Science.gov

Sample records for plasma microinstabilities

  1. Structure of micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas: Stiff transport or plasma eruptions?

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, D.

    2014-01-15

    Solutions to a model 2D eigenmode equation describing micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas are presented that demonstrate a sensitivity of the mode structure and stability to plasma profiles. In narrow regions of parameter space, with special plasma profiles, a maximally unstable mode is found that balloons on the outboard side of the tokamak. This corresponds to the conventional picture of a ballooning mode. However, for most profiles, this mode cannot exist, and instead, a more stable mode is found that balloons closer to the top or bottom of the plasma. Good quantitative agreement with a 1D ballooning analysis is found, provided the constraints associated with higher order profile effects, often neglected, are taken into account. A sudden transition from this general mode to the more unstable ballooning mode can occur for a critical flow shear, providing a candidate model for why some experiments observe small plasma eruptions (Edge Localised Modes, or ELMs) in place of large Type I ELMs.

  2. Solar wind plasma : kinetic properties and micro-instabilities

    E-print Network

    Kasper, Justin Christophe, 1977-

    2003-01-01

    The kinetic properties of ions in the solar wind plasma are studied. Observations of solar wind +H and +2He by the Faraday Cup instrument component of the Solar Wind Experiment on the Wind spacecraft show that these ions ...

  3. The spectral problem of global microinstabilities in tokamak-like plasmas using a gyrokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Fivaz, M.; Appert, K.

    1996-12-31

    Tokamak-like plasmas are modeled by a periodic cylindrical system with magnetic shear and realistic density and temperature profiles. Linear electrostatic microinstabilities in such plasmas are studied by solving the eigenvalue problem starting from gyrokinetic theory. The actual eigenvalue equation is then of integral type. With this approach, finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects to all orders are taken into account. FLR effects provide for the only radial coupling in a cylinder and to lowest order correspond to polarization drift. This effectively one-dimensional problem helped us to gain useful knowledge for solving gyrokinetic equations in a curved system. When searching for the eigenfrequencies of the global modes, two different methods have been tested and compared. Either the true eigenvalue problem is solved by finding the zeros of the characteristic equation, or one considers a system driven by an antenna and looks for resonances in the power response of the plasma. In addition, mode structures were computed as well in direct as in Fourier space. The advantages and disadvantages of these various approaches are discussed. Ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities are studied over a wide range of parameters and for wavelengths perpendicular to the magnetic field down to the scale of ion Larmor radii. Flute instabilities driven by magnetic curvature drifts are also considered. Some of these results are compared with a time evolution PIC code. Such comparisons are valuable as the convergence of PIC results is often questioned. Work considering true toroidal geometry is in progress.

  4. Microinstabilities in space plasmas: Anisotropy bounds by wave-particle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S.P.

    1997-04-01

    If a large-scale computer model fails to provide an accurate description of a space plasma, the discrepancy is often blamed on computational limitations, for example, the boundary conditions may not be predicted with sufficient accuracy, or the computational mesh may not be sufficiently fine. However, another possible source of inaccuracy in such models may be the physics; if the fluid equations used to represent a plasma are obtained by means of inappropriate assumptions, they cannot provide a good description of the system. In a relatively dense, relatively cold plasma, particle/particle collisions are strong. Such collisions drive the species velocity distributions toward local thermodynamic equilibrium. By considering distributions to have only small perturbations about such an equilibrium state, a set of fluid equations can be derived which is well-posed theoretically and which provides a useful description of such plasmas. Many space plasmas are relatively tenuous and relatively hot so that particle/particle interactions are weak; such plasmas are called {open_quotes}collisionless.{close_quotes} In such plasmas, interactions between particles are mediated by electromagnetic fields, including both the slowly varying electric and magnetic fields which are well represented by large-scale models and the rapidly varying, short wavelength fields which are not.

  5. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient.

  6. Microinstabilities in the Gasdynamic Mirror Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2005-01-01

    The gasdynamic mirror has been proposed as a concept which could form the basis of a highly efficient fusion rocket engine. Gasdynamic mirrors differ from most other mirror type plasma confinement schemes in that they have much larger aspect ratios and operate at somewhat higher plasma densities. There are several types of instabilities which are known to plague mirror type confinement schemes. These instabilities fall into two general classes. One class of instability is the Magnetohydrodynamic or MHD instability which induces gross distortions in the plasma geometry. The other class of instability is the "loss cone" microinstability which leads to general plasma turbulence. The "loss cone" microinstability is caused by velocity space asymmetries resulting from the loss of plasma having constituent particle velocities within the angle of the magnetic mirror "loss cone." These instabilities generally manifest themselves in high temperature, moderately dense plasmas. The present study indicates that a GDM configured as a rocket engine might operate in a plasma regime where microinstabilities could potentially be significant.

  7. Microinstabilities in the Gasdynamic Mirror Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2005-01-01

    The gasdynamic mirror has been proposed as a concept which could form the basis of a highly efficient fusion rocket engine. Gasdynamic mirrors differ from most other mirror type plasma confinement schemes in that they have much larger aspect ratios and operate at somewhat higher plasma densities. There are several types of instabilities which are known to plague mirror type confinement schemes. These instabilities fall into two general classes. One class of instability is the Magnetohdrodynamic or MHD instability which induces gross distortions in the plasma geometry. The other class of instability is the "loss cone" microinstability which leads to general plasma turbulence. The "loss cone" microinstability is caused by velocity space asymmetries resulting from the loss of plasma having constituent particle velocities within the angle of the magnetic mirror "loss cone." These instabilities generally manifest themselves in high temperature, moderately dense plasmas. The present study indicates that a GDM configured as a rocket engine might operate in a plasma regine where microinstabilities could potentially be significant.

  8. Microinstability Studies for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.M. Tang; H. Sugama; N. Nakajima; K.Y. Watanabe; S. Murakami; H. Yamada; W.A. Cooper

    2002-01-28

    Fully kinetic assessments of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes have been obtained for cases for the Large Helical Device (LHD). This calculation employs the comprehensive linear microinstability code FULL, as recently extended for nonaxisymmetric systems. The code retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. These effects include trapped particles, FLR, transit and bounce and magnetic drift frequency resonances, etc., for any number of plasma species. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped electrons and ion temperature gradients are presented, using numerically-calculated three-dimensional MHD equilibria. These are reconstructed from experimental measurements. Quasilinear fluxes of particles and energy for each species are also calculated. Pairs of LHD discharges with different magnetic axis positions and with and without pellet injection are compared.

  9. Finite-? simulation of microinstabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Edward A.; Lee, W. W.

    2014-02-15

    A new split-weight perturbative particle simulation scheme for finite-? plasmas in the presence of background inhomogeneities is presented. The scheme is an improvement over the original split-weight scheme, which splits the perturbed particle response into adiabatic and non-adiabatic parts to improve numerical properties. In the new scheme, by further separating out the adiabatic response of the particles associated with the quasi-static bending of the magnetic field lines in the presence of background inhomogeneities of the plasma, we are able to demonstrate the finite-? stabilization of drift waves and ion temperature gradient modes using a simple gyrokinetic particle code based on realistic fusion plasma parameters. However, for ?m{sub i}/m{sub e} ? 1, it becomes necessary to use the electron skin-depth as the grid size of the simulation to achieve accuracy in solving the resulting equations, unless special numerical arrangement is made for the cancelling of the two large terms on the either side of the governing equation. The proposed scheme is most suitable for studying shear-Alfvén physics in general geometry using straight field line coordinates for microturbulence and magnetic reconnection problems.

  10. Microinstability-based model for anomalous thermal confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of microinstability-based thermal transport coefficients (chi/sub j/) for the purpose of modelling anomalous energy confinement properties in tokamak plasmas. Attention is primarily focused on ohmically heated discharges and the associated anomalous electron thermal transport. An appropriate expression for chi/sub e/ is developed which is consistent with reasonable global constraints on the current and electron temperature profiles as well as with the key properties of the kinetic instabilities most likely to be present. Comparisons of confinement scaling trends predicted by this model with the empirical ohmic data base indicate quite favorable agreement. The subject of anomalous ion thermal transport and its implications for high density ohmic discharges and for auxiliary-heated plasmas is also addressed.

  11. Core micro-instability analysis of JET hybrid and baseline discharges with carbon wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Pusztai, I.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Garzotti, L.; Bourdelle, C.; Pueschel, M. J.; Lupelli, I.; Romanelli, M.; JET-EFDA Contributors, the

    2014-12-01

    The core micro-instability characteristics of hybrid and baseline plasmas in a selected set of JET plasmas with carbon wall are investigated through local linear and non-linear and global linear gyro-kinetic simulations with the GYRO code (Candy and Belli 2011 General Atomics Report GA-A26818). In particular, we study the role of plasma pressure on the micro-instabilities, and scan the parameter space for the important plasma parameters responsible for the onset and stabilization of the modes under experimental conditions. We find that a good core confinement due to strong stabilization of the micro-turbulence driven transport can be expected in the hybrid plasmas due to the stabilizing effect of the fast ion pressure that is more effective at the low magnetic shear of the hybrid discharges. While parallel velocity gradient destabilization is important for the inner core, at outer radii the hybrid plasmas may benefit from a strong quench of the turbulence transport by E × B rotation shear.

  12. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. II. Numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Proll, J. H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2013-12-15

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-J geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here, the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes, and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all simulations that include kinetic electrons, and the latter are indeed found to be stabilizing in the energy budget. These results suggest that imperfectly optimized stellarators can retain most of the stabilizing properties predicted for perfect maximum-J configurations.

  13. Comparison of Linear Microinstability Calculations of Varying Input Realism

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt

    2003-09-08

    The effect of varying ''input realism'' or varying completeness of the input data for linear microinstability calculations, in particular on the critical value of the ion temperature gradient for the ion temperature gradient mode, is investigated using gyrokinetic and gyrofluid approaches. The calculations show that varying input realism can have a substantial quantitative effect on the results.

  14. Gyrokinetic analysis of linear microinstabilities for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Xanthopoulos, P.; Jenko, F.

    2007-04-15

    A linear collisionless gyrokinetic investigation of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes--considering both adiabatic and full electron dynamics--and trapped electron modes (TEMs) is presented for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) [G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525]. The study of ITG modes reveals that in W7-X, microinstabilities of distinct character coexist. The effect of changes in the density gradient and temperature ratio is discussed. Substantial differences with respect to the axisymmetric geometry appear in W7-X, concerning the relative separation of regions with a large fraction of helically trapped particles and those of pronounced bad curvature. For both ITG modes and TEMs, the dependence of their linear growth rates on the background gradients is studied along with their parallel mode structure.

  15. Microinstabilities and turbulent transport in the reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmody, Daniel Richard

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with addressing the nature of drift wave microturbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP). Microturbulence is an important phenomenon and contributor to heat and particle transport in tokamaks, where it has been studied for several decades, but its role in the RFP is a rather new topic of study. As such, the nature of RFP drift waves and their relationship to their tokamak counterparts is still developing, and many of the results in this work are focused on addressing this challenge. Fundamental advances in microturbulence research have been made in recent decades through two parallel developments: the theoretical framework encompassed in the gyrokinetic model, and the computational power offered by massively-parallel, high-performance computing systems. Gyrokinetics is a formulation of kinetic theory in such a way that the fast timescale gyromotion of particles around magnetic field lines is averaged out. The implementation and use of RFP equilibrium models in gyrokinetic codes constitutes the bulk of this thesis. A simplified analytic equilibrium, the toroidal Bessel function model (TBFM), is used in the gyrokinetic code GYRO to explore the fundamental scaling properties of drift waves in the RFP geometry. Two drift wave instabilities, the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the microtearing mode (MTM) are found to occur, and the relationship of their critical threshold in driving gradients and plasma beta is explored. The critical values in these parameters are found to be above those of similar tokamak cases by roughly a factor of the flux surface aspect ratio. The MTM is found to be stabilized by increasing the RFP pinch parameter theta, making it unlikely for it to unstable in the high-theta improved confinement pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) discharges. Efforts are also made to address microinstabilities in specific experimental discharges of the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). A semi-analytic equilibrium, the adjusted circular model (ACM), is developed and implemented in the gyrokinetic code GENE to investigate representative PPCD discharges. The flexibility of the ACM enables it to be used for the high-theta PPCD discharges where the TBFM breaks down. The dominant linear instabilites for the discharges modeled here---ITG and the trapped electron mode (TEM)---are studied, as are their scaling properties in the PPCD regime. It is found that these instabilities are present outside of the reversal surface, where the driving gradients are strongest. Nonlinear simulations of the TEM turbulence are performed, the first such done for the RFP, and zonal flows are found to play an important role in the nonlinear saturation mechanism. These zonal flows lead to a large Dimits-like shift and suppressed transport. There is also evidence that residual global tearing mode fluctuations are a necessary part of modeling transport in the RFP, even in improved confinement PPCD discharges, and by modeling these residual fluctuations through the use of an externally imposed perpendicular magnetic field perturbation it is possible to bring simulated fluxes into agreement with experiment. Finally, the nature of the collisionless MTM, an instability seen to arise in some parameter regimes of the RFP, is investigated analytically using a fluid expansion in the drift-kinetic framework. Particular attention is paid to the role of magnetic drifts, and some evidence for their role in the collisionless instability is presented. Comparisons are made to gyrokinetic simulations and to earlier theory on the magnetic-curvature drift instability.

  16. MICROINSTABILITY OF THE SHOULDER IN THE OVERHEAD ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    The overhead throwing athlete is an extremely challenging patient in sports medicine. The repetitive microtraumatic stresses and extreme ranges of motion observed within the athlete’s shoulder joint complex during the throwing motion constantly place the athlete at risk for injury. While gross instability of the shoulder is possible, microinstability is seen far more frequently and is associated with a variety of different pathologies, including rotator cuff tendonitis, internal impingement, and labral lesions. Treatment of the overhead athlete requires the understanding of several principles based on the unique physical characteristics of this type of athlete and the demands placed upon the static stabilizing structures during the act of throwing. The purpose of this paper is to describe these principles and incorporate them into in a multi?phase progressive rehabilitation program designed to prevent injuries and rehabilitate the injured athlete, both non?operatively and postoperatively. PMID:24175140

  17. Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron and ohmic heated discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusztai, I.; Moradi, S.; Fülöp, T.; Timchenko, N.

    2011-08-01

    Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron (EC) and ohmic heated (OH) discharges in the T10 tokamak have been analyzed by linear electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] aiming to find insights into the effect of auxiliary heating on the transport. Trapped electron modes are found to be unstable in both OH and the EC heated scenarios. In the OH case the main drive is from the density gradient and in the EC case from the electron temperature gradient. The growth rates and particle fluxes exhibit qualitatively different scaling with the electron-to-ion temperature ratios in the two cases. This is mainly due to the fact that the dominant drives and the collisionalities are different. The inward flow velocity of impurities and the impurity diffusion coefficient decreases when applying EC heating, which leads to lower impurity peaking, consistently with experimental observations.

  18. Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron and ohmic heated discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Moradi, S.; Fueloep, T.; Timchenko, N.

    2011-08-15

    Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron (EC) and ohmic heated (OH) discharges in the T10 tokamak have been analyzed by linear electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations with gyro[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] aiming to find insights into the effect of auxiliary heating on the transport. Trapped electron modes are found to be unstable in both OH and the EC heated scenarios. In the OH case the main drive is from the density gradient and in the EC case from the electron temperature gradient. The growth rates and particle fluxes exhibit qualitatively different scaling with the electron-to-ion temperature ratios in the two cases. This is mainly due to the fact that the dominant drives and the collisionalities are different. The inward flow velocity of impurities and the impurity diffusion coefficient decreases when applying EC heating, which leads to lower impurity peaking, consistently with experimental observations.

  19. Dynamics and microinstabilities at perpendicular collisionless shock: A comparison of large-scale two-dimensional full particle simulations with different ion to electron mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki Kidani, Yoshitaka; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-02-15

    Large-scale two-dimensional (2D) full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out for studying the relationship between the dynamics of a perpendicular shock and microinstabilities generated at the shock foot. The structure and dynamics of collisionless shocks are generally determined by Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, while microinstabilities at the shock foot are controlled by the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity and the ratio of the plasma-to-cyclotron frequency. With a fixed Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity is given as a function of the ion-to-electron mass ratio. The present 2D full PIC simulations with a relatively low Alfven Mach number (M{sub A} ? 6) show that the modified two-stream instability is dominant with higher ion-to-electron mass ratios. It is also confirmed that waves propagating downstream are more enhanced at the shock foot near the shock ramp as the mass ratio becomes higher. The result suggests that these waves play a role in the modification of the dynamics of collisionless shocks through the interaction with shock front ripples.

  20. Electron cyclotron microinstability in the foot of a perpendicular shock: A self-consistent PIC simulation

    E-print Network

    Muschietti, Laurent

    Electron cyclotron microinstability in the foot of a perpendicular shock: A self-consistent PIC in the foot during the self-reformation phase of low bi supercritical shocks. The instability is excited beam mode carried by the reflected ions. Dispersion properties in the foot are analysed. We discuss

  1. Collisionality dependence of the quasilinear particle flux due to microinstabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fueloep, T.; Pusztai, I.; Helander, P.

    2008-07-15

    The collisionality dependence of the quasilinear particle flux due to the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron mode (TEM) instabilities is studied by including electron collisions modeled by a pitch-angle scattering collision operator in the gyrokinetic equation. The inward transport due to ITG modes is caused mainly by magnetic curvature and thermodiffusion and can be reversed as electron collisions are introduced, if the plasma is far from marginal stability. However, if the plasma is close to marginal stability, collisions may even enhance the inward transport. The sign and the magnitude of the transport are sensitive to the form of the collision operator, to the magnetic drift normalized to the real frequency of the mode, and to the density and temperature scale lengths. These analytical results are in agreement with previously published gyrokinetic simulations. Unlike the ITG-driven flux, the TEM-driven flux is expected to be outwards for conditions far from marginal stability and inwards otherwise.

  2. A comprehensive gyrokinetic description of global electrostatic microinstabilities in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.; Angelino, P.

    2009-05-15

    It is believed that low frequency microinstabilities such as ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven modes and trapped electron modes (TEMs) are largely responsible for the experimentally observed anomalous transport via the ion and electron channels in a tokamak. In the present work, a comprehensive global linear gyrokinetic model incorporating fully kinetic (trapped and passing) electrons and ions, actual ion to electron mass ratio, radial coupling, and profile variation is used to investigate the ITG driven modes and pure TEMs. These modes are found to exhibit multiscale structures in the presence of nonadiabatic passing electrons. The multiscale structure is related to the large nonadiabaticity of electrons in the vicinity of mode rational magnetic surfaces and leads to reduced mixing length estimates of transport compared to those obtained from adiabatic electron models.

  3. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. I. Analytical theory of trapped-particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Proll, J. H. E.; Plunk, G. G.; Max-Planck/Princeton Research Center for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald

    2013-12-15

    This is the first in a series of papers about collisionless, electrostatic micro-instabilities in stellarators, with an emphasis on trapped-particle modes. It is found that, in so-called maximum-J configurations, trapped-particle instabilities are absent in large regions of parameter space. Quasi-isodynamic stellarators have this property (approximately), and the theory predicts that trapped electrons are stabilizing to all eigenmodes with frequencies below the electron bounce frequency. The physical reason is that the bounce-averaged curvature is favorable for all orbits, and that trapped electrons precess in the direction opposite to that in which drift waves propagate, thus precluding wave-particle resonance. These considerations only depend on the electrostatic energy balance and are independent of all geometric properties of the magnetic field other than the maximum-J condition. However, if the aspect ratio is large and the instability phase velocity differs greatly from the electron and ion thermal speeds, it is possible to derive a variational form for the frequency showing that stability prevails in a yet larger part of parameter space than what follows from the energy argument. Collisionless trapped-electron modes should therefore be more stable in quasi-isodynamic stellarators than in tokamaks.

  4. Bump-on-tail instability in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Susmita; Paul, Samit; Denra, Raicharan

    2015-10-01

    Bump-on-tail instability of Langmuir waves propagating in unmagnetized Lorentzian plasma modeled by a Kappa velocity distribution with spectral index ? has been investigated in this paper. Growth rate of this microinstability has been determined analytically from the Langmuir wave dispersion relation. Change in the maximum growth rate with increasing ? has been numerically estimated for different number density and temperature ratios using solar wind data.

  5. Non-Linear Dynamics and Emergence in Laboratory Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hnat, B.

    2011-09-22

    Turbulent behaviour of laboratory fusion plasma system is modelled using extended Hasegawa-Wakatani equations. The model is solved numerically using finite difference techniques. We discuss non-linear effects in such a system in the presence of the micro-instabilities, specifically a drift wave instability. We explore particle dynamics in different range of parameters and show that the transport changes from diffusive to non-diffusive when large directional flows are developed.

  6. Comparing Linear Microinstability of the National Compact Stellarator Expriment and a Shaped Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Baumgaertel, G.W. Hammett and D.R. Mikkelsen

    2012-11-20

    One metric for comparing con nement properties of di erent magnetic fusion energy con gurations is the linear critical gradient of drift wave modes. The critical gradient scale length determines the ratio of the core to pedestal temperature when a plasma is limited to marginal stability in the plasma core. The gyrokinetic turbulence code GS2 was used to calculate critical temperature gradients for the linear, collisionless ion tem- perature gradient (ITG) mode in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and a prototypical shaped tokamak, based on the pro les of a JET H-mode shot and the stronger shaping of ARIES-AT. While a concern was that the narrow cross section of NCSX at some toroidal locations would result in steep gradients that drive instabilities more easily, it is found that other stabilizing e ects of the stellarator con guration o set this so that the normalized critical gradients for NCSX are competitive with or even better than for the tokamak. For the adiabatic ITG mode, NCSX and the tokamak had similar critical gradients, though beyond marginal stability, NCSX had larger growth rates. However, for the kinetic ITG mode, NCSX had a higher critical gradient and lower growth rates until a/LT ?#25; 1:5 a/LT;crit, when it surpassed the tokamak's. A discussion of the results presented with respect to a/LT vs R/LT is included.

  7. Plasma confinement experiments in the TMX tandem mirror. Paper IAEA-CN-38/F-1

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Anderson, C.A.; Casper, T.A.

    1980-05-22

    Results from the new Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) are described. Tandem-mirror density and potential profiles are produced using end-plug neutral-beam injection and central-cell gas-fueling. TMX parameters are near those predicted theoretically. The end-plug electron temperature is higher than in the comparably sized single-mirror 2XIIB. Axial confinement of the finite-beta central-cell plasma is improved by the end plugs by as much as a factor of 9. In TMX, end-plug microinstability limits central-cell confinement in agreement with theory.

  8. Microfluctuations of plasma density in a theta-pinch and spatial coherency of a probing laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, A. B.; Burtsev, V. A.; Kozhevin, V. M.; Smirnov, V. G.; Sholokhov, Yu. I.

    Spatial distribution of RMS value of density fluctuations and perturbation wave lengths determined by low hybrid drift (LHD)-instability is obtained on the basis of 1-D MHD model describing the behavior of the linear theta pinch plasma taking account of the process of classical and anomalous transfer. The assumption about spatial uniform distribution of electron density fluctuations inside the plasma layer is introduced proceeding from the results of these calculations. The angular spectrum of laser radiation passing through the plasma is obtained analytically in the framework of this assumption. Comparison of the spectrum shape obtained in the paper with the experiment has shown that anomalously great increase of divergence of coherent probing radiation can be explained by LHD-instability development. Such a sharp change in spatial coherency (divergency) may be used for diagnosis as a method to study microinstabilities of plasma in pinch discharges.

  9. Adiabatic electron response and solitary wave generation by trapped particle nonlinearity in a hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra

    2014-10-15

    The finite amplitude ion acoustic waves that trap electrons modify the structure of the evolving nonlinear soliton solutions. In the numerical simulations, self-consistently generated solitary waves are studied that emerge as a result of a current driven microinstability growing the ion acoustic mode in a collisionless Vlasov plasma. The growth saturates as a result of nonlinear effects governed by a combination of nonlinearities originating from the hydrodynamic model and kinetic particle trapping effects. The resulting solitary waves also coexist with a finite current and an electron plasma wave capable of perturbing the trapping potential. The results of multiscale simulation are analyzed and characterized following the kinetic prescription of undamped trapped particle mode in the form of phase space vortex solutions that are generalized form of Sagdeev's solitons and obey the solutions of a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, accounting for a stronger nonlinearity originating from the electron trapping.

  10. Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, David R.; Tanaka, K.; Nunami, M.; Watanabe, T-H.; Sugama, H.; Yoshinuma, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yashura, R.; Akiyama, T.; Pablant, Novimir A.

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  11. Quasilinear carbon transport in an impurity hole plasma in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Tanaka, K.; Nunami, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Yoshinuma, M.; Ida, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Pablant, N. A.

    2014-08-01

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-internal transport barrier (ITB) and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions, the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  12. SciDAC - Center for Plasma Edge Simulation - Project Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Scott

    2014-11-03

    Final Technical Report: Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) Principal Investigator: Scott Parker, University of Colorado, Boulder Description/Abstract First-principle simulations of edge pedestal micro-turbulence are performed with the global gyrokinetic turbulence code GEM for both low and high confinement tokamak plasmas. The high confinement plasmas show a larger growth rate, but nonlinearly a lower particle and heat flux. Numerical profiles are obtained from the XGC0 neoclassical code. XGC0/GEM code coupling is implemented under the EFFIS (“End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation”) framework. Investigations are underway to clearly identify the micro-instabilities in the edge pedestal using global and flux-tube gyrokinetic simulation with realistic experimental high confinement profiles. We use both experimental profiles and those obtained using the EFFIS XGC0/GEM coupled code framework. We find there are three types of instabilities at the edge: a low-n, high frequency electron mode, a high-n, low frequency ion mode, and possibly an ion mode like kinetic ballooning mode (KBM). Investigations are under way for the effects of the radial electric field. Finally, we have been investigating how plasmas dominated by ion-temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, how cold Deuterium and Tritium ions near the edge will naturally pinch radially inward towards the core. We call this mechanism “natural fueling.” It is due to the quasi-neutral heat flux dominated nature of the turbulence and still applies when trapped and passing kinetic electron effects are included. To understand this mechanism, examine the situation where the electrons are adiabatic, and there is an ion heat flux. In such a case, lower energy particles move inward and higher energy particles move outward. If a trace amount of cold particles are added, they will move inward.

  13. Flute instability growth on a magnetized plasma column.

    SciTech Connect

    Genoni, Thomas C.; Welch, Dale Robert; Ditmire, T.; Rose, David Vincent; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Porter, John Larry, Jr.

    2006-08-01

    The growth of the flute-type instability for a field-aligned plasma column immersed in a uniform magnetic field is studied. Particle-in-cell simulations are compared with a semi-analytic dispersion analysis of the drift cyclotron instability in cylindrical geometry with a Gaussian density profile in the radial direction. For the parameters considered here, the dispersion analysis gives a local maximum for the peak growth rates as a function of R/r{sub i}, where R is the Gaussian characteristic radius and r{sub i} is the ion gyroradius. The electrostatic and electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation results give azimuthal and radial mode numbers that are in reasonable agreement with the dispersion analysis. The electrostatic simulations give linear growth rates that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis results, while the electromagnetic simulations yield growth rate trends that are similar to the dispersion analysis but that are not in quantitative agreement. These differences are ascribed to higher initial field fluctuation levels in the electromagnetic field solver. Overall, the simulations allow the examination of both the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability in this physical system up to and beyond the point of wave energy saturation. Keywords: Microinstabilities, Magnetic confinement and equilibrium, Particle-in-cell method.

  14. Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated NSTX plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, S. M.; Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R.; Gerhardt, S.; Leblanc, B.; Maingi, R.

    2014-10-01

    A representative H-mode discharge from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is studied in detail as a basis for a time-evolving prediction of the electron temperature profile using an appropriate reduced transport model. The time evolution of characteristic plasma variables such as ?e, ?e*, the MHD ? parameter and the gradient scale lengths of Te, Ti and ne were examined prior to performing linear gyrokinetic calculations to determine the fastest growing microinstability at various times and locations throughout the discharge. The inferences from the parameter evolutions and the linear stability calculations were consistent. Early in the discharge, when ?e and ?e* were relatively low, ballooning parity modes were dominant. As both ?e and ?e* increased with time, microtearing became the dominant low-k?mode, especially in the outer half of the plasma. There are instances in time and radius where other modes, at higher-k?, may be important for driving electron transport. The Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) electron thermal diffusivity model, which is based on microtearing-induced transport, was used to predict the time-evolving electron temperature across most of the profile. The results indicate that RLW does a good job of predicting Te for times and locations where microtearing was determined to be important, but not as well when microtearing was predicted to be stable or subdominant. This work has been supported by U.S. Dept of Energy contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Numerical simulation of non-equilibrium plasma flow in a cylindrical MPD thruster using a high-order flux-difference splitting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangar, Mahdy; Ebrahimi, Reza; Shams, Mehrzad

    2014-10-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational algorithm is developed to simulate the plasma flow field in a self-field MPD thruster, in order to determine the flow behavior and the electromagnetic characteristics distribution. The convective flux vector is computed by using Roe's scheme in combination with Powell's eigensystem technique, and a new modified MUSCL technique called OMUSCL2 is employed to obtain the stable high-accuracy solution. Madrane-Tadmor entropy correction is used to prevent unrealistic expansion shocks near the electrodes tips. To accurately capture the physics of plasma in the system, different physical-chemical sub-models including multi-level non-equilibrium ionization model, generalized Ohm's law for partially ionized plasma, micro-instabilities effects, two-temperature model, and a real equation of state are considered. Numerical results of plasma flow simulation in a cylindrical lab-scale thruster, with mass flow rate of 6 g/s and total discharge current of 8 kA, are presented and comparison with experimental data shows good agreement between the predicted and measured contours of enclosed current and electric potential. The estimated thrust is 16.34 N which exhibits less than 5% difference compared with measured value. Furthermore, this simulation properly predicts the experimentally observed argon jet structure.

  16. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  17. PIC Simulations of Hypersonic Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Niemann, C.; Decyk, V.; Schriver, D.; Clark, E.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma sheaths formed around hypersonic aircraft (Mach number, M > 10) are relatively unexplored and of interest today to both further the development of new technologies and solve long-standing engineering problems. Both laboratory experiments and analytical/numerical modeling are required to advance the understanding of these systems; it is advantageous to perform these tasks in tandem. There has already been some work done to study these plasmas by experiments that create a rapidly expanding plasma through ablation of a target with a laser. In combination with a preformed magnetic field, this configuration leads to a magnetic "bubble" formed behind the front as particles travel at about Mach 30 away from the target. Furthermore, the experiment was able to show the generation of fast electrons which could be due to instabilities on electron scales. To explore this, future experiments will have more accurate diagnostics capable of observing time- and length-scales below typical ion scales, but simulations are a useful tool to explore these plasma conditions theoretically. Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations are necessary when phenomena are expected to be observed at these scales, and also have the advantage of being fully kinetic with no fluid approximations. However, if the scales of the problem are not significantly below the ion scales, then the initialization of the PIC simulation must be very carefully engineered to avoid unnecessary computation and to select the minimum window where structures of interest can be studied. One method of doing this is to seed the simulation with either experiment or ion-scale simulation results. Previous experiments suggest that a useful configuration for studying hypersonic plasma configurations is a ring of particles rapidly expanding transverse to an external magnetic field, which has been simulated on the ion scale with an ion-hybrid code. This suggests that the PIC simulation should have an equivalent configuration; however, modeling a plasma expanding radially in every direction is computationally expensive. In order to reduce the computational expense, we use a radial density profile from the hybrid simulation results to seed a self-consistent PIC simulation in one direction (x), while creating a current in the direction (y) transverse to both the drift velocity and the magnetic field (z) to create the magnetic bubble observed in experiment. The simulation will be run in two spatial dimensions but retain three velocity dimensions, and the results will be used to explore the growth of micro-instabilities present in hypersonic plasmas in the high-density region as it moves through the simulation box. This will still require a significantly large box in order to compare with experiment, as the experiments are being performed over distances of 104 ?De and durations of 105 ?pe-1.

  18. Nonlinear electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenko, F.; Dorland, W.

    2001-12-01

    One of the central physics issues currently targeted by nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations is the role of finite-? effects. The latter change the MHD equilibrium, introduce new dynamical space and time scales, alter and enlarge the zoo of electrostatic microinstabilities and saturation mechanisms, and lead to turbulent transport along fluctuating magnetic field lines. It is shown that the electromagnetic effects on primarily electrostatic microinstabilities are generally weakly or moderately stabilizing. However, the saturation of these modes and hence the determination of the transport level in the quasi-stationary turbulent state can be dominated by nonlinear electromagnetic effects and yield surprising results. Despite this, the induced transport is generally electrostatic in nature well below the ideal ballooning limit.

  19. Dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Winske, D.; Keinigs, R.; Lemons, D.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of dusty plasmas at the Laboratory. While dusty plasmas are found in space in galactic clouds, planetary rings, and cometary tails, and as contaminants in plasma enhanced fabrication of microelectronics, many of their properties are only partially understood. Our work has involved both theoretical analysis and self-consistent plasma simulations to understand basic properties of dusty plasmas related to equilibrium, stability, and transport. Such an understanding can improve the control and elimination of plasma dust in industrial applications and may be important in the study of planetary rings and comet dust tails. We have applied our techniques to the study of charging, dynamics, and coagulation of contaminants in plasma processing reactors for industrial etching and deposition processes and to instabilities in planetary rings and other space plasma environments. The work performed in this project has application to plasma kinetics, transport, and other classical elementary processes in plasmas as well as to plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities.

  20. Plasma valve

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY); Sharma, Sushil (Hinsdale, IL); Noonan, John (Naperville, IL); Rotela, Elbio (Clarendon Hills, IL); Khounsary, Ali (Hinsdale, IL)

    2003-01-01

    A plasma valve includes a confinement channel and primary anode and cathode disposed therein. An ignition cathode is disposed adjacent the primary cathode. Power supplies are joined to the cathodes and anode for rapidly igniting and maintaining a plasma in the channel for preventing leakage of atmospheric pressure through the channel.

  1. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  2. Plasma Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Radio communication with space probes requires sending signals through the Earth's ionosphere and usually the solar wind. During planetary flybys, the signal may also pass through the ionosphere of another planet. These ionized media can perturb the radio signal in a variety of ways. Examples of these perturbations are variations in the electrical length between the spacecraft and the ground station, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized signals, amplitude and phase scintillations, and spectral and angular broadening. These plasma effects can have undesirable influences on telemetry performance and thus need to be understood from a communications engineering viewpoint. The plasma effects are, however, useful from a scientific viewpoint, since the effects on the communications link can often be inverted to estimate the physical conditions in the plasma.

  3. Burning plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

  4. Plasma Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2005-10-01

    The Plasma Shield is a vortex-stabilized arc that is employed to shield beams and workpiece area of interaction from atmospheric or liquid environment. A vortex-stabilized arc is established between a beam generating device (laser, ion or electron gun) and the target object. The arc, which is composed of a pure noble gas (chemically inert), engulfs the interaction region and generates an outward flow, thus, shielding it from any surrounding liquids (water) or atmospheric gases. The vortex is composed of a sacrificial gas or liquid that swirls around and stabilizes the arc. In current art, many industrial processes that involve ion and electron beams like, dry etching, micro-fabrication, machining, welding and melting are performed exclusively in vacuum, since guns, and accelerators must be kept at a reasonably high vacuum, and since chemical interactions with atmospheric gases adversely affect various processes. Various processes involving electron ion and laser beams can, with the Plasma Shield be performed in practically any environment (under water). It should allow for in situ repair of ship and nuclear reactor components, as well as in-air ion implantation of semiconductors. The plasma shield results in both thermal (since the plasma is hotter than the environment) and chemical shielding. The latter feature brings about in-vacuum process purity out of vacuum, and the thermal shielding aspect results in higher production rates. Experimental results will be presented. *Plasma Shield/Work supported by Acceleron, Inc., Connecticut Light & Power Co., US DOE funding under a NICE3 grant DE-FG41-01R110925, and Connecticut DEP.

  5. Properties of large scale plasma flow during the early stage of the plasmaspheric refilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Craven, P.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to better characterize the macroscopic properties of the interhemisphere plasma flow by solving a more complete set of hydrodynamic equations than that solved previously. Specifically, the ion continuity, momentum and energy equations were solved for the plasma flow along the closed magnetic field lines. During the initial stage of the supersonic outflow in the equatorial region, the ions cool substantially. Using the hydrodynamic model for the large-scale plasma flow, the dynamics of shocks was examined which form in the geomagnetic flux tubes during the early stages of refilling. These shocks are more like those forming in neutral gases than the electrostatic shocks driven by microinstabilities involving ion-ion interaction. Therefore, the shocks seen in the hydrodynamic model are termed as hydrodynamic shocks. Such shocks are generally unsteady and therefore the usual shock jump conditions given by Rankine-Hugoniot relations are not strictly applicable to them. The density, flow velocity and temperature structures associated with the shocks are examined for both asymmetrical and symmetrical flows. In the asymmetrical flow the outflow from one of two conjugate ionospheres is dominant. On the other hand, in the symmetrical case outflows from the two ionospheric sources are identical. Both cases are treated by a two-stream model. In the late type of flow, the early-time refilling shows a relaxation type of oscillation, which is driven by the large-scale interactions between the two identical streams. After this early stage, the resulting temperature structure shows some interesting features. In the equatorial region the streams are isothermal, but in the off-equatorial regions the streams have quite different temperatures, and also densities and flow velocities. The dense and slow stream is found to be warmer than the low-density fast stream. In the late stage of refilling, the temperature is found to steadily increase from the conjugate ionospheres towards the equator; the equatorial temperature is found to be as high as about 8000 K compared to the ionospheric temperature of 3600 K.

  6. PLASMA SUBSTITUTES

    PubMed Central

    Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Miller, L. L.; Alling, E. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1946-01-01

    Hemoglobin and globin alone, supplemented, or modified in various ways are seriously considered as plasma substitutes. Human globin given to doubly depleted (anemic and hypoproteinemic) dogs by vein contributes to the production of new hemoglobin and plasma protein, but there is some toxicity and weight loss. Dog hemoglobin given intraperitoneally is better tolerated and somewhat more completely utilized with more blood proteins formed and less weight loss. Dog globin (tryptic digest) given by vein in anemic dogs is associated with a moderate production of new hemoglobin. Horse globin by mouth contributes to the formation of new hemoglobin in the standard anemic dog. Dog hemoglobin given intraperitoneally in protein fasting, non-anemic dogs is well utilized to maintain nitrogen and weight balance. A dl-isoleucine supplement fails to improve this utilization of hemoglobin for maintenance in the dog. A small supplement of dl-methionine greatly improves the utilization of dog hemoglobin for maintenance in the dog and further addition of isoleucine is without effect. The intermediary metabolism of dog hemoglobin is not yet worked out. Electrophoretic analyses (Table 6) suggest that globin appears in the peripheral circulation after intraperitoneal injections of hemoglobin. PMID:19871535

  7. Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schep, T.J.

    2004-03-15

    Plasmas and magnetic fields are inseparably related in numerous physical circumstances. This is not only the case in natural occurring plasmas like the solar corona and the earth magnetic tail, but also in laboratory plasmas like tokamaks and stellarators.

  8. Plasma Free Metanephrines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Plasma Free Metanephrines Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Plasma Metanephrines Formal name: Fractionated Plasma Free Metanephrines (Metanephrine ...

  9. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  10. Plasma crystals and liquid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.

    1998-10-21

    General properties of strongly coupled colloidal plasmas are briefly summarised, and their properties of being able to 'condense' into a self-organised liquid and crystalline form is discussed. Both laboratory and microgravity aspects of the research into this new form of matter are described and the theoretical constraints are compared with available measurements. Finally, the phase transition solid-liquid-gaseous is investigated using measurements of the 'normalised interaction cross section', {sigma}{sigma}{sub p}, derived from molecular diffusion of the colloid component.

  11. Global simulation of edge pedestal micro-instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weigang; Parker, Scott; Chen, Yang

    2011-10-01

    We study micro turbulence of the tokamak edge pedestal with global gyrokinetic particle simulations. The simulation code GEM is an electromagnetic ?f code. Two sets of DIII-D experimental profiles, shot #131997 and shot #136051 are used. The dominant instabilities appear to be two kinds of modes both propagating in the electron diamagnetic direction, with comparable linear growth rates. The low n mode is at the Alfven frequency range and driven by density and ion temperature gradients. The high n mode is driven by electron temperature gradient and has a low real frequency. A ? scan shows that the low n mode is electromagnetic. Frequency analysis shows that the high n mode is sometimes mixed with an ion instability. Experimental radial electric field is applied and its effects studied. We will also show some preliminary nonlinear results. We thank R. Groebner, P. Snyder and Y. Zheng for providing experimental profiles and helpful discussions.

  12. Plasma Dictionary Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Don; Heeter, Robert; Alvarez, Mitch

    2000-10-01

    In response to many inquiries for a list of plasma terms, a database driven Plasma Dictionary website (plasmadictionary.llnl.gov) was created that allows users to submit new terms, search for specific terms or browse alphabetic listings. The Plasma Dictionary website contents began with the Fusion & Plasma Glossary terms available at the Fusion Energy Educational website (fusedweb.llnl.gov). Plasma researchers are encouraged to add terms and definitions. By clarifying the meanings of specific plasma terms, it is envisioned that the primary use of the Plasma Dictionary website will be by students, teachers, researchers, and writers for (1) Enhancing literacy in plasma science, (2) Serving as an educational aid, (3) Providing practical information, and (4) Helping clarify plasma writings. The Plasma Dictionary website has already proved useful in responding to a request from the CRC Press (www.crcpress.com) to add plasma terms to its CRC physics dictionary project (members.aol.com/physdict/).

  13. Plasma sweeper. [Patents

    DOEpatents

    Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

    1982-10-25

    A device is described for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from RF power introducing means to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the RF power introducing means. Means are described for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  14. Plasmas for space propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahedo, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    Plasma thrusters are challenging the monopoly of chemical thrusters in space propulsion. The specific energy that can be deposited into a plasma beam is orders of magnitude larger than the specific chemical energy of known fuels. Plasma thrusters constitute a vast family of devices ranging from already commercial thrusters to incipient laboratory prototypes. Figures of merit in plasma propulsion are discussed. Plasma processes and conditions differ widely from one thruster to another, with the pre-eminence of magnetized, weakly collisional plasmas. Energy is imparted to the plasma via either energetic electron injection, biased electrodes or electromagnetic irradiation. Plasma acceleration can be electrothermal, electrostatic or electromagnetic. Plasma-wall interaction affects energy deposition and erosion of thruster elements, and thus is central for thruster efficiency and lifetime. Magnetic confinement and magnetic nozzles are present in several devices. Oscillations and turbulent transport are intrinsic to the performances of some thrusters. Several thrusters are selected in order to discuss these relevant plasma phenomena.

  15. Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE

    E-print Network

    Chen, Francis F.

    Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE I. What is a plasma? 1 II. Plasma fundamentals 3 1. Quasineutrality and Debye length 2. Plasma frequency and acoustic velocity 3. Larmor radius; magnetic buckets Cross section data 21 PART A3: PLASMA SOURCES I IV. Introduction to plasma sources 25 1

  16. Industrial plasmas in academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Howling, AA; Guittienne, Ph; Furno, I.

    2015-01-01

    The present review, written at the occasion of the 2014 EPS Innovation award, will give a short overview of the research and development of industrial plasmas within the last 30?years and will also provide a first glimpse into future developments of this important topic of plasma physics and plasma chemistry. In the present contribution, some of the industrial plasmas studied at the CRPP/EPFL at Lausanne are highlighted and their influence on modern plasma physics and also discharge physics is discussed. One of the most important problems is the treatment of large surfaces, such as that used in solar cells, but also in more daily applications, such as the packaging industry. In this contribution, the advantages and disadvantages of some of the most prominent plasmas such as capacitively- and inductively-coupled plasmas are discussed. Electromagnetic problems due to the related radio frequency and its consequences on the plasma reactor performance, and also dust formation due to chemical reactions in plasma, are highlighted. Arcing and parasitic discharges occurring in plasma reactors can lead to plasma reactor damages. Some specific problems, such as the gas supply of a large area reactor, are discussed in more detail. Other topics of interest have been dc discharges such as those used in plasma spraying where thermal plasmas are applied for advanced material processing. Modern plasma diagnostics make it possible to investigate sparks in electrical discharge machining, which surprisingly show properties of weakly-coupled plasmas. Nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasmas have been applied to more speculative topics such as applications in aerodynamics and will surely be important in the future for ignition and combustion. Most of the commonly-used plasma sources have been shown to be limited in their performance. Therefore new, more effective plasma sources are urgently required. With the recent development of novel resonant network antennas for new advanced large area or large volume plasma sources, an important step towards high performance plasmas and new fast processes is made.

  17. Plasma surface cleaning using microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.; Nelson, W.D.; Schechter, D.E.; Thompson, L.M.; Campbell, V.B.; Glover, A.L.; Googin, J.M.

    1993-11-01

    In a microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source, reactive plasmas of oxygen and its mixture with argon are used for plasma-cleaning experiments. Aluminum test samples (0.95 {times} 1.9 cm) were coated with thin films ({le} 20 {mu}m in thickness) of Shell Vitrea oil and cleaned by using such reactive plasmas. The plasma cleaning was done in various discharge conditions with fixed microwave power, rf power, biased potential, gas pressures (0.5 and 5 mtorr), and operating time up to 35 min. The status of plasma cleaning has been monitored by using mass spectroscopy. Mass loss of the samples after plasma cleaning was measured to estimate cleaning rates. Measured clean rates of low pressure (0.5 mtorr) argon/oxygen plasmas were as high as 2.7 {mu}/min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine cleanliness of the sample surfaces and confirm the effectiveness of plasma cleaning in achieving atomic levels of surface cleanliness. In this paper, significant results are reported and discussed.

  18. Plasma and magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Research and development in plasmas and magnetospheric environments is reported. Topics discussed include: analysis and techniques of software development; data analysis and modeling; spacecraft sheath effects; laboratory plasma flow studies; instrument development.

  19. Plasma sheath driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, J.H.; Freeman, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    Plasma focus driven target implosions are simulated using hydrodynamic-burn codes. Support is given to the idea that the use of a target in a plasma focus should allow ''impedance matching'' between the fuel and gun, permitting larger fusion yields from a focus-target geometry than the scaling laws for a conventional plasma focus would predict.

  20. PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Budny, Robert

    Magnetic Shear M.G. Bell Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton, N.J., U.S.A. with contributions, G.L. Schmidt, E.J. Synakowski, M.C. Zarnstorff #12;PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL Topics enhanced confinement modes · Stability issues · Possibilities for exploitation #12;PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS

  1. Strongly Coupled Plasma Liquids

    E-print Network

    Z. Donko; P. Hartmann; G. J. Kalman

    2007-10-27

    This paper intends to review some of the prominent properties of strongly coupled classical plasmas having in mind the possible link with the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions. Thermodynamic and transport properties of classical liquid-state one-component plasmas are described and features of collective excitations are presented.

  2. Afterglow Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samarian, A. A.; Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M.

    2008-09-07

    The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

  3. Industrial Plasma Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeff, Igor

    2007-11-01

    This presentation summarizes an extensive program on plasma antennas. Plasma antennas are just as effective as metal antennas. In addition, they can transmit, receive and reflect lower frequency signals while being transparent to higher frequency signals. When de-energized, they electrically disappear. Plasma noise does not appear to be a problem. New technology that has been developed include a method of operating at high plasma density at minimal power consumption, a novel technique of noise reduction, and a method of opening a plasma window in a plasma microwave barrier on a time scale of microseconds rather than the usual time scale of milliseconds due to plasma decay. We are at present testing an intelligent plasma antenna in which a plasma ``window'' in a circular plasma barrier surrounding an antenna rotates azimuthally, seeking a radio transmitter. When located, a computer locks onto the transmitter. When the transmitter is de-energized, the plasma window recommences scanning. Commercial interest is strong, with invited papers being presented for 4 years in succession at the SMi Stealth Conference in London, UK, an operating model on permanent exhibition at the Booze-Allen headquarters in Alexandria, VA, and strong interest from Lockheed-Martin. In collaboration with Ted Anderson, Haleakala R&D Corp.; Esmaeil Farshi, Fred Dyer, Jeffrey Peck, Eric Pradeep, Nanditha Pulasani, and Naresh Karnam, University of Tennessee.

  4. Plasma -Sheath Interface Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Natalia; Slemrod, Marshall

    1999-10-01

    For a collisional bounded plasma problem, it is necessary to model the plasma and sheath separately because of the different scales in each region. We specify the plasma boundary by Godyak's criterion and sheath boundary by Bohm's criterion. We connect the plasma and sheath by a viscous interfacial region where the electric field is approximately constant. The approach enables us to develop and solve universal models for each of the three regions, and combine the solutions continously to approximate the solution to the bounded plasma problem. Comparison of combined solutions with corresponding solution to the bounded plasma problem yields relative error at wall for ion density of 9velocity 10within experimental range. When the interface is neglected and the plasma and sheath are combined, the relative errors are ion density 40Although the interface region is very small it greatly improves the result.

  5. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    E-print Network

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  6. Plasma contactor research, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of double layers observed by researchers investigating magnetospheric phenomena are contrasted to those observed in plasma contacting experiments. Experiments in the electron collection mode of the plasma contacting process were performed and the results confirm a simple model of this process for current levels ranging to 3 A. Experimental results were also obtained in a study of the process of electron emission from a hollow cathode plasma contactor. High energy ions are observed coming from the cathode in addition to the electrons and a phenomenological model that suggests a mechanism by which this could occur is presented. Experimental results showing the effects of the design parameters of the ambient plasma simulator on the plasma potential, electron temperature, electron density and plasma noise levels induced in plasma contacting experiments are presented. A preferred simulator design is selected on the basis of these results.

  7. Plasmas for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2013-09-01

    Plasma medicine is an innovative and emerging field combining plasma physics, life science and clinical medicine. In a more general perspective, medical application of physical plasma can be subdivided into two principal approaches. (i) “Indirect” use of plasma-based or plasma-supplemented techniques to treat surfaces, materials or devices to realize specific qualities for subsequent special medical applications, and (ii) application of physical plasma on or in the human (or animal) body to realize therapeutic effects based on direct interaction of plasma with living tissue. The field of plasma applications for the treatment of medical materials or devices is intensively researched and partially well established for several years. However, plasma medicine in the sense of its actual definition as a new field of research focuses on the use of plasma technology in the treatment of living cells, tissues, and organs. Therefore, the aim of the new research field of plasma medicine is the exploitation of a much more differentiated interaction of specific plasma components with specific structural as well as functional elements or functionalities of living cells. This interaction can possibly lead either to stimulation or inhibition of cellular function and be finally used for therapeutic purposes. During recent years a broad spectrum of different plasma sources with various names dedicated for biomedical applications has been reported. So far, research activities were mainly focused on barrier discharges and plasma jets working at atmospheric pressure. Most efforts to realize plasma application directly on or in the human (or animal) body for medical purposes is concentrated on the broad field of dermatology including wound healing, but also includes cancer treatment, endoscopy, or dentistry. Despite the fact that the field of plasma medicine is very young and until now mostly in an empirical stage of development yet, there are first indicators of its enormous economic potential. This ambivalent situation fundamentally requires a responsible use of plasma sources, which are specifically designated for biomedical applications. To enable physicians as well as life scientists to decide whether a given plasma source is really suitable for medical applications or biological experiments, a meaningful and mandatory spectrum of indicators has to be compiled to allow for a basic estimation of the potential of this plasma source.

  8. Boundary Plasma Issues in Burning Plasma Science

    E-print Network

    Pitcher, C. S.

    magnetic fusion configuration: 1. wide dispersal of power 2. high divertor gas pressures 3. eliminate plasma/neutral densities · criterion for high recycling and cold divertor, Tt ~ 5 eV (a prerequisite (Tt carbon

  9. Plasma Biomedicine in Orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satsohi

    2012-10-01

    Various effects of plasmas irradiation on cells, tissues, and biomaterials relevant for orthopedic applications have been examined. For direct application of plasmas to living cells or tissues, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with helium flows into ambient air were used. For biomaterial processing, on the other hand, either helium DBDs mentioned above or low-pressure discharges generated in a chamber were used. In this presentation, plasma effects on cell proliferation and plasma treatment for artificial bones will be discussed. First, the conditions for enhanced cell proliferation in vitro by plasma applications have been examined. The discharge conditions for cell proliferation depend sensitively on cell types. Since cell proliferation can be enhanced even when the cells are cultured in a plasma pre-treated medium, long-life reactive species generated in the medium by plasma application or large molecules (such as proteins) in the medium modified by the plasma are likely to be the cause of cell proliferation. It has been found that there is strong correlation between (organic) hydroperoxide generation and cell proliferation. Second, effects of plasma-treated artificial bones made of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) have been examined in vitro and vivo. It has been found that plasma treatment increases hydrophilicity of the surfaces of microscopic inner pores, which directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells introduced into the pores and therefore causes faster bone growth. The work has been performed in collaboration with Prof. H. Yoshikawa and his group members at the School of Medicine, Osaka University.

  10. What is a plasma?

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, Thomas P.

    2012-08-30

    This introduction will define the plasma fourth state of matter, where we find plasmas on earth and beyond, and why they are useful. There are applications to many consumer items, fusion energy, scientific devices, satellite communications, semiconductor processing, spacecraft propulsion, and more. Since 99% of our observable universe is ionized gas, plasma physics determines many important features of astrophysics, space physics, and magnetosphere physics in our solar system. We describe some plasma characteristics, examples in nature, some useful applications, how to create plasmas. A brief introduction to the theoretical framework includes the connection between kinetic and fluid descriptions, quasi neutrality, Debye shielding, ambipolar electric fields, some plasma waves. Hands-on demonstrations follow. More complete explanations will follow next week.

  11. Pulsed plasma electron sourcesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Yarmolich, D.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Vekselman, V.; Hadas, Y.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Felsteiner, J.

    2009-05-01

    There is a continuous interest in research of electron sources which can be used for generation of uniform electron beams produced at E ?105 V/cm and duration ?10-5 s. In this review, several types of plasma electron sources will be considered, namely, passive (metal ceramic, velvet and carbon fiber with and without CsI coating, and multicapillary and multislot cathodes) and active (ferroelectric and hollow anodes) plasma sources. The operation of passive sources is governed by the formation of flashover plasma whose parameters depend on the amplitude and rise time of the accelerating electric field. In the case of ferroelectric and hollow-anode plasma sources the plasma parameters are controlled by the driving pulse and discharge current, respectively. Using different time- and space-resolved electrical, optical, spectroscopical, Thomson scattering and x-ray diagnostics, the parameters of the plasma and generated electron beam were characterized.

  12. Principles of plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Ian H.

    The physical principles, techniques, and instrumentation of plasma diagnostics are examined in an introduction and reference work for students and practicing scientists. Topics addressed include basic plasma properties, magnetic diagnostics, plasma particle flux, and refractive-index measurements. Consideration is given to EM emission by free and bound electrons, the scattering of EM radiation, and ion processes. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, sample problems, and a glossary of symbols are provided.

  13. Plasma and magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of programs for statistical analysis of boundary and structure type files based on surveys of Dynamics Explorere data. Programs being used for handling data on plasma boundaries in the inner magnetosphere, the structure of the plasmasphere, and the heavy ion torus may be useful for determining statistics on the warm plasma cloak and the auroral ion fountain. Data analysis and modeling; spacecraft sheath effects; and laboratory plasma flow studies are discussed.

  14. Chiral plasma instabilities.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2013-08-01

    We study the collective modes in relativistic electromagnetic or quark-gluon plasmas with an asymmetry between left- and right-handed chiral fermions, based on the recently formulated kinetic theory with Berry curvature corrections. We find that there exists an unstable mode, signaling the presence of a plasma instability. We argue the fate of this "chiral plasma instability" including the effect of collisions, and briefly discuss its relevance in heavy ion collisions and compact stars. PMID:23952387

  15. Helicons in Unbounded Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    Helicons are whistler modes with helical phase fronts. They have been studied in solid state plasmas and in discharge tubes where boundaries and nonuniformities are ever present. The present work shows that helicons also exist in unbounded and uniform plasmas, thereby bridging the fields of laboratory and space plasma physics. First measurements of helicon field lines in three dimensional space are presented. Helicons with negative and positive mode numbers can propagate with equal amplitudes.

  16. Space plasma physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    During the course of this grant, work was performed on a variety of topics and there were a number of significant accomplishments. A summary of these accomplishments is included. The topics studied include empirical model data base, data reduction for archiving, semikinetic modeling of low energy plasma in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, O(+) outflows, equatorial plasma trough, and plasma wave ray-tracing studies. A list of publications and presentations which have resulted from this research is also included.

  17. Planetary plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary types of plasma waves observed in the vicinity of the planets Venus, Mars, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are described. The observations are organized according to the various types of plasma waves observed, ordered according to decreasing distance from the planet, starting from the sunward side of the planet, and ending in the region near the closest approach. The plasma waves observed include: electron plasma oscillations and ion acoustic waves; trapped continuum radiation; electron cyclotron and upper hybrid waves; whistler-mode emissions; electrostatic ion cyclotron waves; and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  19. Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

    2007-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

  20. Leo space plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1991-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays interact with the low earth orbit (LEO) space plasma in two fundamentally different ways. One way is the steady collection of current from the plasma onto exposed conductors and semiconductors. The relative currents collected by different parts of the array will then determine the floating potential of the spacecraft. In addition, these steady state collected currents may lead to sputtering or heating of the array by the ions or electrons collected, respectively. The second kind of interaction is the short time scale arc into the space plasma, which may deplete the array and/or spacecraft of stored charge, damage solar cells, and produce EMI. Such arcs only occur at high negative potentials relative to the space plasma potential, and depend on the steady state ion currents being collected. New high voltage solar arrays being incorporated into advanced spacecraft and space platforms may be endangered by these plasma interactions. Recent advances in laboratory testing and current collection modeling promise the capability of controlling, and perhaps even using, these space plasma interactions to enable design of reliable high voltage space power systems. Some of the new results may have an impact on solar cell spacing and/or coverslide design. Planned space flight experiments are necessary to confirm the models of high voltage solar array plasma interactions. Finally, computerized, integrated plasma interactions design tools are being constructed to place plasma interactions models into the hands of the spacecraft designer.

  1. Solid expellant plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H. (Inventor); Poe, Garrett D. (Inventor); Rood, Robert (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved solid expellant plasma generator has been developed. The plasma generator includes a support housing, an electrode rod located in the central portion of the housing, and a mass of solid expellant material that surrounds the electrode rod within the support housing. The electrode rod and the solid expellant material are made of separate materials that are selected so that the electrode and the solid expellant material decompose at the same rate when the plasma generator is ignited. This maintains a point of discharge of the plasma at the interface between the electrode and the solid expellant material.

  2. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    Plasma plumes, or plasma jets, belong to a large family of gas discharges whereby the discharge plasma is extended beyond the plasma generation region into the surrounding ambience, either by a field (e.g. electromagnetic, convective gas flow, or shock wave) or a gradient of a directionless physical quantity (e.g. particle density, pressure, or temperature). This physical extension of a plasma plume gives rise to a strong interaction with its surrounding environment, and the interaction alters the properties of both the plasma and the environment, often in a nonlinear and dynamic fashion. The plasma is therefore not confined by defined physical walls, thus extending opportunities for material treatment applications as well as bringing in new challenges in science and technology associated with complex open-boundary problems. Some of the most common examples may be found in dense plasmas with very high dissipation of externally supplied energy (e.g. in electrical, optical or thermal forms) and often in or close to thermal equilibrium. For these dense plasmas, their characteristics are determined predominantly by strong physical forces of different fields, such as electrical, magnetic, thermal, shock wave, and their nonlinear interactions [1]. Common to these dense plasma plumes are significant macroscopic plasma movement and considerable decomposition of solid materials (e.g. vaporization). Their applications are numerous and include detection of elemental traces, synthesis of high-temperature materials and welding, laser--plasma interactions, and relativistic jets in particle accelerators and in space [2]-[4]. Scientific challenges in the understanding of plasma jets are exciting and multidisciplinary, involving interweaving transitions of all four states of matter, and their technological applications are wide-ranging and growing rapidly. Using the Web of Science database, a search for journal papers on non-fusion plasma jets reveals that a long initial phase up to 1990 with only 31 papers per year on average, and a total of some 1300 papers, precedes a considerable growth of some 35-50% in research activity every five years, over the last 20 years or so. As shown in the table, the annual dissemination of the field is more than 1600 papers and the total number of papers is in excess of 20000. This upwards trajectory is typical of a strong and growing subject area in physical science, with considerable capacity in both fundamental science and applications. PeriodNumber of papersPapers per annum 1948-1990130031 1991-19952279456 1996-20003447689 2001-20054571914 2006-201066401328 2011 1658 In many of the dense plasma jets discussed above, strong physical forces generated by the plasma are often desired and this favours plasma generation at elevated gas pressure, including atmospheric pressure, which favours a high level of gas ionization. Historically it has been challenging to reduce and control the strong physical forces in high-pressure plasmas for applications where these are unwanted, for example, surface modification of polymeric sheets [5]. Indeed, there is a real need for a vast range of material processing applications at temperatures below 100oC (or below 400 K) and this favours atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained far from thermal equilibrium with the dissipated electrical energy largely used not in heat generation but in unleashing non-equilibrium chemical reactions. The long-standing difficulty of effectively controlling the level of gas ionization at atmospheric pressure was overcome by the technological breakthrough of achieving atmospheric-pressure glow discharges in the late 1980s [6]. A related challenge stemming from high collisionality of atmospheric-pressure plasmas (v >> ?0) means that large-area plasmas sustained between parallel-plate electrodes are very susceptible to strong plasma instabilities when molecular gases are introduced for processing applications. This led to an effective technological solution in the early to late 1990s of confining atmospheric plasmas in a small volume

  3. Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors Xudong ``Peter'' Xu Engineering, Urbana, Illinois 61801 Received 13 May 1999; accepted 1 October 1999 Perfluorinated compounds PFCs , gases which have large global warming potentials, are widely used in plasma processing

  4. Ferroelectric Plasma Cathodes for Plasma Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaevsky, Alexander; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2002-11-01

    During last decade the phenomenon of strong ferroelectric emission was studied widely in many laboratories all around the world. It was shown that the application of a kilovolt-range driving pulse between solid rear and patterned front electrodes which cover a sample of a ferroelectric ceramics results in electron emission from the side of the front electrode. The current density of this electron emission varies from hundreds of mA to hundreds of A per cm^2. The duration of the current pulse is several hundreds of nanoseconds with the repetition rate up to several MHz. Recent investigations showed that the strong electron emission occurs from surface discharge plasma formed on the ceramic surface near the edges of the front electrode pattern. The surface plasma has a density of 10^11 - 10^13 cm-3, an electron temperature of 2-3 eV, and consists mostly from ions of ferroelectric ceramic material and the front electrode. Ferroelectric Plasma Cathodes (FPC) are used widely in electron guns, microwave sources, and high current switches. It was recently showed that a strong ferroelectric-gas discharge occurs at a background pressure about of 1 Torr. Dense plasma formed in the ferroelectric-gas discharge can be used either as a powerful cathodes-neutralizer or as a plasma source for an ion thruster. Ferroelectric segmented electrodes are also very promising for Hall thrusters in both emissive and nonemissive modes.

  5. Self-energized plasma compressor. [for compressing plasma discharged from coaxial plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shriver, E. L.; Igenbergs, E. B. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    The self-energized plasma compressor is described which compresses plasma discharged from a coaxial plasma generator. The device includes a helically shaped coil which is coaxially aligned with the center axis of the coaxial plasma generator. The plasma generator creates a current through the helical coil which, in turn, generates a time varying magnetic field that creates a force which acts radially upon the plasma. The coaxial plasma generator and helical coil move the plasma under high pressure and temperature to the narrow end of the coil. Positioned adjacent to the narrow end of the coil are beads which are engaged by the plasma to be accelerated to hypervelocities for simulating meteoroids.

  6. Superlite Plasma Collection System.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Sohachi

    2003-02-01

    The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare launched a national initiative to become plasma self-sufficient by reducing reliance on imported plasma products and increasing plasma collections to enable plasma-derived pharmaceuticals, including albumin, globulin, and Factor VIII products to use plasma collected within Japan. In order to realize this goal, plasma collections from volunteer donors must increase to about 1.5 million litres of plasma per year (1) or about 50% more than what the Japan Red Cross currently collects. A mobile device, such as the Superlite system, will make it easier and more efficient for Japan's sole blood collection agency, the Japan Red Cross, to add plasma collection to mobile blood drives. Haemonetics Corporation (Braintree, MA, USA) has combined many years of apheresis experience with up-to-date technology to create the Superlite Plasma Collection System (PCS) for the Japan Red Cross. This new device, which is expected to greatly contribute to the Red Cross's national source plasma collection program, is even smaller than the Ultralite PCS and offers several advanced features and benefits. Light, compact, and very portable, the Superlite has a Japanese language friendly user interface that continually displays collection status, including time remaining in the collection procedure. The device features a protocol that limits extra-corporeal blood volume for low-weight donors; a program used in conjunction with a reduced volume disposable bowl. Superlite, designed for use in both fixed-site and mobile applications, combines the portable ease-of-use of the Ultralite with the collection process calculation abilities of the CCS to provide a state-of-the-art collection device that will help define the future of Japan plasma collection. PMID:12921116

  7. Laboratory Dipole Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Jay

    2011-10-01

    Modern laboratory studies of plasma confined by a strong dipole magnet originated twenty years ago when it was learned that planetary magnetospheres have centrally-peaked plasma pressure profiles that form naturally when solar wind drives plasma circulation and heating. Unlike other internal rings devices, like spherators and octupoles, the magnetic flux tubes of the dipole field expand rapidly with radius. Unlike plasma confinement devices that obtain stability from magnetic shear and average good curvature, like tokamaks and levitrons, the dipole-confined plasma obtains stability from plasma compressibility. These two geometric characteristics of the dipole field have profound consequences: (i) plasma can be stable with local beta exceeding unity, (ii) fluctuations can drive either heat or particles inward to create stationary profiles that are strongly peaked, and (iii) the confinement of particles and energy can decouple. During the past decade, several laboratory dipole experiments and modeling efforts have lead to new understanding of interchange, centrifugal and entropy modes, nonlinear gyrokinetics, and plasma transport. Two devices, the LDX experiment at MIT and RT-1 at the University of Tokyo, operate with levitated superconducting dipole magnets. With a levitated dipole, not only is very high-beta plasma confined in steady state but, also, levitation produces high-temperature at low input power and demonstrates that toroidal magnetic confinement of plasma does not require a toroidal field. Modeling has explained many of the processes operative in these experiments, including the observation of a strong inward particle pinch. Turbulent low-frequency fluctuations in dipole confined plasma cause adiabatic transport and form a fundamental linkage between the radial variation of flux-tube volume and the centrally peaked density and pressure profiles. In collaboration with M.E. Mauel and D.T. Garnier; supported by DoE FG02-98ER54458.

  8. Partially ionized plasmas, including the Third Symposium on Uranium Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, M.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals of both electrically and fission generated plasmas are discussed. Research in gaseous fuel reactors using uranium hexafluoride is described and other partially ionized plasma applications are discussed.

  9. Laser plasma diagnostics of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Amendt, P.; Budil, K.S.; Hammel, B.A.; Kalantar, D.H.; Key, M.H.; Landen, O.L.; Remington, B.A.; Desenne, D.E.

    1995-07-12

    The authors describe several experiments on Nova that use laser-produced plasmas to generate x-rays capable of backlighting dense, cold plasmas (p {approximately} 1--3 gm/cm{sup 3}, kT {approximately} 5--10 eV, and areal density {rho}{ell}{approximately} 0.01--0.05 g/cm{sup 2}). The x-rays used vary over a wide range of h{nu}, from 80 eV (X-ray laser) to 9 keV. This allows probing of plasmas relevant to many hydrodynamic experiments. Typical diagnostics are 100 ps pinhole framing cameras for a long pulse backlighter and a time-integrated CCD camera for a short pulse backlighter.

  10. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

    E-print Network

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas General Plasma Science Developing Laboratory Plasma Program at FES Highlights of a world-class program A science-edge radiation- hydrodynamics codes, and for demonstrating substantial leadership qualities in high- energy

  11. EnergyandPower Plasma Science

    E-print Network

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    , embedded systems, plasma science and engineering, terahertz science and technology, MEMS, computer vision, MEMS and integrated microsystems, plasma science and engineering, optics and photonics, lasers, quantumEnergyandPower Plasma Science Electromagnetics Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology Quantum

  12. Plasma thrusters from Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, E.J.

    1992-09-01

    A report on the Russian stationary plasma thrusters having plasma accelerated to high velocities by electrical and magnetic forces is described. For specific impulses of 15-20 km/sec, optimal for such applications as satellite station keeping and orbital transfer, a unit supplying 0.05 N from a 2-kW input has a 30-cm-diameter nozzle.

  13. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  14. Diamagnetism of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. C.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ellis, R. F.; Teodorescu, C.

    2011-11-15

    Diamagnetism and magnetic measurements of a supersonically rotating plasma in a shaped magnetic field demonstrate confinement of plasma pressure along the magnetic field resulting from centrifugal force. The Grad-Shafranov equation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic force balance, including supersonic rotation, is solved to confirm that the predicted angular velocity is in agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler shifts.

  15. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamsstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  17. Plasma engineering for MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Baldwin, D.E.; Barr, W.L.

    1983-03-24

    The two-year Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in the conceptual design of a commercial, electricity-producing fusion reactor based on tandem mirror confinement. The physics basis for the MARS reactor was developed through work in two highly coupled areas of plasma engineering: magnetics and plasma performance.

  18. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  19. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  20. Plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Savage, Mark E. (Albuquerque, NM); Mendel, Jr., Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  1. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  2. Solar system plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  3. Waves in Space Plasmas Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) program is a joint international effort involving instrumentation to be designed and fabricated by funding from NASA and the National Research Council of Canada. The instrumentation, with a tentatively planned payload for 1986, can be used to perturb the plasma with radio waves to solve problems in ionospheric, atmospheric, magnetospheric, and plasma physics. Among the ionospheric and plasma phenomena to be investigated using WISP instrumentation are VLF wave-particle interactions; ELF/VLF propagation; traveling ionospheric disturbances and gravity wave coupling; equatorial plasma bubble phenomena; plasma wave physics such as mode-coupling, dispersion, and instabilities; and plasma physics of the antenna-plasma interactions.

  4. Boundary Plasma Issues in Burning Plasma Science

    E-print Network

    magnetic fusion configuration: 1. wide dispersal of power 2. high divertor gas pressures 3. eliminate plasma/neutral densities · criterion for high recycling and cold divertor, Tt ~ 5 eV (a prerequisite target plate physical sputtering is small · chemical sputtering of carbon a serious issue (no energy

  5. Plasma Science Committee (PLSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council. Plasma sciences represent a broad and diverse field. The PLSC has accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general health of the field as whole. Although select advisory bodies have been created to address specific issues that affect plasma science, such as the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC), the PLSC provides a focus for the plasma science community that is unique and essential. The membership of the PLSC is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include accelerators and beams, space physics, astrophysics, computational physics and applied mathematics, fusion plasmas, fundamental experiments and theory, radiation sources, low temperature plasmas, and plasma-surface interactions. The PLSC is well prepared to respond to requests for studies on specific issues.

  6. Origins of magnetospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.E. )

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of recent (1987-1990) progress in understanding of the origins of plasmas in the earth's magnetosphere. In counterpoint to the early supposition that geomagnetic phenomena are produced by energetic plasmas of solar origin, 1987 saw the publication of a provocative argument that accelerated ionospheric plasma could supply all magnetospheric auroral and ring current particles. Significant new developments of existing data sets, as well as the establishment of entirely new data sets, have improved the ability to identify plasma source regions and to track plasma through the magnetospheric system of boundary layers and reservoirs. These developments suggest that the boundary between ionospheric and solar plasmas, once taken to lie at the plasmapause, actually lies much nearer to the magnetopause. Defining this boundary as the surface where solar wind and ionosphere contribute equally to the plasma, it is referred to herein as the 'geopause'. It is now well established that the infusion of ionospheric O(+) plays a major role in the storm-time distention of the magnetotail and inflation of the inner magnetosphere. After more than two decades of observation and debate, the question remains whether magnetosheric are protons of solar or terrestrial origin. 161 refs.

  7. Plasma Chemical Aspects Of Dust Formation In Hydrocarbon Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stepanovic, O.; Stefanovic, I.; Winter, J.

    2008-09-07

    This contribution deals with some plasma chemical aspects of dust formation in hydrocarbon plasmas. The interplay between dust formation and plasma chemistry will be discussed by means of different experimental results. One specific example concerns the formation of benzene and the role of atomic hydrogen for plasma chemical processes and dust formation in hydrocarbon discharges.

  8. Parametric plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, V. P.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    1986-04-01

    We present the results of the main papers published during the last few years on the theory of parametric absorption of electromagnetic radiation energy in plasmas. We use the approach of weak Langmuir turbulence theory, since it can be asserted on the basis of the contents of the present paper that this approach is consistent with a wide range of contemporary experiments. The results of the theory of the parametric turbulence of Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in homogenous plasmas are presented. The shape of the turbulence spectra for different conditions of wave excitation and the properties of the time relaxation of the spectra are discussed. Special attention is paid to the theory of weak Langmuir turbulence in plasmas with inhomogeneous density. The spectra of one-dimensional parametric turbulence in planar plasmas are considered. It is shown that the inhomogeneity of the density extends the domain of the applicability of weak turbulence theory due to the transfer of the Langmuir wave energy from the region of the excitation of waves to the more rarefield plasma layers. The accelaration of electrons in parametrically turbulent inhomogenous plasmas is discussed. It is shown, that the estimates of the efficiency of parametric energy absorption in plasmas can be obtained not only in the framework of the kinetic theory of waves but also on the basis of the simpler considerationsof the balance of the wave energy fluxes. Estimates of the efficiency of parametric absorption in laser-produced plasmas are given. It is shown that it is possible to have a considerable parametric absorption rate even in the case of steep density gradients. Parametric instabilities can also produce effective absorption in the case of lower-hybrid and electron-cyclotron heating of a plasma in a strong magnetic field.

  9. Plasma for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that grew from research in application of low-temperature (or cold) atmospheric plasmas in bioengineering. One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is cancer therapy. Convincing evidence of CAP selectivity towards the cancer cells has been accumulated. This review summarizes the state of the art of this emerging field, presenting various aspects of CAP application in cancer such as the role of reactive species (reactive oxygen and nitrogen), cell cycle modification, in vivo application, CAP interaction with cancer cells in conjunction with nanoparticles, and computational oncology applied to CAP.

  10. Optical plasma microelectronic devices

    E-print Network

    Forati, Ebrahim; Dill, Thyler; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The semiconductor channel in conventional microelectronic devices was successfully replaced with an optically triggered gas plasma channel. The combination of DC and laser-induced gas ionizations controls the conductivity of the channel, enabling us to realize different electronic devices such as transistors, switches, modulators, etc. A special micro-scale metasurface was used to enhance the laser-gas interaction, as well as combining it with DC ionization properly. Optical plasma devices benefit form the advantages of plasma/vacuum electronic devices while preserving most of the integrablity of semiconductor based devices.

  11. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, Thomas C.; Rolston, Steven L.

    2010-03-15

    Plasmas are collections of charged particles that can exhibit an impressively diverse set of collective phenomena. They exist in an extraordinary variety of environments and span a great range of densities and temperatures, from 15 million kelvin in the core of the Sun to 200 K in the ionosphere and from 10{sup 30} particles per cubic centimeter in a white dwarf to 1 particle per cm{sup 3} in interstellar space. They can find application in lighting sources, manufacturing of computer chips, and fusion energy research. Plasmas created in the laboratory are used to replicate and study those that occur naturally and to probe the fundamental and complex behavior of plasmas.

  12. Turbulences in boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    We simulate boundary plasma turbulence using a 3D turbulence code BOUT and a linearized electromagnetic instability shooting code BAL. The code BOUT solves fluid equations for plasma vorticity,density, ion temperature and parallel momentum (along the magnetic field), electron temperature, and parallel momentum. A realistic DIII-D X point magnetic geometry is used. The focus is on the possible local linear instability drivers and turbulence suppression mechanisms from L to H mode. Comparison is made with data from the DIII-D toltamak where probe measurements provide turbulence statistics in the boundary plasma and transport modeling.

  13. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  14. Plasma surface modification of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirotsu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Thin plasma polymerization films are discussed from the viewpoint of simplicity in production stages. The application of selective, absorbent films and films used in selective permeability was tested. The types of surface modification of polymers discussed are: (1) plasma etching, (2) surface coating by plasma polymerized thin films, and (3) plasma activation surface graft polymerization.

  15. PLASMA PHYSICS PPPL UC Davis

    E-print Network

    PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis Scattering System for ETG physics on NSTX H. Park, E. Mazzucato, and D. Smith PPPL, Princeton University C, 2006 Hyatt Regency, Dallas, TX #12;PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis PRINCETON PLASMA

  16. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  17. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Chan, Shi-Kit (Washington, DC); Van Hoven, Raymond L. (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  18. Computer simulation of astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Claire E.

    1991-01-01

    The role of sophisticated numerical models and simulations in the field of plasma astrophysics is discussed. The need for an iteration between microphysics and macrophysics in order for astrophysical plasma physics to produce quantitative results that can be related to astronomical data is stressed. A discussion on computational requirements for simulations of astrophysical plasmas contrasts microscopic plasma simulations with macroscopic system models. An overview of particle-in-cell simulations (PICS) is given and two examples of PICS of astrophysical plasma are discussed including particle acceleration by collisionless shocks in relativistic plasmas and magnetic field reconnection in astrophysical plasmas.

  19. Magnetospheric Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Barry H.

    Magnetospheric Plasma Physics is volume 4 of an ongoing series of review books entitled Developments in Earth and Planetary Sciences organized by the Center for Academic Publications Japan. The series is intended to stress Japanese work; however, the present volume was written by seven internationally selected authors who have reviewed works from a broad range of sources. This volume is composed of articles drawn from five lecture series presented at the Autumn College o f Plasma Physics, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, October-November 1979. The audiences for these lecture series were plasma and/or space plasma physicists, or students of the same, and the level and tone of this volume clearly reflect that condition.

  20. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2010-01-08

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the ?burning plasma? regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  1. Plasma edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, K.

    1992-06-01

    Atomic physics models for the interpretation of plasma edge spectroscopic measurements are discussed. Spectroscopy of the plasma edge, mainly in the visible range, provides information on hydrogen and impurity influxes, on impurity production measurements and on particle confinement. Some basic processes determining the population of excited levels are presented leading to the corona excitation balance and to collisional radiative models. These were discussed for the special case of helium. A first application of plasma edge spectroscopy is the investigation of atom and ion particle flux densities at the boundary of tokamaks or stellarators. Results are shown for oxygen, carbon and chromium in JET. Molecular particle fluxes, like H2, D2 and CH4 are then focused upon. The interpretation of the shape and intensity of molecular band emission is explained, and results are presented with respect to chemical carbon production. The mechanisms of impurity screening at the plasma edge are investigated and respective measurements are shown.

  2. Plasma Cell Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) Multiple Myeloma Macroglobulinemia Heavy Chain Diseases Plasma cell disorders are uncommon. They begin ... antibody produced is incomplete, consisting of only light chains or heavy chains (functional antibodies normally consist of ...

  3. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  4. Gingival plasma cell granuloma.

    PubMed

    Pandav, Amitkumar B; Gosavi, Alka V; Lanjewar, Dhaneshwar N; Jagadale, Rakhi V

    2012-11-01

    Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma. PMID:23559965

  5. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Pandav, Amitkumar B; Gosavi, Alka V; Lanjewar, Dhaneshwar N; Jagadale, Rakhi V

    2012-01-01

    Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma. PMID:23559965

  6. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  7. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  8. Wakes in inhomogeneous plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kompaneets, Roman; Ivlev, Alexei V; Nosenko, Vladimir; Morfill, Gregor E

    2014-04-01

    The Debye shielding of a charge immersed in a flowing plasma is an old classic problem. It has been given renewed attention in the last two decades in view of experiments with complex plasmas, where charged dust particles are often levitated in a region with strong ion flow. Efforts to describe the shielding of the dust particles in such conditions have been focused on the homogeneous plasma approximation, which ignores the substantial inhomogeneity of the levitation region. We address the role of the plasma inhomogeneity by rigorously calculating the point charge potential in the collisionless Bohm sheath. We demonstrate that the inhomogeneity can dramatically modify the wake, making it nonoscillatory and weaker. PMID:24827356

  9. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F. (New Ellenton, SC); Pak, Donald J. (Martine, GA)

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  10. Electrostatics of moving plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatov, A. M.

    2013-07-15

    The stability of charge distribution over the surface of a conducting body in moving plasma is analyzed. Using a finite-width plate streamlined by a cold neutralized electron flow as an example, it is shown that an electrically neutral body can be unstable against the development of spontaneous polarization. The plasma parameters at which such instability takes place, as well as the frequency and growth rate of the fundamental mode of instability, are determined.

  11. Plasmas in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ackerson, K. L.; Wolfe, J. H.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The solar wind plasma analyzer on board Pioneer 2 provides first observations of low-energy positive ions in the magnetosphere of Saturn. Measurable intensities of ions within the energy-per-unit charge (E/Q) range 100 eV to 8 keV are present over the planetocentric radial distance range about 4 to 16 R sub S in the dayside magnetosphere. The plasmas are found to be rigidly corotating with the planet out to distances of at least 10 R sub S. At radial distances beyond 10 R sub S, the bulk flows appear to be in the corotation direction but with lesser speeds than those expected from rigid corotation. At radial distances beyond the orbit of Rhea at 8.8 R sub S, the dominant ions are most likely protons and the corresponding typical densities and temperatures are 0.5/cu cm and 1,000,000 K, respectively, with substantial fluctuations. It is concluded that the most likely source of these plasmas in the photodissociation of water frost on the surface of the ring material with subsequent ionization of the products and radially outward diffusion. The presence of this plasma torus is expected to have a large influence on the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere since the pressure ratio beta of these plasmas approaches unity at radial distances as close to the planet as 6.5 R sub S. On the basis of these observational evidences it is anticipated that quasi-periodic outward flows of plasma, accompanied with a reconfiguration of the magnetosphere beyond about 6.5 R sub S, will occur in the local night sector in order to relieve the plasma pressure from accretion of plasma from the rings.

  12. Plasmas in Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, L.A.; Burek, B.G.; Ackerson, K.L.; Wolfe, J.H.; Mihalov, J.D.

    1980-04-01

    The solar wind plasma analyzer on board Pioneer II provides first observations of low-energy positive ions in the magnetosphere of Saturn. Measurable intensities of ions within the energy-per-unit charge (E/Q) range 100 eV to 8 keV are present over the planetocentric radial distance range about 4 to 16 R/sub S/ in the dayside magnetosphere. The plasmas are found to be rigidly corotating with the planet out to distances of at least 10 R/sub S/. At radial distances beyond 10 R/sub S/, the bulk flows appear to be in the corotation direction but with lesser speeds than those expected from rigid corotation. At radial distances beyond the orbit of Rhea at 8.8 R/sub S/, the dominant ions are most likely protons and the corresponding typical densities and temperatures are 0.5/cu cm and 1,000,000 K, respectively, with substantial fluctuations. It is concluded that the most likely source of these plasmas in the photodissociation of water frost on the surface of the ring material with subsequent ionization of the products and radially outward diffusion. The presence of this plasma torus is expected to have a large influence on the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere since the pressure ratio beta of these plasmas approaches unity at radial distances as close to the planet as 6.5 R/sub S/. On the basis of these observational evidences it is anticipated that quasi-periodic outward flows of plasma, accompanied with a reconfiguration of the magnetosphere beyond about 6.5 R/sub S/, will occur in the local night sector in order to relieve the plasma pressure from accretion of plasma from the rings.

  13. Plasma contactor research - 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholtz, Brett; Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    A report describing the operating principles of hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors emitting or collecting electrons from an ambient plasma is summarized. Preliminary experiments conducted to determine the noise generated by these plasma contactors in the emission-current return line and in the plasma near it are described. These noise data are measured as current fluctuations in the return line and to the Langmuir probe and then analyzed using a fast Fourier transform technique. The spectral compositions of the data are characterized using power spectral density plots which are examined to identify possible noise source(s) and production mechanism(s). The precautions taken in the construction and calibration of the instrumentation to assure adequate frequency response are described. Experimental results show that line-current noise levels are typically 2 percent of the electron current being emitted or collected. However, noise levels increase to as much as 20 percent of the electron current at a few electron-collection operating conditions. The frequencies associated with most of the noise were harmonics of the 60 Hz input to system power supplies. Plasma noise had characteristics similar in magnitude and frequency to those for the return-line noise, but they contained additional features at frequencies considered to be related to ion-acoustic instabilities. Also discussed is a new probe positioning system built to facilitate future plasma-contractor research.

  14. Magnetospheric space plasma investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Topics and investigations covering this period of this semiannual report period (August 1994 - January 1995) are as follows: (1) Generalized SemiKinetic (GSK) modeling of the synergistic interaction of transverse heating of ionospheric ions and magnetospheric plasma-driven electric potentials on the auroral plasma transport. Also, presentations of GSK modeling of auroral electron precipitation effects on ionospheric plasma outflows, of ExB effects on such outflow, and on warm plasma thermalization and other effects during refilling with pre-existing warm plasmas; (2) Referees' reports received on the statistical study of the latitudinal distributions of core plasmas along the L = 4.6 field line using DE-1/RIMS data. Other work is concerned in the same field, field-aligned flows and trapped ion distributions; and (3) A short study has been carried out on heating processes in low density flux tubes in the outer plasmasphere. The purpose was to determine whether the high ion temperatures observed in these flux tubes were due to heat sources operating through the thermal electrons or directly to the ions. Other investigations center along the same area of plasmasphere-ionosphere coupling. The empirical techniques and model, the listing of hardware calibrated, and/or tested, and a description of notable meetings attended is included in this report, along with a list of all present publication in submission or accepted and those reference papers that have resulted from this work thus far.

  15. Plasma electron analysis: Voyager plasma science experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Plasma Science Experiment (PLS) on the Voyager spacecraft provide data on the plasma ions and electrons in the interplanetary medium and the magnetospheres of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. A description of the analysis used to obtain electron parameters (density, temperature, etc.) from the plasma science experiment PLS electron measurements which cover the energy range from 10 eV to 5950 eV is presented. The electron sensor (D cup) and its transmission characteristics are described. A derivation of the fundamental analytical expression of the reduced distribution function F(e) is given. The electron distribution function F(e), used in the moment integrations, can be derived from F(e). Positive ions produce a correction current (ion feedthrough) to the measured electron current, which can be important to the measurements of the suprathermal electron component. In the case of Saturn, this correction current, which can either add to or subtract from the measured electron current, is less than 20% of the measured signal at all times. Comments about the corrections introduced by spacecraft charging to the Saturn encounter data, which can be important in regions of high density and shadow when the spacecraft can become negatively charged are introduced.

  16. Measuring the plasma density of a ferroelectric plasma source in an expanding plasma

    E-print Network

    Measuring the plasma density of a ferroelectric plasma source in an expanding plasma A. Dunaevsky Jersey 08536 Received 19 September 2003; accepted 9 February 2004 The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements

  17. Understanding helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tarey, R. D.; Sahu, B. B.; Ganguli, A.

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of work on the helicon plasmas and also discusses various aspects of RF power deposition in such plasmas. Some of the work presented here is a review of earlier work on theoretical [A. Ganguli et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 113503 (2007)] and experimental [A. Ganguli et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20(1), 015021 (2011)] investigations on helicon plasmas in a conducting cylindrical waveguide for m = -1 mode. This work also presents an approach to investigate the mechanisms by which the helicon and associated Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) waves are responsible for RF power deposition in Helicon discharges. Experiment design adopts the recent theory of damping and absorption of Helicon modes in conducting waveguides [A. Ganguli et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 113503 (2007)]. The effort has also been made to detect the warm electrons, which are necessary for ionization, because Helicon discharges are of high density, low T{sub e} discharges and the tail of the bulk electron population may not have sufficient high-energy electrons. Experimental set up also comprises of the mirror magnetic field. Measurements using RF compensated Langmuir probes [A. Ganguli et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 17, 015003 (2008)], B-dot probe and computations based on the theory shows that the warm electrons at low pressure (0.2-0.3 mTorr) Helicon discharges, are because of the Landau damping of TG waves. In collisional environment, at a pressure Almost-Equal-To 10 mTorr, these high-energy electrons are due to the acceleration of bulk electrons from the neighboring regions across steep potential gradients possibly by the formation of double layers.

  18. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, G.; Karger, O.; Knetsch, A.; Xi, Y.; Deng, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smith, J.; Manahan, G. G.; Sheng, Z.-M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Hidding, B.

    2015-08-01

    A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  19. Plasma plume propagation characteristics of pulsed radio frequency plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. H.; Liu, X. Y.; Hu, K.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-04-11

    A 4 cm long helium cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet with pulsed radio frequency (rf) excitation was obtained by a copper electrode inside a quartz tube. The plasma bullet propagation characteristics common to the microseconds direct current pulse and kilohertz plasma jet is not observed in this case. The space-, time-, and wavelength-resolved optical emission profiles suggest the pulsed rf plasma channel out of the tube was strengthened by ions and metastables with longer life time than the rf period, and the plasma propagation was actually an illumination of the plasma channel caused by energetic electrons accelerated along the channel.

  20. Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1998-09-14

    OAK B188 Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program. The purpose of the Travel Grant Program is to increase the awareness of plasma research. The new results and techniques of plasma research in fusion plasmas, plasma processing space plasmas, basic plasma science, etc, have broad applicability throughout science. The benefits of these results are limited by the relatively low awareness and appreciation of plasma research in the larger scientific community. Whereas spontaneous interactions between plasma scientists and other scientists are useful, a focused effort in education and outreach to other scientists is efficient and is needed. The academic scientific community is the initial focus of this effort, since that permits access to a broad cross-section of scientists and future scientists including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and research staff.

  1. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; ">the JET Contributors, plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low ? N scenarios. At high ? N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10?5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is underway and JET has successfully achieved H 98(y,2)??=??1 for plasma currents up to 2.5 MA at moderate ? N.

  2. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOEpatents

    McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

    1985-01-15

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  3. Magneto-plasma waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Min Sup; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2003-10-01

    A new method of guiding electromagnetic radiation with plasmas is presented. The concept uses a homogeneous plasma and an inhomogeneous external magnetic field to make a guiding channel for electromagnetic (EM) radiation. The basic idea is to use the external magnetic field to create a transverse variation in the refractive index. This is possible since the refractive index of the magnetized plasma is dependent on the external magnetic field as well as the plasma density. Particle in cell simulations with XOOPIC show that the idea works as expected. In the simulations, a right-hand-polarized microwave pulse was launched into a uniform density plasma with an axial applied magnetic field whose intensity varied transversly. The results agreed well with an analysis based on an envelope equation for the transverse spot size of the wave. Owing to the resonance in the dispersion relation, the index of refraction exhibits much sharper gradients then the applied magnetic field. Using this fact, a simple theory based on specifying the boundary condition at a magnetic wall (defined by the radius where the cut-off is reached) yields a dispersion relation which agrees well with simulation results. A magnetic wiggler, which satisfies the Ampere's law with zero current (curl B=0), was also used. The wave intensity is well-conserved in the periodic focusing and defocusing channel created by a superposition of the wiggler and a uniform axial field. Possible applications of this magnetic guiding scheme are discussed.

  4. DC Dusty Plasma Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenkopf, Joshua; Wissel, Stephanie; Zwicker, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    We describe the development of simulations of a complex plasma-composed of a low-temperature plasma and dust grains-to be used in comparing the electron, dust and ion interactions in the simulations to the Dusty Plasma eXperiments (DPX) being conducted at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). There are two DPX experiments: a ground-based experiment used to investigate the spontaneous formation of dust acoustic waves and the flight-based experiment that has gone on three flights on NASA's ``Weightless Wonder.'' The latter experiment has recently been outfitted with a thermal heater used to generate a thermal gradient in the device. This thermal gradient produces a thermophoretic force on the charged dust grains that counteracts gravity, thereby simulating the flights on the ``Weightless Wonder.'' We have modified the XOOPIC code (J.P. Verboncoeur et al., Comp. Phys. Comm., 87, May 11, 1995, pp. 199-211) to simulate the DPX apparatuses by adding a new dielectric particle species and creating additional modules to handle dust by allowing variable charge and deposition currents during the collision phase of the code. Using these simulations, plasma dynamics and dust cloud characteristics are compared with experimental results (C. Udemgba, these proceedings).

  5. Road Map for a Modular Magnetic Fusion Program Dale M. Meade

    E-print Network

    plant. The Lawson Diagram - A Topographical Map for Fusion The physics requirements for a burning plasma accomplished and 90% remains to achieve the confinement needed for a magnetic fusion power plant that limit the maximum plasma pressure, microinstabilities that limit the plasma energy confinement and fast

  6. Road Map for a Modular Magnetic Fusion Program Dale M. Meade

    E-print Network

    plant. The Lawson Diagram ­ A Topographical Map for Fusion The physics requirements for a burning plasma accomplished and 90% remains to achieve the confinement needed for a magnetic fusion power plant that limit the maximum plasma pressure, microinstabilities that limit the plasma energy confinement and fast

  7. Features of terrestrial plasma transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Chappell, C. R.; Pollock, C. J.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Research concerning the transport and distribution of ionospheric plasma in the magnetosphere are reviewed, stressing the dichotomy in explanations given for the low plasma densities outside the plasmasphere. The convection/hot solar plasma model and the convection/loss model are considered. Observations of global ionospheric outflows are compared with theoretical studies. It is suggested that there is a need for a hybrid model of magnetospheric plasma in which terrestrial plasma is both lost into the solar wind and energized and trapped within the magnetosphere, inflating the geomagnetic field and excluding cold plasma from conjugate regions.

  8. Plasma effects on subcellular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gweon, Bomi; Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, Heesoo; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H.

    2010-03-08

    Atmospheric pressure helium plasma treated human hepatocytes exhibit distinctive zones of necrotic and live cells separated by a void. We propose that plasma induced necrosis is attributed to plasma species such as oxygen radicals, charged particles, metastables and/or severe disruption of charged cytoskeletal proteins. Interestingly, uncharged cytoskeletal intermediate filaments are only minimally disturbed by plasma, elucidating the possibility of plasma induced electrostatic effects selectively destroying charged proteins. These bona fide plasma effects, which inflict alterations in specific subcellular structures leading to necrosis and cellular detachment, were not observed by application of helium flow or electric field alone.

  9. Design of a Plasma Injector for a Pulsed Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassibry, J. T.; Thio, Y. C. F.; Markusic, T. E.; Sommers, J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, a pulsed plasma accelerator has been proposed as a candidate stand-off driver for the formation of an imploding liner in magnetized target fusion. For a near-term physics exploratory experiment to study the feasibility of this standoff approach, a plasma accelerator has been proposed that requires the controlled introduction and preparation of the initial plasma for acceleration. This includes uniform injection of the propellant downstream of the breech with a high degree of ionization. The design of a plasma feed is presented, which injects a high conductivity, highly collisional propellant transverse to the conductor. The plasma injector is designed to establish an initial plasma with a moderate Hall parameter at the trailing edge of the plasma slug, high Hall parameter behind the slug for magnetic insulation, and a short diffusion length in comparison with characteristic dimensions of the plasma slug to avoid propellant loss at the trailing edge.

  10. Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 Mark J. Kushnerb Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan

  11. Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments

    E-print Network

    fatigue · Spans science specialties from ionized gases to materials science Core Plasma Boundary Plasma trapping and release, surface segregation · Materials science for nuclear radiation damage, thermal fatigue, stress corrosion, creep, bonding, and hydrogen trapping · Engineering science for stress management, heat

  12. Deflagration plasma thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.; Chang, C. N.

    1984-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of the magnetized plasma deflagration process to space propulsion. The deflagration process has the unique capability of efficiently converting input energy into kinetic energy in the accelerating direction. To illustrate the totally divergent characters of 'snowplow' detonation and deflagration discharges, examples of the differences between deflagration and detonation 'snowplow' discharges are expressed in terms of current densities, temperature, and particle velocities. Magnetic field profiles of the deflagration mode of discharges are measured. Typical attainable plasma characteristics are described in terms of velocity, electron temperature, and density, as well as measurement techniques. Specific impulses measured by piezo-electric probe and pendulum methods are presented. The influence of the transmission line in the discharge circuits on plasma velocity is measured by means of a microwave time-of-flight method. The results for the deflagration thruster are compared with other space thrusters. Further research areas are identified.

  13. Large area plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor); Patterson, Michael (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An all permanent magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance, large diameter (e.g., 40 cm) plasma source suitable for ion/plasma processing or electric propulsion, is capable of producing uniform ion current densities at its exit plane at very low power (e.g., below 200 W), and is electrodeless to avoid sputtering or contamination issues. Microwave input power is efficiently coupled with an ionizing gas without using a dielectric microwave window and without developing a throat plasma by providing a ferromagnetic cylindrical chamber wall with a conical end narrowing to an axial entrance hole for microwaves supplied on-axis from an open-ended waveguide. Permanent magnet rings are attached inside the wall with alternating polarities against the wall. An entrance magnet ring surrounding the entrance hole has a ferromagnetic pole piece that extends into the chamber from the entrance hole to a continuing second face that extends radially across an inner pole of the entrance magnet ring.

  14. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  15. Equilibrium of KSTAR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.-I.; Lee, D.-K.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L.; Kstar Team

    2011-10-01

    We have installed the EFIT code on our computing system and made some modification to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research). KSTAR PF and TF coil systems use a CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductor) type superconductor. The CICC jacket material for most PF and all TF coils is Incoloy 908, which is a magnetic material with relative magnetic permeability greater than 10 in low external field. We newly introduced Diamagnetic Loop and variational Motion Stark Effect signals to equilibrium reconstruction. In this paper, we present some results of equilibrium reconstruction with the EFIT code, assess the effects of newly introduced diagnsotics signal on the equilibrium reconstruction and compare the EFIT results with the various diagnostics data in various plasma conditions including H- and L- modes. In addition, we will show the Incoloy908 effects on the plasma equilibrium.

  16. Plasma Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

  17. The 2012 Plasma Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samukawa, Seiji; Hori, Masaru; Rauf, Shahid; Tachibana, Kunihide; Bruggeman, Peter; Kroesen, Gerrit; Whitehead, J. Christopher; Murphy, Anthony B.; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana; Kortshagen, Uwe; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre; Sommerer, Timothy J.; Kushner, Mark J.; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Mason, Nigel

    2012-06-01

    Low-temperature plasma physics and technology are diverse and interdisciplinary fields. The plasma parameters can span many orders of magnitude and applications are found in quite different areas of daily life and industrial production. As a consequence, the trends in research, science and technology are difficult to follow and it is not easy to identify the major challenges of the field and their many sub-fields. Even for experts the road to the future is sometimes lost in the mist. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics is addressing this need for clarity and thus providing guidance to the field by this special Review article, The 2012 Plasma Roadmap. Although roadmaps are common in the microelectronic industry and other fields of research and development, constructing a roadmap for the field of low-temperature plasmas is perhaps a unique undertaking. Realizing the difficulty of this task for any individual, the plasma section of the Journal of Physics D Board decided to meet the challenge of developing a roadmap through an unusual and novel concept. The roadmap was divided into 16 formalized short subsections each addressing a particular key topic. For each topic a renowned expert in the sub-field was invited to express his/her individual visions on the status, current and future challenges, and to identify advances in science and technology required to meet these challenges. Together these contributions form a detailed snapshot of the current state of the art which clearly shows the lifelines of the field and the challenges ahead. Novel technologies, fresh ideas and concepts, and new applications discussed by our authors demonstrate that the road to the future is wide and far reaching. We hope that this special plasma science and technology roadmap will provide guidance for colleagues, funding agencies and government institutions. If successful in doing so, the roadmap will be periodically updated to continue to help in guiding the field.

  18. Plasma contactor research, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probes were used to measure plasma potential profiles, plasma densities, electron energy distributions, and plasma noise levels near a hollow cathode-based plasma contactor emitting electrons. The effects of electron emission current (100 to 1500 mA) and contactor flowrate (2 to 10 sccm (Xenon)) on these data are examined. Retarding potential analyzer (RPA) measurements showing that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted are also presented, and a mechanism by which this occurs is postulated. This mechanism, which involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice, results in a region of high positive space charge and high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggests that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this potential hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a simple one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and is shown to agree qualitatively with these observations. Experimental results of the first stage of bilateral cooperation with the Italian Institute of Interplanetary Space Physics (IFSI CNR) are presented. Sharp, well-defined double layers were observed downstream of a contactor collecting electrons from an ambient plasma created in the IFSI Facility. The voltage drop across these double layers was observed to increase with the current drawn from the ambient plasma. This observation, which was not as clear in previous IFSI tests conducted at higher neutral pressures, is in agreement with previous experimental observations made at both Colorado State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. Greater double layer voltage drops, multiple double layers, and higher noise levels in the region near the double layers were also observed when a magnetic field was imposed and oriented perpendicular to the line joining the contactor and simulator.

  19. Thermal plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-02-01

    Emphasis has been on plasma synthesis of fine powders, plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), on related diagnostics, and on modeling work. Since plasma synthesis as well as plasma CVD make frequent use of plasma jets, the beginning has been devoted of plasma jets and behavior of particulates injected into such plasma jets. Although most of the construction of the Triple-Torch Plasma Reactor (TTPR) has already been done, modifications have been made in particular modifications required for plasma CVD of diamond. A new reactor designed for Counter-Flow Liquid Injection Plasma Synthesis (CFLIPS) proved to be an excellent tool for synthesis of fine powders as well as for plasma CVD. An attempt was made to model flow and temperature fields in this reactor. Substantial efforts were made to single out those parameters which govern particle size, size distribution, and powder quality in our plasma synthesis experiments. This knowledge is crucial for controlling the process and for meaningful diagnostics and modeling work. Plasma CVD of diamond films using both reactors has been very successful and we have been approached by a number of companies interested in using this technology for coating of tools.

  20. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    E-print Network

    Komppula, J

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g. electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  1. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  2. Why plasma harmonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the emergence of interest in the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) of ultrashort pulses propagated through laser-produced plasmas. It is shown that, during the last few years, substantial amendments of plasma HHG allowed in some cases the characteristics of gas HHG to be surpassed. The attractiveness of a new approach in coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation generation is demonstrated, which can also be used as a tool for laser-ablation-induced HHG spectroscopy of a giant class of solids. We present general ideas and prospects for this relatively new field of nonlinear optics.

  3. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  4. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  5. Compression of spinning plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic compression of a spinning plasma in cylindrical geometry is studied in thermodynamical limit. Compared to spinning neutral gas, additional electrostatic energy of charge separation yields to increased heat capacity for both axial and longitudinal compressions. Radial compression of plasma with external axial magnetic field is also considered. The obtained results can be used as thermodynamical estimations for z-pinch compression. This work was supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466, and by NNSA SSAA Grant No. DE-FG52-08NA28553.

  6. Plasma contactors for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors, conducted concurrently at NASA Lewis Research Center and Colorado State University, are reviewed. These research programs include the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation both as electron emitters and electron collectors to and from a simulated space plasma. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents, sufficient for electrodynamic tether operation, can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma.

  7. Theory of the unmagnetized plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    The Vlasov mathematical model of a plasma, which has come to be thought more useful than any other in describing the dynamical behavior of the majority of plasmas of interest, is first examined. Macroscopic variables and moment equations; linear electrostatics solutions; plasma oscillations, ion acoustic waves, and linear instabilities are treated, as well as external fields, 'test' charges, and nonlinear Vlasov phenomena. Plasmas are statistically described, and attention is given to the kinetic theory of the stable, uniform plasma and the Balescu-Lenard equation; two-time ensemble averages and fluctuation spectra in stable plasmas; the kinetic theory of the unstable plasma; and ensembles of Vlasov plasmas. Some illustrative experiments are described. Four appendixes deal with the electrostatic approximation and transverse waves; solution of the linearized Vlasov equation in a magnetic field; estimates of correlation functions from thermal equilibrium; and equivalence of spatially uniform BBGKY and Klimontovich correlations.

  8. A microwave plasma cleaning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C. C.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.; Thompson, L. M.; Glover, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    In a microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source, reactive plasmas of oxygen and its mixtures of argon have been used for evaluating plasma cleaning technologies. Small aluminum samples (0.95 x 1.9 cm) were coated with thin films (less than or equal to 20 micrometers in thickness) of Shell Vitrea oil and cleaned with reactive plasmas. The discharge parameters, such as gas pressure, magnetic field, substrate biasing, and microwave power, were varied to change cleaning conditions. A mass spectroscopy (or residual gas analyzer) was used to monitor the status of plasma cleaning. Mass loss of the samples after plasma cleaning was measured to estimate cleaning rates. Measured cleaning rates of low-pressure (0.5-m torr) argon/oxygen plasmas were as high as 2.7 micrometers/min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine cleanliness of the sample surfaces. In this paper, significant results of the plasma cleaning are reported and discussed.

  9. Time Dependence in Plasma Codes

    E-print Network

    S. Seager

    2001-06-12

    Time-dependent plasma codes are a natural extension of static nonequilibrium plasma codes. Comparing relevant timescales will determine whether or not time-dependent treatment is necessary. In this article I outline the ingredients for a time-dependent plasma code in a homogeneous medium and discuss the computational method. In the second half of the article I describe recombination in the early Universe as a detailed example of a problem whose solution requires a time-dependent plasma code.

  10. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  11. Experiments on Cryogenic Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, O.; Sekine, W.; Kubota, J.; Uotani, N.; Chikasue, M.; Shindo, M.

    2009-11-10

    Experiments on a cryogenic complex plasma have been performed. Preliminary experiments include production of a plasma in a liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by a pulsed discharge. The extended production of a plasma has been realized in a vapor of liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by rf discharge. The charge of dust particles injected in such a plasma has been studied in detail.

  12. Millimeter Wave Communication through Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    Millimeter wave communication through plasma at frequencies of 35 GHz or higher shows promise in maintaining communications connectivity during rocket launch and re-entry, critical events which are typically plagued with communication dropouts. Extensive prior research into plasmas has characterized the plasma frequency at these events, and research at the Kennedy Space Center is investigating the feasibility of millimeter communication through these plasma frequencies.

  13. Information Theory and Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, R. O.

    2009-11-10

    Information theory, applied directly to measured signals, yields new perspectives on, and quantitative knowledge of, the physics of strongly nonlinear and turbulent phenomena in plasmas. It represents a new and productive element of the topical research programmes that use modern techniques to characterise strongly nonlinear signals from plasmas, and that address global plasma behaviour from a complex systems perspective. We here review some pioneering studies of mutual information in solar wind and magnetospheric plasmas, using techniques tested on standard complex systems.

  14. Dynamics of H+ + H ionization in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. Y.; Qi, X.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yang, L.

    2014-04-01

    Collision dynamics of H+ + H ionization in plasma-free cases and plasmas is studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas have been compared with these of weakly coupled plasmas. It is shown the plasma screening effects increase the ionization cross sections. Cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are bigger than these in weakly coupled plasmas.

  15. Implicit plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, A.B.

    1985-03-03

    Implicit time integration methods have been used extensively in numerical modelling of slowly varying phenomena in systems that also support rapid variation. Examples include diffusion, hydrodynamics and reaction kinetics. This article discussed implementation of implicit time integration in plasma codes of the ''particle-in-cell'' family, and the benefits to be gained.

  16. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  17. Compact plasma accelerator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John E.

    2002-05-01

    A compact plasma accelerator concept based on plasma production at a magnetic cusp was designed and fabricated. Plume and discharge characteristics of the device were documented using a Faraday probe and a retarding potential analyzer. The discharge current variations with increasing discharge voltage were nonlinear with the discharge current increasing rapidly with voltage. The device demonstrated the capability of generating ion beamlets (˜80 eV) with downstream peak current densities comparable to that of higher power ion thruster devices (7 mA/cm2). In general, the device appeared to operate best at very low flow rates. High propellant utilization fractions (ionization fractions) were measured below 1 SCCM of Xe flow (88% at 0.48 SCCM). Floating potential measurements made downstream of the device were used to estimate the downstream electric field. These measurements, which were used to qualitatively assess beam neutralization, indicated beam neutralization does occur downstream of the device. Based on the measurements, the compact plasma accelerator concept could potentially be used as a low energy ion source for propulsion applications or for low energy plasma/materials processing applications.

  18. Dissipation in intercluster plasma

    E-print Network

    Maxim Lyutikov

    2007-09-11

    We discuss dissipative processes in strongly gyrotropic, nearly collisionless plasma in clusters of galaxies (ICM). First, we point out that Braginsky theory, which assumes that collisions are more frequent that the system's dynamical time scale, is inapplicable to fast, sub-viscous ICM motion. Most importantly, the electron contribution to collisional magneto-viscosity dominates over that of ions for short-scale Alfvenic motions. Thus, if a turbulent cascade develops in the ICM and propagates down to scales $\\leq 1$ kpc, it is damped collisionally not on ions, but on electrons. Second, in high beta plasma of ICM, small variations of the magnetic field strength, of relative value $\\sim 1/\\beta$, lead to development of anisotropic pressure instabilities (firehose, mirror and cyclotron). Unstable wave modes may provide additional resonant scattering of particles, effectively keeping the plasma in a state of marginal stability. We show that in this case the dissipation rate of a laminar, subsonic, incompressible flows scales as inverse of plasma beta parameter. We discuss application to the problem of ICM heating.

  19. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Stuart

    infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all], is calculated using RxMHD. [1] Helical bifurcation and tearing mode in a plasma -- a description based

  20. Laboratory plasma probe studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic experiments performed in a collisionless plasma using CO2 as the working gas are described. In particular, simultaneous measurements that have been performed by means of Langmuir- and RF-probes are presented. A resonance occurring above the parallel resonance in the frequency characteristic of a two electrode system is interpreted as being due to the resonant excitation of electroacoustic waves.

  1. PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Budny, Robert

    and Power and Particle Handling in Reactor Regimes K.W. Hill, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Budny, C.E. Bush,1 D Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 2 Columbia University, New York, NY Presented at the 40th Annual Meeting APS Division of Plasma Physics November 16-20, 1998 · New Orleans, LA #12;PRINCETON

  2. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  3. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics, based on the Elsasser variables was developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to ones based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected. the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. For a system with many such vortices we present a statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories. but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is outlined as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected.

  4. Computations in Plasma Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Killeen, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses contributions of computers to research in magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion, charged-particle-beam propogation, and space sciences. Considers use in design/control of laboratory and spacecraft experiments and in data acquisition; and reviews major plasma computational methods and some of the important physics problems they…

  5. Plasma cell gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Chandershekhar; Shukla, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present a report on the clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis with the use of herbal toothpowder. Plasma cell gingivitis [PCG] is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterized by sharply demarcated erythematous and edematous gingivitis often extending to the mucogingival junction. As the name suggests it is diffuse and massive infiltration of plasma cells into the sub-epithelial gingival tissue. It is a hypersensitivity reaction to some antigen, often flavouring agents or spices found in chewing gums, toothpastes and lorenzes. A 27-yr old male with a chief complaint of painful, bleeding swollen mass in his lower front teeth region with prolong use of herbal toothpowder. The gingiva bled readily on probing. Patient was advised to refrain from the use of herbal toothpowder and along with periodontal treatment, no further reoccurrence was found. as more and more herbal products are gaining popularity, clinicians should be aware of effects of these products. Early diagnosis is essential as plasma cell gingivitis has similar pathologic changes seen clinically as in leukemia, HIV infection, discoid lupus erythematosis, atrophic lichen planus, desquamative gingivitis, or cicatrical pemphigoid which must be differentiated through hematologic and serologic testing. PMID:26015677

  6. Plasma chemistry and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozumi, K.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between discharge phenomena and plasma chemistry, as well as the equipment and mechanisms of plasma chemical reactions are described. Various areas in which plasma chemistry is applied are surveyed, such as: manufacturing of semiconductor integrated circuits; synthetic fibers; high polymer materials for medical uses; optical lenses; and membrane filters (reverse penetration films).

  7. Tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Natalia

    2009-10-01

    In the previous work [1], we discussed a ``technology'' of tomographic method and relations between the tomographic diagnostics in thermal (equilibrium) and nonthermal (nonequilibrium) plasma sources. The conclusion has been made that tomographic reconstruction in thermal plasma sources is the standard procedure at present, which can provide much useful information on the plasma structure and its evolution in time, while the tomographic reconstruction of nonthermal plasma has a great potential at making a contribution to understanding the fundamental problem of substance behavior in strongly nonequilibrium conditions. Using medical terminology, one could say, that tomographic diagnostics of the equilibrium plasma sources studies their ``anatomic'' structure, while reconstruction of the nonequilibrium plasma is similar to the ``physiological'' examination: it is directed to study the physical mechanisms and processes. The present work is focused on nonthermal plasma research. The tomographic diagnostics is directed to study spatial structures formed in the gas discharge plasmas under the influence of electrical and gravitational fields. The ways of plasma ``self-organization'' in changing and extreme conditions are analyzed. The analysis has been made using some examples from our practical tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasma sources, such as low-pressure capacitive and inductive discharges. [0pt] [1] Denisova N. Plasma diagnostics using computed tomography method // IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 2009 37 4 502.

  8. High-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

  9. Controlled zone microwave plasma system

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-10-20

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  10. Numerical simulation of dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1995-09-01

    The numerical simulation of physical processes in dusty plasmas is reviewed, with emphasis on recent results and unresolved issues. Three areas of research are discussed: grain charging, weak dust-plasma interactions, and strong dust-plasma interactions. For each area, we review the basic concepts that are tested by simulations, present some appropriate examples, and examine numerical issues associated with extending present work.

  11. Plasma Physics Applied (New Book)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabbe, Crockett

    2007-03-01

    0.5cm Plasma physics applications are one of the most rapidly growing fields in engineering & applied science today. The last decade alone has seen the rapid emergence of new applications such as dusty plasmas in the semiconductor and microchip industries, and plasma TVs. In addition, this last decade saw the achievement of the 50-year Lawson breakeven condition for fusion. With new discoveries in space plasma physics and applications to spacecraft for worldwide communication and space weather, as well as new applications being discovered, this diversity is always expanding. The new book Plasma Physics Applied reviews developments in several of these areas. Chapter 1 reviews the content and its authors, and is followed by a more comprehensive review of plasma physics applications in general in Chapter 2. Plasma applications in combustion and environmental uses are presented in Chapter 3. Lightning effects in planetary magnetospheres and potential application are described in Chapter 4. The area of dusty plasmas in both industrial and space plasmas and their applications are reviewed in Chapter 5. The particular area of Coulomb clusters in dusty plasmas is presented in Chapter 6. The variety of approaches to plasma confinement in magnetic devices for fusion are laid out in Chapter 7. Finally, an overview of plasma accelerator developments and their applications are presented in Chapter 8.

  12. Gas-discharge plasma sources for nonlocal plasma technology

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Simonov, V. Ya.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlocal plasma technology is based on the effect of self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume [V. I. Demidov, C. A. DeJoseph, Jr., and A. A. Kudryavtsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 215002 (2006)]. This effect can be achieved by changing the ratio of fast electron flux to ion flux incident on the plasma boundaries. This in turn leads to a significant change in plasma properties and therefore can be useful for technological applications. A gas-discharge device which demonstrates control of the plasma properties by this method is described.

  13. Merging and Splitting of Plasma Spheroids in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikikian, Maxime; Tawidian, Hagop; Lecas, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Dust particle growth in a plasma is a strongly disturbing phenomenon for the plasma equilibrium. It can induce many different types of low-frequency instabilities that can be experimentally observed, especially using high-speed imaging. A spectacular case has been observed in a krypton plasma where a huge density of dust particles is grown by material sputtering. The instability consists of well-defined regions of enhanced optical emission that emerge from the electrode vicinity and propagate towards the discharge center. These plasma spheroids have complex motions resulting from their mutual interaction that can also lead to the merging of two plasma spheroids into a single one. The reverse situation is also observed with the splitting of a plasma spheroid into two parts. These results are presented for the first time and reveal new behaviors in dusty plasmas.

  14. Pulsed Electromagnetic Acceleration of Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason T.; Markusic, Tom E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A major shift in paradigm in driving pulsed plasma thruster is necessary if the original goal of accelerating a plasma sheet efficiently to high velocities as a plasma "slug" is to be realized. Firstly, the plasma interior needs to be highly collisional so that it can be dammed by the plasma edge layer not (upstream) adjacent to the driving 'vacuum' magnetic field. Secondly, the plasma edge layer needs to be strongly magnetized so that its Hall parameter is of the order of unity in this region to ensure excellent coupling of the Lorentz force to the plasma. Thirdly, to prevent and/or suppress the occurrence of secondary arcs or restrike behind the plasma, the region behind the plasma needs to be collisionless and extremely magnetized with sufficiently large Hall parameter. This places a vacuum requirement on the bore conditions prior to the shot. These requirements are quantified in the paper and lead to the introduction of three new design parameters corresponding to these three plasma requirements. The first parameter, labeled in the paper as gamma (sub 1), pertains to the permissible ratio of the diffusive excursion of the plasma during the course of the acceleration to the plasma longitudinal dimension. The second parameter is the required Hall parameter of the edge plasma region, and the third parameter the required Hall parameter of the region behind the plasma. Experimental research is required to quantify the values of these design parameters. Based upon fundamental theory of the transport processes in plasma, some theoretical guidance on the choice of these parameters are provided to help designing the necessary experiments to acquire these data.

  15. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  16. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Thomas J. (Gainesville, FL); Palmer, Byron A. (Los Alamos, NM); Hof, Douglas E. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  17. Plasma beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1983-06-01

    We perform an analytic study of some quantities relevant to the plasma beat-wave accelerator (PBWA) concept. We obtain analytic expressions for the plasma frequency, longitudinal electron velocity, plasma density and longitudinal plasma electric field of a nonlinear longitudinal electron plasma oscillation with amplitude less than the wave-breaking limit and phase velocity approaching the speed of light. We also estimate the luminosity of a single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear PBWA collider assuming the energy and collision beamstrahlung are fixed parameters.

  18. Modulational interactions in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, F.; Tyshetskiy, Yu.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501; Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 ; Ishihara, O.

    2013-07-15

    A formalism for treating modulational interactions of electrostatic fields in collisionless quantum plasmas is developed, based on the kinetic Wigner-Poisson model of quantum plasma. This formalism can be used in a range of problems of nonlinear interaction between electrostatic fields in a quantum plasma, such as development of turbulence, self-organization, as well as transition from the weak turbulent state to strong turbulence. In particular, using this formalism, we obtain the kinetic quantum Zakharov equations that describe nonlinear coupling of high frequency Langmuir waves to low frequency plasma density variations, for cases of non-degenerate and degenerate plasma electrons.

  19. Plasmas in the earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the general charcteristics of plasmas within the earth's magnetotail and its environs is presented. Present knowledge of the plasma within these regions as gained via in situ measurements provides the general theme, although observations of magnetic fields, energetic particles and plasma waves are included in the discussion. Primary plasma regimes in the magnetotail are the plasma sheet, its boundary layer, the magnetotail lobes, the boundary layer at the magnetopause and the distant magnetotail. Although great progress in the understanding of these regions is evident in the literature of the past several years, many of their features remain as exciting enigmas to be resolved by future observational and theoretical investigation.

  20. On description of quantum plasma

    E-print Network

    S. V. Vladimirov; Yu. O. Tyshetskiy

    2011-01-21

    A plasma becomes quantum when the quantum nature of its particles significantly affects its macroscopic properties. To answer the question of when the collective quantum plasma effects are important, a proper description of such effects is necessary. We consider here the most common methods of description of quantum plasma, along with the related assumptions and applicability limits. In particular, we analyze in detail the hydrodynamic description of quantum plasma, as well as discuss some kinetic features of analytic properties of linear dielectric response function in quantum plasma. We point out the most important, in our view, fundamental problems occurring already in the linear approximation and requiring further investigation. (submitted to Physics-Uspekhi)

  1. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

    1990-11-06

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

  2. Experimental Plasma Research project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  3. Transport processes in space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Elphic, R.C.; Feldman, W.C.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project represents a comprehensive research effort to study plasma and field transport processes relevant for solar-terrestrial interaction, involving the solar wind and imbedded magnetic field and plasma structures, the bow shock of the Earth`s magnetosphere and associated waves, the Earth`s magnetopause with imbedded flux rope structures and their connection with the Earth, plasma flow in the Earth`s magnetotail, and ionospheric beam/wave interactions. The focus of the work was on the interaction between plasma and magnetic and electric fields in the regions where different plasma populations exist adjacent to or superposed on each other. These are the regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, important for plasma and energy transport and rapid energy releases. The research addressed questions about how this interaction takes place, what waves, instabilities, and particle/field interactions are involved, how the penetration of plasma and energy through characteristic boundaries takes place, and how the characteristic properties of the plasmas and fields of the different populations influence each other on different spatial and temporal scales. These topics were investigated through combining efforts in the analysis of plasma and field data obtained through space missions with theory and computer simulations of the plasma behavior.

  4. Space plasma contractor research, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Results of experiments conducted on hollow cathode-based plasma contractors are reported. Specific tests in which attempts were made to vary plasma conditions in the simulated ionospheric plasma are described. Experimental results showing the effects of contractor flowrate and ion collecting surface size on contactor performance and contactor plasma plume geometry are presented. In addition to this work, one-dimensional solutions to spherical and cylindircal space-charge limited double-sheath problems are developed. A technique is proposed that can be used to apply these solutions to the problem of current flow through elongated double-sheaths that separate two cold plasmas. Two conference papers which describe the essential features of the plasma contacting process and present data that should facilitate calibration of comprehensive numerical models of the plasma contacting process are also included.

  5. New Aspects of Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukla, Padma K.; Stenflo, Lennart; Eliasson, Bengt

    2008-03-01

    Nonlinear collective processes in very dense plasmas / P. K. Shukla, B. Eliasson and D. Shaikh -- Quantum, spin and QED effects in plasmas / G. Brodin and M. Marklund -- Spin quantum plasmas - new aspects of collective dynamics / M. Marklund and G. Brodin -- Revised quantum electrodynamics with fundamental applications / B. Lehnert -- Quantum methodologies in beam, fluid and plasma physics / R. Fedele -- Plasma effects in cold atom physics / J. T. Mendonca ... [et al.] -- General properties of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in different plasma configurations: the plasma foil model / F. Pegoraro and S. V. Bulanov -- The Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a plasma foil accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra intense laser pulse / F. Pegoraro and S. V. Bulanov -- Generation of galactic seed magnetic fields / H. Saleem -- Nonlinear dynamics of mirror waves in non-Maxwellian plasmas / O. A. Pokhotelov et al. -- Formation of mirror structures near instability threshold / E. A. Kuznetsov, T. Passot and P. L. Sulem -- Nonlinear dispersive Alfvén waves in magnetoplasmas / P. K. Shukla ... [et al.] -- Properties of drift and Alfvén waves in collisional plasmas / J. Vranjes, S. Poedts and B. P. Pandey -- Current driven acoustic perturbations in partially ionized collisional plasmas / J. Vranjes ... [et al.] -- Multifluid theory of solitons / F. Verheest -- Nonlinear wavepackets in pair-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas / I. Kourakis et al. -- Electro-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas / A. A. Mamun and P. K. Shukla -- Physics of dust in magnetic fusion devices / Z. Wang et al. -- Short wavelength ballooning mode in Tokamaks / A. Hirose and N. Joiner -- Effects of perpendicular shear superposition and hybrid ions intruduction on parallel shear driven plasma instabilities / T. Kaneko and R. Hatakeyama.

  6. Linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a lot of attention in the last decade due to their huge potential for biomedical applications. In my group, we have characterized an RF driven APPJ in great detail. The characterization includes electrical measurements, imaging, optical emission spectroscopy, (two photon enhanced) laser induced fluorescence, Thomson scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering and mass spectrometry. This led to a detailed knowledge of the electron density, electron temperature, gas temperature, NO, O, OH, O3 densities, ionic species and air concentrations in the plasma effluent. Living organisms for in vitro studies are typically kept in complex solutions or culture media. Plasma-bio interactions involves not only the production of reactive species in the plasma gas phase but also transport to the liquid phase and plasma induced liquid phase chemistry and its impact on the living organisms. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species have been identified as the key reactive species. Recent results of my group show that controlling the gas phase plasma chemistry can lead to significant different biological responses of the living organisms corresponding to different chemical pathways. The effect of plasma jet interaction with liquids containing mammalian cells, bacteria and virus will be discussed. The outcomes of these studies allow unraveling chemical pathways responsible for plasma-bio interactions and linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions.

  7. Momentum transfer to rotating magnetized plasma from gun plasma injection

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, Imran; Hassam, A. B.; Ellis, R. F.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Phillips, M. W.

    2006-11-15

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the penetration and momentum coupling of a gun-injected plasma slug into a rotating magnetized plasma. An experiment along these lines is envisioned for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)] using a coaxial plasma accelerator gun developed by HyperV Technologies Corp. [F. D. Witherspoon et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, LP1 87 (2005)]. The plasma gun would be located in the axial midplane and fired off-axis into the rotating MCX plasma annulus. The numerical simulation is set up so that the initial momentum in the injected plasma slug is of the order of the initial momentum of the target plasma. Several numerical firings are done into the cylindrical rotating plasma. Axial symmetry is assumed. The slug is seen to penetrate readily and deform into a mushroom, characteristic of interchange deformations. It is found that up to 25% of the momentum in the slug can be transferred to the background plasma in one pass across a cylindrical chord. For the same initial momentum, a high-speed low density slug gives more momentum transfer than a low-speed high density slug. Details of the numerical simulations and a scaling study are presented.

  8. Gravitational lensing in plasma: Relativistic images at homogeneous plasma

    E-print Network

    Oleg Yu. Tsupko; Gennady S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2013-05-30

    We investigate the influence of plasma presence on relativistic images formed by Schwarzschild black hole lensing. When a gravitating body is surrounded by a plasma, the lensing angle depends on a frequency of the electromagnetic wave due to refraction properties, and the dispersion properties of the light propagation in gravitational field in plasma. The last effect leads to difference, even in uniform plasma, of gravitational deflection angle in plasma from vacuum case. This angle depends on the photon frequency, what resembles the properties of the refractive prism spectrometer. Here we consider the case of a strong deflection angle for the light, traveling near the Schwarzschild black hole, surrounded by a uniform plasma. Asymptotic formulae are obtained for the case of a very large deflection angle, exceeding $2\\pi$. We apply these formulae for calculation of position and magnification of relativistic images in a homogeneous plasma, which are formed by the photons performing one or several revolutions around the central object. We conclude that the presence of the uniform plasma increases the angular size of relativistic rings or the angular separation of point images from the gravitating center. The presence of the uniform plasma increases also a magnification of relativistic images. The angular separation and the magnification become significantly larger than in the vacuum case, when the photon frequency goes to a plasma frequency.

  9. The Coalition for Plasma Science: Bringing Plasmas to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2003-10-01

    The Coalition for Plasma Science is a group of institutions, organizations, and companies that have joined forces to increase awareness and understanding of plasma science and its many applications and benefits for society. The CPS undertakes a range of activities to support this goal. Members include national laboratories, universities, industries, and individuals. The CPS maintains a web page (http://www.plasmacoalition.org), and has developed several types of plasma-related publications. The web page includes a compilation of evaluated plasma web sites. The evaluations were conducted by teachers and based on national teaching standards. The web site also contains copies of CPS publications including the brochure ''Plasmas are Everywhere.'' Thousands of these brochures are distributed each year, and a poster version is now available. Another publication is the ''About Plasmas'' series. Each of these two-page papers (which is written for a general audience) is about a specific plasma-related topic, such as lighting, fusion, space plasmas and plasma decontamination of biological hazards. Papers on other topics are under development. The CPS also organizes educational luncheon/seminars for Members of Congress and their staff. The most recent seminar was given by David Newman on January 28th of this year and was his ''state of the universe'' address. A second seminar is planned this year on the topic of semiconductor manufacturing. Activities under discussion include a topical science fair award for a project on plasmas and the development of a broad, history-based educational web site.

  10. Plasma Generated Spherules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, C. J.

    2005-04-01

    Z-pinch plasma simulations have been performed that indicate the production of spherules under certain experimental parameters. (A. L. Peratt, private communication) While performing experiments dealing with the impact of plasma discharges on various materials, we observed that spherules were created at the surface of some of the materials. For specific materials and conditions, spherules were always produced. Both individual spherules and joined spherules were created. The size and shapes were nearly identical to items found by the Mars rover, Opportunity, and called ``blueberries.'' Sky & Telescope, June 2004, p. 20, among other sources indicated the blueberries were gray spherules composed of hematite. The experiments produced hematite spherules identical in appearance to those found on Mars. These experiments suggest how the newly discovered blueberries were formed on Mars while providing an explanation that does not depend on the presence of water.

  11. Plasma and magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Several programs and variations have been developed to determine statistical means of different plasma parameters when binned in different variables. These parameters include temperature, densities and spacecraft potentials for any of the ion species, as well as ratios of these variables for any other ion species to the corresponding variable for H(+). The variables for binning include L, radial distance, and geomagnetic latitude; and separate statistics are automatically run for local morning and local evening data. These programs all run from output files from the plasma parameter thin sheath analysis program. A variant program also bins for magnetic activity, using either Kp or Dst, which requires an additional magnetic activity input file. These programs can be run either interactively or in batch mode, using file listings generated by a DIRECTORY command. In addition to printed output, these programs generate output files which can be used to plot the results. Programs to plot these averaged data are under development.

  12. Hybrid plasma modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Pointon, Timothy David

    2009-02-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2007 and FY2008 for the LDRD project ''Hybrid Plasma Modeling''. The goal of this project was to develop hybrid methods to model plasmas across the non-continuum-to-continuum collisionality spectrum. The primary methodology to span these regimes was to couple a kinetic method (e.g., Particle-In-Cell) in the non-continuum regions to a continuum PDE-based method (e.g., finite differences) in continuum regions. The interface between the two would be adjusted dynamically ased on statistical sampling of the kinetic results. Although originally a three-year project, it became clear during the second year (FY2008) that there were not sufficient resources to complete the project and it was terminated mid-year.

  13. The cathode plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksila, Thada

    Since its invention at the University of Stuttgart, Germany in the mid-1960, scientists have been trying to understand and explain the mechanism of the plasma interaction inside the magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thruster. Because this thruster creates a larger level of efficiency than combustion thrusters, this MPD thruster is the primary cadidate thruster for a long duration (planetary) spacecraft. However, the complexity of this thruster make it difficult to fully understand the plasma interaction in an MPD thruster while operating the device. That is, there is a great deal of physics involved: the fluid dynamics, the electromagnetics, the plasma dynamics, and the thermodynamics. All of these physics must be included when an MPD thruster operates. In recent years, a computer simulation helped scientists to simulate the experiments by programing the physics theories and comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. Many MPD thruster simulations have been conducted: E. Niewood et al.[5], C. K. J. Hulston et al.[6], K. D. Goodfellow[3], J Rossignol et al.[7]. All of these MPD computer simulations helped the scientists to see how quickly the system responds to the new design parameters. For this work, a 1D MPD thruster simulation was developed to find the voltage drop between the cathode and the plasma regions. Also, the properties such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat capacity are temperature and pressure dependent. These two conductivity and heat capacity are usually definded as constant values in many other models. However, this 1D and 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations include both temperature and pressure effects to the electrical, thermal conductivities and heat capacity values interpolated from W. F. Ahtye [4]. Eventhough, the pressure effect is also significant; however, in this study the pressure at 66 Pa was set as a baseline. The 1D MPD thruster simulation includes the sheath region, which is the interface between the plasma and the cathode regions. This sheath model [3] has been fully combined in the 1D simulation. That is, the sheath model calculates the heat flux and the sheath voltage by giving the temperature and the current density. This sheath model must be included in the simulation, as the sheath region is treated differently from the main plasma region. For our 2D cylindrical symmetry simulation, the dimensions of the cathode, the anode, the total current, the pressure, the type of gases, the work function can be changed in the input process as needed for particular interested. Also, the sheath model is still included and fully integrated in this 2D cylindrical symmetry simulation at the cathode surface grids. In addition, the focus of the 2D cylindrical symmetry simulation is to connect the properties on the plasma and the cathode regions on the cathode surface until the MPD thruster reach steady state and estimate the plasma arc attachement edge, electroarc edge, on the cathode surface. Finally, we can understand more about the behavior of an MPD thruster under many different conditions of 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations.

  14. Axially Modulated Plasma Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Layer, B. D.; York, A. G.; Varma, S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2009-01-22

    We demonstrate two techniques for making periodically modulated plasma waveguides-one with sharp, stable voids as short as 50 {mu}m with a period as small as 200 {mu}m, and another which modulates the waveguide diameter with a corrugation period as short as 35 {mu}m[1]. These features persist as the plasma expands for the full lifetime of the waveguide (>6 ns). The waveguides were made using the hydrodynamic shock method in a cluster jet using hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon. We demonstrate guided propagation at intensities up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, limited by our laser energy currently available. This technique is useful for quasi-phase matching to allow efficient coupling of laser energy to acceleration of relativistic electrons or generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation at selected frequencies.

  15. Wave and Plasma Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, J.; Vasquez, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    Rapidly moving streams of plasma emanate from the Sun and team with long magnetized waves which are called Alfven waves. The waves have sharp edges showing evidence of nonlinear wave steepening. They are also arc-polarized wherein the total magnetic intensity is a constant but the magnetic field direction sweeps back and forth along a circular arc like a wiper-blade. The solar-wind plasma is nearly collisionless and shows evidence of preferred ion heating. There are also distinct beams of various atoms which stream relative to the main component of solar-wind protons. The detailed individual motions of the ions are important to follow in order to understand the behavior of the plasma and waves. We employ hybrid numerical simulations using particle ions and fluid electrons. We present results from 3 simulation projects which will demonstrate how small but resonant forces can cumulatively lead to large changes: (1) Small amplitude and linearly polarized Alfven waves propagating parallel to the background magnetic field nonlinearly steepen. We have measured the time of steepening as a function of the ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure, especially for ratios of order unity where analytical calculations cannot determine the steepening time. (2) Arc-polarized Alfven waves can propagate without changing form, but we show that small disturbances can lead to their decay into new waves. (3) Beams of ions streaming relative to one another can drive up waves from the smallest starting disturbances. We show that this slows the relative streaming speed below a threshold where the speed becomes steady. This work was completed at the University of New Hampshire through the Science and Mathematics Achievement through Research Training (SMART) program.

  16. Generator powered plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    An earlier set of experiments will be described briefly, in which plate flux compression generators were used to power a Plasma Focus. Currents, voltages and 'rundown times' obtained in these experiments are shown to agree well with a simple model. This same model is then used to show how dramatic operational improvements could be obtained with use of an appropriate fuse, provided the model remained valid.

  17. Dusty spin plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Zamanian, J.

    2008-09-07

    A fluid model is derived, taking into account the effect of spin magnetization of electrons as well as of magnetized dust grains. The model is analyzed, and it is found that both the acoustic velocity and the Alfven velocity is decreased due to the magnetization effects. Furthermore, for low-temperature high density plasmas, it is found that the linear wave modes can be unstable, due to the magnetic attraction of individual fluid elements. The significance of our results are discussed.

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  19. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (? 20%) and absolute number (? 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  20. Plasma Modeling of Electrosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Scott; Friedrichs, Daniel; Gilbert, James; Park, Wounjhang; Maksimovic, Dragan

    2014-10-01

    Electrosurgery is the use of high frequency alternating current (AC) to illicit a clinical response in tissue, such as cutting or cauterization. Power electronics converters have been demonstrated to generate the necessary output voltage and current for electrosurgery. The design goal of the converter is to regulate output power while supplying high frequency AC. The design is complicated by fast current and voltage transients that occur when the current travels through air in the form of an arc. To assist in designing a converter that maintains the desired output power during these transients, we have used the COMSOL Plasma Module to determine the output voltage and current characteristics during an arc. This plasma model, used in conjunction with linear circuit elements, allows the full electrosurgical system to be validated. Two models have been tested with the COMSOL Plasma Module. One is a four-species, four-reaction model based on the local field approximation technique. The second simulates the underlying air chemistry using 30 species, 151 chemical reactions, and a coupled electron energy distribution function. Experimental output voltage and current samples have been collected and compared to both models.

  1. Screening Resonances In Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, P.

    1998-12-01

    When it was suggested that a new recombination mechanism (Resonant Radiative Recombination (RRR)) which, based on very general physical arguments, should happen in dense plasmas and promises to provide useful information for the local temperature and density diagnostics of plasmas, they assumed the existence of screening resonances. For model potentials the existence of screening resonances has been demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt in a number of calculations. The key question, how well those potentials describe the dominant effects of a real plasma remains open. The relation of theoretical predictions to experimentally measurable effects is an important issue at the present stage of their research. In particular, RRR is expected to account for enhanced recombination rates of low energetic electrons with their ions, since the first stage is the resonant capture of a slow electron by an atom or ion. The mechanism that traps an electron is a combination of complicated many-body interactions of the ions and electrons. For clarity they start here, however, with a discussion in terms of local potential traps the shapes of which are determined predominantly and in an average way by two factors: the degree of screening present at the ionic site and the degree of short-range order in the immediate neighborhood of this ion.

  2. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  3. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Gorbatkin, Steven M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Berry, Lee A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  4. Plasma immersion surface modification with metal ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Yu, K.M. ); Godechot, X. Societe Anonyme d'Etudes et Realisations Nucleaires , 94 - Limeil-Brevannes )

    1991-04-01

    We describe here a novel technique for surface modification in which metal plasma is employed and by which various blends of plasma deposition and ion implantation can be obtained. The new technique is a variation of the plasma immersion technique described by Conrad and co-workers. When a substrate is immersed in a metal plasma, the plasma that condenses on the substrate remains there as a film, and when the substrate is then implanted, qualitatively different processes can follow, including' conventional' high energy ion implantation, recoil implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam assisted deposition, and metallic thin film and multilayer fabrication with or without species mixing. Multiple metal plasma guns can be used with different metal ion species, films can be bonded to the substrate through ion beam mixing at the interface, and multilayer structures can be tailored with graded or abrupt interfaces. We have fabricated several different kinds of modified surface layers in this way. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Plasma Sterilization Technology for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, S. J.; Olson, R. L.; Leavens, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The application of plasma gas technology to sterilization and decontamination of spacecraft components is considered. Areas investigated include: effective sterilizing ranges of four separate gases; lethal constituents of a plasma environment; effectiveness of plasma against a diverse group of microorganisms; penetrating efficiency of plasmas for sterilization; and compatibility of spacecraft materials with plasma environments. Results demonstrated that plasma gas, specifically helium plasma, is a highly effective sterilant and is compatible with spacecraft materials.

  6. The diverse applications of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mukul; Dubey, Shivani; Darwhekar, Gajanan; Jain, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Plasma being the fourth state of matter has always been an attraction for Physicists and Chemists. With the advent of time, plasma energy has been recognized in having widening horizons in the field of Biomedical Sciences. Plasma medicine can be subdivided into three main fields; Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure direct plasma for medical therapy; Plasma-assisted modification of bio-relevant surfaces and Plasma-based bio-decontamination and sterilization. The basis of the research is that as it has free carrier molecules, it has the ability to target specific cells and regulate functions like wound healing. Plasma does not harm healthy human cells but can kill bacteria and possibly even cancer cells to help treat various diseases. Nosocomial infection control, prevention and containment of contagious diseases, disinfection of medical devices, surface treatment (heat and UV sensitive surfaces) are research of interest. Recent success in generating plasma at very low temperature ie. Cold plasma makes the therapy painless. It has the ability to activate cellular responses and important mechanisms in the body. They target specific molecules such as prothrombin for blood coagulation, cytokines for killing bacteria, and angiogenesis for tissue regeneration. Plasma has bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal properties. Plasma technology has flourishing future in diverse fields like Textiles, Nanofabrication, Automotives, Waste management, Microbiology, Food Hygiene, Medical Science like Skin treatments, sterilisation of wounds, Hand disinfection, Dental treatments etc. Food hygiene using plasma can be achieved in disinfection of food containers, food surface disinfection, hygiene in food handling, preparation and packaging. Therefore Plasma is most promising field for budding Scientist for fluorishing research in Biological Sciences.

  7. Plasma surface cleaning in a microwave plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Nelson, W.D.; Haselton, H.H.; Schechter, D.E.; Thompson, L.M.; Campbell, V.B.; Glover, A.L.; Googin, J.M.

    1994-03-01

    A microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source has been operated to produce reactive plasmas of oxygen and its mixture with argon. Aluminum samples (0.95 cm by 1.9 cm) were coated with thin films (<20 {mu}m in thickness) of Shell Vitrea oil and cleaned by using such reactive plasmas. The plasma cleaning was done in discharge conditions of microwave power up to 1300 W, radio frequency power up to 200 W, biased potential up to 400 V, gas pressures up to 5 mtorr, and operating time up to 35 min. The surface texture of the postcleaned samples has been examined visually. Mass loss of the samples after plasma cleaning was measured to estimate cleaning rates. Measured clean rates of low-pressure (0.5-mtorr) argon/oxygen plasmas were as high as 2.7 {mu}m/min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine cleanliness of the sample surfaces after plasma cleaning. The XPS study on polished samples confirmed the effectiveness of plasma cleaning in achieving atomic level of surface cleanliness. In this technical memorandum plasma properties, cleaning phenomena, and significant results are reported and discussed.

  8. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, F Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 microg of plasma with density above 10(17) cm(-3) to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 microg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments. PMID:19725654

  9. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J.; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W.; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 ?g of plasma with density above 1017 cm-3 to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 ?g has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  10. Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003 ( 2003) Model of the Negative DC Corona Plasma

    E-print Network

    Chen, Junhong

    ­25). The electric field in the plasma region was 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of MinnesotaPlasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003 ( 2003) Model of the Negative DC Corona Plasma: Comparison to the Positive DC Corona Plasma Junhong Chen1 and Jane H. Davidson1,2 Receiûed

  11. Recovering aluminum via plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szente, R. N.; Schroeter, R. A.; Garcia, M. G.; Bender, O. W.

    1997-11-01

    A process based on the use of a plasma system for recovering aluminum from dross, beverage cans, and aluminum scrap has been developed. The plasma process is clean, and there is no need for the addition of any compound, such as salt. In principle, a higher recovery rate of aluminum is attainable, since no oxidation of the aluminum occurs during the process. An economic analysis shows that the operating costs for the plasma system are at least 23% cheaper than for the traditional process using air/gas or ail/oil burners; the plasma process also does not generate either of the common residues produced by the burners. The maintenance costs of the plasma process are also lower than that of the traditional process. Overall, the plasma system is cheaper, cleaner, and easier than the oil/gas burner technology when recovering aluminum from dross, beverage cans, and scrap.

  12. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  13. SSX MHD plasma wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael R.; Schaffner, David A.

    2015-06-01

    A new turbulent plasma source at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) facility is described. The MHD wind tunnel configuration employs a magnetized plasma gun to inject high-beta plasma into a large, well-instrumented, vacuum drift region. This provides unique laboratory conditions approaching that in the solar wind: there is no applied background magnetic field in the drift region and has no net axial magnetic flux; the plasma flow speed is on the order of the local sound speed (M ~ 1), so flow energy density is comparable to thermal energy density; and the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure is of order unity (plasma ? ~ 1) so thermal energy density is also comparable to magnetic energy density. Results presented here and referenced within demonstrate the new capabilities and show how the new platform is proving useful for fundamental plasma turbulence studies.

  14. Plasma flows in MPD thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannelli, Sebastiano; Andreussi, Tommaso; Pegoraro, Francesco; Andrenucci, Mariano

    2011-10-01

    A fundamental description of the plasma acceleration process in magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters is presented. The properties of plasma flows in self-field MPD thrusters are investigated by adopting a stationary, axisymmetric, resistive magnetohydrodynamic plasma model. First, the acceleration process in a cylindrical MPD channel is analyzed by neglecting the gasdynamic pressure term. A class of solutions is presented, which allows for a simple analytical treatment of the flow. The physical and mathematical nature of the flow is thus described in terms of two characteristic parameters: a dimensionless channel length, scaled with the plasma resistive length, and a dimensionless parameter which depends on the applied voltage. Then, the effect of gasdynamic pressure is investigated. The presented approach gives an effective description of the plasma acceleration process and defines a framework for the parametric analysis of plasma flows in MPD thrusters. Alta SpA: www.alta-space.com.

  15. MPD thruster plasma instability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Results of an ongoing experimental/theoretical effort to understand the influence of plasma waves and instabilities upon coaxial plasma thruster performance and longevity are discussed. An experiment which permits measurement of the plasma dispersion relation plus a suite of plasma parameters for each one millisecond quasi-steady discharge is described. This investigation is guided by a linearized Boltzmann-Poisson kinetic numerical model which can accommodate the effects of collisions, inhomogeneities and the magnetic field. Preliminary tests reveal the presence of the low-frequency branch of an ion cyclotron wave. Although the stability of these waves still has to be established through spatial growth rate measurements, it is well known that they are prone to 'current-driven' instabilities. 'Current-driven' instabilities in the collisional tensor conducting plasma of the MPD thruster are analytically discussed and their relevance to the MPD plasma is illustrated by estimating a critical total current at which their onset occurs.

  16. On the excess energy of nonequilibrium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2012-01-15

    The energy that can be released in plasma due to the onset of instability (the excess plasma energy) is estimated. Three potentially unstable plasma states are considered, namely, plasma with an anisotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution of plasma particles, plasma with a two-beam velocity distribution, and an inhomogeneous plasma in a magnetic field with a local Maxwellian velocity distribution. The excess energy can serve as a measure of the degree to which plasma is nonequilibrium. In particular, this quantity can be used to compare plasmas in different nonequilibrium states.

  17. PHOTOIONIZATIONAL PLASMAS. II. COMPUTATIONAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Feilu; Salzmann, David; Zha, Gang; Takabe, Hideaki

    2011-11-20

    A new computer code, PhiCRE, has been developed to calculate the ionization and population distributions in a photoionizational-collisional-radiative plasma. Comparisons with experiments show that the present code provides rather accurate ionization distributions in photoionized plasmas and show reasonable agreement with other codes. Using this code, we have carried out a systematic study of the behavior of the charge state distributions and the average charge as a function of several parameters of the incident radiation and the plasma parameters.

  18. The plasma environment of comets

    SciTech Connect

    Gombosi, T.I. )

    1991-01-01

    U.S. research activities in the area of cometary plasma physics during 1987-1990 are reviewed. Consideration is given to mass loading and its consequences in the upstream region, the cometary shock, the cometosheath, the diamagnetic cavity boundary and the inner shock, and the plasma tail. Special attention is given to models and observations that have modified the pre-encounter understanding of cometary plasma environments. 211 refs.

  19. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  20. Experimental results from detached plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Boody, F.P.; Bush, C.E.; Cohen, S.A.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Medley, S.S.

    1986-10-01

    Detached plasmas are formed in TFTR which have the principal property of the boundary to the high temperature plasma core being defined by a radiating layer. This paper documents the properties of TFTR ohmic-detached plasmas with a range of plasma densities at two different plasma currents.

  1. Plasma, The Fourth State of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandy, Hassan F.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses plasma as a source of energy through nuclear fission processes, as well as the difficulties encountered in such a process. States that 99 percent of the matter in the universe is plasma, and only 1 percent is the common three states of matter. Describes the fundamental properties of plasma, plasma "pinch, and plasma oscillations. (RR)

  2. First observation of electrorheological plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G E; Thomas, H M; Räth, C; Joyce, G; Huber, P; Kompaneets, R; Fortov, V E; Lipaev, A M; Molotkov, V I; Reiter, T; Turin, M; Vinogradov, P

    2008-03-01

    We report the experimental discovery of "electrorheological (ER) complex plasmas," where the control of the interparticle interaction by an externally applied electric field is due to distortion of the Debye spheres that surround microparticles (dust) in a plasma. We show that interactions in ER plasmas under weak ac fields are mathematically equivalent to those in conventional ER fluids. Microgravity experiments, as well as molecular dynamics simulations, show a phase transition from an isotropic to an anisotropic (string) plasma state as the electric field is increased. PMID:18352717

  3. First Observation of Electrorheological Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Raeth, C.; Huber, P.; Kompaneets, R.; Joyce, G.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Reiter, T.; Turin, M.; Vinogradov, P.

    2008-03-07

    We report the experimental discovery of ''electrorheological (ER) complex plasmas,'' where the control of the interparticle interaction by an externally applied electric field is due to distortion of the Debye spheres that surround microparticles (dust) in a plasma. We show that interactions in ER plasmas under weak ac fields are mathematically equivalent to those in conventional ER fluids. Microgravity experiments, as well as molecular dynamics simulations, show a phase transition from an isotropic to an anisotropic (string) plasma state as the electric field is increased.

  4. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (inventor); Mcgee, William F. (inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  5. Electrical characterization of rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1991-08-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) electrical sources are commonly used to generate plasmas for processing of industrial materials and for related experimental work. Published descriptions of such plasmas usually include generator-power measurements, and occasionally include plasma dc-bias measurements. One or both of these quantitites are also used in industrial feedback ccontrol systems for setpoint regulation. Recent work at Sandia an elsewhere with an experimental rf discharge device (the GEC RF Reference Cell'') has shown that power and dc-bias levels are often insufficient information for specifying the state of the plasma. The plasma can have nonlinear electrical characteristics that cause harmonic generation, and the harmonic levels can depend sensitively on the impedance of the external circuitry at harmonic frequencies. Even though the harmonics may be low in amplitude, they can be directly related to large changes in plasma power and to changes in optical emission from the plasma. Consequently, in order for a worker to truly master the plasma-generation process, it is necessary to understand, measure, and control electrical characteristics of the plamsa. In this paper we describe technique that have been developed from work with the Reference Cell for making electrical measurements on rf plasmas, and we describe surprising observations of harmonic behavior. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Plasma contacting - An enabling technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of plasma contacting with an emphasis on the electron collection mode of this process is described. Results illustrating variations in plasma property profiles and potential differences that develop at hollow cathode plasma contactors are presented. A model of the electron collection plasma contacting process that is consistent with experimentally measured results is reviewed. The shortcomings of laboratory results as direct predictors of contactor performance in space and their usefulness in validating numerical models of the contacting process, that can be used to predict such performance, are discussed.

  7. Method for generating surface plasma

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Aragon, Ben P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-05-27

    A method for generating a discharge plasma which covers a surface of a body in a gas at pressures from 0.01 Torr to atmospheric pressure, by applying a radio frequency power with frequencies between approximately 1 MHz and 10 GHz across a plurality of paired insulated conductors on the surface. At these frequencies, an arc-less, non-filamentary plasma can be generated to affect the drag characteristics of vehicles moving through the gas. The plasma can also be used as a source in plasma reactors for chemical reaction operations.

  8. Plasma Sail Concept Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Delamere, P.; Kabin, K.; Linde, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    The mini-magnetospheric plasma propulsion (M2P2) device, originally proposed by Winglee et al., predicts that a 15-km standoff distance (or 20-km cross-sectional dimension) of the magnetic bubble will provide for sufficient momentum transfer from the solar wind to accelerate a spacecraft to unprecedented speeds of 50 C80 km/s after an acceleration period of 3 mo. Such velocities will enable travel out of the solar system in period of 7 yr almost an order of magnitude improvement over present chemical-based propulsion systems. However, for the parameters of the simulation of Winglee et al., a fluid model for the interaction of M2P2 with the solar wind is not valid. It is assumed in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid model, normally applied to planetary magnetospheres, that the characteristic scale size is much greater than the Larmor radius and ion skin depth of the solar wind. In the case of M2P2, the size of the magnetic bubble is actually less than or comparable to the scale of these characteristic parameters. Therefore, a kinetic approach, which addresses the small-scale physical mechanisms, must be used. A two-component approach to determining a preliminary estimate of the momentum transfer to the plasma sail has been adopted. The first component is a self-consistent MHD simulation of the small-scale expansion phase of the magnetic bubble. The fluid treatment is valid to roughly 5 km from the source and the steady-state MHD solution at the 5 km boundary was then used as initial conditions for the hybrid simulation. The hybrid simulations showed that the forces delivered to the innermost regions of the plasma sail are considerably ( 10 times) smaller than the MHD counterpart, are dominated by the magnetic field pressure gradient, and are directed primarily in the transverse direction.

  9. Auroral plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    A review is given of auroral plasma wave phenomena, starting with the earliest ground-based observations and ending with the most recent satellite observations. Two types of waves are considered, electromagnetic and electrostatic. Electromagnetic waves include auroral kilometric radiation, auroral hiss, ELF noise bands, and low-frequency electric and magnetic noise. Electrostatic waves include upper hybrid resonance emissions, electron cyclotron waves, lower hybrid waves, ion cyclotron waves and broadband electrostatic noise. In each case, a brief overview is given describing the observations, the origin of the instability, and the role of the waves in the physics of the auroral acceleration region.

  10. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  11. Laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Malka, V.

    2012-05-15

    This review article highlights the tremendous evolution of the research on laser plasma accelerators which has, in record time, led to the production of high quality electron beams at the GeV level, using compact laser systems. I will describe the path we followed to explore different injection schemes and I will present the most significant breakthrough which allowed us to generate stable, high peak current and high quality electron beams, with control of the charge, of the relative energy spread and of the electron energy.

  12. Renormalization and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    A review is given of modern theories of statistical dynamics as applied to problems in plasma physics. The derivation of consistent renormalized kinetic equations is discussed, first heuristically, later in terms of powerful functional techniques. The equations are illustrated with models of various degrees of idealization, including the exactly soluble stochastic oscillator, a prototype for several important applications. The direct-interaction approximation is described in detail. Applications discussed include test particle diffusion and the justification of quasilinear theory, convective cells, E vector x B vector turbulence, the renormalized dielectric function, phase space granulation, and stochastic magnetic fields.

  13. Modeling of Photoionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I review the motivation and current status of modeling of plasmas exposed to strong radiation fields, as it applies to the study of cosmic X-ray sources. This includes some of the astrophysical issues which can be addressed, the ingredients for the models, the current computational tools, the limitations imposed by currently available atomic data, and the validity of some of the standard assumptions. I will also discuss ideas for the future: challenges associated with future missions, opportunities presented by improved computers, and goals for atomic data collection.

  14. Plasma Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Judith T.

    Despite over a century of observations, the physical processes by which prominence plasma forms and evolves remain controversial. In this chapter we review the observational constraints on all mass formation models, review the four leading models—injection, levitation, evaporation-condensation, and magneto-thermal convection, describe the strengths and weaknesses of each model, and point out opportunities for future work. As needed, short tutorials are provided on fundamental physical mechanisms and concepts not covered in other chapters, including magnetic reconnection and energy balance in coronal loops.

  15. Cold plasma: overview of plasma technologies and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology. It is based on energetic, reactive gases which inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The primary modes of action are due to UV light and reactive chemical products of the cold plasma ionization pro...

  16. Plasma-wall transition in weakly collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Manfredi, G.; Devaux, S.

    2008-10-15

    This paper reviews some theoretical and computational aspects of plasma-wall interactions, in particular the formation of sheaths. Some fundamental results are derived analytically using a simple fluid model, and are subsequently tested with kinetic simulations. The various regions composing the plasma-wall transition (Debye sheath, collisional and magnetic presheaths) are discussed in details.

  17. Effect of plasma motion on tearing modes in cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. Q.; Peng, X. D.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of equilibrium plasma motion on the resistive m/n = 2/1 tearing mode (TM) in low ? plasmas is investigated in cylindrical geometry (with m and n being poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). Without equilibrium plasma motion but with viscosity, the TM stability is mainly determined by the Reynolds number S and reaches maximum near S = 104, which is consistent with previous findings. The poloidal plasma rotation has stabilizing effect on TM; however, the rotation shear has destabilization effect in the low viscosity regime. The axial plasma motion has strong stabilizing effect on TM in the low viscosity regime for Prandtl number Pr < 1, while its shear has slight stabilizing effect with the decrease of growth rate less than 15%. When the axial velocity becomes large enough, the mode frequency tends to be independent of the Prandtl number. In the presence of parallel plasma motion, the growth rate is determined by the axial component at low parallel velocity, while determined by poloidal component at large parallel velocity. The parallel plasma motion drives the TM rotating in the opposite direction. It is shown that the equilibrium motion reduces the growth rate of TM by changing the phase difference and coupling coefficient between potential perturbation and magnetic flux perturbation (deviating from ?/2 ), which results in a lower mode frequency. Compared to the role of velocity shear, the magnitude of plasma velocity itself at the m/n = 2/1 rational surface is dominant in determining the TM characteristics.

  18. Plasma remediation of trichloroethylene in silent discharge plasmas Diane Evans

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    ; accepted for publication 15 July 1993) Plasma destruction of toxins, and volatile organic compounds compounds. In this regard, remediation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in silent discharge plasmas has been bubbler. The destruction efficiency of TCE is smaller in humid mixtures compared to dry mixtures due

  19. Measurement of plasma parameters in zirconium plasma using langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, B.; Majumder, A.; Baruah, S.; Sahu, G. K.; Thakur, K. B.; Mago, V. K.; Das, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    Zirconium (Zr) plasma is produced by electron-impact ionization during Zr vapor evaporation in an electron beam evaporator. The plasma is embedded in the vapor. It expands along with the vapor in a transverse magnetic field. Parameters like ion density, electron temperature, space potential, floating potential of the plasma were measured by a disc type Langmuir probe. Since Zr metal has high melting point (˜ 2128 K), the evaporator is filled with condensable vapor and remains at high temperature (˜ 700 K). The probe was designed and fabricated in a manner that the insulator was protected from the direct deposition of Zr vapor. The measurement shows that the e-beam generated plasma is weakly ionized (degree of ionization ˜ 0.1 %) and it has low electron temperature (˜ 0.1 eV). It is also observed that the plasma ions have a flow velocity in vertical direction similar to the neutral atoms.

  20. Ion plasma wave and its instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2014-04-15

    Some essential features of the ion plasma wave in both kinetic and fluid descriptions are presented. The wave develops at wavelengths shorter than the electron Debye radius. Thermal motion of electrons at this scale is such that they overshoot the electrostatic potential perturbation caused by ion bunching, which consequently propagates as an unshielded wave, completely unaffected by electron dynamics. So in the simplest fluid description, the electrons can be taken as a fixed background. However, in the presence of magnetic field and for the electron gyro-radius shorter than the Debye radius, electrons can participate in the wave and can increase its damping rate. This is determined by the ratio of the electron gyro-radius and the Debye radius. In interpenetrating plasmas (when one plasma drifts through another), the ion plasma wave can easily become growing and this growth rate is quantitatively presented for the case of an argon plasma.

  1. Characteristics of plasma sterilizer using microwave torch plasma with AC high-voltage discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itarashiki, Tomomasa; Hayashi, Nobuya; Yonesu, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Microwave plasma sterilization has recently been attracting attention for medical applications. However, it is difficult to perform low-temperature sterilization in short time periods. Increasing the output power shortens the time required for sterilization but causes the temperature to increase. To overcome this issue, we have developed a hybrid plasma system that combines a microwave torch plasma and a high-voltage mesh plasma, which allows radicals to be produced at low temperatures. Using this system, successful sterilization was shown to be possible in a period of 45 min at a temperature of 41 °C.

  2. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Pencil, Eric J.; Carter, Justin; Heminger, Jason; Gatsonis, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) are currently baselined for the Air Force Mightysat II.1 flight in 1999 and are under consideration for a number of other missions for primary propulsion, precision positioning, and attitude control functions. In this work, PPT plumes were characterized to assess their contamination characteristics. Diagnostics included planar and cylindrical Langmuir probes and a large number of collimated quartz contamination sensors. Measurements were made using a LES 8/9 flight PPT at 0.24, 0.39, 0.55, and 1.2 m from the thruster, as well as in the backflow region behind the thruster. Plasma measurements revealed a peak centerline ion density and velocity of approx. 6 x 10(exp 12) cm(exp -3) and 42,000 m/s, respectively. Optical transmittance measurements of the quartz sensors after 2 x 10(exp 5) pulses showed a rapid decrease in plume contamination with increasing angle from the plume axis, with a barely measurable transmittance decrease in the ultraviolet at 90 deg. No change in optical properties was detected for sensors in the backflow region.

  3. L2 Plasma Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The second LaGrange point, 1.5 million miles from the Earth in the anti-solar direction, is becoming an important destination for scientific spacecraft. The quasi-stable gravity field requires little energy resources for station keeping and astronomical missions-infrared and microwave in particular-find the minimal impact from Earth albedo radiation and limited restrictions on viewing directions a tremendous advantage in their mission design. Spacecraft design for L2 missions will have to consider the plasma environments of the ambient solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail from energies of a few 10s of an eV through 10 s of keV in addition to enhanced energetic particle populations from 10s to l000 keV during solar energetic particle events. This presentation will provide a background on the appropriate L2 charged particle environments at L2 and describe modeling efforts at MSFC to develop environment specification tools for the L2 plasma environment.

  4. L2 Plasma Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The second LaGrange point, 1.5 million miles from the Earth in the anti-solar direction, is becoming an important destination for scientific spacecraft. The quasi-stable gravity field requires little energy resources for station keeping and astronomical missions-infrared and microwave in particular-find the minimal impact from Earth albedo radiation and limited restrictions on viewing directions a tremendous advantage in their mission design. Spacecraft design for L2 missions will have to consider the plasma environments of the ambient solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail from energies of a few 10s of an eV through 10s of keV in addition to enhanced energetic particle populations from 10s to 1000 keV during solar energetic particle events. This presentation will provide a background on the appropriate L2 charged particle environments at L2 and describe modeling efforts at MSFC to develop environment specification tools for the L2 plasma environment.

  5. Plasma Redshift Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2011-04-01

    The newly discovered plasma redshift cross section explains a long range of phenomena; including the cosmological redshift, and the intrinsic redshift of Sun, stars, galaxies and quasars. It explains the beautiful black body spectrum of the CMB, and it predicts correctly: a) the observed XRB, b) the magnitude redshift relation for supernovae, and c) the surface- brightness-redshift relation for galaxies. There is no need for Big Bang, Inflation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion, and Black Holes. The universe is quasi-static and can renew itself forever (for details, see: http://www.plasmaredshift.org). There is no cosmic time dilation. In intergalactic space, the average electron temperature is T = 2.7 million K, and the average electron density is N = 0.0002 per cubic cm. Plasma redshift is derived theoretically from conventional axioms of physics by using more accurate methods than those conventionally used. The main difference is: 1) the proper inclusion of the dielectric constant, 2) more exact calculations of imaginary part of the dielectric constant, and as required 3) a quantum mechanical treatment of the interactions.

  6. Plasma motor generator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Gerald E.

    1987-01-01

    The significant potential advantages of a plasma motor generator system over conventional systems for the generation of electrical power and propulsion for spacecraft in low Earth orbits warrants its further investigation. The two main components of such a system are a long insulated wire and the plasma generating hollow cathodes needed to maintain electrical contact with the ionosphere. Results of preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations of this system are presented. The theoretical work involved the equilibrium configurations of the wire and the nature of small oscillation about these equilibrium positions. A particularly interesting result was that two different configurations are allowed when the current is above a critical value. Experimental investigations were made of the optimal starting and running conditions for the proposed, low current hollow cathodes. Although optimal ranges of temperature, argon pressure and discharge voltage were identified, start up became progressively more difficult. This supposed depletion or contamination of the emissive surface could be countered by the addition of new emissive material.

  7. Andrew P. Zwicker Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Biewer, Theodore

    PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2003 ­ Present Head, Science Education Department, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 2000 ­ 2003 Lead Scientist, Science Education Department, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 1998 ­ 2000 Senior Program Leader, Science Education Department, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. 1993 ­ 1998

  8. Control of impurities in toroidal plasma devices

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for plasma impurity control in closed flux plasma systems such as Tokamak reactors is disclosed. Local axisymmetrical injection of hydrogen gas is employed to reverse the normally inward flow of impurities into the plasma.

  9. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food...Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of...

  10. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food...Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of...

  11. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food...Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of...

  12. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food...Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of...

  13. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food...Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of...

  14. Arc Plasma Gun With Coaxial Powder Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, Isidor

    1988-01-01

    Redesigned plasma gun provides improved metallic and ceramic coatings. Particles injected directly through coaxial bore in cathode into central region of plasma jet. Introduced into hotter and faster region of plasma jet.

  15. Solar array arcing in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1990-01-01

    Solar cells in space plasma conditions are known to arc into the plasma when the interconnects are at a negative potential of a few hundred volts, relative to plasma potential. For cells with silver-coated interconnects, a threshold voltage for arcing exists at about -230 V, as found in both ground and LEO experiments. The arc rate beyond the threshold voltage depends nearly linearly on plasma density, but has a strong power-law dependence on voltage, such that for small increments in operating voltage there is a large increment in arc rate. The arcs generate broadband radio interference and visible light. In ground tests, interconnects have been damaged by arcs in cells having insufficient isolation from a source of high current. Models for the arcs are highly dependent on the choice of interconnect conductor material exposed to the plasma and possibly on the geometry and choice of adjacent insulator material. Finally, new technology solar cells use copper for the cell interconnects, a material which may have a lower arcing threshold voltage than silver. It is expected, from ground tests of simulated solar cells, that any junction of conductor and insulator exposed to space plasma conditions will arc into the plasma at a few hundred volts negative potential, relative to the local plasma.

  16. Plasma chemistry and organic synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezuka, M.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristic features of chemical reactions using low temperature plasmas are described and differentiated from those seen in other reaction systems. A number of examples of applications of plasma chemistry to synthetic reactions are mentioned. The production of amino acids by discharge reactions in hydrocarbon-ammonia-water systems is discussed, and its implications for the origins of life are mentioned.

  17. Space Plasmas and Lunar Electrodynamics

    E-print Network

    , MARCH 23, 2005 #12;LOIS Lunar wake plasma WIND satellite results · Lunar wake electron density 104 m-3, heated up to a few 100 eV · Filled with EM radiation with frequencies matching the plasma frequency are a strong motivation for reopening the field of fundamen

  18. Plasma Processes for Semiconductor Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchon, W. N. G.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma processing is a central technique in the fabrication of semiconductor devices. This self-contained book provides an up-to-date description of plasma etching and deposition in semiconductor fabrication. It presents the basic physics and chemistry of these processes, and shows how they can be accurately modeled. The author begins with an overview of plasma reactors and discusses the various models for understanding plasma processes. He then covers plasma chemistry, addressing the effects of different chemicals on the features being etched. Having presented the relevant background material, he then describes in detail the modeling of complex plasma systems, with reference to experimental results. The book closes with a useful glossary of technical terms. No prior knowledge of plasma physics is assumed in the book. It contains many homework exercises and serves as an ideal introduction to plasma processing and technology for graduate students of electrical engineering and materials science. It will also be a useful reference for practicing engineers in the semiconductor industry.

  19. PLASMA ASTROPHYSICS Instructor: Kouichi HIROTANI

    E-print Network

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    , ISBN-13 978-0-521-82116-2 hardback; ISBN-10 0-521-82116-9 hardback "Physics of Fully Ionized Gases", L Hours: 15:20-18:10, FRI Place: Room 701, Physics Building 1. Course Description The course covers plasma. References "Fundamentals of Plasma Physics", Paul M. Bellan, 2006, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge

  20. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 17 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-11-30

    A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

  2. Plasma technology for waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D.R.

    1995-04-01

    Improved environmental cleanup technology is needed to meet demanding goals for remediation and treatment of future waste streams. Plasma technology has unique features which could provide advantages of reduced secondary waste, lower cost, and onsite treatment for a wide variety of applications. Plasma technology can provide highly controllable processing without the need for combustion heating. It can be used to provide high temperature processing ({approximately}10,000{degrees}C). Plasma technology can also be employed for low temperature processing (down to room temperature range) through selective plasma chemistry. A graphite electrode arc plasma furnace at MIT has been used to investigate high temperature processing of simulated solid waste for Department of Energy environmental cleanup applications. Stable, non-leachable glass has been produced. To ensure reliable operation and to meet environmental objectives, new process diagnostics have been developed to measure furnace temperature and to determine metals emissions in the gaseous effluent. Selective plasma destruction of dilute concentrations of hazardous compounds in gaseous waste streams has been investigated using electron beam generated plasmas. Selective destruction makes it possible to treat the gas steam at relatively low temperatures in the 30-300{degrees}C range. On-line infrared measurements have been used in feedback operation to maximize efficiency and ensure desired performance. Plasma technology and associated process diagnostics will be used in future studies of a wide range of waste streams.

  3. Plasma theory and simulation research

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Our research group uses both theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of instabilities, heating, diffusion, transport and other phenomena in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation, both theoretically and practically. Our focus has been more and more on the plasma edge (the sheath''), interactions with boundaries, leading to simulations of whole devices (someday a numerical tokamak).

  4. Space plasma contactor research, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple model describing the process of electron collection from a low pressure ambient plasma in the absence of magnetic field and contactor velocity effects is presented. Experimental measurments of the plasma surrounding the contactor are used to demonstrate that a double-sheath generally develops and separates the ambient plasma from a higher density, anode plasma located adjacent to the contactor. Agreement between the predictions of the model and experimental measurements obtained at the electron collection current levels ranging to 1 A suggests the surface area at the ambient plasma boundary of the double-sheath is equal to the electron current being collected divided by the ambient plasma random electron current density; the surface area of the higher density anode plasma boundary of the double-sheath is equal to the ion current being emitted across this boundary divided by the ion current density required to sustain a stable sheath; and the voltage drop across the sheath is determined by the requirement that the ion and electron currents counterflowing across the boundaries be at space-charge limited levels. The efficiency of contactor operation is shown to improve when significant ionization and excitation is induced by electrons that stream from the ambient plasma through the double-sheath and collide with neutral atoms being supplied through the hollow cathode.

  5. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  6. Presheath profiles in simulated tokamak edge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.; Tynan, G.

    1988-04-01

    The PISCES plasma surface interaction facility at UCLA generates plasmas with characteristics similar to those found in the edge plasmas of tokamaks. Steady state magnetized plasmas produced by this device are used to study plasma-wall interaction phenomena which are relevant to tokamak devices. We report here progress on some detailed investigations of the presheath region that extends from a wall surface into these /open quotes/simulated tokamak/close quotes/ edge plasma discharges along magnetic field lines.

  7. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

    1984-01-10

    This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

  8. Helicon plasma thruster discharge model

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.

    2014-04-15

    By considering particle, momentum, and energy balance equations, we develop a semi-empirical quasi one-dimensional analytical discharge model of radio-frequency and helicon plasma thrusters. The model, which includes both the upstream plasma source region as well as the downstream diverging magnetic nozzle region, is compared with experimental measurements and confirms current performance levels. Analysis of the discharge model identifies plasma power losses on the radial and back wall of the thruster as the major performance reduction factors. These losses serve as sinks for the input power which do not contribute to the thrust, and which reduce the maximum plasma density and hence propellant utilization. With significant radial plasma losses eliminated, the discharge model (with argon) predicts specific impulses in excess of 3000?s, propellant utilizations above 90%, and thruster efficiencies of about 30%.

  9. Plasma treatment advantages for textiles

    E-print Network

    Sparavigna, Amelia

    2008-01-01

    The textile industry is searching for innovative production techniques to improve the product quality, as well as society requires new finishing techniques working in environmental respect. Plasma surface treatments show distinct advantages, because they are able to modify the surface properties of inert materials, sometimes with environment friendly devices. For fabrics, cold plasma treatments require the development of reliable and large systems. Such systems are now existing and the use of plasma physics in industrial problems is rapidly increasing. On textile surfaces, three main effects can be obtained depending on the treatment conditions: the cleaning effect, the increase of microroughness (anti-pilling finishing of wool) and the production of radicals to obtain hydrophilic surfaces. Plasma polymerisation, that is the deposition of solid polymeric materials with desired properties on textile substrates, is under development. The advantage of such plasma treatments is that the modification turns out to ...

  10. Physical domains in plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Liboff, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Do the plasma in the sun's core and the electron-conduction plasma in a semiconductor behave in the same way. This question is both fundamental and practical, for plasma physics plays a role in a vast area of natural phenomena and in many engineering devices. Understanding the cosmos, or designing a computer chip or a thermonuclear fusion reactor, requires first of all a realization of equations of motion that are appropriate to the particular problem. Similar physical differences occur in engineered structures. The plasmas in most thermonuclear fusion devices are basically like the plasma in the core of the sun: weakly coupled and classical - that is, obeying Newton's laws and Maxwell's equations. The conduction electrons in a semiconductor, on the other hand, obey the laws of quantum mechanics.

  11. Photovoltaic Plasma Interaction Test 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Bradford A.; Chrulski, Daniel; Myers, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program is developing a plasma contactor to mitigate the harmful effects of charge collection on the station's large photovoltaic arrays. The purpose of the present test was to examine the effects of charge collection on the solar array electrical circuit and to verify the effectiveness of the plasma contactor. The results showed that the plasma contactor was able to eliminate structure arcing for any array output voltage. However, the current requirements of the plasma contactor were higher than those for prior testing and predicted by analysis. Three possible causes for this excess current demand are discussed. The most likely appeared to be a high local pressure on or very near the surface of the array as a result of vacuum tank conditions. Therefore, in actual space conditions, the plasma contactor should work as predicted.

  12. Plasma waves near the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Eastman, T. E.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoppe, M. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Etcheto, J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma waves associated with the magnetosphere from the magnetosheath to the outer magnetosphere are investigated to obtain a clear definition of the boundaries and regions, to characterize the waves observed in these regions, to determine which wave modes are present, and to determine their origin. Emphasis is on high time resolution data and a comparison between measurements by different antenna systems. It is shown that the magnetosheath flux transfer events, the magnetopause current layer, the outer magnetosphere, and the boundary layer can be identified by their magnetic field and plasma wave characteristics, as well as by their plasma and energetic particle signatures. The plasma wave characteristics in the current layer and in the boundary layer are very similar to the features in the flux transfer events, and upon entry into their outer magnetosphere, the plasma wave spectra are dominated by intense electromagnetic chorus bursts and electrostatic emissions.

  13. Advances in plasma melting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, R.; Hoffelner, W.

    The quest for 'defect-free' high performance metals has benefited from the expansion of plasma hearth melting capacity. 'Skull' melting in water-cooled copper containers under an inert gas atmosphere allows elimination of ceramic and refractory metal inclusions when melting reactive metals and superalloys, while retaining the input alloy content. The interactions of operating variables such as furnace pressure, nature of gas, arc current and heat input pattern with product properties such as homogeneity, grain size, and inclusions are described. By proper process control, plasma hearth melting has been qualified as one of only two processes suitable for particularly demanding rotating grade engine parts made of titanium alloy. Costs of plasma hearth melting are less than with electron beam. Extension of plasma processing to other alloys is being actively pursued. Powder production is currently practical with plasma melting and bottom pouring to make powder. Some speculations on future trends in materials and operating temperatures are offered.

  14. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  15. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  16. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  17. Plasma vertical stabilisation in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribov, Y.; Kavin, A.; Lukash, V.; Khayrutdinov, R.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Loarte, A.; Snipes, J. A.; Zabeo, L.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the progress in analysis of the ITER plasma vertical stabilisation (VS) system since its design review in 2007-2008. Two indices characterising plasma VS were studied. These are (1) the maximum value of plasma vertical displacement due to free drift that can be stopped by the VS system and (2) the maximum root mean square value of low frequency noise in the dZ/dt measurement signal used in the VS feedback loop. The first VS index was calculated using the PET code for 15 MA plasmas with the nominal position and shape. The second VS index was studied with the DINA code in the most demanding simulations for plasma magnetic control of 15 MA scenarios with the fastest plasma current ramp-up and early X-point formation, the fastest plasma current ramp-down in a divertor configuration, and an H to L mode transition at the current flattop. The studies performed demonstrate that the VS in-vessel coils, adopted recently in the baseline design, significantly increase the range of plasma controllability in comparison with the stabilising systems VS1 and VS2, providing operating margins sufficient to achieve ITER's goals specified in the project requirements. Additionally two sets of the DINA code simulations were performed with the goal of assessment of the capability of the PF system with the VS in-vessel coils: (i) to control the position of runaway electrons generated during disruptions in 15 MA scenarios and (ii) to trigger ELMs in H-mode plasmas of 7.5 MA/2.65 T scenarios planned for the early phase of ITER operation. It was also shown that ferromagnetic structures of the vacuum vessel (ferromagnetic inserts) and test blanket modules insignificantly affect the plasma VS.

  18. Surface plasma source with anode layer plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Proposed plasma generation system can be used for high current negative ion beam production and for directed deposition by flux of sputtered neutrals and negative ions. The main mechanism of negative ion formation in surface plasma sources is the secondary emission from low work function surface bombarded by a flux of positive ion or neutrals. The emission of negative ions is enhanced significantly by introducing a small amount of cesium or other substance with low ionization potential. In the proposed source are used positive ions generated by Hall drift plasma accelerator (anode layer plasma accelerator or plasma accelerator with insulated channel, with cylindrical or race track configuration of emission slit). The target-emitter is bombarded by the ion beam accelerated in crossed ExB fields. Negative ions are extracted from the target surface with geometrical focusing and are accelerated by negative voltage applied between emitter and plasma, contacting with the plasma accelerator. Hall drift ion source has a special design with a space for passing of the emitted negative ions and sputtered particles through the positive ion source.

  19. Surface plasma source with anode layer plasma acceleratora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-01

    Proposed plasma generation system can be used for high current negative ion beam production and for directed deposition by flux of sputtered neutrals and negative ions. The main mechanism of negative ion formation in surface plasma sources is the secondary emission from low work function surface bombarded by a flux of positive ion or neutrals. The emission of negative ions is enhanced significantly by introducing a small amount of cesium or other substance with low ionization potential. In the proposed source are used positive ions generated by Hall drift plasma accelerator (anode layer plasma accelerator or plasma accelerator with insulated channel, with cylindrical or race track configuration of emission slit). The target-emitter is bombarded by the ion beam accelerated in crossed ExB fields. Negative ions are extracted from the target surface with geometrical focusing and are accelerated by negative voltage applied between emitter and plasma, contacting with the plasma accelerator. Hall drift ion source has a special design with a space for passing of the emitted negative ions and sputtered particles through the positive ion source.

  20. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-21

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  1. Experimental investigation of plasma relaxation using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott; University of New Mexico Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation in a low density background plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear HelCat device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes within the intergalactic medium. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5-10 kV and ~100 kA. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities ~1.2Cs and densities ~1020 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  2. Research in plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Three aspects of barium ion cloud dynamics are discussed. First, the effect of the ratio of ion cloud conductivity to background ionospheric conductivity on the motion of barium ion clouds is investigated and compared with observations of barium ion clouds. This study led to the suggestion that the conjugate ionosphere participates in the dynamics of barium ion clouds. Second, analytic work on the deformation of ion clouds is presented. Third, a linearized stability theory was extended to include the effect of the finite extent of an ion cloud, as well as the effect of the ratio of ion cloud to ionospheric conductivities. The stability properties of a plasma with contra-streaming ion beams parallel to a magnetic field are investigated. The results are interpreted in terms of parameters appropriate for collisionless shock waves. It is found that this particular instability can be operative only if the up-stream Alfven Mach number exceeds 5.5.

  3. Magnetospheric space plasma investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1994-01-01

    A time dependent semi-kinetic model that includes self collisions and ion-neutral collisions and chemistry was developed. Light ion outflow in the polar cap transition region was modeled and compared with data results. A model study of wave heating of O+ ions in the topside transition region was carried out using a code which does local calculations that include ion-neutral and Coulomb self collisions as well as production and loss of O+. Another project is a statistical study of hydrogen spin curve characteristics in the polar cap. A statistical study of the latitudinal distribution of core plasmas along the L=4.6 field line using DE-1/RIMS data was completed. A short paper on dual spacecraft estimates of ion temperature profiles and heat flows in the plasmasphere ionosphere system was prepared. An automated processing code was used to process RIMS data from 1981 to 1984.

  4. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; D. Spong; R. Majeski; M. Zarnstorff

    2003-02-28

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral-beam injection, and radio-frequency. Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The plan is to provide 3 MW of 50 keV balanced neutral-beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 msec for initial experiments, and to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. Subsequent upgrades will add 3 MW of neutral-beam injection. This Chapter discusses the NCSX neutral-beam injection requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) neutral-beam injection system. In addition, estimations are given for beam-heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size an d magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam-injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of radio-frequency heating by mode-conversion ion-Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron-cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the radio-frequency system lend themselves to current drive, so that if current drive became desirable for any reason only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The radio-frequency system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly ion-Bernstein-wave-generated sheared flows.

  5. Plasma Nanoscience: from Nano-Solids in Plasmas to Nano-Plasmas in Solids

    E-print Network

    Ostrikov, K; Meyyappan, M

    2013-01-01

    The unique plasma-specific features and physical phenomena in the organization of nanoscale solid-state systems in a broad range of elemental composition, structure, and dimensionality are critically reviewed. These effects lead to the possibility to localize and control energy and matter at nanoscales and to produce self-organized nano-solids with highly unusual and superior properties. A unifying conceptual framework based on the control of production, transport, and self-organization of precursor species is introduced and a variety of plasma-specific non-equilibrium and kinetics-driven phenomena across the many temporal and spatial scales is explained. When the plasma is localized to micrometer and nanometer dimensions, new emergent phenomena arise. The examples range from semiconducting quantum dots and nanowires, chirality control of single-walled carbon nanotubes, ultra-fine manipulation of graphenes, nano-diamond, and organic matter, to nano-plasma effects and nano-plasmas of different states of matter...

  6. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

  7. Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    C1 - Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) Dale Meade Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory plasma issues: Burning Plasma Physics - The achievement and understanding of self-heated plasmas Toroidal Physics - The achievement and understanding of sustained self- heated plasmas with characteristics

  8. Plasma medicine: an introductory review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M. G.; Kroesen, G.; Morfill, G.; Nosenko, T.; Shimizu, T.; van Dijk, J.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    This introductory review on plasma health care is intended to provide the interested reader with a summary of the current status of this emerging field, its scope, and its broad interdisciplinary approach, ranging from plasma physics, chemistry and technology, to microbiology, biochemistry, biophysics, medicine and hygiene. Apart from the basic plasma processes and the restrictions and requirements set by international health standards, the review focuses on plasma interaction with prokaryotic cells (bacteria), eukaryotic cells (mammalian cells), cell membranes, DNA etc. In so doing, some of the unfamiliar terminology—an unavoidable by-product of interdisciplinary research—is covered and explained. Plasma health care may provide a fast and efficient new path for effective hospital (and other public buildings) hygiene—helping to prevent and contain diseases that are continuously gaining ground as resistance of pathogens to antibiotics grows. The delivery of medically active 'substances' at the molecular or ionic level is another exciting topic of research through effects on cell walls (permeabilization), cell excitation (paracrine action) and the introduction of reactive species into cell cytoplasm. Electric fields, charging of surfaces, current flows etc can also affect tissue in a controlled way. The field is young and hopes are high. It is fitting to cover the beginnings in New Journal of Physics, since it is the physics (and non-equilibrium chemistry) of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas that have made this development of plasma health care possible.

  9. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  10. EDITORIAL: Stochasticity in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.

    2008-02-01

    In recent years the importance of externally imposed resonant magnetic fields on plasmas has become more and more recognized. These fields act either at well defined plasma layers, e.g. by ergodization or more globally by exciting large-size modes in the plasma. A major achievement of research in recent years is the possibility to suppress large type 1 ELMS by resonant perturbation fields which modify the transport at the plasma edge. This option has been studied extensively at DIII-D and recently progress has also been made at JET and TEXTOR. Several devices are preparing further experiments to study the important aim of avoiding transient heat pulses and thus to substantially increase the lifetime of ITER. Other topics of interest for fusion reactors are the option of distributing the heat to a large area, optimizing methods for heat and particle exhaust, and understanding the transport around tearing mode instabilities. Since October 2003, three SFP workshops have taken place. Important papers from the first two workshops have been published in previous special issues of Nuclear Fusion (stacks.iop.org/NF/44/i=6 and stacks.iop.org/NF/46/i=4) and the contents of this issue are based on presentations to the Third Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas (SFP) held in Jülich, Germany, 5-7 March 2007. The SFP workshops have been stimulated by the installation of the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED) in the TEXTOR tokamak. It has attracted colleagues working on various plasma configurations such as tokamaks, stellarators or reversed field pinches. The workshop is devoted to phenomena on the plasma edge and to transport questions over the whole plasma cross section. It is a meeting place for experimental and theoretical working groups. The next workshop is planned for February/March 2009 in Jülich. For details see www.fzjuelich.de/sfp/. We hope that the article series in Nuclear Fusion will stimulate interest in the fascinating subject of plasma physics.

  11. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  12. Plasma diagnostics of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, Alexey; Scott, David; Keidar, Michael; Shneider, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Intensive development and biomedical application of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jet (NEAPJ) facilitates rapid growth of the plasma medicine field. The NEAPJ facility utilized at the George Washington University (GWU) demonstrated efficacy for treatment of various cancer types (lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin). In this work we review recent advances of the research conducted at GWU concerned with the development of NEAPJ diagnostics including Rayleigh Microwave Scattering setup, method of streamer scattering on DC potential, Rogowski coils, ICCD camera and optical emission spectroscopy. These tools allow conducting temporally-resolved measurements of plasma density, electrical potential, charge and size of the streamer head, electrical currents flowing though the jet, ionization front propagation speed etc. Transient dynamics of plasma and discharge parameters will be considered and physical processes involved in the discharge will be analyzed including streamer breakdown, electrical coupling of the streamer tip with discharge electrodes, factors determining NEAPJ length, cross-sectional shape and propagation path etc.

  13. The plasma-sheath transition in an asymmetric collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, H.-P.; Riemann, K.-U.; Ecker, G.

    1991-03-01

    The plasma-sheath problem (?D ? 0) for an asymmetric warm collision-free plasma is solved in plane parallel geometry. To this end Emmert's model source term [Phys. Fluids 23, 803 (1980)] is generalized to account for a superimposed plasma drift. The quasineutral plasma approximation results in a system of coupled integral equations that can be solved analytically. In contrast to Emmert's symmetric model the upstream facing sheath edge shows the usual field singularity. At the downstream facing sheath edge, a finite field strength and an oversatisfied Bohm criterion are found. These results are in full agreement with general considerations on the Bohm criterion and on the sheath edge field singularity [Phys. Fluids B 1, 961 (1989)].

  14. Interactions of plastic plasma with different atomic number plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasperczuk, Andrzej; Pisarczyk, Tadeusz; Chodukowski, Tomasz; Kalinowska, Zofia; Gus'kov, Sergiey Yu; Demchenko, Nikolay N.; Ullschmied, Jiri; Krousky, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jiri; Pisarczyk, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    This paper is devoted to determination of the plasma ablative pressures for ablators with different atomic numbers. For this reason several target materials with a wide range of atomic numbers (Z = 3.5-73), i.e. plastic (CH), Al, Cu, Ag and Ta, were used. To compare pressures of plasmas produced from various materials, the targets consisted of two components. One of them, in the form of a cylindrical insert 200 ?m in diameter, was fixed to the second one. The targets were irradiated by the third harmonic of the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) laser radiation with the energy of 130 J and focal beam diameter of 600 ?m on the target surface. The results presented show that the plasma pressure decreases with increasing atomic number, but in a limited range of Z only. For higher Z, starting approximately from Z = 47 (Ag), the plasma pressure becomes constant, as confirmed by interferometric measurements.

  15. The Absence of Plasma in"Spark Plasma Sintering"

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, Dustin M.; Anders, Andre; Dudina, Dina V.; Andersson, Joakim; Jiang, Dongtao; Unuvar, Cosan; Anselmi-Tamburini, Umberto; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Mukherjee, Amiya K.

    2008-04-10

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is a remarkable method for synthesizing and consolidating a large variety of both novel and traditional materials. The process typically uses moderate uni-axial pressures (<100 MPa) in conjunction with a pulsing on-off DC current during operation. There are a number of mechanisms proposed to account for the enhanced sintering abilities of the SPS process. Of these mechanisms, the one most commonly put forth and the one that draws the most controversy involves the presence of momentary plasma generated between particles. This study employees three separate experimental methods in an attempt to determine the presence or absence of plasma during SPS. The methods employed include: in-situ atomic emission spectroscopy, direct visual observation and ultra-fast in-situ voltage measurements. It was found using these experimental techniques that no plasma is present during the SPS process. This result was confirmed using several different powders across a wide spectrum of SPS conditions.

  16. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R P; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Piller, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M; Welton, R

    2012-02-01

    A prototype RF H(-) surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA?kW. Control experiments with H(-) beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing. PMID:22380221

  17. Plasma acceleration processes in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Noji, Ryosuke; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2007-03-15

    Plasma acceleration processes in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster (APPT) were investigated. APPTs are space propulsion options suitable for microspacecraft, and have recently attracted much attention because of their low electric power requirements and simple, compact propellant system. The plasma acceleration mechanism, however, has not been well understood. In the present work, emission spectroscopy, high speed photography, and magnetic field measurements are conducted inside the electrode channel of an APPT with rectangular geometry. The successive images of neutral particles and ions give us a comprehensive understanding of their behavior under electromagnetic acceleration. The magnetic field profile clarifies the location where the electromagnetic force takes effect. As a result, it is shown that high density, ablated neutral gas stays near the propellant surface, and only a fraction of the neutrals is converted into plasma and electromagnetically accelerated, leaving the residual neutrals behind.

  18. Hydrodynamic confinement of thermonuclear plasmas trisops VIII (plasma liner confinement)

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, D.R.; Ziajka, P.E.; Tunstall, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on fusion reactions produced by adiabatic compression of plasma vortex structures are discussed. The TRISOPS machine at the University of Miami has been modified by improving the preionization of the plasma and increasing the ring frequency of the conical theta-pinch coils. The results obtained with a series of experiments leading up to the latest machine, TRISOPS VIII, are reviewed. It has been possible, with this modified machine, to obtain ion temperatures of 1 keV before secondary magnetic compression without any magnetic guide field. Ion temperatures of over 6 keV are obtained with secondary magnetic compression fields of 30,000 G. The plasma pressure, in both instances, must be balanced by hydrodynamic forces. Ion temperatures and densities were measured by three different methods. All methods yield essentially the same results. The plasma was held in stable equilibrium for 30 ..mu..s and neutrons were produces for 40 ..mu..s.

  19. Radioimmunoassay of ACTH in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Berson, Solomon A.; Yalow, Rosalyn S.

    1968-01-01

    Techniques are described in detail for a radioimmunoassay of plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) that is capable of detecting hormone in unextracted normal human plasma at 1:5 dilution under the conditions described. The sensitivity of the assay is at the level of 1 ??g/ml (equivalent to 0.014 mU/100 ml). In normal subjects ACTH concentrations averaged 22 ??g/ml (equivalent to 0.308 mU/100 ml) plasma at 8-10 a.m. In a smaller group the concentrations averaged 9.6 ??g/ml (equivalent to 0.134 mU/100 ml) at 10-11 p.m. Although a circadian rhythm in normal subjects was not always well marked throughout the daytime hours, plasma ACTH usually fell to its lowest value in the late evening. In hospital patients who were not acutely ill, concentrations were infrequently above 100 ??g/ml in the morning and usually fell to significantly lower levels in the late evening. Severely ill hospital patients occasionally exhibited a.m. concentrations above 200 ??g/ml. In a group of subjects showing frequent spiking of plasma 17-OHCS concentrations throughout the day parallel spiking of plasma ACTH as well was generally observed. Metyrapone produced marked increases in plasma ACTH within 24 hr in all cases and generally within 3-6 hr except when started late in the day. Dexamethasone brought about a persistent reduction in plasma ACTH in a patient under continued treatment with metyrapone. Hypoglycemia, electroshock, surgery under general anesthesia, histalog and vasopressin administration were usually followed by significant increases in plasma ACTH concentration. Prior administration of dexamethasone blocked the response to hypoglycemia. Marked elevations in plasma ACTH were observed in patients with adrenal insufficiency off steroid therapy, in Cushing's disease after adrenalectomy even in the presence of persistent hypercortisolemia, and in some untreated patients with Cushing's disease. Umbilical cord blood contained higher plasma ACTH concentrations than maternal blood at delivery in seven of eight cases. After suppression of ACTH secretion by dexamethasone or cortisol. ACTH disappeared from plasma with half-times ranging from 22 min to 30 min in three cases studied. Images PMID:4302180

  20. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  1. Laboratory experiments on plasma contactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.; Williams, John D.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results describing the operation of hollow cathode plasma contactors collecting and emitting electrons from and to an ambient plasma at current levels of the order of one ampere are presented. The voltage drops induced between a contactor and an ambient plasma are shown to be a few tens of volts at such current levels. The development of a double sheath and the production of substantial numbers of ions by electrons streaming across it are associated with the electron collection process. The development of a complex potential structure including a high potential hill just downstream of the cathode orifice is shown to characterize typical contactor emitting electrons.

  2. Cleaning nanoelectrodes with air plasma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Blanchard, Pierre-Yves; Mirkin, Michael V

    2015-04-21

    Unlike macroscopic and micrometer-sized solid electrodes whose surface can be reproducibly cleaned by mechanical polishing, cleaning the nanoelectrode surface is challenging because of its small size and extreme fragility. Even very gentle polishing typically changes the nanoelectrode size and geometry, thus, complicating the replication of nanoelectrochemical experiments. In this letter, we show the possibility of cleaning nanoelectrode surfaces nondestructively by using an air plasma cleaner. The effects of plasma cleaning have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, voltammetry, and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). A related issue, the removal of an insoluble organic film from the nanoelectrode by plasma cleaning, is also discussed. PMID:25839963

  3. Laser plasma interactions in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1994-10-05

    Lasers plasma instabilities are an important constraint in x-ray driven inertial confinement fusion. In hohlraums irradiated with 1.06 {mu}m light on the Shiva laser, plasma instabilities were extremely deleterious, driving the program to the use of shorter wavelength light. Excellent coupling has been achieved in hohlraums driven with 0.35 {mu}m light on the Nova laser. Considerable attention is being given to the scaling of this excellent coupling to the larger hohlraums for an ignition target. Various instability control mechanisms such as large plasma wave damping and laser beam incoherence are discussed, as well as scaling experiments to check the instability levels.

  4. The Diagnostics of the External Plasma for the Plasma Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1997-01-01

    Three regions of plasma temperature/energy are being investigated to understand fully the behavior of the plasma created by the propulsion device and the operation of the RPA. Each type of plasma has a RPA associated with it; i.e. a thermal RPA, a collimated RPA, and a high temperature RPA. Through the process of developing the thermal and collimated RPAs, the proper knowledge and experience has been gained to not only design a high temperature RPA for the plasma rocket, but to understand its operation, results, and uncertainty. After completing a literature search for, reading published papers on, and discussing the operation of the RPA with electric propulsion researchers, I applied the knowledge gained to the development of a RPA for thermal plasma. A design of a thermal RPA was made which compensates for a large Debye length and low ionized plasma. From this design a thermal RPA was constructed. It consists of an outer stainless steel casing, a phenolic insulator (outgases slightly), and stainless steel mesh for the voltage screens. From the experience and knowledge gained in the development of the thermal RPA, a RPA for collimated plasma was developed. A collimated RPA has been designed and constructed. It compensate for a smaller Debye length and much higher ionization than that existing in the thermal plasma. It is 17% of the size of the thermal RPA. A stainless steel casing shields the detector from impinging electrons and ions. An insulating material, epoxy resin, was utilized which has a negligible outgassing. This material can be molded in styrofoam and machined quite nicely. It is capable of withstanding moderately high temperatures. Attached to this resin insulator are inconel screens attached by silver plated copper wire to a voltage supply. All the work on the RPAs and thermal ion source, I performed in the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) engineering machine shop.

  5. Pulse-discharge plasmas for plasma-accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lopes, N. C.

    2012-12-21

    For particle-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, a long and fully-ionized plasma is desirable. We describe an experiment at UCLA to develop a prototype of such plasma using a pulsed-current discharge. Scaling of the plasma density with glass-tube diameter and with discharge-circuit parameters is currently underway. We have found that 4 Torr of Argon can be fully ionized to a density of about 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} when the current density in the 1 inch diameter, 1.2 meter-long tube is around 2 kA/cm{sup 2}, at least at one point along the discharge. The homogeneity of the plasma density in the longitudinal direction is crucial to prevent slippage of the driven plasma structures with the particles. Equally important are the transverse gradients since any dipole asymmetry in the transverse direction can lead to 'steering' of the particle beam. The longitudinal and transverse gradients may be a function of time into the discharge, the shape of the electrodes, the tube size, and the fractional ionization for a given fill pressure. These issues are currently under investigation.

  6. Ion Beam Plasma Interactions in the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Kesterson, A.; Kamar, O.; Lin, Y.; Munoz, J.; Wang, X.

    2008-11-01

    A 100 KeV NEC duoplasmatron is used to produce an energetic ion beam (10 KeV < E < 100 KeV). The beam is sent through plasmas produced by the ASTRAL helicon plasma source. The beam current and beam size are measured by a device combining Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) and Faraday Cup (FC) features. ASTRAL produces bright intense He/Ne/Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field < 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. Depending on the ion beam energy and the ratio of beam density over plasma density different wave instabilities will be generated within the plasmas. A real-time spectrum analyzer will be used to identify the wave instabilities and their evolution in the plasma. We will present early experimental results together with some preliminary theoretical simulation using 2D and 3D hybrid simulation codes. In these codes, ions are treated as fully kinetic particles while electrons are treated as a fluid. Both species are moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field.

  7. 21 CFR 640.30 - Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma. 640.30 Section 640.30 Food and Drugs FOOD... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.30 Plasma. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this component is Plasma. The component is defined as: (1) The fluid portion of one...

  8. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  9. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of freeze-dried animal or human plasma that...

  10. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human blood collected...

  11. 21 CFR 640.30 - Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Plasma. 640.30 Section 640.30 Food and Drugs FOOD... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.30 Plasma. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this component is Plasma. The component is defined as: (1) The fluid portion of one...

  12. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of freeze-dried animal or human plasma that...

  13. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of freeze-dried animal or human plasma that...

  14. 21 CFR 640.30 - Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasma. 640.30 Section 640.30 Food and Drugs FOOD... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.30 Plasma. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this component is Plasma. The component is defined as: (1) The fluid portion of one...

  15. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  16. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of freeze-dried animal or human plasma that...

  17. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  18. 21 CFR 640.30 - Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasma. 640.30 Section 640.30 Food and Drugs FOOD... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.30 Plasma. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this component is Plasma. The component is defined as: (1) The fluid portion of one...

  19. 21 CFR 640.30 - Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasma. 640.30 Section 640.30 Food and Drugs FOOD... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.30 Plasma. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this component is Plasma. The component is defined as: (1) The fluid portion of one...

  20. 21 CFR 866.2160 - Coagulase plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coagulase plasma. 866.2160 Section 866.2160 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2160 Coagulase plasma. (a) Identification. Coagulase plasma is a device that consists of freeze-dried animal or human plasma that...

  1. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  2. Injection of plasma into the Trimyx Galathea

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. I.; Bugrova, A. I.; Bishaev, A. M.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Vasil'ev, V. I.; Strunnikov, V. M.

    2006-03-15

    The Galathea-3 device, which consists of a coaxial plasma gun, a plasma guide, a lock chamber, and the Trimyx Galathea confinement system with three myxines, is briefly described. The plasma parameters at the outlet from the plasma gun, in the plasma guide, and in the confinement system are presented. It is shown that the plasma can be efficiently entrapped into the Galathea and spread out along it. The confined plasma is found to go beyond the Ohkawa surfaces. Estimates show that the particle losses from the system are on the order of the classical ones.

  3. Characterisation of plasma in a rail gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of plasma and projectile acceleration in a DC rail gun is described from a microscopic point of view through the establishment of the Hall field. The plasma conductivity is shown to be a tensor, indicating that there is a small component of current parallel to the direction of acceleration. The plasma characteristics are evaluated in the experiment of Bauer et. al., as a function of plasma mass through a simple fluid mechanical analysis of the plasma. By equating the energy dissipatated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the properties of the plasma are determined.

  4. Plasma Glucose Lab Problems --Solutions 1 Bio390 Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems --Solutions

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Plasma Glucose Lab Problems -- Solutions 1 Bio390 Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems -- Solutions 1. Assume that a person ingests 50g of glucose and that all of it enters the blood and none is metabolized or excreted. Calculate the concentration (in mg glucose/dl plasma) in that person's plasma if: plasma

  5. Measurement of the Plasma Beta in the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD)

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angles, University of

    ) with a Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB6) cathode, a pulsed plasma was created the plasma beta ( = nek(Te+Ti) B2/(2µ0Measurement of the Plasma Beta in the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) K.L. DeRose ,1, 2 C Utilizing the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD), a large toroidal chamber (30 m in circumference

  6. Principles of Rotating Plasma in Plasma Propulsion Systems N. J. Fisch

    E-print Network

    ;Anode (gas distributor) Magnetic circuit Cathode-neutralizer Plasma jet IH Hall Thruster (SchematicPrinciples of Rotating Plasma in Plasma Propulsion Systems N. J. Fisch Department) Washington, D.C October 8, 2013 One of the main ways to propel plasma exploits rotating electron plasmas

  7. Surface kinetics and plasma equipment model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Surface kinetics and plasma equipment model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas Da Zhanga August 1999; accepted for publication 18 October 1999 Plasma-surface interactions during plasma etching processing is towards the use of low pressure, high plasma density etching reactors in which re- active

  8. Comprehensive physical models and simulation package for plasma/material interactions during plasma instabilities 1

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Comprehensive physical models and simulation package for plasma/material interactions during plasma physics of the disrupting plasma, as well as on the physics of plasma-material interactions concept. The extent of the damage depends on the detailed physics of the dis- rupting plasma as well

  9. Plasma reactor waste management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, Robert O., Jr.; Rindt, John R.; Ness, Sumitra R.

    1992-01-01

    The University of North Dakota is developing a plasma reactor system for use in closed-loop processing that includes biological, materials, manufacturing, and waste processing. Direct-current, high-frequency, or microwave discharges will be used to produce plasmas for the treatment of materials. The plasma reactors offer several advantages over other systems, including low operating temperatures, low operating pressures, mechanical simplicity, and relatively safe operation. Human fecal material, sunflowers, oats, soybeans, and plastic were oxidized in a batch plasma reactor. Over 98 percent of the organic material was converted to gaseous products. The solids were then analyzed and a large amount of water and acid-soluble materials were detected. These materials could possibly be used as nutrients for biological systems.

  10. Plasma Rain - Duration: 33 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 19, 2010 AIA observed one of the largest prominence eruptions in years. The huge structure erupts, but a great deal of the plasma (hundreds of millions of tons) is unable to escape the gra...

  11. Geophysical plasmas and atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, E.; Chaturvedi, P.; Chen, J.; Drake, J.; Ganguli, G.; Lee, Y. C.; Lindzen, R.; Lyon, J.; Mitchell, H.; Papadopoulos, D.

    1983-02-01

    In the following subsections we will describe the major accomplishments in each of the following research efforts: (1) magnetospheric computer simulation, (2) non-linear saturation and transport via the lower hybrid drift instability, (3) the current driven ion cyclotron instability, (4) tearing-mode stability properties of an anisotropic plasma layer, (5) analyses of high latitude irregularity phenomena, (6) auroral plasma transport, (7) the EXB instability, (8) the morphology of a multi-bubble system in the ionosphere, (9) double layer simulations, (10) anomalous resistivity of auroral electrons, (11) energy exchange in the Io plasma torus, (12) uranium cloud modeling, (13) NRL Laser/HANE experiment support, (14) fractal theory applied to striating ionospheric plasma clouds, (15) ELF/VLF wave generation, (16) ozone transport in the lower atmosphere and, (17) stratospheric dynamics.

  12. Geophysical plasmas and atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, E.; Chaturvedi, P.; Chen, J.; Drake, J.; Ganguli, G.

    1984-03-01

    We will describe the major accomplishments in each of the following research efforts: (1) 3D magnetospheric modeling, (2) Tearing instability in an anisotropic neutral sheet, (3) Auroral plasma transport, (4) Magnetic shear effects on the current driven ion cyclotron instability, (5) Instability mechanisms causing high latitude ionospheric irregularities, (6) Auroral instability studies, (7) Nonlinear saturation of low hybrid drift instability and anomalous plasma transport, (8) Laser/HANE theory support, (9) Early time HANE phenomena, (10) Uranium vapor release, (11) Late time HANE striation, (12) Quasi steady state multi plasma cloud configurations in the ionosphere, (13) Chaotic behavior ionospheric processes, (14) Linear dynamics of tropical heat sources and interactions with mid latitudes, (16) The large scale dynamics of the Indian Summer monsoon, (17) Collective particle acceleration (CPA), and (18) Plasma behavior in crossed electric and magnetic fields.

  13. Plasma transport near material boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The fluid theory of two-dimensional (2-d) plasma transport in axisymmetric devices is reviewed. The forces which produce flow across the magnetic field in a collisional plasma are described. These flows may lead to up-down asymmetries in the poloidal rotation and radial fluxes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conditions under which the known 2-d plasma fluid equations provide a valid description of these processes. Attempts to extend the fluid treatment to less collisional, turbulent plasmas are discussed. A reduction to the 1-d fluid equations used in many computer simulations is possible when sources or boundary conditions provide a large enough radial scale length. The complete 1-d fluid equations are given in the text, and 2-d fluid equations are given in the Appendix.

  14. The beam driven plasma neutralizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrey, E.; Holmes, A.

    2013-02-01

    The improvement of the efficiency of neutral beam systems to be compatible with the economic requirements of fusion power plants is a key theme in the European research programme. A novel plasma neutralizer, in which the negative ion beam itself is the source of the plasma, is described. Its success depends on the confinement of the free electrons generated by stripping from the beam and their generation of additional plasma. The device requires no additional power in contrast to the photoneutralizer, presently the main device of research interest. Although the efficiency of the plasma device is not as high as the photoneutralizer it is essentially of a low technological risk, inherently reliable and will not require a significant R&D programme to demonstrate.

  15. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOEpatents

    D`Silva, A.P.; Jaselskis, E.J.

    1999-03-30

    A system is described for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remotely from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer. 10 figs.

  16. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  17. Conductivity of a relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Braams, B.J.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1989-03-01

    The collision operator for a relativistic plasma is reformulated in terms of an expansion in spherical harmonics. This formulation is used to calculate the electrical conductivity. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOEpatents

    D'Silva, Arthur P. (Ames, IA); Jaselskis, Edward J. (Ames, IA)

    1999-03-30

    A system for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remote from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer.

  19. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  20. Hall Effect in a Plasma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an apparatus and procedure for conducting an undergraduate laboratory experiment to quantitatively study the Hall effect in a plasma. Includes background information on the Hall effect and rationale for conducting the experiment. (JN)

  1. Plasma Heating: An Advanced Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Mercury and Apollo spacecraft shields were designed to protect astronauts from high friction temperatures (well over 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit) when re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. It was necessary to test and verify the heat shield materials on Earth before space flight. After exhaustive research and testing, NASA decided to use plasma heating as a heat source. This technique involves passing a strong electric current through a rarefied gas to create a plasma (ionized gas) that produces an intensely hot flame. Although NASA did not invent the concept, its work expanded the market for commercial plasma heating systems. One company, Plasma Technology Corporation (PTC), was founded by a member of the team that developed the Re-entry Heating Simulator at Ames Research Center (ARC). Dr. Camacho, President of PTC, believes the technology has significant environmental applications. These include toxic waste disposal, hydrocarbon, decomposition, medical waste disposal, asbestos waste destruction, and chemical and radioactive waste disposal.

  2. The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Forest, C B; Brookhart, M; Cooper, C M; Clark, M; Desangles, V; Egedal, J; Endrizzi, D; Miesch, M; Khalzov, I V; Li, H; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Olson, J; Peterson, E; Roesler, F; Schekochihin, A; Schmitz, O; Siller, R; Spitkovsky, A; Stemo, A; Wallace, J; Weisberg, D; Zweibel, E

    2015-01-01

    The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) is a flexible user facility designed to study a range of astrophysically relevant plasma processes as well as novel geometries which mimic astrophysical systems. A multi-cusp magnetic bucket constructed from strong samarium cobalt permanent magnets now confines a 10 m$^3$, fully ionized, magnetic-field free plasma in a spherical geometry. Plasma parameters of $ T_{e}\\approx5-20$ eV and $n_{e}\\approx10^{11}-5\\times10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$ provide an ideal testbed for a range of astrophysical experiments including self-exciting dynamos, collisionless magnetic reconnection, jet stability, stellar winds, and more. This article describes the capabilities of WiPAL along with several experiments, in both operating and planning stages, that illustrate the range of possibilities for future users.

  3. Dusty-Plasma Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A dusty-plasma apparatus is being investigated as means of accelerating nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. Applications for the dusty-plasma particle accelerators fall into two classes: Simulation of a variety of rapidly moving dust particles and micrometeoroids in outer-space environments that include micrometeoroid streams, comet tails, planetary rings, and nebulae and Deposition or implantation of nanoparticles on substrates for diverse industrial purposes that could include hardening, increasing thermal insulation, altering optical properties, and/or increasing permittivities of substrate materials. Relative to prior apparatuses used for similar applications, dusty-plasma particle accelerators offer such potential advantages as smaller size, lower cost, less complexity, and increased particle flux densities. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator exploits the fact that an isolated particle immersed in plasma acquires a net electric charge that depends on the relative mobilities of electrons and ions. Typically, a particle that is immersed in a low-temperature, partially ionized gas, wherein the average kinetic energy of electrons exceeds that of ions, causes the particle to become negatively charged. The particle can then be accelerated by applying an appropriate electric field. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator (see figure) includes a plasma source such as a radio-frequency induction discharge apparatus containing (1) a shallow cup with a biasable electrode to hold the particles to be accelerated and (2) a holder for the substrate on which the particles are to impinge. Depending on the specific design, a pair of electrostatic-acceleration grids between the substrate and discharge plasma can be used to both collimate and further accelerate particles exiting the particle holder. Once exposed to the discharge plasma, the particles in the cup quickly acquire a negative charge. Application of a negative voltage pulse to the biasable electrode results in the initiation of a low-current, high-voltage cathode spot. Plasma pressure associated with the cathode spot as well as the large voltage drop at the cathode spot accelerates the charged particles toward the substrate. The ultimate kinetic energy attained by particles exiting the particle holder depends in part on the magnitude of the cathode spot sheath potential difference, which is proportional to the magnitude of the voltage pulse, and the on the electric charge on the dust. The magnitude of the voltage pulse can be controlled directly, whereas the particle s electric charge can be controlled indirectly by controlling the operating parameters of the plasma apparatus.

  4. Semiconductor Industry Plasma Processing Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Richard; Panda, Siddhartha; Yan, Wendy

    2003-10-01

    The plasma requirements of dry etch equipment used for advanced semiconductor process development and low cost semiconductor manufacturing are reviewed. Introduction of ArF (193nm) photolithography has resulted in increased demands on resist selectivity, increased sensitivity to plasma induced or exacerbated line edge roughness, and the introduction of novel hard and soft mask schemes. State of the art plasma processing chambers must be able to deliver low DC bias due to line edge roughness requirements with adequate ion/radical density to prevent loss of critical dimension control in deep features. These same systems may be required to operate in a high DC bias, low plasma density regime to achieve adequate etch rate on different films, and in many cases the system must be able to switch between low and high DC bias modes. The acceptable plasma density is limited by that necessary to provide adequate production of passivation agents necessary to achieve selectivity to ArF photoresists. Further limits on plasma density may be needed due to device and etch profile sensitivity to differential charging. The allowable DC bias may be limited to avoid damage to shallow implanted regions and thin gate. Decreases in gate length have increased sensitivity to non-anisotropic profiles, which in turn requires a minimum of DC bias to provide anisotropy. Particle sensitivity has resulted in a migration toward integrated plasma processing, putting additional demands on the stability and flexibility of the plasma equipment. State of the art plasma tooling must be capable of operating over a wide range of plasma densities, delivering both high and low DC bias, and provide RF stability over a wide range of wafer/chamber impedances. The increased uniformity requirements of 300 mm tools requires the anode and cathode potential be uniformly distributed over the entire surface, and that the plasma generation be as uniform as possible. Extended wet clean cycles have driven the need for integrated cleans, which also must be capable of removing deposited films uniformly over the chamber surface.

  5. Experiment of THz transmission through plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jinhai; Gallacher, Jordan; Issac, Riju; Huang, Zhixun; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2014-12-01

    Research on terahertz wave transmission through plasma is significant for researches on plasma itself and transmission discipline of terahertz wave through plasma. It is possible for plasma with suitable density to be an available stealth outerwear for plane or missile in THz waveband. In this paper, plasma is gotten by ionizing inert gases such as argon and helium gases with pulsed high alternating voltage. With electro-optic pump-probe measurement, THz transmission phenomena through plasma have been studied. The experiments show that some parts of THz frequency components have been cut off by plasma, and with the density of plasma rising, the starting frequency of THz prohibited by plasma is going higher. Experiments also provide an assistant scheme for plasma diagnose with terahertz technique.

  6. EDITORIAL: Stochasticity in fusion plasmas Stochasticity in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterberg, Bernhard

    2010-03-01

    Structure formation and transport in stochastic plasmas is a topic of growing importance in many fields of plasma physics from astrophysics to fusion research. In particular, the possibility to control transport in the boundary of confined fusion plasmas by resonant magnetic perturbations has been investigated extensively during recent years. A major research achievement was finding that the intense transient particle and heat fluxes associated with edge localized modes (here type-I ELMs) in magnetically confined fusion plasmas can be mitigated or even suppressed by resonant magnetic perturbation fields. This observation opened up a possible scheme to avoid too large erosion and material damage by such transients in future fusion devices such as ITER. However, it is widely recognized that a more basic understanding is needed to extrapolate the results obtained in present experiments to future fusion devices. The 4th workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas was held in Jülich, Germany, from 2 to 4 March 2009. This series of workshops aims at gathering fusion experts from various plasma configurations such as tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches to exchange knowledge on structure formation and transport in stochastic fusion plasmas. The workshops have attracted colleagues from both experiment and theory and stimulated fruitful discussions about the basics of stochastic fusion plasmas. Important papers from the first three workshops in 2003, 2005 and 2007 have been published in previous special issues of Nuclear Fusion (stacks.iop.org/NF/44/i=6, stacks.iop.org/NF/46/i=4 and stacks.iop.org/NF/48/i=2). This special issue comprises contributions presented at the 4th SFP workshop, dealing with the main subjects such as formation of stochastic magnetic layers, energy and particle transport in stochastic magnetic fields, plasma response to external, non-axis-symmetric perturbations and last but not least application of resonant magnetic perturbations for ELM control and implications for ITER. The next workshop is planned for February/March 2011 in Jülich. For details see http://www.fz-juelich.de/sfp/. We hope that this special issue of Nuclear Fusion will further stimulate interest in the fascinating and important subject of stochasticity in fusion plasmas.

  7. Inertial currents in isotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Erickson, G. M.; Pontius, D. H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetospheric convection electric field contributes to Birkeland currents. The effects of the field are to polarize the plasma by displacing the bounce paths of the ions from those of electrons, to redistribute the pressure so that it is not constant along magnetic field lines, and to enhance the pressure gradient by the gradient of the bulk speed. Changes in the polarization charge during the convection of the plasma are neutralized by electrons in the form of field-aligned currents that close through the ionosphere. The pressure drives field-aligned currents through its gradient in the same manner as in quasi-static plasmas, but with modifications that are important if the bulk speed is of the order of the ion thermal speed; the variations in the pressure along field lines are maintained by a weak parallel potential drop. These effects are described in terms of the field-aligned currents in steady state, isotropic, MHD plasma. Solutions are developed by taking the MHD limit ot two-fluid solutions and illustrated in the special case of Maxwellian plasma for which the temperature is constant along magnetic field lines. The expression for the Birkeland current density is a generalization of Vasyliunas' expression for the field-aligned current density in quasi-static plasma and provides a unifying expression when both pressure gradients and ion inertia operate simultaneously as sources of field-aligned currents. It contains a full account of different aspects of the ion flow (parallel and perpendicular velocity and vorticity) that contribute to the currents. Contributions of ion inertia to field-aligned currents will occur in regions of strong velocity shear, electric field reversal, or large gradients in the parallel velocity or number density, and may be important in the low-latitude boundary layer, plasma sheet boundary layer, and the inner edge region of the plasma sheet.

  8. Electrorheological Plasma in PK-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Markus

    Electrorheological systems are complex fluids which can change their behavior, e.g. viscosity, if an external electric field is applied. In dusty plasmas a similar phenomenon can be observed. Such experiments with the dusty plasma experiment facility PK-4, which will be operated on the ISS starting in 2015, were performed under microgravity in 3 parabolic flight campaigns. The experiments as well as their results will be discussed here.

  9. Inertial currents in isotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Erickson, G. M.; Pontius, D. H. JR.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetospheric convection electric field contributes to Birkeland currents. The effects of the field are to polarize the plasma by displacing the bounce paths of the ions from those of electrons, to redistribute the pressure so that it is not constant along magnetic field lines, and to enhance the pressure gradient by the gradient of the bulk speed. Changes in the polarization charge during the convection of the plasma are neutralized by electrons in the form of field-aligned currents that close through the ionosphere. The pressure drives field-aligned currents through its gradient in the same manner as in quasi-static plasma, but with modifications that are important if the bulk speed is of the order of the ion thermal speed; the variations in the pressure along field lines are maintained by a weak parallel potential drop. These effects are described in terms of the field-aligned currents in steady state, isotropic, magnetohyrodynamic (MHD) plasma. Solutions are developed by taking the MHD limit of two-fluid solutions and illustrated in the special case of Maxwellian plasma for which the temperature is constant along magnetic field lines. The expression for the Birkeland current density is a generalization of Vasyliunas' expression for the field-aligned current density in quasi-static plasma and provides a unifying expression when both pressure gradients and ion inertia operate simultaneously as sources of field-aligned currents. It contains a full account of different aspects of the ion flow (parallel and perpendicular velocity and vorticity) that contribute to the currents. Contributions of ion inertia to field-aligned currents will occur in regions of strong velocity shear, electric field reversal, or large gradients in the parallel velocity or number density, and may be important in the low-latitude boundary layer, plasma sheet boundary layer, and the inner edge region of the plasma sheet.

  10. Inertial Currents in Isotropic Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Erickson, G. M.; Pontius, D. H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetospheric convection electric field contributes to Birkeland currents. The effects of the field are to polarize the plasma by displacing the bounce paths of the ions from those of electrons, to redistribute the pressure so that it is not constant along magnetic field lines, and to enhance the pressure gradient by the gradient of the bulk speed. Changes in the polarization charge during the convection of the plasma are neutralized by electrons in the form of field-aligned currents that close through the ionosphere. The pressure drives field-aligned currents through its gradient in the same manner as in quasi-static plasma, but with modifications that are important if the bulk speed is of the order of the ion thermal speed; the variations in the pressure along field lines are maintained by a weak parallel potential drop. These effects are described in terms of the field-aligned currents in steady state, isotropic, MED plasma. Solutions are developed by taking the MHD limit of two-fluid solutions and illustrated in the special case of Maxwellian plasma for which the temperature is constant along magnetic field lines. The expression for the Birkeland current density is a generalization of Vasyliunas' expression for the field-aligned current density in quasi-static plasma and provides a unifying expression when both pressure gradients and ion inertia operate simultaneously as sources of field-aligned currents. It contains a full account of different aspects of the ion flow (parallel and perpendicular velocity and vorticity) that contribute to the currents. Contributions of ion inertia to field-aligned currents will occur in regions of strong velocity shear, electric field reversal, or large gradients in the parallel velocity or number density, and may be important in the low-latitude boundary layer, plasma sheet boundary layer, and the inner edge region of the plasma sheet.

  11. Neutrino dispersion in magnetized plasma

    E-print Network

    N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

    2008-12-02

    The neutrino dispersion in the charge symmetric magnetized plasma is investigated. We have studied the plasma contribution into the additional energy of neutrino and obtained the simple expression for it. We consider in detail the neutrino self-energy under physical conditions of weak field, moderate field and strong field limits. It is shown that our result for neutrino dispersion in moderate magnetic field differ substantially from the previous one in the literature.

  12. Flavors in an expanding plasma

    E-print Network

    Johannes Große; Romuald A. Janik; Piotr Surówka

    2008-02-05

    We consider the effect of an expanding plasma on probe matter by determining time-dependent D7 embeddings in the holographic dual of an expanding viscous plasma. We calculate the chiral condensate and meson spectra including contributions of viscosity. The chiral condensate essentially confirms the expectation from the static black hole. For the meson spectra we propose a scheme that is in agreement with the adiabatic approximation. New contributions arise for the vector mesons at the order of the viscosity terms.

  13. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  14. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  15. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  16. Space Plasma Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. James L. Horwitz and R. Hugh Comfort's studies with the high altitude TIDE data have been progressing well. We concluded a study on the relationship of polar cap ion properties observed by TIDE near apogee with solar wind and IMF conditions. We found that in general H+ did not correlate as well as O+ with solar wind and IMF parameters. O+ density correlated(sub IMF), and Kp. At lower solar wind speeds, O+ density decreased with increasing latitude, but this trend was not observed at higher solar wind speeds. By comparing these results with results from other studies of O+ in different parts of the magnetosphere, we concluded that O+ ions often leave the ionosphere near the foot point of the cusp/cleft region, pass through the high-altitude polar cap lobes, and eventually arrive in the plasma sheet. We found that H+ outflows are a persistent feature of the polar cap and are not as dependent on the geophysical conditions; even classical polar wind models show H+ ions readily escaping owing to their low mass. Minor correlations with solar wind drivers were found; specifically, H+ density correlated best with IMF By, V(sub sw)B(sub IMF), and ESW(sub sw).

  17. Plasma pinchlamp surface preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    1997-09-01

    A high-pressure laser-guided gas-embedded plasma pinchlamp is described for the generation of intense UV radiation. It has been configured to optimize energy transfer from the storage PFN. The output energy peaks within the spectral range 150 - 250 nm with a pulsed power of 20 MW at 10 Hz. The device employs a working gas of argon at 3 AMAGAT and has a pulsewidth of 20 microseconds. The results of exploratory surface modification experiments with the pinchlamp are reported. These include the destruction of chemical warfare agent simulants, asbestos, petroleum, and insecticides on surfaces as well as semiconductor annealing. In addition it was determined that various aircraft coatings are able to be removed from aluminum and composite substrates. These coatings included primers, top coats, and anti-erosion materials. This pinchlamp technology potentially fills a performance gap in the hard ultraviolet between flashlamps and lasers. On the one hand it offers a peak power and brightness comparable to parameters customarily associated with laser technology. On the other hand it possesses the efficiency, simplicity, and scalability often encountered with conventional flashlamp systems.

  18. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  19. Antimicrobial outcomes in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.; Woloszko, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Plasma is referred to as the fourth state of matter and is frequently generated in the environment of a strong electric field. The result consists of highly reactive species--ions, electrons, reactive atoms and molecules, and UV radiation. Plasma Medicine unites a number of fields, including Physics, Plasma Chemistry, Cell Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine. The treatment modality utilizes Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP), which is able to sterilize and treat microbes in a nonthermal manner. These gas-based plasma systems operate at close to room temperature and atmospheric pressure, making them very practical for a range of potential treatments and are highly portable for clinical use throughout the health care system. The hypothesis is that gas based plasma kills bacteria, fungus, and viruses but spares mammalian cells. This paper will review systematic work which shows examples of systems and performance in regards to antimicrobial effects and the sparing of mammalian cells. The mechanism of action will be discussed, as well as dosing for the treatment of microbial targets, including sterilization processes, another important healthcare need. In addition, commercial systems will be overviewed and compared, along with evidence-based, patient results. The range of treatments cover wound treatment and biofilms, as well as antimicrobial treatment, with little chance for resistance and tolerance, as in drug regimens. Current clinical studies include applications in dentistry, food treatment, cancer treatment, wound treatment for bacteria and biofilms, and systems to combat health care related infections.

  20. Double Well Neutral Plasma Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Reimann, Anita; Fajans, Joel

    1997-11-01

    The Malmberg-Penning trap is a nearly ideal device for confining single-species plasmas, and researchers have speculated about modifications(See D. S. Hall and G. Gabrielse, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 77 1962, 1996. that would permit Malmberg-Penning traps to confine neutral plasmas. However, Malmberg-Penning traps provide axial confinement for one species only. Double well traps have long been mentioned, and just as quickly dismissed, as a solution to this problem. It was believed that the two species would immediately fall into their respective electrostatic wells, thereby eliminating their overlap. Recently, however, we showed that it is possible to get a plasma to anti-shield an electrostatic well.(C. Hansen and J. Fajans, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 74, 4209, (1995). Instead of the plasma density increasing in the well, it actually decreases. A scheme proposed by Ordonez(Ordonez, C.A. IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci.), 24, 1378 (1996). uses the anti-shielding effect in a double well trap, but suffers from plasma heating. In this poster we will discuss some alternative schemes, and present collision and heating calculations and experimental data relevant to all anti-shielding schemes.

  1. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  2. Variability of Plasmas Near Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Lipatov, A. S.; Gershman, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of particles and fields acquired at the orbit of Europa during the Gailileo mission indicate significant variability of the plasma environment there. It is found that the background plasma density can vary by a factor ~10. Potential causes include changes in the production or transport of plasmas from the Io torus, local-time and longitudinal effects, such as systematic changes in the location of plasma-sheet gradients, or inherent variability of the plasma production rate at Europa. Measurements of the energy and angular distributions of the ions provide a capability for distinguishing thermalized torus ions from pickup ions that have recently been produced within a Europa neutral cloud. Thus the relative density of thermal ions and pickup ions is a measure that can provide insight into the cause of the overall variability of the plasma density at Europa's orbit. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the Galileo observations and discuss their significance in relationship with this above-identified ambiguity.

  3. PPPL3243 Preprint: March 1997, UC427 Microinstability Properties of Negative Magnetic Shear Discharges in the

    E-print Network

    Reactor (TFTR) and DIII-D experiments with and without confinement transitions are investigated, are analyzed using comparisons with results from a two- dimensional calculation. Comparisons are also made in Ref. 7. An approach used here is to vary the minor radius and other parameters and observe

  4. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. III. The ion-temperature-gradient mode

    SciTech Connect

    Plunk, G. G. Helander, P.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Max-Planck Connor, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the linear theory of the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode, with the goal of developing a general understanding that may be applied to stellarators. We highlight the Wendelstein 7X (W7-X) device. Simple fluid and kinetic models that follow closely from existing literature are reviewed and two new first-principle models are presented and compared with results from direct numerical simulation. One model investigates the effect of regions of strong localized shear, which are generic to stellarator equilibria. These “shear spikes” are found to have a potentially significant stabilizing affect on the mode; however, the effect is strongest at short wavelengths perpendicular to the magnetic field, and it is found to be significant only for the fastest growing modes in W7-X. A second model investigates the long-wavelength limit for the case of negligible global magnetic shear. The analytic calculation reveals that the effect of the curvature drive enters at second order in the drift frequency, confirming conventional wisdom that the ITG mode is slab-like at long wavelengths. Using flux tube simulations of a zero-shear W7-X configuration, we observe a close relationship to an axisymmetric configuration at a similar parameter point. It is concluded that scale lengths of the equilibrium gradients constitute a good parameter space to characterize the ITG mode. Thus, to optimize the magnetic geometry for ITG mode stability, it may be fruitful to focus on local parameters, such as the magnitude of bad curvature, connection length, and local shear at locations of bad curvature (where the ITG mode amplitude peaks)

  5. PPPL--3243 --Preprint: March 1997, UC--427 Microinstability Properties of Negative Magnetic Shear

    E-print Network

    and Pogutse in Ref. 10, there can be additional effects of 3 #12; changing the local value of q itself importance of changes in different profiles (density, temperature, q, rotation, etc.) on the linear growth parameters and observe the resulting changes in the linear growth rates and real frequencies. One question

  6. EDITORIAL: Stochasticity in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.

    2006-04-01

    In recent years the importance of externally imposed resonant magnetic fields on plasma has become more and more recognized. These fields will cause ergodization at well defined plasma layers and can induce large size islands at rational q-surfaces. A hope for future large scale tokamak devices is the development of a reliable method for mitigating the large ELMs of type 1 ELMy-H-modes by modifying the edge transport. Other topics of interest for fusion reactors are the option of distributing the heat to a large area and optimizing methods for heat and particle exhaust, or the understanding of the transport around tearing mode instabilities. The cluster of papers in this issue of Nuclear Fusion is a successor to the 2004 special issue (Nuclear Fusion 44 S1-122 ) intended to raise interest in the subject. The contents of this present issue are based on presentations at the Second Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas (SFP) held in Juelich, Germany, 15-17 March 2005. The SFP workshops have been stimulated by the installation of the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED) in the TEXTOR tokamak. It has attracted colleagues working on various plasma configurations such as tokamaks, stellarators or reversed field pinches. The workshop was originally devoted to phenomena on the plasma edge but it has been broadened to transport questions over the whole plasma cross-section. It is a meeting place for experimental and theoretical working groups. The next workshop is planned for February/March 2007 in Juelich, Germany. For details see http://www.fz-juelich.de/sfp/. The content of the workshop is summarized in the following conference summary (K.H. Finken 2006 Nuclear Fusion 46 S107-112). At the workshop experimental results on the plasma transport resulting from ergodization in various devices were presented. Highlights were the results from DIII-D on the mitigation of ELMs (see also T.E. Evans et al 2005 Nuclear Fusion 45 595 ). Theoretical work was focused around the topics of mapping methods of magnetic field lines, 3D-plasma transport modelling efforts of ergodized plasmas and island divertors, and on the penetration of the external field including the resulting force transfer. We hope that the article series in Nuclear Fusion will stimulate interest in this fascinating subject of plasma physics.

  7. Plasma waves in parametric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yampolsky, Nikolai Andreevich

    The nonlinear laser-plasma interaction is widely discussed in the modern plasma literature with applications to inertial confinement fusion, generation of fast electrons, and amplification of high power radiation. Among nonlinear wave phenomena in plasma, the parametric wave coupling often plays the dominant role in laser-plasma interaction at moderate laser intensities since it is the lowest order nonlinear effect. The plasma wave can mediate the parametric laser coupling with high efficiency. We study the interplay of the parametric laser-plasma interaction and other physical effects which may affect this interaction. We study this interplay with an emphasis on the plasma-based backward Raman amplifier (BRA) based on the three-wave coupling. Three major types of physical effects in the parametric wave coupling are studied. In the first part of the thesis, we find the longitudinal profiles of the interacting waves in cases of interest for pulse compression. We find the solution for the output pulse in backward Raman amplification seeded by a laser pulse of finite duration. We also propose a new scheme for high-power amplification for pulses in the terahertz frequency range. For this scheme, based on the four-wave mixing in a capillary filled with plasma, we find the profile of the output pulse. The second part of this thesis is devoted to transverse effects, which may reduce the focusability of the output pulse in backward Raman amplification. We find that the transverse modulations of the pump can be averaged and do not reduce the amplified pulse focusability if the longitudinal length of these modulations is much smaller than the amplification length. In the third part, we study the kinetic effects. We propose a simplified fluid model for the nonlinear Landau damping of a parametrically driven plasma wave and study the effect of nonlinear Landau damping in backward Raman amplification. This simplified model can be useful not only for understanding complex phenomena, but also for making more complex problems tractable numerically. Finally, we analyze current experimental data and indicate limiting mechanisms in plasma-based backward Raman amplifier.

  8. The effect of radio frequency plasma processing reactor circuitry on plasma characteristics

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    The effect of radio frequency plasma processing reactor circuitry on plasma characteristics Shahid Raufa) and Mark J. Kushnerb) Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois strongly influence the performance of radio frequency rf plasma processing reactors. Seemingly minor

  9. Effect of Dielectric and Liquid on Plasma Sterilization Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    E-print Network

    Roy, Subrata

    Effect of Dielectric and Liquid on Plasma Sterilization Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Abstract Plasma sterilization offers a faster, less toxic and versatile alternative to conventional sterilization methods. Using a relatively small, low temperature, atmospheric, dielectric barrier discharge

  10. Plasma Glucose Lab Problems --Solutions 1 Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems --Solutions

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Plasma Glucose Lab Problems -- Solutions 1 Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems of glucose and that all of it enters the blood and none is metabolized or excreted. Calculate the concentration (in mg glucose/dl plasma) in that person

  11. Megawatt Electromagnetic Plasma Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Lapointe, Michael; Mikellides, Pavlos

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center program in megawatt level electric propulsion is centered on electromagnetic acceleration of quasi-neutral plasmas. Specific concepts currently being examined are the Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT). In the case of the MPD thruster, a multifaceted approach of experiments, computational modeling, and systems-level models of self field MPD thrusters is underway. The MPD thruster experimental research consists of a 1-10 MWe, 2 ms pulse-forming-network, a vacuum chamber with two 32 diffusion pumps, and voltage, current, mass flow rate, and thrust stand diagnostics. Current focus is on obtaining repeatable thrust measurements of a Princeton Benchmark type self field thruster operating at 0.5-1 gls of argon. Operation with hydrogen is the ultimate goal to realize the increased efficiency anticipated using the lighter gas. Computational modeling is done using the MACH2 MHD code, which can include real gas effects for propellants of interest to MPD operation. The MACH2 code has been benchmarked against other MPD thruster data, and has been used to create a point design for a 3000 second specific impulse (Isp) MPD thruster. This design is awaiting testing in the experimental facility. For the PIT, a computational investigation using MACH2 has been initiated, with experiments awaiting further funding. Although the calculated results have been found to be sensitive to the initial ionization assumptions, recent results have agreed well with experimental data. Finally, a systems level self-field MPD thruster model has been developed that allows for a mission planner or system designer to input Isp and power level into the model equations and obtain values for efficiency, mass flow rate, and input current and voltage. This model emphasizes algebraic simplicity to allow its incorporation into larger trajectory or system optimization codes. The systems level approach will be extended to the pulsed inductive thruster and other electrodeless thrusters at a future date.

  12. ECR Plasma Sterilisation, Argon and Nitrogen Treated Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helhel, Selcuk; Oksuz, Lutfi; Cerezci, Osman; Rad, Abbas Y.

    2004-09-01

    ECR type plasma system was built to produce plasma in axial direction. Plasma was initiated in a specially designed Nickel - Chrome cylindrical vacuum tube which is being driven through dielectric window by 2.45GHz commercial magnetron source. Tube is also surrounded by a coil driving 150ADC to generate approximately 875Gauss magnetic field at the center. Langmuir probe and ICCD for optical spectrometry were used to characterize internal parameters like electron density, electron temperature and different characteristics of the plasma. Bacillus Subtilis var nigar, bacillus Stearothermophilus, bacillus pumilus E601, Escherichia coli and staphylococcus aureus type bacteria were selected as a reference. Each is resistant for different actions while the Bacilus cereus is the most resistant bacteria for microwave interaction. This study presents the effect of system on used bacteria. Those are gram positive and gram negative bacteria that refers to structure of cell wall. The sterilization efficacy of Argon type ECR plasma was found to be over 99, 5% in Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis (vegetative cell), Bacillus cereus (vegetative cell), Bacillus pumilus and Escherichia coli. System response type is less than 2 minutes.

  13. Space plasma laboratory - Experiment in simulated ionospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konradi, A.; Garriott, O. K.; Bernstein, W.

    1978-01-01

    Several experiments with simulated ionospheric plasma were performed in the Johnson Space Center's large (17 m diameter x 27 m height) vacuum chamber. Two of these, the RF discharge and the electron-beam plasma discharge, are described here. The RF experiment involved measurement of the loading on a 5 m dipole and a 5 m loop antenna caused by the presence of a plasma. The results indicate that when the RF frequency is near the electron gyro frequency a self-sustained plasma discharge is set up and the real part of the complex antenna impedance increases. The beam-plasma experiment was carried out to study a discharge produced by an electron beam with an energy of about 1 keV when the electron beam was injected parallel to the ambient magnetic field. As the beam current was raised to a critical level, a spontaneous transition occurred whereby a luminous halo was formed around the electron beam indicating a sustained discharge.

  14. Characteristics of plasma properties in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenherr, Tony; Nees, Frank; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Herdrich, Georg

    2013-03-15

    Pulsed plasma thrusters are electric space propulsion devices which create a highly transient plasma bulk in a short-time arc discharge that is expelled to create thrust. The transitional character and the dependency on the discharge properties are yet to be elucidated. In this study, optical emission spectroscopy and Mach-Zehnder interferometry are applied to investigate the plasma properties in variation of time, space, and discharge energy. Electron temperature, electron density, and Knudsen numbers are derived for the plasma bulk and discussed. Temperatures were found to be in the order of 1.7 to 3.1 eV, whereas electron densities showed maximum values of more than 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Both values showed strong dependency on the discharge voltage and were typically higher closer to the electrodes. Capacitance and time showed less influence. Knudsen numbers were derived to be in the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}, thus, indicating a continuum flow behavior in the main plasma bulk.

  15. Wakes in Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian Norman

    Plasma wave wakes, which are the collective oscillatory response near the plasma frequency to the propagation of particles or electromagnetic waves through a plasma, play a critical role in many plasma processes. New results from backwards stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS), in which wakes with phase velocities much less than the speed of light are induced by the beating of counter-propagating light waves, and from electron beam stopping, in which the wakes are produced by the motion of relativistically propagating electrons through the dense plasma, are discussed. Both processes play important roles in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In BSRS, laser light is scattered backwards out of the plasma, decreasing the energy available to compress the ICF capsule and affecting the symmetry of where the laser energy hits the hohlraum wall in indirect drive ICF. The plasma wave wake can also generate superthermal electrons that can preheat the core and/or the ablator. Electron beam stopping plays a critical role in the Fast Ignition (FI) ICF concept, in which a beam of relativistic electrons is used to heat the target core to ignition temperatures after the compression stage. The beam stopping power determines the effectiveness of the heating process. This dissertation covers new discoveries on the importance of plasma wave wakes in both BSRS and electron beam stopping. In the SRS studies, 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using OSIRIS are performed, which model a short-duration (˜500/?0 --1FWHM) counter-propagating scattered light seed pulse in the presence of a constant pump laser with an intensity far below the absolute instability threshold for plasma waves undergoing Landau damping. The seed undergoes linear convective Raman amplification and dominates over the amplification of fluctuations due to particle discreteness. The simulation results are in good agreement with results from a coupled-mode solver when special relativity and the effects of finite size PIC simulation particles are accounted for. Linear gain spectra including both effects are discussed. Extending the PIC simulations past when the seed exits the simulation domain reveals bursts of large-amplitude scattering in many cases, which do not occur in simulations without the seed pulse. These bursts can have amplitudes several times greater than the amplified seed pulse, and an examination of the orbits of particles trapped in the wake illustrates that the bursts are caused by a reduction of Landau damping due to particle trapping. This large-amplitude scattering is caused by the seed inducing a wake earlier in the simulation, thus modifying the distribution function. Performing simulations with longer duration seeds leads to parts of the seeds reaching amplitudes several times more than the steady-state linear theory results, similarly caused by a reduction of Landau damping. Simulations with continuous seeds demonstrate that the onset of inflation depends on the seed wavelength and incident intensity, and oscillations in the reflectivity are observed at a frequency equal to the difference between the seed frequency and the frequency at which the inflationary SRS grows. In the electron beam stopping studies, 3D PIC simulations are performed of relativistic electrons with a momentum of 10mec propagating in a cold FI core plasma. Some of the simulations use one simulation particle per real particle, and particle sizes much smaller than the interparitcle spacing. The wake made by a single electron is compared against that calculated using cold fluid theory assuming the phase velocity of the wake is near the speed of light. The results agree for the first wavelength of the wake. However, the shape of the wake changes for succeeding wavelengths and depends on the background plasma temperature, with the concavity pointing in the direction the electron is moving in cold plasmas and in the opposite direction as the plasma temperature increases. In the warm plasma the curvature is described by electrostatic Vlasov theory (for vparticle >> vth) and is due

  16. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D. (Aiken, SC)

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  17. Autonomous Method and System for Minimizing the Magnitude of Plasma Discharge Current Oscillations in a Hall Effect Plasma Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, Vladimir (Inventor); Demmons, Nathaniel (Inventor); Ehrbar, Eric (Inventor); Pote, Bruce (Inventor); Rosenblad, Nathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An autonomous method for minimizing the magnitude of plasma discharge current oscillations in a Hall effect plasma device includes iteratively measuring plasma discharge current oscillations of the plasma device and iteratively adjusting the magnet current delivered to the plasma device in response to measured plasma discharge current oscillations to reduce the magnitude of the plasma discharge current oscillations.

  18. Measurements of the Plasma Parameters and Low Frequency Oscillations in the Fisk Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Edward, Jr.; Wallace, Kent; Lampkin, Gregory; Watson, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A new plasma device, the Fisk Plasma Source (FPS), has been developed at Fisk University. This plasma device is used to study the physics of low temperature plasmas and plasma-material interactions. The FPS device is a stainless steel vacuum 6-way cross vacuum vessel with at 10-inch inner diameter. Low temperature argon plasmas are generated using DC glow discharge and thermionic filament techniques. Spatial profiles of the plasma density, plasma potential, and electron temperature are measured using Langmuir probes. We present initial experimental measurements of density and temperature profiles in the FPS device. Experimental and theoretical studies of low frequency oscillations observed in the FPS device are also presented.

  19. Plasma Characteristics of 450 mm Diameter Ferrite-Enhanced Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seung Pyo; Hyeuk Lim, Jong; Gweon, Gwang Ho; Yeom, Geun Young

    2010-08-01

    The effect of C-shaped ferrite modules installed above a spiral-type inductively coupled plasma (ICP) antenna coil and the plasma characteristics of an ICP source operated at 2 MHz were investigated in order to realize 450 mm wafer processing. The application of an appropriate amount of Ni-Zn ferrite modules to the antenna increased the plasma density slightly and decreased the plasma potential, while the application of the ferrite modules all over the antenna line decreased the plasma density and increased the plasma potential. In particular, by installing the ferrite modules locally in a low-plasma-density region, plasma uniformity was improved effectively.

  20. Coherent control of plasma dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan

    2014-10-01

    The concept of coherent control - precise measurement or determination of a process through control of the phase of an applied oscillating field - has been applied to numerous systems with great success. Here, we demonstrate the use of coherent control on plasma dynamics in a laser wakefield electron acceleration experiment. A tightly focused femtosecond laser pulse (10 mJ, 35 fs) was used to generate electron beams by plasma wakefield acceleration in the density down ramp. The technique is based on optimization of the electron beam using a deformable mirror adaptive optical system with an iterative evolutionary genetic algorithm. The image of the electrons on a scintillator screen was processed and used in a fitness function as direct feedback for the optimization algorithm. This coherent manipulation of the laser wavefront leads to orders of magnitude improvement to the electron beam properties such as the peak charge and beam divergence. The laser beam optimized to generate the best electron beam was not the one with the ``best'' focal spot. When a particular wavefront of laser light interacts with plasma, it can affect the plasma wave structures and trapping conditions of the electrons in a complex way. For example, Raman forward scattering, envelope self-modulation, relativistic self-focusing, and relativistic self-phase modulation and many other nonlinear interactions modify both the pulse envelope and phase as the pulse propagates, in a way that cannot be easily predicted and that subsequently dictates the formation of plasma waves. The optimal wavefront could be successfully determined via the heuristic search under laser-plasma conditions that were not known a priori. Control and shaping of the electron energy distribution was found to be less effective, but was still possible. Particle-in-cell simulations were performed to show that the mode structure of the laser beam can affect the plasma wave structure and trapping conditions of electrons, which subsequently produces electron beams with a different divergence. The proof-of-principle demonstration of coherent control for plasmas opens new possibilities for future laser-based accelerators and their applications. This study should also enable a significantly improved understanding of the complex dynamics of laser plasma interactions. This work was supported by DARPA under Contract No. N66001-11-1-4208, the NSF under Contract No. 0935197 and MCubed at the University of Michigan.

  1. Atomic Transitions in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Michael Sean

    Motivation for the study of hot, dense ( ~solid density) plasmas has historically been in connection with stellar interiors. In recent years, however, there has been a growing interest in such plasmas due to their relevance to short wavelength (EUV and x-ray) lasers, inertial confinement fusion, and optical harmonic generation. In constrast to the stellar plasmas, these laboratory plasmas are typically composed of high-z elements and are not in thermal equilibrium. Descriptions of nonthermal plasma experiments must necessarily involve the consideration of the various atomic processes and the rates at which they occur. Traditionally, the rates of collisional atomic processes are calculated by considering a binary collision picture. For example, a single electron may be taken to collisionally excite an ion. A cross section may be defined for this process and, multiplying by a flux, the rate may be obtained. In a high density plasma this binary picture clearly breaks down as the electrons no longer act independently of each other. The cross section is ill-defined in this regime and another approach is needed to obtain rates. In this thesis an approach based on computing rates without recourse to a cross section is presented. In this approach, binary collisions are replaced by stochastic density fluctuations. It is then these density fluctuations which drive transitions in the ions. Furthermore, the oscillator strengths for the transitions are computed in screened Coulomb potentials which reflect the average polarization of the plasma near the ion. Numerical computations are presented for the collisional ionization rate. The effects of screening in the plasma -ion interaction are investigated for He^+ ions in a plasma near solid density. It is shown that dynamic screening plays an important role in this process. Then, density effects in the oscillator strength are explored for both He^+ and Ar^{+17}. Approximations which introduce a nonorthogonality between the initial and final states is shown to introduce a nonnegligible error. Changes in the bound state energy levels are included in the calculation as well and are shown to dramatically increase the ionization rate over the low density result. Finally, a calculation is presented in which the final state wavefunctions are found exactly within a (density-dependent) screened Coulomb potential.

  2. Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heberlein, Joachim, V.R.; Pfender, Emil; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2005-02-28

    Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials The project had the overall objective of improving our understanding of the influences of process parameters on the properties of advanced superhard materials. The focus was on high rate deposition processes using thermal plasmas and atmospheric pressure glow discharges, and the emphasis on superhard materials was chosen because of the potential impact of such materials on industrial energy use and on the environment. In addition, the development of suitable diagnostic techniques was pursued. The project was divided into four tasks: (1) Deposition of superhard boron containing films using a supersonic plasma jet reactor (SPJR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (2) Deposition of superhard nanocomposite films in the silicon-nitrogen-carbon system using the triple torch plasma reactor (TTPR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (3) Deposition of films consisting of carbon nanotubes using an atmospheric pressure glow discharge reactor. (4) Adapting the Thomson scattering method for characterization of atmospheric pressure non-uniform plasmas with steep spatial gradients and temporal fluctuations. This report summarizes the results.

  3. Stationary Plasma Thruster Plume Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    The emission spectrum from a xenon plasma produced by a Stationary Plasma Thruster provided by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) was measured. Approximately 270 individual Xe I, Xe II, and XE III transitions were identified. A total of 250 mW of radiated optical emission was estimated from measurements taken at the thruster exit plane. There was no evidence of erosion products in the emission signature. Ingestion and ionization of background gas at elevated background pressure was detected. The distribution of excited states could be described by temperatures ranging from fractions of 1 eV to 4 eV with a high degree of uncertainty due to the nonequilibrium nature of this plasma. The plasma was over 95 percent ionized at the thruster exit plane. Between 10 and 20 percent of the ions were doubly charged. Two modes of operation were identified. The intensity of plasma emission increased by a factor of two during operation in an oscillatory mode. The transfer between the two modes of operation was likely related to unidentified phenomena occurring on a time scale of minutes.

  4. The plasma environment of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.; Richardson, J. D.; Selesnick, R. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Bagenal, F.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the observational results on the plasma environment at Uranus is given, and the implications of these observations for magnetospheric physics at Uranus are discussed. During the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus, an extended magnetosphere filled with a tenuous plasma was detected. This low-energy plasma was found to consist of protons and electrons, with no significant heavy ion contribution, and with a density in the regions sampled by the spacecraft of at most three electrons per cubic centimeter. The plasma electrons and ions exhibit both a thermal component (with temperatures of tens of eV) and a hot component (with temperatures of a few keV). The thermal ion component is observed both inside and outside an L-shell value near 5, whereas the hot ion and electron component is excluded from the region inside of that L-shell. The source of the thermal component of the plasma is either the planetary ionosphere or the neutral hydrogen corona surrounding Uranus, whereas the hot component is convected in from the magnetotail, with probably an ionospheric source.

  5. Genetic determinants of plasma triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Christopher T.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hegele, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma triglyceride (TG) concentration is reemerging as an important cardiovascular disease risk factor. More complete understanding of the genes and variants that modulate plasma TG should enable development of markers for risk prediction, diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapies and might help specify new directions for therapeutic interventions. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified both known and novel loci associated with plasma TG concentration. However, genetic variation at these loci explains only ?10% of overall TG variation within the population. As the GWAS approach may be reaching its limit for discovering genetic determinants of TG, alternative genetic strategies, such as rare variant sequencing studies and evaluation of animal models, may provide complementary information to flesh out knowledge of clinically and biologically important pathways in TG metabolism. Herein, we review genes recently implicated in TG metabolism and describe how some of these genes likely modulate plasma TG concentration. We also discuss lessons regarding plasma TG metabolism learned from various genomic and genetic experimental approaches. Treatment of patients with moderate to severe hypertriglyceridemia with existing therapies is often challenging; thus, gene products and pathways found in recent genetic research studies provide hope for development of more effective clinical strategies. PMID:21041806

  6. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.; Catto, P.J.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.

    1993-04-27

    Work on ICRF interaction with the edge plasma is reported. ICRF generated convective cells have been established as an important mechanism for influencing edge transport and interaction with the H-mode, and for controlling profiles in the tokamak scrape-off-layer. Power dissipation by rf sheaths has been shown to be significant for some misaligned ICRF and IIBW antenna systems. Near-field antenna sheath work has been extended to the far-field case, important for experiments with low single pass absorption. Impurity modeling and Faraday screen design support has been provided for the ICRF community. In the area of core-ICRF physics, the kinetic theory of heating by applied ICRF waves has been extended to retain important geometrical effects relevant to modeling minority heated tokamak plasmas, thereby improving on the physics base that is standard in presently employed codes. Both the quasilinear theory of ion heating, and the plasma response function important in wave codes have been addressed. In separate studies, it has been shown that highly anisotropic minority heated plasmas can give rise to unstable field fluctuations in some situations. A completely separate series of studies have contributed to the understanding of tokamak confinement physics. Additionally, a diffraction formalism has been produced which will be used to access the focusability of lower hybrid, ECH, and gyrotron scattering antennas in dynamic plasma configurations.

  7. Damping Measurements of Plasma Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2010-11-01

    For azimuthally symmetric plasma modes in a magnesium ion plasma, confined in a 3 Tesla Penning-Malmberg trap with a density of n ˜10^7cm-3, we measure a damping rate of 2s-1< ?< 10^4s-1 over a wide range in temperature (5 x10-6 eV< T < 5eV) and aspect ratio (0.25 < ?< 25), with a wave amplitude of ?n / n ˜5%. Changing the aspect ratio, ?= Lp/ 2rp, of the plasma column, alters the frequency of the mode from 16 KHz to 192 KHz. The oscillatory fluid displacement is small compared to the wavelength of the mode; in contrast, the fluid velocity, ?vf, can be large compared to v. The real part of the frequency satisfies a linear dispersion relation. In long thin plasmas (?> 10) these modes are Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes, and for smaller values of ? they are Dubin spheroidal modes. However the damping appears to be non-linear; initially large waves have weaker exponential damping, which is not yet understood. Recent theoryootnotetextM.W. Anderson and T.M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007). calculates the damping of TG modes expected from viscosity due to ion-ion collisions; but the measured damping, while having a similar temperature and density dependence, is about 40 times larger than calculated. This discrepancy might be due to an external damping mechanism.

  8. Microwave diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David

    Plasma treatment of biological tissues has tremendous potential due to the wide range of applications. Most plasmas have gas temperatures which greatly exceed room temperature. These are often utilized in electro-surgery for cutting and coagulating tissue. Another type of plasma, referred to as cold atmospheric plasma, or CAP, is characterized by heavy particle temperatures which are at or near room temperature. Due to this lack of thermal effect, CAP may provide less invasive medical procedures. Additionally, CAP have been demonstrated to be effective at targeting cancer cells while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissue. A recently fabricated Microwave Electron Density Device (MEDD) utilizes microwave scattering on small atmospheric plasmas to determine the electron plasma density. The MEDD can be utilized on plasmas which range from a fraction of a millimeter to several centimeters at atmospheric pressure when traditional methods cannot be applied. Microwave interferometry fails due to the small size of the plasma relative to the microwave wavelength which leads to diffraction and negligible phase change; electrostatic probes introduce very strong perturbation and are associated with difficulties of application in strongly-collisional atmospheric conditions; and laser Thomson scattering is not sensitive enough to measure plasma densities less than 1012 cm-3. The first part of this dissertation provides an overview of two types of small atmospheric plasma objects namely CAPs and plasmas utilized in the electro-surgery. It then goes on to describe the fabrication, testing and calibration of the MEDD facility. The second part of this dissertation is focused on the application of the MEDD and other diagnostic techniques to both plasma objects. A series of plasma images that illustrate the temporal evolution of a discharge created by an argon electrosurgical device operating in the coagulation mode and its behavior was analyzed. The discharge of the argon electrosurgical system was studied using an Intensified Charge-Coupled Device (ICCD) and the MEDD. The plasma density was measured and found to be in the range of (7.5-9.5) x 1015 cm-3 for applied powers of 15-60 Watts. The discharge can be classified as a glow discharge of alternating current with a contracted positive column. The discharge ignites every half-wave of the driving voltage when voltage increases above the breakdown threshold of about 300 Volts and is interrupted at the end of each half-wave when the voltage approaches zero. Additionally, it was shown that the plasma discharges on the target object during the positive half-wave of the voltage. The power distribution was also analyzed. It was found that 60-70% of the input power is delivered into the tissue and the remaining 30-40% is consumed by the plasma column between the electrosurgical probe and tissue. The application of the MEDD to a helium CAP revealed the temporal dynamics of the discharge. It was observed that streamer development associated with the measured plasma density peak is developing on the decaying part of the main inter-electrode discharge. The third part of the dissertation focuses on the simulation of a helium CAP. A one-dimensional model of a helium CAP was used to simulate twenty-one oxygen, helium, and nitrogen species. One hundred and forty reactions were successfully used. The predicted maximum and average densities of the species were tabulated. Graphs of the species densities were presented showing the change in densities with respect to the radius of the CAP. The plasma bullets can be seen via these graphs, with most species displaying maximum densities at a radius which is not the center of the CAP. This shows that the plasma bullets are a disk-like structure at the moment of time presented. Values of E/p were varied from 20 -- 30 volts/cm Torr. Based on experimental results of moments in time with which the maximum plasma density occurs, this data can be used to predict the actual E/p values for future experiments.

  9. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygiene—and the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low-pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two-dimensional cold atmospheric plasma jet array for uniform treatment of large-area

  11. Storm-enhanced plasma density features, daytime polar cap plasma enhancements, and their underlying plasma flows investigated during superstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2009-11-01

    This study investigates the effects of November superstorms on the daytime-evening northern topside ionosphere. We utilize multi-instrument interplanetary and geomagnetic data to analyze the interplanetary shock/electric (E) field events. To assess their impact, field-aligned DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) passes are employed. We tracked evening storm-enhanced density (SED) features and daytime polar plasma enhancements occurring regularly that allowed us to learn about the basic mechanisms responsible for their development. Results show that large vertical downward plasma flows supplied the plasma building up the SED features and polar plasma enhancements detected. These plasma formations occurred during the main phase with the forward superfountain and during a substorm with the reverse fountain. These provide observational evidence that primary downward plasma flows, triggered by detachment processes caused by the westward subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) E-fields, existed and became transported sunward. At SED latitudes, these primary downward plasma flows were intensified by the forward superfountain when its upward plasma flow spilled over into the equatorial anomaly and cascaded down the magnetic field lines. When the reverse fountain was active, such intensification was not available to the primary downward plasma flows at SED latitudes. As the downward streaming plasma found its way to the polar cap, it resulted in the development of daytime polar plasma enhancements. Statistically, daytime polar plasma enhancements occurred at all longitudes contradicting the myth that the North American region is better suited for the development of large plasma enhancements in the polar cap.

  12. Plasma contacting with a solid expellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtner, David

    The break of the tether during the second electrodynamic tether mission (TSS-1R) was followed by efficient plasma contacting between the broken end of the tether and the ambient plasma. Experiments and analysis are described that illustrate the important physical processes required for such plasma contacting to occur. It is shown (1) that a dense plasma discharge can be sustained by ionization of decomposed tether vapors, and (2) that current is transported between the tether and the dense plasma primarily by ions. Operation of a hollow-cathode plasma contactor on a vaporized solid expellant is also demonstrated.

  13. Comprehensive computational model for thermal plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical model is described for simulating thermal plasmas containing entrained particles, with emphasis on plasma spraying applications. The plasma is represented as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting ideal gas, while the particles are tracked as discrete Lagrangian entities coupled to the plasma. The overall computational model is embodied in a new computer code called LAVA. Computational results are presented from a transient simulation of alumina spraying in a turbulent argon-helium plasma jet in air environment, including torch geometry, substrate, and multiple species with chemical reactions. Plasma-particle interactions including turbulent dispersion have been modeled in a fully self- consistent manner. 17 refs.

  14. Comprehensive computational model for thermal plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.

    1992-08-01

    A new numerical model is described for simulating thermal plasmas containing entrained particles, with emphasis on plasma spraying applications. The plasma is represented as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting ideal gas, while the particles are tracked as discrete Lagrangian entities coupled to the plasma. The overall computational model is embodied in a new computer code called LAVA. Computational results are presented from a transient simulation of alumina spraying in a turbulent argon-helium plasma jet in air environment, including torch geometry, substrate, and multiple species with chemical reactions. Plasma-particle interactions including turbulent dispersion have been modeled in a fully self- consistent manner. 17 refs.

  15. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.

    1994-03-08

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

  16. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Haselton, Halsey H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm.sup.2 at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance.

  17. Ultrarelativistic electromagnetic pulses in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Leboeuf, J. N.; Tajima, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Kennel, C. F.

    1981-01-01

    The physical processes of a linearly polarized electromagnetic pulse of highly relativistic amplitude in an underdense plasma accelerating particles to very high energies are studied through computer simulation. An electron-positron plasma is considered first. The maximum momenta achieved scale as the square of the wave amplitude. This acceleration stops when the bulk of the wave energy is converted to particle energy. The pulse leaves behind as a wake a vacuum region whose length scales as the amplitude of the wave. The results can be explained in terms of a snow plow or piston-like action of the radiation on the plasma. When a mass ratio other than unity is chosen and electrostatic effects begin to play a role, first the ion energy increases faster than the electron energy and then the electron energy catches up later, eventually reaching the same value.

  18. Theory of beam plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1982-01-01

    The general theory of beam plasma discharge (BPD) is discussed in relation to space and laboratory beam injection situations. An important concept introduced is that even when beam plasma instabilities are excited, there are two regime of BPD with radically different observational properties. They are described here as BPD with either classical or anomalous energy depositions. For high pressures or low altitudes, the classical is expected to dominate. For high altitudes and laboratory experiments, where the axial system size is less than lambda sub en, no BPD will be triggered unless the unstable waves are near the ambient plasma frequency and their amplitudes at saturation are large enough to create suprathermal tails by collapsing.

  19. Double layer formation. [in plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the plasma processes which occur during the formation of a double layer in response to an applied initial electric field, when triggered by a current in the plasma. The important feature of the formation process was the creation of an ion-rich plasma-density cavity. The positive space charge of the cavity was shielded by induction of a negative space charge on the low potential side of the cavity, giving rise to the formation of a fully developed double layer. The shielding was complete only when the electron current from the low potential side exceeded the electron thermal current. It was found that during the formation of double layers counterstreaming electrons are generated. Moreover, transient double layers with reverse polarity also occur during this phase. Thus, the recurring formation of double layers can give rise to flickering double layers.

  20. Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Bentefour, E; Levin, Daniel S.; Moshe, M.; Silver, Yiftah; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

  1. Plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer

    DOEpatents

    Hartvigsen, Joseph J.; Elangovan, S.; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

    2013-06-11

    A reformer is disclosed that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding method and system are also disclosed and claimed herein.

  2. Lagrangian description of warm plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.

    1970-01-01

    Efforts are described to extend the averaged Lagrangian method of describing small signal wave propagation and nonlinear wave interaction, developed by earlier workers for cold plasmas, to the more general conditions of warm collisionless plasmas, and to demonstrate particularly the effectiveness of the method in analyzing wave-wave interactions. The theory is developed for both the microscopic description and the hydrodynamic approximation to plasma behavior. First, a microscopic Lagrangian is formulated rigorously, and expanded in terms of perturbations about equilibrium. Two methods are then described for deriving a hydrodynamic Lagrangian. In the first of these, the Lagrangian is obtained by velocity integration of the exact microscopic Lagrangian. In the second, the expanded hydrodynamic Lagrangian is obtained directly from the expanded microscopic Lagrangian. As applications of the microscopic Lagrangian, the small-signal dispersion relations and the coupled mode equations are derived for all possible waves in a warm infinite, weakly inhomogeneous magnetoplasma, and their interactions are examined.

  3. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Dickinson, Michael (San Leandro, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Winnetka, IL)

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  4. Electron collision frequency in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Rogers, F.J.; DeWitt, H.E.

    1982-03-01

    In strongly coupled, degenerate plasmas, the electron collision frequency has been described by the Ziman formula with the ion-ion correlations modeled by the classical one-component plasma (OCP). However, this model fails to reproduce the correct quantum Lenard-Balescu result in the weak-coupling limit. It is demonstrated here that a recently obtained, correlation-function expression for the collision frequency reduces to the Ziman and Lenard-Balescu results in the appropriate limits. In addition, it is shown that an extension of the Lenard-Balescu result to include strong coupling can be interpreted as the Ziman collision frequency with the OCP structure factor replaced by the ion-ion structure factor for a two-component system. Numerical estimates of this structure factor are used to calculate the electrical conductivity in moderately coupled (GAMMA< or =2) hydrogen plasmas.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics experiments in plasmas

    E-print Network

    Nurujjaman, Md

    2009-01-01

    The study of nonlinear dynamics or chaos theory has emerged in the last three decades or so as an important interdisciplinary area of research encompassing a wide range of fields like: fluids, plasmas, biomedical sciences, finance, turbulence, astronomy, material sciences, etc. In plasma chaos was first experimentally observed by Boswell. Different other nonlinear dynamics related phenomena like, the intermittency route to a chaos, Homoclinic chaos, Period adding route to chaos and period subtracting, mode locking, period pulling, etc., had been observed by several researchers. In this thesis, we have presented (a) anode glow related observation of chaos to order transition and homoclinic bifurcation; (b) coherence resonance and stochastic resonance; and self organized criticality behavior in glow discharge plasma.

  6. Plasma Injection Experiment at MCX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker; Messer, S.

    2008-11-01

    MCX uses an axial magnetic field and a radial voltage to drive supersonic azimuthal flows. It has been observed that the high flow velocity and large radial velocity shear suppresses the higher order interchange modes. However, the MCX discharges are currently limited by the charge and current available from the capacitor bank supplying the radial voltage. The High Density Plasma Injection Experiment combines the MCX experiment with a modified coaxial plasma gun to drive rotation in the target vessel. A 32-injector prototype coaxial gun has been designed, constructed and installed at MCX midplane, top tangential port, as alternate means of momentum input. Unlike traditional coaxial plasma jets, the transport of the jet has been optimized via a combination of electrode shaping and tailored armature at HyperV Technologies Corp. in order to prevent the blow-by instability. Data will be presented for a wide range of MCX parameters and the prospects for future injection experiments will be evaluated.

  7. Plasma sheet expansion: Statistical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, S.; Mukai, T.

    2006-05-01

    The present study addresses the cause of plasma sheet expansion by statistically comparing the characteristics of lobe-to-plasma sheet (LB-to-PS) and PS-to-LB crossings observed by the Geotail satellite. Whereas the flapping motion of the magnetotail causes both types of crossing, the PS expansion (thinning) can be associated only with the LB-to-PS (PS-to-LB) crossing. Thus any systematic difference between the two types of crossing should reflect the difference between the PS expansion and thinning. Geotail observed more LB-to-PS crossings (744 events) than PS-to-LB crossings (640 events), and the preferred occurrence of the LB-to-PS crossing is more manifest closer to the Earth. It is found that at the PS-to-LB crossing, the plasma moves in the same direction as the boundary motion. At the LB-to-PS crossing, in contrast, the plasma often moves in the opposite direction to the boundary motion, indicating that there is a finite electric field in the frame of the boundary motion associated with the PS expansion. The PS expansion is therefore considered to be a manifestation of magnetic reconnection. That is, the PS expands because new PS flux tubes are added onto the preexisting PS. In the course of the PS expansion, the total pressure decreases, which may be interpreted in terms of the replacement of the preexisting PS plasma with new low-pressure plasma originating from the tail lobe. The PS expansion is also characterized by relaxation (dipolarization) of the local magnetic field, which is inferred to be a direct consequence of reconnection. On the basis of recent reports of the lack of a one-to-one correspondence between reconnection and substorm onset, it is suggested that the PS expansion cannot be uniquely associated with a specific substorm phase.

  8. Uses of plasma in Spain.

    PubMed

    Algora, M; Barbolla, L

    2007-12-01

    In Spain, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) currently recovered either by whole blood centrifugation or by apheresis is mainly considered as a source of plasma derivates rather than a product to be transfused. Upon this consideration, the amount of plasma transfused in the last two decades has remained stable, while the production of FFP has grown steadily during all these years. Thus, much more plasma has been derived to industry for manufacturing. Although, since 1993 a consensus conference established the clinical situation where plasma has demonstrated its efficacy, the true situation is that many indications seem not to be supported on a scientific evidence basis. Only a few studies have been performed in the last years to assess the appropriateness of these indications. We present the initial result of an ongoing survey addressed by the Madrid Blood Transfusion Centre. Based on the criteria of total amount of RBC transfused per year, large hospitals (more than 10,000 units of RBC) transfused an average of 23.87% of FFP, while medium hospitals (5000-10,000 units of RBC) used 19.5% and small ones (less than 5000) about 12.5%. It is important to point out that inside each group there were some important differences in ratio values for similar hospitals. This could indicate that much more is necessary to cope with indications. Although national figures of uses of FFP, whether in ratio or absolute terms, show a moderate consumption in comparison with published figures of other European countries, there can be no doubt that plasma overuses still seem to be present. PMID:18417402

  9. Food Predictors of Plasma Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Sara J.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Eliassen, A. Heather

    2013-01-01

    Empirical prediction models that weight food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) food items by their relation to nutrient biomarker concentrations may estimate nutrient exposure better than nutrient intakes derived from food composition databases. Carotenoids may especially benefit because contributing foods vary in bioavailability and assessment validity. Our objective was to develop empirical prediction models for the major plasma carotenoids and total carotenoids and evaluate their validity compared with dietary intakes calculated from standard food composition tables. 4180 nonsmoking women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) blood subcohort with previously measured plasma carotenoids were randomly divided into training (n = 2787) and testing (n = 1393) subsets. Empirical prediction models were developed in the training subset by stepwise selection from foods contributing ?0.5% to intake of the relevant carotenoid. Spearman correlations between predicted and measured plasma concentrations were compared to Spearman correlations between dietary intake and measured plasma concentrations for each carotenoid. Three to 12 foods were selected for the ?-carotene, ?-carotene, ?-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids prediction models. In the testing subset, Spearman correlations with measured plasma concentrations for the calculated dietary intakes and predicted plasma concentrations, respectively, were 0.31 and 0.37 for ?-carotene, 0.29 and 0.31 for ?-carotene, 0.36 and 0.41 for ?-cryptoxanthin, 0.28 and 0.31 for lutein/zeaxanthin, 0.22 and 0.23 for lycopene, and 0.22 and 0.27 for total carotenoids. Empirical prediction models may modestly improve assessment of some carotenoids, particularly ?-carotene and ?-cryptoxanthin. PMID:24152746

  10. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  11. Relativistic effects on plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad

    2014-07-15

    The expansion of electron-ion plasma is studied through a fully relativistic multi-fluids plasma model which includes thermal pressure, ambipolar electrostatic potential, and internal energy conversion. Numerical investigation, based on quasi-neutral assumption, is performed for three different regimes: nonrelativistic, weakly relativistic, and relativistic. Ions' front in weakly relativistic regime exhibits spiky structure associated with a break-down of quasi-neutrality at the expanding front. In the relativistic regime, ion velocity is found to reach a saturation limit which occurs at earlier stages of the expansion. This limit is enhanced by higher electron velocity.

  12. Dynamics of colliding ultracold plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. P.; Grant, E. R.

    2015-02-01

    Formation of a secondary plasma of NO+ ions and electrons within an ultracold plasma produces an observable change in the hydrodynamics of the system. Direct photoionization adds energetic electrons, which increases the rate of expansion. The introduction of a secondary Rydberg gas has the opposite effect. In both cases, the added ions create an inertial drag that acts initially to retard the expansion of the electron gas. A cold-ion hydrodynamic shell model, which accounts well for the effect of energy added by photoionization electrons, predicts the formation of collisionless shock waves.

  13. Pair creation and plasma oscillations.

    SciTech Connect

    Prozorkevich, A. V.; Vinnik, D. V.; Schmidt, S. M.; Hecht, M. B.; Roberts, C. D.

    2000-12-15

    We describe aspects of particle creation in strong fields using a quantum kinetic equation with a relaxation-time approximation to the collision term. The strong electric background field is determined by solving Maxwell's equation in tandem with the Vlasov equation. Plasma oscillations appear as a result of feedback between the background field and the field generated by the particles produced. The plasma frequency depends on the strength of the initial background fields and the collision frequency, and is sensitive to the necessary momentum-dependence of dressed-parton masses.

  14. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  15. Radiative Losses in Plasma Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Kostyukhov, Yu; Pukhov, A E

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a relativistic electron in a strongly nonlinear plasma wave in terms of classical mechanics by taking into account the action of the radiative reaction force. The two limiting cases are considered. In the first case where the energy of the accelerated electrons is low, the electron makes many betatron oscillations during the acceleration. In the second case where the energy of the accelerated electrons is high, the betatron oscillation period is longer than the electron residence time in the accelerating phase. We show that the force of radiative friction can severely limit the rate of electron acceleration in a plasma accelerator.

  16. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Beam-Plasma Interaction in a 2D Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrkos, Stamatios; Kalman, G. J.; Rosenberg, M.

    2006-10-01

    In a complex (dusty) plasma, penetrating ion or electron beams may lead to beam-plasma instabilities. The instability displays interesting new properties when either the plasma or the beam, or both, are strongly interacting^1. Foremost amongst them is the possible generation of transverse instabilities. We consider the case when a 2D plasma is in the crystalline phase, forming a lattice, and the beam is moving in the lattice plane. Both the grains and the beam particles interact through a realistic Yukawa potential. The beam particles are assumed to be weakly coupled to each other and to the lattice^2. Using the full phonon spectrum for a 2D hexagonal Yukawa lattice^3, we determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The behavior of the growth rates depends on the direction of the beam and on the relationship between the beam speed v and the longitudinal and transverse sound speeds sL, sT. For beam speeds between the longitudinal and transverse sound speeds, the transverse instability could be more important, because it appears at lower k values. ^1 G. J. Kalman and M. Rosenberg, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 36 5963 (2003) ^2 M. Rosenberg, G. J. Kalman, S. Kyrkos and Z. Donko, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 4613 (2006) ^3 T. Sullivan, G. J. Kalman, S. Kyrkos, P. Bakshi, M. Rosenberg and Z. Donko, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 4607 (2006)

  18. Kinetic Theory of Plasma Waves - Part III: Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lamalle, P.U

    2004-03-15

    Given the extent of the subject, the present text merely provides a list of topics, striking features and references relevant to the kinetic theory of high-frequency wave propagation and absorption in inhomogeneous plasmas. The discussion focuses on tokamak geometry.

  19. Nonlinear interaction of plasma waves in a cold magnetized plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Y.-C.

    1972-01-01

    Coupling equations are derived for the general case of nonlinear coupling of any wave modes in a cold magnetized plasma with particle drift motions. Specifically, the transformation of electrostatic waves is studied in connection with solar type-III radiation. A relevant numerical analysis is also presented.

  20. Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Ankur; Kushner, Mark J.

    2009-01-15

    The decrease in feature sizes in microelectronics fabrication will soon require plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching (PALE) is forming a layer of passivation that allows the underlying substrate material to be etched with lower activation energy than in the absence of the passivation. The subsequent removal of the passivation with carefully tailored activation energy then removes a single layer of the underlying material. If these goals are met, the process is self-limiting. A challenge of PALE is the high cost of specialized equipment and slow processing speed. In this work, results from a computational investigation of PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having acceptable processing speeds. Results will be discussed using inductively coupled and magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasmas in which nonsinusoidal waveforms are used to regulate ion energies to optimize the passivation and etch steps. This strategy may also enable the use of a single gas mixture, as opposed to changing gas mixtures between steps.

  1. Plasma cell leukaemia and other aggressive plasma cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sher, Taimur; Miller, Kena C; Deeb, George; Lee, Kelvin; Chanan-Khan, Asher

    2010-08-01

    Extramedullary plasma cell cancers, such as plasma cell leukaemia (PCL) and multiple extramedullary plasmacytomas (MEP) are very aggressive malignancies. These can be primary (de-novo) or secondary due to progressive prior multiple myeloma (MM). Recent reports suggest an increase in incidence of these disorders. Compared to MM, organ invasion is common in PCL, while soft tissue tumors involving the head, neck or paraspinal area are common sites for MEP. Markers of poor prognosis are frequently observed in these extramedullary forms of plasma cell cancers, and survival is significantly inferior compared to patients with MM. Conventional chemotherapeutic and radiotherapy approaches have been employed with variable results. Even high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue has not been able to demonstrate consistent improvement in survival outcome. Although not specifically evaluated, novel anti-plasma cell agents, such as the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide, appear to be active against these aggressive cancers. Clinical and translational research directed at improved understanding of disease biology and development of novel therapeutics is urgently needed. PMID:20701603

  2. Plasma cell leukaemia and other aggressive plasma cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sher, Taimur; Miller, Kena C.; Deeb, George; Lee, Kelvin; Chanan-Khan, Asher

    2014-01-01

    Summary Extramedullary plasma cell cancers, such as plasma cell leukemia (PCL) and multiple extramedullary plasmacytomas (MEP) are very aggressive malignancies. These can be primary (de-novo) or secondary due to progressive prior multiple myeloma (MM). Recent reports suggest an increase in incidence of these disorders. Compared to MM, organ invasion is common in PCL, while soft tissue tumors involving the head, neck or paraspinal area are common sites for MEP. Markers of poor prognosis are frequently observed in these extramedullary forms of plasma cell cancers, and survival is significantly inferior compared to patients with MM. Conventional chemotherapeutic and radiotherapy approaches have been employed with variable results. Even high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue has not been able to demonstrate consistent improvement in survival outcome. Although not specifically evaluated, novel anti-plasma cell agents, such as the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide, appear to be active against these aggressive cancers. Clinical and translational research directed at improved understanding of disease biology and development of novel therapeutics is urgently needed. PMID:20701603

  3. On the breaking of a plasma wave in a thermal plasma. II. Electromagnetic wave interaction with the breaking plasma wave

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric; Califano, Francesco; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-11-15

    In thermal plasma, the structure of the density singularity formed in a relativistically large amplitude plasma wave close to the wavebreaking limit leads to a refraction coefficient with discontinuous spatial derivatives. This results in a non-exponentially small above-barrier reflection of an electromagnetic wave interacting with the nonlinear plasma wave.

  4. Microwave plasma conversion of volatile organic compounds

    E-print Network

    Ko, Y; Yang, G S; Chang, DPY; Kennedy, Ian M

    2003-01-01

    study were to evaluate the technical feasibility of destroying VOCs from gas streams by using a commercially available microwave plasma torch andstudy the technical feasibility of destroying VOCs from gas streams by using a commercially available microwave plasma torch

  5. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  6. On coating adhesion during impulse plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafal; Okrasa, Sebastian; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Sk?adnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The impulse plasma deposition (IPD) technique is the only method of plasma surface engineering (among plasma-based technologies) that allows a synthesis of layers upon a cold unheated substrate and which ensures a good adhesion. This paper presents a study of plasma impacts upon a copper substrate surface during the IPD process. The substrate was exposed to pulsed N2/Al plasma streams during the synthesis of AlN layers. For plasma-material interaction diagnostics, the optical emission spectroscopy method was used. Our results show that interactions of plasma lead to sputtering of the substrate material. It seems that the obtained adhesion of the layers is the result of a complex surface mechanism combined with the effects of pulsed plasma energy impacts upon the unheated substrate. An example of such a result is the value of the critical load for the Al2O3 layer, which was measured by the scratch-test method to be above 40 N.

  7. Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems Physiology Biology 390

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems Physiology ­ Biology 390 1. Assume that a person ingests 50g of glucose and that all of it enters the blood and none is metabolized or excreted. Calculate the concentration (in mg glucose/dl plasma

  8. Theory of edge plasma in a spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    Properties of the edge plasma in the SSPX spheromak during the plasma formation and sustainment phases are discussed. For the breakdown and formation phase, the main emphasis is on the analysis of possible plasma contamination by impurities from the electrodes of the plasma gun (helicity injector). The issue of an azimuthally uniform breakdown initiation is also discussed. After the plasma settles down in the main vacuum chamber, one has to sustain the current between the electrodes, in order to continuously inject helicity. We discuss properties of the plasma on the field lines intersecting the electrodes. We conclude that the thermal balance of this plasma is maintained by Joule heating competing with parallel heat losses to the electrodes. The resulting plasma temperature is in the range of 15 - 30 eV. Under the expected operational conditions, the ``current`` velocity of the electrons is only slightly below their thermal velocity. Implications of this observation are briefly discussed.

  9. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  10. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  11. The plasma focus as a thruster 

    E-print Network

    Hardy, Richard Lee

    2005-02-17

    The need for low propellant weight, high efficiency propulsion systems is a glaring need for various space missions. This thesis presents the thrust modeling of the Dense Plasma Focus plasma motion phases. It also contrasts some of the engineering...

  12. The study of helicon plasma source.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Zhan-Wen; Shang, Yong; Sun, Liang-Ting; Zhang, Xue-Zhen; Zhao, Huan-Yu

    2010-02-01

    Helicon plasma source is known as efficient generator of uniform and high density plasma. A helicon plasma source was developed for investigation of plasma neutralization and plasma lens in the Institute of Modern Physics in China. In this paper, the characteristics of helicon plasma have been studied by using Langmuir four-probe and a high argon plasma density up to 3.9x10(13) cm(-3) have been achieved with the Nagoya type III antenna at the conditions of the magnetic intensity of 200 G, working gas pressure of 2.8x10(-3) Pa, and rf power of 1200 W with a frequency of 27.12 MHz. In the experiment, the important phenomena have been found: for a given magnetic induction intensity, the plasma density became greater with the increase in rf power and tended to saturation, and the helicon mode appeared at the rf power between 200 and 400 W. PMID:20192412

  13. Rotation generation and transport in tokamak plasmas

    E-print Network

    Podpaly, Yuri Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation is a factor important for plasma stability and transport, but it is still a fairly poorly understood area of physics. This thesis focuses on three aspects of rotation: momentum transport, Ohmic ...

  14. A Survey of Plasmas and Their Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Timothy E.; Grabbe, C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Plasmas are everywhere and relevant to everyone. We bath in a sea of photons, quanta of electromagnetic radiation, whose sources (natural and artificial) are dominantly plasma-based (stars, fluorescent lights, arc lamps.. .). Plasma surface modification and materials processing contribute increasingly to a wide array of modern artifacts; e.g., tiny plasma discharge elements constitute the pixel arrays of plasma televisions and plasma processing provides roughly one-third of the steps to produce semiconductors, essential elements of our networking and computing infrastructure. Finally, plasmas are central to many cutting edge technologies with high potential (compact high-energy particle accelerators; plasma-enhanced waste processors; high tolerance surface preparation and multifuel preprocessors for transportation systems; fusion for energy production).

  15. A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Brown, Jeff

    2010-11-30

    A plasma lens, consisting of a solenoid and potential-defining ring electrodes, has been placed between a magnetron and substrates to be coated. Photography reveals qualitative information on excitation, ionization, and the transport of plasma to the substrate.

  16. The study of helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Miao Tingting; Shang Yong; Zhao Hongwei; Liu Zhanwen; Sun Liangting; Zhang Xuezhen; Zhao Huanyu

    2010-02-15

    Helicon plasma source is known as efficient generator of uniform and high density plasma. A helicon plasma source was developed for investigation of plasma neutralization and plasma lens in the Institute of Modern Physics in China. In this paper, the characteristics of helicon plasma have been studied by using Langmuir four-probe and a high argon plasma density up to 3.9x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} have been achieved with the Nagoya type III antenna at the conditions of the magnetic intensity of 200 G, working gas pressure of 2.8x10{sup -3} Pa, and rf power of 1200 W with a frequency of 27.12 MHz. In the experiment, the important phenomena have been found: for a given magnetic induction intensity, the plasma density became greater with the increase in rf power and tended to saturation, and the helicon mode appeared at the rf power between 200 and 400 W.

  17. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  18. Physics issues associated with low-beta plasma generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic aspects of MHD generators are explored by examining the propagation of dense, low-beta streams of plasma. Three situations are considered: the basic principles of plasma-stream propagation, the propagation of plasma streams into vacuum, and the propagation of plasma streams into ambient plasmas. These three situations are analogous to plasma generators, plasma generators with vacuum loads, and plasma generators with plasma loads. Kinetic (microphysics) aspects include oscillations of the generator plasma, the effects of diocotron instabilities, the acceleration of particles, the starvation of current systems, and plasma-wave production.

  19. Stability of the active plasma sheath system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, R. N.; Slemrod, M.

    2003-08-01

    The macrostability of the active plasma-sheath is examined by extending recent work to include the process of volume ionization in the plasma being joined. The consequence of this is found to be more complicated and physically profound than expected, but nevertheless it is concluded that in real electropositive plasmas the steady-state plasma-sheath solution is one that is temporally stable.

  20. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  1. Practical applications of plasma surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    Radio frequency activated gas plasma is an environmentally conscious manufacturing process which provides surface treatments for improved product quality. Plasma processing offers significant potential for reducing the use of solvents and other wet processing chemicals now used in surface treatments such as cleaning, activation for bonding, and moisture removal. Plasma treatments are generally accomplished without creating hazardous waste streams to dispose of. Plasma process development and application is ongoing at Allied Signal Inc., Kansas City Division.

  2. Atomic physics and radiation processes in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Salzmann, D.; Takabe, H.; Kato, T.

    1993-08-01

    It is pointed out that atomic and molecular (A/M) processes play important roles in divertor plasmas but the problems related to these processes are not yet studied quantitatively. Recently new subjects related to A/M processes such as plasma-vapor interaction during plasma disruption are presented. This is a brief summary of our discussions. Our recent results of the calculations for the line emissions of carbon atoms in edge plasmas are also included.

  3. Gas Plasma Surface Chemistry for Biological Assays.

    PubMed

    Sahagian, Khoren; Larner, Mikki

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems respond to and interact with surfaces. Gas plasma provides a scalable surface treatment method for designing interactive surfaces. There are many commercial examples of plasma-modified products. These include well plates, filtration membranes, dispensing tools, and medical devices. This chapter presents an overview of gas plasma technology and provides a guide to using gas plasma for modifying surfaces for research or product development. PMID:26160577

  4. Plasma contactor design for electrodynamic tether applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.; Laupa, Thomas G.

    1988-01-01

    The plasma contacting process is described and experiments are discussed that suggest the key role that cold ions play in establishing a low impedance plasma bridge that can conduct current in either direction between a contactor electrode and a dilute plasma. A ring cusp contactor is shown to provide from 1000-mA of electron emission to 500-mA of electron collection as its bias relative to a simulated space plasma is varied through an 80-v range.

  5. Development of a Plasma Panel Muon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Daniel S.; Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Dai, T.; Etzion, E; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Silver, Yiftah; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weaverdyck, Curtis; White, Sebastion; Zhou, Bing

    2010-01-01

    A radiation detector technology based on Plasma Display Panels (PDP), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays is being investigated. Emerging from this well established television technology is the Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS), a novel variant of the micropattern radiation detector. The PPS is fundamentally a fast, high resolution detector comprised of an array of plasma discharge cells operating in a hermetically sealed gas mixture. We report on the PPS development effort, including proof-of-principle results of laboratory signal observations.

  6. Detached plasma in Saturn's front side magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma observations in the outer front side Saturnian magnetosphere are discussed which indicate the existence of dense flux tubes outside the plasma sheets. It is suggested that flux tubes are detached from the plasma sheet by a centifugally driven flute instability. The same instability leads to a dispersal of Titan-injected plasma. It is shown that the detached flux tubes will probably break open as they convect into the nightside magnetotail and lose their content in the form of a planetary wind.

  7. Atypical plasma lipid profiles in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Areeb; Zaid, Muhammad; Munir, Rimsha; Usman, Hina; Kalbacher, Hubert; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Zaidi, Nousheen

    2016-01-15

    Numerous studies have reported alterations in the plasma lipid profiles of leukemia patients. However, there are several inconsistencies in these reports. The present review highlights and compiles findings from different research groups regarding association of plasma lipoprotein levels with the risk of developing leukemia. We have also discussed the clinical significance of plasma lipid profiles in management of leukemia. Furthermore, the potential role of plasma lipids in promoting leukemogenesis is also highlighted. PMID:26549657

  8. Numerical simulation and analysis of plasma turbulence the Large Plasma M. V. Umansky,1,b)

    E-print Network

    Carter, Troy

    is a linear device in which a hot cathode dis- charge is used to produce a plasma on a solenoidal magneticNumerical simulation and analysis of plasma turbulence the Large Plasma Devicea) M. V. Umansky,1,b Plasma Dynamics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547, USA (Received 28 November

  9. PHYSICS DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR ESTIMATING PLASMA PERFORMANCE IN A BURNING PLASMA EXPERIMENT (FIRE)

    E-print Network

    PHYSICS DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR ESTIMATING PLASMA PERFORMANCE IN A BURNING PLASMA EXPERIMENT (FIRE The physics design guidelines for a next step, high- field tokamak, burning plasma experiment (FIRE, Fusion Ignition Research Experiment) have been developed as an update of the ITER Physics Basis (IPB). The plasma

  10. Integrated plasma equipment model for polysilicon etch profiles in an inductively coupled plasma reactor with subwafer

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Integrated plasma equipment model for polysilicon etch profiles in an inductively coupled plasma clamps, is known to impact adjacent feature profiles during plasma etching of microelectronic devices polysilicon etching in an inductively coupled plasma reactor. We find that, when using low conductivity wafers

  11. Plasma torch igniter for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Timothy C.; Obrien, Walter F.; Northam, G. Burton; Eggers, James M.

    1986-01-01

    A small, uncooled plasma torch was developed and used in combination with an injector designed to study ignition and flameholding in hydrogen-fueled supersonic flows. The plasma torch was operated on mixtures of hydrogen and argon with total flows of 10 to 70 scfh. The fuel injector design consisted of five small upstream pilot fuel injectors, a rearward facing step for recirculation, and three main fuel injectors downstream of the step. The plasma torch was located in the recirculation region, and all injection was perpendicular to the Mach 2 stream. Both semi-freejet and ducted tests were conducted. The experimental results indicate that a low power plasma torch operating on a 1:1 volumetric mixture of hygrogen and argon and located in the recirculation zone fueled by the upstream pilot fuel injectors is a good igniter for flow conditions simulating a flight Mach number of 3.7. The total temperature required to autoignite the hydrogen fuel for this injector geometry was 2640 R. The injector configuration was shown to be a good flameholder over a wide range of total temperature. Spectroscopic measurements were used to verify the presence of air total temperatures below 1610 R.

  12. Plasma torch igniter for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Timothy C.; O'Brien, Walter F.; Northam, G. Burton; Eggers, James M.

    1989-01-01

    A small, uncooled plasma torch was developed and used in combination with an injector designed to study ignition and flameholding in hydrogen-fueled supersonic flows. The plasma torch was operated on mixtures of hydrogen and argon with total flows of 10 to 70 scfh. The fuel injector design consisted of five small upstream pilot fuel injectors, a rearward facing step for recirculation, and three main fuel injectors downstream of the step. The plasma torch was located in the recirculation region, and all injection was perpendicular to the Mach 2 stream. Both semi-freejet and ducted tests were conducted. The experimental results indicate that a low power plasma torch operating on a 1:1 volumetric mixture of hydrogen and argon and located in the recirculation zone fueled by the upstream pilot fuel injectors is a good igniter for flow conditions simulating a flight Mach number of 3.7. The total temperature required to autoignite the hydrogen fuel for this injector geometry was 2640 R. The injector configuration was shown to be a good flameholder over a wide range of total temperature. Spectroscopic measurements were used to verify the presence of air total temperatures below 1610 R.

  13. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma ( r / a > 0.5 ) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  14. Burning Plasma Developments Presented to

    E-print Network

    SAC Recommendation on Burning Plasma Experiment* 5) Solid support within a broad scientific community for US will be required. The US scientific community needs to take the lead in articulating the goals of an achievable positioned strategically as a science program, advocacy by the larger scientific community for the next US

  15. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  16. Advances in cold plasma technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens continue to be an issue on a variety of commodities, prompting research into novel interventions. Cold plasma is a nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The prim...

  17. Plasma Spraying Reclaims Compressor Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissler, George W.; Yuhas, John S.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-spraying process used to build up material in worn and pitted areas. Newly applied material remachined to specified surface contours. Effective technique for addition of metal to out-of-tolerance magnesium-alloy turbine-engine compressor housings.

  18. Hydrodynamics of the cascading plasma

    E-print Network

    Alex Buchel

    2009-06-03

    The cascading gauge theory of Klebanov et.al realizes a soluble example of gauge/string correspondence in a non-conformal setting. Such a gauge theory has a strong coupling scale Lambda, below which it confines with a chiral symmetry breaking. A holographic description of a strongly coupled cascading gauge theory plasma is represented by a black brane solution of type IIB supergravity on a conifold with fluxes. A characteristic parameter controlling the high temperature expansion of such plasma is 1/ln(T/Lambda). In this paper we study the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of the cascading gauge theory plasma to order 1/ln(T/Lambda)^4. We find that the bulk viscosity satisfies the bound conjectured in arXiv:0708.3459. We comment on difficulties of computing the transport coefficients to all orders in T/Lambda. Previously, it was shown that a cascading gauge theory plasma undergoes a first-order deconfinement transition with unbroken chiral symmetry at T_c=0.6141111(3) Lambda. We show here that a deconfined chirally symmetric phase becomes perturbatively unstable at T_u=0.8749(0) T_c. Near the unstable point the specific heat diverges as c_V ~ |1-T_u/T|^(-1/2).

  19. Megavolt, Multigigawatt Pulsed Plasma Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma switch proposed for use in high-voltage, high-current pulse power system. Designed not only to out-perform conventional spark-gap switch but also relatively compact and lightweight. Features inverse-pinch configuration to prevent constriction of current sheets into filaments, plus multiple-ring-electrode structure to resist high-voltage breakdown.

  20. Cold plasma decontamination of foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas such as air, oxygen, nitrogen or helium; antimicrobi...

  1. Alcohol consumption and plasma homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Sakuta, Hidenari; Suzuki, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    A few reports show that consumption of spirits and of wine correlate with elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), which is associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. We analyzed the relation between tHcy and current daily ethanol consumption cross-sectionally in middle-aged Japanese men (n = 974, age 51-59 years). Plasma tHcy was positively associated with consumption of whiskey but not with consumption of shochu (Japanese spirits), sake, beer, or wine. Odds ratios of an increase in daily intake of 30 ml ethanol (approximately 1 standard deviation) for hyperhomocysteinemia (>14.0 micromol/l) were 2.58 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-5.14) for whiskey, 1.08 (0.78-1.50) for shochu, 0.99 (0.59-1.66) for sake, 0.98 (0.58-1.63) for beer, and 1.70 (0.31-9.50) for wine in a multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for the daily number of cigarettes smoked, physical activity, vegetable consumption, and serum creatinine levels. After inclusion of plasma folate and vitamin B12 in the multivariate analysis model, the association between whiskey ethanol consumption and hyperhomocysteinemia remained significant with odds ratio of 2.79 (1.36-5.72). These results suggest that whiskey consumption correlates with hyperhomocysteinemia independently of plasma folate or vitamin B12 or lifestyle factors in the population studied. PMID:16584970

  2. Plasmas: Diversity, pervasiveness and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1998-01-01

    When considered inclusively, plasma science and technology encompass immense diversity, pervasiveness and potential: diversity through numerous topical areas (see list of nearly 200 in Table II); pervasiveness with examples covering the full range of energy, time and spatial scale; and potential through innumerable current and future applications.

  3. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOEpatents

    Ballou, Nathan E. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

  4. The Polar Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Randall, R. F.; Odem, D. L.; Remington, S. L.; Averkamp, T. F.; Debower, M. M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Huff, R. L.; Kirchner, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Wave Instrument on the Polar spacecraft is designed to provide measurements of plasma waves in the Earth's polar regions over the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 800 kHz. Three orthogonal electric dipole antennas are used to detect electric fields, two in the spin plane and one aligned along the spacecraft spin axis. A magnetic loop antenna and a triaxial magnetic search coil antenna are used to detect magnetic fields. Signals from these antennas are processed by five receiver systems: a wideband receiver, a high-frequency waveform receiver, a low-frequency waveform receiver, two multichannel analyzers; and a pair of sweep frequency receivers. Compared to previous plasma wave instruments, the Polar plasma wave instrument has several new capabilities. These include (1) an expanded frequency range to improve coverage of both low- and high-frequency wave phenomena, (2) the ability to simultaneously capture signals from six orthogonal electric and magnetic field sensors, and (3) a digital wideband receiver with up to 8-bit resolution and sample rates as high as 249k samples s(exp -1).

  5. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOEpatents

    Ballou, N.E.

    1992-04-14

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  6. TROPIX plasma interactions group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Chock, Ricaurte

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to summarize the spacecraft charging analysis conducted by the plasma interactions group during the period from April 1993 to July 1993, on the proposed TROPIX spacecraft, and to make design recommendations which will limit the detrimental effects introduced by spacecraft charging. The recommendations were presented to the TROPIX study team at a Technical Review meeting held on 15 July 1993.

  7. Plasma Jet Modeling for PLX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Caroline F.; Mason, Rodney J.; Faehl, R. J.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2011-10-01

    The implicit simulation code ePLAS has been applied to plasma jets generated with mini-rail guns for plasma production and compression aimed at use with PLX. The rails are typically planar, 2.5 cm apart and arranged to transport an initial 1 cm or wider vertical plasma fill some 10 cm into a void. The driving magnetic field is 3.2 T. The plasma singly ionized argon at 1017 cm-3. We use ePLAS in both its traditional implicit/hybrid form where it is restricted by an electron Courant time step, and in a new super-hybrid form that extracts the main electron moments from the E&B-field solutions. This provides numerical stability at ion Courant limits, for at least a 10 times larger time step, thus probing microsecond jet dynamics with computational economy. We examine possible field penetration at the cathode and anode gun electrodes. Cathode erosion and EMHD B - Field penetration are possible at lower jet densities. We examine jet transport beyond the gun, modeling possible ionization with either analytic or tabular EOSs. We study the merger of jets with ions represented as either fluids or particles. Work supported by the USDOE under SBIR GRANT DE-SC0004207.

  8. Plasma Melter, Zybek Advanced Products

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The plasma torch melter in Boulder, Colorado exists nowhere else in the world. The mixed and ground rock on the left in a 1-ton bag is fed into the melter to be made into glass. __________ The USGS has created man-made moon dirt, or regolith, to help NASA prepare for upcoming moon explorations. Fo...

  9. Properties of plasma radiation diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Idzorek, G.C.; Oona, H.

    1996-06-01

    A number of diagnostics utilizing the radiation emitted from high-temperature plasmas have been developed at Los Alamos. Photoemissive x-ray diodes with photon energy bandpass filters provide time resolved rough spectral data from bout 6 eV to > 10 keV photon energy. Filtered silicon photodiodes can be used down to 1 eV and offer the advantages of nominally flat response and ability to operate in poor vacuum conditions. Both types of diodes will provide a rough time resolved spectrum and both are relatively inexpensive, reliable, and passive (i.e. no synchronization problems). For higher energy resolution bent crystal spectrographs are used in the x-ray region. With the addition of streak cameras or gated microchannel plates these systems provide data with high energy and high time resolution. To measure the total energy output a thin foil bolometer is used that measures the change in foil resistance as it is heated by the plasma radiation. Information on the physical location of the plasma is provided by a suite of visible framing cameras and x-ray pinhole cameras. By combining these diagnostics into a complementary set good diagnostic information can be guaranteed on any plasma experiment.

  10. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  11. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  12. Temperature Relaxation in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daughton, William

    2000-10-01

    For strongly coupled dense plasmas, where the potential energy exceeds the mean thermal energy, much of traditional plasma physics breaks down and a clear separation between atomic and plasma physics is no longer possible. In these difficult regimes, there are a variety of reasons to question the validity of Spitzer-type relaxation rates and transport coefficients. In particular, the problem of temperature relaxation between ions and electrons is of fundamental importance for these regimes. In this work, the energy exchange rate is calculated using a modified Ziman approach, a technique which has been used extensively to compute the electrical resistivity in liquid metals and dense plasmas. The necessary correlation functions and interaction potentials are computed using a simplified density functional theory. The theoretical description amounts to a self-consistent coupling between Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory to describe the electrons and the hypernetted chain theory to describe strong ion correlations. Comparisons are made with the Spitzer coefficient over an interesting range of parameters.

  13. Presented to Plasma Physics Group

    E-print Network

    FIRE D. Meade Presented to Plasma Physics Group August 24, 2001 FIRE Lighting the Way to Fusion by FESAC August 2, 2001 3. The US Fusion Energy Sciences Program should establish a proactive US plan not select among them. The workshop would further confirm that a critical mass of fusion scientists believe

  14. Vacuum arc plasma mass separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperny, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.; Lebedev, N. V.; Astrakchantsev, N. V.; Chernikch, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    The propagation of a metal plasma flow in a transport system with a curvilinear magnetic field was studied experimentally. The flow was generated by a pulsed vacuum arc discharge with a composite (W+Fe) cathode. The ion energy measurements at the transport system output showed that all ion components were accelerated up to equal energies per charge unit, about 150 eV and 320 eV in the outer and inner areas of the curved plasma flow, respectively. The spatial separation of the atoms of the cathode material was measured at the system output by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The ions of the lighter element (Fe) were concentrated in the inner part of the cathodic plasma flow deflected by the magnetic field while the distribution of the heavy element (W) was substantially shifted toward the outer area of the flow. The maximum mass separation efficiency reached 45, the effective value being 7.7. Such a system is promising for use in plasma technology for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, namely for the separation of the heavy radioactive fission product from nuclear waste.

  15. Geometry of thermal plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Da; Noble, A.

    2009-01-22

    We develop a method for investigating the relationship between the shape of a 1-particle distribution and non-linear electrostatic oscillations in a collisionless plasma, incorporating transverse thermal motion. A general expression is found for the maximum sustainable electric field, and is evaluated for a particular highly anisotropic distribution.

  16. Helping Teachers Teach Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Donald

    2008-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's E/O program in Fusion Science and Plasma Physics now includes both `pre-service' as well as `in-service' high school science teacher professional development activities. Teachers are instructed and mentored by `master teachers' and LLNL plasma researchers working in concert. The Fusion/Plasma E/O program exploits a unique science education partnership that exists between LLNL's Science Education Program and the UC Davis Edward Teller Education Center. For `in-service' teachers, the Fusion & Astrophysics Teacher Research Academy (TRA) has four levels of workshops that are designed to give in-service high school science teachers experience in promoting and conducting research, most notably in the filed of plasma spectroscopy. Participating teachers in all four TRA levels may earn up to ten units of graduate credit from Cal-State University East Bay, and may apply these units toward a Masters of Science in Education. For `pre-service' teachers, the Science Teacher and Researcher (STAR) program, as a partnership with the California State University System, includes attracting undergraduate science majors to teaching careers by allowing them to pursue professional identities as both a research scientist as well as a science teacher. Participating `pre-service' STAR students are provided research internships at LLNL and work closely with the `in-service' TRA teachers. Results from the continuum `pre-service' to `in-service' science teacher professional development programs will be presented.

  17. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    DOEpatents

    Motley, Robert W. (Princeton, NJ); Glanz, James (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1985-01-01

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  18. Master Thesis: Fusion Plasma Thermal Transport

    E-print Network

    Master Thesis: Fusion Plasma Thermal Transport Radial and Poloidal Profile Modeling Martin Olesen-axis localised ion cyclotron resonance heating source. 2. Cold pulse shock induction at the plasma edge via laser wave propagation from heat modulation and the fast propagation of a cold pulse, at the same plasma

  19. Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cold. The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) collaborates to develop fusion as a safe, clean and abundant energy source for the future. This video discusses PPPL's research and development on plasma, the fourth state of matter.

  20. Plasma quiescence in a reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jerde, L.; Friedman, S.; Carr, W.; Seidl, M.

    1980-02-01

    A thermionic cathode reflex discharge and the plasma it produces are studied. It is found that extremely quiescent plasmas can be produced when the electron-loss rate due to classical diffusion is equal to the ion-loss rate. Particle and power balances for the quiescent plasma are obtained, and the average electron energy loss per ion produced is determined.