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Sample records for plasma ion implantation

  1. Key issues in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Matossian, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a scaleable, non-line-of-sight method for the surface modification of materials. In this paper, we consider three important issues that should be addressed before wide-scale commercialization of PSII: (1) implant conformality; (2) ion sources; and (3) secondary electron emission. To insure uniform implanted dose over complex shapes, the ion sheath thickness must be kept sufficiently small. This criterion places demands on ion sources and pulsed-power supplies. Another limitation to date is the availability of additional ion species beyond B, C, N, and 0. Possible solutions are the use of metal arc vaporization sources and plasma discharges in high-vapor-pressure organometallic precursors. Finally, secondary electron emission presents a potential efficiency and x-ray hazard issue since for many metallurgic applications, the emission coefficient can be as large as 20. Techniques to suppress secondary electron emission are discussed.

  2. Plasma immersion ion implantation for silicon processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankov, Rossen A.; Mändl, Stephan

    2001-04-01

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a technology which is currently widely investigated as an alternative to conventional beam line implantation for ultrashallow doping beyond the 0.15 m technology. However, there are several other application areas in modern semiconductor processing. In this paper a detailed discussion of the PIII process for semiconductors and of actual as well as future applications is given. Besides the well known advantages of PIII - fast process, implantation of the whole surface, low cost of ownership - several peculiarities - like spread of the implantation energy due to finite rise time or collisions, no mass separation, high secondary electron emission - must be mentioned. However, they can be overcome by adjusting the system and the process parameters. Considering the applications, ultrashallow junction formation by PIII is an established industrial process, whereas SIMOX and Smart-Cut by oxygen and hydrogen implantation are current topics between research and introduction into industry. Further applications of PIII, of which some already are research topics and some are only investigated by conventional ion implantation, include seeding for metal deposition, gettering of metal impurities, etch stop layers and helium implantation for localized lifetime control.

  3. Investigation on plasma immersion ion implantation treated medical implants.

    PubMed

    Mändl, S; Sader, R; Thorwarth, G; Krause, D; Zeilhofer, H-F; Horch, H H; Rauschenbach, B

    2002-08-01

    In this work the biocompatibility of osteosynsthesis plates treated with plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was tested using a rat model. Small rods (Ø 0.9 mm, and length 10 mm) prepared from different materials-pure Ti, anodised Ti, and two NiTi alloys (SE 508, and SM 495)-were implanted with oxygen by PIII to form a rutile surface layer and subsequently inserted into rat femurs, together with a control group of untreated samples. The results of the biomechanical tests correlate with the histological results, and show that plasma immersion ion implantation leads to an increase of biocompatibility and osseointegration of titanium and NiTi, albeit no improvement of the (bad) biocompatibility of the anodised Ti. Despite the layer thickness of up to 0.5 microm a strong influence of the base material is still present. PMID:12202173

  4. A commercial plasma source ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuer, J.T.; Adler, R.A.; Horne, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Empire Hard Chrome has recently installed commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSU) equipment built by North Star Research Corporation. Los Alamos National Laboratory has assisted in this commercialization effort via two Cooperative Research and Development Agreements to develop the plasma source for the equipment and to identify low-risk commercial PSII applications. The PSII system consists of a 1 m x 1 m cylindrical vacuum chamber with a rf plasma source. The pulse modulator is capable of delivering pulses kV and peak currents of 300 A at maximum repetition rate of 400 Hz. thyratron tube to switch a pulse forming network which is tailored to match the dynamic PSII load. In this paper we discuss the PSII system, process facility, and early commercial applications to production tooling.

  5. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  6. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Li, L H; Liu, H T; Yu, K M; Xu, Y; Zuo, X J; Zhu, P Z; Ma, Y F; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering. PMID:24985818

  7. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H.; Liu, H. T.; Yu, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  8. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Yu, K. M.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-15

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  9. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, J.R.

    1988-08-16

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner. 7 figs.

  10. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, John R.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner.

  11. Metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.

    1996-09-01

    Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID) is a hybrid process combining cathodic arc deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation. The properties of metal plasma produced by vacuum arcs are reviewed and the consequences for MePIIID are discussed. Different version of MePIIID are described and compared with traditional methods of surface modification such as ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). MePIIID is a very versatile approach because of the wide range of ion species and energies used. In one extreme case, films are deposited with ions in the energy range 20--50 eV, and at the other extreme, ions can be implanted with high energy (100 keV or more) without film deposition. Novel features of the technique include the use of improved macroparticle filters; the implementation of several plasma sources for multi-element surface modification; tuning of ion energy during implantation and deposition to tailor the substrate-film intermixed layer and structure of the growing film; simultaneous pulsing of the plasma potential (positive) and substrate bias (negative) with a modified Marx generator; and the use of high ion charge states.

  12. Experiments and Theory of Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Qi, B.; Lau, Y. Y.; Johnston, M. D.; Doll, G. L.; Lazarides, A.

    2000-10-01

    Research is underway to accelerate laser ablation plume ions for implantation into substrates. Ablation plasma ion implantation (APII) biases the deposition substrate to a large negative voltage. APII has the advantages of direct acceleration and implantation of ions from metals or any other solid targets. This process is environmentally friendly because it avoids the use of toxic gaseous precursors. Initial experiments are directed towards the implantation of iron ions into silicon substrates at negative voltages from 2-10 kV. A KrF laser ablates iron targets at pulse energies up to 600 mJ and typical repetition rates of 10 Hz. Parameters which can be varied include laser fluence, relative timing of laser and high voltage pulse, and target-to-substrate distance. Spectroscopic diagnostics yield Fe plasma plume electron temperatures up to about 10 eV. Analysis of films will compare surface morphology, hardness and adhesion between deposited Vs accelerated-implanted plumes. A simple one dimensional theory is developed [1] to calculate the implanted ion current, extracted from the ion matrix sheath, as a function of time for various substrate-plume separations. This model accurately recovers Lieberman's classic results when the plume front is initially in contact with the substrate. [1] B. Qi, Y. Y. Lau, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. (to be published). * This research is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  13. Plasma Source Ion Implantation of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kevin Carl

    Three plasma source ion implantation (PSII) schemes applied to three aluminum systems have been studied. Pure aluminum, and aluminum alloys 7075 (Al-Cu-Mg-Zn) and A390 (Al-17Si-Cu-Fe) were (1) argon ion sputter-cleaned and nitrogen-implanted, (2) nitrogen-implanted without sputter -cleaning, and (3) argon-implanted. Nitrogen implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by transformation of the surface to aluminum-nitride. Argon implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by inducing radiation damage. All implantation schemes were accomplished using a glow discharge mode of the PSII process. Implanted surfaces were investigated using Auger depth profiling and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The profiles indicated a stoichiometric layer, ~ 0.15 μm thick, of AlN on the nitrogen-implanted samples. Electron microscopy confirmed the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Knoop microhardness tests showed an increase in surface hardness, especially at low loads. The improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning and were approximately equal for the studied aluminum systems. Pin-on-disk wear tests were conducted using a ruby stylus and isopropanol lubrication. Argon implantation decreased the wear resistance of pure aluminum and 7075. Nitrogen implantation improved the wear rates by a factor of ~10 for pure aluminum and 7075. These improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning. The coefficient of friction was not significantly influenced by the implantation schemes. Due to a coarse microstructure, tribological tests of ion-implanted A390 were inconclusive. Corrosion studies performed in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution (seawater) indicated nitrogen implantation gave pure aluminum improved corrosion resistance. The improvement is due to the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Because of pre-existing precipitates, the corrosion properties of 7075 and A390 were not

  14. Biologic stability of plasma ion-implanted miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Chae; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Park, Young-Chel; Jung, Han-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To gain basic information regarding the biologic stability of plasma ion-implanted miniscrews and their potential clinical applications. Methods Sixteen plasma ion-implanted and 16 sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) miniscrews were bilaterally inserted in the mandibles of 4 beagles (2 miniscrews of each type per quadrant). Then, 250 - 300 gm of force from Ni-Ti coil springs was applied for 2 different periods: 12 weeks on one side and 3 weeks contralaterally. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and mandibular specimens including the miniscrews were collected. The insertion torque and mobility were compared between the groups. The bone-implant contact and bone volume ratio were calculated within 800 µm of the miniscrews and compared between the loading periods. The number of osteoblasts was also quantified. The measurements were expressed as percentages and analyzed by independent t-tests (p < 0.05). Results No significant differences in any of the analyzed parameters were noted between the groups. Conclusions The preliminary findings indicate that plasma ion-implanted miniscrews have similar biologic characteristics to SLA miniscrews in terms of insertion torque, mobility, bone-implant contact rate, and bone volume rate. PMID:23814706

  15. Computer Simulation of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Masaaki; Nakadate, Hiroshi; Nakao, Setsuo; Miyagawa, Soji

    By using a newly developed simulation program "PEGASUS", plasma behavior was analyzed for the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). For plasma analysis of low pressure gas which is used in PIII&D, the software uses a particle in cell (PIC) method for the analysis of electric and magnetic fields and the motion of charged particles. A Monte Carlo collision method is used for collisions of ions, electrons and neutrals in the plasma, and the dynamic-SASAMAL code is used for the ion-solid surface interactions. Spatial distributions of potential, electron density and ion density together with the ion flux distribution on the target surface were calculated for the case where a negative pulse voltage was applied to a trench shaped target immersed in a high density Ar plasma (1010 cm-3). The time evolution of sheath length obtained by the simulations for a flat plane part of the surface agreed with the analytical result obtained by the Child-Langmuir method. In a bipolar pulse PIII&D system, a positive and a negative pulse voltages are applied alternately to a workpiece without any other external plasma source. Simulation has been conducted for a target immersed in a very low density Ar plasma (107 cm-3) to compare the plasma generated by a negative and a positive pulse voltage applied to the target. When a negative pulse voltage is applied to the target, only a weak plasma is generated. In contrast to it, when a positive pulse voltage is applied, a two-order or more high density plasma is generated under the same condition. The plasma behavior around a trench shaped target is also presented.

  16. Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation Optimization and Deposition of Compound Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. C.; Qi, B.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Johnston, M. D.; Lau, Y. Y.; Doll, G. L.; Lazarides, A.

    2002-10-01

    Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation (APII) utilizes KrF laser ablation plasma plumes to implant ions into pulsed, negatively-biased substrates [1]. Ablation targets are Ti foils and TiN disks. Substrates are Si wafers and Al, biased from 0 to -10 kV. Optimization experiments address: 1) configurations that reduce arcing, 2) reduction of particulate, and 3) deposition/implantation of compounds (e.g. TiN). Arcing is suppressed by positioning the target perpendicular (previously parallel) to the substrate. Thus, bias voltage can be applied at the same time as the KrF laser, resulting in higher ion current. This geometry also yields lower particulate. APII with TiN has the goal of hardened coatings with excellent adhesion. SEM, AFM, XPS, TEM, and scratch tests characterize properties of the thin films. Ti APII films at - 4kV are smoother with lower friction. 1. B. Qi, R.M. Gilgenbach, Y.Y. Lau, M.D. Johnston, J. Lian, L.M. Wang, G. L. Doll and A. Lazarides, APL, 78, 3785 (2001) * Research funded by NSF

  17. Magnetic insulation of secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Wood, B.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-09-01

    The uncontrolled loss of accelerated secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation (PSII) can significantly reduce system efficiency and poses a potential x-ray hazard. This loss might be reduced by a magnetic field applied near the workpiece. The concept of magnetically-insulated PSII is proposed, in which secondary electrons are trapped to form a virtual cathode layer near the workpiece surface where the local electric field is essentially eliminated. Subsequent electrons that are emitted can then be reabsorbed by the workpiece. Estimates of anomalous electron transport from microinstabilities are made. Insight into the process is gained with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  18. Cost estimates for commercial plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J. ); Alexander, R.B. )

    1994-07-01

    A semiempirical model for the cost of a commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSII) facility is presented. Amortized capital and operating expenses are estimated as functions of the surface area throughput [ital T]. The impact of secondary electron emission and batch processing time is considered. Treatment costs are found to decrease monotonically with [ital T] until they saturate at large [ital T] when capital equipment payback and space rental dominate the expense. A reasonably sized PSII treatment facility should be able to treat a surface area of 10[sup 4] m[sup 2] per year at a cost of $0.01 per cm[sup 2].

  19. A one-dimensional collisional model for plasma-immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, V.; Lieberman, M.A.; Alves, M.V.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1991-02-15

    Plasma-immersion ion implantation (also known as plasma-source ion implantation) is a process in which a target is immersed in a plasma and a series of large negative-voltage pulses are applied to it to extract ions from the plasma and implant them into the target. A general one-dimensional model is developed to study this process in different coordinate systems for the case in which the pressure of the neutral gas is large enough that the ion motion in the sheath can be assumed to be highly collisional.

  20. Ion enhanced deposition by dual titanium and acetylene plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z. M.; Tian, X. B.; Chu, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) offers a non-line-of-sight fabrication method for various types of thin films on steels to improve the surface properties. In this work, titanium films were first deposited on 9Cr18 (AISI440) stainless bearing steel by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIII-D) using a titanium vacuum arc plasma source. Afterwards, carbon implantation and carbon film deposition were performed by acetylene (C2H2) plasma immersion ion implantation. Multiple-layered structures with superior properties were produced by conducting Ti MePIII-D + C2H2 PIII successively. The composition and structure of the films were investigated employing Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the mixing for Ti and C atoms is much better when the target bias is higher during Ti MePIII-D. A top diamond-like carbon layer and a titanium oxycarbide layer are formed on the 9Cr18 steel surface. The wear test results indicate that this dual PIII-D method can significantly enhance the wear properties and decrease the surface friction coefficient of 9Cr18 steel.

  1. Numerical Simulation Research in Plasma Technologies 4. PIC-MCC Simulation for Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Yoshiko

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) has been developed as a method for high-flux implantation and conformal implantation on a complex shaped target. In PIII, a negative pulsed high voltage is applied to the target immersed in low-pressure high-density plasma. Then an ion sheath is formed around the target and energetic ions are implanted on the target surface. By increasing the plasma density, conformal implantation is possible. However, this process can not be easily realized for a complex shaped target, for instance which has a trench or holes with high aspectratios. In order to find the best condition in the process, it is very important to know the sheath shape around the target and the energy and flux distributions of implanted ions at each surface point. Plasma behavior in the PIII process has been simulated using “PEGASUS”.

  2. Plasma sheath physics and dose uniformity in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liuhe; Li Jianhui; Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wang Zhuo

    2009-07-01

    Based on the multiple-grid particle-in-cell code, an advanced simulation model is established to study the sheath physics and dose uniformity along the sample stage in order to provide the theoretical basis for further improvement of enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. At t=7.0 mus, the expansion of the sheath in the horizontal direction is hindered by the dielectric cage. The electron focusing effect is demonstrated by this model. Most of the ions at the inside wall of the cage are implanted into the edge of the sample stage and a relatively uniform ion fluence distribution with a large peak is observed at the end. Compared to the results obtained from the previous model, a higher implant fluence and larger area of uniformity are disclosed.

  3. Experimental investigation of plasma-immersion ion implantation treatment for biocompatible polyurethane implants production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iziumov, R. I.; Beliaev, A. Y.; Kondyurina, I. V.; Shardakov, I. N.; Kondyurin, A. V.; Bilek, M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Modification of the surface layer of polyurethane with plasma-immersion ion implantation (PIII) and studying its physical and chemical changes have been discussed in this paper. The goal of the research was to obtain carbonized layer allowing creating biocompatible polyurethane implants. The experiments of PIII treatment in various modes were performed. The investigation of the modified surface characteristics was carried out by observing the kinetics of free surface energy for two weeks after treatment. The regularities between treatment time and the level of free surface energy were detected. The explanation of high energy level was given through the appearance of free radicals in the surface layer of material. The confirmation of the chemical activation of the polyurethane surface after PIII treatment was obtained.

  4. Operations manual for the plasma source ion implantation economics program

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeault, M.L.; Thayer, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a surface modification technique for metal. PSIICOSTMODEL95 is an EXCEL-based program that estimates the cost for implementing a PSII system in a manufacturing setting where the number of parts to be processed is over 5,000 parts per day and the shape of each part does not change from day to day. Overall, the manufacturing process must be very well defined and should not change. This document is a self-contained manual for PSIICOSTMODEL95. It assumes the reader has some general knowledge of the technical requirements for PSII. Configuration of the PSII process versus design is used as the methodology in PSIICOSTMODEL95. The reason behind this is twofold. First, the design process cannot be programmed into a computer when the relationships between design variables are not understood. Second, the configuration methodology reduces the number of assumptions that must be programmed into our software. Misuse of results are less likely to occur if the user has fewer assumptions to understand.

  5. Application of a pulsed, RF-driven, multicusp source for low energy plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wengrow, A.B.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Rickard, M.; Williams, M.D.; Tucker, M.

    1996-06-01

    The multicusp ion source can produce large volumes of uniform, quiescent, high density plasmas. A plasma chamber suited for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was readily made. Conventional PIII pulses the bias voltage applied to the substrate which is immersed in a CW mode plasma. Here, a method by which the plasma itself is pulsed was developed. Typically pulse lengths of 500 {mu}s are used and are much shorter than that of the substrate voltage pulse (5-15 ms). This approach, together with low gas pressures and low bias voltages, permits the constant energy implantation of an entire wafer simultaneously without glow discharge. Results show that this process can yield implant currents of up to 2.5 mA/cm{sup 2}; thus very short implant times can be achieved. Uniformity of the ion flux is also discussed. As this method can be scaled to any dimension, it can be made to handle any size wafer.

  6. Plasma source ion implantation to increase the adhesion of subsequently deposited coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Walter, K.C.; Taylor, T.N.

    1997-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) an object is placed in a plasma and pulse biased to a high negative potential, so as to implant the plasma ions into the surface of the object. Although ion implantation, by itself, can yield desirable surface modification, it is even more useful as a method of creating a functionally graded interface between the substrate material and a subsequently deposited coating, which may be produced by altering operating conditions on the same plasma source. Although this interfacial region is very thin - as little as 20 nm - it can greatly increase the adhesion of the deposited coatings. We present here a description of this process, and compare a simulation of the graded interface with an XPS depth profile of the interfacial region for erbium metal implanted into steel.

  7. Effect of plasma immersion ion implantation in TiNi implants on its interaction with animal subcutaneous tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Kashin, Oleg A.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A.; Shishkova, Darya K.; Krukovskii, Konstantin V.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.

    2016-08-01

    Here we investigated in vivo interaction of Si-modified titanium nickelide (TiNi) samples with adjacent tissues in a rat subcutaneous implant model to assess the impact of the modification on the biocompatibility of the implant. Modification was performed by plasma immersion ion processing, which allows doping of different elements into surface layers of complex-shaped articles. The aim of modification was to reduce the level of toxic Ni ions on the implant surface for increasing biocompatibility. We identified a thin connective tissue capsule, endothelial cells, and capillary-like structures around the Si-modified implants both 30 and 90 days postimplantation. No signs of inflammation were found. In conclusion, modification of TiNi samples with Si ions increases biocompatibility of the implant.

  8. Formation of Wear Resistant Steel Surfaces by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maendl, S.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2003-08-26

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a versatile and fast method for implanting energetic ions into large and complex shaped three-dimensional objects where the ions are accelerated by applying negative high voltage pulses to a substrate immersed in a plasma. As the line-of-sight restrictions of conventional implanters are circumvented, it results in a fast and cost-effective technology. Implantation of nitrogen at 30 - 40 keV at moderate temperatures of 200 - 400 deg. C into steel circumvents the diminishing thermal nitrogen activation encountered, e.g., in plasma nitriding in this temperature regime, thus enabling nitriding of additional steel grades. Nitride formation and improvement of the mechanical properties after PIII are presented for several steel grades, including AISI 316Ti (food industry), AISI D2 (used for bending tools) and AISI 1095 (with applications in the textile industry)

  9. Computer simulation of plasma for plasma immersed ion implantation and deposition with bipolar pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Y.; Ikeyama, M.; Miyagawa, S.; Nakadate, H.

    2003-05-01

    In order to analyze the plasma behavior under the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) condition, a newly developed simulation software "PEGASUS" has been used. The spatial distributions of potential, ion and electron density were calculated for trench-shaped target immersed in Ar plasma (1 mTorr, 10 10 cm -3). The obtained time dependence of sheath length agreed with the analytical results based on Child-Langmuir theory. In the bipolar pulse PIII&D system, a positive- and a negative- pulse voltage are applied alternately to a target, instead of negative pulses used in the conventional PIII&D method. Using simulation, the following results were obtained; when a negative pulse voltage is applied to a target, a weak plasma is generated around the target. In contrast, when a positive pulse voltage is applied, a more intense plasma is generated under the same conditions. The results obtained by simulation of the behavior of ions and electrons near a trench-shaped target are presented.

  10. First results from the Los Alamos plasma source ion implantation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Gribble, R.J.; Henins, I.; Kodali, P.; Nastasi, M.; Reass, W.A.; Tesmer, J.; Walter, K.C.; Wood, B.P.; Conrad, J.R.; Horswill, N.; Shamim, M.; Sridharan, K.

    1993-12-01

    A new facility is operational at Los Alamos to examine plasma source ion implantation on a large scale. Large workpieces can be treated in a 1.5-m-diameter, 4.6-m-long plasma vacuum chamber. Primary emphasis is directed towards improving tribological properties of metal surfaces. First experiments have been performed at 40 kV with nitrogen plasmas. Both coupons and manufactured components, with surface areas up to 4 m{sup 2}, have been processed. Composition and surface hardness of implanted materials are evaluated. Implant conformality and dose uniformity into practical geometries are estimated with multidimensional particle-in-cell computations of plasma electron and ion dynamics, and Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport in solids.

  11. Voltage dependence of cluster size in carbon films using plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. R.; Tarrant, R. N.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Pearce, G.; Marks, N. A.; McCulloch, D. G.; Lim, S. H. N.

    2003-05-01

    Carbon films were prepared using a cathodic arc with plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Using Raman spectroscopy to determine cluster size, a comparison is made between cluster sizes at high voltage and a low duty cycle of pulses with the cluster sizes produced at low voltage and a higher duty cycle. We find that for ion implantation in the range 2-20 kV, the cluster size depends more on implantation energy ( E) than implantation frequency ( f), unlike stress relief, which we have previously shown [M.M.M. Bilek, et al., IEEE Trans. in Plasma Sci., Proceedings 20th ISDEIV 1-5 July 2002, Tours, France, Cat. No. 02CH37331, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, p. 95] to be dependent on the product Ef. These differences are interpreted in terms of a model in which the ion impacts create thermal spikes.

  12. Comparison between conventional and plasma source ion-implanted femoral knee components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Scheuer, J. T.; Ritter, C.; Alexander, R. B.; Conrad, J. R.

    1991-12-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation of Ti-6Al-4V knee joint femoral components was carried out by both plasma source ion implantation (PSII), a non-line of sight technique, and conventional beamline implantation. Implantation using the PSII process was performed on a flat sample as well as a 2×2 square array of components to demonstrate batch processing capability. The retained dose of the flat sample and at different locations on the implanted components was measured by a scanning auger microprobe (SAM). The variation in dose of the PSII treated component was found to be within the SAM error, while the dose at one location on the beamline implanted component was found to be significantly low. For the beamline case, the SAM results show good agreement with the PC profile computer simulation, which includes the angular dependence of sputtering.

  13. Method For Plasma Source Ion Implantation And Deposition For Cylindrical Surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Fetherston, Robert P. , Shamim, Muhammad M. , Conrad, John R.

    1997-12-02

    Uniform ion implantation and deposition onto cylindrical surfaces is achieved by placing a cylindrical electrode in coaxial and conformal relation to the target surface. For implantation and deposition of an inner bore surface the electrode is placed inside the target. For implantation and deposition on an outer cylindrical surface the electrode is placed around the outside of the target. A plasma is generated between the electrode and the target cylindrical surface. Applying a pulse of high voltage to the target causes ions from the plasma to be driven onto the cylindrical target surface. The plasma contained in the space between the target and the electrode is uniform, resulting in a uniform implantation or deposition of the target surface. Since the plasma is largely contained in the space between the target and the electrode, contamination of the vacuum chamber enclosing the target and electrodes by inadvertent ion deposition is reduced. The coaxial alignment of the target and the electrode may be employed for the ion assisted deposition of sputtered metals onto the target, resulting in a uniform coating of the cylindrical target surface by the sputtered material. The independently generated and contained plasmas associated with each cylindrical target/electrode pair allows for effective batch processing of multiple cylindrical targets within a single vacuum chamber, resulting in both uniform implantation or deposition, and reduced contamination of one target by adjacent target/electrode pairs.

  14. Plasma immersion ion implantation for the efficient surface modification of medical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Slabodchikov, Vladimir A. Borisov, Dmitry P. Kuznetsov, Vladimir M.

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports on a new method of plasma immersion ion implantation for the surface modification of medical materials using the example of nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys much used for manufacturing medical implants. The chemical composition and surface properties of NiTi alloys doped with silicon by conventional ion implantation and by the proposed plasma immersion method are compared. It is shown that the new plasma immersion method is more efficient than conventional ion beam treatment and provides Si implantation into NiTi surface layers through a depth of a hundred nanometers at low bias voltages (400 V) and temperatures (≤150°C) of the substrate. The research results suggest that the chemical composition and surface properties of materials required for medicine, e.g., NiTi alloys, can be successfully attained through modification by the proposed method of plasma immersion ion implantation and by other methods based on the proposed vacuum equipment without using any conventional ion beam treatment.

  15. Basic Aspects of the Formation and Activation of Boron Junctions Using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zschaetzsch, G.; Vandervorst, W.; Hoffmann, T.; Goossens, J.; Everaert, J.-L.; Agua Borniquel, J. I. del; Poon, T.

    2008-11-03

    This study investigates the basic aspects of junction formation using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation using BF{sub 3} and addresses the role of (pre)amorphization, C(F)-co-implantation, plasma parameters (bias, dose) and the thermal anneal cycle (spike versus msec laser anneal). The basic physics are studied using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, sheet resistance and using four point probe and RsL. Profiles with junction depths ranging from 10-12 nm and sheet resistance values below 800 Ohm/sq are readily achievable.

  16. Influence of annular magnet on discharge characteristics in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liuhe; Wang Zhuo; Lu Qiuyuan; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Pang Enjing; Dun Dandan; He Fushun; Li Fen

    2011-01-10

    A permanent annular magnet positioned at the grounded anode alters the discharge characteristics in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation (EGD-PIII). The nonuniform magnetic field increases the electron path length and confines electron motion due to the magnetic mirror effect and electron-neutral collisions thus occur more frequently. The plasma potential and ion density measured by a Langmuir probe corroborate that ionization is improved near the grounded anode. This hybrid magnetic field EGD-PIII method is suitable for implantation of gases with low ionization rates.

  17. Initial operation of a large-scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Henins, I.; Gribble, R.J.; Reass, W.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Nastasi, M.A.; Rej, D.J.

    1993-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII), a workpiece to be implanted is immersed in a weakly ionized plasma and pulsed to a high negative voltage. Plasma ions are accelerated toward the workpiece and implanted in its surface. Experimental PSII results reported in the literature have been for small workpieces. A large scale PSII experiment has recently been assembled at Los Alamos, in which stainless steel and aluminum workpieces with surface areas over 4 m{sup 2} have been implanted in a 1.5 m-diameter, 4.6 m-length cylindrical vacuum chamber. Initial implants have been performed at 50 kV with 20 {mu}s pulses of 53 A peak current, repeated at 500 Hz, although the pulse modulator will eventually supply 120 kV pulses of 60 A peak current at 2 kHz. A 1,000 W, 13.56 MHz capacitively-coupled source produces nitrogen plasma densities in the 10{sup 15} m{sup {minus}3} range at neutral pressures as low as 0.02 mtorr. A variety of antenna configurations have been tried, with and without axial magnetic fields of up to 60 gauss. Measurements of sheath expansion, modulator voltage and current, and plasma density fill-in following a pulse are presented. The authors consider secondary electron emission, x-ray production, workpiece arcing, implant conformality, and workpiece and chamber heating.

  18. Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.; Yoshida, Y.

    In this tutorial we describe the basic principles of the ion implantation technique and we demonstrate that emission Mössbauer spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique to investigate the atomic and electronic configuration around implanted atoms. The physics of dilute atoms in materials, the final lattice sites and their chemical state as well as diffusion phenomena can be studied. We focus on the latest developments of implantation Mössbauer spectroscopy, where three accelerator facilities, i.e., Hahn-Meitner Institute Berlin, ISOLDE-CERN and RIKEN, have intensively been used for materials research in in-beam and on-line Mössbauer experiments immediately after implantation of the nuclear probes.

  19. Radial {sup 32}P ion implantation using a coaxial plasma reactor: Activity imaging and numerical integration

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, M.A.; Dufresne, V.; Paynter, R.; Sarkissian, A.; Stansfield, B.

    2004-12-01

    Beta-emitting biomedical implants are currently employed in angioplasty, in the treatment of certain types of cancers, and in the embolization of aneurysms with platinum coils. Radioisotopes such as {sup 32}P can be implanted using plasma-based ion implantation (PBII). In this article, we describe a reactor that was developed to implant radioisotopes into cylindrical metallic objects. The plasma first ionizes radioisotopes sputtered from a target, and then acts as the source of particles to be implanted into the biased biomedical device. The plasma therefore plays a major role in the ionization/implantation process. Following a sequence of implantation tests, the liners protecting the interior walls of the reactor were changed and the radioactivity on them measured. This study demonstrates that the radioactive deposits on these protective liners, adequately imaged by radiography, can indicate the distribution of the radioisotopes that are not implanted. The resulting maps give unique information about the activity distribution, which is influenced by the sputtering of the {sup 32}P-containing fragments, their ionization in the plasma, and also by the subsequent ion transport mechanisms. Such information can be interpreted and used to significantly improve the efficiency of the implantation procedure. Using a surface barrier detector, a comparative study established a relationship between the gray scale of radiographs of the liners, and activity measurements. An integration process allows the quantification of the activities on the walls and components of the reactor. Finally, the resulting integral of the {sup 32}P activity is correlated to the sum of the radioactivity amounts that were sputtered from radioactive targets inside the implanter before the dismantling procedure. This balance addresses the issue of security regarding PBII technology and confirms the confinement of the radioactivity inside the chamber.

  20. Metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIIID) on screw-shaped titanium implant: The effects of ion source, ion dose and acceleration voltage on surface chemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung-Soo; Sul, Young-Taeg; Jeong, Yongsoo; Byon, Eungsun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Cho, Suyeon; Oh, Se-Jung; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2011-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIIID) process parameters, i.e., plasma sources of magnesium and calcium, ion dose, and acceleration voltage on the surface chemistry and morphology of screw-type titanium implants that have been most widely used for osseointegrated implants. It is found that irrespective of plasma ion source, surface topography and roughness showed no differences at the nanometer level; that atom concentrations increased with ion dose but decreased with acceleration voltage. Data obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and auger electron spectroscopy suggested that MePIIID process produces 'intermixed' layer of cathodic arc deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation. The MePIIID process may create desired bioactive surface chemistry of dental and orthopaedic implants by tailoring ion and plasma sources and thus enable investigations of the effect of the surface chemistry on bone response. PMID:21334957

  1. Carbon plasma immersion ion implantation of nickel-titanium shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Poon, R W Y; Yeung, K W K; Liu, X Y; Chu, P K; Chung, C Y; Lu, W W; Cheung, K M C; Chan, D

    2005-05-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys possess super-elasticity in addition to the well-known shape memory effect and are potentially suitable for orthopedic implants. However, a critical concern is the release of harmful Ni ions from the implants into the living tissues. We propose to enhance the corrosion resistance and other surface and biological properties of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII&D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Our tribological tests show that the treated surfaces are mechanically more superior and cytotoxicity tests reveal that both sets of plasma-treated samples favor adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts. PMID:15585228

  2. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  3. Fabrication of Genesis Sample Simulants Using Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma source ion implantation can be used to fabricate simulant samples for the Genesis mission. These simulants will be needed by investigators to validate sample preparation and analysis techniques for the returned Genesis samples. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Structure and micro-mechanical properties of helium-implanted layer on Ti by plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinxin; Li, Jinlong; Sun, Mingren

    2008-08-01

    The present paper concentrates on structure and micro-mechanical properties of the helium-implanted layer on titanium treated by plasma-based ion implantation with a pulsed voltage of -30 kV and doses of 3, 6, 9 and 12 × 10 17 ions/cm 2, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are employed to characterize the structure of the implanted layer. The hardnesses at different depths of the layer were measured by nano-indentation. We found that helium ion implantation into titanium leads to the formation of bubbles with a diameter from a few to more than 10 nm and the bubble size increases with the increase of dose. The primary existing form of Ti is amorphous in the implanted layer. Helium implantation also enhances the ingress of O, C and N and stimulates the formations of TiO 2, Ti 2O 3, TiO, TiC and TiN in the near surface layer. And the amount of the ingressed oxygen is obviously higher than those of nitrogen and carbon due to its higher activity. At the near surface layer, the hardnesses of all implanted samples increases remarkably comparing with untreated one and the maximum hardness has an increase by a factor of up to 3.7. For the samples implanted with higher doses of 6, 9 and 12 × 10 17 He/cm 2, the local displacement bursts are clearly found in the load-displacement curves. For the samples implanted with a lower dose of 3 × 10 17 He/cm 2, there is no obvious displacement burst found. Furthermore, the burst width increases with the increase of the dose.

  5. Plasma source ion implantation research and applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, C.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Henins, I.

    1996-12-31

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation research at Los Alamos Laboratory includes direct investigation of the plasma and materials science involved in target surface modification, numerical simulations of the implantation process, and supporting hardware engineering. Target materials of Al, Cr, Cu-Zn, Mg, Ni, Si, Ti, W, and various Fe alloys have been processed using plasmas produced from Ar, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gases. Individual targets with surface areas as large as {approximately}4 m{sup 2}, or weighing up to 1200 kg, have been treated in the large LANL facility. In collaboration with General Motors and the University of Wisconsin, a process has been developed for application of hard, low friction, diamond-like-carbon layers on assemblies of automotive pistons. Numerical simulations have been performed using a 2{1/2}-D particle- in-cell code, which yields time-dependent implantation energy, dose, and angle of arrival for ions at the target surface for realistic geometries. Plasma source development activities include the investigation of pulsed, inductively coupled sources capable of generating highly dissociated N{sup +} with ion densities n{sub i} {approximately} 10{sup 11}/cm{sup 3}, at {approximately}100 W average input power. Cathodic arc sources have also been used to produce filtered metallic and C plasmas for implantation and deposition either in vacuum, or in conjunction with a background gas for production of highly adherent ceramic coatings.

  6. From plasma immersion ion implantation to deposition: A historical perspective on principles and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2001-06-14

    Plasma immersion techniques of surface modification are known under a myriad of names. The family of techniques reaches from pure plasma ion implantation, to ion implantation and deposition hybrid modes, to modes that are essentially plasma film deposition with substrate bias. In the most general sense, all plasma immersion techniques have in common that the surface of a substrate (target) is exposed to plasma and that relatively high substrate bias is applied. The bias is usually pulsed. In this review, the roots of immersion techniques are explored, some going back to the 1800s, followed by a discussion of the groundbreaking works of Adler and Conrad in the 1980s. In the 1990s, plasma immersion techniques matured in theoretical understanding, scaling, and the range of applications. First commercial facilities are now operational. Various immersion concepts are compiled and explained in this review. While gas (often nitrogen) ion implantation dominated the early years, film-forming immersion techniques and semiconductor processing gained importance. In the 1980s and 1990s we have seen exponential growth of the field but signs of slowdown are clear since 1998. Nevertheless, plasma immersion techniques have found, and will continue to have, an important place among surface modification techniques.

  7. Nitrogen mass transfer models for plasma-based low-energy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Bocong; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Che, Honglong; Lei, Mingkai

    2015-03-15

    The nitrogen mass transfer process in plasma-based low-energy ion implantation (PBLEII) is theoretically and experimentally studied in order to explore the process mechanism of PBLEII and therefore to optimize the apparatus design and the process conditions. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge generates the nitrogen plasma with a high density of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}, which diffuses downstream to the process chamber along the divergent magnetic field. The nitrogen ions in the plasma implant into the surface and transport to the matrix of an austenitic stainless steel under the low negative pulsed bias of −2 kV at a process temperature of 400 °C. A global plasma model is used to simulate the ECR microwave plasma discharge for a range of working pressures and microwave powers. The fluid models are adopted to calculate the plasma downstream diffusion, the sheath expansion and the low-energy ion implantation on the surface. A nonlinear kinetic discrete model is established to describe the nitrogen transport in the austenitic stainless steel and the results are compared with the experimental measurements. Under an average implantation current density of 0.3–0.6 mA/cm{sup 2}, the surface nitrogen concentration in the range from 18.5 to 29 at. % is a critical factor for the nitrogen transport in the AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by PBLEII, which accelerates the implanted nitrogen diffusion inward up to 6–12 μm during a nitriding time of 4 h.

  8. Surface modification of polymeric substrates by plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuji, S.; Sekiya, M.; Nakabayashi, M.; Endo, H.; Sakudo, N.; Nagai, K.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) as a tool for polymer modification is studied. Polymeric films have good performances for flexible use, such as food packaging or electronic devices. Compared with inorganic rigid materials, polymers generally have large permeability for gases and moisture, which causes packaged contents and devices to degrade. In order to add a barrier function, surface of polymeric films are modified by PBII. One of the advantageous features of this method over deposition is that the modified surface does not have peeling problem. Besides, micro-cracks due to mechanical stress in the modified layer can be decreased. From the standpoint of mass production, conventional ion implantation that needs low-pressure environment of less than 10-3 Pa is not suitable for continuous large-area processing, while PBII works at rather higher pressure of several Pa. In terms of issues mentioned above, PBII is one of the most expected techniques for modification on flexible substrates. However, the mechanism how the barrier function appears by ion implantation is not well explained so far. In this study, various kinds of polymeric films, including polyethyleneterephthalate (PET), are modified by PBII and their barrier characteristics that depend on the ion dose are evaluated. In order to investigate correlations of the barrier function with implanted ions, modified surface is analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is assumed that the diffusion and sorption coefficients are changed by ion implantation, resulting in higher barrier function.

  9. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  10. Modeling of Inner Surface Modification of a Cylindrical Tube by Plasma-Based Low-Energy Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bocong; Wang, Kesheng; Lei, Mingkai

    2015-04-01

    The inner surface modification process by plasma-based low-energy ion implantation (PBLEII) with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma source located at the central axis of a cylindrical tube is modeled to optimize the low-energy ion implantation parameters for industrial applications. In this paper, a magnetized plasma diffusion fluid model has been established to describe the plasma nonuniformity caused by plasma diffusion under an axial magnetic field during the pulse-off time of low pulsed negative bias. Using this plasma density distribution as the initial condition, a sheath collisional fluid model is built up to describe the sheath evolution and ion implantation during the pulse-on time. The plasma nonuniformity at the end of the pulse-off time is more apparent along the radial direction compared with that in the axial direction due to the geometry of the linear plasma source in the center and the difference between perpendicular and parallel plasma diffusion coefficients with respect to the magnetic field. The normalized nitrogen plasma densities on the inner and outer surfaces of the tube are observed to be about 0.39 and 0.24, respectively, of which the value is 1 at the central plasma source. After a 5 μs pulse-on time, in the area less than 2 cm from the end of the tube, the nitrogen ion implantation energy decreases from 1.5 keV to 1.3 keV and the ion implantation angle increases from several degrees to more than 40° both variations reduce the nitrogen ion implantation depth. However, the nitrogen ion implantation dose peaks of about 2×1010 - 7×1010 ions/cm2 in this area are 2 - 4 times higher than that of 1.18×1010 ions/cm2 and 1.63×1010 ions/cm2 on the inner and outer surfaces of the tube. The sufficient ion implantation dose ensures an acceptable modification effect near the end of the tube under the low energy and large angle conditions for nitrogen ion implantation, because the modification effect is mainly determined by the

  11. Study of plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon substrate using magnetic mirror geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillaca, E. J. D. M.; Ueda, M.; Kostov, K. G.; Reuther, H.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of magnetic field enhanced plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) in silicon substrate has been investigated at low and high pulsed bias voltages. The magnetic field in magnetic bottle configuration was generated by two magnetic coils installed outside the vacuum chamber. The presence of both, electric and magnetic field in PIII creates a system of crossed E × B fields, promoting plasma rotation around the target. The magnetized electrons drifting in crossed E × B fields provide electron-neutral collision. Consequently, the efficient background gas ionization augments the plasma density around the target where a magnetic confinement is achieved. As a result, the ion current density increases, promoting changes in the samples surface properties, especially in the surface roughness and wettability and also an increase of implantation dose and depth.

  12. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentecoste, Lucile; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal; Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (1011-1014 ions.cm2.s-1) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He+), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  13. Plasma immersion ion implantation for sub-22 nm node devices: FD-SOI and Tri-Gate

    SciTech Connect

    Duchaine, J.; Milesi, F.; Coquand, R.; Barraud, S.; Reboh, S.; Gonzatti, F.; Mazen, F.; Torregrosa, Frank

    2012-11-06

    Here, we present and discuss the electrical characteristics of fully depleted MOSFET transistors of planar and tridimensional architecture, doped by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) or Beam Line Ion Implantation (BLII). Both techniques delivered similar and satisfactory results in considering the planar architecture. For tri-dimensional Tri-Gate transistors, the results obtained with PIII are superior.

  14. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  15. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  16. An All Solid-State Pulsed Power Generator for Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kefu; Qiu, Jian; Wu, Yifan

    2009-04-01

    An all solid-state pulsed power generator for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is described. The pulsed power system is based on a Marx circuit configuration and semiconductor switches, which have many advantages in adjustable repetition frequency, pulse width modulation and long serving life compared with the conventional circuit category, tube-based technologies such as gridded vacuum tubes, thyratrons, pulse forming networks and transformers. The operation of PIII with pulse repetition frequencies up to 500 Hz has been achieved at a pulse voltage amplitude from 2 kV to 60 kV, with an adjustable pulse duration from 1 μs to 100 μs. The proposed system and its performance, as used to drive a plasma ion implantation chamber, are described in detail on the basis of the experimental results.

  17. Modification of the properties of vanadium dioxide by plasma-immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdyukh, S. V.; Stefanovich, G. B.; Pergament, A. L.; Berezina, O. Ya.; Avdeev, N. A.; Cheremisin, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hydrogenation of thin films of vanadium dioxide by plasma-immersion ion implantation on their conductivity is characterized. It is demonstrated that the parameters of the metal-insulator phase transition observed in VO2 films depend on the irradiation dose. If the dose exceeds a certain threshold, film metallization occurs and the phase transition vanishes. The time of retention of hydrogen within films is considerably longer than that typical for other hydrogenation methods.

  18. Flexible system for multiple plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiubo; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Anders, Andre; Gong, Chunzhi; Yang, Shiqin

    2003-12-01

    Multiple plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition offers better flexibility compared to other thin film deposition techniques with regard to process optimization. The plasmas may be based on either cathodic arc plasmas (metal ions) or gas plasmas (gas ions) or both of them. Processing parameters such as pulsing frequency, pulse duration, bias voltage amplitude, and so on, that critically affect the film structure, internal stress, surface morphology, and other surface properties can be adjusted relatively easily to optimize the process. The plasma density can be readily controlled via the input power to obtain the desirable gas-to-metal ion ratios in the films. The high-voltage pulses can be applied to the samples within (in-duration mode), before (before-duration mode), or after (after-duration mode) the firing of the cathodic arcs. Consequently, dynamic ion beam assisted deposition processes incorporating various mixes of gas and metal ions can be achieved to yield thin films with the desirable properties. The immersion configuration provides to a certain degree the ability to treat components that are large and possess irregular geometries without resorting to complex sample manipulation or beam scanning. In this article we describe the hardware functions of such a system, voltage-current behavior to satisfy the needs of different processes, as well as typical experimental results.

  19. Diamond-like carbon produced by plasma source ion implantation as a corrosion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Taylor, T.N.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-03-01

    There currently exists a broad range of applications for which the ability to produce an adherent, hard, wear and, corrosion-resistant coating plays a vital role. These applications include engine components, orthopedic devices, textile manufacturing components, hard disk media, optical coatings, and cutting and machining tools (e.g., punches, taps, scoring dies, and extrusion dies). Ion beam processing can play an important role in all of these technologies. Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is an emerging technology which has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional ion implantation by: (1) reducing the time and expense for implanting onto complex shapes and large areas and (2) extending the thickness of the modification zone through ion beam enhanced plasma growth of surface coatings. In PSII, targets are placed directly in a plasma source and then pulse biased to produce a non-line-of-sight process for complex-shaped targets without complex fixturing. If the pulse bias is a relatively high negative potential (20 to 100 kV) ion implantation will result. If however, a low voltage (50--1,200 eV) high duty cycle pulse bias is applied, film deposition from the chamber gas will result, thereby increasing the extent of the surface modification into the 1--10 micron regime. To evaluate the potential for DLC to be used as a corrosion barrier, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and traditional electrochemistry techniques were used to investigate the breakdown mechanism in chloride and nonchloride containing environments. The effect of surface preparation on coating breakdown was also evaluated.

  20. Performance Enhancement of PFET Planar Devices by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (P3I)

    SciTech Connect

    Ortolland, Claude; Horiguchi, Naoto; Kerner, Christoph; Chiarella, Thomas; Eyben, Pierre; Everaert, Jean-Luc; Hoffmann, Thomas; Del Agua Borniquel, Jose Ignacio; Poon, Tze; Santhanam, Kartik; Porshnev, Peter; Foad, Majeed; Schreutelkamp, Robert; Absil, Philippe; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Felch, Susan

    2008-11-03

    A study of doping the pMOS Lightly Doped Drain (LDD) by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (P3i) with BF3 is presented which demonstrates a better transistor performance compared to standard beam line Ion Implantation (I/I). The benefit of P3i comes from the broad angular distribution of the impinging ions thereby doping the poly-silicon gate sidewall as well. Gate capacitance of short channel devices has been measured and clearly shows this improvement. This model is clearly supported by high resolution 2D-carrier profiles using Scanning Spreading Resistance Microscopy (SSRM) which shows this gate sidewall doping. The broad angular distribution also implies a smaller directional sensitivity (to for instance the detailed gate edge shape) and leads to devices which are perfectly balanced, when Source and Drain electrode are switched.

  1. Investigation of dose uniformity on the inner races of bearings treated by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z. M.; Kwok, T. K.; Tian, X. B.; Tang, B. Y.; Chu, P. K.

    1999-07-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is an effective technique for the surface modification of industrial components possessing an irregular shape. We have recently used PIII to treat a real industrial ball bearing to enhance the surface properties of the race surface on which the balls roll. The implantation dose uniformity along the groove is assessed using theoretical simulation and experiments. The two sets of results agree very well, showing larger doses near the center. However, the highest dose is not observed at the bottom or center of the groove, but rather offset toward the side close to the sample platen when the bearing is placed horizontally. The minimum dose is observed near the edge or corner of the groove and our model indicates that it is due to the more glancing ion incidence as a result of the evolution of the ion sheath near the corner. The dose nonuniformity along the groove surface is about 40% based on our experimental data.

  2. Experiments on plasma immersion ion implantation inside conducting tubes embedded in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillaca, E. J. D. M.; Ueda, M.; Reuther, H.; Pichon, L.; Lepienski, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tubes of stainless steel (SS) embedded in external magnetic field were used to study the effects of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) as a function of their diameter. The study was complemented with and without a grounded auxiliary electrode (AE) placed at the axis of the tube. During the discharge tests in tubes of larger diameter (D = 11 cm), with and without AE, nitrogen gas breakdown was established inside the tube at pressures near 2.0 × 10-2 mbar. Under the same operation conditions, stable plasmas with similar PIII current densities were obtained for both arrangements. Reducing the diameter of the tube (D = 1.5 cm) turned the plasma unstable and made it inappropriate for ion implantation. This situation was solved by supplying gas at higher pressure or using higher magnetic field, without the presence of an AE. Under these conditions, nitrogen PIII treatments of these small diameter tubes were performed but gave not the best implantation results yet. Our results have also shown higher ion implantation current density (16 mA/cm2) in tube of intermediate diameter (D = 4 cm) using AE, compared to largest diameter tube used. In this case, a thick nitrogen layer of about 9 μm was obtained in the SS sample placed inside the tube. As a consequence of this, its structural and mechanical properties were enhanced. These results are attributed to the thermal diffusion promoted by ions hitting the inner wall in a large number due to the presence of the AE and the magnetic field.

  3. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy of plasma immersion ion implanted H13 tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwagne, G.; Collins, G. A.; Hutchings, R.

    1994-12-01

    Conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) has been used to investigate nitride formation in AISI-H13 tool steel after treatment by plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) at 350 °C. With only slight variation in the plasma conditions, it is possible to influence the kinetics of nitride precipitation so as to obtain nitrogen concentrations that range from those associated with ɛ-Fe2N through ɛ-Fe3N to γ'-Fe4N. The CEMS results enable a more definite identification of the nitrides than that obtained by glancing-angle X-ray diffraction and nuclear reaction analysis alone.

  4. Surface modification of silicone medical materials by plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yokota, Toshihiko; Kato, Rui; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Iwaki, Masaya; Terai, Takayuki; Takahashi, Noriyoshi; Miyasato, Tomonori; Ujiie, Hiroshi

    2007-04-01

    Silicone (polydimethylsiloxane) sheets and tubes for medical use were irradiated with inert gas ions using plasma-based ion implantation (PBII). The affinity of the surface with tissue examined by an animal test was improved by the irradiation at optimal conditions. The cell attachment percentage increased at an applied voltage of less than -7.5 kV; however, it decreased at higher voltage. The specimens irradiated at higher voltages were more hydrophobic than unirradiated specimens. The surface became rough with increasing voltage and textures, and small domains appeared. This effect was caused by different etching speeds in the amorphous and crystalline areas.

  5. Simultaneous Sterilization With Surface Modification Of Plastic Bottle By Plasma-Based Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakudo, N.; Ikenaga, N.; Ikeda, F.; Nakayama, Y.; Kishi, Y.; Yajima, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Dry sterilization of polymeric material is developed. The technique utilizes the plasma-based ion implantation which is same as for surface modification of polymers. Experimental data for sterilization are obtained by using spores of Bacillus subtilis as samples. On the other hand we previously showed that the surface modification enhanced the gas barrier characteristics of plastic bottles. Comparing the implantation conditions for the sterilization experiment with those for the surface modification, we find that both sterilization and surface modification are simultaneously performed in a certain range of implantation conditions. This implies that the present bottling system for plastic vessels will be simplified and streamlined by excluding the toxic peroxide water that has been used in the traditional sterilization processes.

  6. Simultaneous Sterilization With Surface Modification Of Plastic Bottle By Plasma-Based Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sakudo, N.; Ikenaga, N.; Ikeda, F.; Nakayama, Y.; Kishi, Y.; Yajima, Z.

    2011-01-07

    Dry sterilization of polymeric material is developed. The technique utilizes the plasma-based ion implantation which is same as for surface modification of polymers. Experimental data for sterilization are obtained by using spores of Bacillus subtilis as samples. On the other hand we previously showed that the surface modification enhanced the gas barrier characteristics of plastic bottles. Comparing the implantation conditions for the sterilization experiment with those for the surface modification, we find that both sterilization and surface modification are simultaneously performed in a certain range of implantation conditions. This implies that the present bottling system for plastic vessels will be simplified and streamlined by excluding the toxic peroxide water that has been used in the traditional sterilization processes.

  7. Enhanced osteogenic activity of poly ether ether ketone using calcium plasma immersion ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Qian, Shi; Meng, Fanhao; Ning, Congqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-06-01

    As a promising implantable material, poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) possesses similar elastic modulus to that of cortical bones yet suffers from bio-inertness and poor osteogenic properties, which limits its application as orthopedic implants. In this work, calcium is introduced onto PEEK surface using calcium plasma immersion ion implantation (Ca-PIII). The results obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm the modified layer with varying contents of calcium are formed on PEEK surfaces. Water contact angle measurements reveal the increasing hydrophobicity of both Ca-PIII treated surfaces. In vitro cell adhesion, viability assay, alkaline phosphatase activity and collagen secretion analyses disclose improved the adhesion, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) on Ca-PIII treated surfaces. The obtained results indicate that PEEK surface with enhanced osteogenic activity can be produced by calcium incorporation. PMID:26954085

  8. Plasma immersion ion implantation of boron for ribbon silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbouz, K.; Michel, T.; De Moro, F.; Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F.; Belouet, C.; Slaoui, A.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we report for the first time on the solar cell fabrication on n-type silicon RST (for Ribbon on Sacrificial Template) using plasma immersion ion implantation. The experiments were also carried out on FZ silicon as a reference. Boron was implanted at energies from 10 to 15 kV and doses from 1015 to 1016 cm-2, then activated by a thermal annealing in a conventional furnace at 900 and 950 °C for 30 min. The n+ region acting as a back surface field was achieved by phosphorus spin-coating. The frontside boron emitter was passivated either by applying a 10 nm deposited SiOX plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or with a 10 nm grown thermal oxide. The anti-reflection coating layer formed a 60 nm thick SiNX layer. We show that energies less than 15 kV and doses around 5 × 1015 cm-2 are appropriate to achieve open circuit voltage higher than 590 mV and efficiency around 16.7% on FZ-Si. The photovoltaic performances on ribbon silicon are so far limited by the bulk quality of the material and by the quality of the junction through the presence of silicon carbide precipitates at the surface. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that plasma immersion ion implantation is very promising for solar cell fabrication on ultrathin silicon wafers such as ribbons.

  9. Optimization of a plasma immersion ion implantation process for shallow junctions in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Ashok; Nori, Rajashree; Bhatt, Piyush; Lodha, Saurabh; Pinto, Richard Rao, Valipe Ramgopal; Jomard, François; Neumann-Spallart, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process has been developed for realizing shallow doping profiles of phosphorus and boron in silicon using an in-house built dual chamber cluster tool. High Si etch rates observed in a 5% PH{sub 3} in H{sub 2} plasma have been ascribed to high concentration of H(α) radicals. Therefore, subsequent work was carried out with 5% PH{sub 3} in He, leading to much smaller etch rates. By optical emission spectroscopy, the radical species H(α), PH*{sub 2}, and PH* have been identified. The concentration of all three species increased with pressure. Also, ion concentrations increased with pressure as evidenced by Langmuir data, with a maximum occurring at 0.12 mbar. The duty cycle of pulsed DC bias has a significant bearing on both the implantation and the etching process as it controls the leakage of positive charge collected at the surface of the silicon wafer during pulse on-time generated primarily due to secondary electron emission. The P implant process was optimized for a duty cycle of 10% or less at a pressure of 0.12 mbar with implant times as low as 30 s. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed a P dopant depth of 145 nm after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 950 °C for 5 s, resulting in a sheet resistance of 77 Ω/◻. Si n{sup +}/p diodes fabricated with phosphorus implantation using optimized PIII and RTA conditions exhibit J{sub on}/J{sub off} > 10{sup 6} with an ideality factor of nearly 1.2. Using similar conditions, shallow doping profiles of B in silicon have also been realized.

  10. Inner Surface Modification of a Tube by Magnetic Glow-Arc Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gu-Ling; Wang, Jiu-Li; Wu, Xing-Fang; Feng, Wen-Ran; Chen, Guang-Liang; Gu, Wei-Chao; Niu, Er-Wu; Fan, Song-Hua; Liu, Chi-Zi; Yang, Si-Ze

    2006-05-01

    A new method named the magnetic glow-arc plasma source ion implantation (MGA-PSII) is proposed for inner surface modification of tubes. In MGA-PSII, under the control of an axial magnetic field, which is generated by an electric coil around the tube sample, glow arc plasma moves spirally into the tube from its two ends. A negative voltage applied on the tube realized its inner surface implantation. Titanium nitride (TiN) films are prepared on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube in diameter 90 mm and length 600 mm. Hardness tests show that the hardness at the tube centre is up to 20 GPa. XRD, XPS and AES analyses demonstrate that good quality of TiN films can be achieved.

  11. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  12. Etching and structural changes in nitrogen plasma immersion ion implanted polystyrene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B. K.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Kondyurin, A.; Mizuno, K.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2006-06-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), with nitrogen ions of energy 20 keV in the fluence range of 5 × 1014-2 × 1016 ions cm-2, is used to modify 100 nm thin films of polystyrene on silicon wafer substrates. Ellipsometry is used to study changes in thickness with etching and changes in optical constants. Two distinctly different etch rates are observed as the polymer structure is modified. FTIR spectroscopy data reveals the structural changes, including changes in aromatic and aliphatic groups and oxidation and carbonisation processes, occurring in the polystyrene film as a function of the ion fluence. The transformation to a dense amorphous carbon-like material was observed to progress through an intermediate structural form containing a high concentration of Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds.

  13. Effects of carbon dioxide plasma immersion ion implantation on the electrochemical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy in physiological environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruizhen; Yang, Xiongbo; Zhang, Xuming; Wang, Mei; Li, Penghui; Zhao, Ying; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is conducted to improve the intrinsically poor corrosion properties of biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy in the physiological environment. Carbon dioxide is implanted into the samples and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterize the materials. The corrosion properties are systematically studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests in two simulated physiological environments, namely simulated body fluids and cell culture medium. The plasma-implanted materials exhibit a lower initial corrosion rate. Being a gaseous ion PIII technique, conformal ion implantation into an object with a complex shape such as an orthopedic implant can be easily accomplished and CO2 PIII is a potential method to improve the biological properties of magnesium and its alloys in clinical applications.

  14. Fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition facility for hybrid surface modification layer fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Langping; Huang Lei; Xie Zhiwen; Wang Xiaofeng; Tang Baoyin

    2008-02-15

    The fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) facility for hybrid and batch treatment was built in our laboratory recently. Comparing with our previous PIIID facilities, several novel designs are utilized. Two multicathode pulsed cathodic arc plasma sources are fixed on the chamber wall symmetrically, which can increase the steady working time from 6 h (the single cathode source in our previous facilities) to about 18 h. Meanwhile, the inner diameter of the pulsed cathodic arc plasma source is increased from the previous 80 to 209 mm, thus, large area metal plasma can be obtained by the source. Instead of the simple sample holder in our previous facility, a complex revolution-rotation sample holder composed of 24 shafts, which can rotate around its axis and adjust its position through revolving around the center axis of the vacuum chamber, is fixed in the center of the vacuum chamber. In addition, one magnetron sputtering source is set on the chamber wall instead of the top cover in the previous facility. Because of the above characteristic, the PIIID hybrid process involving ion implantation, vacuum arc, and magnetron sputtering deposition can be acquired without breaking vacuum. In addition, the PIIID batch treatment of cylinderlike components can be finished by installing these components on the rotating shafts on the sample holder.

  15. Fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition facility for hybrid surface modification layer fabrication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Langping; Huang, Lei; Xie, Zhiwen; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tang, Baoyin

    2008-02-01

    The fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) facility for hybrid and batch treatment was built in our laboratory recently. Comparing with our previous PIIID facilities, several novel designs are utilized. Two multicathode pulsed cathodic arc plasma sources are fixed on the chamber wall symmetrically, which can increase the steady working time from 6 h (the single cathode source in our previous facilities) to about 18 h. Meanwhile, the inner diameter of the pulsed cathodic arc plasma source is increased from the previous 80 to 209 mm, thus, large area metal plasma can be obtained by the source. Instead of the simple sample holder in our previous facility, a complex revolution-rotation sample holder composed of 24 shafts, which can rotate around its axis and adjust its position through revolving around the center axis of the vacuum chamber, is fixed in the center of the vacuum chamber. In addition, one magnetron sputtering source is set on the chamber wall instead of the top cover in the previous facility. Because of the above characteristic, the PIIID hybrid process involving ion implantation, vacuum arc, and magnetron sputtering deposition can be acquired without breaking vacuum. In addition, the PIIID batch treatment of cylinderlike components can be finished by installing these components on the rotating shafts on the sample holder. PMID:18315292

  16. Plasma immersion ion implantation of nitrogen into H13 steel under moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, M.; Leandro, C.; Reuther, H.; Lepienski, C. M.

    2005-10-01

    Ion implantation of nitrogen into samples of tempered and quenched H13 steel was carried out by plasma immersion technique. A glow discharge plasma of nitrogen species was the ion source and the negative high voltage pulser provided 10-12 kV, 60 μs duration and 1.0-2.0 kHz frequency, flat voltage pulses. The temperatures of the samples remained between 300 and 450 °C, sustained solely by the ion bombardment. In some of the discharges, we used a N2 + H2 gas mixture with 1:1 ratio. PIII treatments as long as 3, 6, 9 and up to 12 h were carried out to achieve as thickest treated layer as possible, and we were able to reach over 20 μm treated layers, as a result of ion implantation and thermal (and possibly radiation enhanced) diffusion. The nitrogen depth profiles were obtained by GDOS (Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy) and the exact composition profiles by AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy). The hardness of the treated surface was increased by more than 250%, reaching 18.8 GPa. No white layer was seen in this case. A hardness profile was obtained which corroborated a deep hardened layer, confirming the high efficacy of the moderate temperature PIII treatment of steels.

  17. Irradiation influence on Mylar and Makrofol induced by argon ions in a plasma immersion ion implantation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.; El-Saftawy, A. A.; Aal, S. A. Abd El; Ghazaly, M. El

    2015-08-01

    Mylar and Makrofol polycarbonate polymers were irradiated by Ar ions in a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system. The surface wettability of both polymers was investigated by employing the contact angle method. The measured contact angles were found to depend on the surface layer properties. Good wetting surfaces were found to depend not only on surface roughness but also on its chemistry that analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Surfaces topography and roughness was investigated and correlated to their surface energy which studied with the aid of acid-base model for evaluating the improvement of surface wettability after irradiation. PIII improves polymers surface properties efficiently in a controllable way.

  18. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation with Solid Targets for Space and Aerospace Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, R. M.; Goncalves, J. A. N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, G.; Baba, K.

    2009-01-05

    This paper describes successful results obtained by a new type of plasma source, named as Vaporization of Solid Targets (VAST), for treatment of materials for space and aerospace applications, by means of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Here, the solid element is vaporized in a high pressure glow discharge, being further ionized and implanted/deposited in a low pressure cycle, with the aid of an extra electrode. First experiments in VAST were run using lithium as the solid target. Samples of silicon and aluminum alloy (2024) were immersed into highly ionized lithium plasma, whose density was measured by a double Langmuir probe. Measurements performed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed clear modification of the cross-sectioned treated silicon samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that lithium was implanted/deposited into/onto the surface of the silicon. Implantation depth profiles may vary according to the condition of operation of VAST. One direct application of this treatment concerns the protection against radiation damage for silicon solar cells. For the case of the aluminum alloy, X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the appearance of prominent new peaks. Surface modification of A12024 by lithium implantation/deposition can lower the coefficient of friction and improve the resistance to fatigue of this alloy. Recently, cadmium was vaporized and ionized in VAST. The main benefit of this element is associated with the improvement of corrosion resistance of metallic substrates. Besides lithium and cadmium, VAST allows to performing PIII and D with other species, leading to the modification of the near-surface of materials for distinct purposes, including applications in the space and aerospace areas.

  19. Effect of vacuum ion-plasma treatment on the electrochemical corrosion characteristics of titanium-alloy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. A.; Skvortsova, S. V.; Petrov, L. M.; Chernyshova, Yu. V.; Lukina, E. A.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of mechanical polishing and various types of vacuum ion-plasma treatment of model implants made of VT1-0, VT20, and VT6 titanium alloys on their electrochemical corrosion characteristics in a 0.9% NaCl solution (Ringer’s solution) is studied. Ion nitriding and the evaporation of a titanium nitride coating are shown to form a surface structure that provides an increase in the hardness, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of these implants.

  20. Surface, electrical and mechanical modifications of PMMA after implantation with laser produced iron plasma ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Qazi Salman; Bashir, Shazia; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Mahmood, Khaliq; Akram, Mahreen; Khalid, Ayesha; Yaseen, Nazish; Arshad, Atiqa

    2016-07-01

    Laser Produced Plasma (LPP) was employed as an ion source for the modifications in surface, electrical and mechanical properties of poly methyl (methacrylate) PMMA. For this purpose Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 6 ns, 10 Hz) at a fluence of 12.7 J/cm2 was employed to generate Fe plasma. The fluence and energy measurements of laser produced Fe plasma ions were carried out by employing Thomson Parabola Technique in the presence of magnetic field strength of 0.5 T, using CR-39 as Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD). It has been observed that ion fluence ejecting from ablated plasma was maximum at an angle of 5° with respect to the normal to the Fe target surface. PMMA substrates were irradiated with Fe ions of constant energy of 0.85 MeV at various ion fluences ranging from 3.8 × 106 ions/cm2 to 1.8 × 108 ions/cm2 controlled by varying laser pulses from 3000 to 7000. Optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were utilized for the analysis of surface features of irradiated PMMA. Results depicted the formation of chain scission, crosslinking, dendrites and star like structures. To explore the electrical behavior, four probe method was employed. The electrical conductivity of ion irradiated PMMA was increased with increasing ion fluence. The surface hardness was measured by shore D hardness tester and results showed the monotonous increment in surface hardness with increasing ion fluence. The increasing trend of surface hardness and electrical conductivity with increasing Fe ion fluence has been well correlated with the surface morphology of ion implanted PMMA. The temperature rise of PMMA surface due to Fe ion irradiation is evaluated analytically and comes out to be in the range of 1.72 × 104 to 1.82 × 104 K. The values of total Linear Energy Transfer (LET) or stopping power of 0.8 MeV Fe ions in PMMA is 61.8 eV/Å and their range is 1.34 μm evaluated by SRIM simulation.

  1. Effect of charge imbalance parameter on LEKW in ion-implanted quantum semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Sandhya; Yadav, Nishchhal; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    In this study we present an analytical investigation on the propagation characteristics of electro-kinetic wave modified through quantum correction term and charge imbalance parameter using quantum hydrodynamic model for an ion-implanted semiconductor plasma. The dispersion relation has been analyzed in two distinct velocity regimes. We found that as the number of negative charges resides on the colloids increases, their role become increasing effective. The present investigation is important for understanding of wave and instability phenomena and can be put to various interesting applications.

  2. Nitrogen Plasma Ion Implantation of Al and Ti alloys in the High Voltage Glow Discharge Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, R. M.; Ueda, M.; Rossi, J. O.; Reuther, H.; Lepienski, C. M.; Beloto, A. F.

    2006-11-01

    Enhanced surface properties can be attained for aluminum and its alloys (mechanical and tribological) and Ti6Al4V (mainly tribological) by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) technique. The main problem here, more severe for Al case, is the rapid oxygen contamination even in low O partial pressure. High energy nitrogen ions during PIII are demanded for this situation, in order to enable the ions to pass through the formed oxide layer. We have developed a PIII system that can operate at energies in excess of 50keV, using a Stacked Blumlein (SB) pulser which can nominally provide up to 100 kV pulses. Initially, we are using this system in the High Voltage Glow Discharge (HVGD) mode, to implant nitrogen ions into Al5052 alloy with energies in the range of 30 to 50keV, with 1.5μs duration pulses at a repetition rate of 100Hz. AES, pin-on-disc, nanoindentation measurements are under way but x-ray diffraction results already indicated abundant formation of AlN in the surface for Al5052 treated with this HVGD mode. Our major aim in this PIII experiment is to achieve this difficult to produce stable and highly reliable AlN rich surface layer with high hardness, high corrosion resistance and very low wear rate.

  3. Novel plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition hardware and technique based on high power pulsed magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhongzhen; Tian Xiubo; Shi Jingwei; Wang Zeming; Gong Chunzhi; Yang Shiqin; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-03-15

    A novel plasma immersion ion implantation technique based on high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) discharge that can produce a high density metal plasma is described. The metal plasma is clean and does not suffer from contamination from macroparticles, and the process can be readily scaled up for industrial production. The hardware, working principle, and operation modes are described. A matching circuit is developed to modulate the high-voltage and HPPMS pulses to enable operation under different modes such as simultaneous implantation and deposition, pure implantation, and selective implantation. To demonstrate the efficacy of the system and technique, CrN films with a smooth and dense surface without macroparticles were produced. An excellent adhesion with a critical load of 59.9 N is achieved for the pure implantation mode.

  4. Ta-ion implantation induced by a high-intensity laser for plasma diagnostics and target preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Malinsky, P.; Mackova, A.; Matousek, J.; Torrisi, L.; Slepicka, P.; Ullschmied, J.

    2015-12-01

    The present work is focused on the implantation of Ta ions into silicon substrates covered by a silicon dioxide layer 50-300 nm thick. The implantation is achieved using sub-nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (1015 W/cm2) with the objective of accelerating non-equilibrium plasma ions. The accelerated Ta ions are implanted into the exposed silicon substrates at energies of approximately 20 keV per charge state. By changing a few variables in the laser pulse, it is possible to control the kinetic energy, the yield and the angular distribution of the emitted ions. Rutherford Back-Scattering analysis was performed using 2.0 MeV He+ as the probe ions to determine the elemental depth profiles and the chemical composition of the laser-implanted substrates. The depth distributions of the implanted Ta ions were compared to SRIM 2012 simulations. The evaluated results of energy distribution were compared with online techniques, such as Ion Collectors (IC) and an Ion Energy Analyser (IEA), for a detailed identification of the produced ion species and their energy-to-charge ratios (M/z). Moreover, XPS (X-ray Photon Spectroscopy) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) analyses were carried out to obtain information on the surface morphology and the chemical composition of the modified implanted layers, as these features are important for further application of such structures.

  5. Plasma analysis for the plasma immersion ion implantation processing by a PIC-MCC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Y.; Ikeyama, M.; Miyagawa, S.; Tanaka, M.; Nakadate, H.

    2007-07-01

    In order to analyze the plasma behavior during PIII processing, a computer simulation has been carried out using the simulation software "PEGASUS". The software uses a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method for the movement of charged particles in the electromagnetic field and a Monte Carlo method for collisions of ions, electrons, and neutrals in the plasma and also a Monte Carlo method to analyze the background gas behavior for a low density gas system. This approach is based on the weighting collision simulation scheme allowing for disparate number densities of different species. The spatial distributions of potential and densities of ions, electrons and radicals in the coating system were calculated together with the flux of ions and electrons on the surface of the object. The gas pressure was 0.01 to 50 Pa and a negative and/or a positive pulse voltage ( V=0.1 to 20 kV) was applied to the object. The calculation is fully self-consistent. A two-dimensional Cartesian and a cylindrical coordinate system were used. The effects of gas pressure, applied voltage, and secondary electron emission coefficient by ion impact ( γ) on the sheath thickness, the spatial distribution of densities of electron, ion, and neutral atoms, the ion flux and its spatial distribution, etc. were studied for PIII processing of a trench shaped object, inner wall of a pipe and a PET bottle.

  6. Oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation treatment to enhance data retention of tungsten nanocrystal nonvolatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jer-Chyi Chang, Wei-Cheng; Lai, Chao-Sung; Chang, Li-Chun; Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa

    2014-03-15

    Data retention characteristics of tungsten nanocrystal (W-NC) memory devices using an oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment are investigated. With an increase of oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time, the capacitance–voltage hysteresis memory window is increased but the data retention characteristics become degraded. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that this poor data retention is a result of plasma damage on the tunneling oxide layer, which can be prevented by lowering the bias voltage to 7 kV. In addition, by using the elevated temperature retention measurement technique, the effective charge trapping level of the WO{sub 3} film surrounding the W-NCs can be extracted. This measurement reveals that a higher oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time induces more shallow traps within the WO{sub 3} film, degrading the retention behavior of the W-NC memory.

  7. DBR laser with nondynamic plasma grating formed by focused ion beam implanted dopants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boenke, Myra M.; Wu, M. C.; Wang, Shyh; Clark, William M., Jr.; Stevens, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    A static plasma grating has been demonstrated experimentally (Wu et al., 1988) in a large-optical-cavity focused-ion-beam-distributed-Bragg-reflector (FIB-DBR) GaAlAs/GaAs laser diode. The grating is formed by implanting stripes of dopants with a focused ion beam. The dopants ionize to form periodic fluctuations in the carrier concentration which, through the Kramers-Kronig relations, form an index grating. A model of the grating strength for optimizaton of the laser design is developed and presented. The computed results show that the coupling coefficient k can be increased by more than an order of magnitude over the 15/cm experimentally. Therefore, FIB-DBR or FIB-distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers with performance comparable to that of conventional DBR (or DFB) lasers can be expected.

  8. Boron doping to diamond and DLC using plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Ikegami, T.; Grotjohn; Reinhard, D.; Asmussen, J.

    1997-12-31

    Controlling carriers in diamond by doping is important to realize diamond electronic devices with advanced electrical characteristics. As a doping method the Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) has been gathering attention due to its excellence in making shallow, highly doped regions over large areas, and its high dose rate, good dose controllability and isotropic doping properties. The authors have begun to investigate boron doping of diamond, silicon and diamond-like carbon films using PIII. As a doping source they use the plasma sputtering of a solid boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) target instead of toxic gas source like diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}). The B{sub 4}C target of 1-in. diameter and a substrate (Si, diamond or diamond-like carbon film) are located in the downtown region of an ECR plasma produced by the microwave plasma disc reactor (MPDR) filled with 1--5 mTorr Ar gas. In order to sputter the target a negative self bias from {minus}400V to {minus}700V is induced by applying RF (13.56 MHz) power of 50--200W to the target holder. For boron ion implantation, negative pulses of {minus}1kV to {minus}8kV, 1--5{micro}s pulse duration, 1--200Hz repetition rate are applied to the substrate holder using a voltage pulser which consists of high voltage capacitors and MOSFETs. After thermal treatment of the doped materials their electrical resistivity are measured using the four-probe method. Details of both the PIII source and substrate doping experimental results are shown at the meeting.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Plasma Immersion Ion Implanted PEEK for Bioactivation of Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Wakelin, Edgar A; Fathi, Ali; Kracica, Masturina; Yeo, Giselle C; Wise, Steven G; Weiss, Anthony S; McCulloch, Dougal G; Dehghani, Fariba; Mckenzie, David R; Bilek, Marcela M M

    2015-10-21

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is used to modify the surface properties of polyether ether ketone for biomedical applications. Modifications to the mechanical and chemical properties are characterized as a function of ion fluence (treatment time) to determine the suitability of the treated surfaces for biological applications. Young's modulus and elastic recovery were found to increase with respect to treatment time at the surface from 4.4 to 5.2 MPa and from 0.49 to 0.68, respectively. The mechanical properties varied continuously with depth, forming a graded layer where the mechanical properties returned to untreated values deep within the layer. The treated surface layer exhibited cracking under cyclical loads, associated with an increased modulus due to dehydrogenation and cross-linking; however, it did not show any sign of delamination, indicating that the modified layer is well integrated with the substrate, a critical factor for bioactive surface coatings. The oxygen concentration remained unchanged at the surface; however, in contrast to ion implanted polymers containing only carbon and hydrogen, the oxygen concentration within the treated layer was found to decrease. This effect is attributed to UV exposure and suggests that PIII treatments can modify the surface to far greater depths than previously reported. Protein immobilization on PIII treated surfaces was found to be independent of treatment time, indicating that the surface mechanical properties can be tuned for specific applications without affecting the protein coverage. Our findings on the mechanical properties demonstrate such treatments render PEEK well suited for use in orthopedic implantable devices. PMID:26366514

  10. Bio-functionalisation of polyether ether ketone using plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakelin, Edgar; Yeo, Giselle; Kondyurin, Alexey; Davies, Michael; McKenzie, David; Weiss, Anthony; Bilek, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is used here to improve the surface bioactivity of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) by modifying the chemical and mechanical properties and by introducing radicals. Modifications to the chemical and mechanical properties are characterised as a function of ion fluence (proportional to treatment time) to determine the suitability of the treated surfaces for biological applications. Radical generation increases with treatment time, where treatments greater than 400 seconds result in a high concentration of long-lived radicals. Radical reactions are responsible for oxidation of the surface, resulting in a permanent increase in the polar surface energy. The nano-scale reduced modulus was found to increase with treatment time at the surface from 4.4 to 5.2 GPa. The macromolecular Young's modulus was also found to increase, but by an amount corresponding to the volume fraction of the ion implanted region. The treated surface layer exhibited cracking under cyclical loads, associated with an increased modulus due to dehydrogenation and crosslinking, however it did not show any sign of delamination, indicating that the modified layer is well integrated with the substrate - a critical factor for bioactive surface coatings to be used in-vivo. Protein immobilisation on the PIII treated surfaces was found to saturate after 240 seconds of treatment, indicating that there is room to tune surface mechanical properties for specific applications without affecting the protein coverage. Our findings indicate that the modification of the chemical and mechanical properties by PIII treatments as well as the introduction of radicals render PEEK well suited for use in orthopaedic implantable devices.

  11. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, M.; Takagi, T.

    2002-05-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (~10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%.

  12. Enhanced osteoblast responses to poly ether ether ketone surface modified by water plasma immersion ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heying; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) offers a set of characteristics superior for human implants; however, its application is limited by the bio-inert surface property. In this work, PEEK surface was modified using single step plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment with a gas mixture of water vapor as a plasma resource and argon as an ionization assistant. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the microstructure and composition of the modified PEEK surface. The water contact angle and zeta-potential of the surfaces were also measured. Osteoblast precursor cells MC3T3-E1 and rat bone mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on the PEEK samples to evaluate their cytocompatibility. The obtained results show that the hydroxyl groups as well as a "ravined structure" are constructed on water PIII modified PEEK. Compared with pristine PEEK, the water PIII treated PEEK is more favorable for osteoblast adhesion, spreading and proliferation, besides, early osteogenic differentiation indicated by the alkaline phosphatase activity is also up-regulated. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblast responses to the PEEK surface modified by water PIII, which gives positive information in terms of future biomedical applications. PMID:24632035

  13. Adherent diamond like carbon coatings on metals via plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on various materials. Many of these techniques use metallic interlayers, such as Ti or Si, to improve the adhesion of a DLC coating to a ferrous substrate. An alternative processing route would be to use plasma source ion implantation (PSII) to create a carbon composition gradient in the surface of the ferrous material to serve as the interface for a DLC coating. The need for interlayer deposition is eliminated by using a such a graded interfaces PSII approach has been used to form adherent DLC coatings on magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, brass, nickel, and tungsten. A PSII process tailored to create a graded interface allows deposition of adherent DLC coatings even on metals that exhibit a positive heat of formation with carbon, such as magnesium, iron, brass and nickel.

  14. Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition of DLC coating for modification of orthodontic magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarat, W.; Sarapirom, S.; Aukkaravittayapun, S.; Jotikasthira, D.; Boonyawan, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    This study was aimed to use the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) technique to form diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films on orthodontic magnets to solve the corrosion problem. To search for the optimal material modification effect, PIII-D conditions including gases, processing time, and pulsing mode were varied. The formation of DLC films was confirmed and characterized with Raman spectra. The intensity of the remnant magnetic field of the magnets and the hardness, adhesion and thickness of the thin films were then measured. A corrosion test was carried out using clinic dental fluid. Improved benefits including a satisfying hardness, adhesion, remnant magnetic strength and corrosion resistance of the DLC coating could be achieved by using a higher interrupting time ratio and shorter processing time.

  15. New method of plasma immersion ion implantation and also deposition of industrial components using tubular fixture and plasma generated inside the tube by high voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Mario; Silva, Ataide Ribeiro da; Pillaca, Elver J. D. M.; Mariano, Samantha F. M.; Oliveira, Rogério de Moraes; Rossi, José Osvaldo; Lepienski, Carlos Mauricio; Pichon, Luc

    2016-01-01

    A new method of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) and deposition (PIII and D) for treating industrial components in the batch mode has been developed. A metal tubular fixture is used to allocate the components inside, around, and along the tube, exposing only the parts of each component that are to be ion implanted to the plasma. Hollow cathode-like plasma is generated only inside the tube filled with the desired gas, by applying high negative voltage pulses to the hollow cylindrical fixture which is insulated from the vacuum chamber walls. This is a very convenient method of batch processing of industrial parts by ion implantation, in which a large number of small to medium sized components can be treated by PIII and PIII and D, very quickly, efficiently, and also at low cost.

  16. New method of plasma immersion ion implantation and also deposition of industrial components using tubular fixture and plasma generated inside the tube by high voltage pulses.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mario; da Silva, Ataide Ribeiro; Pillaca, Elver J D M; Mariano, Samantha F M; Oliveira, Rogério de Moraes; Rossi, José Osvaldo; Lepienski, Carlos Mauricio; Pichon, Luc

    2016-01-01

    A new method of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) and deposition (PIII and D) for treating industrial components in the batch mode has been developed. A metal tubular fixture is used to allocate the components inside, around, and along the tube, exposing only the parts of each component that are to be ion implanted to the plasma. Hollow cathode-like plasma is generated only inside the tube filled with the desired gas, by applying high negative voltage pulses to the hollow cylindrical fixture which is insulated from the vacuum chamber walls. This is a very convenient method of batch processing of industrial parts by ion implantation, in which a large number of small to medium sized components can be treated by PIII and PIII and D, very quickly, efficiently, and also at low cost. PMID:26827328

  17. The effect of ion implantation on the oxidation resistance of vacuum plasma sprayed CoNiCrAlY coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Zhao, Huayu; Zhou, Xiaming; Tao, Shunyan; Ding, Chuanxian

    2012-11-01

    CoNiCrAlY coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) were implanted with Nb and Al ions at a fluence of 1017 atoms/cm2. The effects of ion implantation on the oxidation resistance of CoNiCrAlY coatings were investigated. The thermally grown oxide (TGO) formed on each specimen was characterized by XRD, SEM and EDS, respectively. The results showed that the oxidation process of CoNiCrAlY coatings could be divided into four stages and the key to obtaining good oxidation resistance was to remain high enough amount of Al and promote the lateral growth of TGO. The implantation of Nb resulted in the formation of continuous and dense Al2O3 scale to improve the oxidation resistance. The Al implanted coating could form Al2O3 scale at the initial stage, however, the scale was soon broken and TGO transformed to non-protective spinel.

  18. A hybrid model for simulation of secondary electron emission in plasma immersion ion implantation under different pulse rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Navab Safa, N. Ghomi, H.

    2015-02-15

    A hybrid fluid Particle in Cell–Monte Carlo Collision (PiC–MCC) model is presented to study the effect of secondary electron emission on the plasma immersion ion implantation process under different pulse rise time. The model describes the temporal evolution of various parameters of plasma such as ion density, ion velocity, secondary electron density, and secondary electron current for different rise times. A 3D–3 V PiC–MCC model is developed to simulate the secondary electrons which are emitted from the sample surface while the plasma ions and electrons are treated using a 1D fluid model. The simulation results indicate that the secondary electron density and secondary electron current increase as the rise time decreases. The main differences between the results for different rise times are found during the initial phase of the pulse. The results are explained through studying the fundamental parameters of plasma.

  19. Surface modification of biomaterials using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tao; Qiao, Yuqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2012-01-01

    Although remarkable progress has been made on biomaterial research, the ideal biomaterial that satisfies all the technical requirements and biological functions is not available up to now. Surface modification seems to be a more economic and efficient way to adjust existing conventional biomaterials to meet the current and ever-evolving clinical needs. From an industrial perspective, plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) is an attractive method for biomaterials owing to its capability of treating objects with irregular shapes, as well as the control of coating composition. It is well acknowledged that the physico-chemical characteristics of biomaterials are the decisive factors greatly affecting the biological responses of biomaterials including bioactivity, haemocompatibility and antibacterial activity. Here, we mainly review the recent advances in surface modification of biomaterials via PIII&D technology, especially titanium alloys and polymers used for orthopaedic, dental and cardiovascular implants. Moreover, the variations of biological performances depending on the physico-chemical properties of modified biomaterials will be discussed. PMID:23741609

  20. Plasma-based ion implantation: a valuable technology for the elaboration of innovative materials and nanostructured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vempaire, D.; Pelletier, J.; Lacoste, A.; Béchu, S.; Sirou, J.; Miraglia, S.; Fruchart, D.

    2005-05-01

    Plasma-based ion implantation (PBII), invented in 1987, can now be considered as a mature technology for thin film modification. After a brief recapitulation of the principle and physics of PBII, its advantages and disadvantages, as compared to conventional ion beam implantation, are listed and discussed. The elaboration of thin films and the modification of their functional properties by PBII have already been achieved in many fields, such as microelectronics (plasma doping/PLAD), biomaterials (surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible materials), plastics (grafting, surface adhesion) and metallurgy (hard coatings, tribology), to name a few. The major advantages of PBII processing lie, on the one hand, in its flexibility in terms of ion implantation energy (from 0 to 100 keV) and operating conditions (plasma density, collisional or non-collisional ion sheath), and, on the other hand, in the easy transferrability of processes from the laboratory to industry. The possibility of modifying the composition and physical nature of the films, or of drastically changing their physical properties over several orders of magnitude makes this technology very attractive for the elaboration of innovative materials, including metastable materials, and the realization of micro- or nanostructures. A review of the state of the art in these domains is presented and illustrated through a few selected examples. The perspectives opened up by PBII processing, as well as its limitations, are discussed.

  1. Performance improvement of gadolinium oxide resistive random access memory treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jer-Chyi Hsu, Chih-Hsien; Ye, Yu-Ren; Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa

    2014-03-15

    Characteristics improvement of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub x}O{sub y}) resistive random access memories (RRAMs) treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was investigated. With the hydrogen PIII treatment, the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs exhibited low set/reset voltages and a high resistance ratio, which were attributed to the enhanced movement of oxygen ions within the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} films and the increased Schottky barrier height at Pt/Gd{sub x}O{sub y} interface, respectively. The resistive switching mechanism of Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs was dominated by Schottky emission, as proved by the area dependence of the resistance in the low resistance state. After the hydrogen PIII treatment, a retention time of more than 10{sup 4} s was achieved at an elevated measurement temperature. In addition, a stable cycling endurance with the resistance ratio of more than three orders of magnitude of the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs can be obtained.

  2. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation Applied To N+P Junction Realisation In 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottaviani, Laurent; Biondo, Stéphane; Daineche, Rachid; Palais, Olivier; Milesi, Frédéric; Duchaine, Julian; Torregrosa, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process giving rise to Nitrogen introduction into SiC p-type epitaxial layers. Standard ion implantation and PULSION™ processes are performed at two distinct energies (700 eV and 7 keV), followed by an annealing at 1600 °C in a furnace specifically adapted to SiC material, aiming at creating thin n+p junctions. The doping profiles issued from the implantations show an important channeling effect for all samples. Surface roughness and Nitrogen activation after annealing are studied using AFM and Micro-Four Point Probe means, respectively. A better surface morphology is found on plasma-implanted samples, with a higher sheet resistance (in comparison with standard samples) which could either be related to a lower implanted dose and/or to a lower dopant activation.

  3. Physics of Plasma-Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID)and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS): A Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2007-08-28

    The emerging technology of High Power Impulse MagnetronSputtering (HIPIMS) has much in common with the more establishedtechnology of Plasma Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID):both use pulsed plasmas, the pulsed sheath periodically evolves andcollapses, the plasma-sheath system interacts with the pulse-drivingpower supply, the plasma parameters are affected by the power dissipated,surface atoms are sputtered and secondary electrons are emitted, etc.Therefore, both fields of science and technology could learn from eachother, which has not been fully explored. On the other hand, there aresignificant differences, too. Most importantly, the operation of HIPIMSheavilyrelies on the presence of a strong magnetic field, confiningelectrons and causing their ExB drift, which is closed for typicalmagnetron configurations. Second, at the high peak power levels used forHIPIMS, 1 kW/cm2 or greater averaged over the target area, the sputteredmaterial greatly affects plasma generation. For PBIID, in contrast,plasma generation and ion processing of the surface (ion implantation,etching, and deposition) are considered rela-tively independentprocesses. Third, secondary electron emission is generally considered anuisance for PBIID, especially at high voltages, whereas it is a criticalingredient to the operation of HIPIMS. Fourth, the voltages in PBIID areoften higher than in HIPIMS. For the first three reasons listed above,modelling of PBIID seems to be easier and could give some guidance forfuture HIPIMS models, which, clearly, will be more involved.

  4. Surface modification of NiTi by plasma based ion implantation for application in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, R. M.; Fernandes, B. B.; Carreri, F. C.; Gonçalves, J. A. N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, M. M. N. F.; Silva, M. M.; Pichon, L.; Camargo, E. N.; Otubo, J.

    2012-12-01

    The substitution of conventional components for NiTi in distinct devices such as actuators, valves, connectors, stents, orthodontic arc-wires, e.g., usually demands some kind of treatment to be performed on the surface of the alloy. A typical case is of biomaterials made of NiTi, in which the main drawback is the Ni out-diffusion, an issue that has been satisfactorily addressed by plasma based ion implantation (PBII). Even though PBII can tailor selective surface properties of diverse materials, usually, only thin modified layers are attained. When NiTi alloys are to be used in the harsh space environment, as is the case of devices designed to remotely release the solar panels and antenna arrays of satellites, e.g., superior mechanical and tribological properties are demanded. For this case the thickness of the modified layer must be larger than the one commonly achieved by conventional PBII. In this paper, new nitrogen PBII set up was used to treat samples of NiTi in moderate temperature of 450 °C, with negative voltage pulses of 7 kV/250 Hz/20 μs, in a process lasting 1 h. A rich nitrogen atomic concentration of 85 at.% was achieved on the near surface and nitrogen diffused at least for 11 μm depth. Tribological properties as well as corrosion resistance were evaluated.

  5. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-09-24

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

  6. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

  7. Effects of long pulse width and high pulsing frequency on surface superhydrophobicity of polytetrafluoroethylene in quasi-direct-current plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Wang Huaiyu; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Zhang Yumei

    2009-03-01

    Long pulse, high frequency quasi-direct-current (dc) oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is utilized to create a superhydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface with a water contact angle of over 150 deg. This technique allows the use of a high duty cycle without deleterious effects such as extensive sample heating encountered in conventional PIII. Scanning electron microscopy images review submicrometer-nanometer structures on the PTFE surface after long pulse, high frequency PIII indicative of ion implantation. On the other hand, plasma modification is the dominant effect in short pulse, low frequency PIII. Quasi-dc PIII is demonstrated to offer adjustable synergistic plasma and ion beam effects.

  8. Structural phase states in nickel-titanium surface layers doped with silicon by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, Oleg A.; Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.; Krukovsky, Konstantin V.; Ostapenko, Marina G.; Neiman, Alexey A.; Borisov, Dmitry P.

    2015-10-01

    The paper reports on a study of NiTi-based alloys used for manufacturing self-expanding intravascular stents to elucidate how the technological modes of plasma immersion ion implantation with silicon influence the chemical and phase composition of their surface layers. It is shown that two types of surface structure can be obtained depending on the mode of plasma immersion implantation: quasi-amorphous Si coating and Si-doped surface layer. The Si-doped surface layer contains new phases: a phase structured as the main B2 phase of NiTi but with a lower lattice parameter, R phase, and phase of highly dispersed SiO2 precipitates.

  9. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO{sub 2} layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M.; Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F.; Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E.; Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A.

    2013-12-16

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO{sub 2} films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories.

  10. Ion implantation into concave polymer surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakudo, N.; Shinohara, T.; Amaya, S.; Endo, H.; Okuji, S.; Ikenaga, N.

    2006-01-01

    A new technique for ion implantation into concave surface of insulating materials is proposed and experimentally studied. The principle is roughly described by referring to modifying inner surface of a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottle. An electrode that is supplied with positive high-voltage pulses is inserted into the bottle. Both plasma formation and ion implantation are simultaneously realized by the same high-voltage pulses. Ion sheath with a certain thickness that depends on plasma parameters is formed just on the inner surface of the bottle. Since the plasma potential is very close to that of the electrode, ions from the plasma are accelerated in the sheath and implanted perpendicularly into the bottle's inner surface. Laser Raman spectroscopy shows that the inner surface of an ion-implanted PET bottle is modified into DLC (diamond-like carbon). Gas permeation measurement shows that gas-barrier property enhances due to the modification.

  11. The structure and tribological properties of gradient layers prepared by plasma-based ion implantation on 2024 Al alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J. X.; Xia, L. F.; Sun, M. R.; Liu, W. M.; Xu, T.; Xue, Q. J.

    2004-02-01

    Using plasma-based ion implantation, two types of gradient layers have been prepared on 2024 Al alloy. One is prepared by N-implantation then C-deposition, the other adds an interlayer composed of a Ti layer and a Ti-N layer between N-implantation and C-deposition. C-deposition is carried out at various implanting voltages or C2H2/H2 ratios. The composition depth profiles of these layers were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The structure, morphologies and microstructure of the C layers were studied using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The surface hardness was measured with a Knoop tester and a mechanical property microprobe. The dry ball-on-disc wear tests were performed in ambient air. The gradient layer without interlayer is composed of an N-implanted layer rich in AlN and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) layer (film), and the two layers are connected with a C-Al transition layer containing Al4C3. The Ti layer rich in agr -Ti and the N-implanted layer are connected by a Ti-Al transition layer containing TiAl3, while the Ti-N layer rich in TiN and the DLC film are connected by a C-Ti transition layer containing TiC, TiCN, etc. Thus, the gradient layer with interlayers has optimized the gradient structure. DLC films are compact and amorphous, contain high sp3/sp2 ratios and depend on the implanting voltage and the C2H2/H2 ratio. Similarly, these gradient layers exhibit significant improvement in morphologies, surface hardness and tribological properties; the interlayer, the implanting voltage and the C2H2/H2 ratio all have prominent effects on these properties.

  12. dc field-emission analysis of GaAs and plasma-source ion-implanted stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hernandez; T. Wang; T. Siggins; D. Bullard; H. F. Dylla; C. Reece; N. D. Theodore; D. M. Manos

    2003-06-01

    Field-emission studies have been performed on a GaAs wafer and a sample of its stainless-steel (SS) support electrode that are part of a photocathode gun for the 10 kW Upgrade infrared free electron laser at Jefferson Lab. The objective of the studies presented here is to characterize the effect of both the cleanliness of the wafer and the plasma-source ion-implanted layer on the electrode to suppress field emission. Field emission is the limiting factor to achieve the required 6 MV/m at the surface of the wafer. Potential field emitters are first located on the surface of 1 in. diameter samples with a dc scanning field-emission microscope at 60 MV/m, then each emitter is characterized in a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The GaAs wafer was hydrogen cleaned before the study. The results show three emitters caused by indium contamination during wafer handling. The GaAs wafer thus shows good high-voltage characteristics and the need to maintain cleanliness during handling. The SS sample is hand polished with diamond paste to a 1-m surface finish, then implanted with N2/SiO2 in a plasma-source ion-implantation chamber in preparation for the field-emission studies.

  13. Dispersion and absorption of longitudinal electro-kinetic wave in ion-implanted GaN semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Dilip; Sharma, Giriraj; Saxena, Ajay; Jadhav, Akhilesh

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study on propagation characteristics of longitudinal electro-kinetic (LEK) waves is presented. Based on multi-fluid model of plasma, we have derived a dispersion relation for LEK waves in colloid laden GaN semiconductor plasmas. It is assumed that ions are implanted to form colloids in the GaN sample. The colloids are continuously bombarded by the plasma particles and stick on them, but they acquire a net negative charge due to relatively higher mobility of electrons. It is found from the dispersion relation that the presence of charged colloids not only modifies the existing modes but also supports new novel modes of LEKWs. It is hoped that the study would enhance understanding on dispersion and absorption of LEKWs and help in singling out the appropriate configurations in which GaN crystal would be better suited for fabrication of microwave devices.

  14. Revealing the surface origin of green band emission from ZnO nanostructures by plasma immersion ion implantation induced quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Sun, X. W.; Tay, B. K.; Cao, Peter H. T.; Wang, J. X.; Zhang, X. H.

    2008-03-15

    Surface defect passivation for ZnO nanocombs (NCBs), random nanowires (RNWs), and aligned nanowires (ANWs) was performed through a metal plasma immersion ion implantation with low bias voltages ranging from 0 to 10 kV, where Ni was used as the modification ion. The depth of surface-originated green band (GB) emission is thus probed, revealing the surface origin of the GB. It is also found that the GB is closely related to oxygen gas content during growth of the nanostructures. The GB origin of NCBs and RNWs grown with higher oxygen content is shallower ({approx}0.5 nm), which can be completely quenched with no bias applied. However, the GB origin of ANWs grown at lower oxygen content is much deeper ({approx}7 nm) with a complete quenching bias of 10 kV. Quenching of the GB can be attributed to passivation of the surface hole or electron trapping sites (oxygen vacancies) by Ni ions.

  15. Cell adhesion and growth on surfaces modified by plasma and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, W. W. R.; Teixeira, F. S.; da Silva, G. N.; Salvadori, D. M. F.; Salvadori, M. C.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we show and discuss the results of the interaction of living CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary) cells, in terms of adhesion and growth on glass, SU-8 (epoxi photoresist), PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and DLC (hydrogen free diamond-like carbon) surfaces. Glass, SU-8, and DLC but not PDMS showed to be good surfaces for cell growth. DLC surfaces were treated by oxygen plasma (DLC-O) and sulfur hexafluoride plasma (DLC-F). After 24 h of cell culture, the number of cells on DLC-O was higher than on DLC-F surface. SU-8 with silver implanted, creating nanoparticles 12 nm below the surface, increased significantly the number of cells per unit area.

  16. Plasma immersion ion implantation: A viable candidate for low cost purification of mc-Si by nanocavities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouadri-boudjelthia, E.-A.; Ntsoenzok, E.; Benoit, R.; Regula, G.; Etienne, H.; Michel, T.; Ashok, S.

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost purification technique was evaluated on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si). It consists of an efficient impurity trapping process involving nanocavities created by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The study consisted of assessing (i) the creation of nanocavities by PIII and (ii) their ability to trap impurities in real conditions (without intentional contamination). Square pieces of p-type mc-Si samples, having a surface of 4 cm2 were used. They were implanted with hydrogen by PIII at 20 kV with a fluence of 5 × 1016 cm-2 and then annealed for 30 min, in the temperature range 673-1273 K. The evolution of shape, size and spatial distribution of nanocavities was studied by transmission electron microscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry in order to check both the formation of cavities and to test their ability to getter impurities by either precipitation or chemisorption. Results reveal surprisingly that, despite the triangular as-implanted H profile, nanocavities can be created by H-PIII, evidently because of the multi-energetic and high flux implantation (about 8 × 1013 cm-2 s-1, 40-80 times greater than in conventional implantation) and that they are able to trap various impurities, initially present in mc-Si, such as Fe, Cu and Ni (according to their Gibbs energy), competing with the many existing gettering sites available in mc-Si, such as Si-related precipitates (oxygen, carbon, nitrogen or metal silicides), dislocations and grain boundaries. The area containing the biggest cavities have the highest density of gettering sites, especially for Cu, which can be trapped either by chemisorption (since it has higher binding energy with cavities) or by Cu3Si precipitation since the corresponding volume expansion can be damped by surrounding cavities.

  17. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosobrodova, E.; Kondyurin, A.; Chrzanowski, W.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2014-06-01

    At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of Cdbnd O bonds and much lower concentration of O-H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered island-like structure were observed.

  18. Blood compatibility of titanium-based coatings prepared by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, I.; Maitz, M. F.; Wieser, E.

    2004-07-01

    Titanium with its natural oxide is known to be generally good biocompatible; and therefore, the suitability of some Ti-based coatings as coating for blood-contacting implants is analyzed. Layers of pure Ti, Ti oxynitrides (TiN 1- xO x with x=0.25, 0.50, and 0.75), and Ti oxides were deposited on oxidized Si from a plasma produced by cathodic arc evaporation under addition of N 2 and/or O 2 to the ambient near the substrate. The oxynitrides are crystalline with the fcc structure of TiN up to x=0.25. For x=0.5, a two-phase system of fcc TiN and fcc TiO has been found. In dependence on the deposition parameters, amorphous and crystalline layers (anatase + brookite or rutile) of TiO 2 have been obtained. The rutile layers were doped by implantation of P. The amorphous TiO 2 layers were implanted with Cr. To study the correlation between structure of the coating and blood compatibility, the clotting time of blood plasma as well as the adhesion and activation of blood platelets on the surface was investigated. TiN and oxynitrides showed the longest clotting time compared to rutile. Minimum platelet adhesion has been observed for pure TiO 2. Contrasting tendencies in the dependence of clotting time and platelet adhesion on the microstructure have been stated. However, for P +-doped rutile, both enhanced clotting time and improved platelet adhesion were observed. Platelet adherence and activation always showed similar trends.

  19. Improving the corrosion resistance of nitinol by plasma-immersion ion implantation with silicon for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramova, P. V.; Korshunov, A. V.; Lotkov, A. I.; Kashin, O. A.; Borisov, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic polarization have been applied to study electrochemical behavior and to determine corrosion resistance of nitinol, which surface was modified with silicon using plasma-immersion ion implantation, in 0.9 % NaCl solution and in artificial blood plasma. It was found out that continuous, and also homogeneous in composition thin Si-containing layers are resistant to corrosion damage at high positive potentials in artificial physiological solutions due to formation of stable passive films. Breakdown potential Eb of Si-modified NiTi depends on the character of silicon and Ni distribution at the alloy surface, Eb values amounted to 0.9-1.5 V (Ag/AgCl/KCl sat.) for the alloy samples with continuous Si-containing surface layers and with decreased Ni surface concentration.

  20. Effects of magnetic field on pulse wave forms in plasma immersion ion implantation in a radio-frequency, inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Honghui; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Tang, Deli; Zeng, Xuchu; Chu, Paul K.

    2002-09-01

    The time-dependent current wave forms measured using a pulse biased planar electrode in hydrogen radio-frequency (rf), inductively coupled plasma, plasma immersion ion implantation experiments are observed to vary in the presence of an external magnetic field B. Results further indicate that the magnitude of the pulse current is related to the strength and direction of the magnetic field, rf power, and pressure, but the pulse current curves can be primarily correlated with B. The plasma discharges are enhanced in all cases due to magnetic confinement of the electrons, enlargement of the plasma generation volume, and increase in the rf power absorbing efficiency. The plasma density diagnosed by Langmuir probe diminishes in front of the sample chuck with B, whereas the plasma is confined nearby the sidewall of the vacuum chamber at high magnetic field. The high degree of plasma density nonuniformity at high B in front of the sample chuck is not desirable for the processing of planar samples such as silicon wafers and must be compensated. The reduction in the plasma density and plasma density gradient in the sheath can be accounted for by the changes in the pulse current wave forms.

  1. Investigation of plasma immersion ion implantation of nickel-titanium rod by multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Wu, Shuilin; Liu, Xiangmei; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2008-03-01

    A multiple-grid-particle-in-cell numerical method has been developed. This method uses grids of different cell sizes and details are needed in only one part of the simulation region and not others. Hence, there are fewer nodes in the simulation thereby reduced computational time without sacrificing details. In the multiple-grid system, a phenomenon is identified to arise at the interface between two grids and a half-cell weighting method is utilized to solve the weighting issue at the boundary. It is shown that the expression of the change of momentum has no weighting function. This method is employed to numerically simulate the plasma immersion ion implantation process into a nickel titanium rod measuring 50 mm long and 4.8 mm in diameter used in orthopaedic surgery. To conduct more uniform implantation, the NiTi rod is elevated on the sample stage by a metal rod. The nitrogen implantation fluences and depth profiles are simulated and compared to experimental values determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  2. A study of interface and adhesion of c-BN film on Si(1 0 0) modified by nitrogen plasma based ion implantation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Jingze; Zhang Qing; Xia Lifang; Yoon, S.F.; Ahn, J.; Byon, E.S.; Zhou, Q.; Wang, S.G.; Li, J.Q.; Yang, D.J

    2004-06-08

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were deposited on Si substrate with poor adhesion using magnetically enhanced active reaction evaporation (ME-ARE). An attempt has been made to enhance the adhesion strength between c-BN film and substrate by nitrogen plasma based ion implantation (PBII) into c-BN film. Nitrogen ion doses range from 5x10{sup 16} to 1x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2} at an implant voltage of 50 kV. The nitrogen ion implanted c-BN films were analyzed using FTIR, scratch test, and XPS to investigate the change of structure, adhesion strength of c-BN film, and interfacial mixing between the initial turbostratic BN (t-BN) film layer and substrate caused by nitrogen ion implantation. FTIR spectra showed little change of c-BN phase content in the films under the above implantation conditions but XPS depth elemental profile of N{sup +}-implanted boron nitride films displayed a mixed layer consisting of elements from film and substrate formed at interface. A highly optimized dynamic Monte Carlo program TAMIX was used to simulate the PBII process in a good agreement with above measured depth elemental profile. The scratch test showed that the adhesion strength evaluated in terms of the critical load of N{sup +}-implanted c-BN film was 1.4 times higher than that of as deposited c-BM film.

  3. System design and operation of a 100 kilovolt, 2 kilohertz pulse modulator for plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W.A.

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the electrical design and operation of a high power modulator system implemented for the Los Alamos Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) facility. To test the viability of the PSII process for various automotive components, the modulator must accept wide variations of load impedance. Components have varying area and composition which must be processed with different plasmas. Additionally, the load impedance may change by large factors during the typical 20 uS pulse, due to plasma displacement currents and sheath growth. As a preliminary design to test the system viability for automotive component implantation, suitable for a manufacturing environment, circuit topology must be able to directly scale to high power versions, for increased component through-put. We have chosen an evolutionary design approach with component families of characterized performance, which should Ion result in a reliable modulator system with component lifetimes. The modulator utilizes a pair of Litton L-3408 hollow beam amplifier tubes as switching elements in a ``hot-deck`` configuration. Internal to the main of planar triode hot deck, an additional pair decks, configured in a totem pole circuit, provide input drive to the L-3408 mod-anodes. The modulator can output over 2 amps average current (at 100 kV) with 1 kW of modanode drive. Diagnostic electronics monitor the load and stops pulses for 100 mS when a load arcs occur. This paper, in addition to providing detailed engineering design information, will provide operational characteristics and reliability data that direct the design to the higher power, mass production line capable modulators.

  4. An unconventional ion implantation method for producing Au and Si nanostructures using intense laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Mackova, A.; Lavrentiev, V.; Pfeifer, M.; Krousky, E.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes measurements of ion implantation by high-intensity lasers in an innovative configuration. The ion acceleration and implantation were performed using the target normal sheath acceleration regime. Highly ionized charged ions were generated and accelerated by the self-consistent electrostatic accelerating field at the rear side of a directly illuminated foil surface. A sub-nanosecond pulsed laser operating at an intensity of about 1016 W cm-2 was employed to irradiate thin foils containing Au atoms. Multi-energy and multi-species ions with energies of the order of 1 MeV per charge state were implanted on exposed substrates of monocrystalline silicon up to a concentration of about 1% Au atoms in the first superficial layers. The target, laser parameters and irradiation conditions play a decisive role in the dynamic control of the characteristics of the ion beams to be implanted. The ion penetration depth, the depth profile, the integral amount of implanted ions and the concentration-depth profiles were determined by Rutherford back-scattering analysis. Ion implantation produces Si nanocrystals and Au nanoparticles and induces physical and chemical modifications of the implanted surfaces.

  5. Direct coupling of pulsed radio frequency and pulsed high power in novel pulsed power system for plasma immersion ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunzhi; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2008-04-01

    A novel power supply system that directly couples pulsed high voltage (HV) pulses and pulsed 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) has been developed for plasma processes. In this system, the sample holder is connected to both the rf generator and HV modulator. The coupling circuit in the hybrid system is composed of individual matching units, low pass filters, and voltage clamping units. This ensures the safe operation of the rf system even when the HV is on. The PSPICE software is utilized to optimize the design of circuits. The system can be operated in two modes. The pulsed rf discharge may serve as either the seed plasma source for glow discharge or high-density plasma source for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The pulsed high-voltage glow discharge is induced when a rf pulse with a short duration or a larger time interval between the rf and HV pulses is used. Conventional PIII can also be achieved. Experiments conducted on the new system confirm steady and safe operation. PMID:18447526

  6. Haemocompatibility of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Kwok, S. C. H.; Chu, P. K.; Leng, Y. X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, J.; Huang, N.

    2003-05-01

    Diamond-like-carbon has attracted much attention recently as a potential biomaterial in blood contacting biomedical devices. However, previous reports in this area have not adequately addressed the biocompatibility and acceptability of the materials in blood contacting applications. In this study, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were fabricated on silicon wafers (1 0 0) using plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition. A series of a-C:H films with different structures and chemical bonds were fabricated under different substrate voltages. The results indicate that film graphitization is promoted at higher substrate bias. The film deposited at a lower substrate bias of -75 V possesses better blood compatibility than the films at higher bias and stainless steel. Our results suggest two possible paths to improve the blood compatibility, suppression of the endogenic clotting system and reduction of platelet activation.

  7. Tunable transport properties of n-type ZnO nanowires by Ti plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, L.; Zhang, Z.; Yan, B.; Li, G. P.; Wu, T.; Shen, Z. X.; Yu, T.; Yang, Y.; Cao, H. T.; Chen, L. L.; Tay, B. K.; Sun, X. W.

    2008-10-01

    Single-crystalline, transparent conducting ZnO nanowires were obtained simply by Ti plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Electrical transport characterizations demonstrate that the n-type conduction of ZnO nanowire could be tuned by appropriate Ti-PIII. When the energy of PIII is increased, the resistivity of ZnO decreases from 4x10{sup 2} to 3.3x10{sup -3} {omega} cm, indicating a semiconductor-metal transition. The failure-current densities of the metallic ZnO could be up to 2.75x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Therefore, this facile method may provide an inexpensive alternative to tin doped indium oxide as transparent conducting oxide materials.

  8. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  9. Diffusion, trapping, and isotope exchange of plasma implanted deuterium in ion beam damaged tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Joseph Lincoln

    Tritium accumulation in nuclear fusion reactor materials is a major concern for practical and safe fusion energy. This work examines hydrogen isotope exchange as a tritium removal technique, analyzes the effects of neutron damage using high energy copper ion beams, and introduces a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the concentration of trapped atoms. Tungsten samples were irradiated with high energy (0.5 - 5 MeV) copper ions for controlled levels of damage - 10-3 to 10-1 displacements per atom (dpa) - at room temperature. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma at constant temperature (˜ 380 K) to a high fluence of 1024 ions/m2, where retention is at is maximized (i.e. saturated). By then subsequently exposing these samples to fractions of this fluence with hydrogen plasma, isotope exchange rates were observed. The resulting deuterium still trapped in the tungsten is then measured post mortem. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) gives the depth resolved deuterium retention profile with the 3He(D,p) 4He reaction, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) gives the total amount of deuterium trapped in the tungsten by heating a sample in vacuum up to 1200 K and measuring the evaporated gas molecules with a residual gas analyzer. Isotope exchange data show that hydrogen atoms can displace trapped deuterium atoms efficiently only up to the first few microns, but does not affect the atoms trapped at greater depths. In ion damaged tungsten, measurements showed a significant increase in retention in the damage region proportional to dpa 0.66, which results in a significant spike in total retention, and isotope exchange in damaged samples is still ineffective at depths greater than a few microns. Thus, isotope exchange is not an affective tritium removal technique; however, these experiments have shown that trapping in material defects greatly affects diffusion. These experiments lead to a simplified diffusion model with defect densities as the only free

  10. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  11. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  12. Effects of oxygen plasma source ion implantation on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lizhen

    Near-equiatomic NiTi is an important shape memory alloy used in both medical and non-medical applications, which are dependent upon the surface characteristics of NiTi. The work presented here is the first use of plasma source ion implantation with oxygen as the incident species to modify the surface structure of NiTi shape memory alloy. Two levels of voltage bias and three levels of ion dose were employed to investigate the effect of processing parameters on surface microstructure and surface-related properties. Several surface analytical techniques, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), were employed to analyze the effects of the surface modification on surface characteristics including oxide thickness, oxide constitution, phase distribution, morphology and topography. A two-layer surface structure consisting of an oxide layer and a precipitate accommodation layer was observed on modified NiTi. The surface morphology, roughness and hydrophilicity, which are considered to play important roles in affecting protein adsorption behavior, were found to be altered by surface modification. The effects of surface modification on surface-related properties including corrosion resistance, hardness and wear resistance were evaluated by cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests, Knoop hardness microindentation and fretting wear tests, respectively. The optimum corrosion and wear resistance of NiTi were achieved with ion implantation under high bias and moderate dose. Archard's equation was modified by incorporating the pseudoelasticity effect on wear resistance in addition to hardness. The modified Archard's equation better describes the fretting wear resistance of NiTi. A combination of nanoindentation and AES was employed to understand the relationship between mechanical properties and composition of the modified material.

  13. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  14. Formation of amorphous carbon on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) by helium plasma based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, A.; Veres, M.; Kereszturi, K.; Mohai, M.; Bertóti, I.; Szépvölgyi, J.

    2011-08-01

    The surface modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) by helium plasma based ion implantation (He PBII) was studied. The effect of the main process parameters (acceleration voltage, fluence and fluence rate) on the alterations of the surface chemical composition and structure were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. According to SRIM calculations, at ion energies above 2 keV the stopping power of PET for He + ions is dominated by the electronic component and the contribution of the nuclear component is relatively small. Degradation of the ester group and carbonisation were observed by XPS due to elimination of O-rich fragments. The total C-content of the modified layer increased with the increase of fluence rate and acceleration voltage of particles, enabling the purposeful alteration of the surface composition. A strong broadening was detected in the Raman spectrum between 1000 and 1700 cm -1, testifying to the intense formation of amorphous carbon. The area ratio of the D (˜1410 cm -1) to G (˜1570 cm -1) band increased with the increase of particle fluence and the increase of acceleration voltage, offering the possibility of tailoring the chemical structure of the amorphous carbon layer created by the He PBII treatment.

  15. Study rationale and protocol: prospective randomized comparison of metal ion concentrations in the patient's plasma after implantation of coated and uncoated total knee prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Lützner, Jörg; Dinnebier, Gerd; Hartmann, Albrecht; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Kirschner, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Background Any metal placed in a biological environment undergoes corrosion. Thus, with their large metallic surfaces, TKA implants are particularly prone to corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions into the human body which may cause local and systemic toxic effects and hypersensitivity reactions, and increase cancer risk. To address this problem, a new 7-layer zirconium coating developed especially for cobalt-chrome orthopaedic implants was tested biomechanically and found to lower metal ion release. The purpose of the proposed clinical trial is to compare the metal ion concentration in patients' plasma before and after implantation of a coated or uncoated TKA implant. Methods/Design In this randomised controlled trial, 120 patients undergoing primary TKA will be recruited at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of the University Hospital in Dresden, Germany, and randomised to either the coated or uncoated prosthesis. Outcome assessments will be conducted preoperatively and at 3 months, 12 months and 5 years postoperatively. The primary clinical endpoint will be the chromium ion concentration in the patient's plasma after 1 and 5 years. Secondary outcomes include cobalt, molybdenum and nickel ion concentrations after 1 and 5 years, allergy testing for hypersensitivity against one of these metals, the Knee Society Score to assess clinical and physical function of the knee joint, the self-assessment Oxford Score and the Short Form 36 quality of live questionnaire. Discussion The metal ion concentration in the patient's plasma has been shown to increase after TKA, its eventual adverse effects being widely debated. In the light of this discussion, ways to reduce metal ion release from orthopaedic implants should be studied in detail. The results of this investigation may lead to a new method to achieve this goal. Trials register Clinicaltrials registry NCT00862511 PMID:19828019

  16. Metal Ion Sources for Ion Beam Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W. J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Ren, X. T.

    2008-11-03

    In this paper a theme touched upon the progress of metal ion sources devoted to metal ion beam implantation (MIBI) will be reviewed. A special emphasis will be given to some kinds of ion sources such as ECR, MEVVA and Cluster ion sources. A novel dual hollow cathode metal ion source named DUHOCAMIS will be introduced and discussed.

  17. Two-wavelength Raman study of poly(ethylene terephthalate) surfaces modified by helium plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, M.; Tóth, A.; Mohai, M.; Bertóti, I.; Szépvölgyi, J.; Tóth, S.; Himics, L.; Koós, M.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was modified by helium plasma-based ion implantation (He PBII). The untreated and surface modified samples were characterised with optical absorption spectroscopy and two-wavelength micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with 488 nm and 785 nm light sources, allowing to examine the chemical bonding configuration of the surface layers on different depths and by selective enhancement of vibrations of different structural units. Upon treatment, simultaneously with the development of the broad D and G bands, a gradual decrease of the peaks corresponding to the Cdbnd C stretching and Cdbnd O stretching modes were observed with both excitations. Downshifting and broadening were detected for the Cdbnd C peak with both excitations and also for the Cdbnd O peak with the 488 nm excitation due to formation of condensed aromatic rings. Oppositely, upshifting was found with 785 nm excitation for the Cdbnd O peak and especially for its broad shoulder newly developed at the high wavenumber side. The latter feature was assigned to Cdbnd O groups attached to polymer chains without conjugation and the bands behaviour was interpreted by breaking of the Cdbnd C bonds of the polymer, leading to the formation of a crosslinked, disordered and stressed structure with still intact Cdbnd O groups, due to the increased nuclear damage at the end of the ion track.

  18. Bioactivity of plasma implanted biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) is an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification of biomedical materials is described. NiTi alloys have unique super-elastic and shape memory properties and are suitable for orthopedic implants but the leaching of toxic Ni may pose health hazards in humans. We have recently investigated the use of acetylene, oxygen and nitrogen PIII&D to prevent out-diffusion of nickel and good results have been obtained. Silicon is the most important material in the microelectronics industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PIII into silicon to improve the surface bioactivity and observed biomimetic growth of apatite on the surface in simulated body fluids. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness and by incorporation of elements such as nitrogen and phosphorus, the surface blood compatibility can be improved. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results are discussed in this article.

  19. Improved hydrogen ionization rate in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation by enlarging the interaction path using an insulating tube

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhuo; Zhu Ying; Li Liuhe; He Fushun; Dun Dandan; Li Fen; Lu Qiuyuan; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-02-15

    A small pointed hollow anode and large tabular cathode are used in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation (EGD-PIII). Electrons are repelled from the substrate by the electric field formed by the negative voltage pulses and concentrate in the vicinity of the anode to enhance the self-glow discharge process. To extend the application of EGD-PIII to plasma gases with low ionization rates, an insulating tube is used to increase the interaction path for electrons and neutrals in order to enhance the discharge near the anode. Results obtained from numerical simulation based on the particle-in-cell code, finite element method, and experiments show that this configuration enhances the ionization rate and subsequent ion implant fluence. The process is especially suitable for gases that have low ionization rates such as hydrogen and helium.

  20. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  1. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  2. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate.

  3. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J A

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  4. Current transport studies of ZnO/p-Si heterostructures grown by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.D.; Ling, C.C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C.D.; Mei, Y.F.; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Siu, G.G.; Chu, Paul K.

    2006-03-27

    Rectifying undoped and nitrogen-doped ZnO/p-Si heterojunctions were fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The undoped and nitrogen-doped ZnO films were n type (n{approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) and highly resistive (resistivity {approx}10{sup 5} {omega} cm), respectively. While forward biasing the undoped-ZnO/p-Si, the current follows Ohmic behavior if the applied bias V{sub forward} is larger than {approx}0.4 V. However, for the nitrogen-doped-ZnO/p-Si sample, the current is Ohmic for V{sub forward}<1.0 V and then transits to J{approx}V{sup 2} for V{sub forward}>2.5 V. The transport properties of the undoped-ZnO/p-Si and the N-doped-ZnO/p-Si diodes were explained in terms of the Anderson model and the space charge limited current model, respectively.

  5. Residual stress analysis of TiN film fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxi; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Chuanqi; Tang, Baoyin

    2013-02-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) films were fabricated on AISI52100 bearing steel surface employing a hybrid plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) technique. The chemical composition, morphology and microstructure of TiN films were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The residual stress of TiN films under different deposition parameter conditions were measured by means of glazing incidence angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) method. The influence of film thickness and X-ray glazing incidence angle on residual stress were investigated. AFM observation reveals that the TiN films have extremely smooth surface, high uniformity and efficiency of space filling over large areas. XRD analysis results indicate that TiN phase exists in the surface modified layer and exhibits a preferred orientation with the (2 0 0) plane. The GIXRD data shows that the residual stress in as-deposited TiN films is compressive stress, and the residual stress value decreases with the film thickness and increases with the glazing incidence angle. The compressive stress reduces from 2.164 GPa to 1.163 GPa, which corresponds to the film thickness from 1.5 μm to 4.5 μm, respectively. Reasonably selecting PIIID process parameters for TiN films fabrication, the residual stress in the film can be controlled effectively.

  6. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem was meeting commercialization goals did not succeed for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. An additional noteworthy reason for failure to commercialize is the fact that the ion implantation manufacturing industry had been in a very deep bust cycle. BNL, however, has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to the need high charge state ions in some RHIC preinjectors. Since the invention of the transistor, the trend has been to miniaturize semiconductor devices. As semiconductors become smaller (and get miniaturized), ion energy needed for implantation decreases, since shallow implantation is desired. But, due to space charge (intra-ion repulsion) effects, forming and transporting ion beams becomes a rather difficult task. A few small manufacturers of low quality semiconductors use plasma immersion to circumvent the problem. However, in plasma immersion undesired plasma impurity ions are also implanted; hence, the quality of those semiconductors is poor. For high quality miniature semiconductor manufacturing, pure, low energy ion beams are utilized. But, low energy ion implanters are characterized by low current (much lower than desirable) and, therefore, low production rates. Consequently, increasing the current of pure low energy

  7. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shigeki Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2014-02-15

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  8. Plasma-implantation-based surface modification of metals with single-implantation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X. B.; Cui, J. T.; Yang, S. Q.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2004-12-01

    Plasma ion implantation has proven to be an effective surface modification technique. Its biggest advantage is the capability to treat the objects with irregular shapes without complex manipulation of target holder. Many metal materials such as aluminum, stainless steel, tool steel, titanium, magnesium etc, has been treated using this technique to improve their wear-resistance, corrosion-resistance, fatigue-resistance, oxidation-resistance, bio-compatiblity etc. However in order to achieve thicker modified layers, hybrid processes combining plasma ion implantation with other techniques have been frequently employed. In this paper plasma implantation based surface modification of metals using single-implantation mode is reviewed.

  9. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ion implantation of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Emlin, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ion implantation experiments of C, N, and O into stainless steel have been performed, with beam-line and plasma source ion implantation methods. Acceleration voltages were varied between 27 and 50 kV, with pulsed ion current densities between 1 and 10 mA/cm{sup 2}. Implanted doses ranged from 0.5 to 3 {times} 10{sup 18}cm{sup -2}, while workpiece temperatures were maintained between 25 and 800 C. Implant concentration profiles, microstructure, and surface mechanical properties of the implanted materials are reported.

  10. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn0.85Mg0.15O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-01

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on <100> Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000 °C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of <101¯0> and <101¯3> peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the <0002> peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15 K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic exciton-exciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45 eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic exciton-exciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  11. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Murata, H; Kitami, H; Mitsubori, H; Sakuraba, J; Soga, T; Aoki, Y; Katoh, T

    2016-02-01

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P(+) beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P(+) beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH3 gas. PMID:26932118

  12. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Murata, H.; Kitami, H.; Mitsubori, H.; Sakuraba, J.; Soga, T.; Aoki, Y.; Katoh, T.

    2016-02-01

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P+ beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P+ beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH3 gas.

  13. Influence of sputter rate and crystal orientation on the distribution of carbon in polycrystalline copper surfaces treated by plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Flege, S.; Kraft, G.; Bruder, E.; Ensinger, W.; Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    2009-07-15

    The sputter rate influences the resulting thickness of the carbon containing layer within a surface that was treated by plasma immersion ion implantation. Choosing a polycrystalline substrate with rather large crystals and a material with an inherent high sputter rate, inhomogeneous distributions of carbon over the substrate area due to different thicknesses of the incorporated carbon can be detected. A correlation of three factors namely the carbon x-ray intensity in electron probe microanalysis, the thickness of the carbon layer, and the sputter rate in depth profiling measurements via secondary ion mass spectrometry can be shown. Essential for these factors is the crystal orientation that is visualized by mapping via electron backscatter diffraction. The differences in carbon content due to the orientation are most likely one of the reasons that the adhesion of diamond-like carbon films on copper does not improve with an interlayer of implanted carbon.

  14. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  15. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  16. In-situ deposition of sacrificial layers during ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Brown, I.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1995-02-01

    The retained dose of implanted ions is limited by sputtering. It is known that a sacrificial layer deposited prior to ion implantation can lead to an enhanced retained dose. However, a higher ion energy is required to obtain a similar implantation depth due to the stopping of ions in the sacrificial layer. It is desirable to have a sacrificial layer of only a few monolayers thickness which can be renewed after it has been sputtered away. We explain the concept and describe two examples: (i) metal ion implantation using simultaneously a vacuum arc ion source and filtered vacuum arc plasma sources, and (ii) Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID). In MePIIID, the target is immersed in a metal or carbon plasma and a negative, repetitively pulsed bias voltage is applied. Ions are implanted when the bias is applied while the sacrificial layer suffers sputtering. Low-energy thin film deposition - repair of the sacrificial layer -- occurs between bias pulses. No foreign atoms are incorporated into the target since the sacrificial film is made of the same ion species as used in the implantation phase.

  17. Improvements of anti-corrosion and mechanical properties of NiTi orthopedic materials by acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2005-08-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are useful materials in orthopedics and orthodontics due to their unique super-elasticity and shape memory effects. However, the problem associated with the release of harmful Ni ions to human tissues and fluids has been raising safety concern. Hence, it is necessary to produce a surface barrier to impede the out-diffusion of Ni ions from the materials. We have conducted acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) into NiTi alloys in an attempt to improve the surface properties. All the implanted and annealed samples surfaces exhibit outstanding corrosion and Ni out-diffusion resistance. Besides, the implanted layers are mechanically stronger than the substrate underneath. XPS analyses disclose that the layer formed by C2H2 PIII is composed of mainly TiCx with increasing Ti to C concentration ratios towards the bulk. The nitrogen PIII layer is observed to be TiN, whereas the oxygen PIII layer is composed of oxides of Ti4+, Ti3+ and Ti2+.

  18. A novel method for effective sodium ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Qiuyuan; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-07-15

    Although sodium ion implantation is useful to the surface modification of biomaterials and nano-electronic materials, it is a challenging to conduct effective sodium implantation by traditional implantation methods due to its high chemical reactivity. In this paper, we present a novel method by coupling a Na dispenser with plasma immersion ion implantation and radio frequency discharge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling reveals that sodium is effectively implanted into a silicon wafer using this apparatus. The Na 1s XPS spectra disclose Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} bonds and the implantation effects are confirmed by tapping mode atomic force microscopy. Our setup provides a feasible way to conduct sodium ion implantation effectively.

  19. Co(II)-mediated effects of plain and plasma immersion ion implanted cobalt-chromium alloys on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schröck, Kathleen; Lutz, Johanna; Mändl, Stephan; Hacker, Michael C; Kamprad, Manja; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2015-03-01

    Medical CoCr is one of the main alloys used for metal-on-metal prosthesis in patients with total hip arthroplasty. CoCr surfaces modified by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) are characterized by improved wear resistance but also showed increased Co(II) ion release under in vitro conditions. For the first time, CoCr modified by nitrogen PIII was evaluated with regard to its effect on the osteogenic differentiation of MSC. The activity of alkaline phosphatase, the expression of the osteogenic genes Runt-related transcription factor 2, osteopontin as well as integrin-binding bone sialoprotein and the production of osteocalcin and hydroxyapatite were determined. The results of our study demonstrate that Co(II) ions released from the alloy affected the osteogenic differentiation of MSC. Distinct differences in differentiation markers were found between pristine and modified alloys for osteocalcin but not for integrin-binding sialoprotein and hydroxyapatite. Interestingly, osteopontin was upregulated in naive and differentiated MSC by Co(II) ions and modified CoCr, likely through the induction of a cellular hypoxic response. The findings of this study contribute to a better understanding of possible risk factors with regard to a clinical applicability of surface modified CoCr implant materials. PMID:25469667

  20. Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc ion implanted titanium.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guodong; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are widely used as orthopedic and dental implants. In this work, zinc (Zn) was implanted into oxalic acid etched titanium using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the surface morphology and composition of Zn-implanted titanium. The results indicate that the depth profile of zinc in Zn-implanted titanium resembles a Gaussian distribution, and zinc exists in the form of ZnO at the surface whereas in the form of metallic Zn in the interior. The Zn-implanted titanium can significantly stimulate proliferation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as well as initial adhesion, spreading activity, ALP activity, collagen secretion and extracellular matrix mineralization of the rat mesenchymal stem cells. The Zn-implanted titanium presents partly antibacterial effect on both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The ability of the Zn-implanted titanium to stimulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation as well as the antibacterial effect on E. coli can be improved by increasing implantation time even to 2 h in this work, indicating that the content of zinc implanted in titanium can easily be controlled within the safe concentration using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. The Zn-implanted titanium with excellent osteogenic activity and partly antibacterial effect can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic and dental implants. PMID:24632388

  1. Influence of surface modification of nitinol with silicon using plasma-immersion ion implantation on the alloy corrosion resistance in artificial physiological solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, O. A.; Borisov, D. P.; Lotkov, A. I.; Abramova, P. V.; Korshunov, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic polarization have been applied to study electrochemical behavior and to determine corrosion resistance of nitinol, which surface was modified with silicon using plasma-immersion ion implantation, in 0.9% NaCl solution and in artificial blood plasma. It was found out that continuous, and also homogeneous in composition, thin Si-containing layers are resistant to corrosion damage at high positive potentials in artificial physiological solutions due to formation of stable passive films. Breakdown potential Eb of Si-modified NiTi depends on the character of silicon and Ni distribution at the alloy surface, Eb values amounted to 0.9-1.5 V (Ag/AgCl/KCl sat.) for the alloy samples with continuous Si-containing surface layers and with decreased Ni surface concentration.

  2. Contamination Control in Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, R.; Doi, D.; Santos, I.; Wriggins, W.

    2011-01-07

    The investigation and elimination or control of metallic contamination in ion implanters has been a leading, continuous effort at implanter OEMs and in fabs/IDMs alike. Much of the efforts have been in the area of control of sputtering through material and geometry changes in apertures, beamline and target chamber components. In this paper, we will focus on an area that has not, heretofore, been fully investigated or controlled. This is the area of lubricants and internal and external support material such as selected cleaning media. Some of these materials are designated for internal use (beamline/vacuum) only while others are for internal and/or external use. Many applications for selected greases, for example, are designated for or are used for platens, implant disks/wheels and for wafer handling components. We will present data from popular lubricants (to be unnamed) used worldwide in ion implanters. This paper will review elements of concern in many lubricants that should be tracked and monitored by all fabs.Proper understanding of the characteristics, risks and the control of these potential contaminants can provide for rapid return to full process capability following major PMs or parts changes. Using VPD-ICPMS, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography (IC) data, we will review the typical cleaning results and correlation to ''on wafer'' contamination by elements of concern--and by some elements that are otherwise barred from the fab.

  3. Amorphous silicon nitride films of different composition deposited at room temperature by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I.V.; Jacobsohn, L.G.; Averitt, R.D.; Nastasi, M.

    2004-11-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}:H) films of different compositions (0{<=}x{<=}1.18) were prepared by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The processing gases were silane and nitrogen at a substrate temperature {<=}50 deg. C. The properties of the films were investigated using Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, UV-visible optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies, and nanoindentation. Depending on the value of x, the band gap of the films changes from 1.54 to 4.42 eV, and hardness changes from 11.2 to 15.3 GPa. Changes in the film properties are caused by formation of Si-N bonds and by reducing disorder in the films. It is shown that hard and transparent silicon nitride films can be obtained at room temperature.

  4. Amorphous silicon nitride films of different composition deposited at room temperature by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I. V.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Averitt, R. D.; Nastasi, M.

    2004-11-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) films of different compositions (0<=x<=1.18) were prepared by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The processing gases were silane and nitrogen at a substrate temperature <=50 °C. The properties of the films were investigated using Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, UV-visible optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies, and nanoindentation. Depending on the value of x, the band gap of the films changes from 1.54 to 4.42 eV, and hardness changes from 11.2 to 15.3 GPa. Changes in the film properties are caused by formation of Si-N bonds and by reducing disorder in the films. It is shown that hard and transparent silicon nitride films can be obtained at room temperature.

  5. Surface modification by plasma immersion ion processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kevin C.; Lee, Deok H.; He, X. M.; Baker, N. P.; Nastasi, Michael; Munson, C. P.; Scarborough, W. K.; Tuszewski, M.; Wood, B. P.

    1998-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is actively researching a surface modification technique called plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP). PIIP is the latest innovation of the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) approach to surface modification. Like PSII, PIIP allows the modification of large areas and non-planar surface geometries, however PIIP is primarily a coating deposition technology rather than solely an ion implantation technology. PIIP utilizes a pulsed-bias on a target to extract ions out of plasma for ion implantation and coating deposition. Plasmas can be made by capacitive or inductive radio frequency sources or by initiating a glow discharge during each pulse of high voltage. Plasmas of hydrocarbon gases have been used to deposit adherent diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating son a variety of ferrous and non-ferrous materials. Instead of sputter depositing interlayers to improve the adhesion of DLC, PIIP uses ion implantation to create a graded interface between the metallic substrate and the DLC coating. Demonstrating the scaleability of PIIP, a 3 m2 area has been simultaneously coated with an adherent DLC coating approximately 7 micrometers thick. Plasmas of diborane and acetylene mixtures are being used to develop deposition processes for boron-carbide coatings. Through the use of organometallics and inorganic gases, other coatings are possible. The PIIP deposition conditions, composition and tribological properties of DLC and boron-carbide coatings will be highlighted.

  6. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., George W.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  7. Influence of albumin and inorganic ions on electrochemical corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated magnesium for surgical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Peng; Lin, Xiao; Tan, LiLi; Li, Lugee; Li, WeiRong; Yang, Ke

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are of great interest for biodegradable metallic devices. However, the degradation behavior and mechanisms of magnesium treated with coating in physiological environment in the presence of organic compound such as albumin have not been elucidated. In this study, the plasma electrolytic oxidation coated magnesium immersed in four different simulated body fluids: NaCl, PBS and with the addition of albumin to investigate the influence of protein and inorganic ions on degradation behavior by electrochemical methods. The results of electrochemical tests showed that aggressive corrosion took place in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution; whereas albumin can act as an inhibitor, its adsorption impeded further dissolution of the coating. The mechanism was attributed to the synergistic effect of protein adsorption and precipitation of insoluble salts.

  8. Hydrogenation of Zr-2.5Nb alloy after plasma-immersion titanium implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutygina, A. N.; Kashkarov, E. B.; Nikitenkov, N. N.; Tyurin, Yu I.; Syrtanov, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    The study results of the influence of plasma-immersion ion implantation of titanium in Zr-2.5Nb on hydrogenation are presented. The titanium implantation was carried out in two modes: with active plasma filtering (APF) and passive plasma filtering (PPF). The results of total hydrogen concentration, absorption rate, XRD analyses and depth distribution of elements revealed that modified surface layer after titanium ion implantation is formed hydrogen diffusion barrier reduces hydrogen absorption by Zr-2.5Nb.

  9. Improved bio-tribology of biomedical alloys by ion implantation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C.; Lutz, J.; Mändl, S.; García, J. A.; Martínez, R.; Rodríguez, R. J.

    2009-05-01

    Surface modification of biomaterials by conventional ion implantation (II) and plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) are innovative methods to improve the biocompatibility of these advanced materials. This paper describes the biocompatibility improvements of Ti6Al4V and Co28Cr6Mo implanted with N and O in a conventional implantation and a plasma immersion ion implantation processes. Tribo-corrosion friction and wear tests were performed in a realistic environment - in Hank's solution - to investigate the introduced modifications. The wear performance was only slightly improved due to a thin layer thickness, whereas, in contrast, the corrosion rate was significantly reduced.

  10. Silicon on sapphire for ion implantation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisciotta, B. P.

    1974-01-01

    Van der Pauw or bridge samples are ultrasonically cut from silicon on sapphire wafers. Contact pad regions are implanted with moderately heavy dose of ions. Ion of interest is implanted into sample; and, before being annealed in vacuum, sample is sealed with sputtered layer of silicon dioxide. Nickel or aluminum is sputtered onto contact pad areas and is sintered in nitrogen atmosphere.

  11. The study of composition, structure, mechanical properties and platelet adhesion of Ti-O/TiN gradient films prepared by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, F.; Huang, N.; Sun, H.; Wan, G. J.; Chu, P. K.; Leng, Y.

    2004-07-01

    Titanium oxide and titanium nitrogen gradient films were prepared by three different processes using metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MPIII-D). The mechanical properties of the films synthesized on silicon wafers, Ti6A14V and low temperature isotropic carbon (LTIC) were evaluated by nano-indentation, pin-on-disc wear, and scratching test. The hardness of the film was measured to be 19.5 GPa. Investigation by XRD shows that the surface Ti-O layer possesses a rutile structure and analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) discloses that the surface composition of the synthesized TiN/Ti-O films is non-stoichiometric. The gradient characteristics of the films were corroborated by qualitative analysis of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The thickness of films was 510-940 nm. Platelet adhesion experiments adopted to estimate the blood compatibility of the films show that the adsorption and deformation of platelets on the synthesized TiN/Ti-O gradient films have been significantly suppressed compared to LTIC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used to assess the wear and scratch tracks discloses that the films exhibit good wear resistance and high adhesion strength.

  12. Surface modification of sapphire by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.

    1998-11-01

    The range of microstructures and properties of sapphire (single crystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) that are produced by ion implantation are discussed with respect to the implantation parameters of ion species, fluence, irradiation temperature and the orientation of the ion beam relative to crystallographic axes. The microstructure of implanted sapphire may be crystalline with varying concentrations of defects or it may be amorphous perhaps with short-range order. At moderate to high fluences, implanted metallic ions often coalesce into pure metallic colloids and gas ions form bubbles. Many of the implanted microstructural features have been identified from studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering-channeling. The chemical, mechanical, and physical properties reflect the microstructures.

  13. Ion implantation and laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Three ion implantation and laser annealing projects have been performed by ORNL through the DOE sponsored Seed Money Program. The research has contributed toward improving the characteristics of wear, hardness, and corrosion resistance of some metals and ceramics, as well as the electrical properties of semiconductors. The work has helped to spawn related research, at ORNL and elsewhere, concerning the relationships between microstructure and materials properties. ORNL research has resulted in major advances in extended life and non-corrosive artificial joints (hip and knee), high performance semiconductors, failure resistant ceramics (with potential energy applications), and solar cells. The success of the seed money projects was instrumental in the formation of ORNL's Surface Modification and Characterization Facility (SMAC). More than 60 universities and companies have participated in SMAC programs.

  14. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  15. Laser-driven ion sources for metal ion implantation for the reduction of dry friction

    SciTech Connect

    Boody, F. P.; Juha, L.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Laska, L.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Straka, P.; Perina, V.; Woryna, E.; Giersch, D.; Hoepfl, R.; Kelly, J. C.; Hora, H.

    1997-04-15

    The anomalously high ion currents and very high ionization levels of laser-produced plasmas give laser-driven ion sources significant advantages over conventional ion sources. In particular, laser-driven ion sources should provide higher currents of metal ions at lower cost, for implantation into solids in order to improve their material properties such as friction. The energy and charge distributions for Pb and Sn ions produced by ablation of solid targets with {approx}25 J, {approx}300 ps iodine laser pulses, resulting in up to 48-times ionized MeV ions, as well as the optimization of focus position, are presented. Implantation of these ions into Ck-45 steel, without electrostatic acceleration, produced profiles with two regions. Almost all of the ions were implanted in a near surface region a few nm deep. However, a small but significant number of ions were implanted as deep as could be measured with Rutherford backscattering (RBS), here 150 nm for Sn and 250 nm for Pb. For the implanted ion densities and profiles achieved, no change in the coefficient of friction was measured for either ion.

  16. Versatile high current metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    A metal ion implantation facility has been developed with which high current beams of practically all the solid metals of the periodic table can be produced. A multi-cathode, broad beam, metal vapor vacuum arc ion source is used to produce repetitively pulsed metal ion beams at an extraction voltage of up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion-charge state multiplicity, and with a beam current of up to several amperes peak pulsed and several tens of mA time averaged delivered onto a downstream target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we summarize some of the features of the ion source and the implantation facility that has been built up around it. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Ion Implantation with Scanning Probe Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Liddle, J.A.; Schenkel, T.; Bokor, J.; Ivanov, Tzv.; Rangelow, I.W.

    2005-07-12

    We describe a scanning probe instrument which integrates ion beams with the imaging and alignment function of a piezo-resistive scanning probe in high vacuum. The beam passes through several apertures and is finally collimated by a hole in the cantilever of the scanning probe. The ion beam spot size is limited by the size of the last aperture. Highly charged ions are used to show hits of single ions in resist, and we discuss the issues for implantation of single ions.

  18. Comparison between radical- and energetic ion-induced growth of SiCxNy films in plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I. V.; Nastasi, M.

    2004-12-01

    Ternary SiCxNy compounds are materials with some remarkable properties such as high oxidation resistance and high hardness. In this work we compare the properties of SiCxNy films obtained using radio-frequency (rf) and pulsed glow discharge (PGD) plasmas with combinations of SiH4, C2H2, N2, and Ar source gases. The pulsed voltage used for the rf deposition was 200V and for the PGD deposition it was 4kV. During the rf growth, the growth takes place mostly by attaching neutral radicals to form chemical bonds. In the PGD method, the deposition takes place by subplantation and surface activation by energetic ions. We show that in the case of low-energy RF deposition, a high relative number of C -N bonds with sp3 hybridization is formed and very few Si -C bonds can be observed. Apparently the growth of carbon nitride and silicon nitride networks takes place independently. This indicates that SiH3 radicals attach to the dangling bonds of silicon and nitrogen, whereas C2H radicals attach to the dangling bonds of carbon and nitrogen. During pulsed glow discharge deposition, bonds between all three components are formed apparently by means of subplantation and damage-induced disorder. The hardness of the PGD films exceed that of the RF films, showing that to form a dense SiCxNy film one has to either supply energy during the growth of the films by heating the substrate, as in the case of chemical vapor deposition or by using energetic ions.

  19. Ion-implantation doping of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.; Edwards, A.; Rao, M.V.; Papanicolaou, N.; Kelner, G.; Holland, O.W.

    1997-10-01

    Because of their commercial availability in bulk single crystal form, the 6H- and 4H- polytypes of SiC are gaining importance for high-power, high-temperature, and high-frequency device applications. Selective area doping is a crucial processing step in integrated circuit manufacturing. In Si technology, selective area doping is accomplished by thermal diffusion or ion-implantation. Because of the low diffusion coefficients of most impurities in SiC, ion implantation is indispensable in SiC device manufacturing. In this paper the authors present their results on donor, acceptor, and compensation implants in 6H-SiC.

  20. Surface Protection and Improved Performance of Satellite Components as well as Mitigation of Space Environmental Pollution by Plasma Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, M.; Takahashi, W. K.; Marcondes, A. R.; Tan, I. H.; Silva, G.

    2009-01-05

    Three plasma processing systems based on PII technique have been used in the improvement of surface properties of different materials important for aerospace and space applications. Metal plasma PII of Al and Mg was used for surface protection of polymers used in space such as Kapton, Mylar and polyethylene. Al alloys were treated with nitrogen PII for improved resistance to corrosion aiming at aerospace applications. A rigid polymer UHMWPE was also treated in a nitrogen PII to produce a protective layer with DLC. Although not very light, SS304 stainless steel components are being used in a imaging camera in space, and some components made of this material showed endurance to vibration tests after nitrogen PII, therefore being qualified for on-board application.

  1. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojak, S.; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors - Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 1017 ions/cm2. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  2. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn{sub 0.85}Mg{sub 0.15}O thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-11

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on 〈100〉 Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000 °C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of 〈101{sup ¯}0〉 and 〈101{sup ¯}3〉 peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the 〈0002〉 peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15 K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic exciton–exciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45 eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic exciton–exciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  3. High-intensity laser for Ta and Ag implantation into different substrates for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Matousek, J.; Torrisi, L.; Ullschmied, J.

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity lasers generating non-equilibrium plasma, can be employed to accelerate ions in the keV-MeV region, useful for many applications. In the present work, we performed study of ion implantation into different substrates by using a high-intensity laser at the PALS laboratory in Prague. Multi-energy ions generated by plasma from Ta and Ag targets were implanted into polyethylene and metallic substrates (Al, Ti) at energies of tens of keV per charge state. The ion emission was monitored online using time-of-flight detectors and electromagnetic deflection systems. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to characterise the elemental composition in the implanted substrates by ion plasma emission and to provide the implanted ion depth profiling. These last measurements enable offline plasma characterisation and provide information on the useful potentiality of multi-ion species and multi-energy ion implantation into different substrates. XPS analysis gives information on the chemical bonds and their modifications in the first superficial implanted layers. The depth distributions of implanted Ta and Ag ions were compared with the theoretical ones achieved by using the SRIM-2012 simulation code.

  4. Effects of electrical conductivity of substrate materials on microstructure of diamond-like carbon films prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Sonoda, T.

    2013-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared by a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation, and the structural differences between DLC films deposited on different electrical conductive substrates, i.e., conductive Si wafers and insulating glass plates are examined by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo emission spectroscopy (XPS). In the Raman measurements, graphite (G) and disorder (D) peaks are observed for both samples. However, the additional photo luminescence is overlapped on the spectra in the case of on-glass sample. To elucidate the structural difference, the intensity ratio of D to G peak (I(D)/I(G)), G peak position and full width at half maximum (FWHM) are obtained by curve fitting using Gaussian function and linear baseline. It is found that the I(D)/I(G) is lower, G peak position is higher and FWHM of G peak is narrower for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. According to Robertson [1], lower I(D)/I(G) seems more sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. In contrast, higher G peak position and narrower FWHM of G peak suggest less sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. The results of XPS analysis with C1s spectra reveal that sp3 ratio, i.e., the intensity ratio of sp3/(sp3+sp2) is smaller for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. The inconsistency of the trend between I(D)/I(G) and other parameters (G peak position and FWHM of G peak) might be caused by the overlap of photo luminescence signal on Raman spectrum as to on-glass sample. From these results, it is considered that sp3 C-C bonding is reduced in amount when using insulating substrate in comparison with conductive substrate.

  5. Annealing of ion implanted gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.H.; Williams, J.S.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D.J.; Pearton, S.J.; Zolper, J.C.; Stall, R.A.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper, we examine Si and Te ion implant damage removal in GaN as a function of implantation dose, and implantation and annealing temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that amorphous layers, which can result from high-dose implantation, recrystallize between 800 and 1100{degree}C to very defective polycrystalline material. Lower-dose implants (down to 5{times}10{sup 13}cm{sup {minus}2}), which are not amorphous but defective after implantation, also anneal poorly up to 1100{degree}C, leaving a coarse network of extended defects. Despite such disorder, a high fraction of Te is found to be substitutional in GaN both following implantation and after annealing. Furthermore, although elevated-temperature implants result in less disorder after implantation, this damage is also impossible to anneal out completely by 1100{degree}C. The implications of this study are that considerably higher annealing temperatures will be needed to remove damage for optimum electrical properties. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Ion implantation of silicon nitride ball bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Hypothesis for ion implantation effect was that stress concentrations reflected into the bulk due to topography such as polishing imperfections, texture in the race, or transferred material, might be reduced due to surface amorphization. 42 control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. Six ion implanted balls were tested to an extended period of 150 h. Accelerated testing was done in a V groove so that wear was on two narrow wear tracks. Rutherford backscattering, XRPS, profilometry, optical microscopy, nanoindentation hardness, and white light interferometry were used. The balls were implanted with 150-keV C ions at fluence 1.1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The samples had preexisting surface defects (C-cracks), so the failure rate of the control group was unacceptable. None of the ion-implanted samples failed in 150 h of testing. Probability of randomly selecting 6 samples from the control group that would perform this well is about 5%, so there is good probability that ion implantation improved performance. Possible reasons are discussed. Wear tracks, microstructure, and impurity content were studied in possible relation to C-cracks.

  7. Ion implantation and diamond-like coatings of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Malaczynski, G.W.; Hamdi, A.H.; Elmoursi, A.A.; Qiu, X.

    1997-04-01

    In an attempt to increase the wear resistance of some key automotive components, General Motors Research and Development Center initiated a study to determine the potential of surface modification as a means of improving the tribological properties of automotive parts, and to investigate the feasibility of mass producing such parts. This paper describes the plasma immersion ion implantation system that was designed for the study of various options for surface treatment, and it discusses bench testing procedures used for evaluating the surface-treated samples. In particular, both tribological and microstructural analyses are discussed for nitrogen implants and diamond-like hydrocarbon coatings of some aluminum alloys.

  8. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  9. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described. PMID:26932065

  10. More-reliable SOS ion implantations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Conducting layer prevents static charges from accumulating during implantation of silicon-on-sapphire MOS structures. Either thick conducting film or thinner film transparent to ions is deposited prior to implantation, and gaps are etched in regions to be doped. Grounding path eliminates charge flow that damages film or cracks sapphire wafer. Prevention of charge buildup by simultaneously exposing structure to opposite charges requires equipment modifications less practical and more expensive than deposition of conducting layer.

  11. Fluorescence effect of ion-implanted sapphire doped with Ag/Cu/Fe elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-jian; Wang, Yu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Dai, Hou-mei; Ji, Ling-ling; Wang, Ru-wu; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Zheng, Li-rong

    2015-11-01

    The fluorescence effect and microstructure of the nanocomposite samples prepared by ion implantation have been studied in the subsurface area. Based on the UV-vis and VUV data, the luminescence properties of implanted samples have been presented and discussed. The research indicates that the surface plasma resonance has an impact on the fluorescence effect notably. In addition, the fluorescence performance of the substrates implanted with ions is related to the outermost electron number of the injection element. And SRIM is used to analyze the energy loss in the process of ion implantation.

  12. Ion-implantation damage in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. W.

    Ion implantation is a rapid technique for simulating damage induced by alpha recoil nuclei in nuclear waste forms. The simulation has been found to be quite good in TEM comparisons with natural alpha decay damage in minerals, but leach rate differences have been observed in glass studies and were attributed to dose rate differences. The similarities between ion implantation and recoil nuclei as a means of producing damage suggest that insights into the long term behavior of glass waste forms can be obtained by examination of what is known about ion implantation damage in silicate glasses. This paper briefly reviews these effects and shows that leaching results in certain nuclear waste glasses can be understood as resulting from plastic flow and track overlap. Phase separation is also seen to be a possible consequence of damage induced compositional changes.

  13. Isotopic fractionation in low-energy ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponganis, K. V.; Graf, T.; Marti, K.

    1997-08-01

    The evolutions of planetary atmospheres and other solar system reservoirs have been affected by a variety of fractionating mechanisms. It has been suggested that one of these mechanisms could be low-energy ion implantation. Bernatowicz and Hagee [1987] showed that Kr and Xe implanted at low energy onto tungsten are fractionated by approximately 1% per amu, favoring the heavy isotopes; we confirm these effects. We have extended these studies to Ar and Ne, using a modified Bayard-Alpert type implanter design of cylindrical symmetry with collector potentials of -40 to -100V, and observe systematically larger mass dependent isotopic fractionation for argon and neon, >=3% per amu and >=4% per amu, respectively. These fractionations scale approximately as Δm/m for all of the noble gases measured, consistent with the findings of Bernatowicz and coworkers. Experimental data at higher energies and predictions by TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) code simulations indicate that sticking probabilities may depend upon the mass ratios of projectile and target. Many natural environments for low-energy ion implantation existed in the early solar nebula, such as in dusty plasmas or in the interaction of the bipolar outflow with small grains or in the wind of the early active Sun with accreting planetesimals. Low-energy ions provide viable sources for gas loading onto nebular dust grains; the result is isotopic and elemental fractionation of the projectiles.

  14. High energy implantation with high-charge-state ions in a vacuum arc ion implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E.M. |; Anders, A.; Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Ion implantation energy can in principal be increased by increasing the charge states of the ions produced by the ion source rather than by increasing the implanter operating voltage, providing an important savings in cost and size of the implanter. In some recent work the authors have shown that the charge states of metal ions produced in a vacuum arc ion source can be elevated by a strong magnetic field. In general, the effect of both high arc current and high magnetic field is to push the distribution to higher charge states--the mean ion charge state is increased and new high charge states are formed. The effect is significant for implantation application--the mean ion energy can be about doubled without change in extraction voltage. Here they describe the ion source modifications, the results of time-of-flight measurements of ion charge state distributions, and discuss the use and implications of this technique as a means for doing metal iron implantation in the multi-hundreds of keV ion energy range.

  15. Influence of Temperature on Nitrogen Ion Implantation of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Zheng, Yong-zhen; Mo, Zhi-tao; Tang, De-li; Tong, Hong-hui; Geng, Man

    2001-04-01

    In order to achieve increased layer thickness, and wearing resistance, enhanced ion implantation with nitrogen has been carried out at temperatures of 100, 200, 400, and 600°C with a dose of 4×1018 ions cm-2. Using the Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) device, specimens of Ti6Al4V alloy were implanted at elevated temperatures, using the ion flux as the heating source. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), x-ray Diffraction (XRD), micro-hardness measurements and pin-on-disk wearing tester were utilized to evaluate the surface property improvements. The thickness of the implanted layer increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 to 600°C. Higher surface hardness and wearing resistance was also obtained in implantation under higher temperature. XRD image showed the presence of titanium nitrides on the implanted surface.

  16. Diffusion mechanism and the thermal stability of fluorine ions in GaN after ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. J.; Yuan, L.; Chen, K. J.; Xu, F. J.; Shen, B.

    2009-04-15

    The diffusion mechanisms of fluorine ions in GaN are investigated by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Instead of incorporating fluorine ions close to the sample surface by fluorine plasma treatment, fluorine ion implantation with an energy of 180 keV is utilized to implant fluorine ions deep into the GaN bulk, preventing the surface effects from affecting the data analysis. It is found that the diffusion of fluorine ions in GaN is a dynamic process featuring an initial out-diffusion followed by in- diffusion and the final stabilization. A vacancy-assisted diffusion model is proposed to account for the experimental observations, which is also consistent with results on molecular dynamic simulation. Fluorine ions tend to occupy Ga vacancies induced by ion implantation and diffuse to vacancy rich regions. The number of continuous vacancy chains can be significantly reduced by a dynamic thermal annealing process. As a result, strong local confinement and stabilization of fluorine ions can be obtained in GaN crystal, suggesting excellent thermal stability of fluorine ions for device applications.

  17. Hybrid quantum circuit with implanted erbium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Probst, S.; Rotzinger, H.; Tkalčec, A.; Kukharchyk, N.; Wieck, A. D.; Wünsch, S.; Siegel, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Bushev, P. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments with focused ion beam implanted Er{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} coupled to an array of superconducting lumped element microwave resonators. The Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal is divided into several areas with distinct erbium doping concentrations, each coupled to a separate resonator. The coupling strength is varied from 5 MHz to 18.7 MHz, while the linewidth ranges between 50 MHz and 130 MHz. We confirm the paramagnetic properties of the implanted spin ensemble by evaluating the temperature dependence of the coupling. The efficiency of the implantation process is analyzed and the results are compared to a bulk doped Er:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} sample. We demonstrate the integration of these engineered erbium spin ensembles with superconducting circuits.

  18. A comparative study of the structure and cytotoxicity of polytetrafluoroethylene after ion etching and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtansky, D. V.; Glushankova, N. A.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, F. V.; Sheveiko, A. N.; Sigarev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    The ion-plasma treatment has been widely used for modifying the surface structure of polymers in order to improve their properties, but it can lead to destruction of the surface and, as a consequence, to an increase in their toxicity. A comparative study of the structure and cytotoxicity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) after the ion etching (IE) and ion implantation (II) for 10 min with energy densities of 363 and 226 J/cm2, respectively, has been performed. It has been shown that, unlike the ion implantation, the ion etching results in the destruction of the polymer and in the appearance of the cytotoxicity. The factors responsible for this effect, which are associated with the bulk and surface treatment, as well as with the influence of the temperature, have been discussed.

  19. Ion implantation of solar cell junctions without mass analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D.; Tonn, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a summary of an investigation to determine the feasibility of producing solar cells by means of ion implantation without the use of mass analysis. Ion implants were performed using molecular and atomic phosphorus produced by the vaporization of solid red phosphorus and ionized in an electron bombardment source. Solar cell junctions were ion implanted by mass analysis of individual molecular species and by direct unanalyzed implants from the ion source. The implant dose ranged from 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 16th atoms/sq cm and the energy per implanted atom ranged from 5 KeV to 40 KeV in this study.

  20. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  1. Improved corrosion resistance on biodegradable magnesium by zinc and aluminum ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruizhen; Yang, Xiongbo; Suen, Kai Wong; Wu, Guosong; Li, Penghui; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have promising applications as biodegradable materials, and plasma ion implantation can enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition. In this study, suitable amounts of zinc and aluminum are plasma-implanted into pure magnesium. The surface composition, phases, and chemical states are determined, and electrochemical tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are conducted to investigate the surface corrosion behavior and elucidate the mechanism. The corrosion resistance enhancement after ion implantation is believed to stem from the more compact oxide film composed of magnesium oxide and aluminum oxide as well as the appearance of the β-Mg17Al12 phase.

  2. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOEpatents

    Hampikian, Janet M; Hunt, Eden M

    2001-01-01

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  3. ION SOURCES FOR ENERGY EXTREMES OF ION IMPLANTATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HERSCHCOVITCH,A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; BATALIN, V.A.; KROPACHEV, G.N.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; KULEVOY, T.V.; KOLOMIETS, A.A.; PERSHIN, V.I.; PETRENKO, S.V.; RUDSKOY, I.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; BUGAEV, A.S.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; LITOVKO, I.V.; OKS, E.M.; YUSHKOV, G. YU.; MASEUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.; POOLE, H.J.; STOROZHENKO, P.A.; SVAROVSKI, YA.

    2007-08-26

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques, which meet the two energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. For low energy ion implantation our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, Boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bemas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  4. Rhenium ion beam for implantation into semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Seleznev, D. N.; Alyoshin, M. E.; Kraevsky, S. V.; Yakushin, P. E.; Khoroshilov, V. V.; Gerasimenko, N. N.; Smirnov, D. I.; Fedorov, P. A.; Temirov, A. A.

    2012-02-15

    At the ion source test bench in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics the program of ion source development for semiconductor industry is in progress. In framework of the program the Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc ion source for germanium and rhenium ion beam generation was developed and investigated. It was shown that at special conditions of ion beam implantation it is possible to fabricate not only homogenous layers of rhenium silicides solid solutions but also clusters of this compound with properties of quantum dots. At the present moment the compound is very interesting for semiconductor industry, especially for nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, but there is no very developed technology for production of nanostructures (for example quantum sized structures) with required parameters. The results of materials synthesis and exploration are presented.

  5. Production of Endohedral Fullerenes by Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, M.D.; Alford, J. M.; Mirzadeh, S.

    2007-05-31

    The empty interior cavity of fullerenes has long been touted for containment of radionuclides during in vivo transport, during radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and radioimaging for example. As the chemistry required to open a hole in fullerene is complex and exceedingly unlikely to occur in vivo, and conformational stability of the fullerene cage is absolute, atoms trapped within fullerenes can only be released during extremely energetic events. Encapsulating radionuclides in fullerenes could therefore potentially eliminate undesired toxicity resulting from leakage and catabolism of radionuclides administered with other techniques. At the start of this project however, methods for production of transition metal and p-electron metal endohedral fullerenes were completely unknown, and only one method for production of endohedral radiofullerenes was known. They therefore investigated three different methods for the production of therapeutically useful endohedral metallofullerenes: (1) implantation of ions using the high intensity ion beam at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Surface Modification and Characterization Research Center (SMAC) and fullerenes as the target; (2) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following alpha decay; and (3) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following neutron capture, using ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as a thermal neutron source. While they were unable to obtain evidence of successful implantation using the ion beam at SMAC, recoil following alpha decay and neutron capture were both found to be economically viable methods for the production of therapeutically useful radiofullerenes. In this report, the procedures for preparing fullerenes containing the isotopes {sup 212}Pb, {sup 212}Bi, {sup 213}Bi, and {sup 177}Lu are described. None of these endohedral fullerenes had ever previously been prepared, and all of these radioisotopes are actively under investigation for RIT. Additionally, the chemistry for

  6. Surface mechanical properties - effects of ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Herbert

    1981-05-01

    Ion implantation has been used to modify the mechanical properties of a wide range of metals and alloys. The affected properties which have been studied include friction and wear, erosion and fatigue. Both BCC and FCC systems have been examined, with the major effort being directed at the former, due to the strong influence of interstitial implantants on mechanical properties of BCC and because of the industrial utility of these alloys. In seeking the microstructural origins of these sometimes dramatic effects, researchers have employed numerous surface analysis techniques, including backscattering and electron spectroscopy, TEM, SEM, X-ray and Mössbauer analysis and internal friction measurements. The interactions of surface dislocation structures with implantation-induced imperfections, surface alloying, and precipitation phenomena are discussed. A review is given of the current status of activities as represented by a number of research groups.

  7. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  8. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  9. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojkumar, P. A.; Chirayath, V. A.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A. K.; Raj, Baldev

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  10. Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei

    2012-11-06

    Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

  11. Multiple Ion Implantation Effects on Wear and Wet Ability of Polyethylene Based Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Visco, A. M.; Campo, N.

    2004-10-01

    Polyethylene based polymers were ion implanted with multiple irradiations of different ions (N+, Ar+ and Kr+) at energies between 30 keV and 300 keV and doses ranging between 1013 and 1016 ions/cm2. The ion implantation dehydrogenises the polyethylene inducing cross-link effects in the residual polymer carbons. At high doses the irradiated surface show properties similar to graphite surfaces. The depth of the modified layers depends on the ion range in polyethylene at the incident ion energy. The chemical modification depends on the implanted doses and on the specie of the incident ions. A "pin-on-disc" machine was employed to measure the polymer wear against AISI-316 L stainless steel. A "contact-angle-test" machine was employed to measure the wet ability of the polymer surface for 1 μl pure water drop. Measurements demonstrate that the multiple ion implantation treatments decrease the surface wear and the surface wetting and produce a more resistant polymer surface. The properties of the treated surfaces improves the polymer functionality for many bio-medical applications, such as those relative to the polyethylene friction discs employed in knee and hip prosthesis joints. The possibility to use multiply ion implantations of polymers with traditional ion implanters and with laser ion sources producing plasmas is investigated.

  12. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  13. Electrocatalysis on ion-implanted electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, W E; Wolf, G K

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation of formic acid and methanol has been stuidied on electrodes prepared by ion implanting Pt in RuO/sup 2/. Formic acid was found to oxidize readily on this catalyst without poisoning the surface. In the case of methanol no reaction was found to take place. Using XPS techniques, Pt was shown to have a lower binding energy than bulk Pt. This suggests that there is excess charge on this form of Pt which changes its reactivity.

  14. High current vacuum-arc ion source for ion implantation and coating deposition technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Ryabchikov, Igor A.; Stepanov, Igor B.; Dektyarev, Sergey V.

    2006-03-15

    This work is devoted to the development and investigation of a high current ion source based on dc vacuum-arc plasma generation. Extraction and acceleration of ion beams are realized in a repetitively pulsed mode with the pulse repetition rate up to 200 pps, the pulse duration up to 400 {mu}s, the accelerating voltage up to 40 kV, and the pulsed ion-beam current up to 2 A. To remove microparticles from the vacuum-arc plasma a straight-line plasma filter is used. Examples of the source use for realization of high-intensity and high-concentration ion implantation regimes including those with formation of doped layers at depths that exceed ion projective range for more than an order of magnitude are presented. At the expense of change in order and intensity of ion and plasma material treatment, the advantage of application of one source for execution of material surface pretreatment and activation regimes, formation of wide transition layers between the substrate and coating, coating deposition, and high-intensity ion mixing using ions of the same type was shown.

  15. In vivo stimulation of bone formation by aluminum and oxygen plasma surface-modified magnesium implants.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Man; Zhao, Ying; Tam, Vivian; Wu, Shuilin; Chu, Paul K; Zheng, Yufeng; To, Michael Kai Tsun; Leung, Frankie K L; Luk, Keith D K; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2013-12-01

    A newly developed magnesium implant is used to stimulate bone formation in vivo. The magnesium implant after undergoing dual aluminum and oxygen plasma implantation is able to suppress rapid corrosion, leaching of magnesium ions, as well as hydrogen gas release from the biodegradable alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF). No released aluminum is detected from the SBF extract and enhanced corrosion resistance properties are confirmed by electrochemical tests. In vitro studies reveal enhanced growth of GFP mouse osteoblasts on the aluminum oxide coated sample, but not on the untreated sample. In addition to that a small amount (50 ppm) of magnesium ions can enhance osteogenic differentiation as reported previously, our present data show a low concentration of hydrogen can give rise to the same effect. To compare the bone volume change between the plasma-treated magnesium implant and untreated control, micro-computed tomography is performed and the plasma-treated implant is found to induce significant new bone formation adjacent to the implant from day 1 until the end of the animal study. On the contrary, bone loss is observed during the first week post-operation from the untreated magnesium sample. Owing to the protection offered by the Al2O3 layer, the plasma-treated implant degrades more slowly and the small amount of released magnesium ions stimulate new bone formation locally as revealed by histological analyses. Scanning electron microscopy discloses that the Al2O3 layer at the bone-implant interface is still present two months after implantation. In addition, no inflammation or tissue necrosis is observed from both treated and untreated implants. These promising results suggest that the plasma-treated magnesium implant can stimulate bone formation in vivo in a minimal invasive way and without causing post-operative complications. PMID:24060425

  16. Molecular Ion Beam Transportation for Low Energy Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Kropachev, G. N.; Seleznev, D. N.; Yakushin, P. E.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kozlov, A. V.; Koshelev, V. A.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Polozov, S. M.; Poole, H. J.

    2011-01-07

    A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for 100's of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past five years. Current density limitation associated with extracting and transporting low energy ion beams result in lower beam currents that in turn adversely affects the process throughput. The transport channel with electrostatic lenses for decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}) and carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beams transportation was developed and investigated. The significant increase of ion beam intensity at the beam transport channel output is demonstrated. The transport channel simulation, construction and experimental results of ion beam transportation are presented.

  17. An experiment on the dynamics of ion implantation and sputtering of surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. A.; Kesler, L. A.; Peterson, E. E.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Woller, K. B.

    2014-02-15

    A major impediment towards a better understanding of the complex plasma-surface interaction is the limited diagnostic access to the material surface while it is undergoing plasma exposure. The Dynamics of ION Implantation and Sputtering Of Surfaces (DIONISOS) experiment overcomes this limitation by uniquely combining powerful, non-perturbing ion beam analysis techniques with a steady-state helicon plasma exposure chamber, allowing for real-time, depth-resolved in situ measurements of material compositions during plasma exposure. Design solutions are described that provide compatibility between the ion beam analysis requirements in the presence of a high-intensity helicon plasma. The three primary ion beam analysis techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, and nuclear reaction analysis, are successfully implemented on targets during plasma exposure in DIONISOS. These techniques measure parameters of interest for plasma-material interactions such as erosion/deposition rates of materials and the concentration of plasma fuel species in the material surface.

  18. Influence of ion source configuration and its operation parameters on the target sputtering and implantation process.

    PubMed

    Shalnov, K V; Kukhta, V R; Uemura, K; Ito, Y

    2012-06-01

    In the work, investigation of the features and operation regimes of sputter enhanced ion-plasma source are presented. The source is based on the target sputtering with the dense plasma formed in the crossed electric and magnetic fields. It allows operation with noble or reactive gases at low pressure discharge regimes, and, the resulting ion beam is the mixture of ions from the working gas and sputtering target. Any conductive material, such as metals, alloys, or compounds, can be used as the sputtering target. Effectiveness of target sputtering process with the plasma was investigated dependently on the gun geometry, plasma parameters, and the target bias voltage. With the applied accelerating voltage from 0 to 20 kV, the source can be operated in regimes of thin film deposition, ion-beam mixing, and ion implantation. Multi-component ion beam implantation was applied to α-Fe, which leads to the surface hardness increasing from 2 GPa in the initial condition up to 3.5 GPa in case of combined N(2)-C implantation. Projected range of the implanted elements is up to 20 nm with the implantation energy 20 keV that was obtained with XPS depth profiling. PMID:22755619

  19. Influence of ion source configuration and its operation parameters on the target sputtering and implantation process

    SciTech Connect

    Shalnov, K. V.; Kukhta, V. R.; Uemura, K.; Ito, Y.

    2012-06-15

    In the work, investigation of the features and operation regimes of sputter enhanced ion-plasma source are presented. The source is based on the target sputtering with the dense plasma formed in the crossed electric and magnetic fields. It allows operation with noble or reactive gases at low pressure discharge regimes, and, the resulting ion beam is the mixture of ions from the working gas and sputtering target. Any conductive material, such as metals, alloys, or compounds, can be used as the sputtering target. Effectiveness of target sputtering process with the plasma was investigated dependently on the gun geometry, plasma parameters, and the target bias voltage. With the applied accelerating voltage from 0 to 20 kV, the source can be operated in regimes of thin film deposition, ion-beam mixing, and ion implantation. Multi-component ion beam implantation was applied to {alpha}-Fe, which leads to the surface hardness increasing from 2 GPa in the initial condition up to 3.5 GPa in case of combined N{sub 2}-C implantation. Projected range of the implanted elements is up to 20 nm with the implantation energy 20 keV that was obtained with XPS depth profiling.

  20. Biodegradable radioactive implants for glaucoma filtering surgery produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, W.; Schubert, M.; Held, A.; Pichler, A.; Chill, A.; Kiermaier, S.; Schlösser, K.; Busch, H.; Schenk, K.; Streufert, D.; Lanzl, I.

    2007-04-01

    A biodegradable, β-emitting implant has been developed and successfully tested which prevents fresh intraocular pressure increase after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ion implantation has been used to load the polymeric implants with the β-emitter 32P. The influence of ion implantation and gamma sterilisation on degradation and 32P-fixation behavior has been studied by ion beam and chemical analysis. Irradiation effects due to the applied ion fluence (1015 ions/cm2) and gamma dose (25 kGy) are found to be tolerable.

  1. Simulation of ion beam transport through the 400 Kv ion implanter at Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Naab, F. U.; Toader, O. F.; Was, G. S.

    2013-04-19

    The Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory houses a 400 kV ion implanter. An application that simulates the ion beam trajectories through the implanter from the ion source to the target was developed using the SIMION Registered-Sign code. The goals were to have a tool to develop an intuitive understanding of abstract physics phenomena and diagnose ion trajectories. Using this application, new implanter users of different fields in science quickly understand how the machine works and quickly learn to operate it. In this article we describe the implanter simulation application and compare the parameters of the implanter components obtained from the simulations with the measured ones. The overall agreement between the simulated and measured values of magnetic fields and electric potentials is {approx}10%.

  2. Electric propulsion using ion-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanesland, A.; Meige, A.; Chabert, P.

    2009-04-01

    Recently, we have proposed to use both positive and negative ions for thrust in an electromagnetic space propulsion system. This concept is called PEGASES for Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative GASES and has been patented by the Ecole Polytechnique in France in 2007. The basic idea is to create a stratified plasma with an electron free (ion-ion plasma) region at the periphery of a highly ionized plasma core such that both positive and negative ions can be extracted and accelerated to provide thrust. As the extracted beam is globally neutral there is no need for a downstream neutralizer. The recombination of positive and negative ions is very efficient and will result in a fast recombination downstream of the thruster and hence there is no creation of a plasma plume downstream. The first PEGASES prototype, designed in 2007, has recently been installed in a small vacuum chamber for preliminary tests in our laboratory and the first results have been presented in several conferences. This paper reviews important work that has been used in the process of designing the first PEGASES prototype.

  3. Computational stochastic model of ions implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zmievskaya, Galina I. Bondareva, Anna L.; Levchenko, Tatiana V.; Maino, Giuseppe

    2015-03-10

    Implantation flux ions into crystal leads to phase transition /PT/ 1-st kind. Damaging lattice is associated with processes clustering vacancies and gaseous bubbles as well their brownian motion. System of stochastic differential equations /SDEs/ Ito for evolution stochastic dynamical variables corresponds to the superposition Wiener processes. The kinetic equations in partial derivatives /KE/, Kolmogorov-Feller and Einstein-Smolukhovskii, were formulated for nucleation into lattice of weakly soluble gases. According theory, coefficients of stochastic and kinetic equations uniquely related. Radiation stimulated phase transition are characterized by kinetic distribution functions /DFs/ of implanted clusters versus their sizes and depth of gas penetration into lattice. Macroscopic parameters of kinetics such as the porosity and stress calculated in thin layers metal/dielectric due to Xe{sup ++} irradiation are attracted as example. Predictions of porosity, important for validation accumulation stresses in surfaces, can be applied at restoring of objects the cultural heritage.

  4. Mutagenesis of Arabidopsis Thaliana by N+ Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Genfa; Shi, Xiaoming; Nie, Yanli; Jiang, Shan; Zhou, Hongyu; Lu, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2006-05-01

    Ion implantation, as a new biophysically mutagenic technique, has shown a great potential for crop breeding. By analyzing polymorphisms of genomic DNA through RAPD-based DNA analysis, we compared the frequency and efficiency of somatic and germ-line mutations of Arabidopsis thaliana treated with N+ ion implantation and γ-rays radiation. Our data support the following conclusions: (1) N+ ion implantation can induce a much wider spectrum of mutations than γ-rays radiation does; (2) Unlike the linear correlation between the doses and their effect in γ-rays radiation, the dose-effect correlation in N+ ion implantation is nonlinear; (3) Like γ-rays radiation, both somatic and germ-line mutations could be induced by N+ ion implantation; and (4) RAPD deletion patterns are usually seen in N+ ion implantation induced mutation.

  5. Ion-Implanted Diamond Films and Their Tribological Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Korenyi-Both, Andras L.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the physical characterization and tribological evaluation of ion-implanted diamond films. Diamond films were produced by microwave plasma, chemical vapor deposition technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes (0.3 and 3 microns) and roughness (9.1 and 92.1 nm r.m.s. respectively) were implanted with C(+) (m/e = 12) at an ion energy of 160 eV and a fluence of 6.72 x 10(exp 17) ions/sq cm. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum (6.6 x 10(exp -7)Pa), dry nitrogen and humid air (40% RH) environments. The effects of C(+) ion bombardment on fine and coarse-grained diamond films are as follows: the surface morphology of the diamond films did not change; the surface roughness increased (16.3 and 135.3 nm r.m.s.); the diamond structures were damaged and formed a thin layer of amorphous non-diamond carbon; the friction coefficients dramatically decreased in the ultrahigh vacuum (0.1 and 0.4); the friction coefficients decreased slightly in the dry nitrogen and humid air environments.

  6. Properties of ion implanted Ti-6Al-4V processed using beamline and PSII techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Woodring, J.S.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.M.; Williams, J.M.; Poker, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    The surface of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) alloy has been modified using beamline implantation of boron. In separate experiments, Ti64 has been implanted with nitrogen using a plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique utilizing either ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen (N{sub 2}), or their combinations as the source of nitrogen ions. Beamline experiments have shown the hardness of the N-implanted surface saturates at a dose level of {approximately} 4 {times} 10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2} at {approximately} 10 GPa. The present work makes comparisons of hardness and tribological tests of (1) B implantation using beamline techniques, and (2) N implanted samples using ammonia and/or nitrogen gas in a PSII process. The results show that PSII using N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} gives similar hardness as N implantation using a beamline process. The presence of H in the Ti alloy surface does not affect the hardness of the implanted surface. Boron implantation increased the surface hardness by as much as 2.5x at the highest dose level. Wear testing by a pin-on-disk method indicated that nitrogen implantation reduced the wear rate by as much as 120x, and boron implantation reduced the wear rate by 6.5x. Increased wear resistance was accompanied by a decreased coefficient of friction.

  7. Ion implantation effects in 'cosmic' dust grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.; Meunier, R.; Jouffrey, B.; Jouret, C.

    1974-01-01

    Cosmic dust grains, whatever their origin may be, have probably suffered a complex sequence of events including exposure to high doses of low-energy nuclear particles and cycles of turbulent motions. High-voltage electron microscope observations of micron-sized grains either naturally exposed to space environmental parameters on the lunar surface or artificially subjected to space simulated conditions strongly suggest that such events could drastically modify the mineralogical composition of the grains and considerably ease their aggregation during collisions at low speeds. Furthermore, combined mass spectrometer and ionic analyzer studies show that small carbon compounds can be both synthesized during the implantation of a mixture of low-energy D, C, N ions in various solids and released in space by ion sputtering.

  8. Applications of ion implantation for high efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation is utilized for the dopant introduction processes necessary to fabricate a silicon solar cell. Implantation provides a versatile powerful tool for development of high efficiency cells. Advantages and problems of implantation and the present status of developmental use of the technique for solar cells are discussed.

  9. PLEPS study of ions implanted RAFM steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojak, S.; Slugeň, V.; Egger, W.; Ravelli, L.; Petriska, M.; Veterníková, J.; Stacho, M.; Sabelová, V.

    2014-04-01

    Current nuclear power plants (NPP) require radiation, heat and mechanical resistance of their structural materials with the ability to stay operational during NPP planned lifetime. Radiation damage much higher, than in the current NPP, is expected in new generations of nuclear power plants, such as Generation IV and fusion reactors. Investigation of perspective structural materials for new generations of nuclear power plants is among others focused on study of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. These steels have good characteristics as reduced activation, good resistance to volume swelling, good radiation, and heat resistance. Our experiments were focused on the study of microstructural changes of binary Fe-Cr alloys with different chromium content after irradiation, experimentally simulated by ion implantations. Fe-Cr alloys were examined, by Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) at FRM II reactor in Garching (Munich), after helium ion implantations at the dose of 0.1 C/cm2. The investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistivity. In particular, the vacancy type defects (monovacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. Based on our previous results achieved by conventional lifetime technique, the decrease of the defects size with increasing content of chromium is expected also for PLEPS measurements.

  10. Flame annealing of ion implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, J.; Young, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    The authors investigated flame annealing of ion implantation damage (consisting of amorphous layers and dislocation loops) in (100) and (111) silicon substrates. The temperature of a hydrogen flame was varied from 1050 to 1200/sup 0/C and the interaction time from 5 to 10 seconds. Detailed TEM results showed that a defect-free annealing of amorphous layers by solid-phase-epitaxial growth could be achieved up to a certain concentration. However, dislocation loops in the region below the amorphous layer exhibited coarsening, i.e., the average loop size increased while the number density of loops decreased. Above a critical loop density, which was found to be a function of ion implantation variables and substrate temperature, formation of 90/sup 0/ dislocations (a cross-grid of dislocation in (100) and a triangular grid in (111) specimens) were observed. Electrical (Van der Pauw) measurements indicated nearly a complete electrical activation of dopants with mobility comparable to pulsed laser annealed specimens. The characteristics of p-n junction diodes showed a good diode perfection factor of 1.20-1.25 and low reverse bias currents.

  11. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  12. All-ion-implantation process for integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    Simpler than diffusion fabrication, ion bombardment produces complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor / silicon-on-sapphire (CMOS/SOS) circuits that are one-third faster. Ion implantation simplifies the integrated circuit fabrication procedure and produces circuits with uniform characteristics.

  13. Mechanical stresses and amorphization of ion-implanted diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelnitsky, R. A.; Dravin, V. A.; Tal, A. A.; Latushko, M. I.; Khomich, A. A.; Khomich, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Terentiev, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Scanning white light interferometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the mechanical stresses and structural changes in ion-implanted natural diamonds with different impurity content. The uniform distribution of radiation defects in implanted area was obtained by the regime of multiple-energy implantation of keV He+ ions. A modification of Bosia's et al. (Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 268 (2010) 2991) method for determining the internal stresses and the density variation in an ion-implanted diamond layer was proposed that suggests measuring, in addition to the surface swelling of a diamond plate, the radius of curvature of the plate. It is shown that, under multiple-energy implantation of He+, mechanical stresses in the implanted layer may be as high as 12 GPa. It is shown that radiation damage reaches saturation for the implantation fluence characteristic of amorphization of diamond but is appreciably lower than the graphitization threshold.

  14. Surface and corrosion characteristics of carbon plasma implanted and deposited nickel-titanium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, R.W.Y.; Liu, X.Y.; Chung, C.Y.; Chu, P.K.; Yeung, K.W.K.; Lu, W.W.; Cheung, K.M.C.

    2005-05-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are potentially useful in orthopedic implants on account of their super-elastic and shape memory properties. However, the materials are prone to surface corrosion and the most common problem is out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the substrate into body tissues and fluids. In order to improve the corrosion resistance and related surface properties, we used the technique of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition to deposit an amorphous hydrogenated carbon coating onto NiTi and implant carbon into NiTi. Both the deposited amorphous carbon film and carbon plasma implanted samples exhibit much improved corrosion resistances and surface mechanical properties and possible mechanisms are suggested.

  15. Plasma ion composition measurements for Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, E. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Paterson, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Lipatov, A. S.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Paschalidis, N. P.; Coplan, M. A.; Cassidy, T. A.; Richardson, J. D.; Fegley, B.; Andre, N.

    2013-11-01

    Jupiter magnetospheric interactions and surface composition, both important to subsurface ocean detection for the Galilean icy moons Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, can be measured using plasma ion mass spectrometry on either an orbiting spacecraft or one designed for multiple flybys of these moons. Detection of emergent oceanic materials at the Europa surface is more likely than at Ganymede and Callisto. A key challenge is to resolve potential intrinsic Europan materials from the space weathering patina of iogenic species implanted onto the sensible surface by magnetospheric interactions. Species-resolved measurements of pickup ion currents are also critical to extraction of oceanic induced magnetic fields from magnetospheric interaction background dominated by these currents. In general the chemical astrobiological potential of Europa should be determined through the combination of surface, ionospheric, and pickup ion composition measurements. The requisite Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) for these measurements would need to work in the high radiation environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere between the orbits of Europa and Ganymede, and beyond. A 3D hybrid model of the moon-magnetosphere interaction is also needed to construct a global model of the electric and magnetic fields, and the plasma environment, around Europa. Europa's ionosphere is probably usually dominated by hot pickup ions with 100-1000 eV temperatures, excursions to a "classical" cold ionosphere likely being infrequent. A field aligned ionospheric wind driven by the electron polarization electric field should arise and be measurable.

  16. Modeling of nanocluster formation by ion beam implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kun-Dar

    2011-08-15

    A theoretical model was developed to investigate the mechanism of the formation of nanoclusters via ion beam implantation. The evolution of nanoclusters, including the nucleation and growth process known as Ostwald ripening, was rebuilt using numerical simulations. The effects of implantation parameters such as the ion energy, ion fluence, and temperature on the morphology of implanted microstructures were also studied through integration with the Monte Carlo Transport of Ions in Matter code calculation for the distribution profiles of implanted ions. With an appropriate ion fluence, a labyrinth-like nanostructure with broad size distributions of nanoclusters formed along the ion implantation range. In a latter stage, a buried layer of implanted impurity developed. With decreasing ion energy, the model predicted the formation of precipitates on the surface. These simulation results were fully consistent with many experimental observations. With increased temperature, the characteristic length and size of nanostructures would increase due to the high mobility. This theoretical model provides an efficient numerical approach for fully understanding the mechanism of the formation of nanoclusters, allowing for the design of ion beam experiments to form specific nanostructures through ion-implantation technology.

  17. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOEpatents

    Muller, R.H.; Zhang, S.

    1997-01-14

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, and sodium sulfur. 6 figs.

  18. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOEpatents

    Muller, Rolf H.; Zhang, Shengtao

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, end sodium sulfur.

  19. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi; Jiao, Yang; Guan, Jing; Wang, Lei

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He+ ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He+ ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  20. Ion-Assisted Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Daniel; Abraham-Shrauner, Barbara

    1996-11-01

    We analyze plasma etching of two-dimensional, long trenches where directed ions modeled by drifted Maxwellian distribution functions and isotropic neutral molecules contribute to the etch rate. Analytic expressions for the etch rates enable the user to plot the etch profiles by using standard computer packages for nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equations for the point and its slope. First, etch profiles are shown for ion-assisted etching where the thermal etching of the neutrals is enhanced by the ions. Second, we show etch profiles of a multiple layer device where one layer is n-type silicon (arsenic doped) that etches isotropically (G.S. Oehrlein, "Reactive Ion Etching," Handbook of Plasma Processing, Technology, Ed. S.M. Rossnagel, et al., Noyes Pub., NJ, 1990) The etch rates for the other layers are in the ion flux-limited regime. The lateral etching of the n-type silicon illustrates the necessity of sidewall passivation for this structure.

  1. Dopant profile engineering of advanced Si MOSFET's using ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolk, P. A.; Ponomarev, Y. V.; Schmitz, J.; van Brandenburg, A. C. M. C.; Roes, R.; Montree, A. H.; Woerlee, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Ion implantation has been used to realize non-uniform, steep retrograde (SR) dopant profiles in the active channel region of advanced Si MOSFET's. After defining the transistor configuration, SR profiles were formed by dopant implantation through the polycrystalline Si gate and the gate oxide (through-the-gate, TG, implantation). The steep nature of the as-implanted profile was retained by applying rapid thermal annealing for dopant activation and implantation damage removal. For NMOS transistors, TG implantation of B yields improved transistor performance through increased carrier mobility, reduced junction capacitances, and reduced susceptibility to short-channel effects. Electrical measurements show that the gate oxide quality is not deteriorated by the ion-induced damage, demonstrating that transistor reliability is preserved. For PMOS transistors, TG implantation of P or As leads to unacceptable source/drain junction broadening as a result of transient enhanced dopant diffusion during thermal activation.

  2. Modification of sol-gel coatings by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Hiroshi; Adachi, Kenji; Imai, Hiroaki

    1994-10-01

    In order to densify and to improve the physical properties, TiO2 sol-gel films, about 100 nm in thickness, on silica glass or silicon wafer were implanted with Ar+ or B+ ions. The refractive index of the as-dried films increased and the IR absorption band of OH disappeared after Ar+ implantation. Dehydration and densification of sol-gel films were enhanced by Ar+ implantation. On the other hand, the refractive index and the thickness of the films hardly changed by B+ implantation. However, IR absorption bands attributed to B-O bond were observed after B+ implantation. This suggests that sol-gel films could be chemically modified by ion implantation with reactive ion species.

  3. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research. PMID:26931931

  4. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  5. Implantation of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphorus ions into metals

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, M.I.; Gordeeva, G.V.

    1987-01-01

    The application of ion implantation for alloying offers a unique opportunity to modify the chemical composition, phase constitution, and microstructure of the surface layers of metals. The authors studied ion implantation of nitrogen and carbon into the surface layers of metallic targets. The phase composition of the implanted layers obtained on the Kh18N10T stainless steel, the refractory molybdenum alloy TsM-6, niobium, and nickel was determined according to the conventional method of recording the x-ray diffraction pattern of the specimens using monochromatic FeK/sub alpha/-radiation on a DRON-2,0 diffractometer. The targets were bombarded at room temperature in an ILU-3 ion accelerator. The implantation of metalloid ions was also conducted with the targets being bombarded with 100-keV phosphorus ions and 40-keV carbon ions.

  6. Ultrahigh-current-density metal-ion implantation and diamondlike-hydrocarbon films for tribological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1993-09-01

    The metal-ion-implantation system used to implant metals into substrates are described. The metal vapor required for operation is supplied by drawing sufficient electron current from the plasma discharge to an anode-potential crucible so a solid, pure metal placed in the crucible will be heated to the point of vaporization. The ion-producing, plasma discharge is initiated within a graphite-ion-source body, which operates at high temperature, by using an argon flow that is turned off once the metal vapor is present. Extraction of ion beams several cm in diameter at current densities ranging to several hundred micro-A/sq cm on a target 50 cm downstream of the ion source were demonstrated using Mg, Ag, Cr, Cu, Si, Ti, V, B, and Zr. These metals were implanted into over 100 substrates (discs, pins, flats, wires). A model describing thermal stresses induced in materials (e.g. ceramic plates) during high-current-density implantation is presented. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of iron and 304-stainless-steel samples implanted with Ti or B are examined. Diamondlike-hydrocarbon coatings were applied to steel surfaces and found to exhibit good tribological performance.

  7. Sources and transport systems for low energy extreme of ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Batalin, V.A.; Bugaev, A.S.; Gushenets, V.I.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Johnson, B.M.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kropachev, G.N.; Kuibeda, R.P.; Kulevoy, T.V.; Masunov, E.S.; Oks, E.M.; Pershin, V.I.; Polozov, S.M.; Poole, H.J.; Seleznev, D.N.; Storozhenko, P.A.; Vizir, A.; Svarovski, A.Ya.; Yakushin, P.; Yushkov, G.Yu.

    2010-06-06

    For the past seven years a joint research and development effort focusing on the design of steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal being to meet the two, energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. However, since the last Fortier is low energy ion implantation, focus of the endeavor has shifted to low energy ion implantation. For boron cluster source development, we started with molecular ions of decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}), octadecaborane (B{sub 18}H{sub 22}), and presently our focus is on carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ions developing methods for mitigating graphite deposition. Simultaneously, we are developing a pure boron ion source (without a working gas) that can form the basis for a novel, more efficient, plasma immersion source. Our Calutron-Berna ion source was converted into a universal source capable of switching between generating molecular phosphorous P{sub 4}{sup +}, high charge state ions, as well as other types of ions. Additionally, we have developed transport systems capable of transporting a very large variety of ion species, and simulations of a novel gasless/plasmaless ion beam deceleration method were also performed.

  8. Ion Implantation into Presolar Grains: A Theoretical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    A numerical model for ion implantation into spherical grains in free space has been developed. It can be applied to single grains or collections of grains with known grain-size distributions. Ion-scattering effects were taken into account using results of computer simulations. Possible isotope and element fractionation of the implanted species was investigated using this model. The astrophysical significance of the model lies in the possible identification of energetically different components (such as noble gases) implanted into presolar grains (such as diamond and SiC) and in establishing implantation energies of the components.

  9. Subcutoff microwave driven plasma ion sources for multielemental focused ion beam systems.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jose V; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2008-06-01

    A compact microwave driven plasma ion source for focused ion beam applications has been developed. Several gas species have been experimented including argon, krypton, and hydrogen. The plasma, confined by a minimum B multicusp magnetic field, has good radial and axial uniformity. The octupole multicusp configuration shows a superior performance in terms of plasma density (~1.3 x 10(11) cm(-3)) and electron temperature (7-15 eV) at a power density of 5-10 Wcm(2). Ion current densities ranging from a few hundreds to over 1000 mA/cm(2) have been obtained with different plasma electrode apertures. The ion source will be combined with electrostatic Einzel lenses and should be capable of producing multielemental focused ion beams for nanostructuring and implantations. The initial simulation results for the focused beams have been presented. PMID:18601405

  10. Microstructure evolution in carbon-ion implanted sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Orwa, J. O.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Peng, J. L.; Rubanov, S.

    2010-01-15

    Carbon ions of MeV energy were implanted into sapphire to fluences of 1x10{sup 17} or 2x10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} and thermally annealed in forming gas (4% H in Ar) for 1 h. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results obtained from the lower dose implant showed retention of implanted carbon and accumulation of H near the end of range in the C implanted and annealed sample. Three distinct regions were identified by transmission electron microscopy of the implanted region in the higher dose implant. First, in the near surface region, was a low damage region (L{sub 1}) composed of crystalline sapphire and a high density of plateletlike defects. Underneath this was a thin, highly damaged and amorphized region (L{sub 2}) near the end of range in which a mixture of i-carbon and nanodiamond phases are present. Finally, there was a pristine, undamaged sapphire region (L{sub 3}) beyond the end of range. In the annealed sample some evidence of the presence of diamond nanoclusters was found deep within the implanted layer near the projected range of the C ions. These results are compared with our previous work on carbon implanted quartz in which nanodiamond phases were formed only a few tens of nanometers from the surface, a considerable distance from the projected range of the ions, suggesting that significant out diffusion of the implanted carbon had occurred.