the collapse has a high temperature and a high pressure, resulting in the production of a plasma. This talk will be focused on cavitation-related plasma phenomena and the role of the cavitation bubble in the synthesis of nanoparticles. A method for inducing a cavitation bubble is laser ablation in liquid. After the disappearance of laser-produced plasma with optical emission, we have observed the formation of a cavitation bubble. We have found that the inside of the cavitation bubble is the reaction field for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The atomic and molecular species ejected from the ablation target toward the liquid are transported into the cavitation bubble, and they condense into nanoparticles inside it. It is important to note that nanoparticles are stored inside the cavitation bubble until its collapse. We have shown that the size and the structure of nanoparticles are controlled by controlling the dynamics of the cavitation bubbles. Another method for inducing cavitation bubbles is to use ultrasonic power. We have found a simple method for the efficient production of standing cavitation bubbles. The method is just inserting a punching metal plate into water irradiated by ultrasonic wave. The depth of water and the position of the punching plate should be tuned precisely. We have proposed the mechanism of the efficient production of cavitation bubbles by this method. Currently, we try to have electric discharges in cavitation bubbles with the intention of realizing nonequilibrium sonochemistry. In particular, the electric discharge in a laser-induced cavitation bubble shows interesting distortion of the bubble shape, which suggests the electrostatic characteristics of the cavitation bubble.

  13. Microwave Produced Plasma Study in a Cylindrical System

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, V. K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Bora, D.

    2008-03-19

    Hydrogen plasma using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is produced and is studied in a small linear system for breakdown parameters. Microwave power in the experimental system is delivered by a magnetron at 2.45 GHz for 30 ms during which the breakdown of neutral gas occurs. The axial magnetic field required for ECR in the system is such that the fundamental ECR surface (B = 875 G) resides at the geometrical centre of the plasma system. ECR breakdown parameters such as plasma delay and plasma decay time are observed from plasma density measurements, carried out at the centre of plasma system using a specially designed Langmuir probe. The operating parameters such as working gas pressure (10{sup -5}-10{sup -2} mbar) and input microwave power (160-800 W) are varied and the corresponding effect on the breakdown parameters is observed and the parameter space for operating the pulsed experimental system has been identified. All the relevant experimental results obtained are presented.

  14. Electrostatic structure of a magnetized laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Jeffrey; Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the structure of the electrostatic fields produced by the expansion of a laser-produced plasma into a background magnetized plasma are presented. The three-dimensional measurements of the electrostatic field are made using an emissive probe that measures the time-varying plasma potential on two orthogonal planes, one across and one containing the background magnetic field. The inductive electric field is also calculated from probe measurements of the time-varying magnetic fields. Deviations from local charge neutrality at the level of 10(-4) generate a radial electrostatic field with peak strength an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding inductive field. The electrostatic energy density near full expansion is over an order of magnitude larger than that of the induced azimuthal electric field. These measurements show that electrostatic fields must be included in theoretical and computational models of collisionless coupling in magnetized point explosions of laser-produced plasmas and their relation to similar phenomena such as magnetospheric chemical releases. PMID:26651639

  15. Initial Results from the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert

    2003-10-01

    The Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity (ASTRAL) is 2 m long Helicon source designed to investigate basic plasma and space plasma processes. The device produces a plasma with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 20 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.1 eV. A series of large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.2 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce up to 2 kWatt of RF power into the plasma through a matching pi circuit. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device. A RF compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure electron temperature and plasma density. A 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator with a high performance CCD camera is used to measure impurity concentration and to develop novel spectroscopy diagnostic. A diode laser based Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is used to obtain ion temperature and ion drift in the plasma column. A microwave interferometer is also used to calibrate the Langmuir probe. First experimental results associated with this new facility are presented.

  16. Plasma observations near Neptune: Initial results for Voyager 2

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, J.W.; Bridge, H.S.; Coppi, B.; Gordon, G.S. Jr.; Lazarus, A.J.; McNutt, R.L. Jr.; Richardson, J.D.; Steinberg, J.T.; Sullivan, A.; Szabo, A.; Villanueva, L.; Zhang, M. ); Bagenal, F. ); Divers, O. ); Ogilvie, K.W.; Sittler, E.C. Jr. ); Siscoe, G.L. ); Eviatar, A. ); Vasyliunas, V.M. )

    1989-12-15

    The plasma science experiment on Voyager 2 made observations of the plasma environment in Neptune's magnetosphere and in the surrounding solar wind. Because of the large tilt of the magnetic dipole and fortuitous timing, Voyager entered Neptune's magnetosphere through the cusp region, the first cusp observations at an outer planet. Thus the transition from the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere observed by Voyager 2 was not sharp but rather appeared as a gradual decrease in plasma density and temperature. The maximum plasma density observed in the magnetosphere is inferred to be 1.4 per cubic centimeter (the exact value depends on the composition), the smallest observed by Voyager in any magnetosphere. The plasma has at least two components; light ions (mass, 1 to 5) and heavy ions (mass, 10 to 40), but more precise species identification is not yet available. Most of the plasma is concentrated in a plasma sheet or plasma torus and near closest approach to the planet. A likely source of the heavy ions is Triton's atmosphere or ionosphere, whereas the light ions probably escape from Neptune. The large tilt of Neptune's magnetic dipole produces a dynamic magnetosphere that changes configuration every 16 hours as the planet rotates.

  17. Plasma observations near neptune: initial results from voyager 2.

    PubMed

    Belcher, J W; Bridge, H S; Bagenal, F; Coppi, B; Divers, O; Eviatar, A; Gordon, G S; Lazarus, A J; McNutt, R L; Ogilvie, K W; Richardson, J D; Siscoe, G L; Sittler, E C; Steinberg, J T; Sullivan, J D; Szabo, A; Villanueva, L; Vasyliunas, V M; Zhang, M

    1989-12-15

    The plasma science experiment on Voyager 2 made observations of the plasma environment in Neptune's magnetosphere and in the surrounding solar wind. Because of the large tilt of the magnetic dipole and fortuitous timing, Voyager entered Neptune's magnetosphere through the cusp region, the first cusp observations at an outer planet. Thus the transition from the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere observed by Voyager 2 was not sharp but rather appeared as a gradual decrease in plasma density and temperature. The maximum plasma density observed in the magnetosphere is inferred to be 1.4 per cubic centimeter (the exact value depends on the composition), the smallest observed by Voyager in any magnetosphere. The plasma has at least two components; light ions (mass, 1 to 5) and heavy ions (mass, 10 to 40), but more precise species identification is not yet available. Most of the plasma is concentrated in a plasma sheet or plasma torus and near closest approach to the planet. A likely source of the heavy ions is Triton's atmosphere or ionosphere, whereas the light ions probably escape from Neptune. The large tilt of Neptune's magnetic dipole produces a dynamic magnetosphere that changes configuration every 16 hours as the planet rotates. PMID:17756003

  18. Plasma species dynamics in a laser produced carbon plasma expanding in low pressure neutral gas background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, H. M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Bhuyan, H.; Chuaqui, H.; Wyndham, E.

    2012-06-01

    We present time and space resolved spectroscopic observations of a laser produced carbon plasma, in an argon background. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 6.8 J/cm2, is used to produce a plasma from a solid graphite target, at a base pressure of 0.5 mTorr, and with 80 mTorr Argon background. The spectral emission in the visible is recorded with 15 ns time resolution. 20 ns time resolution plasma imagining, filtered at characteristic carbon species emission wavelengths, is used to study the dynamics of the expanding plasma. Two different fronts with ionic or molecular compositions are seen to detach from de laser target plasma.

  19. Studies on Trapping of Laser-Produced Plasma by SL-1 Surmac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoshi, Sumio; Asano, Hiroshi; Kisaka, Masashi; Sekiguchi, Tadashi

    1983-01-01

    A beryllium plasma was produced in a small “Surmac” container (named SL-1 Surmac), by utilizing a neodymium-glass laser of ˜5J and ˜35ns (FWHM). The dependence of the initial particle loss due to the plasma effusion across the container field on the magnetic field strength of the Surmac was observed, and it was found that the effusion decreases drastically above a certain threshold value of the magnetic field. At stronger field, the total amount of plasma particles trapped by the container attains its maximum about 20 μs after the laser shot and it is 25 to 37 percent of that initially produced by the laser pulse. The plasma parameters obtained are as follows: average electron density 3× 1012 cm-3, electron temperature ˜ 10 eV and maximum plasma-beta value at outer “bridge” position, three percent. The plasma particle confinement time is about 44 μs, it exhibits a very weak dependence on the magnetic field and agrees approximately with that calculated from the particle loss to the mechanical supports for the internal current conductors and the beryllium target alone.

  20. Instabilities observed at the bubble edge of a laser produced plasma during its expansion in an ambient tenuous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Clark, S. E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Niemann, C.

    2014-10-01

    The Raptor kJ class 1053 nm Nd:Glass laser in the Phoenix laser laboratory at University of California, Los Angeles, is used to ablate a dense debris plasma from a graphite or plastic target embedded in a tenuous, uniform, and quiescent ambient magnetized plasma in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) which provides a peak plasma density of ni ~ 1013 cm-3. Its background magnetic field can vary between 200 and 1200 G. Debris ions from laser produced plasma expand out conically with super-Alfvénic speed (MA ~ 2) and expel the background magnetic field and ambient ions to form a diamagnetic bubble. The debris plasma interacts with the ambient plasma and the magnetic field and acts as a piston which can create collisionless shocks. Flute-type instabilities, which are probably large Larmor radius Rayleigh Taylor instabilities or lower hybrid drift instabilities, are developed at the bubble edge and also observed in the experiment. The amplitude and wavelength dependence of the instabilities, which might be a strong function of debris to ambient mass to charge ratio, is studied and the experimental results are compared to the two dimensional hybrid simulations. the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the Excellence Initiative Darmstadt Graduate School of Energy Science and Engineering (GSC1070).

  1. Plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Han, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. The optimal fill gas pressures for the azimuthally uniform plasma-puff were about 120 mTorr less than P(opt) less than 450 Torr for He and N2. For Argon 120 mTorr less than P(opt) less than 5 Torr for argon. The inverse pinch switch was triggered with the plasma-puff and the switching capability under various electrical parameters and working gas pressures of Ar, He and N2 was determined. It was also shown that the azimuthally uniform switching discharges were dependent on the type of fill gas and its fill pressure. A new concept of plasma-focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of the inverse pinch switch with the plasma-focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr. In order to assess the effects of plasma current density on material erosion of electrodes, emissions from both an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) and from a spark gap switch under test were studied with an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). The color temperature of the argon plasma was approximately 4,000 K which corresponded with the peak continuum emission near 750 nm. There are the strong line emissions of argon in the 650 - 800 nm range and a lack of line emissions of copper and other solid material used in the switch. This indicates that the plasma current density during closing is low and the hot spot or hot filament in the switch is negligible. This result also indicates considerable reduction of line emission with the INPIStron switch over that of a spark-gap switch. However, a strong carbon line

  2. Spectroscopic Analysis and Thomson Scattering Diagnostics of Wire Produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechaty, Christopher; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel; Caplinger, James; Wallerstein, Austin; Kim, Tony

    2014-10-01

    The Lower Hybrid Drift Instability (LHDI) in plasma is driven by the presence of inhomogeneities in density, temperature, or magnetic field (Krall 1971, Davidson 1977), and occurs in systems where the electrons are magnetized and the ions are effectively unmagnetized. The LHDI is thought to occur in magnetic reconnection (Huba 1977), and has also been investigated as a mitigation technique which can allow for communications to take place through the plasma formed around hypersonic aircraft (Sotnikov 2010). To further understand the phenomenology of the LHDI, we plan to carry out experiments at the Air Force Research Laboratory, in the newly formed Plasma Physics Sensors Laboratory. In experiment, a pulsed power generator is employed to produce plasma by passing current through single, or dual-wire configurations. To characterize the plasma, a Thomson scattering diagnostic is employed, along with a visible spectroscopy diagnostic. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Defense by Riverside Research under Contract BAA-FA8650-13-C-1539.

  3. Plasma irregularities in the D-region ionosphere in association with sprite streamer initiation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jianqi; Pasko, Victor P; McHarg, Matthew G; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C

    2014-01-01

    Sprites are spectacular optical emissions in the mesosphere induced by transient lightning electric fields above thunderstorms. Although the streamer nature of sprites has been generally accepted, how these filamentary plasmas are initiated remains a subject of active research. Here we present observational and modelling results showing solid evidence of pre-existing plasma irregularities in association with streamer initiation in the D-region ionosphere. The video observations show that before streamer initiation, kilometre-scale spatial structures descend rapidly with the overall diffuse emissions of the sprite halo, but slow down and stop to form the stationary glow in the vicinity of the streamer onset, from where streamers suddenly emerge. The modelling results reproduce the sub-millisecond halo dynamics and demonstrate that the descending halo structures are optical manifestations of the pre-existing plasma irregularities, which might have been produced by thunderstorm or meteor effects on the D-region ionosphere. PMID:24806314

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli ATCC 11775 in fresh produce using atmospheric pressure cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez-Aguirre, Daniela; Wemlinger, Erik; Barbosa-Canovas, Gustavo; Pedrow, Patrick; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Food-borne outbreaks are associated with the presence of pathogenic bacteria in food products such as fresh produce. One of the target microorganisms is Escherichia coli which exhibits resistance to being inactivated with conventional disinfection methods for vegetables. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP) was tested to disinfect three vegetables with challenge surfaces, lettuce, carrots and tomatoes. The produce was inoculated with the bacteria to reach an initial microbial concentration of 107 cfu/g. Vegetables were initially exposed to the APCP discharges from a needle array at 5.7 kV RMS in argon, processing times of 0.5, 3 and 5 min. Initial results indicate that microbial decontamination is effective on the lettuce (1.2 log reduction) when compared with other vegetables. To claim disinfection, a 3 log reduction or more is needed, which makes APCP treatment very promising technology for decontamination of produce. We propose that with method refinements full disinfection can be achieved using APCP.

  5. Elastic properties of porous structural ceramics produced by plasma-spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, A.

    1998-12-31

    This study focuses on the relationship between porosity and elastic stiffness of structural ceramic materials produced by plasma-spraying. Mg-Al-spinel was chosen as a model material and studied in as-sprayed condition as well as upon annealing to increasingly higher temperatures up to 1650 C. The detailed analysis of the stiffness and mass density evolution offers a deep insight into the initial microstructural state of the material and into the morphological changes that occur upon heat treatment.

  6. Acceleration of neutrals in a nanosecond laser produced nickel plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Philip, Reji

    2014-12-15

    Time of flight dynamics of slow neutrals, fast neutrals, and ions from a nanosecond laser produced nickel (Ni) plasma are investigated. Species arrival times confirm the hypothesis that fast neutrals are formed by the recombination of fast ions with free electrons. Both neutrals and ions are found to accelerate for a short interval immediately after ablation, which is attributed to internal Coulomb forces which create electrostatic potentials resulting in the charged particle acceleration. This process is further enhanced by laser-plasma energy coupling. Emission from neutrals could be measured for longer axial distances in the plume compared to that of ions confirming that the ions recombine to form neutrals as they move away from the target surface.

  7. Analysis of extreme ultraviolet spectra from laser produced rhenium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Liu, Luning; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly-charged rhenium ions were observed in the 1-7 nm region using two Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths of 150 ps and 10 ns, respectively, operating at a number of laser power densities. The maximum focused peak power density was 2.6 × 1014 W cm-2 for the former and 5.5 × 1012 W cm-2 for the latter. The Cowan suite of atomic structure codes and unresolved transition array (UTA) approach were used to calculate and interpret the emission properties of the different spectra obtained. The results show that n = 4-n = 4 and n = 4-n = 5 UTAs lead to two intense quasi-continuous emission bands in the 4.3-6.3 nm and 1.5-4.3 nm spectral regions. As a result of the different ion stage distributions in the plasmas induced by ps and ns laser irradiation the 1.5-4.3 nm UTA peak moves to shorter wavelength in the ps laser produced plasma spectra. For the ns spectrum, the most populated ion stage during the lifetime of this plasma that could be identified from the n = 4-n = 5 transitions was Re23+ while for the ps plasma the presence of significantly higher stages was demonstrated. For the n = 4-n = 4 4p64dN-4p54dN+1 + 4p64dN-14f transitions, the 4d-4f transitions contribute mainly in the most intense 4.7-5.5 nm region while the 4p-4d subgroup gives rise to a weaker feature in the 4.3-4.7 nm region. A number of previously unidentified spectral features produced by n = 4-n = 5 transitions in the spectra of Re XVI to Re XXXIX are identified.

  8. Relative ion expansion velocity in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, S.; Moreno, J. C.; Griem, H. R.; Cohen, Leonard; Richardson, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    The spectra of highly ionized titanium, Ti XIII through Ti XXI, and C VI Lyman lines were excited in laser-produced plasmas. The plasma was produced by uniformly irradiating spherical glass microballoons coated with thin layers of titanium and parylene. The 24-beam Omega laser system produced short, 0.6 ns, and high-intensity, 4 x 10 to the 14th W/sq cm, laser pulses at a wavelength of 351 nm. The measured wavelength for the 2p-3s Ti XIII resonance lines had an average shift of + 0.023 A relative to the C VI and Ti XX spectral lines. No shift was found between the C VI, Ti XIX, and Ti XX lines. The shift is attributed to a Doppler effect, resulting from a difference of (2.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the 7th cm/s in the expansion velocities of Ti XIX and Ti XX ions compared to Ti XIII ions.

  9. Recent Science Education Initiatives at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Dominguez, Arturo; Gershman, Sophia; Guilbert, Nick; Merali, Aliya; Ortiz, Deedee

    2013-10-01

    An integrated approach to program development and implementation has significantly enhanced a variety of Science Education initiatives for students and teachers. This approach involves combining the efforts of PPPL scientists, educators, research and education fellows, and collaborating non-profit organizations to provide meaningful educational experiences for students and teachers. Our undergraduate internship program continues to have outstanding success, with 72% of our participants going to graduate school and 45% concentrating in plasma physics. New partnerships have allowed us to increase the number of underrepresented students participating in mentored research opportunities. The number of participants in our Young Women's Conference increases significantly each year. Our Plasma Camp workshop, now in its 15th year, recruits outstanding teachers from around the country to create new plasma-centered curricula. Student research in the Science Education Laboratory concentrates on the development of a high-fidelity plasma speaker, a particle dropper for a dusty plasma experiment, microplasmas along liquid surfaces for a variety of applications, an Internet-controlled DC glow discharge source for students, and a Planeterrella for demonstrating the aurora and other space weather phenomenon for the general public.

  10. Interplanetary field and plasma during initial phase of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, V. L.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-three geomagnetic storm events during 1966 to 1970 were studied by using simultaneous interplanetary magnetic field and plasma parameters. Explorer 33 and 35 field and plasma data were analyzed on large-scale (hourly) and small-scale (3 min.) during the time interval coincident with the initial phase of the geomagnetic storms. The solar-ecliptic Bz component turns southward at the end of the initial phase, thus triggering the main phase decrease in Dst geomagnetic field. The By component also shows large fluctuations along with Bz. When there are no clear changes in the Bz component, the By shows abrupt changes at the main phase onset. On the small-scale, behavior of the magnetic field and electric field were studied in detail for the three events; it is found that the field fluctuations in By, Bz and Ey and Ez are present in the initial phase. In the large-scale, the behavior field remains quiet because the small-scale variations are averaged out. It appears that large as well as small time scale fluctuations in the interplanetary field and plasma help to alter the internal electromagnetic state of the magnetosphere so that a ring current could causing a geomagnetic storm decrease.

  11. Initiation and assembly of the plasma in a plasma flow switch

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Greene, A.E.; Peterson, D.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Cochrane, J.C.; Kruse, H.; Roderick, N.F.

    1996-04-01

    A series of fast opening switch experiments was carried out on the Pegasus pulsed power facility. The first series of experiments characterized the assembly and run down of a 50 mg plasma flow switch operating in the 6 MA regime. The switch plasma arises from the vaporization of a wire array and a barrier foil. Arrays with different numbers of wires were examined. Two-dimensional (2-D) radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the initial vaporization stage of the array plasma and its assembly on the barrier foil are presented, which include the effects of initial perturbations on the evolution of the switch plasma as it moves down a coaxial gun barrel. Sparse wire arrays were observed to perform poorly. A change in the experimental design, motivated by 2-D simulations, led to improved performance. Computational results which lead to these changes are discussed, and the results are compared with experimental data.

  12. Saturation of Langmuir waves in laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    This dissertation deals with the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma (a quasineutral collection of electrons and ions). During this interaction, the laser drives large-amplitude waves through a class of processes known as parametric instabilities. Several such instabilities drive one type of wave, the Langmuir wave, which involves oscillations of the electrons relative to the nearly-stationary ions. There are a number of mechanisms which limit the amplitude to which Langmuir waves grow. In this dissertation, these mechanisms are examined to identify qualitative features which might be observed in experiments and/or simulations. In addition, a number of experiments are proposed to specifically look for particular saturation mechanisms. In a plasma, a Langmuir wave can decay into an electromagnetic wave and an ion wave. This parametric instability is proposed as a source for electromagnetic emission near half of the incident laser frequency observed from laser-produced plasmas. This interpretation is shown to be consistent with existing experimental data and it is found that one of the previous mechanisms used to explain such emission is not. The scattering version of the electromagnetic decay instability is shown to provide an enhanced noise source of electromagnetic waves near the frequency of the incident laser.

  13. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Harilal, S S; LaHaye, N L; Phillips, M C

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of a solid aluminum target at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous wave (cw) Ti:sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the cw laser at one transition. Time-delayed, gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate resonantly excited fluorescence emission from thermally excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable cw laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultrahigh resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing cw laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods. PMID:27472615

  14. Observation and numerical analysis of plasma parameters in a capillary discharge-produced plasma channel waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bobrova, Nadezhda; Sasorov, Pavel; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sasaki, Toru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2011-03-01

    We observed the parameters of the discharge-produced plasma in cylindrical capillary. Plasma parameters of the waveguide were investigated by use of both a Normarski laser interferometer and a hydrogen plasma line spectrum. A space-averaged maximum temperature of 3.3 eV with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed at a discharge time of 150 ns and a maximum discharge current of 200 A. One-dimensional dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code was used to analyze the discharge dynamics in the gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-intensity laser pulses. Simulations were performed for the conditions of the experiment. We compared the temporal behavior of the electron temperature and the radial electron density profiles, measured in the experiment with the results of the numerical simulations. They occurred to be in a good agreement. An ultrashort, intense laser pulse was guided by use of this plasma channel.

  15. Numerical analysis of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, T.; Sakata, N.; Kato, S.; Nagayama, T.; Fujita, K.

    1999-07-01

    For this study, the Arcjet Plasmodynamic Analysis Code (APAC) developed by Fujita has been significantly modified in order to investigate the physical phenomena of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system. For self-consistent determination of the heating process of working gas, plasma flow, which contains complicated physical phenomena, is obtained by interconnecting flow field analysis with electric field analysis. The main conclusions obtained are summarized as follows: (1) Discharge voltage decreased with discharge current significantly. On the other hand, it increases slightly with hydrogen flow rate. (2) Current density distribution governs physical phenomena in plasma flow. (3) Temperature and velocity distribution at the nozzle exit depend on the discharge current.

  16. Electron temperature and average density in spherical laser-produced plasmas - Ultraviolet plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, S.; Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Behring, W. E.; Cohen, L.

    1985-01-01

    The average values of the electron temperature Te and the electron density Ne in the corona plasmas of spherically irradiated high-Z targets have been estimated. Targets composed of the elements Cu through Br, Rb, and Mo were irradiated using the fundamental (1.06 microns) and the frequency-tripled (351 nm) output of the Omega laser system. Spectra were recorded in the wavelength region 15-200 A. Using various extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic techniques, it is found that for the case of a Mo plasma produced by frequency-tripled laser irradiation, Te = 2600 + or - 600 eV and Ne is greater than 6 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm. This is consistent with a 'flux limit' smaller than 0.1. The estimated values of Te and Ne are lower in the corona plasmas produced using the fundamental (1.06 micron) irradiation.

  17. Measurements of Electron Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2013-10-01

    Knowing spatial profiles of electron density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (n plasma is essential to understanding LPI initiation in inertial confinement fusion research. In the recent Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) was deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. Plasmas were produced from flat CH targets illuminated by Nike KrF laser with total energies up to 1 kJ of 0.5 ~ 1 nsec FWHM pulses. The GIR resolved ne up to 3 ×1021 /cm3 in space taking 2D snapshot images of probe laser (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. The individual beamlet transmittances were also measured for Te estimation. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera simultaneously detected light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay instabilities. The measured spatial profiles are compared with simulation results from the FAST3D radiation hydrocode and their effects on the LPI observations are investigated. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  18. Detection of electromagnetic pulses produced by hypervelocity micro particle impact plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Sigrid; Lee, Nicolas; Johnson, Theresa; Goel, Ashish; Fletcher, Alexander; Linscott, Ivan; Strauss, David; Lauben, David; Srama, Ralf; Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian

    2013-09-15

    Hypervelocity micro particles (mass < 1 ng), including meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and produce plasmas that are initially dense (∼10{sup 28} m{sup −3}), but rapidly expand into the surrounding vacuum. We report the detection of radio frequency (RF) emission associated with electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) from hypervelocity impacts of micro particles in ground-based experiments using micro particles that are 15 orders of magnitude less massive than previously observed. The EMP production is a stochastic process that is influenced by plasma turbulence such that the EMP detection rate that is strongly dependent on impact speed and on the electrical charge conditions at the impact surface. In particular, impacts of the fastest micro particles occurring under spacecraft charging conditions representative of high geomagnetic activity are the most likely to produce RF emission. This new phenomenon may provide a source for unexplained RF measurements on spacecraft charged to high potentials.

  19. Plasma processes for producing silanes and derivatives thereof

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Richard M; Massey, Dean Richard; Peterson, Peter Young

    2014-03-25

    The invention is generally related to process for generating one or more molecules having the formula Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z, and mixtures thereof, where x,y and z are integers .gtoreq.1, H is hydrogen and D is deuterium, such as silane, comprising the steps of: providing a silicon containing material, wherein the silicon containing material includes at least 20 weight percent silicon atoms based on the total weight of the silicon containing material; generating a plasma capable of vaporizing a silicon atom, sputtering a silicon atom, or both using a plasma generating device; and contacting the plasma to the silicon containing material in a chamber having an atmosphere that includes at least about 0.5 mole percent hydrogen atoms and/or deuterium atoms based on the total moles of atoms in the atmosphere; so that a molecule having the formula Si.sub.xH.sub.y; (e.g., silane) is generated. The process preferably includes a step of removing one or more impurities from the Si.sub.xH.sub.y (e.g., the silane) to form a clean Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z (e.g., silane). The process may also include a step of reacting the Si.sub.xH.sub.y, Si.sub.xD.sub.y, Si.sub.xH.sub.yD.sub.z (e.g., the silane) to produce a high purity silicon containing material such as electronic grade metallic silicon, photovoltaic grade metallic silicon, or both.

  20. [Testing of medicinal products produced from pooled plasma].

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, U; Hunfeld, A; Breitner-Ruddock, S

    2014-10-01

    Medicinal products produced from human plasma fall under the administrative batch release procedure of the competent authority. In Germany, this has been carried out since 1995 by the Paul Ehrlich Institute (PEI), the responsible state control agency for blood products. Medicinal products released for the European and national market are tested for quality, efficacy and safety. Experimental testing of the final product and the starting materials, the plasma pools, as well as control of the production documentation guarantee a constantly high product safety. In the 28,000 batches tested since the beginning of the state controlled batch release testing of these blood products at the PEI, there has been no transmission of infectious viruses (HIV, HBV and HCV) to any patient. The batch release has made a contribution to the improvement of product quality. This procedure is still an important tool to ensure safety of blood products. The PEI is integrated in the batch release network of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & Health Care (EDQM) in Strasbourg. Regulations and guidelines for official control authority batch release (OCABR) ensure harmonized procedures for mutual recognition of batch release on the European level. The EU certificates and German national certificates are requested and accepted in over 70 countries worldwide. Experimental testing in the EU and the requisite certificates have developed into a seal of quality for the world market. PMID:25213735

  1. Emission analysis of a laser-produced barium plasma plume.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Joshi, H C; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-09-01

    In the present work we report the characteristic emission features of a laser-produced barium plasma plume. The time-resolved analysis for the different spectral lines of neutral and singly charged ionic barium has been carried out. It has been observed that the temporal evolution of electron temperature and density shows a peculiar behavior which is significantly different from the reported results of laser ablation of materials. The electron density increases with increase in delay time but the temperature does not change to any significant extent. Strong self-reversal in the emission of a resonant singly charged barium ionic line (455.4 nm) with time delay indicates the increase of population of singly charged barium ion with time. The results are explained on the basis of the increased population of barium metastables and subsequent ionization (Penning type). PMID:26368891

  2. Plasma Parameter of a Capillary Discharge-Produced Plasma Channel to Guide an Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bai, Jin-xiang; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-01-22

    We have observed the optical guiding of a 100-fs laser pulse with the laser intensity in the range of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} using a 1.5-cm long capillary discharge-produced plasma channel for compact electron acceleration applications. The optical pulse propagation using the plasma channel is achieved with the electron densities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and the electron temperatures of 0.5-4 eV at a discharge time delay of around 150 ns and a discharge current of 500 A with a pulse duration of 100-150 ns. An energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons from a laser-plasma acceleration scheme showed a peak at 1.3 MeV with a maximum energy tail of 1.6 MeV.

  3. Filter media properties of mineral fibres produced by plasma spray.

    PubMed

    Prasauskas, Tadas; Matulevicius, Jonas; Kliucininkas, Linas; Krugly, Edvinas; Valincius, Vitas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the properties of fibrous gas filtration media produced from mineral zeolite. Fibres were generated by direct current plasma spray. The paper characterizes morphology, chemical composition, geometrical structure of elementary fibres, and thermal resistance, as well as the filtration properties of fibre media. The diameter of the produced elementary fibres ranged from 0.17 to 0.90 μm and the length ranged from 0.025 to 5.1 mm. The release of fibres from the media in the air stream was noticed, but it was minimized by hot-pressing the formed fibre mats. The fibres kept their properties up to the temperature of 956°C, while further increase in temperature resulted in the filter media becoming shrunk and brittle. The filtration efficiency of the prepared filter mats ranged from 95.34% to 99.99% for aerosol particles ranging in a size between 0.03 and 10.0 μm. Unprocessed fibre media showed the highest filtration efficiency when filtering aerosol particles smaller than 0.1 µm. Hot-pressed filters were characterized by the highest quality factor values, ranging from 0.021 to 0.064 Pa(-1) (average value 0.034 Pa(-1)). PMID:26583905

  4. Detailed energy distributions in laser-produced plasmas of solid gold and foam gold planar targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Jiamin; Shang, Wanli

    2013-12-15

    Foam gold was proposed to increase the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency due to its important applications. To understand the mechanism of x-ray enhancement, the detailed energy distributions and plasma profiles for laser-irradiated solid gold and foam gold targets were studied comparatively by hydrodynamic simulations using the code Multi-1D. It is confirmed that the radiation heat wave is subsonic for the normal solid gold target, while supersonic for the foam gold target. The shock wave, which is behind the supersonic radiation heat wave for the foam gold target, generates a plasma temperature gradient with high temperature near the shock wave front to produce an additional net outward radiation for enhancement of the x-ray emission. Much larger inward plasma velocity is also driven by the shock wave as an initial plasma velocity for the laser deposition and electron thermal conduct zone, which decreases the expanding plasma kinetic energy loss and helps to increase the x-ray radiation.

  5. Visible spectral power emitted from a laser produced uranium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Jalufka, N. W.

    1975-01-01

    The development of plasma-core nuclear reactors for advanced terrestrial and space-power sources is researched. Experimental measurements of the intensity and the spectral distribution of radiation from a nonfissioning uranium plasma are reported.

  6. Focused excimer laser initiated and radio frequency sustained plasma formation in high pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giar, Ryan

    A doctoral thesis project was performed to experimentally investigate the feasibility of focused excimer laser initiation of air plasmas for radio frequency sustainment. A 193 nm, 15 MW, 300 mJ laser was focused with a 18 cm focal length lens to form a small, high density (ne ~ 10 14 cm--3) seed plasma. These laser plasmas were produced inside a borosilicate glass tube around which was wrapped a 5 turn helical antenna. This antenna was powered with 5 kW of 13.56 MHz of radiation for 1.5 s. This was accomplished at a pressure of 22 Torr, resulting in a large volume (300 cm3) air plasma. Diagnostic measurements of this air plasma determined an electron density of 5E10 cm-3 and an electron temperature 1.3 eV with a neutral temperature of 3500 K. The collision frequency was measured to be 9E10 Hz which resulted in a plasma-loaded antenna resistance of 6 O with a voltage reflection coefficient of 0.7.

  7. Focused excimer laser initiated, radio frequency sustained high pressure air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giar, Ryan; Scharer, John

    2011-11-15

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes and plasma production by focusing 193 nm, 300 mJ, 15 MW high power laser radiation inside a 6 cm diameter helical radio frequency (RF) coil are presented. Quantum resonant multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and collisional cascade laser ionization processes are exploited that have been shown to produce high-density (n{sub e} {approx} 7 x 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3}) cylindrical seed plasmas at 760 Torr. Air breakdown in lower pressures (from 7-22 Torr), where REMPI is the dominant laser ionization process, is investigated using an UV 18 cm focal length lens, resulting in a laser flux of 5.5 GW/cm{sup 2} at the focal spot. The focused laser power absorption and associated shock wave produce seed plasmas for sustainment by the RF (5 kW incident power, 1.5 s) pulse. Measurements of the helical RF antenna load impedance in the inductive and capacitive coupling regimes are obtained by measuring the loaded antenna reflection coefficient. A 105 GHz interferometer is used to measure the plasma electron density and collision frequency. Spectroscopic measurements of the plasma and comparison with the SPECAIR code are made to determine translational, rotational, and vibrational neutral temperatures and the associated neutral gas temperature. From this and the associated measurement of the gas pressure the electron temperature is obtained. Experiments show that the laser-formed seed plasma allows RF sustainment at higher initial air pressures (up to 22 Torr) than that obtained via RF-only initiation (<18 Torr) by means of a 0.3 J UV laser pulse.

  8. Structure of an exploding laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, A.; Gekelman, W.

    2011-05-15

    Currents and instabilities associated with an expanding dense plasma embedded in a magnetized background plasma are investigated by direct volumetric probe measurements of the magnetic field and floating potential. A diamagnetic cavity is formed and found to collapse rapidly compared to the expected magnetic diffusion time. The three-dimensional current density within the expanding plasma includes currents along the background magnetic field, in addition to the diamagnetic current. Correlation measurements reveal that flutelike structures at the plasma surface translate with the expanding plasma across the magnetic field and extend into the current system that sustains the diamagnetic cavity, possibly contributing to its collapse.

  9. Initial Studies of Core and Edge Transport of NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    E.J. Synakowski; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; C.E. Bush; C. Bourdelle; D. Darrow; W. Dorland; A. Ejiri; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; S. Kubota; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; R.J. Maqueda; J.E. Menard; D. Mueller; A. Rosenberg; S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; G. Taylor; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; W. Peebles; Y-K.M. Peng; A.L. Roquemore , C.H. Skinner; V.A. Soukhanovskii; and the NSTX Research Team

    2001-09-19

    Rapidly developing diagnostic, operational, and analysis capability is enabling the first detailed local physics studies to begin in high-beta plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These studies are motivated in part by energy confinement times in neutral-beam-heated discharges that are favorable with respect to predictions from the ITER-89P scaling expression. Analysis of heat fluxes based on profile measurements with neutral-beam injection (NBI) suggest that the ion thermal transport may be exceptionally low, and that electron thermal transport is the dominant loss channel. This analysis motivates studies of possible sources of ion heating not presently accounted for by classical collisional processes. Gyrokinetic microstability studies indicate that long wavelength turbulence with k(subscript ''theta'') rho(subscript ''i'') {approx} 0.1-1 may be suppressed in these plasmas, while modes with k(subscript ''theta'') rho(subscript ''i'') {approx} 50 may be robust. High-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) heating efficiently heats electrons on NSTX, and studies have begun using it to assess transport in the electron channel. Regarding edge transport, H-mode [high-confinement mode] transitions occur with either NBI or HHFW heating. The power required for low-confinement mode (L-mode) to H-mode transitions far exceeds that expected from empirical edge-localized-mode-free H-mode scaling laws derived from moderate aspect ratio devices. Finally, initial fluctuation measurements made with two techniques are permitting the first characterizations of edge turbulence.

  10. Laser produced plasma EUV sources for device development and HVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, David C.; Fomenkov, Igor V.; Lercel, Michael J.; La Fontaine, Bruno M.; Myers, David W.; Brown, Daniel J.; Ershov, Alex I.; Sandstrom, Richard L.; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Das, Palash; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Kevin; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rajyaguru, Chirag; De Dea, Silvia; Dunstan, Wayne J.; Baumgart, Peter; Ishihara, Toshi; Simmons, Rod D.; Jacques, Robert N.; Bergstedt, Robert A.; Porshnev, Peter I.; Wittak, Christian J.; Woolston, Michael R.; Rafac, Robert J.; Grava, Jonathan; Schafgans, Alexander A.; Tao, Yezheng

    2012-03-01

    Laser produced plasma (LPP) systems have been developed as the primary approach for the EUV scanner light source for optical imaging of circuit features at sub-22nm and beyond nodes on the ITRS roadmap. This paper provides a review of development progress and productization status for LPP extreme-ultra-violet (EUV) sources with performance goals targeted to meet specific requirements from leading scanner manufacturers. We present the latest results on exposure power generation, collection, and clean transmission of EUV through the intermediate focus. Semiconductor industry standards for reliability and source availability data are provided. We report on measurements taken using a 5sr normal incidence collector on a production system. The lifetime of the collector mirror is a critical parameter in the development of extreme ultra-violet LPP lithography sources. Deposition of target material as well as sputtering or implantation of incident particles can reduce the reflectivity of the mirror coating during exposure. Debris mitigation techniques are used to inhibit damage from occuring, the protection results of these techniques will be shown over multi-100's of hours.

  11. Pulsed power produced counter-propagating supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Valenzuela, J.; Collins, G.; Mariscal, D.; Narkis, J.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Haque, S.; Hammel, B.; Wallace, M.; Covington, A.; Beg, F.

    2015-11-01

    High-Mach-number, ionized, flowing gases are ubiquitous in the universe, and in many astrophysical environments they take the shape of highly collimated and unidirectional jets. Pulsed power current drivers provide the opportunity to create plasma jets while achieving conditions required to explore radiative cooling, magnetic field advection, shock formation and microinstabilities, all of which are important in the astrophysical environment. We present results from an experimental campaign carried out with the ZEBRA driver (long pulse mode: 0.5 MA in 200 ns current rise) at the Nevada Terawatt Facility where we have performed a comprehensive study of the physics of conical wire array outflows. We have implemented a double conical array configuration in which two counter-propagating jets are produced. Characterization of the jets was done with Faraday rotation, interferometry and an optical streak camera. We will present available data comparing two wire materials (Al and Cu) and the shock formation in different parameter regimes. The work is funded by the Department of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0001063 and DE-NA0001995.

  12. Parameters of atmospheric plasmas produced by electrosurgical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alexey; Canady, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    Electrosurgical systems are extensively utilized in general surgery, surgical oncology, plastic and reconstructive surgery etc. In this work we study plasma parameters created by electrosurgical system SS-200E/Argon 2 of US Medical Innovations. The maximal length of the discharge plasma column at which the discharge can be sustained was determined as function of discharge power and argon flow rate. Electrical parameters including discharge current and voltage were measured. Recently proposed Rayleigh microwave scattering method for temporally resolved density measurements of small-size atmospheric plasmas was utilized. Simultaneously, evolution of plasma column was observed using intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera.

  13. Initial operation of a large-scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Henins, I.; Gribble, R.J.; Reass, W.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Nastasi, M.A.; Rej, D.J.

    1993-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII), a workpiece to be implanted is immersed in a weakly ionized plasma and pulsed to a high negative voltage. Plasma ions are accelerated toward the workpiece and implanted in its surface. Experimental PSII results reported in the literature have been for small workpieces. A large scale PSII experiment has recently been assembled at Los Alamos, in which stainless steel and aluminum workpieces with surface areas over 4 m{sup 2} have been implanted in a 1.5 m-diameter, 4.6 m-length cylindrical vacuum chamber. Initial implants have been performed at 50 kV with 20 {mu}s pulses of 53 A peak current, repeated at 500 Hz, although the pulse modulator will eventually supply 120 kV pulses of 60 A peak current at 2 kHz. A 1,000 W, 13.56 MHz capacitively-coupled source produces nitrogen plasma densities in the 10{sup 15} m{sup {minus}3} range at neutral pressures as low as 0.02 mtorr. A variety of antenna configurations have been tried, with and without axial magnetic fields of up to 60 gauss. Measurements of sheath expansion, modulator voltage and current, and plasma density fill-in following a pulse are presented. The authors consider secondary electron emission, x-ray production, workpiece arcing, implant conformality, and workpiece and chamber heating.

  14. Characterization of linear plasma synthetic jet actuators in an initially quiescent medium

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Reasor, Daniel A. Jr.; LeBeau, Raymond P. Jr.

    2009-04-15

    The plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) is a geometrical variant of the aerodynamic plasma actuator that can be used to produce zero-mass flux jets similar to those created by mechanical devices. This jet can be either three-dimensional using annular electrode arrays (annular PSJA) or nearly two dimensional using two rectangular-strip exposed electrodes and one embedded electrode (linear PSJA). Unsteady pulsing of the PSJA at time scales decoupled to the ac input frequency results in a flow field dominated by counter-rotating vortical structures similar to conventional synthetic jets, and the peak velocity and momentum of the jet is found to be affected by a combination of the pulsing frequency and input power. This paper investigates the fluid dynamic characteristics of linear plasma synthetic jet actuators in an initially quiescent medium. Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements on the actuator are used to validate a previously developed numerical model wherein the plasma behavior is introduced into the Navier-Stokes equations as an electrohydrodynamic force term calculated from Maxwell's equations and solved for the fluid momentum. The numerical model was implemented in an incompressible, unstructured grid code. The results of the simulations are observed to reproduce some aspects of the qualitative and quantitative experimental behavior of the jet for steady and pulsed modes of actuator operation. The self-similarity behavior of plasma synthetic jets are examined and compared to mechanically driven continuous and synthetic jets.

  15. Investigation of Nd:YAG laser produced tin droplet plasma expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ziqi; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang; Wang, Junwu

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports an investigation of plasma expansion produced by Nd:YAG laser irradiating tin droplets. An intensified charged coupled device camera was used to record the plasma plume images, and the temporal evolution of the plasma plume was studied at various laser intensities. Our results demonstrate that the shape of the plasma plume develops from an approximate circle to an ellipse. The temporal evolutions of plasma boundary and plasma centroid were calculated by the secondary moment of plasma image intensity. The angle distributions of the plasma expanding velocity were obtained; the results show that the plasma expanding velocity decreases with increase of the angle to the incoming laser axis. In addition, the eccentricity of the plasma ellipse decreases with time. Meanwhile, we found that the centroid of plasma clusters moves toward the laser incoming direction during the expansion stage and the velocity of this motion is independent of laser intensity.

  16. Persistence of uranium emission in laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S. Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-04-28

    Detection of uranium and other nuclear materials is of the utmost importance for nuclear safeguards and security. Optical emission spectroscopy of laser-ablated U plasmas has been presented as a stand-off, portable analytical method that can yield accurate qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of a variety of samples. In this study, optimal laser ablation and ambient conditions are explored, as well as the spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma for spectral analysis of excited U species in a glass matrix. Various Ar pressures were explored to investigate the role that plasma collisional effects and confinement have on spectral line emission enhancement and persistence. The plasma-ambient gas interaction was also investigated using spatially resolved spectra and optical time-of-flight measurements. The results indicate that ambient conditions play a very important role in spectral emission intensity as well as the persistence of excited neutral U emission lines, influencing the appropriate spectral acquisition conditions.

  17. Laser propagation and channel formation in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. E.

    1996-05-01

    The understanding of laser beam propagation through underdense plasmas is of vital importance to inertial confinement fusion schemes, as well as being a fundamental physics issue. Formation of plasma channels has numerous applications including table-top x-ray lasers and laser-plasma induced particle accelerators. The fast ignitor concept (M. Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1), 1626 (1994)., for example, requires the formation of an evacuated channel through a large, underdense plasma. Scaled experiments (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63), 2812 (1989). (S. Wilks et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73), 2994 (1994). (P.E. Young et al, Phys. Plasmas 2), 2825 (1995). have shown that the axial extent of a channel formed by a 100 ps pulse is limited by the onset of the filamentation instability (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 61), 2336 (1988).. We have obtained quantitative comparison between filamentation theory and experiment (P.E. Young, Phys. Plasmas 2), 2815 (1995).. More recent experiments (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 1082 (1995). have shown that by increasing the length of the channel-forming pulse, the filamentation instability is overcome and the channel forms at higher densities. This result has important implications for the fast ignitor design and the understanding of time-dependent beam dynamics. In addition, we will present measurements of ion energies ejected by the ponderomotive force which is a measurement of the peak laser intensity in the plasma; the ion energies indicate filamented laser intensities above 1.5× 10^17 W/cm^2. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48. ^ In collaboration with S. Wilks, J. Hammer, W. Kruer, M. Foord, G. Guethlein, and M. Tabak.

  18. Initial study of the optical spectrum of the ISIS H{sup -} ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Philippe, K.

    2012-02-15

    The front end test stand is being constructed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, with the aim of producing a 60 mA, 2 ms, 50 Hz, perfectly chopped H{sup -} ion beam. To meet the beam requirements, a more detailed understanding of the ion source plasma is required. To this end, an initial study is made of the optical spectrum of the plasma using a digital spectrometer. The atomic and molecular emission lines of hydrogen and caesium are clearly distinguished and a quantitative comparison is made when the ion source is run in different conditions. The electron temperature is 0.6 eV and measured line widths vary by up to 75%.

  19. Harmonic generation in the extended plasmas produced on the non-metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The review of the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) studies in the extended plasma plumes produced on the surfaces of non-metal targets (elemental semiconductors, oxygen- and fluorine-contained crystals) is presented. The objective of those studies was to reveal the attractive properties of non-metal plasmas. We discuss the results of HHG optimization in the above plasma plumes using different methods. These studies demonstrate the usefulness of the plasma harmonic approach for the analysis of the nonlinear optical and spectroscopic properties of the extended laser-produced plasmas formed on the non-metal surfaces.

  20. Plasma produced by impacts of fast dust particles on a thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried

    1994-01-01

    The thin-film impact plasma detector was pioneered by Berg for detecting small cosmic dust particles and measuring their approximate velocities in a time-of-flight configuration. While Berg's device was highly successful in establishing the flux of interplanetary dust, the accuracy of measuring the velocities of individual particles was a moderate 18 percent in magnitude and 27 degrees in angle. A much greater accuracy of less than or equal to 1 percent in determining the velocity components appears desirable in order to associate a particle with its parent body. In order to meet that need, research was initiated to determine if a thin-film detector can be designed to provide such accurate velocity measurements. Previous laboratory investigations of the impact plasma uncovered two difficulties: (1) solid or liquid spray is ejected from a primary impact crater and strikes neighboring walls where it produces secondary impact craters and plasma clouds; as a result, both quantity and time of detection of the plasma can vary significantly with the experiment configuration. Particles from an accelerator rarely have speeds v greater than or equal to 10-15 km/s, while cosmic dust particles typically impact at v = 10-72 km/s. The purpose of the tests discussed in this paper was to resolve the two difficulties mentioned. That is, the experiment configuration was designed to reduce the contribution of plasma from secondary impacts. In addition, most particles with v less than or equal to 25 km/s and all particles with v less than or equal to 10 km/s were eliminated from the beam.

  1. Research on plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. Research is presented and resulting conference papers are attached. These papers include 'Characteristics of Plasma-Puff Trigger for an Inverse-Pinch Plasma Switch'; 'Ultra-High-Power Plasma Switch INPUTS for Pulse Power Systems'; 'Characteristics of Switching Plasma in an Inverse-Pinch Switch'; 'Comparative Study of INPIStron and Spark Gap'; and 'INPIStron Switched Pulsed Power for Dense Plasma Pinches.'

  2. Suprathermal electrons produced by beam-plasma-discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments conducted with a low energy plasma lens, HARP, in the electron beam of the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center indicate that an enhanced population of 50 to 300 volt electrons appear when the beam goes into the Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) mode. Below the BPD instability the electron distribution appears to be characterized as non-energized single particle scattering and energy loss. At 100 cm from the beam core in the BPD mode the fluxes parallel to the beam are reduced by a factor of 20 with respect to the fluxes at 25 cm. Some evidence for isotropy near the beam core is presented.

  3. Generation of collisionless shock in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2015-08-01

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments and are tightly connected with magnetic-field amplification and particle acceleration. The fast progress in high-power laser technology is bringing the study of high Mach number shocks into the realm of laboratory plasmas, where in situ measurements can be made helping us understand the fundamental kinetic processes behind shocks. I will discuss the recent progress in laser-driven shock experiments at state-of-the-art facilities like NIF and Omega and how these results, together with ab initio massively parallel simulations, can impact our understanding of magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration in astrophysical plasmas.

  4. Transient fields produced by a cylindrical electron beam flowing through a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firpo, Marie-Christine

    2012-10-01

    Fast ignition schemes (FIS) for inertial confinement fusion should involve in their final stage the interaction of an ignition beam composed of MeV electrons laser generated at the critical density surface with a dense plasma target. In this study, the out-of-equilibrium situation in which an initially sharp-edged cylindrical electron beam, that could e.g. model electrons flowing within a wire [1], is injected into a plasma is considered. A detailed computation of the subsequently produced magnetic field is presented [2]. The control parameter of the problem is shown to be the ratio of the beam radius to the electron skin depth. Two alternative ways to address analytically the problem are considered: one uses the usual Laplace transform approach, the other one involves Riemann's method in which causality conditions manifest through some integrals of triple products of Bessel functions.[4pt] [1] J.S. Green et al., Surface heating of wire plasmas using laser-irradiated cone geometries, Nature Physics 3, 853--856 (2007).[0pt] [2] M.-C. Firpo, http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00695629, to be published (2012).

  5. Multilayer refractory nozzles produced by plasma-spray process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliton, J. L.; Rausch, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Multilayer rocket nozzles formed by plasma spraying have good thermal shock resistance and can be reheated in an oxidizing environment without loss of coating adherence. Suggested application of this process are for the production of refractory components, which can be formed as surfaces of revolution.

  6. Initial experimental test of a helicon plasma based mass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Evans, E. S.; Zweben, S. J.; Fisch, N. J.; Levinton, F.

    2016-06-01

    High throughput plasma mass separation requires rotation control in a high density multi-species plasmas. A preliminary mass separation device based on a helicon plasma operating in gas mixtures and featuring concentric biasable ring electrodes is introduced. Plasma profile shows strong response to electrode biasing. In light of floating potential measurements, the density response is interpreted as the consequence of a reshaping of the radial electric field in the plasma. This field can be made confining or de-confining depending on the imposed potential at the electrodes, in a way which is consistent with single particle orbit radial stability. Concurrent spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements suggest ion separation, with heavy to light ion emission line ratio increasing with radius when a specific potential gradient is applied to the electrodes.

  7. Initial experimental test of a helicon plasma based mass filter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gueroult, R.; Evans, E. S.; Zweben, S. J.; Fisch, N. J.; Levinton, F.

    2016-05-12

    High throughput plasma mass separation requires rotation control in a high density multi-species plasmas. A preliminary mass separation device based on a helicon plasma operating in gas mixtures and featuring concentric biasable ring electrodes is introduced. Plasma profile shows strong response to electrode biasing. In light of floating potential measurements, the density response is interpreted as the consequence of a reshaping of the radial electric field in the plasma. This field can be made confining or de-confining depending on the imposed potential at the electrodes, in a way which is consistent with single particle orbit radial stability. In conclusion, concurrentmore » spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements suggest ion separation, with heavy to light ion emission line ratio increasing with radius when a specific potential gradient is applied to the electrodes.« less

  8. Energy relaxation of intense laser pulse-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab, M.; Abou-Koura, G. H.; El-Siragy, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a collisional radiative model (CRE) of homogeneously expanded nickel plasmas in vacuum. The CRE model is coupled with two separate electron and ion temperature magneto-hydrodynamic equations. On the output, the model provides the temporal variation of the electron temperature, ion temperature, and average charge state. We demonstrate the effect of three-body recombination ({∝}N_e T^{-9/2}_e) on plasma parameters, as it changes the time dependence of electron temperature from t^{-2} to t^{-1} and exhibits a pronounced effect leading to a freezing feature in the average charge state. In addition, the effect of the three-body recombination on the warm up of ions and delaying the equilibration is addressed.

  9. Topical applications of resonance internal conversion in laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2007-04-01

    Physical aspects of resonance effects arising in plasma due to interactions of nuclei with the electrons are considered. Among them are resonance conversion (TEEN) and the reverse process of NEET. These processes are of great importance for pumping the excited nuclear states (isomers) and for accelerating their decay. Experiment is discussed on studying the unique 3.5-eV 229m Th nuclide.

  10. Astrophysical Weibel instability in counterstreaming laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, William; Fiksel, Gennady; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Change, Po-Yu; Germaschewski, Kai; Hu, Suxing; Nilson, Philip

    2014-06-01

    Astrophysical shock waves play diverse roles, including energizing cosmic rays in the blast waves of astrophysical explosions, and generating primordial magnetic fields during the formation of galaxies and clusters. These shocks are typically collisionless and require collective electromagnetic fields to couple the upstream and downstream plasmas. The Weibel instability has been proposed to provide the requisite interaction mechanism for shock formation in weakly-magnetized shocks by generating turbulent electric and magnetic fields in the shock front. This work presents the first laboratory identification of this Weibel instability between counterstreaming supersonic plasma flows and confirms its basic features, a significant step towards understanding these shocks. In the experiments, conducted on the OMEGA EP laser facility at the University of Rochester, a pair of plasmas plumes are generated by irradiating of a pair of opposing parallel plastic (CH) targets. The ion-ion interaction between the two plumes is collisionless, so as the plumes interpenetrate, supersonic, counterstreaming ion flow conditions are obtained. Electromagnetic fields formed in the interaction of the two plumes were probed with an ultrafast laser-driven proton beam, and we observed the growth of a highly striated, transverse instability with extended filaments parallel to the flows. The instability is identified as an ion-driven Weibel instability through agreement with analytic theory and particle-in-cell simulations, paving the way for further detailed laboratory study of this instability and its consequences for particle energization and shock formation.[1] W. Fox, G. Fiksel, A. Bhattacharjee, P. Y. Chang, K. Germaschewski, S. X. Hu, and P. M. Nilson, “Filamentation instability of counterstreaming laser-driven plasmas,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 225002 (2013).

  11. Dependence of Initial Plasma Size on Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Ohtani, Toshiro; Sasoh, Akihiro; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-30

    At Tohoku University, experiments of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) have been carried out. In order to observe the initial state of plasma and blast wave, the visualization experiment was carried out using the shadowgraph method. In this paper, dependency of initial plasma size on LITA performance is investigated numerically. The plasma size is estimated using shadowgraph images and the numerical results are compared with the experimental data of pressure measurement and results of previous modeling.

  12. Dependence of Initial Plasma Size on Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sukyum; Ohtani, Toshiro; Sasoh, Akihiro; Jeung, In-Seuck; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2004-03-01

    At Tohoku University, experiments of Laser-driven In-Tube Accelerator (LITA) have been carried out. In order to observe the initial state of plasma and blast wave, the visualization experiment was carried out using the shadowgraph method. In this paper, dependency of initial plasma size on LITA performance is investigated numerically. The plasma size is estimated using shadowgraph images and the numerical results are compared with the experimental data of pressure measurement and results of previous modeling.

  13. Plume Dynamics of Laser-Produced Swine Muscle Tissue Plasma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Joaquin J; Diaz, Luis; Marin-Roldan, Alicia; Moncayo, Samuel; Caceres, Jorge O

    2016-07-01

    We report on the plume dynamics of the plasma induced by laser ablation of a swine skeletal muscle tissue sample in different vacuum conditions. Pulses from a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser were focused onto a target sample and the induced plasma was allowed to expand in different air pressures. The expansion features were studied using fast photography of the overall visible emission by using a gated intensified charged coupled device. Free expansion and plume splitting were observed at different pressure levels. The expansion of the plasma plume front was analyzed using various expansion models and the velocity of the plume front was estimated. The effect of the number of accumulated laser shots on the crater volume at different ambient air pressures and an elemental analysis of the sample were performed using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The surface morphology of the irradiated surface showed that increasing the pressure of the ambient gas decreased the ablated mass, or in other words it reduced significantly the laser-target coupling. PMID:27301327

  14. Angular emission of ions and mass deposition from femtosecond and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the angular distribution of ions and atoms emanating from femto- and nanosecond laser-produced metal plasmas under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, aluminum targets are ablated in vacuum employing pulses from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) and an Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). The angular distribution of ion emission as well as the kinetic energy distribution is characterized by a Faraday cup, while a quartz microbalance is used for evaluating deposited mass. The ion and deposited mass features showed that fs laser ablated plasmas produced higher kinetic energy and more mass per pulse than ns plumes over all angles. The ion flux and kinetic energy studies show fs laser plasmas produce narrower angular distribution while ns laser plasmas provide narrower energy distribution.

  15. Initial H-mode experiments in DT plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.E.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Bell, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    H-modes have been obtained for the first time in high temperature, high poloidal beta plasmas with significant tritium concentrations in TFTR. Tritium is provided mainly through high power neutral beam injection (NBI) with powers up to 28 MW and beam energies of 90--110 keV. Transition to a circular limiter H-mode has been obtained following a rapid ramp down of the plasma current. Some of the highest values of {tau}{sub E} have been achieved on TFTR during the ELM-free phase of these DT H-mode plasmas. {tau}{sub E} enhancements greater than four times L-mode have been achieved.

  16. Robe Development for Electrical Conductivity Analysis in an Electron Gun Produced Helium Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Bitteker, Leo; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The use of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power conversion systems, potentially coupled with a fission power source, is currently being investigated as a driver for an advanced propulsion system, such as a plasma thruster. The efficiency of a MHD generator is strongly dependent on the electrical conductivity of the fluid that passes through the generator; power density increases as fluid conductivity increases. Although traditional MHD flows depend on thermal ionization to enhance the electrical conductivity, ionization due to nuclear interactions may achieve a comparable or improved conductivity enhancement while avoiding many of the limitations inherent to thermal ionization. Calculations suggest that nuclear-enhanced electrical conductivity increases as the neutron flux increases; conductivity of pure He-3 greater than 10 mho/m may be achievable if exposed to a flux greater than 10(exp 12) neutrons/cm2/s.) However, this remains to be demonstrated experimentally. An experimental facility has been constructed at the Propulsion Research Center at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using helium as the test fluid. High energy electrons will be used to simulate the effects of neutron-induced ionization of helium gas to produce a plasma. These experiments will be focused on diagnosis of the plasma in a virtually static system; results will be applied to future tests with a MHD system. Initial experiments will utilize a 50 keV electron gun that can operate at up to a current of 200 micro A. Spreading the electron beam over a four inch diameter window results in an electron flux of 1.5x 10(exp 13) e/sq cm/s. The equivalent neutron flux that would produce the same ionization fraction in helium is 1x10(exp 12) n/sq cm/s. Experiments will simulate the neutron generated plasma modeled by Bitteker, which takes into account the products of thermal neutron absorption in He-3, and includes various ion species in estimating the conductivity of the resulting plasma. Several

  17. Combination of graph heuristics in producing initial solution of curriculum based course timetabling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Juliana; Hussin, Naimah Mohd

    2016-08-01

    The construction of population of initial solution is a crucial task in population-based metaheuristic approach for solving curriculum-based university course timetabling problem because it can affect the convergence speed and also the quality of the final solution. This paper presents an exploration on combination of graph heuristics in construction approach in curriculum based course timetabling problem to produce a population of initial solutions. The graph heuristics were set as single and combination of two heuristics. In addition, several ways of assigning courses into room and timeslot are implemented. All settings of heuristics are then tested on the same curriculum based course timetabling problem instances and are compared with each other in terms of number of population produced. The result shows that combination of saturation degree followed by largest degree heuristic produce the highest number of population of initial solutions. The results from this study can be used in the improvement phase of algorithm that uses population of initial solutions.

  18. New Outreach Initiatives at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Dominguez, Arturo; Greco, Shannon; Ortiz, Deedee; Delooper, John

    2015-11-01

    In FY15, PPPL concentrated its efforts on a portfolio of outreach activities centered around plasma science and fusion energy that have the potential to reach a large audience and have a significant and measurable impact. The overall goal of these outreach activities is to expose the public (within New Jersey, the US and the world) to the Department of Energy's scientific endeavors and specifically to PPPL's research regarding fusion and plasma science. The projects include several new activities along with upgrades to existing ones. The new activities include the development of outreach demos for the plasma physics community and the upgrade of the Internet Plasma Physics Experience (IPPEX). Our first plasma demo is a low cost DC glow discharge, suitable for tours as well as for student laboratories (plasma breakdown, spectroscopy, probes). This has been field tested in a variety of classes and events. The upgrade to the IPPEX web site includes a new template and a new interactive virtual tokamak. Future work on IPPEX will provide users limited access to data from NSTX-U. Finally, our Young Women's Conference was expanded and improved. These and other new outreach activities will be presented.

  19. Ion beam and plasma methods of producing diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of plasma and ion beam techniques was employed to generate diamondlike carbon films. These methods included the use of RF sputtering, dc glow discharge, vacuum arc, plasma gun, ion beam sputtering, and both single and dual ion beam deposition. Since films were generated using a wide variety of techniques, the physico-chemical properties of these films varied considerably. In general, these films had characteristics that were desirable in a number of applications. For example, the films generated using both single and dual ion beam systems were evaluated for applications including power electronics as insulated gates and protective coatings on transmitting windows. These films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicated hydrogen to carbon ratios to be 1.00, which allowed the films to have good transmittance not only in the infrared, but also in the visible. Other evaluated properties of these films include band gap, resistivity, adherence, density, microhardness, and intrinsic stress. The results of these studies and those of the other techniques for depositing diamondlike carbon films are presented.

  20. Initial plasma formation by laser radiation acting on absorbing materials for a planar geometry of expansion of the plasma formed

    SciTech Connect

    Min'ko, L.Y.; Chivel', Y.A.; Chumakov, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental studies of nonstationary processes of initial plasma formation as well as with the elucidation of the role of the erosion and air plasmas in the formation of the screening plasma flame. To this end, the authors performed complex experiments using high-speed shadow, photo and spectrographic methods, as well as the methods of photoelectric recording of the incident and reflected laser radiation together with time-referencing of the apparatus complex to within 20 nsec using a specially developed generator of synchronous electrical and light pulses. Specific measurements were performed primarily for determining the dependence of the time of the initial plasma formation and development of screening on the power density of the LR and the chemical composition of the plasma-forming material.

  1. Beam heated linear theta-pinch device for producing hot plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1981-01-01

    A device for producing hot plasmas comprising a single turn theta-pinch coil, a fast discharge capacitor bank connected to the coil, a fuel element disposed along the center axis of the coil, a predetermined gas disposed within the theta-pinch coil, and a high power photon, electron or ion beam generator concentrically aligned to the theta-pinch coil. Discharge of the capacitor bank generates a cylindrical plasma sheath within the theta-pinch coil which heats the outer layer of the fuel element to form a fuel element plasma layer. The beam deposits energy in either the cylindrical plasma sheath or the fuel element plasma layer to assist the implosion of the fuel element to produce a hot plasma.

  2. Treatment Characteristics of Polysaccharides and Endotoxin Using Oxygen Plasma Produced by RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazaki, Satoshi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-10-13

    Treatment of polysaccharides and endotoxin were attempted using oxygen plasma produced by RF discharge. Oxygen radicals observed by optical light emission spectra are factors of decomposition of polysaccharides and endotoxin. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicate that most of chemical bonds in the polysaccharides are dissociated after irradiation of the oxygen plasma. Also, the decomposition rate of endotoxin was approximately 90% after irradiation of the oxygen plasma for 180 min.

  3. Ballistic pendula for measuring the momentum of a laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Grun, J.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-09-17

    We describe the use of a ballistic pendulum array to measure the momentum of a laser-produced plasma. An insitu calibration method is described and the pendulum results are compared to measurements made with other diagnostics.

  4. Ballistic pendula for measuring the momentum of a laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Grun, J.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-12-01

    We describe the use of a ballistic pendulum array to measure the momentum of a laser-produced plasma. An in situ calibration method is described and the pendulum results are compared to measurements made with other diagnostics.

  5. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S.; Sheppard, J. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S.

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  6. Specific features of microheterogeneous plasma produced by irradiation of a polymer aerogel target with an intense 500-ps-long laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Borisenko, N. G.; Merkul’ev, Yu. A.; Orekhov, A. S.; Chaurasia, S.; Tripathi, S.; Munda, D. S.; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Pimenov, V. G.; Sheveleva, E. E.

    2013-08-15

    The properties of microheterogeneous plasma produced by irradiation of a polymer aerogel target with an intense (10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 3}) short (0.5 ps) 1.064-μm laser pulse were studied. It is found that, even at plasma densities exceeding the critical density, a small fraction of the incident laser radiation penetrates through the plasma in which the processes of density and temperature equalization still take place. The intensification (as compared to plasmas produced from denser foams and solid films) of transport processes in such plasma along and across the laser beam can be caused by the initial microheterogeneity of the solid target. The replacement of a small (10% by mass) part of the polymer with copper nanoparticles leads to a nearly twofold increase in the intensity of the plasma X-ray emission.

  7. Surface Wave Plasma Driven by Ring Dielectric Line for Producing Dense, Large Area, Uniform Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoki

    1999-10-01

    Surface Wave excited Plasma (SWP), has been put into practice as a plasma source for the fabrication process of ULSI and LCD devices. This plasma has several advanced features: 1) Very high electron density with relatively low electron temperature; 2) Very uniform plasma density over large areas; 3) Operation from gas pressure of few mT to the order of thousands of mT. We present a newly developed microwave driven surface wave plasma source called a Ring Dielectric Line (RDL). The RDL is a metal ring wave-guide, filled with dielectric material, driven by a microwave. Slots for coupling the microwave power are symmetrically arrayed under the dielectric, facing towards the processing chamber. The electromagnetic power generates an electromagnetic surface wave, which in turn excites a plasma surface wave on the bottom side of the quartz plate in the processing chamber. In terms of its plasma characteristics, the uniformly distributed argon plasma with wide range of pressure of 20, 40 and 80mT as well as with high density about 5×10^17/m^3 over the cutoff density was observed. The electron temperature was about 2eV. In addition, in the 5000-minutes continuous running test for C_4F8 etching, it achieved repeatability of +/-0.7% and non-uniformity of about +/-3%.

  8. Heating dynamics and extreme ultraviolet radiation emission of laser-produced Sn plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yuspeh, S.; Sequoia, K. L.; Tao, Y.; Tillack, M. S.; Burdt, R. A.; Najmabadi, F.

    2010-06-28

    The impact of 1.064 mum laser absorption depth on the heating and in-band (2% bandwidth) 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emissions in Sn plasmas is investigated experimentally and numerically. In-band emission lasting longer than the laser pulse and separation between the laser absorption and in-band emission region are observed. Maximum efficiency is achieved by additional heating of the core of the plasma to allow the optimal temperature to expand to a lower and more optically thin density. This leads to higher temperature plasma that emits less in-band light as compared to CO{sub 2} produced plasma sources for the same application.

  9. Thomson scattering measurement of a shock in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Moritaka, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Takabe, H.; Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikane-yama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 ; Tomita, K.; Nakayama, K.; Inoue, K.; Uchino, K.; Ide, T.; Tsubouchi, K.; Nishio, K.; Ide, H.; Kuwada, M.

    2013-09-15

    We report the first direct measurement of temporally and spatially resolved plasma temperatures at a shock as well as its spatial structure and propagation in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas. Two shocks are formed in counter-streaming collisionless plasmas early in time, and they propagate opposite directions. This indicates the existence of counter-streaming collisionless flows to keep exciting the shocks, even though the collisional effects increase later in time. The shock images are observed with optical diagnostics, and the upstream and downstream plasma parameters of one of the shocks are measured using Thomson scattering technique.

  10. Characteristics of laser produced plasmas and lasers for pulsed ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Suzuki, T.; Itoh, Y.; Kamiya, T.; Watanabe, M.; Kawakita, Y.; Shioda, K.; Kanazawa, H.

    1996-05-01

    Preliminary experiments were performed to investigate the fundamental characteristics of the laser produced plasmas and the KrF lasers for the pulsed ion beam production. (1) Lithium target was irradiated by a small e-beam pumped KrF laser and the exhausted plasmas were measured. (2) A larger KrF laser of the same kind was operated and the output characteristics were observed. (3) The mode patterns of a discharge-pumped KrF laser was also measured most recently to prepare the future target irradiation to produce ion-source plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Characteristics of the soft X-ray emission from laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Arai, Goki; Kondo, Yoshiki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Ejima, Takeo; Hatano, Tadashi; Jiang, Weihua; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    We characterized the spectral structure of the soft X-ray emission and determined the plasma parameters in laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas. The spectral structure observed originated from Pt21+ to Pt34+ ions, emissions from which overlapped to produce a high output flux in the carbon-window soft X-ray spectral region. Using dual laser pulse irradiation, we observed the maximum output flux, which was 20% larger than that obtained under single-laser irradiation, and the evolution of a strongly absorbed spectral structure, which was attributed to the effects of both opacity and long-scale length of the expanding pre-plasma.

  12. Injection of a coaxial-gun-produced magnetized plasma into a background helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2014-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental investigation of plasma bubble relaxation into a lower density background plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear device HelCat at UNM. The gun is powered by a 120-uF ignitron-switched capacitor bank, which is operated in a range of 5 to 10 kV and 100 kA. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate the plasma relaxation process. Magnetized argon plasma bubbles with velocities 1.2Cs, densities 1020 m-3 and electron temperature 13eV have been achieved. The background helicon plasma has density 1013 m-3, magnetic field from 200 to 500 Gauss and electron temperature 1eV. Several distinct operational regimes with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images. Additionally a B-dot probe array has been employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  13. Initial measurements of two- and three-dimensional ordering, waves, and plasma filamentation in the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edward; Konopka, Uwe; Merlino, Robert L.; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2016-05-01

    The Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment at Auburn University has been operational for over one year. In that time, a number of experiments have been performed at magnetic fields up to B = 2.5 T to explore the interaction between magnetized plasmas and charged, micron-sized dust particles. This paper reports on the initial results from studies of: (a) the formation of imposed, ordered structures, (b) the properties of dust wave waves in a rotating frame, and (c) the generation of plasma filaments.

  14. Particle Dynamics in Neutral-Gas Confined Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-produced plasma from a metallic target can be confined to higher plasma densities by immersing the target in an inert gas medium at increasingly high density. The plasma becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, however, when the mass density of the neutral gas exceeds the plasma mass density substantially.[1] A new plasma diagnostic method is developed to help examine the early time development of the gas-plasma interfacial structure. A preliminary study based on plasma polarization spectroscopy is presented, in which the dynamics of atoms and ions are visualized in the presence of electromagnetic fields due to charge separation. The ambient gas pressure of argon is varied as active control in the low-pressure regime. Time-resolved multi-directional projections of an aluminum plasma are obtained in line and continuum emissions, polarization and spectral broadening including Doppler shifts. The electrostatic potential of the target is also followed. The results indicate a bifurcation of the phase-space distribution function and structural segmentation of the plasma into a thermalized core and a crown with highly aligned, energetic atoms and ions. Reconstruction of the plasma structure appears possible by generalization of the two new algorithms we have developed.[1,2] 1. Y.W. Kim and J.-C. Oh, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 948 (2001). 2. Y.W. Kim and C.D. Lloyd-Knight, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 944 (2001).

  15. Ion species control in high flux deuterium plasma beams produced by a linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, G.-N.; Shu, W.M.; Nakamura, H.; O'Hira, S.; Nishi, M.

    2004-11-01

    The ion species ratios in low energy high flux deuterium plasma beams formed in a linear plasma generator were measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. And the species control in the plasma generator was evaluated by changing the operational parameters like neutral pressure, arc current, and axial magnetic confinement to the plasma column. The measurements reveal that the lower pressures prefer to form more D{sup +} ions, and the medium magnetic confinement at the higher pressures results in production of more D{sub 2}{sup +}, while the stronger confinement and/or larger arc current are helpful to D{sub 2}{sup +} conversion into D{sub 3}{sup +}. Therefore, the ion species can be controlled by adjusting the operational parameters of the plasma generator. With suitable adjustment, we can achieve plasma beams highly enriched with a single species of D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, or D{sub 3}{sup +}, to a ratio over 80%. It has been found that the axial magnetic configuration played a significant role in the formation of D{sub 3}{sup +} within the experimental pressure range.

  16. Experimental Results from Initial Operation of Plasma Injector 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    General Fusion has begun operation of its first full-scale plasma injector, designed to accelerate high density spheromak plasmas into the compression chamber of a proposed MTF reactor. The geometry of Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is that of a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with a conical converging accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, while pulsed power is applied in the same configuration as the RACE device. PI-1 is 5 meters in length and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration/compression stage is 4 m long and tapers to a final outer diameter of 40 cm. PI-1 is now operating at 1 MJ of total capacitor power, which will be doubled again before it reaches its design parameters. Diagnostics include 3 interferometer chords, 21 magnetic probes (2 axis poloidal/toroidal), 13 fast photodiode chords, as well as one Thomson scattering chord, a visible light survey spectrometer, and a Langmuir triple probe. Electrode voltage and current are also monitored. So far spheromaks of poloidal flux exceeding 100 mWb have been formed in the expansion region, and spheromaks of 40-50 mWb have been formed and accelerated out the end of the accelerator into a flux conserving target chamber. Expansion region densities are typically ˜5 x10^14cm-3, while conditions in the target chamber have reached ne˜10^16cm-3, and lifetimes of 300 μs.

  17. Optimizing laser produced plasmas for efficient extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-08-15

    Photon sources produced by laser beams with moderate laser intensities, up to 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, are being developed for many industrial applications. The performance requirements for high volume manufacture devices necessitate extensive experimental research supported by theoretical plasma analysis and modeling predictions. We simulated laser produced plasma sources currently being developed for several applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography using 13.5% ± 1% nm bandwidth, possibly beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography using 6.× nm wavelengths, and water-window microscopy utilizing 2.48 nm (La-α) and 2.88 nm (He-α) emission. We comprehensively modeled plasma evolution from solid/liquid tin, gadolinium, and nitrogen targets as three promising materials for the above described sources, respectively. Results of our analysis for plasma characteristics during the entire course of plasma evolution showed the dependence of source conversion efficiency (CE), i.e., laser energy to photons at the desired wavelength, on plasma electron density gradient. Our results showed that utilizing laser intensities which produce hotter plasma than the optimum emission temperatures allows increasing CE for all considered sources that, however, restricted by the reabsorption processes around the main emission region and this restriction is especially actual for the 6.× nm sources.

  18. Colliding laser-produced plasmas: a new tool for nuclear astrophysics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Tudisco, S.; Bonanno, A.; Gambino, N.; Ivanovski, S.; Anzalone, A.; Gammino, S.; Miracoli, R.; Musumeci, F.

    2010-10-01

    Laser-generated plasmas, formed when a high power pulsed laser is focused onto a solid target, have been used since the 1960s. At higher power densities (>109-1010 W/cm2), such non-equilibrium plasmas expand in vacuum with supersonic velocities. Hydrodynamic simulations and experimental data show that at the beginning of the expansion the plasma temperature may reach several hundreds of eV, while the density is in the order of 1016 cm-3 or higher. Colliding laser-produced plasmas have constituted a largely unexplored and unexploited research domain until quite recent times, either for applications in materials or energy science. In this article, we propose the use of colliding laser-produced plasmas as an unique opportunity for nuclear astrophysics studies. We present a series of calculations about fusion reaction rates in laser-produced plasmas where the electron screening puzzle is taken into account. The numerical simulations have been carried out using the hydro code ZEUSMP2, while Monte Carlo codes have been used to simulate the fusion reaction rates according to the plume density and temperature evolution predicted by the simulations. We think that this type of investigation can be important in understanding the efficiency of nuclear reaction rates during the red giant phase of stellar evolution, as a significant part of the produced energy is dissipated in the low-density radiative envelope by shock waves.

  19. Initial simulation of MHD instabilites in a high speed plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Hughes, Tom; Thio, Francis

    2005-10-01

    High density, high Mach number plasma jets are under development for a variety of critical fusion applications. These applications include fueling, rotation driving, and disruption mitigation in magnetic fusion devices. They also include a range of innovative approaches to high energy density plasmas. FAR-TECH, Inc. has begun 3D MHD simulations using the LSP code [1] to examine such high speed plasma jets. An initial study to benchmark the code is currently underway. The blow-by instability will be simulated in a coaxial plasma accelerator using the 3D LSP code and compared with the 2D MACH2 code results. [1] LSP-Manual-MRC-ABQ-R-1942.pdf

  20. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Tai Ho; Williams, Arthur H.

    1985-01-01

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasmas generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  1. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOEpatents

    Tan, T.H.; Williams, A.H.

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasma generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  2. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-09-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  3. Experimental observation of the ion energy spectra of Al, Co, and Cu laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanol Apiñaniz, Jon; Peralta Conde, Alvaro; Martínez Perez de Mendiola, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that nanosecond laser produced plasmas (LPPs) produce high kinetic energy ions when they expand to vacuum. The acceleration process is nowadays accepted to be due to the formation of a sharp double layer (DL) in the plasma-vacuum boundary. With the purpose of studying this acceleration process, kinetic energy spectra of the plasma ions are measured for each charge state separately. Experimental results are obtained by irradiating planar targets of Cu, Co and Al at a laser wavelength of 532 nm and fluences up to 58.1 J cm-2. The obtained results show two new insights in the ion energy spectra. Firstly, they are non-maxwellian despite the widely accepted local thermal equilibrium in these type of plasmas. Secondly they show non-expected bicomponents distributions. The average energy of each species does not vary linearly with the charge state, suggesting complex acceleration processes.

  4. Impurity Ions in a Plasma Produced by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonesu, Akira; Komori, Akio; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism of the generation of impurity ions is experimentally evidenced in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma produced with a copper Lisitano coil. It is shown that neutral copper particles are sputtered from the Lisitano coil by argon ions and are ionized by the collisions with electrons. The argon ions are accelerated by the ion sheath formed on the Lisitano coil surface, so that the plasma space potential plays an important role in producing the impurities. The impurity flux calculated by using plasma parameters and the sputtering yield of copper is found to be consistent with the observed value. The production of a pure ECR plasma is also attempted with an aluminum Lisitano coil which has a smaller sputtering yield than that of the copper Lisitano coil.

  5. Fokker Planck and Krook theory of energetic electron transport in a laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace; Colombant, Denis

    2015-09-01

    Various laser plasma instabilities, such as the two plasma decay instability and the stimulated Raman scatter instability, produce large quantities of energetic electrons. How these electrons are transported and heat the plasma are crucial questions for laser fusion. This paper works out a Fokker Planck and Krook theory for such transport and heating. The result is a set of equations, for which one can find a simple asymptotic approximation for the solution, for the Fokker Planck case, and an exact solution for the Krook case. These solutions are evaluated and compared with one another. They give rise to expressions for the spatially dependent heating of the background plasma, as a function of the instantaneous laser and plasma parameters, in either planar or spherical geometry. These formulas are simple, universal (depending weakly only on the single parameter Z, the charge state), and can be easily be incorporated into a fluid simulation.

  6. External magnetic field influence on properties of high-power laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołowski, J.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.

    1996-03-01

    The paper presents results of formation of expanding plasma by combining laser-produced plasma with an external strong magnetic field. The plasma was generated by means of a Nd-glass laser which was focused on a solid target located on the axis of a single-turn coil providing magnetic field of up to 50 T. Spatial characteristics of the dynamics of interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field were registered by means of a three-frame interferometry. For registration and analysis of interferograms, CCD cameras and a multichannel image acquisition system were used. An interesting influence of the strong magnetic field on the plasma dynamics and shape was observed. Preliminary results of numerical modelling are compared with the experimental data.

  7. Measurement of Noise Produced by a Plasma Contactor Operating in Ground Based Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Steve

    1996-01-01

    Methods to measure electric field fluctuations accurately in a plasma with an active monopole antenna are described. It is shown that the conductive surfaces of the antenna must be adequately isolated from the ambient plasma and that the monopole must be sufficiently short to avoid antenna amplifier saturation. Experimental results illustrate that the noise produced by plasma contactor operation and sensed by the antenna is due to plasma phenomena and is not induced by laboratory power supplies. A good correlation is shown between the current fluctuations in the contactor electrical circuit and the noise detected by the antenna. A large body of experimental data support the conclusion that the majority of noise sensed by the antenna at frequencies less than 1 MHz is due to current fluctuations (electrostatic waves) in the plasma adjacent to the antenna and not to electromagnetic wave radiation. Caution is suggested when comparing antenna noise measurements to conventional specifications for radiated emissions.

  8. Fokker Planck and Krook theory of energetic electron transport in a laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Manheimer, Wallace; Colombant, Denis

    2015-09-15

    Various laser plasma instabilities, such as the two plasma decay instability and the stimulated Raman scatter instability, produce large quantities of energetic electrons. How these electrons are transported and heat the plasma are crucial questions for laser fusion. This paper works out a Fokker Planck and Krook theory for such transport and heating. The result is a set of equations, for which one can find a simple asymptotic approximation for the solution, for the Fokker Planck case, and an exact solution for the Krook case. These solutions are evaluated and compared with one another. They give rise to expressions for the spatially dependent heating of the background plasma, as a function of the instantaneous laser and plasma parameters, in either planar or spherical geometry. These formulas are simple, universal (depending weakly only on the single parameter Z, the charge state), and can be easily be incorporated into a fluid simulation.

  9. Photo-oxidation of Polymers Synthesized by Plasma and Initiated CVD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baxamusa, Salmaan H.; Suresh, Aravind; Ehrmann, Paul; Laurence, Ted; Hanania, Jiries; Hayes, Jeff; Harley, Stephen; Burkey, Daniel D.

    2015-11-09

    Plasma polymers are often limited by their susceptibility to spontaneous and photo-oxidation. We show that the unusual photoluminescence (PL) behavior of a plasma polymer of trans-2-butene is correlated with its photoluminescence strength. These photo-processes occur under blue light illumination (λ=405 nm), distinguishing them from traditional ultraviolet degradation of polymers. These photo-active defects are likely formed during the plasma deposition process and we show that a polymer synthesized using initiated (i)CVD, non-plasma method, has 1000× lower PL signal and enhanced photo-stability. In conclusion, non-plasma methods such as iCVD may therefore be a route to overcoming material aging issues that limit themore » adoption of plasma polymers.« less

  10. Photo-oxidation of Polymers Synthesized by Plasma and Initiated CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, Salmaan H.; Suresh, Aravind; Ehrmann, Paul; Laurence, Ted; Hanania, Jiries; Hayes, Jeff; Harley, Stephen; Burkey, Daniel D.

    2015-11-09

    Plasma polymers are often limited by their susceptibility to spontaneous and photo-oxidation. We show that the unusual photoluminescence (PL) behavior of a plasma polymer of trans-2-butene is correlated with its photoluminescence strength. These photo-processes occur under blue light illumination (λ=405 nm), distinguishing them from traditional ultraviolet degradation of polymers. These photo-active defects are likely formed during the plasma deposition process and we show that a polymer synthesized using initiated (i)CVD, non-plasma method, has 1000× lower PL signal and enhanced photo-stability. In conclusion, non-plasma methods such as iCVD may therefore be a route to overcoming material aging issues that limit the adoption of plasma polymers.

  11. Short-pulse laser-produced plasma from C60 molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wuelker, Cornelius; Theobald, Wolfgang; Ouw, Donald; Schaefer, Fritz P.; Chichkov, Boris N.

    1995-05-01

    The first experimental observations of a plasma produced in a vapor of C60 molecules with a high-intensity subpicosecond KrF laser (6x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) are reported. It differs from a plasma created in an ordinary carbon preplasma by reaching much higher ionization stages under the same experimental conditions. This remarkable property of C60 molecules (and other clusters) opens new prospects for short-pulse driven X-ray lasers.

  12. Sputter-produced plasma as a measure of satellite surface composition - The Cassini mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the co-orbiting neutral cloud or the plasma produced by sputtering of the icy Saturnian satellites can be used to determine the relative abundance of a minority surface species which would be difficult to determine from reflectance spectra. This is due to the fact that the sputter source rates, hence the plasma supply rates, are directly proportional to the bulk concentrations of mixed solids or clathrates, although the surface grains may be depleted in the most volatile species.

  13. Plasma waves produced by the xenon ion beam experiment on the Porcupine sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Kelley, M.

    1982-01-01

    The production of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves by a perpendicular ion beam in the F-region ionosphere is described. The ion beam experiment was part of the Porcupine program and produced electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves just above harmonics of the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. The plasma process may be thought of as a magnetized background ionosphere through which an unmagnetized beam is flowing. The dispersion equation for this hypothesis is constructed and solved. Preliminary solutions agree well with the observed plasma waves.

  14. Silicon surface periodic structures produced by plasma flow induced capillary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcinovic, I. P.; Kuraica, M. M.; Obradovic, B. M.; Puric, J.

    2006-08-14

    Silicon single crystal surface modification by the action of nitrogen quasistationary compression plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor is studied. It has been found that highly oriented silicon periodic cylindrical shape structures are produced during a single pulse surface treatment. The periodical structure formation can be related to the driven capillary waves quenched during fast cooling and resolidification phase of the plasma flow interaction with silicon surface. These waves are induced on the liquid silicon surface due to the compression plasma flow intrinsic oscillations.

  15. On the atomic state densities of plasmas produced by the ``torche à injection axiale''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkers, J.; Vos, H. P. C.; van der Mullen, J. A. M.; Timmermans, E. A. H.

    1996-04-01

    The atomic state densities of helium and argon plasmas produced by the microwave driven plasma torch called the "torche à injection axiale" are presented. They are obtained by absolute line intensity measurements of the excited states and by applying the ideal gas law to the ground state. It will be shown that the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) does not obey the Saha-Boltzmann law: the ASDF cannot be described by one temperature. From the shape of the ASDF it can be concluded that the plasma is ionising. By extrapolating the measured state densities towards the ionisation limit, a minimum value of the electron density can be determined.

  16. Balmer-beta line asymmetry characteristics in a high pressure, microwave-produced argon plasma.

    PubMed

    Palomares, J M; Torres, J; Gigosos, M A; van der Mullen, J J A M; Gamero, A; Sola, A

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a study on the asymmetry of the Balmer H(beta) profile in plasmas produced by microwaves at high pressure with the help of some functions of asymmetry for the whole profile, as well as by means of some specific parameters characterizing only its central dip. The study shows how this asymmetry--very low in our case--depends on the electron density and flux of gases and how the existence of inhomogeneities in the plasma can affect the shape and symmetry of this line. Also, limitations on the determination of the asymmetry are pointed out and the use of this profile for plasma diagnosis is discussed. PMID:19891830

  17. Experimental discovery of charge-exchange-caused dips in spectral lines from laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Leboucher-Dalimier, E; Oks, E; Dufour, E; Sauvan, P; Angelo, P; Schott, R; Poquerusse, A

    2001-12-01

    We report the first experimental observation of charge-exchange-caused dips (also called x dips) in spectral lines of multicharged ions in laser-produced plasmas. Specifically, in the process of a laser irradiation of targets made out of aluminum carbide, we observed two x dips in the Ly(gamma) line of Al XIII perturbed by fully stripped carbon. From the practical point of view, this opens up a way to experimentally produce not-yet-available fundamental data on charge exchange between multicharged ions, virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. From the theoretical viewpoint, the results are important because the x dips are the only one signature of charge exchange in profiles of spectral lines emitted by plasmas and they are the only one quasimolecular phenomenon that could be observed at relatively "low" densities of laser-produced plasmas. PMID:11736229

  18. Precision closed bomb calorimeter for testing flame and gas producing initiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. R., Jr.; Taylor, A. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A calorimeter has been developed under this study to help meet the needs of accurate performance monitoring of electrically or mechanically actuated flame and gas producing devices, such as squib-type initiators. A ten cubic centimeter closed bomb (closed volume) calorimeter was designed to provide a standard pressure trace and to measure a nominal 50 calorie output, using the basic components of a Parr Model 1411 calorimeter. Two prototype bombs were fabricated, pressure tested to 2600 psi, and extensively evaluated.

  19. A study of subsurface crack initiation produced by rolling contact fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Arun M.; Hahn, George T.; Rubin, Carol A.

    1993-01-01

    Results of subsurface crack initiation studies produced by pure rolling contact fatigue in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy are presented in this article. Microstructural changes and subsequent crack initiation below the contacting surface in cylindrical test specimens subjected to repeated rolling contact are illustrated. The rolling conditions are simulated in a three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element model in order to estimate the plastic strains and residual stresses in the test material. The numerically estimated distribution of plastic strains in the model correlate well with the extent of microstructural changes observed in the test specimen. Results also indicate that a combination of plastic strains and low values of residual stresses is conducive to subsurface crack initiation and growth.

  20. Mouse intracerebral hemorrhage models produce different degrees of initial and delayed damage, axonal sprouting, and recovery.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Harriet E; Lanman, Tyler A; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms of delayed damage and recovery after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remain poorly defined. Two rodent models of ICH are commonly used: injection of the enzyme collagenase (cICH) and injection of autologous blood (bICH). In mice, we compared the effects of these two models on initial and delayed tissue damage, motor system connections, and behavioral recovery. There is no difference in lesion size between models. Injection of autologous blood causes greater mass effect and early mortality. However, cICH produces greater edema, inflammation, and cell death. Injection of the enzyme collagenase causes greater loss of cortical connections and secondary shrinkage of the striatum. Intracerebral hemorrhage occurs within the motor system connections of the striatum. Mapping of the projections of the forelimb motor area shows a significant sprouting in motor cortex projections only in cICH. Both models of ICH produce deficits in forelimb motor control. Behavioral recovery occurs by 5 weeks in cICH and 9 weeks in bICH. In summary, cICH and bICH differ in almost every facet of initial and delayed stroke pathophysiology, with cICH producing greater initial and secondary tissue damage and greater motor system axonal sprouting than bICH. Motor recovery occurs in both models, suggesting that motor system axonal sprouting in cICH is not causally associated with recovery. PMID:24917041

  1. Convection of Plasmaspheric Plasma into the Outer Magnetosphere and Boundary Layer Region: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ober, Daniel M.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    We present initial results on the modeling of the circulation of plasmaspheric-origin plasma into the outer magnetosphere and low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL), using a dynamic global core plasma model (DGCPM). The DGCPM includes the influences of spatially and temporally varying convection and refilling processes to calculate the equatorial core plasma density distribution throughout the magnetosphere. We have developed an initial description of the electric and magnetic field structures in the outer magnetosphere region. The purpose of this paper is to examine both the losses of plasmaspheric-origin plasma into the magnetopause boundary layer and the convection of this plasma that remains trapped on closed magnetic field lines. For the LLBL electric and magnetic structures we have adopted here, the plasmaspheric plasma reaching the outer magnetosphere is diverted anti-sunward primarily along the dusk flank. These plasmas reach X= -15 R(sub E) in the LLBL approximately 3.2 hours after the initial enhancement of convection and continues to populate the LLBL for 12 hours as the convection electric field diminishes.

  2. Convection of Plasmaspheric Plasma into the Outer Magnetosphere and Boundary Layer Region: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ober, Daniel M.; Horwitz, J. L.; Gallagher, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    We present initial results on the modeling of the circulation of plasmaspheric- origin plasma into the outer magnetosphere and low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL), using a dynamic global core plasma model (DGCPM). The DGCPM includes the influences of spatially and temporally varying convection and refilling processes to calculate the equatorial core plasma density distribution throughout the magnetosphere. We have developed an initial description of the electric and magnetic field structures in the outer magnetosphere region. The purpose of this paper is to examine both the losses of plasmaspheric-origin plasma into the magnetopause boundary layer and the convection of this plasma that remains trapped on closed magnetic field lines. For the LLBL electric and magnetic structures we have adopted here, the plasmaspheric plasma reaching the outer magnetosphere is diverted anti-sunward primarily along the dusk flank. These plasmas reach X = -15 R(sub E) in the LLBL approximately 3.2 hours after the initial enhancement of convection and continues to populate the LLBL for 12 hours as the convection electric field diminishes.

  3. Optical properties of analogs of Titan's aerosols produced by dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.-B.; Mahjoub, A.; Gautier, T.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Szopa, C.

    2013-10-01

    Analogs of Titan's aerosols are produced in the laboratory as grains in a gas mixture, or as layers on a substrate. This production procedure enables the methane-nitrogen mixture composition to be changed. The aim of this paper is to understand the variations observed on the linear polarization of the scattered light as a function of the production conditions. The influence of the concentration of methane injected in the plasma will be discussed and compared with the previous work of Hadamcik et al. (2009a). The diameter of the grains are measured by SEM-FEG images. The decrease of absorption with increasing wavelength, measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry on layers, is observed for a decreasing initial methane ratio and analyzed in terms of an increasing `amine' content in the materials. The phase function parameters of the linear polarization of the scattered light are discussed in terms of the diameters of the aggregates and of the constituent grains, and the variation of the refractive indices (mainly absorption). The polarization is found to be highly correlated with the constituent grain size. Finally, the experimental results are compared to polarization measurements from space of the Titan's atmosphere.

  4. Proton imaging of an electrostatic field structure formed in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, T.; Kugland, N. L.; Wan, W.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Fiuza, F.; Gregori, G.; Huntington, C.; Ishikawa, T.; Koenig, M.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Martinez, D.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Pelka, A.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.; Quirós, N.; Remington, B. A.; Reville, B.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Steele, L.; Takabe, H.; Yamaura, Y.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.

    2016-03-01

    We report the measurements of electrostatic field structures associated with an electrostatic shock formed in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas with proton imaging. The thickness of the electrostatic structure is estimated from proton images with different proton kinetic energies from 4.7 MeV to 10.7 MeV. The width of the transition region is characterized by electron scale length in the laser-produced plasma, suggesting that the field structure is formed due to a collisionless electrostatic shock.

  5. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Augustoni, A.L.; Gerardo, J.B.; Raymond, T.D.

    1992-12-29

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography is disclosed. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser. 8 figs.

  6. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Augustoni, Arnold L.; Gerardo, James B.; Raymond, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser.

  7. The effect of target materials on colliding laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingwen; Yang, Zefeng; Wu, Jian; Han, Jiaxun; Wei, Wenfu; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2016-04-01

    In laser ablation, nanosecond to femtosecond lasers with a wide range of laser power densities are used. During ablation, the result of collisions between two plasmas is of interest to many researchers in inertial confinement fusion and nuclear astrophysics. In this paper, the collisions of two seed plasmas ablated from planar target surfaces of different target materials (Al, Cu, and W) were studied with temporal-spatially resolved imaging and spectroscopy. The initial relative velocities and densities of the seed plasmas were measured, and then the collisional parameters were calculated to evaluate the degree of the collisions. In addition, spatially resolved spectra were analyzed to study the influences of materials on the temporal-spatial distribution of atom or ions. The results indicated that under the same laser intensity, the high atomic number (Z) material had a small value of collisionality parameter, mostly because of its heavy ion mass. Higher laser intensity would increase the initial relative velocity of seed plasmas, resulting in a lower collision frequency. In addition, the distribution of the ions from seed plasmas was influenced by the stagnation layer plasmas.

  8. [Preliminary study of atomic emission spectrometry of Ti (H) plasma produced by vacuum arc ion source].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-Feng; Wu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Fu; Lu, Biao; Wen, Zhong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the discharge process of vacuum arc ion source, make a detail description of the discharge plasma, and lay the foundation for further research on ion source, atomic emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the parameters of plasma produced by vaccum arc ion source. In the present paper, two kinds of analysis method for the emission spectra data collected by a spectrometer were developed. Those were based in the stark broadening of spectral lines and Saba-Boltzmann equation. Using those two methods, the electron temperature, electron number density and the ion temperature of the plasma can be determined. The emission spectroscopy data used in this paper was collected from the plasma produced by a vacuum are ion source whose cathode was made by Ti material (which adsorbed hydrogen during storage procedure). Both of the two methods were used to diagnose the plasma parameters and judge the thermal motion state of the plasma. Otherwise, the validity of the diagnostic results by the two methods were analyzed and compared. In addition, the affection from laboratory background radiation during the spectral acquisition process was discussed. PMID:25208416

  9. Quasi-steady-state air plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Chen, Shi-You; Ma, Jing-Long; Hou, Lei; Liao, Guo-Qian; Wang, Jin-Guang; Han, Yu-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Long; Teng, Hao; Han, Hai-Nian; Li, Yu-Tong; Chen, Li-Ming; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    A long air plasma channel can be formed by filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. However, the lifetime of the plasma channel produced by a single femtosecond laser pulse is too short (only a few nanoseconds) for many potential applications based on the conductivity of the plasma channel. Therefore, prolonging the lifetime of the plasma channel is one of the key challenges in the research of femtosecond laser filamentation. In this study, a unique femtosecond laser source was developed to produce a high-quality femtosecond laser pulse sequence with an interval of 2.9 ns and a uniformly distributed single-pulse energy. The metre scale quasi-steady-state plasma channel with a 60–80 ns lifetime was formed by such pulse sequences in air. The simulation study for filamentation of dual femtosecond pulses indicated that the plasma channel left by the previous pulse was weakly affected the filamentation of the next pulse in sequence under our experimental conditions. PMID:26493279

  10. Dynamics of neutrals and ions in an ultrafast laser produced Zn plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Rao, Kavya H.; Philip, Reji

    2015-03-15

    Optical time of flight dynamics of neutrals and ions in an ultrafast laser produced zinc plasma generated by irradiating a solid zinc target using 100 fs laser pulses is investigated. An acceleration of ions is observed which arises from internal Coulomb forces acting between charged species in the plasma. Some of the fast ions recombine with electrons in the plasma and generate fast neutrals. Plasma plume imaging performed at various ambient pressures indicates adiabatic expansion at lower pressures and plume front deceleration at higher pressures: at lower pressures the plume front-time (R-t) plot displays a linear expansion, shock wave model fits to the data at 5 Torr and at higher pressures the data fits better to the drag model. Furthermore, around an intermediate pressure of 10 Torr, the R-t plot fits to the shock wave model at earlier stages of plasma expansion, while it fits to the drag model at the later stages. These investigations provide relevant information on the acceleration of ions and neutrals in an expanding zinc plasma plume produced by ultrafast laser pulses.

  11. Quasi-steady-state air plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Chen, Shi-You; Ma, Jing-Long; Hou, Lei; Liao, Guo-Qian; Wang, Jin-Guang; Han, Yu-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Long; Teng, Hao; Han, Hai-Nian; Li, Yu-Tong; Chen, Li-Ming; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    A long air plasma channel can be formed by filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. However, the lifetime of the plasma channel produced by a single femtosecond laser pulse is too short (only a few nanoseconds) for many potential applications based on the conductivity of the plasma channel. Therefore, prolonging the lifetime of the plasma channel is one of the key challenges in the research of femtosecond laser filamentation. In this study, a unique femtosecond laser source was developed to produce a high-quality femtosecond laser pulse sequence with an interval of 2.9 ns and a uniformly distributed single-pulse energy. The metre scale quasi-steady-state plasma channel with a 60-80 ns lifetime was formed by such pulse sequences in air. The simulation study for filamentation of dual femtosecond pulses indicated that the plasma channel left by the previous pulse was weakly affected the filamentation of the next pulse in sequence under our experimental conditions. PMID:26493279

  12. Extreme-ultraviolet radiation transport in small scale length laser-produced tin plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequoia, Kevin Lamar Williams

    The majority of the studies on laser-produced plasmas as an efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light source have focused on relatively large plasmas produced at large laser facilities. However, to develop a commercially viable light source for EUV lithography, much smaller lasers and hence much smaller plasmas must be employed. Smaller plasmas behave quite differently than large plasmas in that the temperature and density are less uniform, and lateral expansion is more important. These differences affect the energy transport and, in particular, the radiation transport. This work studies the EUV radiation transport in small scale length tin plasmas, focusing on the effects of target geometry and laser pulse duration. Both planar and spherical tin targets were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 microm. Conversion efficiency of laser light to 13.5 nm radiation (in-band), EUV emission spectrum, two-dimensional in-band emission profile, and the plasma electron density were measured experimentally. These measurements provide insight into where the laser is absorbed, where the in-band emission is produced, and how the radiation is transmitted. The plasma evolution in these experiments were simulated with a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code, while the radiation transport and atomic kinetics where modeled with a collisional radiative code. Additional experiments were conducted using planar targets where the pulse duration was varied from 0.5 ns to 16 ns to understand the effects of laser pulse duration. It was found that the optimum plasma temperature for efficient generation and transmission of in-band emission is 20 eV. This is lower than the previously reported optimum temperature of 30 eV. The use of a 1.064 microm heating laser results in overheating of the plasma in a region that is much too dense to transmit the in-band emission. This overheating is necessary for the plasma to reach the optimum temperature in the region where the density is

  13. Characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry

    SciTech Connect

    Craxton, R.S.; Turner, F.S.; Hoefen, R. ); Darrow, C. ); Gabl, E.F.; Busch, G.E. )

    1993-12-01

    Grid image refractometry (GIR) is proposed as a technique for determining the two-dimensional density profiles of long scale-length laser-produced plasmas. Its distinctive feature is that an optical probe beam is broken up into rays'' by being passed through a grid before traversing the plasma. The refraction angles of the rays are measured by imaging the plasma at two or more object planes and are integrated to yield the phase front. For cylindrically symmetric plasmas the density profile is then determined using Abel inversion. The feasibility of GIR is illustrated by an experiment in which a thick CH target was irradiated with [similar to]100 J of 527 nm radiation and diagnosed with a 20 ps, 263 nm probe. The resulting density profile is substantially larger than any that have previously been reported using interferometry and compares quite closely with hydrodynamic simulations.

  14. Characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craxton, R. S.; Turner, F. S.; Hoefen, R.; Darrow, C.; Gabl, E. F.; Busch, Gar. E.

    1993-12-01

    Grid image refractometry (GIR) is proposed as a technique for determining the two-dimensional density profiles of long scale-length laser-produced plasmas. Its distinctive feature is that an optical probe beam is broken up into ``rays'' by being passed through a grid before traversing the plasma. The refraction angles of the rays are measured by imaging the plasma at two or more object planes and are integrated to yield the phase front. For cylindrically symmetric plasmas the density profile is then determined using Abel inversion. The feasibility of GIR is illustrated by an experiment in which a thick CH target was irradiated with ˜100 J of 527 nm radiation and diagnosed with a 20 ps, 263 nm probe. The resulting density profile is substantially larger than any that have previously been reported using interferometry and compares quite closely with hydrodynamic simulations.

  15. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-04-15

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β ∼ 10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  16. On the highly directional expansion of laser-produced plasmas. [metallic targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Burkhalter, P. G.; Finn, T.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    The expansion of plasmas produced by focusing a CO2 laser pulse onto solid planar targets is discussed. The plasmas are studied using an extreme-ultraviolet spectroheliograph. With titanium and iron targets the plasma blow-off observed in transitions within highly ionized species (e.g., Fe XVI) occurs parallel to the target normal. The plasma is tightly confined to narrow cylindrical structures about 0.7 mm in diameter and is observed as far as 1 cm from the target surface. The electron density is about 2.8 by 10 to the 18th power per cu cm at a distance of 0.7 mm from the target surface and decreases to approximately 6.5 by 10 to the 17th power per cu cm at a distance of 2.9 mm from the surface.

  17. Apoptotic effects on cultured cells of atmospheric-pressure plasma produced using various gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominami, Kanako; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kudo, Tada-aki; Sasaki, Shota; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma on various cells such as rat fibroblastic Rat-1 cell line, rat neuroblastoma-like PC12 cell line, and rat macrophage-like NR8383 cell line. The plasma was irradiated directly to a culture medium containing plated cells for 0-20 s. The applied voltage, excitation frequency, and argon or helium gas flow were, respectively, 3-6 kV, 10 kHz, and 3 L/min. Cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated using annexin-V/propidium iodide staining. Results showed that the low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation promoted cell death in a discharge-voltage-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. Furthermore, different effects are produced depending on the cell type. Moreover, entirely different mechanisms might be responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cells by helium and argon plasma.

  18. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Xinbing; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-01

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer-Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Four-color laser diagnostics for Z-pinch and laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Begishev, I A

    2016-01-20

    Four-color laser diagnostics were developed for Z-pinch and laser plasma at the 1 MA pulsed power generator. Four harmonics of the Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 266, and 213 nm were produced during the cascade conversion in three nonlinear crystals and propagated together in one beampath. Deep UV probing allows better penetration of the dense plasma. Laser probing at four wavelengths allows observation of plasma in a wide range of densities in one shot of the diagnostic laser. Examples of four-color laser shadowgraphy and interferometry of the wire-array load and laser plasma interaction are presented and discussed. PMID:26835923

  20. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Wang, Xinbing Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-21

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer–Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  1. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  2. Transient loss of plasma from a theta pinch having an initially reversed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Heidrich, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the transient loss of plasma from a 25-cm-long theta pinch initially containing a reversed trapped magnetic field are presented. The plasma, amenable to MHD analyses, was a doubly ionized helium plasma characterized by an ion density N/sub i/ = 2 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and an ion temperature T/sub i/ = 15 eV at midcoil and by N/sub i/ = 0.5 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub i/ = 6 eV at a position 2.5 cm beyond the end of the theta coil.

  3. Shock formation in supersonic cluster jets and its effect on axially modulated laser-produced plasma waveguides.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S J; Goers, A J; Hine, G A; Magill, J D; Elle, J A; Chen, Y-H; Milchberg, H M

    2013-07-01

    We examine the generation of axially modulated plasmas produced from cluster jets whose supersonic flow is intersected by thin wires. Such plasmas have application to modulated plasma waveguides. By appropriately limiting shock waves from the wires, plasma axial modulation periods can be as small as 70 μm, with plasma structures as narrow as 45 µm. The effect of shocks is eliminated with increased cluster size accompanied by a reduced monomer component of the flow. PMID:23842374

  4. XUV spectral analysis of ns- and ps-laser produced platinum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-12-01

    XUV spectra of ns- and ps-laser produced platinum (Pt) plasmas in the 1-7 nm wavelength region, where Δn = 1 n = 4-5 and Δn = 0 n = 4-4 transitions dominate the observed emission, were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Ab initio calculations using the Hartree-Fock with configuration interaction (HFCI) Cowan suite of codes and the unresolved transition array (UTA) formalism, as well as consideration of previous predictions of isoelectronic trends, together with spectra obtained under different laser power densities are all employed to identify lines and a number of new features in spectra from Pt XX to Pt XLII. The possible reasons for the main differences between the ns- and ps-laser plasmas spectra are also demonstrated. This work extends previous analyses of the XUV spectra of laser produced gold, tungsten, tantalum, hafnium and rhenium plasmas in the 1-7 nm wavelength range.

  5. Numerical simulation of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser produced plasma jets using MAG code

    SciTech Connect

    Diyankov, O. V.; Glazyrin, I. V.; Koshelev, S. V.; Lykov, V. A.

    1997-04-15

    The results of numerical simulation of spontaneous magnetic field generation and influence of this field on laser produced plasma jet expansion in vacuum and low density gas are presented. The numerical simulation has been carried out using MAG code for the case of aluminum plate of 5 {mu}m of thickness irradiated by Nd laser. The laser pulse duration was 0.5 nsec at half-width, laser irradiation intensity was up to 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} and laser focal spot diameter was about 100 {mu}m. According to the received results, the magnetic field amplitude achieves the value of 150 kGs. This fact has no considerable influence on the temperature maximum in laser produced plasma, but significantly affects the process of the energy transport from plasma jet to low density gas.

  6. Initial interpretation of Titan plasma interaction as observed by the Cassini plasma spectrometer: Comparisons with Voyager 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, R. E.; Sittler, E. C.; Neubauer, F. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Smith, H. T.; Crary, F.; McComas, D. J.; Young, D. T.; Coates, A. J.; Simpson, D.; Bolton, S.; Reisenfeld, D.; Szego, K.; Berthelier, J. J.; Rymer, A.; Vilppola, J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Andre, N.

    2006-10-01

    The Cassini plasma spectrometer (CAPS) instrument made measurements of Titan's plasma environment when the Cassini Orbiter flew through the moon's plasma wake October 26, 2004 (flyby TA). Initial CAPS ion and electron measurements from this encounter will be compared with measurements made by the Voyager 1 plasma science instrument (PLS). The comparisons will be used to evaluate previous interpretations and predictions of the Titan plasma environment that have been made using PLS measurements. The plasma wake trajectories of flyby TA and Voyager 1 are similar because they occurred when Titan was near Saturn's local noon. These similarities make possible direct, meaningful comparisons between the various plasma wake measurements. They lead to the following: (A) The light and heavy ions, H +and N +/O +, were observed by PLS in Saturn's magnetosphere in the vicinity of Titan while the higher mass resolution of CAPS yielded H + and H 2+as the light constituents and O +/CH 4+ as the heavy ions. (B) Finite gyroradius effects were apparent in PLS and CAPS measurements of ambient O + ions as a result of their absorption by Titan's extended atmosphere. (C) The principal pickup ions inferred from both PLS and CAPS measurements are H +, H 2+, N +, CH 4+ and N 2+. (D) The inference that heavy pickup ions, observed by PLS, were in narrow beam distributions was empirically established by the CAPS measurements. (E) Slowing down of the ambient plasma due to pickup ion mass loading was observed by both instruments on the anti-Saturn side of Titan. (F) Strong mass loading just outside the ionotail by a heavy ion such as N 2+ is apparent in PLS and CAPS measurements. (G) Except for the expected differences due to the differing trajectories, the magnitudes and structures of the electron densities and temperatures observed by both instruments are similar. The high-energy electron bite-out observed by PLS in the magnetotail is consistent with that observed by CAPS.

  7. Measuring the electron density, temperature, and electronegativity in electron beam-generated plasmas produced in argon/SF6 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, D. R.; Fernsler, R. F.; Walton, S. G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents measurements of electron density (ne0), electron temperature (Te), and electronegativity (α) in electron beam-generated plasmas produced in mixtures of argon and SF6 using Langmuir probes and plasma resonance spectroscopy. Langmuir probe measurements are analyzed using a model capable of handling multi-component plasmas with both positive and negative ions. Verification of the model is provided through plasma frequency resonance measurements of ne0. The results suggest a simple approach to ascertaining α in negative-ion-containing plasmas using Langmuir probes alone. In addition, modest amounts of SF6 are shown to produce sharp increases in both Te and α in electron beam generated plasmas.

  8. Towards laboratory-produced relativistic electron-positron pair-plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Beiersdorfer, P; Cauble, R; Dollar, F; Falk, K; Hazi, A; Murphy, C D; Park, J; Seely, J; Szabo, C I; Shepherd, R; Tommasini, R; Zulick, K

    2010-08-31

    Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the last few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} and 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, respectively. With the advent of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a charge-neutral, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter. This talk will present some details of the laser-produced pair-plasma experiments.

  9. A scheme to produce high density and high temperature plasma for opacity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The opacity of shock-compressed material is of general scientific interest for astrophysical plasmas and for inertial confinement fusion research. A proposal is suggested to produce high temperature plasma with density around 1 g/cm{sup −3}. Two types of opacity target (the sandwich target and the foam enhanced sandwich target) are investigated numerically. The foam enhanced sandwich target has structure of foam–solid-sample-solid-foam. The foam will increase laser absorption efficiency and the ablating pressure. Hydrodynamic simulations confirm that the laser can be fully absorbed by the under-critical-density foam and a faster shock is produced inside the CH layer. High intensity lasers heat opacity target from both sides. The CH layers must be thick enough to keep the laser away from the sample. The laser-driven shocks move inward and collide at the center. Part of their kinetic energy is converted into internal energy and high density and high temperature local thermodynamic equilibrium sample plasma is produced. The plasma produced by laser heating the foam enhanced sandwich target has higher sample temperature than by laser heating the sandwich target. It may be useful for measuring the opacity of shock compressed material in laboratory.

  10. Possibility of deexcitation of isomeric nuclei in plasmas produced by subpicosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, V. I.

    2009-02-15

    Possible schemes of X-ray-activated deexcitation of isomers of rhodium, silver, tellurium, and bismuth are considered. It is shown that conditions necessary for deexcitation of rhodium isomer can, in principle, be achieved in a high-temperature solid-body-density plasma produced by an ultrashort laser pulse.

  11. A phosphopantetheinylating polyketide synthase producing a linear polyene to initiate enediyne antitumor antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Van Lanen, Steven G; Ju, Jianhua; Liu, Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Li, Wenli; Kelleher, Neil L; Shen, Ben

    2008-02-01

    The enediynes, unified by their unique molecular architecture and mode of action, represent some of the most potent anticancer drugs ever discovered. The biosynthesis of the enediyne core has been predicted to be initiated by a polyketide synthase (PKS) that is distinct from all known PKSs. Characterization of the enediyne PKS involved in C-1027 (SgcE) and neocarzinostatin (NcsE) biosynthesis has now revealed that (i) the PKSs contain a central acyl carrier protein domain and C-terminal phosphopantetheinyl transferase domain; (ii) the PKSs are functional in heterologous hosts, and coexpression with an enediyne thioesterase gene produces the first isolable compound, 1,3,5,7,9,11,13-pentadecaheptaene, in enediyne core biosynthesis; and (iii) the findings for SgcE and NcsE are likely shared among all nine-membered enediynes, thereby supporting a common mechanism to initiate enediyne biosynthesis. PMID:18223152

  12. Study of Unsteady Flow Actuation Produced by Surface Plasma Actuator on 2-D Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Minh Khang; Shin, Jichul

    2014-10-01

    Effect of flow actuation driven by low current continuous or pulsed DC surface glow discharge plasma actuator is studied. Schlieren image of induced flow on flat plate taken at a high repetition rate reveals that the actuation is mostly initiated near the cathode. Assuming that the actuation is mostly achieved by ions in the cathode sheath region, numerical model for the source of flow actuation is obtained by analytical estimation of ion pressure force created in DC plasma sheath near the cathode and added in momentum equation as a body force term. Modeled plasma flow actuator is simulated with NACA0012 airfoil oscillating over a certain range of angle of attack (AoA) at specific reduced frequencies of airfoil. By changing actuation authority according to the change in AoA, stabilization of unsteady flow field is improved and hence steady aerodynamic performance can be maintained. Computational result shows that plasma actuation is only effective in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of separated flow. It turns out that plasma pulse frequency should be tuned for optimal performance depending on phase angle and rotating speed. The actuation authority can be parameterized by a ratio between plasma pulse frequency and reduced frequency.

  13. Morphological and structural effects on tungsten targets produced by fusion plasma pulses from a table top plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inestrosa-Izurieta, M. J.; Ramos-Moore, E.; Soto, L.

    2015-09-01

    A table top plasma focus device operating at hundreds of joules was used to simulate an equivalent damage factor than the obtained on the divertor in tokamak experiments. Using the ejected plasma produced after the pinch disruptions, the effects on tungsten targets from 50 cumulative plasma shocks with power fluxes per shot between 2.6 and 9200 kW cm-2 and with a duration time in the order of tens of nanoseconds (damage factor in the order of 100-103 (W cm-2)s1/2) were studied. Morphological analysis shows an increasing appearance of cracked surfaces with holes, fissures and defects, suggesting a potential progression of stress effects and a fast heat load that melts the surface, ending in thermal contractions that recrystallize the surface of the target. A structural analysis demonstrates a compressive stress development and suggests that part of the energy is released in the melting of the surface in case of a plasma shock with a power flux of 9.2 MW cm-2, 75 ns duration pulse, 2.5   ×   103 (W cm-2)s1/2 damage factor. How to increase the damage factor by one order of magnitude up to the expected value from type I ELMs on the ITER divertor, i.e. 104 (W cm-2)s1/2 is discussed.

  14. Novel approach to produce polymerized hydrocarbon coatings using dielectric barrier controlled atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, K. K.; Khardekar, R. K.; Singh, Rashmi; Pant, H. C.

    2002-09-01

    Conventionally, low-pressure (<1 Torr) electrical discharges are used for material processing and thin-film deposition. These schemes suffer mainly due to the high cost of equipment and the complexity of operations. The atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma is developed using a threaded styled electrode in different configurations, and these reactors are used to produce plasma polymerized coatings, required on plane substrates as self-supporting films to obtain membranes for blocking holes in cavities, and on microballoon targets, which are used as fuel containers for inertial confinement fusion, to avoid DT gas permeation. Helium gas is used as the supporting gas for formation and stabilization of atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma reactors. Ethylene and acetylene gases are used as monomers to produce plasma polymerized hydrocarbon films. These films are characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Plasma polymerized coatings of thickness 100 nm-10 μm with a smooth surface finish (rms<100 nm) are deposited successfully. The surface finish is further improved using a postdischarge configuration. Preliminary results are very encouraging but further progress is to be made in this area. We are also planning to extend this technique for C:H coating of microballoons, which are used as fuel containers in inertial confinement fusion.

  15. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  16. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  17. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L [Knoxville, TN; Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; Bigelow, Timothy S [Knoxville, TN

    2010-11-02

    A system to continuously produce fully carbonized or graphitized carbon fibers using microwave-assisted plasma (MAP) processing comprises an elongated chamber in which a microwave plasma is excited in a selected gas atmosphere. Fiber is drawn continuously through the chamber, entering and exiting through openings designed to minimize in-leakage of air. There is a gradient of microwave power within the chamber with generally higher power near where the fiber exits and lower power near where the fiber enters. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN), pitch, or any other suitable organic/polymeric precursor fibers can be used as a feedstock for the inventive system. Oxidized or partially oxidized PAN or pitch or other polymeric fiber precursors are run continuously through a MAP reactor in an inert, non-oxidizing atmosphere to heat the fibers, drive off the unwanted elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen, and produce carbon or graphite fibers faster than conventionally produced carbon fibers.

  18. Collisionless shock generation in counter-streaming plasmas produced by a high-power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Aoki, H.; Tanji, H.; Shibata, S.; Ide, T.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Shiroshita, A.; Shigemori, K.; Sano, T.; Norimatsu, T.; Kato, T.; Takabe, H.; Waugh, J.; Woolsey, N.; Loupias, B.; Gregory, C.; Koenig, M.

    2009-11-01

    Laboratory experiments to study collisionless shock generation in counter-streaming plasmas have been investigated using Gekko XII HIPER laser system (352 nm (3φ), 500 ps, ˜100 J / beam, one or four beams, < 10^15 W/cm^2) at ILE. Two types of double-plane targets, Jet and Ablation types were used. In the Jet (Ablation) type, 10 μm (60 μm) and 60 μm thick CH planes were placed with the separation of 4.5 mm; beams were irradiated on the 1st CH and a rear-side (an ablation) plasma is formed, and the plasma from the 2nd CH is created by radiation and/or plasmas from the1st CH. The plasmas and shocks were diagnosed transverse to the main laser propagation direction; shadowgraphy and modified Nomarski interferometry using a probe laser with ICCD and streak cameras, and SOP and GOI using a visible (450 nm) self-emission. Counter-streaming plasmas were produced, and shock waves were observed. The width of the transition region is much shorter than ion-ion mean-free-path. A particle-in-cell simulation has predicted generation of an electrostatic shock.

  19. Characterization of the Horizontal Confinement Produced by a Glass Box in a Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jace; Douglass, Angela

    2013-10-01

    The majority of plasmas in the visible universe are complex plasmas, consisting of not only electrons, ions, and neutral particles, but also small, usually micron-sized particles called ``dust.'' Recent complex plasma experiments have placed a glass box on the lower electrode of a GEC RF reference cell in order to alter the electric confinement experienced by micrometer-sized particles in the plasma. While this has led to interesting observations, such as vertical chains and Coulomb balls, the nature of the confinement is not well understood. In this experiment, a single melamine formaldehyde dust particle was levitated in the plasma sheath and contained by a glass box. The dust particle was then struck by a laser pulse to perturb the particle from its equilibrium position. The trajectory of the particle was analyzed to determine the nature of the electric potential produced by the walls of the glass box. Trials were run with varying pressures, particle sizes, box sizes, and plasma powers to determine the effect of each parameter on the confinement.

  20. Characterization of laser-produced carbon plasmas relevant to laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Everson, E. T.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Niemann, C.

    2016-07-01

    Experiments, analytic modeling, and numerical simulations are presented to characterize carbon plasmas produced by high-intensity ( 109-1013 W cm-2) lasers relevant to experimental laboratory astrophysics. In the large-scale limit, the results agree well with a self-similar isentropic, adiabatic fluid model. Laser-target simulations, however, show small-scale structure in the velocity distribution of different ion species, which is also seen in experiments. These distributions indicate that most of the plasma energy resides in moderate charge states (C+3-C+4), most of the mass resides in the lowest charge states, and the highest charge states move fastest.

  1. Effects of 2 mass % Si admixture in a laser-produced Fe plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Krasa, Josef; Laska, Leos; Rohlena, Karel; Velyhan, Andriy; Lorusso, Antonella; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Czarnecka, Agata; Parys, Piotr; Ryc, Leszek; Wolowski, Jerzy

    2008-11-10

    Emission of multiply charged ions and soft x-rays from the plasmas produced by laser pulses focused on (111) surface of Fe and Fe-2 mass % Si single crystals is investigated for wavelengths of 1064 and 248 nm and intensities up to {approx_equal}1x10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}. It is demonstrated that the Si admixture in the Fe plasma results in a higher emission of Fe{sup q+} ions (1{<=}q{<=}4) but in a markedly lower x-ray emission. The relation of wavelengths and pulse durations of laser beams used is figured in the fluence dependence of the ion emission.

  2. Stark profiles of forbidden and allowed transitions in a dense, laser produced helium plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ya'akobi, B.; George, E. V.; Bekefi, G.; Hawryluk, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons of experimental and theoretical Stark profiles of the allowed 2(1)P-3(1)D helium line at 6678 A and of the forbidden 2(1)P-3(1)P component at 6632 A in a dense plasma were carried out. The plasma was produced by optical breakdown of helium by means of a repetitive, high power CO2 laser. The allowed line shows good agreement with conventional theory, but discrepancies are found around the centre of the forbidden component. When normally neglected ion motions are taken into consideration, the observed discrepancies are partially removed. Tables of the Stark profiles for the pair of lines are given.

  3. Diamagnetic cavitization of laser-produced barium plasma in transverse magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Raju, Makaraju Srinivasa; Singh, R K; Kumar, Ajai; Gopinath, Pramod

    2015-05-15

    Influence of uniform transverse magnetic field and ambient Ar pressure on the plasma plume produced by Nd:YAG laser ablation of barium has been investigated by time-of-flight optical emission spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out with laser pulse energy of 150 mJ and 0.45 Tesla magnetic field. The time-of-flight profiles showed ambient pressure independent behavior at 6-mm distance from the target, which is attributed to the diamagnetic behavior of the laser plasma. A theoretical model is proposed that may explain the compression of temporal profiles of the ionic lines. PMID:26393695

  4. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  5. Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G.

    1996-07-01

    Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

  6. Breeding L-arginine-producing strains by a novel mutagenesis method: Atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Xu, Jianzhong; Xia, Xiuhua; Guo, Yanfeng; Xu, Kai; Su, Cunsheng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-07-01

    A plasma jet, driven by an active helium atom supplied with an atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) biological breeding system, was used as a novel method to breed L-arginine high-yielding strains. A mutant with resistance to L-homoarginine and 8-azaguaine, ARG 3-15 (L-HA(r), 8-AG(r), L-His(-)), was screened after several rounds of screening. The L-arginine production of these mutants was more than that of the original strain, increased by 43.79% for ARG 3-15. Moreover, N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase activity of these mutants was also increased. After a series of passages, the hereditary properties of these mutants were found to be stable. Interestingly, beet molasses was utilized in a co-feeding fermentation and benefited to increase the productivity by 5.88%. Moreover, the fermentation with 1.0 g/L betaine could produce 9.33% more L-arginine than without betaine. In fed-batch fermentation, C. glutamicum ARG 3-15 began to produce L-arginine at the initial of logarithmic phase, and continuously increased over 24 hr to a final titer of 45.36 ± 0.42 g/L. The L-arginine productivity was 0.571 g/L/hr and the conversion of glucose (α) was 32.4% after 96 hr. These results indicated that C. glutamicum ARG 3-15 is a promising industrial producer. PMID:26460578

  7. Inactivation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 using cold atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Baier, Matthias; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H; Ehlbeck, Jörg; Knorr, Dietrich; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    From cultivation to the end of the post-harvest chain, heat-sensitive fresh produce is exposed to a variety of sources of pathogenic microorganisms. If contaminated, effective gentle means of sanitation are necessary to reduce bacterial pathogen load below their infective dose. The occurrence of rare or new serotypes raises the question of their tenacity to inactivation processes. In this study the antibacterial efficiency of cold plasma by an atmospheric pressure plasma-jet was examined against the Shiga toxin-producing outbreak strain Escherichia coli O104:H4. Argon was transformed into non-thermal plasma at a power input of 8 W and a gas flow of 5 L min(-1). Basic tests were performed on polysaccharide gel discs, including the more common E. coli O157:H7 and non-pathogenic E. coli DSM 1116. At 5 mm treatment distance and 10(5) cfu cm(-2) initial bacterial count, plasma reduced E. coli O104:H4 after 60 s by 4.6 ± 0.6 log, E. coli O157:H7 after 45 s by 4.5 ± 0.6 log, and E. coli DSM 1116 after 30 s by 4.4 ± 1.1 log. On the surface of corn salad leaves, gentle plasma application at 17 mm reduced 10(4) cfu cm(-2) of E. coli O104:H4 by 3.3 ± 1.1 log after 2 min, whereas E. coli O157:H7 was inactivated by 3.2 ± 1.1 log after 60 s. In conclusion, plasma treatment has the potential to reduce pathogens such as E. coli O104:H4 on the surface of fresh produce. However, a serotype-specific adaptation of the process parameters is required. PMID:25782617

  8. Radio-Frequency Sustainment of Laser Initiated, High-Pressure Air Constituent Plasmas*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Kamran; Scharer, John; Tysk, Shane; Denning, Mark

    2003-10-01

    We investigate the feasibility of creating a high-density sim 10^12 -10^14 /cc, large volume plasma in air constituents by laser (300 mJ, 20(+/-2) ns) preionization of an organic gas. Tetrakis (dimethyl-amino) ethylene (TMAE) is seeded in high-pressure air constituent gases and then sustained by the efficient absorption of the radio-frequency (RF) power (1-25 kW pulsed) through inductive coupling of the wave fields, thereby reducing the rf initiation power budget.1 A multi-turn helical antenna is used to couple rf power through a capacitive matching network to sustain the plasma. Plasma density and decay recombination mechanisms with and without the background gas are examined using a 105 GHz interferometr.2 The effect of gas heating on plasma life-time enhancement through reduced formation of negative oxygen ions will also be presented. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to study the process of delayed ionization of the seed gas and RF creation of air constituent plasma and calculate the plasma temperature. RF wave penetration and projection of plasma away from the source region are also examined for different gas flow rates. 1. Kelly K, Scharer J, Paller E, and Ding G, J. App. Phys., 92,698(2002). 2. Akhtar K, Scharer J, Tysk S., and Kho E., Rev. Sci. Instrum., 74, 996 (2003).

  9. Initial planning for interferometry measurements on triggered plasma opening switch source.

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G.; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Sharpe, Rob A.; Gilmore, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    The Triggered Plasma Opening Switch (TPOS) at SNL is a unique device that exploits the high conductivity and low mass properties of plasma. The TPOS's objective is to take the initial {approx}0.8 MA ({approx}250 ns rise time) storage inductor current and deliver {approx}0.5 MA at {approx}2.4 MV ({approx}10 ns rise time) to a load of {approx}5-10 Omega. Configuration advantages include low current jitter and resistive voltage drop, power gain, and minimization of trigger input power as the result of using two stages in series. This two-stage design is novel and is the first to demonstrate operation of magnetically triggered stages. Study of TPOS characteristics is in progress via an offline interferometer diagnostic; specifically, a laser interferometer will be used to make density measurements of the source plasma. It is thought that the gross plasma source density is {approx}10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, but details of the spatial structure and temporal evolution have not previously been studied. In order to better understand switch operation, these details are essential. Presently two interferometer systems are planned for testing: a temporary 1 mum system for initial plasma characterization, and a 10.6 mum laser system for routine use. We will start with a single chord measurement then upgrade to a multi-chord system. Future plans involve varying plasma source parameters, such as magnetic field strength and plasma fill time, in order to understand the density dependence on these parameters. Improved knowledge of the plasma source density behavior should allow for improved switch operation.

  10. Progress Towards a Laser Produced Relativistic Electron-Positron Pair Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Bonlie, J.; Cauble, R.; Fiuza, F.; Goldstein, W.; Hazi, A.; Keane, C.; Link, A.; Marley, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Shepherd, R.; Williams, G. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Fiksel, G.; Barnak, D.; Chang, P. Y.; Nakai, M.; Arikawa, Y.; Azechi, H.; Fujioka, S.; Kojima, S.; Miyanaga, N.; Morita, T.; Nagai, T.; Nishimura, H.; Ozaki, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Takabe, H.; Zhang, Z.; Kerr, S.; Fedosejevs, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.

    2016-03-01

    A set of experiments has been performed exploring unique characteristics of pair jets and plasmas at several energetic short-pulse laser facilities including Titan at Livermore and OMEGA EP in Rochester, as well as the Osaka LFEX and AWE Orion lasers. New results are summarized, including positron beam emittance, scaling of pair production vs. laser energy, and initial results on the pair jet collimation using electromagnetic fields.

  11. High-order harmonic generation from laser plasma produced by pulses of different duration

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Suzuki, M.; Baba, M.; Kuroda, H.

    2007-08-15

    The high-order harmonic generation was analyzed by interaction of the femtosecond pulses with the laser plasma produced on the surfaces of various targets. The plasma formation was accomplished by the interaction of the prepulse radiation of different pulse duration (160 fs, 1.5 ps, 210 ps, and 20 ns) with the low-Z (lithium, boron, carbon), medium-Z (manganese, zinc, nickel), and high-Z (silver, barium) targets. We showed that plasma formation conditions play a crucial role in harmonic generation and the optimization of this process mostly depends on the energy of prepulse rather than its intensity at the target surface. These studies also demonstrated that the delay between the prepulse and femtosecond pulse is another important parameter, which distinguishes harmonic generation in the cases of the low- and high-Z targets.

  12. Investigation of a Gas Jet-Produced Hollow Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N; Blumenfeld, I.; Hogan, M.J.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; Davidson, A.W.; Huang, C.; /UCLA

    2009-05-21

    The effect of ion motion and the need for practical positron propagation in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) have incited interest in hollow plasma channels. These channels are typically assumed to be cylindrically symmetric; however, a different geometry might be easier to achieve. The introduction of an obstruction into the outlet of a high Mach number gas jet can produce two parallel slabs of gas separated by a density depression. Here, there is a detailed simulation study of the density depression created in such a system. This investigation reveals that the density depression is insufficient at the desired plasma density. However, insights from the simulations suggest another avenue for the creation of the hollow slab geometry.

  13. Momentum transfer interaction of a laser-produced plasma with a low-pressure background.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The expansion of a laser-produced metallic plasma into a photoionized hydrogen background has been experimentally studied. Langmuir probe and microwave diagnostics have detected an interaction front which decelerates with a dependence on background density and time consistent with a momentum coupling between the laser plasma and the ionized fraction of the background. An ion percursor has also been observed. Calculations of scattering cross sections indicate that multiple-encounter Coulomb scattering will dominate collisional momentum transfer. The leading edge of the laser plasma contains multiply charged ions of charge state z greater than or equal to 5, and collisional effects appear adequate to explain the principal features of the momentum coupling. The ion precursor may have a collisionless origin.

  14. Structure of the plasma fireball produced by a CO2 laser.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. V.; Bekefi, G.; Ya'akobi, B.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the space and time resolved structure of a helium plasma produced with a repetitive CO2 laser during the first 15 microsec of the afterglow period. The spectra of several neutral and ionized helium lines are used in the determination of the density and temperature profiles of the luminous fireball. It is found that the plasma is comprised of a dense hot core, which emits primarily ionic lines, and a well-defined tenuous outer shell, which is primarily the source of neutral emission lines. This ?two-component' plasma structure develops at about 0.4 microsec after breakdown, at about the time when the luminous fireball dissipates its expansion energy and comes to a virtual standstill.

  15. Volume Diffuse Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Produced by Nanosecond High Voltage Pulse in Airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haicheng; Gao, Wei; Fan, Zhihui; Liu, Yidi; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Volume diffuse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced in subsonic airflow by nanosecond high-voltage pulse power supply with a plate-to-plate discharge cell at 6 mm air gap length. The discharge images, optical emission spectra (OES), the applied voltage and current waveforms of the discharge at the changed airflow rates are obtained. When airflow rate is increased, the transition of the discharge mode and the variations of discharge intensity, breakdown characteristics and the temperature of the discharge plasma are investigated. The results show that the discharge becomes more diffuse, discharge intensity is decreased accompanied by the increased breakdown voltage and time lag, and the temperature of the discharge plasma reduces when airflow of small velocity is introduced into the discharge gap. These phenomena are because that the airflow changes the spatial distribution of the heat and the space charge in the discharge gap. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51437002)

  16. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the self-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzaie, M.; Shokri, B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    2010-01-15

    The dynamic behavior of a high power microwave beam propagating through a gaseous medium, which is ionized in the wave field is investigated. By solving the wave equation, the reflection index of the produced plasma is obtained. It is shown that the cut off condition is different from that of the steady state approximation. The reflection index is less than unity when the plasma density reaches the critical value estimated in the steady state approximation. So, the wave can still propagate through the plasma. By comparing the reflection indexes in the presence and absence of the time delay of the ionization process at different points of the medium, it is shown that it becomes unity much later in the first case. Therefore, the wave propagation takes much more time and consequently the medium is ionized much more.

  17. Parabolic lithium mirror for a laser-driven hot plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Baird, James K.

    1979-06-19

    A hot plasma producing device is provided, wherein pellets, singly injected, of frozen fuel are each ignited with a plurality of pulsed laser beams. Ignition takes place within a void area in liquid lithium contained within a pressure vessel. The void in the liquid lithium is created by rotating the pressure vessel such that the free liquid surface of molten lithium therein forms a paraboloid of revolution. The paraboloid functions as a laser mirror with a reflectivity greater than 90%. A hot plasma is produced when each of the frozen deuterium-tritium pellets sequentially arrive at the paraboloid focus, at which time each pellet is illuminated by the plurality of pulsed lasers whose rays pass through circular annuli across the top of the paraboloid. The beams from the lasers are respectively directed by associated mirrors, or by means of a single conical mirror in another embodiment, and by the mirror-like paraboloid formed by the rotating liquid lithium onto the fuel pellet such that the optical flux reaching the pellet can be made to be uniform over 96% of the pellet surface area. The very hot plasma produced by the action of the lasers on the respective singly injected fuel pellets in turn produces a copious quantity of neutrons and X-rays such that the device has utility as a neutron source or as an x-ray source. In addition, the neutrons produced in the device may be utilized to produce tritium in a lithium blanket and is thus a mechanism for producing tritium.

  18. Study of Plasma Treatment of Produced Water from Oil and Gas Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Kamau

    Unconventional gas and hydraulic fracturing is helping to increase natural gas production, which is widely viewed in the U.S. as a key asset to bolstering a clean and energy-independent future. Safe and economical management and treatment of water produced during such processes remain of key importance. With the increase of hydrocarbon production and national shale gas production expected to increase threefold and account for nearly half of all natural gas produced by 2035, advanced water treatment and management processes must be investigated, to ensure water conservation and associated economic prudence. The state of the art of produced water treatment technologies is described including the efficacy of plasma to modulate the contents of such aqueous solutions, meeting target parameters and potentially enabling the operation of other treatment technologies. Among other effects, progress is presented on the enhancement of an arc-in-water system to remove bicarbonate ions and prevent the mineral fouling ability of water which causes formation of CaCO3 in heat exchangers and distillation units. Qualitative and quantitative treatment targets of produced water treatment are discussed. Experimental work is conducted to test theories and identify and reproduce favorable effects useful to treating wastewaters. Plasma arc-in-water systems demonstrated capability of producing bicarbonate-depleted wastewaters, with experiments with gas-field produced waters indicating that generation of H+ ions plays a greater role in bicarbonate ion removal than local heating. Tests showed abatement of bicarbonate ions from a range of 684--778 mg/L down to zero. Subsequent scaling/fouling tests with waters ranging from 0 to 500 mg/L bicarbonate ions, in the presence of high calcium ion concentrations, showed that scale thickness, as well as mass on a 1-kW heating element was an order of magnitude less for process water containing 100 mg/L bicarbonate ions compared to process water with 500

  19. Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J; Kwon, Soondong; Katz, Lynn; Kinney, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ

  20. Summary of initial results from the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edward

    2015-11-01

    Dusty (or complex) plasmas are four-component plasma systems consisting of electrons, ions, neutral atoms and charged, solid particulates. These particulates, i.e., the ``dust,'' become charged through interactions with the surrounding plasma particles and are therefore fully coupled to the background. The study of dusty plasmas began with astrophysical studies and has developed into a distinct area of plasma science with contributions to industrial, space, and fundamental plasma science. However, the vast majority of the laboratory studies are performed without the presence of a magnetic field. This is because, compared to the masses of the electrons and ions, the dust particles are significantly more massive and therefore the charge-to-mass ratio of the dust is very small. As a result, large (B > 1 T) magnetic fields are required to achieve conditions in which the dynamics of electrons, ions, and dust particles are dominated by the magnetic field. This presentation will provide a brief description of the design of the large bore (50 cm diameter x 158 cm long), multi-configuration, 4-Tesla class, superconducting magnet and integrated plasma chamber optimized for the study of dusty plasmas at high magnetic field - the MDPX device. The presentation will then focus on initial results of measurements made using MDPX - including observations of a new type of imposed ordered structures formed by the dust particles in a magnetized plasma, E x B driven flows of the particles, and observations of instabilities. This work is a collaboration of the author with Uwe Konopka (Auburn), Robert L. Merlino (Univ. of Iowa), Marlene Rosenberg (UCSD), and the MDPX team at Auburn University. Construction of the MDPX device was supported by the NSF-MRI program. Operations are supported by the NSF and DOE.

  1. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2009-07-15

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m>{approx}[8{pi}{beta}(1+D{sub m}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}{gamma}{sub max}{sup -1})]{sup 1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  2. Modification of semiconductor materials with the use of plasma produced by low intensity repetitive laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowski, J.; Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Czarnecka, A.; Parys, P.; Turan, R.; Yerci, S.

    2008-03-19

    This work reports experiments concerning specific application of laser-produced plasma at IPPLM in Warsaw. A repetitive pulse laser system of parameters: energy up to 0.8 J in a 3.5 ns-pulse, wavelength of 1.06 {mu}m, repetition rate of up to 10 Hz, has been employed in these investigations. The characterisation of laser-produced plasma was performed with the use of 'time-of-flight' ion diagnostics simultaneously with other diagnostic methods. The results of laser-matter interaction were obtained in dependence on laser pulse parameters, illumination geometry and target material. The modified SiO{sub 2} layers and sample surface properties were characterised with the use of different methods at the Middle-East Technological University in Ankara and at the Warsaw University of technology. The production of the Ge nanocrystallites has been demonstrated for annealed samples prepared in different experimental conditions.

  3. Picosecond soft-x-ray source from subpicosecond laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Liu, X.; Ellenberger, U.; Coe, J. S.; Chien, C.-Y.; Umstadter, D.

    1996-01-01

    Short-pulse high-intensity laser-plasma interactions are investigated experimentally with temporally and spectrally resolved soft-x-ray diagnostics. We demonstrate that, by adjustment of the incident laser flux, the pulse width of the laser-produced x rays emitted from solid targets may be varied to as short as the picosecond time scale. Bright, picosecond, broadband emission characteristic of a short-scale-length high-density plasma is produced only when a high laser contrast (1010) is used. The results are found to be in qualitative agreement with both the predictions of a simple model of radiation from a collisionally dominated atomic system and the results obtained from a numerical simulation. 52.40.Nk.

  4. The expansion velocities of laser-produced plasmas determined from extreme ultraviolet spectral line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Behring, W. E.; Cohen, L.

    1977-01-01

    The expansion of laser-produced plasma is determined from the shapes of spectral lines of highly ionized iron emitted in the extreme ultraviolet. The plasmas were produced by focusing the pulse from a Nd:glass laser onto solid planar targets, and spectra were recorded with a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrograph. From the Doppler broadening of lines of Fe XX and Fe XXI, expansion velocities of about 830 km/s were determined. The relative time-averaged ion abundances of Fe XVIII, Fe XIX, Fe XX, and Fe XXI are estimated for three different spectra. The abundances do not differ by more than a factor of 4 for any of the spectra.

  5. Analytical characterization of plasma membrane-derived vesicles produced via osmotic and chemical vesiculation.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Chan, Robin B; Zhou, Bowen; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane-derived vesicles are being used in biophysical and biochemical research as a simple, yet native-like model of the cellular membrane. Here we report on the characterization of vesicles produced via two different vesiculation methods from CHO and A431 cell lines. The first method is a recently developed method which utilizes chloride salts to induce osmotic vesiculation. The second is a well established chemical vesiculation method which uses DTT and formaldehyde. We show that both vesiculation methods produce vesicles which contain the lipid species previously reported in the plasma membrane of these cell lines. The two methods lead to small but statistically significant differences in two lipid species only; phosphatidylcholine (PC) and plasmalogen phosphatidylethanolamine (PEp). However, highly significant differences were observed in the degree of incorporation of a membrane receptor and in the degree of retention of soluble cytosolic proteins within the vesicles. PMID:25896659

  6. Characterization of Fast Ion and Neutral Debris from Laser-Produced Lithium Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekioka, Tsuguhisa; Nagano, Akihisa; Ohtani, Nobuyuki; Miyamoto, Shuji; Amano, Sho; Inoue, Takahiro; Mochizuki, Takayasu

    2007-03-01

    Emissions of fast ion and neutral debris from laser-produced lithium plasmas have been investigated. We found that Li+, Li2+, and Li3+ ion energy spectra look similar. The peak positions and maximum energies in their energy spectra were about 700-800 eV and about 800-900 eV, respectively, which were much lower than those of such high-Z targets as Xe and Sn. These indicate that most of the fast Li+ and Li2+ ions were produced by the recombination of Li3+ ions while the plasma expanded, and that they were not accelerated to a high energy range as much as the high-Z targets. We did not observe any fast neutral Li atoms. These results suggest that the use of the Li target for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source would be advantageous for practical applications.

  7. High-quality electron beam from laser wake-field acceleration in laser produced plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Moorti, Anand; Rathore, Ranjana; Ali Chakera, Juzer; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam

    2013-06-10

    Generation of highly collimated ({theta}{sub div}{approx}10 mrad), quasi-monoenergetic electron beam with peak energy 12 MeV and charge {approx}50 pC has been experimentally demonstrated from self-guided laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) in a plasma plume produced by laser ablation of solid nylon (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sub n} target. A 7 TW, 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser system was used for LWFA, and the plasma plume forming pulse was derived from the Nd:YAG pump laser of the same system. The results show that a reproducible, high quality electron beam could be produced from this scheme which is simple, low cost and has the capability for high repetition rate operation.

  8. Analytical description of generation of the residual current density in the plasma produced by a few-cycle laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Silaev, A. A. Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-05-15

    When a gas is ionized by a few-cycle laser pulse, some residual current density (RCD) of free electrons remains in the produced plasma after the passage of the laser pulse. This quasi-dc RCD is an initial impetus to plasma polarization and excitation of the plasma oscillations which can radiate terahertz (THz) waves. In this work, the analytical model for calculation of RCD excited by a few-cycle laser pulse is developed for the first time. The dependences of the RCD on the carrier-envelope phase (CEP), wavelength, duration, and intensity of the laser pulse are derived. It is shown that maximum RCD corresponding to optimal CEP increases with the laser pulse wavelength, which indicates the prospects of using mid-infrared few-cycle laser pulses in the schemes of generation of high-power THz pulses. Analytical formulas for optimal pulse intensity and maximum efficiency of excitation of the RCD are obtained. Basing on numerical solution of the 3D time-dependent Schrödinger equation for hydrogen atoms, RCD dependence on CEP is calculated in a wide range of wavelengths. High accuracy of analytical formulas is demonstrated at the laser pulse parameters which correspond to the tunneling regime of ionization.

  9. Analytical description of generation of the residual current density in the plasma produced by a few-cycle laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaev, A. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    When a gas is ionized by a few-cycle laser pulse, some residual current density (RCD) of free electrons remains in the produced plasma after the passage of the laser pulse. This quasi-dc RCD is an initial impetus to plasma polarization and excitation of the plasma oscillations which can radiate terahertz (THz) waves. In this work, the analytical model for calculation of RCD excited by a few-cycle laser pulse is developed for the first time. The dependences of the RCD on the carrier-envelope phase (CEP), wavelength, duration, and intensity of the laser pulse are derived. It is shown that maximum RCD corresponding to optimal CEP increases with the laser pulse wavelength, which indicates the prospects of using mid-infrared few-cycle laser pulses in the schemes of generation of high-power THz pulses. Analytical formulas for optimal pulse intensity and maximum efficiency of excitation of the RCD are obtained. Basing on numerical solution of the 3D time-dependent Schrödinger equation for hydrogen atoms, RCD dependence on CEP is calculated in a wide range of wavelengths. High accuracy of analytical formulas is demonstrated at the laser pulse parameters which correspond to the tunneling regime of ionization.

  10. Laser-produced plasma EUV source using a colloidal microjet target containing tin dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-10-01

    We realized a low-debris laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a colloidal microjet target, which contained low-concentration (6 wt%) tin-dioxide nanoparticles. An Nd:YAG laser was used to produce a plasma at the intensity on the order of 10^11 W/cm^2. The use of low concentration nanoparticles in a microjet target with a diameter of 50 μm regulated the neutral debris emission from a target, which was monitored by a silicon witness plate placed 30 cm apart from the source in a vacuum chamber. No XPS signals of tin and/or oxygen atoms were observed on the plate after ten thousand laser exposures. The low concentration nature of the target was compensated and the conversion efficiency (CE) was improved by introducing double pulses of two Nd:YAG lasers operated at 532 and 1064 nm as a result of controlling the micro-plasma characteristics. The EUV CE reached its maximum of 1.2% at the delay time of approximately 100 ns with the main laser intensiy of 2 x10^11 W/cm^2. The CE value was comparable to that of a tin bulk target, which, however, produced a significant amount of neutral debris.

  11. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge in Water without Bubbles: A Fundamental Study of Initiation, Propagation and Plasma Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan

    The state of plasma is widely known as a gas-phase phenomenon, but plasma in liquids have also received significant attention over the last century. Generating plasma in liquids however is theoretically challenging, and this problem is often overcome via liquid-gas phase transition preceding the actual plasma formation. In this sense, plasma forms in gas bubbles in the liquid. Recent work at the Drexel Plasma Institute has shown that nanosecond pulsed electric fields can initiate plasma in liquids without any initial cavitation phase, at voltages below theoretical direct-ionization thresholds. This unique regime is poorly understood and does not fit into any current descriptive mechanisms. As with all new phenomena, a complete fundamental description is paramount to understanding its usefulness to practical applications. The primary goals of this research were to qualitatively and quantitatively understand the phenomenon of nanosecond pulsed discharge in liquids as a means to characterizing properties that may open up niche application possibilities. Analysis of the plasma was based on experimental results from non-invasive, sub-nanosecond time-resolved optical diagnostics, including direct imaging, transmission imaging (Schlieren and shadow), and optical emission spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of variations in the electric field amplitude and polarity, liquid permittivity, and pulse duration. It was found that the plasma size and emission intensity was dependent on the permittivity of the liquid, as well as the voltage polarity, and the structure and dynamics were explained by a 'cold-lightning' mechanism. The under-breakdown dynamics at the liquid-electrode interface were investigated by transmission imaging to provide evidence for a novel mechanism for initiation based on the electrostriction. This mechanism was proposed by collaborators on the project and developed alongside the experimental work in this

  12. ELM simulation experiments using transient heat and particle load produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoda, K.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2011-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. It is predicted that the heat load onto the PFCs during type I ELMs in ITER is 0.2-2MJ/m2 with pulse length of ~0.1-1ms. We have investigated interaction between transient heat and particle load and the PFCs by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) at University of Hyogo. In the experiment, a pulsed plasma with duration of ~0.5ms, incident ion energy of ~30eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ~0.3-0.7MJ/m2 was produced by the MCPG. However, no melting occurred on a tungsten surface exposed to a single plasma pulse of ~0.7MJ/m2, while cracks clearly appeared at the edge part of the W surface. Thus, we have recently started to improve the performance of the MCPG in order to investigate melt layer dynamics of a tungsten surface such as vapor cloud formation. In the modified MCPG, the capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is increased from 24.5 kJ to 144 kJ. In the preliminary experiments, the plasmoid with duration of ~0.6 ms, incident ion energy of ~ 40 eV, and the surface absorbed energy density of ~2 MJ/m2 was successfully produced at the gun voltage of 6 kV.

  13. Development and diagnostics of revised ion beam analyzer, ion or laser produced plasmas and X-ray pre-ionizer for gas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Watanabe, M.; Kamiya, T.; Nishigori, K.; Funatsu, M.; Ido, D.; Ebine, T.; Okayama, H.; Sunami, H.; Wu, C.; Adachi, T.; Hotta, E.; Hattori, T.; Yasuike, K.; Nakai, S.; Miyamoto, S.

    1997-04-15

    A CCD element was tested as an end plate of a Thomson parabola analyzer. This element was directly irradiated by ion beams to produce electric signals associated with the beams. With a pin-hole camera, we also tried to measure the divergence angle of ion beams. Coated thin layers of ion source materials on a quartz plate were back-lighted by an e-beam pumped KrF laser, and the produced plasmas were observed to supply advanced source plasmas for pulsed ion diodes. We built a cryogenic target which was cooled by liquid nitrogen, and the ice-covered target was irradiated by proton beams to measure the concerned ablation processes. Fundamental characteristics of an X-ray source with wire-initiated discharge plasmas for pre-ionization of gas mixtures of our former discharge-pumped KrF laser in place of UV pre-ionization were also investigated.

  14. Dust particle charge screening in the dry-air plasma produced by an external ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, I. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2015-08-15

    The ionic composition of the plasma produced by an external ionization source in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature and the screening of the electric field of a dust particle in such a plasma have been investigated. The point sink model based on the diffusion-drift approximation has been used to solve the screening problem. We have established that the main species of ions in the plasma under consideration are O{sub 4}{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, and O{sub 4}{sup -} and that the dust particle potential distribution is described by a superposition of four exponentials with four different constants. We show that the first constant coincides with the inverse Debye length, the second is described by the inverse ambipolar diffusion length of the positive and negative plasma components in the characteristic time of their recombination, the third is determined by the conversion of negative ions, and the fourth is determined by the attachment and recombination of electrons and diatomic ions.

  15. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Marcus, Frederick B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux.

  16. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compressionmore » and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.« less

  17. Radiative Characteristics of the Pulse-Periodic Discharge Plasma Initiated by Runaway Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Sorokin, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Results of experimental investigations of amplitude-temporal and spectral characteristics of radiation of a pulse-periodic discharge plasma initiated in nitrogen by runaway electrons are presented. The discharge was initiated by high-voltage nanosecond voltage pulses with repetition frequency of 60 Hz in a sharply inhomogeneous electric field in a gap between the conic potential cathode and the planar grounded aluminum anode. It is established that intensive lines of Al I atoms and Al II atomic ions, lines of N I atoms and N II ions, bands of the first (1+) and second positive (2+) nitrogen systems, as well as bands of cyanogen CN are observed in the emission spectrum of the discharge plasma under the given excitation conditions.

  18. Measurement of the degree of polarization of the spectra from laser produced recombining Al plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Dong-Eon

    2002-07-01

    Using a polarization-resolved UV-visible spectrometer, the degree of polarization of the spectra from laser produced Al plasmas was measured. The polarization resolution was achieved by using either a dichroic polarizer or a calcite crystal. The degree of polarization of Al III 4s(2)S(1/2)-4p(2)P(o)(3/2) transition at 569.66 nm was measured at different positions from a target surface. The degree of polarization was observed to be 2.1+/-0.13% at a distance of 220 microm from the target and decreased as the distance from the target increased, vanishing at a distance of about 1.3 mm from the target. To avoid the possible error due to the shot-to-shot variation of the line intensity, a calcite crystal was used to simultaneously observe the two polarization components, obtaining a similar result. The electron temperature of about 3 eV and the density of 2 x 10(17) cm(-3) measured spectroscopically indicates that the plasma was in the recombining phase. This is a report on the observation of the polarization of a transition in a laser-produced recombining Al plasma. PMID:12241524

  19. Estimation of the initial amplitude of perturbation and its use in numerical simulation of plasma bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Carrasco, Alexander J.; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.

    2012-07-01

    This work describes an experimental method for the calculation of the initial amplitude of plasma bubble seed perturbation in the bottomside F layer from ionograms. The observations show that after sunset the ionograms exhibit irregularities in the base of the F trace. In the context of the plasma depletion in the bottomside F-layer, the irregularities in ionograms can be seen like isodensity contour in evolution (in space and time). The initial amplitudes, calculated using the methodology, were used to simulate plasma bubbles through the use of flux corrected transport method with Boris-Book's flux limiter for the spatial integration and a predictor-corrector method for the direct time integration of the continuity equation of {O}^{+} and the SOR method for electric potential equation. Generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability plays a predominant role in the evolution of long-wavelength irregularities in the equatorial ionosphere. This instability is influenced by the vertical density gradient at bottom of the F layer, and the magnitude and shape of the density perturbation that seeds the instability. The code is tested with different enhanced evening eastward electric fields to study the influences of pre-reversal enhancement in the zonal electric field on plasma bubble formation and development. The values of the zonal electric fields are based on Digisonde observations over the dip equatorial station of Cachimbo (9.5° S, 54.8° W) during the 2002 COPEX (Conjugate Point Equatorial Experiment) campaign in Brazil.

  20. Proton radiography of dynamic electric and magnetic fields in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Manuel, M.; Casey, D.; Sinenian, N.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Delettrez, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-05-15

    Time-gated, monoenergetic-proton radiography provides unique measurements of the electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields produced in laser-foil interactions and during the implosion of inertial-confinement-fusion capsules. These experiments resulted in the first observations of several new and important features: (1) observations of the generation, decay dynamics, and instabilities of megagauss B fields in laser-driven planar plastic foils, (2) the observation of radial E fields inside an imploding capsule, which are initially directed inward, reverse direction during deceleration, and are likely related to the evolution of the electron pressure gradient, and (3) the observation of many radial filaments with complex electromagnetic field striations in the expanding coronal plasmas surrounding the capsule. The physics behind and implications of such observed fields are discussed.

  1. Proton radiography of dynamic electric and magnetic fields in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Manuel, M.; Casey, D.; Sinenian, N.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Delettrez, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Back, C. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2009-01-01

    Time-gated, monoenergetic-proton radiography provides unique measurements of the electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields produced in laser-foil interactions and during the implosion of inertial-confinement-fusion capsules. These experiments resulted in the first observations of several new and important features: (1) observations of the generation, decay dynamics, and instabilities of megagauss B fields in laser-driven planar plastic foils, (2) the observation of radial E fields inside an imploding capsule, which are initially directed inward, reverse direction during deceleration, and are likely related to the evolution of the electron pressure gradient, and (3) the observation of many radial filaments with complex electromagnetic field striations in the expanding coronal plasmas surrounding the capsule. The physics behind and implications of such observed fields are discussed.

  2. Non-Spitzer heat flow in a steadily ablating laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, A.R.

    1985-06-01

    Electron energy transport in a laser-produced ablating plasma is modeled by the Vlasov--Fokker--Planck equation for electrons and the fluid equations for cold ions. These equations are solved using approximations which maintain good accuracy but allow faster computational solution than was previously possible. It is found that the spatial profiles for temperature and density in planar geometry differ very little from those calculated from the Spitzer conductivity. At high laser intensities, the plasma flow diverges as it flows away from the solid target and the effects of nonplanar flow are important. This is modeled by the adoption of spherical geometry, and it is found that the Spitzer conductivity breaks down and the temperature and density profiles differ significantly from those calculated using the Spitzer conductivity.

  3. Electron energy transport in ion waves and its relevance to laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Electron energy transport in plasmas is examined in the context of ion waves which are intermediate between collisionless isothermal ion acoustic waves and collisional adiabatic sound waves. The conductivity is found to be much less than the Spitzer-Haerm result for wavelengths less than 1000 electron mean free paths. This is expected to be relevant to laser-produced ablating plasmas in which the temperature can vary considerably over a distance of 10 to 100 mean free paths. The reduction in conductivity is independent of the wave amplitude thus differing from the reduction due to saturation found recently by numerical solution of the Fokker--Planck equation. At short wavelengths the heat flow approaches an upper limit which depends on the phase velocity of the wave. Diffusive ion wave damping is strong over a large range of wavelengths.

  4. Optical pyrometer system for collisionless shock experiments in high-power laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sano, T.; Takabe, H.; Dono, S.; Ide, T.; Tanji, H.; Shiroshita, A.; Shibata, S.; Aoki, H.; Waugh, J. N.; Woolsey, N. C.; Gregory, C. D.

    2012-10-15

    A temporally and spatially resolved optical pyrometer system has been fielded on Gekko XII experiments. The system is based on the self-emission measurements with a gated optical imager (GOI) and a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). Both detectors measure the intensity of the self-emission from laser-produced plasmas at the wavelength of 450 nm with a bandpass filter with a width of {approx}10 nm in FWHM. The measurements were calibrated with different methods, and both results agreed with each other within 30% as previously reported [T. Morita et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 283 (2011)]. As a tool for measuring the properties of low-density plasmas, the system is applicable for the measurements of the electron temperature and density in collisionless shock experiments [Y. Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)].

  5. Spectra of plasmas of Ru, Rh, Pd and Mo produced with nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokasani, Ragava; Long, Elaine; Sheridan, Paul; Hayden, Patrick; O'Reilly, Fergal; Dunne, Padraig; Endo, Akira; Limpouch, Jiri; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission recorded in the 2-12 nm region from Mo, Ru, Rh and Pd ions present in the laser produced plasmas. The spectra were found to be dominated by 3p-3d transitions in the 5-8 nm region, which shift slowly to shorter wavelengths with the increasing atomic number, and by 3d-4p and 3d-4f transitions at shorter wavelengths. These transitions, in a number of neighbouring ion stages, were distinguished by comparison with Cowan code calculations and previously reported data. The experimental results show that strong emission can be observed at the 6.X nm region for Ru, Rh and Pd plasmas.

  6. In-package nonthermal plasma degradation of pesticides on fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Misra, N N; Pankaj, S K; Walsh, Tony; O'Regan, Finbarr; Bourke, Paula; Cullen, P J

    2014-04-30

    In-package nonthermal plasma (NTP) technology is a novel technology for the decontamination of foods and biological materials. This study presents the first report on the potential of the technology for the degradation of pesticide residues on fresh produce. A cocktail of pesticides, namely azoxystrobin, cyprodinil, fludioxonil and pyriproxyfen was tested on strawberries. The concentrations of these pesticides were monitored in priori and post-plasma treatment using GC-MS/MS. An applied voltage and time dependent degradation of the pesticides was observed for treatment voltages of 60, 70 and 80 kV and treatment durations ranging from 1 to 5 min, followed by 24h in-pack storage. The electrical characterisation revealed the operation of the discharge in a stable filamentary regime. The discharge was found to generate reactive oxygen and excited nitrogen species as observed by optical emission spectroscopy. PMID:24598029

  7. Consolidation of TiB{sub 2} powders produced by plasma synthesis of cheap raw materials

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, G.L.; Bhaduri, S.B.; Radhakrishnan, R.

    1995-12-31

    TiB{sub 2} powders were produced in a non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor. The starting raw materials were rutile and boron oxide, which reacted in the plasma chamber using methane to form TiB{sub 2}. As received powders were treated to remove any adherent oxide. The powders were consolidated using two different approaches. In the first case the powders were CIPed at 30 ksi, sintered at 1825{center_dot}C, followed by HIPing at 1825{center_dot}C and 28 ksi. In the other approach, the samples were CIPed followed by direct HIPing. The as compacted samples were characterized for microstructure and mechanical properties. The results will be reported in this paper.

  8. Correlation between laser absorption and radiation conversion efficiency in laser produced tin plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukuma, Hiraku Hosoda, Tatsuya; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Tomuro, Hiroaki; Kouge, Kouichiro; Kodama, Takeshi

    2015-09-21

    The correlation between the laser absorption and the conversion efficiency (CE) for 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in a laser-produced tin plasma was investigated. The absorption rate α and the CE were measured simultaneously for a laser-pre-formed low-density tin target as a function of the time delay between the pre-pulse and the main laser pulse. A clear and positive correlation between α and CE was found with increasing delay time; however, the CE decreases rapidly at longer delay times. This result is partly attributed to a reduction in the absorption rate, but is mainly attributed to the self-absorption of EUV light in excessively long-scale plasmas.

  9. Supersonic propagation of ionization waves in an under-dense, laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, C; Back, C A; Fournier, K B; Gregori, G; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Dewald, E L; Miller, M C

    2004-10-22

    We observe a laser-driven supersonic ionization wave heating a mm-scale plasma of sub-critical density up to 2-3 keV electron temperatures. Propagation velocities initially 10 times the sound speed were measured by means of time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics. The measured ionization wave trajectory is modeled analytically and by a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code. The comparison to the modeling suggests that nonlocal heat transport effects may contribute to the attenuation of the heat wave propagation.

  10. Production of geopolymers using glass produced from DC plasma treatment of air pollution control (APC) residues.

    PubMed

    Kourti, Ioanna; Rani, D Amutha; Deegan, D; Boccaccini, A R; Cheeseman, C R

    2010-04-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues are the hazardous waste produced from cleaning gaseous emissions at energy-from-waste (EfW) facilities processing municipal solid waste (MSW). APC residues have been blended with glass-forming additives and treated using DC plasma technology to produce a high calcium alumino-silicate glass. This research has investigated the optimisation and properties of geopolymers prepared from this glass. Work has shown that high strength geopolymers can be formed and that the NaOH concentration of the activating solution significantly affects the properties. The broad particle size distribution of the APC residue glass used in these experiments results in a microstructure that contains unreacted glass particles included within a geopolymer binder phase. The high calcium content of APC residues may cause the formation of some amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. A mix prepared with S/L=3.4, Si/Al=2.6 and [NaOH]=6M in the activating solution, produced high strength geopolymers with compressive strengths of approximately 130 MPa. This material had high density (2070 kg/m(3)) and low porosity. The research demonstrates for the first time that glass derived from DC plasma treatment of APC residues can be used to form high strength geopolymer-glass composites that have potential for use in a range of applications. PMID:20022170