Science.gov

Sample records for plasma research experiment

  1. Lab- and space-based researchers discuss plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Yamada, M.

    Plasma physics provides a common language and set of approaches that tie together all scientists who study the acceleration, transport, and loss processes of the plasma state. Some years ago, researchers from the laboratory and space research communities suggested a workshop to bring together the diverse researchers in the respective fields. A series of workshops on the “Interrelationship between Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and Space” (IPELS) was established, and the third meeting was held July 24-28, 1995, in the beautiful and historic town of Pitlochry in the Scottish Highlands.The conference reestablished the critical point that plasma physics is an important but surprisingly diversified research discipline. Meetings attendees discussed a number of new approaches to plasma research, including novel diagnostic techniques for use in space, such as active antennas and electric field sounding devices. Detailed discussions covered spacecraft-plasma environment interactions, including vehicle charging and neutral gas release; fundamental aspects of industrial application of dusty plasmas and waves in dusty plasmas; a very distinctive phase transition of coulomb crystals (from solid state to liquid state) in dusty plasmas; and terrella experiments to simulate and study chaotic transport in the ionosphere.

  2. Advanced Tokamak Plasmas in the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Kessel; D. Meade; D.W. Swain; P. Titus; M.A. Ulrickson

    2003-10-13

    The Advanced Tokamak (AT) capability of the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) burning plasma experiment is examined with 0-D systems analysis, equilibrium and ideal-MHD stability, radio-frequency current-drive analysis, and full discharge dynamic simulations. These analyses have identified the required parameters for attractive burning AT plasmas, and indicate that these are feasible within the engineering constraints of the device.

  3. Preliminary Pioneer 10 encounter results from the Ames Research Center plasma analyzer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. H.; Collard, H. R.; Mihalov, J. D.; Intriligator, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary results from the Ames Research Center plasma analyzer experiment for the Pioneer 10 Jupiter encounter indicate that Jupiter has a detached bow shock and magnetopause similar to the case at Earth but much larger in spatial extent. In contrast to Earth, Jupiter's outer magnetosphere appears to be highly inflated by thermal plasma and therefore highly responsive in size to changes in solar wind dynamic pressure.

  4. Physics Basis and Simulation of Burning Plasma Physics for the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Kessel; D. Meade; S.C. Jardin

    2002-01-18

    The FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] design for a burning plasma experiment is described in terms of its physics basis and engineering features. Systems analysis indicates that the device has a wide operating space to accomplish its mission, both for the ELMing H-mode reference and the high bootstrap current/high beta advanced tokamak regimes. Simulations with 1.5D transport codes reported here both confirm and constrain the systems projections. Experimental and theoretical results are used to establish the basis for successful burning plasma experiments in FIRE.

  5. Energetic particle physics in fusion research in preparation for burning plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Pinches, S. D.; Toi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics in fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by Heidbrink and Sadler (1994 Nucl. Fusion 34 535). That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the ‘sea’ of Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs), in particular by the toroidicity-induced AE (TAE) modes and reversed shear AEs (RSAEs). In the present paper we attempt a broad review of the progress that has been made in EP physics in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus), including stellarator/helical devices. Introductory discussions on the basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e., particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others, are given to help understanding of the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues related to the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  6. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  7. Experiments with nonneutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Selected experiments with nonneutral plasmas are discussed. These include the laser cooling of a pure ion plasma to a crystalline state, a measurement of the Salpeter enhancement factor for fusion in a strongly correlated plasma and the measurement of thermally excited plasma waves. Also, discussed are experiments that demonstrate Landau damping, trapping and plasma wave echoes in the 2D ExB drift flow of a pure electron plasma, which is isomorphic to the 2D ideal flow (incompressible and inviscid flow) of a neutral fluid.

  8. Plasma contactor research - 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholtz, Brett; Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    A report describing the operating principles of hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors emitting or collecting electrons from an ambient plasma is summarized. Preliminary experiments conducted to determine the noise generated by these plasma contactors in the emission-current return line and in the plasma near it are described. These noise data are measured as current fluctuations in the return line and to the Langmuir probe and then analyzed using a fast Fourier transform technique. The spectral compositions of the data are characterized using power spectral density plots which are examined to identify possible noise source(s) and production mechanism(s). The precautions taken in the construction and calibration of the instrumentation to assure adequate frequency response are described. Experimental results show that line-current noise levels are typically 2 percent of the electron current being emitted or collected. However, noise levels increase to as much as 20 percent of the electron current at a few electron-collection operating conditions. The frequencies associated with most of the noise were harmonics of the 60 Hz input to system power supplies. Plasma noise had characteristics similar in magnitude and frequency to those for the return-line noise, but they contained additional features at frequencies considered to be related to ion-acoustic instabilities. Also discussed is a new probe positioning system built to facilitate future plasma-contractor research.

  9. Study of energetic particle dynamics in Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX) on Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhibin, W.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, X.; Xiao, C.; Zheng, J.; E, P.; Ji, H.; Ding, W.; Lu, Q.; Ren, Y.; Mao, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Chijie Xiao2, Jinxing Zheng3, Peng E1, Hantao Ji1,5, Weixing Ding4, Quaming Lu6, Y. Ren1,5, Aohua Mao11 Laboratory for Space Environment and Physical Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China 150001 2 State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics & Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China 100871 3ASIPP, Hefei, China, 230031 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 6University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, 230026 A new terrella device for laboratory studies of space physics relevant to the inner magnetospheric plasmas, Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX), is scheduled to be built at Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China. HDX is one of two essential parts of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), which is a major national research facility for space physics studies. HDX is designed to provide a laboratory experimental platform to reproduce the earth's magnetospheric structure for investigations on the mechanism of acceleration/loss and wave-particle interaction of energetic particles in radiation belt, and on the influence of magnetic storms on the inner magnetosphere. It can be operated together with Harbin Reconnection eXperiment (HRX), which is another part of SPERF, to study the fundamental processes during interactions between solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. In this presentation, the scientific goals and experimental plans for HDX, together with the means applied to generate the plasma with desired parameters, including multiple plasma sources and different kinds of coils with specific functions, as well as advanced diagnostics designed to be equipped to the facility for multi-functions, are reviewed. Three typical scenarios of HDX with operations of various coils and plasma sources to study specific physical processes in space plasmas will also be

  10. Plasma stabilization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sziklas, E. A.; Fader, W. J.; Jong, R. A.; Stufflebeam, J. H.

    1980-07-01

    The plasma stabilization experiment is an effort to enhance stability in a mirror-confined plasma by trapping cold ions with rf fields applied near the mirror throats. Nagoya Type 3 antennas, coupled to a 60 kW rf power supply are mounted in the throats of the UTRC baseball magnet. An external washer gun provides a source of plasma for both streaming and confined plasma tests. Results show a strong stoppering effect on streaming plasmas and a marginal effect on confined plasmas. Theoretical calculations provide an explanation for the experimental observations. The field generates a ponderomotive force acting on the electrons. The resultant improvement in electron confinement changes the ambipolar potential and inhibits the flow of ions through the mirror throat. Criteria are derived for the validity of this trapping concept. The requisite field strengths are significantly lower than those required to trap ions directly. Scaling laws are developed for application of cold ion trapping to large mirror devices containing dense plasmas. The use of slow-wave antenna structures operated at frequencies above the lower hybrid frequency is recommended for these applications.

  11. Plasma and magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research activities on the following topics were summarized: (1) software for the Space Plasma computer Analysis Network (SPAN), (2) plasmaspheric field-aligned temperature gradients, (3) the shift in spacecraft potential as a function of plasma density, (4) plasma flow, (5) the Fabry-Perot interferometer, and (6) the Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP).

  12. Experiment of THz transmission through plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jinhai; Gallacher, Jordan; Issac, Riju; Huang, Zhixun; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2014-12-01

    Research on terahertz wave transmission through plasma is significant for researches on plasma itself and transmission discipline of terahertz wave through plasma. It is possible for plasma with suitable density to be an available stealth outerwear for plane or missile in THz waveband. In this paper, plasma is gotten by ionizing inert gases such as argon and helium gases with pulsed high alternating voltage. With electro-optic pump-probe measurement, THz transmission phenomena through plasma have been studied. The experiments show that some parts of THz frequency components have been cut off by plasma, and with the density of plasma rising, the starting frequency of THz prohibited by plasma is going higher. Experiments also provide an assistant scheme for plasma diagnose with terahertz technique.

  13. Space plasma physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    During the course of this grant, work was performed on a variety of topics and there were a number of significant accomplishments. A summary of these accomplishments is included. The topics studied include empirical model data base, data reduction for archiving, semikinetic modeling of low energy plasma in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, O(+) outflows, equatorial plasma trough, and plasma wave ray-tracing studies. A list of publications and presentations which have resulted from this research is also included.

  14. Experiments on Cryogenic Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, O.; Sekine, W.; Kubota, J.; Uotani, N.; Chikasue, M.; Shindo, M.

    2009-11-10

    Experiments on a cryogenic complex plasma have been performed. Preliminary experiments include production of a plasma in a liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by a pulsed discharge. The extended production of a plasma has been realized in a vapor of liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by rf discharge. The charge of dust particles injected in such a plasma has been studied in detail.

  15. Pioneer 11 encounter - Preliminary results from the Ames Research Center plasma analyzer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Collard, H. R.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Wolfe, J. H.; Intriligator, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    Pioneer 11 observations of the interaction of Jupiter's magnetosphere with the distant solar wind have confirmed the earlier Pioneer 10 observations of the great size and extreme variability of the outer magnetosphere. The nature of the plasma transitions across Jupiter's bow shock and magnetopause as observed on Pioneer 10 have also been confirmed on Pioneer 11. However, the northward direction of the Pioneer 11 outbound trajectory and the distance of the final magnetopause crossing (80 Jupiter radii) now suggest that Jupiter's magnetosphere is extremely broad with a half-thickness (normal to the ecliptic plane in the noon meridian) which is comparable to or greater than the sunward distance to the nose.

  16. Hard X-ray and Particle Beams Research on 1.7 MA Z-pinch and Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Ishor; Kantsyrev, Victor; Safronova, Alla; Esaulov, Andrey; Nishio, Mineyuki; Shlyaptseva, Veronica; Keim, Steven; Weller, Michael; Stafford, Austin; Petkov, Emil; Schultz, Kimberly; Cooper, Matthew; PPDL Team

    2013-10-01

    Studies of hard x-ray (HXR) emission, electron and ion beam generation in z-pinch and laser plasmas are important for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and development of HXR sources from K-shell and L-shell radiation. The characteristics of HXR and particle beams produced by implosions of planar wire arrays, nested and single cylindrical wire arrays, and X-pinches were analyzed on 100 ns UNR Zebra generator with current up to 1.7 MA. In addition, the comparison of characteristics of HXR and electron beams on Zebra and 350 fs UNR Leopard laser experiments with foils has been performed. The diagnostics include Faraday cups, HXR diodes, different x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems, and ion mass spectrometer using the technique of Thomson parabola. Future work on HXRs and particle beams in HED plasmas is discussed. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. This work was also supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno.

  17. Railgun plasma armature characterisation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, D. D.

    1984-05-01

    A plasma armature characterization experiment (PACE) is described. The PACE device is designed to study the plasma armature of railguns and yields information on properties such as temperature, pressure, densities, plasma potential, and ion species with their degrees of ionization. The main experimental studies are by spectroscopy of the light emitted and by Langmuir probes. The device simulates the plasma moving behind the projectile in a railgun by a static plasma held by electromagnetic forces against a fixed wall. Results to date demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and indicate improvements to the device which ensure that much useful information on railgun plasmas is forthcoming.

  18. Plasma contactor research, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probes were used to measure plasma potential profiles, plasma densities, electron energy distributions, and plasma noise levels near a hollow cathode-based plasma contactor emitting electrons. The effects of electron emission current (100 to 1500 mA) and contactor flowrate (2 to 10 sccm (Xenon)) on these data are examined. Retarding potential analyzer (RPA) measurements showing that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted are also presented, and a mechanism by which this occurs is postulated. This mechanism, which involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice, results in a region of high positive space charge and high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggests that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this potential hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a simple one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and is shown to agree qualitatively with these observations. Experimental results of the first stage of bilateral cooperation with the Italian Institute of Interplanetary Space Physics (IFSI CNR) are presented. Sharp, well-defined double layers were observed downstream of a contactor collecting electrons from an ambient plasma created in the IFSI Facility. The voltage drop across these double layers was observed to increase with the current drawn from the ambient plasma. This observation, which was not as clear in previous IFSI tests conducted at higher neutral pressures, is in agreement with previous experimental observations made at both Colorado State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. Greater double layer voltage drops, multiple double layers, and higher noise levels in the region near the double layers were also observed when a magnetic field was imposed and oriented perpendicular to the

  19. A Plasma, Magnetorotational Instability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C.; Forest, C. B.; Kendrick, R.; Seltzman, A.

    2007-11-01

    A new experiment is underway at the University of Wisconsin to investigate the magnetorotational instability in a plasma. Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a likely mechanism that could account for the observed accretion rates in astrophysical objects. The instability occurs when a weak magnetic field is present, so that tension in perturbed field lines transfers angular momentum outward while mass moves towards the center. In the Plasma Dynamo Experiment Prototype, a cylindrical, axisymmetric, ring cusp confinement geometry is used to produce a large unmagnetized plasma, confined by a highly localized magnetic field at the plasma boundary. The plasma is stirred by a novel axisymmetric electrode set that can control the rotation (angular momentum profile). The feasibility of observing the MRI will be discussed and initial results from a protoype experiment will be presented.

  20. Status of the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Kendrick, Roch; Forest, Cary

    2010-11-01

    Construction is underway to build a new experimental facility for investigating self-generation of magnetic fields in plasma and a broader range of flow driven MHD instabilities. The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) consists of a 3 meter diameter spherical vacuum chamber lined with a series of high strength neodymium permanent magnet rings in a cusp confinement geometry which provides for a large, unmagnetized and hot plasma. Plasma will be produced by a combination of lanthanum hexaboride cathodes and electron cyclotron heating. The plasma will be stirred from the magnetized edge via electrode and ExB flows. This poster will (1) give an overview of the physics goals and required plasma parameters, (2) describe the engineering design of the facility including laboratory infrastructure, vacuum chamber, diagnostics, and heating systems, and (3) give a status report on the construction schedule. The construction is being funded by the NSF Major Research Instrumentation program.

  1. Status of the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Collins, Cami; Katz, Noam; Weisberg, Dave; Forest, Cary

    2012-10-01

    Construction of the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is complete. This facility creates large, un-magnetized, fast flowing, hot plasma for investigating magnetic field self-generation and flow driven MHD instabilities. A 3 meter diameter spherical vacuum chamber lined with a series of high strength samarium cobalt magnets provides plasma confinement. The plasma will be stirred from the magnetized edge using electrodes to produce JxB flows. Plasma sources will include lanthanum hexaboride cathodes and electron cyclotron heating utilizing five 20KW magnetrons. This poster will describe the operational status of the facility including laboratory infrastructure, cast aluminum vacuum chamber, magnets, stirring electrodes, sources, diagnostics and currently produced plasma parameters. Construction was funded by the NSF Major Research Instrumentation program.

  2. Experimental Plasma Research project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  3. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  4. Optimizing Field-Reversed Configuration Plasmas for Plasma Compression Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, C.; Degnan, J. H.; Amdahl, D. J.; Domonkos, M.; Ruden, E. L.; White, W.; Wurden, G. A.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Camacho, J. F.; Coffey, S. K.; Kostora, M.; McCullough, J.; Sommars, W.; Kiuttu, G. F.; Lynn, A. G.; Yates, K.; Bauer, B. S.; Fuelling, S.; Pahl, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Field-Reversed Configuration Heating Experiment (FRCHX) is a collaborative experiment between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study high energy density plasmas and various associated phenomena. With FRCHX, a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma is formed via reversed-field theta pinch and then translated a short distance into a cylindrical aluminum shell (solid liner), where it is either compressed by the magnetically-driven implosion of the shell or diagnosed in preparation for such compression tests. The lifetime of the trapped magnetic flux within the FRC is an important parameter affecting the confinement of plasma during the compression and ultimately the final density, temperature, and yield of neutrons from the plasma. Processes occurring during formation, initial plasma temperature, and instabilities in turn all affect the trapped-flux lifetime and the integrity of the FRC. A discussion of FRC parameters measured on FRCHX and efforts that have been made to improve these parameters and the FRC stability will be presented in connection with results from recent FRCHX experiments. This work is supported by DOE-OFES.

  5. Space plasma contractor research, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Results of experiments conducted on hollow cathode-based plasma contractors are reported. Specific tests in which attempts were made to vary plasma conditions in the simulated ionospheric plasma are described. Experimental results showing the effects of contractor flowrate and ion collecting surface size on contactor performance and contactor plasma plume geometry are presented. In addition to this work, one-dimensional solutions to spherical and cylindircal space-charge limited double-sheath problems are developed. A technique is proposed that can be used to apply these solutions to the problem of current flow through elongated double-sheaths that separate two cold plasmas. Two conference papers which describe the essential features of the plasma contacting process and present data that should facilitate calibration of comprehensive numerical models of the plasma contacting process are also included.

  6. Plasma theory and simulation research

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Our research group uses both theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of instabilities, heating, diffusion, transport and other phenomena in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation, both theoretically and practically. Our focus has been more and more on the plasma edge (the sheath''), interactions with boundaries, leading to simulations of whole devices (someday a numerical tokamak).

  7. Plasma and magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Several programs and variations have been developed to determine statistical means of different plasma parameters when binned in different variables. These parameters include temperature, densities and spacecraft potentials for any of the ion species, as well as ratios of these variables for any other ion species to the corresponding variable for H(+). The variables for binning include L, radial distance, and geomagnetic latitude; and separate statistics are automatically run for local morning and local evening data. These programs all run from output files from the plasma parameter thin sheath analysis program. A variant program also bins for magnetic activity, using either Kp or Dst, which requires an additional magnetic activity input file. These programs can be run either interactively or in batch mode, using file listings generated by a DIRECTORY command. In addition to printed output, these programs generate output files which can be used to plot the results. Programs to plot these averaged data are under development.

  8. High temperature UF6 and plasma research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Research currently under way on technology for uranium plasma core reactors is reviewed. A feeder system to provide a controlled and steady flow of UF6 at rates up to 5 g/sec and temperatures up to 500 K into rf plasma test chambers operating at pressures of up to 20 atm has been developed. Plasma emission and dye laser absorption measurements have been used to estimate the radial distribution of uranium atom number density within the plasma. X-ray absorption equipment and techniques have also been employed to measure the amount of uranium in the plasma, and dc plasma torch experiments have shown variations in plasma VUV emission with temperature. Analysis of residues deposited on various test-chamber components after plasma tests reveals traces of several uranium oxides, including UO2F2, and various exhaust duct configurations with flow augmentation are under investigation as means of preventing uranium deposition. Other areas of research include off- and on-line exhaust gas diagnostics, and a UF6/Ar injection, separation and recirculation system.

  9. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  10. Research in plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Three aspects of barium ion cloud dynamics are discussed. First, the effect of the ratio of ion cloud conductivity to background ionospheric conductivity on the motion of barium ion clouds is investigated and compared with observations of barium ion clouds. This study led to the suggestion that the conjugate ionosphere participates in the dynamics of barium ion clouds. Second, analytic work on the deformation of ion clouds is presented. Third, a linearized stability theory was extended to include the effect of the finite extent of an ion cloud, as well as the effect of the ratio of ion cloud to ionospheric conductivities. The stability properties of a plasma with contra-streaming ion beams parallel to a magnetic field are investigated. The results are interpreted in terms of parameters appropriate for collisionless shock waves. It is found that this particular instability can be operative only if the up-stream Alfven Mach number exceeds 5.5.

  11. Space plasma research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Four basic areas were covered: development of analysis techniques and software and numerical simulations; data analysis and interpretation; spacecraft sheath studies; and laboratory studies. The important details were documented in terms of either appropriate software documentation or publication in referred publication, conference proceeding and technical reports. The major accomplishments are summarized, followed by a chronological listing of the publications and presentations which resulted from the research.

  12. Interdisciplinary research with complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morfill, G. E.; Ivlev, A. V.; Brandt, P.; Loewen, H.

    2010-06-16

    In this topical review we combine results of research from the field of complex plasmas and colloidal dispersions. This research has opened the way to study strong coupling phenomena in real space and time at the most fundamental kinetic level. The physics of complex plasmas is dominated by the dynamics of slow moving and individually visible microparticles. In contrast to colloidal suspensions, where the fluid background medium results in huge overdamping, the neutral gas background medium in complex plasmas introduces only very little damping so that processes at all relevant time scales can be studied. This is of particular importance for some of the most outstanding questions in the self-organization of matter and critical phenomena.

  13. [Plasma properties research: Task 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The principal research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division relate to magnetic fusion plasma physics. In addition, there is a modest amount of work in closely related areas, including space plasma physics, fluid dynamics, and dynamical systems. Members of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division maintain close contacts with fusion researchers in the US and abroad. Some of the work of the Division is clearly directed towards ITER and TPX, while other problems relate to the broader development of fusion plasma physics and to the support of other issues arising in the many experimental programs. Topics of some note in the last year that are discussed in this report are: Application of sophisticated statistical techniques to tokamak data reduction, including time series analysis of TFTR fluctuation data and spline analysis of profile data. Continuing development of edge plasma and divertor modelling, including initial ergodic divertor studies. Analysis of energetic fusion products losses from TFTR plasmas. Examination of anomalous transport in dynamical systems induced by chaotic-like Hamiltonian motion. Numerical simulation of the development of singular MHD equilibria. Exploration of the validity of moment expansions of kinetic equations for weakly collisional systems. Studies of RF- and ripple-induced helium ash removal. Ballooning mode studies in fluids and rotating stars. Studies in dynamical systems, including explosive instabilities, development of chaos, and motion of collisionless particles in a domain with overlapping islands.

  14. [Plasma properties research: Task 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The principal research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division relate to magnetic fusion plasma physics. In addition, there is a modest amount of work in closely related areas, including space plasma physics, fluid dynamics, and dynamical systems. Members of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division maintain close contacts with fusion researchers in the US and abroad. Some of the work of the Division is clearly directed towards ITER and TPX, while other problems relate to the broader development of fusion plasma physics and to the support of other issues arising in the many experimental programs. Topics of some note in the last year that are discussed in this report are: Application of sophisticated statistical techniques to tokamak data reduction, including time series analysis of TFTR fluctuation data and spline analysis of profile data. Continuing development of edge plasma and divertor modelling, including initial ergodic divertor studies. Analysis of energetic fusion products losses from TFTR plasmas. Examination of anomalous transport in dynamical systems induced by chaotic-like Hamiltonian motion. Numerical simulation of the development of singular MHD equilibria. Exploration of the validity of moment expansions of kinetic equations for weakly collisional systems. Studies of RF- and ripple-induced helium ash removal. Ballooning mode studies in fluids and rotating stars. Studies in dynamical systems, including explosive instabilities, development of chaos, and motion of collisionless particles in a domain with overlapping islands.

  15. Research briefing on contemporary problems in plasma science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of the broad perspective of all plasma science. Detailed discussions are given of scientific opportunities in various subdisciplines of plasma science. The first subdiscipline to be discussed is the area where the contemporary applications of plasma science are the most widespread, low temperature plasma science. Opportunities for new research and technology development that have emerged as byproducts of research in magnetic and inertial fusion are then highlighted. Then follows a discussion of new opportunities in ultrafast plasma science opened up by recent developments in laser and particle beam technology. Next, research that uses smaller scale facilities is discussed, first discussing non-neutral plasmas, and then the area of basic plasma experiments. Discussions of analytic theory and computational plasma physics and of space and astrophysical plasma physics are then presented.

  16. Experiences of Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration,…

  17. Dense Plasma Injection Experiment at MCX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun-Kaymak, I.; Messer, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Case, A.; Clary, R.; Ellis, R.; Elton, R.; Hassam, A.; Teodorescu, C.; Witherspoon, D.; Young, W.

    2009-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the High Density Plasma Injection Experiment at the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX). HyperV Technologies Corp. has designed, built, and installed a prototype coaxial gun to drive rotation in MCX. This gun has been designed to avoid the blow-by instability via a combination of electrode shaping and a tailored plasma armature. An array of diagnostics indicates the gun is capable of plasma jets with a mass of 160 μg at 70 km/s with an average plasma density above 1015 cm-3. Preliminary measurements are underway at MCX to understand the penetration of the plasma jet through the MCX magnetic field and the momentum transfer from the jet to the MCX plasma. Data will be presented for a wide range of MCX field parameters, and the prospects for future injection experiments will be evaluated.

  18. Research Status of IEC Experiments at NASA Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris; Hrbud, Ivana; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of IEC (Inertial Electrostatic Confinement) research and experiments at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics covered include: apparatus involvement, iec schematics, iec plasma images, iec deuterium experiments, thomson scattering, detector options and experiment results.

  19. Using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to evaluate ITER PFC safety. [Plasma-Facing Components

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A. ); Bartlit, J.R. ); Causey, R.A. ); Haines, J.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment was assembled at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore to investigate interactions between dense plasmas at low energies and plasma-facing component materials. This apparatus has the unique capability of replicating plasma conditions in a tokamak divertor with particle flux densities of 2 [times] 10[sup 19] ions/cm[sup 2] [center dot] s and a plasma temperature of about 15 eV using a plasma that includes tritium. With the closure of the Tritium Research Laboratory at Livermore, the experiment was moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. An experimental program has been initiated there using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to examine safety issues related to tritium in plasma-facing components, particularly the ITER divertor. Those issues include tritium retention and release characteristics, tritium permeation rates and transient times to coolant streams, surface modification and erosion by the plasma, the effects of thermal loads and cycling, and particulate production. A considerable lack of data exists in these areas for many of the materials, especially beryllium, being considered for use in ITER. Not only will basic material behavior with respect to safety issues in the divertor environment be examined, but innovative techniques for optimizing performance with respect to tritium safety by material modification and process control will be investigated. Supplementary experiments will be carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory to expand and clarify results obtained on the Tritium Plasma Experiment.

  20. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 M A , 100 n s current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μ m Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ˜1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μ s current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics.

  1. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 MA, 100 ns current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μm Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ∼1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μs current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics. PMID:25679726

  2. Microwave Plasma Window Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, Andrew; Zheng, Peng; Franzi, Matthew; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Plasma, Pulsed Power,; Microwave Laboratory Team

    2011-10-01

    The microwave plasma window is an experiment designed to promote RF breakdown in a controlled vacuum-gas environment using a DC bias. Experimental data has shown that this DC bias will significantly reduce the RF power required to yield breakdown, a feature also shown in recent simulation. The cross-polarized conducting array is biased at (100's V) DC on the surface of a Lucite vacuum window. Microwave power is supplied to the window's surface by a single 1-kW magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz CW. The goal of this project is to establish controllable characteristics relating vacuum pressure, DC bias, RF power required for surface breakdown, as well as RF transmission after the formation of plasma. Experimental data will be compared with multipactor susceptibility curves generated using a Monte Carlo simulation which incorporates an applied DC bias and finite pressures of air and argon. Research supported by an AFOSR grant on the Basic Physics of Distributed Plasma Discharge, AFRL, L-3 Communications, and Northrop Grumman.

  3. PlasmaLab/EkoPlasma - The Future of Complex Plasma Research in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapek, Christina; Fortov, Vladimir; Huber, Peter; Mohr, Daniel; Konopka, Uwe; Lipaev, Andrey; Molotkov, Vladimir; Petrov, Oleg; Zähringer, Erich; Thomas, Hubertus

    2016-07-01

    The PlasmaLab project, a Russian-German cooperation, has the aim to develop a future laboratory for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS). Within the project, a new plasma chamber, the Zyflex chamber, has been developed and is now being prepared to be launched to the ISS in 2020 as a laboratory setup with the name EkoPlasma (Experiment komplex Plasma). The Zyflex chamber is a large, cylindrical plasma chamber with parallel, rf-driven electrodes and a flexible inner geometry. It is designed to extend the accessible experimental parameter range and to allow an independent control of the plasma parameters, therefore increasing the experimental possibilities and expected knowledge gain significantly. Further, a 3D optical diagnostic will allow for the study of particle dynamics in 3D realtime. Possible future research topics include e.g. phase transitions, the dynamics of liquids, phase separation, or turbulence. The experimental setup will be presented, as well as some preliminary results of experiments on earth and in parabolic flights to visualize the possibilities of this new laboratory. This work and some of the authors are funded by DLR/BMWi (FKZ 50WM1441).

  4. Plasma MRI Experiments at UW-Madison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, K.; Clark, M.; Desangles, V.; Siller, R.; Wallace, J.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments for driving Keplerian-like flow profiles on both the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U) and the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) user facility are described. Instead of driving flow at the boundaries, as is typical in many liquid metal Couette experiments, a global drive is implemented. A large radial current is drawn across a small axial field generating torque across the whole profile. This global electrically driven flow is capable of producing profiles similar to Keplerian flow. PCX-U has been purposely constructed for MRI experiments, while similar experiments on the WiPAL device show the versatility of the user facility and provide a larger plasma volume. Numerical calculations show the predicted parameter spaces for exciting the MRI in these plasmas and the equilibrium flow profiles expected. In both devices, relevant MRI parameters appear to be within reach of typical operating characteristics.

  5. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  6. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-21

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  7. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 1017 cm-3 has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  8. Ballistic piston fissioning plasma experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. E.; Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.; Lalos, G. T.

    1971-01-01

    The production of fissioning uranium plasma samples such that the fission fragment stopping distance is less than the dimensions of the plasma is approached by using a ballistic piston device for the compression of uranium hexafluoride. The experimental apparatus is described. At room temperature the gun can be loaded up to 100 torr UF6 partial pressure, but at compression a thousand fold increase of pressure can be obtained at a particle density on the order of 10 to the 19th power per cu cm. Limited spectral studies of UF6 were performed while obtaining the pressure-volume data. The results obtained and their implications are discussed.

  9. Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE) is to investigate, by means of a shuttle-based flight experiment and relevant ground-based testing, the arcing and current collection behavior of materials and geometries likely to be exposed to the LEO plasma on high-voltage space power systems, in order to minimize adverse environmental interactions. An overview of the SAMPIE program is presented in outline and graphical form.

  10. Argonne Plasma Engineering Experiment (APEX) Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.H.; Balka, L.J.; Kulovitz, E.E.; Magill, S.R.; McGhee, D.G.; Moretti, A.; Praeg, W.F.

    1981-03-01

    The Argonne Plasma Engineering Experiment (APEX) Tokamak was designed to provide hot plasmas for reactor-relevant experiments with rf heating (current drive) and plasma wall experiments, principally in-situ low-Z wall coating and maintenance. The device, sized to produce energetic plasmas at minimum cost, is small (R = 51 cm, r = 15 cm) but capable of high currents (100 kA) and long pulse durations (100 ms). A design using an iron central core with no return legs, pure tension tapewound toroidal field coils, digital radial position control, and UHV vacuum technology was used. Diagnostics include monochrometers, x-ray detectors, and a microwave interferometer and radiometer for density and temperature measurements. Stable 100 ms shots were produced with electron temperatures in the range 500 to 1000 eV. Initial results included studies of thermal desorption and recoating of wall materials.

  11. Argonne plasma wake-field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cole, B.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Norem, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1989-03-14

    Four years after the initial proposal of the Plasma Wake-field Accelerator (PWFA), it continues to be the object of much investigation, due to the promise of the ultra-high accelerating gradients that can exist in relativistic plasma waves driven in the wake of charged particle beams. These wake-fields are of interest both in the laboratory, for acceleration and focusing of electrons and positrons in future linear colliders, and in nature as a possible cosmic ray acceleration mechanism. The purpose of the present work is to review the recent experimental advances made in PWFA research at Argonne National Laboratory. Some of the topics discussed are: the Argonne Advanced Accelerator Test Facility; linear plasma wake-field theory; measurement of linear plasma wake-fields; review of nonlinear plasma wave theory; and experimental measurement of nonlinear plasma wake-fields. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  13. Complex plasma research on ISS past, present, and future facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurig, R.; Morfill, G.; Fortov, V.; Hofmann, P.

    2007-11-01

    The research in dusty plasma, also known as complex plasma, under prolonged microgravity condition took its first steps in 1998 onboard the Russian Space Station MIR: cosmonauts Vladimir Solovyov and Pavel Vinogradov conducted the first experiments to obtain plasma-dust crystals in the 'Plazmennyi Kristall 1'(PK-1) device using the sun as a 'natural' ionization source. This experiment was followed afterwards by the PK-2 already utilizing its own DC plasma generator. A major step came only three years later with the PKE-Nefedov facility (formerly called PKE-3). Launched in February 2001 and operated in over 13 missions for five consecutive years in the Russian Segment of the International Space Station ISS, this bilateral German-Russian research facility has already shown some surprising, new behavior of radio-frequency induced complex plasmas. An advanced model of PKE-Nefedov, the PK-3 Plus experiment apparatus, is getting readied to be launched to ISS on Progress Cargo spacecraft 20P. Additional developments are in progress to continue this exciting growing research field with: (a) PK-4 utilizing high voltage DC controlled plasma, and (b) IMPACT Laboratory, the European Space Agency's next generation premier research laboratory for plasma and dust physics on the ISS. The paper will provide background information of each of the complex plasma research facilities.

  14. Kinetic simulation of a plasma collision experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Larroche, O. )

    1993-08-01

    The ionic Fokker--Planck code which was written for describing plasma shock wave fronts [M. Casanova [ital et] [ital al]. Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 67], 2143 (1991)] is applied to model the collision of two plasmas in plane geometry. Improvements brought to the code for that purpose are described. The initial phase of the experiment during which the plasmas interpenetrate is accounted for by a simple fluid model, which yields qualitative insight into the phenomena at play as well as an initial condition to start the kinetic simulation. The kinetic results obtained in the stagnation and thermalization phases are discussed with respect to a specific laser-produced plasma collision experiment, as well as to existing fluid and kinetic ( particle-in-cell'') simulations.

  15. Kinetic simulation of a plasma collision experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroche, Olivier

    1993-08-01

    The ionic Fokker-Planck code which was written for describing plasma shock wave fronts [M. Casanova et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2143 (1991)] is applied to model the collision of two plasmas in plane geometry. Improvements brought to the code for that purpose are described. The initial phase of the experiment during which the plasmas interpenetrate is accounted for by a simple fluid model, which yields qualitative insight into the phenomena at play as well as an initial condition to start the kinetic simulation. The kinetic results obtained in the stagnation and thermalization phases are discussed with respect to a specific laser-produced plasma collision experiment, as well as to existing fluid and kinetic (``particle-in-cell'') simulations.

  16. Summer Research Experiences with a Laboratory Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, N.; Mauel, M.; Navratil, G.; Cates, C.; Maurer, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Shilov, M.; Taylor, E.

    1998-11-01

    Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Secondary School Science Teachers seeks to improve middle and high school student understanding of science. The Program enhances science teachers' understanding of the practice of science by having them participate for two consecutive summers as members of laboratory research teams led by Columbia University faculty. In this poster, we report the research and educational activities of two summer internships with the HBT-EP research tokamak. Research activities have included (1) computer data acquisition and the representation of complex plasma wave phenomena as audible sounds, and (2) the design and construction of pulsed microwave systems to experience the design and testing of special-purpose equipment in order to achieve a specific technical goal. We also present an overview of the positive impact this type of plasma research involvement has had on high school science teaching.

  17. Magnetic Flux Compression Experiments Using Plasma Armatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic flux compression reaction chambers offer considerable promise for controlling the plasma flow associated with various micronuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power schemes, primarily because they avoid thermalization with wall structures and permit multicycle operation modes. The major physical effects of concern are the diffusion of magnetic flux into the rapidly expanding plasma cloud and the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the plasma surface, both of which can severely degrade reactor efficiency and lead to plasma-wall impact. A physical parameter of critical importance to these underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes is the magnetic Reynolds number (R(sub m), the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Efficient flux compression requires R(sub m) less than 1, and a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is essential to the reliable design and operation of practical reactors. As a means of improving this understanding, a simplified laboratory experiment has been constructed in which the plasma jet ejected from an ablative pulse plasma gun is used to investigate plasma armature interaction with magnetic fields. As a prelude to intensive study, exploratory experiments were carried out to quantify the magnetic Reynolds number characteristics of the plasma jet source. Jet velocity was deduced from time-of-flight measurements using optical probes, and electrical conductivity was measured using an inductive probing technique. Using air at 27-inHg vacuum, measured velocities approached 4.5 km/s and measured conductivities were in the range of 30 to 40 kS/m.

  18. Research on plasma core reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, G. A.; Barton, D. M.; Helmick, H. H.; Bernard, W.; White, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical studies are being conducted for NASA on critical assemblies with one-meter diameter by one-meter long low-density cores surrounded by a thick beryllium reflector. These assemblies make extensive use of existing nuclear propulsion reactor components, facilities, and instrumentation. Due to excessive porosity in the reflector, the initial critical mass was 19 kg U(93.2). Addition of a 17 cm thick by 89 cm diameter beryllium flux trap in the cavity reduced the critical mass to 7 kg when all the uranium was in the zone just outside the flux trap. A mockup aluminum UF6 container was placed inside the flux trap and fueled with uranium-graphite elements. Fission distributions and reactivity worths of fuel and structural materials were measured. Finally, an 85,000 cu cm aluminum canister in the central region was fueled with UF6 gas and fission density distributions determined. These results are to be used to guide the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test energy removal by optical radiation.

  19. Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

    2011-12-13

    We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches

  20. Construction Status of the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Collins, Cami; Katz, Noam; Weisberg, Dave; Forest, Cary

    2011-10-01

    Construction of the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is partially complete. This facility will be utilized to create large, un-magnetized, fast flowing, hot plasma for investigating magnetic field self-generation and flow driven MHD instabilities. A 3 meter diameter spherical vacuum chamber lined with a series of high strength samarium cobalt magnets will provide plasma confinement. The plasma will be stirred from the magnetized edge using electrodes to produce JxB flows. Plasma sources will include lanthanum hexaboride cathodes and electron cyclotron heating. This poster will describe the current status of the design and construction of the facility including laboratory infrastructure, cast aluminum vacuum chamber, magnets, stirring electrodes, sources and diagnostics. Construction is being funded by the NSF Major Research Instrumentation program.

  1. Diagnostics for the plasma liner experiment.

    PubMed

    Lynn, A G; Merritt, E; Gilmore, M; Hsu, S C; Witherspoon, F D; Cassibry, J T

    2010-10-01

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical "plasma liners" via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of ∼0.1 Mbar using ∼1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n(i)∼10(16) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n(i)>10(19) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed. PMID:21033980

  2. Diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A. G.; Merritt, E.; Gilmore, M.; Hsu, S. C.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2010-10-15

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical ''plasma liners'' via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of {approx}0.1 Mbar using {approx}1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n{sub i}{approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx_equal}T{sub i}{approx}1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n{sub i}>10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx_equal}T{sub i}{approx}0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed.

  3. Space plasma contactor research, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple model describing the process of electron collection from a low pressure ambient plasma in the absence of magnetic field and contactor velocity effects is presented. Experimental measurments of the plasma surrounding the contactor are used to demonstrate that a double-sheath generally develops and separates the ambient plasma from a higher density, anode plasma located adjacent to the contactor. Agreement between the predictions of the model and experimental measurements obtained at the electron collection current levels ranging to 1 A suggests the surface area at the ambient plasma boundary of the double-sheath is equal to the electron current being collected divided by the ambient plasma random electron current density; the surface area of the higher density anode plasma boundary of the double-sheath is equal to the ion current being emitted across this boundary divided by the ion current density required to sustain a stable sheath; and the voltage drop across the sheath is determined by the requirement that the ion and electron currents counterflowing across the boundaries be at space-charge limited levels. The efficiency of contactor operation is shown to improve when significant ionization and excitation is induced by electrons that stream from the ambient plasma through the double-sheath and collide with neutral atoms being supplied through the hollow cathode.

  4. Plasma opening switch research for DECADE

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, J.R.; Kortbawi, D.; Childers, F.K.; Sincerny, P.S.; Weber, B.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Commisso, R.J.; Thompson, J.R.; Babineau, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    Plasma opening switch (POS) research for the DECADE radiation effects test facility is reviewed. This research was first performed on a half-scale generator. DECADE Prototype Module 1, and indicated the importance of the POS electrode geometry to obtain the required impedance at appropriate conduction times. It also was demonstrated that the conduction time jitter was suitable for a multimodule system. Preliminary experiments at full energy were then conducted on DECADE Module 1 that indicated significant current loss when using a bremsstrahlung load, limiting the output radiation to about half of the DECADE requirement. These results initiated an effort to thoroughly diagnose the power-flow region downstream of the switch, an effort that ultimately provided improved understanding of POS operation and improved coupling to bremsstrahlung loads. At the conclusion of this effort, it had been demonstrated that it is possible for the POS-driven system to meet the DECADE requirements.

  5. DHS Research Experience Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachalam, V

    2008-10-24

    I learned a great deal during my summer internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). I plan to continue a career in research, and I feel that my experience at LLNL has been formative. I was exposed to a new area of research, as part of the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group, and I had the opportunity to work on projects that I would not have been able to work on anywhere else. The projects both involved the use of a novel mass spectrometer that was developed at LLNL, so I would not have been able to do this research at any other facility. The first project that Zachary and I worked on involved using SPAMS to detect pesticides. The ability to rapidly detect pesticides in a variety of matrices is applicable to many fields including public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Real-time, or near real-time, detection of potentially harmful or toxic chemical agents can offer significant advantages in the protection of public health from accidental or intentional releases of harmful pesticides, and can help to monitor the environmental effects of controlled releases of pesticides for pest control purposes. The use of organophosphate neurotoxins by terrorists is a possibility that has been described; this is a legitimate threat, considering the ease of access, toxicity, and relatively low cost of these substances. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) has successfully been used to identify a wide array of chemical compounds, including drugs, high explosives, biological materials, and chemical warfare agent simulants. Much of this groundbreaking work was carried out by our group at LLNL. In our work, we had the chance to show that SPAMS fulfills a demonstrated need for a method of carrying out real-time pesticide detection with minimal sample preparation. We did this by using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer to obtain spectra of five different pesticides. Pesticide samples were chosen to

  6. SPDE: Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    The physics of the Solar corona is studied through the use of high resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy and high resolution ultraviolet imagery. The investigation includes the development and application of a flight instrument, first flown in May, 1992 on NASA sounding rocket 36.048. A second flight, NASA founding rocket 36.123, took place on 25 April 1994. Both flights were successful in recording new observations relevant to the investigation. The effort in this contract covers completion of the modifications to the existing rocket payload, its reflight, and the preliminary day reduction and analysis. Experience gained from flight 36.048 led us to plan several payload design modifications. These were made to improve the sensitivity balance between the UV and EUV spectrographs, to improve the scattered light rejection in the spectrographs, to protect the visible light rejection filter for the Normal Incidence X-ray Imager instrument (NIXI), and to prepare one new multilayer mirror coating to the NIXI. We also investigated the addition of a brassboard CCD camera to the payload to test it as a possible replacement for the Eastman type 101-07 film used by the SPDE instruments. This camera was included in the experimeter's data package for the Project Initiation Conference for the flight of NASA Mission 36.123, held in January, 1994, but for programmatic reasons was deleted from the final payload configuration. The payload was shipped to the White Sands Missile Range on schedule in early April. The launch and successful recovery took place on 25 April, in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite and a supporting ground-based observing campaign.

  7. Research Experiences for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rettig, Terrence W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six programs at different colleges and universities which provide research opportunities for undergraduate students in physics, astronomy, marine biology, meteorology, and anthropology. Background, features, and accomplishments of the programs are discussed. (CW)

  8. Plasmas as Antennas - Theory, Experiment and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Gerard

    1999-11-01

    A variety of antennas are employed in telecommunications and radar systems. Some applications pose special problems. Large structures are easily detected by hostile radar. The performance of multi-element HF-VHF arrays is complicated by mutual coupling between large radiating elements. High speed data communications and radar can be limited by signal decay and ringing. A novel solution is an antenna made of plasma that can be made to disappear on microsecond time scales. Recent experiments at the Australian National University (G.G. Borg et. al. App. Phys. Letts. Vol. 74, 3272-3274 [1999]), have shown that highly efficient (25 - 50radiating elements for the range 3 - 300 MHz can be formed using low power (10 - 50 W average) plasma surface waves launched at one end of a tube containing a suitable gas. Only a single capacitive coupler is needed to launch the waves - there is no electrical connection to the other end of the tube. The regimes of wave propagation correlate with expectations from plasma surface wave theory. Actual communications experiments have shown that these plasma antennas can have surprisingly low noise provided they are excited by the rf surface waves and not by a low frequency or DC ohmic current. Applications to HF-VHF communications and radar are being developed. These include both single ruggedised plasma elements and multi-element arrays.

  9. Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Martin, Adam; Bengtson, Roger D.; Briezman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Cassibry, Jason; Shuttpelz, Branwen; Deline, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer (such as the ISS), lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue of the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment was performed to test the theory regarding the Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) detachment scenario. Data from this experiment will be presented. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) being developed by the Ad Astra Rocket Company uses a magnetic nozzle as described above. The VASIMR is also a leading candidate for exploiting an electric propulsion test platform being considered for the ISS.

  10. Intervention research: GAO experiences.

    PubMed

    Grasso, P G

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes tools of program evaluation that may prove useful in conducting research on occupational health and safety interventions. It presents examples of three studies conducted by the U.S. General Accounting Office that illustrate a variety of techniques for collecting and analyzing data on program interventions, including analysis of extant data, synthesis of results of existing studies, and combining data from administrative files with survey results. At the same time, it stresses the importance and difficulty of constructing an adequate "theory" of how the intervention is expected to affect outcomes, both for guiding data collection and for allowing adequate interpretation of results. PMID:8728140

  11. ECH on the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhone, Jason; Clark, Mike; Collins, Cami; Cooper, Chris; Katz, Noam; Nonn, Paul; Wallace, John; Forest, Cary

    2012-10-01

    The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is a 3 meter diameter sphere consisting of 36 axisymmetric rings of samarium cobalt magnets in a ring-cusp configuration. Electrostatic electrodes on the edge will be used to spin the plasma. The purpose of MPDX is to study flow-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Electron cyclotron heating will be used for the ionization and heating of the plasma. A benefit of the ECH is the plasma will have hot electrons leading to good electrical conduction and high magnetic Reynolds number. In addition, direct heating of the electrons helps to obtain a large ionization fraction and a low neutral density. The ECH system on MPDX will consist of 5 separate lines distributed at various positions around the vacuum vessel. Each line will have a 20 kW magnetron operating in continuous wave mode at 2.45 GHz outputting in WR-340 waveguide. The power will be transferred to the vacuum vessel through WR-284 waveguide. Each line will contain a directional coupler for measuring reflected power. A manual 3-stub tuner will be used for impedance matching. The purpose of these elements is to optimize the efficiency of energy transfer to the plasma.

  12. Research on Size Reduction of Plasma Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Xu, Yuemin; Sun, Hailong

    The structure of plasma antenna is more complex than metal antenna to reach ideal gain, efficiency, matching, etc. Therefore, earlier plasma antenna prototypes were always featured with larger size and weight. The NSSC research team has developed new prototypes with equivalent performance as metal antenna. In recent research, we also optimized the antenna structure to reduce size and weight. The new plasma antenna prototype is much smaller than the former ones, and its power consumption is also reduced from more than 100 watts to about 30 watts.

  13. Alpha-particle Measurements Needed for Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2001-09-26

    The next major step in magnetic fusion studies will be the construction of a burning plasma (BP) experiment where the goals will be to achieve and understand the plasma behavior with the internal heating provided by fusion-generated alpha particles. Two devices with these physics goals have been proposed: the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE). Extensive conceptual design work for the instrumentation to try to meet the physics demands has been done for these devices, especially ITER. This article provides a new look at the measurements specifically important for understanding the physics aspects of the alpha particles taking into account two significant events. The first is the completion of physics experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with deuterium-tritium fueling with the first chances to study alpha physics and the second is the realization that relatively compact plasmas, making use of advanced tokamak plasma concepts, are the most probable route to burning plasmas and ultimately a fusion reactor.

  14. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Bibyk, Irene K.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  15. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, L.W.; Bibyk, I.K.

    1995-09-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. Parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology.

  16. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  17. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. PMID:26482650

  18. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ≈ ni ~ 10¹⁶ cm⁻³, Te ≈ Ti ≈ 1.4 eV, Vjet ≈ 30–100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}$ ≈ 1, sonic Mach number Ms ≡ Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ≈ 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.

  19. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; et al

    2015-04-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ≈ ni ~ 10¹⁶ cm⁻³, Te ≈ Ti ≈ 1.4 eV, Vjet ≈ 30–100 km/s, mean chargemore » $$\\bar{Z}$$ ≈ 1, sonic Mach number Ms ≡ Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ≈ 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.« less

  20. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ~ ni ~ 1016 cm-3, Te ~ Ti ~ 1.4 eV, V jet ~ 30-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}$ ~ 1, sonic Mach number Ms ≡ V jet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ~20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.

  1. Status and future of the tritium plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, R.A.; Buchenauer, D.; Taylor, D.; Harbin, W.; Anderl, B.

    1995-10-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) has been recently upgraded and relocated at the Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first tritium plasma in the upgraded system was achieved on May 11, 1995. TPE is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the migration and retention of tritium in fusion reactor materials. This facility is now capable of delivering 100 to 200 eV tritons at a level of 1 A/cm{sup 2} to a 5 mm diameter sample, similar to that expected for the divertor of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). An aggressive research plan has been established, and experiments are expected to begin in June of 1995. 4 figs.

  2. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  3. Research in solar plasma theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, Gerard

    1992-01-01

    The main thrust and significance of our research results are presented. The topics covered include: (1) coronal structure and dynamics; (2) coronal heating; (3) filament formation; and (4) flare energy release.

  4. Calibration of the ISEE plasma composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugher, C. R.; Olsen, R. C.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Plasma Composition experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite was designed to measure ions from 1 to 16 amu, at energies from near zero to 16 keV. The two nearly identical flight instruments were calibrated by means of preflight laboratory tests and in-flight data comparisons. This document presents most of the details of those efforts, with special emphasis on the low energy (0 to 100 eV) portion of the instrument response. The analysis of the instrument includes a ray-tracing calculation, which follows an ensemble of test particles through the detector.

  5. Interactive Plasma Physics Education Using Data from Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Brisa; Davis, Bill; Zwicker, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The Internet Plasma Physics Education Experience (IPPEX) website was created in 1996 to give users access to data from plasma and fusion experiments. Interactive material on electricity, magnetism, matter, and energy was presented to generate interest and prepare users to understand data from a fusion experiment. Initially, users were allowed to analyze real-time and archival data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiment. IPPEX won numerous awards for its novel approach of allowing users to participate in ongoing research. However, the latest revisions of IPPEX were in 2001 and the interactive material is no longer functional on modern browsers. Also, access to real-time data was lost when TFTR was shut down. The interactive material on IPPEX is being rewritten in ActionScript3.0, and real-time and archival data from the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) will be made available to users. New tools like EFIT animations, fast cameras, and plots of important plasma parameters will be included along with an existing Java-based ``virtual tokamak.'' Screenshots from the upgraded website and future directions will be presented.

  6. Parallel Simulation of Underdense Plasma Photocathode Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, David; Hidding, Bernhard; Xi, Yunfeng; Andonian, Gerard; Rosenzweig, James; Cormier-Michel, Estelle

    2013-10-01

    The underdense plasma photocathode concept (aka Trojan horse) is a promising approach to achieving fs-scale electron bunches with pC-scale charge and transverse normalized emittance below 0.01 mm-mrad, yielding peak currents of order 100 A and beam brightness as high as 1019 A /m2 / rad2 , for a wide range of achievable beam energies up to 10 GeV. A proof-of-principle experiment will be conducted at the FACET user facility in early 2014. We present 2D and 3D simulations with physical parameters relevant to the planned experiment. Work supported by DOE under Contract Nos. DE-SC0009533, DE-FG02-07ER46272 and DEFG03-92ER40693, and by ONR under Contract No. N00014-06-1-0925. NERSC computing resources are supported by DOE.

  7. Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grier, N. T.; Stevens, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    An auxiliary payload package called PIX (plasma interaction experiment) was launched on March 5, 1978, on the LANDSAT 3 launch vehicle to study interactions between the space charged-particle environment and surfaces at high applied positive and negative voltages. Three experimental surfaces were used in this package: a plain disk to act as a control, a disk on a Kapton sheet to determine the effect of surrounding insulation on current collection, and a small solar-array segment to evaluate the effect of distributing biased surfaces among an array of insulators. Only half of the results from the 4 hours of PIX operations were recovered. The results did verify effects found in ground simulation testing. The results of this experiment are discussed in detail.

  8. Fundamental Complex Plasma Research on Ground and under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Fortov, Vladimir; Thoma, Markus; Pustylnik, Mikhail; Lipaev, Andrey; Morfill, Gregor; Molotkov, Vladimir; Usachev, Alexander; Nosenko, Vladimir; Fink, Martin; Petrov, Oleg; Rubin-Zuzic, Milenko

    2016-07-01

    Complex (dusty) plasma is plasma containing small solid particles in the sub-mm range. Those "dust" particles are highly charged due to the collection of electrons and ions and they interact electrostatically. Depending on the charge, density, and kinetic temperature of the particles, the interaction may be strong leading to collective effects and the emergence of liquid or solid behavior. In that sense complex plasmas are perfect model systems for the investigation of fundamental processes in classical condensed matter physics since their constituent mesoscopic particles are individually observable and can be regarded as classically interacting "proxy atoms". The term "complex plasmas" is widely used in the literature to distinguish dusty plasmas composed of a weakly ionized gas and charged microparticles specially "designed" for investigations in classical condensed matter, from naturally occurring systems. Gravity influences the complex plasma, the microparticles sediment and stable systems can only be achieved through counteracting gravity with other volume forces, e.g. electric or thermophoretic force. This allows producing two-dimensional - monolayer - systems, or three-dimensional systems under stress. Only under weightlessness conditions, large and homogeneous 3D systems can be formed. Although phenomena in classical condensed matter physics are in the forefront of complex plasma research the basic know-how gained from experiments, theory and numerical simulations can be of importance for the understanding of naturally occurring dusty plasmas in space. Thus, in this presentation I will show recent work on complex plasmas from the ground and first results from the PK-4 facility onboard the International Space Station ISS. Acknowledgements: We would like to acknowledge the joint ESA-ROSCOSMOS Experiment «Plasma Kristall-4» onboard the International Space Station ISS. This work is partly supported by DLR grant 50WM1441/ 50WM1442 and by the Russian Science

  9. Designing Effective Undergraduate Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severson, S.

    2010-12-01

    I present a model for designing student research internships that is informed by the best practices of the Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) Professional Development Program. The dual strands of the CfAO education program include: the preparation of early-career scientists and engineers in effective teaching; and changing the learning experiences of students (e.g., undergraduate interns) through inquiry-based "teaching laboratories." This paper will focus on the carry-over of these ideas into the design of laboratory research internships such as the CfAO Mainland internship program as well as NSF REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) and senior-thesis or "capstone" research programs. Key ideas in maximizing student learning outcomes and generating productive research during internships include: defining explicit content, scientific process, and attitudinal goals for the project; assessment of student prior knowledge and experience, then following up with formative assessment throughout the project; setting reasonable goals with timetables and addressing motivation; and giving students ownership of the research by implementing aspects of the inquiry process within the internship.

  10. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  11. Plasma Shock Wave Modification Experiments in a Temperature Compensated Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vine, Frances J.; Mankowski, John J.; Saeks, Richard E.; Chow, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    A number of researchers have observed that the intensity of a shock wave is reduced when it passes through a weakly ionized plasma. While there is little doubt that the intensity of a shock is reduced when it propagates through a weakly ionized plasma, the major question associated with the research is whether the reduction in shock wave intensity is due to the plasma or the concomitant heating of the flow by the plasma generator. The goal of this paper is to describe a temperature compensated experiment in a "large" diameter shock tube with an external heating source, used to control the temperature in the shock tube independently of the plasma density.

  12. Preliminary results on the plasma environment of Saturn from the Pioneer 11 plasma analyzer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. H.; Mihalov, J. D.; Collard, H. R.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Frank, L. A.; Intriligator, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    The Ames Research Center Pioneer 11 plasma analyzer experiment provided measurements of the solar wind interaction with Saturn and the character of the plasma environment within Saturn's magnetosphere. It is shown that Saturn has a detached bow shock wave and magnetopause quite similar to those at earth and Jupiter. The scale size of the interaction region for Saturn is roughly one-third that at Jupiter, but Saturn's magnetosphere is equally responsive to changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure. Saturn's outer magnetosphere is inflated, as evidenced by the observation of large fluxes of corotating plasma. It is postulated that Saturn's magnetosphere may undergo a large expansion when the solar wind pressure is greatly diminished by the presence of Jupiter's extended magnetospheric tail when the two planets are approximately aligned along the same solar radial vector.

  13. Complex Plasma Research Under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Osamu

    2008-09-07

    Complex plasma research under extreme conditions is described. The extreme conditions include low-dimensionality for self-organized structures of dust particles, dust magnetization in high magnetic field, criticality in phase transition, and cryogenic environment for Coulomb crystals and dust dynamics.

  14. Complex plasmas: An interdisciplinary research field

    SciTech Connect

    Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2009-10-15

    Complex (dusty) plasmas are composed of a weakly ionized gas and charged microparticles and represent the plasma state of soft matter. Complex plasmas have several remarkable features: Dynamical time scales associated with microparticles are ''stretched'' to tens of milliseconds, yet the microparticles themselves can be easily visualized individually. Furthermore, since the background gas is dilute, the particle dynamics in strongly coupled complex plasmas is virtually undamped, which provides a direct analogy to regular liquids and solids in terms of the atomistic dynamics. Finally, complex plasmas can be easily manipulated in different ways--also at the level of individual particles. Altogether, this gives us a unique opportunity to go beyond the limits of continuous media and study--at the kinetic level--various generic processes occurring in liquids or solids, in regimes ranging from the onset of cooperative phenomena to large strongly coupled systems. In the first part of the review some of the basic and new physics are highlighted which complex plasmas enable us to study, and in the second (major) part strong coupling phenomena in an interdisciplinary context are examined. The connections with complex fluids are emphasized and a number of generic liquid and solid-state issues are addressed. In summary, application oriented research is discussed.

  15. Complex plasmas: An interdisciplinary research field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2009-10-01

    Complex (dusty) plasmas are composed of a weakly ionized gas and charged microparticles and represent the plasma state of soft matter. Complex plasmas have several remarkable features: Dynamical time scales associated with microparticles are “stretched” to tens of milliseconds, yet the microparticles themselves can be easily visualized individually. Furthermore, since the background gas is dilute, the particle dynamics in strongly coupled complex plasmas is virtually undamped, which provides a direct analogy to regular liquids and solids in terms of the atomistic dynamics. Finally, complex plasmas can be easily manipulated in different ways—also at the level of individual particles. Altogether, this gives us a unique opportunity to go beyond the limits of continuous media and study—at the kinetic level—various generic processes occurring in liquids or solids, in regimes ranging from the onset of cooperative phenomena to large strongly coupled systems. In the first part of the review some of the basic and new physics are highlighted which complex plasmas enable us to study, and in the second (major) part strong coupling phenomena in an interdisciplinary context are examined. The connections with complex fluids are emphasized and a number of generic liquid and solid-state issues are addressed. In summary, application oriented research is discussed.

  16. Numerical Experiments In Strongly Coupled Complex (Dusty) Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, L. J.; Ivlev A.; Hubertus M. T.; Morfill, G. E.

    2010-07-01

    Complex (dusty) plasma is a suspension of micron-sized charged dust particles in a weakly ionized plasma with electrons, ions, and neutral atoms or molecules. Therein, dust particles acquire a few thousand electron charges by absorbing surrounding electrons and ions, and consequently interact with each other via a dynamically screened Coulomb potential while undergoing Brownian motion due primarily to frequent collisions with the neutral molecules. When the interaction potential energy between charged dust particles significantly exceeds their kinetic energy, they become strongly coupled and can form ordered structures comprising liquid and solid states. Since the motion of charged dust particles in complex (dusty) plasmas can be directly observed in real time by using a video camera, such systems have been generally regarded as a promising model system to study many phenomena occurring in solids, liquids and other strongly-coupled systems at the kinetic level, such as phase transitions, transport processes, and collective dynamics. Complex plasma physics has now grown into a mature research field with a very broad range of interdisciplinary facets. In addition to usual experimental and theoretical study, computer simulation in complex plasma plays an important role in bridging experimental observations and theories and in understanding many interesting phenomena observed in laboratory. The present talk will focus on a class of computer simulations that are usually non-equilibrium ones with external perturbation and that mimic the real complex plasma experiments (i. e., numerical experiment). The simulation method, i. e., the so-called Brownian Dynamics methods, will be firstly reviewed and then examples, such as simulations of heat transfer and shock wave propagation, will be present.

  17. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  18. Chaos in plasma simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, C.; Newman, D.E.; Sprott, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    We investigate the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas using data from both numerical simulations and experiment. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos. These tools include phase portraits and Poincard sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are -the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low,dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental data were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or other simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system.

  19. Design and Assembly of the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Ross; Artis, Darrick; Lynch, Brian; Wood, Keith; Shaw, Joseph; Gilmore, Kevin; Robinson, Daniel; Polka, Christian; Konopka, Uwe; Thomas, Edward; Merlino, Robert; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2013-10-01

    Over the last two years, the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX) has been under construction at Auburn University. This new research device, whose assembly will be completed in late Summer, 2013, uses a four-coil, superconducting, high magnetic field system (|B | >= 4 Tesla) to investigate the confinement, charging, transport, and instabilities in a dusty plasma. A new feature of the MDPX device is the ability to operate the magnetic coils independently to allow a variety of magnetic configurations from highly uniform to quadrapole-like. Envisioned as a multi-user facility, the MDPX device features a cylindrical vacuum vessel whose primary experimental region is an octagonal chamber that has a 35.5 cm inner diameter and is 19 cm tall. There is substantial diagnostics and optical access through eight, 10.2 cm × 12.7 cm side ports. The chamber can also be equipped with two 15.2 cm diameter, 76 cm long extensions to allow long plasma column experiments, particularly long wavelength dust wave studies. This presentation will discuss the final design, assembly, and installation of the MDPX device and will describe its supporting laboratory facility. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation - Major Research Instrumentation (NSF-MRI) award, PHY-1126067.

  20. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH2 at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ṡ 1015 cm-3 for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ṡ 1016 cm-3 for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  1. Development and research of a coaxial microwave plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Juan; Xu Yingqiao; Tang Jinlan; Mao Genwang; Yang Tielian; Tan Xiaoquen

    2008-08-15

    An overview of the research on a coaxial microwave plasma thruster at Northwestern Polytechnic University is presented. Emphasis is put on the development and research on key components of the thruster system, a microthrust balance, plasma plume diagnostics, and a numerical simulation of the plasma flow field inside the thruster cavity. The developed thruster cavity is chosen from a coaxial resonant cavity with concentrated capacitance, which can operate well in atmosphere and vacuum conditions. The development of a microwave source shows that a magnetron powered by a switch power supply has advantages in the power level and efficiency, but a solid state microwave source synthesized from the arsenide field effect transistor is superior in weight and volume. Through elimination of the effect of large gravity and resistance force induced by a gas pipe line and a microwave transmitting line on the microthrust, 15 mN and 340 s in the performance of the microwave plasma thruster at 70 W and with helium gas are measured. Diagnosing experiment shows that the plasma plume density is in the range of (1-7.2)x10{sup 16}/m{sup 3}. Numerical simulation of the plasma flow field inside the coaxial thruster cavity shows that there is a good match between the microwave power and gas flow rate.

  2. Development and research of a coaxial microwave plasma thruster.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Xu, Yingqiao; Tang, Jinlan; Mao, Genwang; Yang, Tielian; Tan, Xiaoquen

    2008-08-01

    An overview of the research on a coaxial microwave plasma thruster at Northwestern Polytechnic University is presented. Emphasis is put on the development and research on key components of the thruster system, a microthrust balance, plasma plume diagnostics, and a numerical simulation of the plasma flow field inside the thruster cavity. The developed thruster cavity is chosen from a coaxial resonant cavity with concentrated capacitance, which can operate well in atmosphere and vacuum conditions. The development of a microwave source shows that a magnetron powered by a switch power supply has advantages in the power level and efficiency, but a solid state microwave source synthesized from the arsenide field effect transistor is superior in weight and volume. Through elimination of the effect of large gravity and resistance force induced by a gas pipe line and a microwave transmitting line on the microthrust, 15 mN and 340 s in the performance of the microwave plasma thruster at 70 W and with helium gas are measured. Diagnosing experiment shows that the plasma plume density is in the range of (1-7.2)x10(16)m(3). Numerical simulation of the plasma flow field inside the coaxial thruster cavity shows that there is a good match between the microwave power and gas flow rate. PMID:19044345

  3. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishilin, O.; Gross, M.; Brinkmann, R.; Engel, J.; Grüner, F.; Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J.; Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y.; Richter, D.; Schroeder, C.; Schütze, R.; Stephan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ.

  4. SAFE II: Large systems space plasma evaluation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Purvis, C. K.; Stevens, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    A shuttle flight experiment, the purpose of which is to obtain space data on the interaction of a high voltage solar array with the ambient space plasma is addressed. This flight experiment is a reflight of the solar array flight experiment, SAFE, except that three active solar array panels, electron release devices and plasma diagnostics are added. This experiment, SAFE 2, evaluates power loss due to parasitic current collected by the solar array, arcing on the solar array and perturbations to the plasma which may increase power loss and disturb plasma and charged particle science acquisition.

  5. International Microgravity Plasma Facility IMPF: A Multi-User Modular Research Facility for Complex Plasma Research on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurig, R.; Burfeindt, J.; Castegini, R.; Griethe, W.; Hofmann, P.

    2002-01-01

    On March 03, 2001, the PKE-Nefedov plasma experiment was successfully put into operation on board ISS. This complex plasma experiment is the predecessor for the semi-autonomous multi-user facility IMPF (International Microgravity Plasma Facility) to be flown in 2006 with an expected operational lifetime of 10 years. IMPF is envisioned to be an international research facility for investigators in the field of multi-component plasmas containing ions, electrons, and charged microparticles. This research filed is often referred to as "complex plasmas". The actual location of IMPF on ISS is not decided yet; potential infrastructure under consideration are EXPRESS Rack, Standard Interface Rack SIR, European Drawer Rack EDR, or a to be designed custom rack infrastructure on the Russian Segment. The actual development status of the DLR funded Pre-phase B Study for IMPF will be presented. For this phase, IMPF was assumed to be integrated in an EXPRESS Rack requiring four middeck lockers with two 4-PU ISIS drawers for accommodation. Technical and operational challenges, like a 240 Mbytes/sec continuous experimental data stream for 60 minutes, will be addressed. The project was funded by the German Space Agency (DLR) and was performed in close cooperation with scientists from the Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestical Physics in Munich, Germany.

  6. Oscillating plasma bubbles. II. Pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2012-08-15

    Time-dependent phenomena have been investigated in plasma bubbles which are created by inserting spherical grids into an ambient plasma and letting electrons and ions form a plasma of different parameters than the ambient one. There are no plasma sources inside the bubble. The grid bias controls the particle flux. There are sheaths on both sides of the grid, each of which passes particle flows in both directions. The inner sheath or plasma potential develops self consistently to establish charge neutrality and divergence free charge and mass flows. When the electron supply is restricted, the inner sheath exhibits oscillations near the ion plasma frequency. When all electrons are excluded, a virtual anode forms on the inside sheath, reflects all ions such that the bubble is empty. By pulsing the ambient plasma, the lifetime of the bubble plasma has been measured. In an afterglow, plasma electrons are trapped inside the bubble and the bubble decays as slow as the ambient plasma. Pulsing the grid voltage yields the time scale for filling and emptying the bubble. Probes have been shown to modify the plasma potential. Using pulsed probes, transient ringing on the time scale of ion transit times through the bubble has been observed. The start of sheath oscillations has been investigated. The instability mechanism has been qualitatively explained. The dependence of the oscillation frequency on electrons in the sheath has been clarified.

  7. Plasma flow switch experiments on the Pegasus facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C. Jr.; Anderson, B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.; Findley, C.; Greene, A.; Kruse, H.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Peterson, D.; Sandoval, G. ); Lee, P.H.Y. ); Turchi, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Plasma flow switch experiments conducted on Pegasus have shown that a conducting layer of plasma shunts the load slot preventing efficient switching of current to the load. This effect is seen computationally. The magnitude of the effect depends on the specific parameters of the switch plasma and current level. Computations have also shown that a plasma boundary layer trap'' would effectively remove enough plasma from the inner conductor of the power flow channel so that efficient switching would occur. This plasma trap has been successfully demonstrated when used with a static load. It has not yet been tested with an imploding load. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  8. The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) description and test program. [electrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma interaction experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the LANDSAT-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  9. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F&ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F&ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I&C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Plasma Reactor Modeling and Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Bose, D.; Hash, D.; Hwang, H.; Cruden, B.; Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma processing is a key processing stop in integrated circuit manufacturing. Low pressure, high density plum reactors are widely used for etching and deposition. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source has become popular recently in many processing applications. In order to accelerate equipment and process design, an understanding of the physics and chemistry, particularly, plasma power coupling, plasma and processing uniformity and mechanism is important. This understanding is facilitated by comprehensive modeling and simulation as well as plasma diagnostics to provide the necessary data for model validation which are addressed in this presentation. We have developed a complete code for simulating an ICP reactor and the model consists of transport of electrons, ions, and neutrals, Poisson's equation, and Maxwell's equation along with gas flow and energy equations. Results will be presented for chlorine and fluorocarbon plasmas and compared with data from Langmuir probe, mass spectrometry and FTIR.

  12. Ion Acoustic Waves, A High School Plasma Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, R.; Wise, J.; Gibson, N.; Buck, M.; Gekelman, W.; Wetzel, E.; Wetzel, C.; Moynihan, C.

    2001-10-01

    Over the last three the Los Angeles Physics Teachers Alliance Group (LAPTAG) has built a plasma device and designed experiments for high school students to learn about plasma properties and behavior. One of the first experiments performed by small student groups (two to three students at a time) is to create ion acoustic wave tonebursts in an Argon plasma, measure the wavelength and frequency of the wave and thereby calculate the velocity of the wave. A grid antenna immersed in the plasma, which is pulsed by a function generator, creates the waves. Measurements are made using a Langmuir probe and read out on a digital oscilloscope. From this information students calculate values such as the temperature of the plasma, the plasma density and percent ionization of the plasma. In order to do these experiments students must understand what plasma is, how plasma can be created using a helicon source, how to use an oscilloscope and many other aspects of the plasma chamber involved in the experiment. Other experiments are currently being done on the device and still others are being designed. For more information visit the LAPTAG website (http://coke.physics.ucla.edu/laptag).

  13. An Experiment to Tame the Plasma Material Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R J; Menard, J E; Allain, J P; Brooks, J N; Canik, J M; Doerner, R; Fu, G; Gates, D A; Gentile, C A; Harris, J H; Hassanein, A; Gorelenkov, N N; Kaita, R; Kaye, S M; Kotschenreuther, M; Kramer, G J; Kugel, H W; Maingi, R; Mahajan, S M; Majeski, R; Neumeyer, C L; Nygren, R E; Ono, M; Owen, L W; Ramakrishnan, S; Rognlien, T D; Ruzic, D N; Ryutov, D D; Sabbagh, S A; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V A; Stevenson, T N; Ulrickson, M A; Valanju, P M; Woolley, R D

    2009-01-08

    The plasma material interface in Demo will be more challenging than that in ITER, due to requirements for approximately four times higher heat flux from the plasma and approximately five times higher average duty factor. The scientific and technological solutions employed in ITER may not extrapolate to Demo. The key questions to be resolved for Demo and the resulting key requirements for an experiment to 'tame the plasma material interface' are analyzed. A possible design point for such an experiment is outlined.

  14. Progress of plasma wakefield self-modulation experiments at FACET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adli, E.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Lindstrøm, C. A.; Muggli, P.; Reimann, O.; Vieira, J. M.; Amorim, L. D.; Clarke, C. I.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; O`Shea, B. D.; Yakimenko, V.; Clayton, C.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Williams, O.

    2016-09-01

    Simulations and theory predict that long electron and positron beams may under favorable conditions self-modulate in plasmas. We report on the progress of experiments studying the self-modulation instability in plasma wakefield experiments at FACET. The experimental results obtained so far, while not being fully conclusive, appear to be consistent with the presence of the self-modulation instability.

  15. Pushing the Limits of Plasma Length in Inertial-Fusion Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; London, R. A.; Michel, P.; Berger, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Neumayer, P.; Ross, J. S.; Wallace, R.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate laser beam propagation and low backscatter in laser produced hohlraum plasmas of ignition plasma length. At intensities I<5×1014Wcm-2 greater than 80% of the energy in a blue (3ω, 351 nm) laser is transmitted through a L=5-mm long, high-temperature (Te=2.5keV), high-density (ne=5×1020cm-3) plasma. These experiments show that the backscatter scales exponentially with plasma length which is consistent with linear theory. The backscatter calculated by a new steady state 3D laser-plasma interaction code developed for large ignition plasmas is in good agreement with the measurements.

  16. Solar terrestrial and plasma processes experiments on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.; Kropp, J. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The currently planned utilization of the space station to perform investigations in solar terrestrial physics and plasma physics is outlined. The investigations and instrumentation planned for the Solar Terrestrial Observatory and its associated space station accommodation requirements are described. In addition, the planned placement of the Solar Terrestrial Observatory instruments are discussed along with typical operational scenarios. In the area of plasma physics, some preliminary plans for scientific investigations and for the accommodation of a plasma physics facility attached to the space station called the Plasma Processes Laboratory are outlined. These preliminary experiment concepts use the space environment around the space station as an unconfined plasma laboratory.

  17. Experiments and Theory of Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    The purpose of this paper is to present the most important theoretical and experimental discoveries that have been made in the area of dusty plasma physics. We describe the physics and observations of the well celebrated dust acoustic wave (DAW) and the dust ion-acoustic wave (DIAW) in dusty plasmas with weakly coupled dust grains, as well as the dust Coulomb crystal and dust lattice oscillations (DLOs) in dusty plasmas with strongly coupled dust grains. In dusty plasmas, the dust charge fluctuation is a dynamical variable, which provides a novel collisionless damping of the DA and DIA waves. The latter and the DLOs are excited by external sources, which are here discussed. Besides the Debye-Hueckel short-range repulsive force between like charged dust grains, there are novel attractive forces (e.g. due to dipole-dipole dust particle interactions, overlapping Debye spheres, ion focusing and ion wakefields, dipole magnetic moments etc.), which provide unique possibilities for attracting charged dust particles of similar polarity. The dust particle attraction is responsible for the formation of dust Coulomb crystals in laboratory dusty plasmas, as well as for the formation of planets and large astrophysical bodies in the Milky Way galaxy and in interstellar media. Furthermore, the nonlinear DAW, DIAW, and DLOs also appear in the form of solitary and shock waves, the physics and observations of which are briefly discussed. Finally, we discuss possible applications of dust-in-plasmas and dusty plasmas in laboratory and space.

  18. Plasma-materials interactions during rf experiments in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Bernabei, S.; Budny, R.; Chu, T.K.; Colestock, P.; Hinnov, E.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Hwang, D.; Jobes, F.

    1984-09-01

    Plasma-materials interactions studied in recent ICRF heating and lower hybrid current drive experiments are reviewed. The microscopic processes responsible for impurity generation are discussed. In ICRF experiments, improvements in machine operation and in antenna and feedthrough design have allowed efficient plasma heating at RF powers up to 3 MW. No significant loss of energy from the plasma core due to impurity radiation occurs. Lower hybrid current drive results in the generation and maintenance of hundreds of kiloamperes of plasma current carried by suprathermal electrons. The loss of these electrons and their role in impurity generation are assessed. Methods to avoid this problem are evaluated.

  19. Non-equilibrium plasma experiments at The Pennsylvania State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The authors have recently established the capability at The Pennsylvania State University to generate non-equilibrium plasma in atmospheric-pressure air and liquids such as water and saline. The plasma is generated using a high-voltage pulser (Pacific-Electronics PT-55), which is capable of voltage pulses of 75-ns width, peak voltage >50 kV, with rise-times on the order of nanoseconds. The electrodes are tungsten wires of various diameters (50 μm, 175 μm, 254 μm) insulated with nylon tubing. The spacing of the electrodes is controlled with translating mounts with resolution of tens of microns. Spectroscopy (Ocean Optics Model HR2000) is presently used for line identification only. Current and voltage vs. time will be measured with a 500-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope, a high-voltage probe and a shunt resistor connected to the ground side of the circuit. Research directions presently being pursued include the effects of solution electrical conductivity on plasma production and propellant ignition studies. Data from several types of experiments will be presented.

  20. Experiments on the Propagation of Plasma Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Noam; Egedal, Jan; Fox, Will; Le, Ari; Porkolab, Miklos

    2008-07-04

    We investigate experimentally the motion and structure of isolated plasma filaments propagating through neutral gas. Plasma filaments, or 'blobs,' arise from turbulent fluctuations in a range of plasmas. Our experimental geometry is toroidally symmetric, and the blobs expand to a larger major radius under the influence of a vertical electric field. The electric field, which is caused by {nabla}B and curvature drifts in a 1/R magnetic field, is limited by collisional damping on the neutral gas. The blob's electrostatic potential structure and the resulting ExB flow field give rise to a vortex pair and a mushroom shape, which are consistent with nonlinear plasma simulations. We observe experimentally this characteristic mushroom shape for the first time. We also find that the blob propagation velocity is inversely proportional to the neutral density and decreases with time as the blob cools.

  1. Review of recent experiments on magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.

    1995-02-01

    The present paper reviews recent laboratory experiments on magnetic reconnection. Examples will be drawn from electron current sheet experiments, merging spheromaks, and from high temperature tokamak plasmas with the Lundquist numbers exceeding 10{sup 7}. These recent laboratory experiments create an environment which satisfies the criteria for MHD plasma and in which the global boundary conditions can be controlled externally. Experiments with fully three dimensional reconnection are now possible. In the most recent TFTR tokamak discharges, Motional Stark effect (MSE) data have verified the existence of a partial reconnection. In the experiment of spheromak merging, a new plasma acceleration parallel to the neutral line has been indicated. Together with the relationship of these observations to the analysis of magnetic reconnection in space and in solar flares, important physics issues such as global boundary conditions, local plasma parameters, merging angle of the field lines, and the 3-D aspects of the reconnection are discussed.

  2. Preliminary results of noncircular plasma experiments in Doublet III

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawa, T.

    1980-02-01

    Preliminary results of noncircular plasma experiments in Doublet III are reported. Shaping and discharge characteristics in doublet plasmas with high-Z limiters are described. Electron energy confinement and maximum plasma density are in agreement with standard circular tokamak empirical scaling laws. Chromium and molybdenum appear to be the dominant high-Z contaminants while carbon appears to dominate low-Z contaminants. High-Z impurity radiation does not appear to dominate the central power balance.

  3. Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    1998-01-01

    This final report summarizes some of the important scientific contributions to the Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) investigation, to the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) mission, and to NASA that resulted from the work carried out under this contract at Carmel Research Center. These include Dr. Intriligator's participation in the PIT for the TSS-1R simulations and flight, her participation in ROPE team meetings and IWG meetings, her scientific analyses, and her writing and submitting technical papers to scientific journals. The scientific analyses concentrated on the characterization of energetic ions and their possible relation to pickup ion effects, correlation of particle and other effects (e.g., magnetic field, satellite surface), and collaboration with theorists including with ROPE co-investigators. In addition, scientific analyses were carried out of the effects due to satellite gas releases.

  4. Plasma Behavior in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorson, T.; Pegasus Team

    1999-11-01

    Initial operations on PEGASUS are focussed on exploring the extremely low aspect ratio regime of operation (A < 1.2) at low toroidal field with ohmic heating. A magnetic null region is achieved for breakdown using the internal poloidal field coils. With a short-pulse ohmic power supply, Ip 0.1 MA has been achieved with A = 1.1 - 1.4 at Bt = 0.07 T. High loop voltage gives a high current ramp, 30-200 MA/sec, and correspondingly highly elongated plasmas (> 3). The plasmas stretch vertically until contact is made with the upper and lower limiters; this is often followed by an influx of impurities and abrupt decrease in the current ramp rate. Strong radial compression results in termination through an n = 0 instability. Low voltage operation with the longer-pulse ohmic power supply should reduce the plasma elongation and control limiter interactions during current channel growth. Completion of the power systems, plus upgrades to the limiters and wall conditioning will allow operation at full pulse length ( ~ 0.05 sec) and plasma current ( ~ 0.3 MA), and thus provide a target plasma for the higher harmonic fast wave heating system.

  5. The INAF/IAPS Plasma Chamber for ionospheric simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Piero

    2016-04-01

    The plasma chamber is particularly suitable to perform studies for the following applications: - plasma compatibility and functional tests on payloads envisioned to operate in the ionosphere (e.g. sensors onboard satellites, exposed to the external plasma environment); - calibration/testing of plasma diagnostic sensors; - characterization and compatibility tests on components for space applications (e.g. optical elements, harness, satellite paints, photo-voltaic cells, etc.); - experiments on satellite charging in a space plasma environment; - tests on active experiments which use ion, electron or plasma sources (ion thrusters, hollow cathodes, field effect emitters, plasma contactors, etc.); - possible studies relevant to fundamental space plasma physics. The facility consists of a large volume vacuum tank (a cylinder of length 4.5 m and diameter 1.7 m) equipped with a Kaufman type plasma source, operating with Argon gas, capable to generate a plasma beam with parameters (i.e. density and electron temperature) close to the values encountered in the ionosphere at F layer altitudes. The plasma beam (A+ ions and electrons) is accelerated into the chamber at a velocity that reproduces the relative motion between an orbiting satellite and the ionosphere (≈ 8 km/s). This feature, in particular, allows laboratory simulations of the actual compression and depletion phenomena which take place in the ram and wake regions around satellites moving through the ionosphere. The reproduced plasma environment is monitored using Langmuir Probes (LP) and Retarding Potential Analyzers (RPA). These sensors can be automatically moved within the experimental space using a sled mechanism. Such a feature allows the acquisition of the plasma parameters all around the space payload installed into the chamber for testing. The facility is currently in use to test the payloads of CSES satellite (Chinese Seismic Electromagnetic Satellite) devoted to plasma parameters and electric field

  6. Experiments and Theory of Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Qi, B.; Lau, Y. Y.; Johnston, M. D.; Doll, G. L.; Lazarides, A.

    2000-10-01

    Research is underway to accelerate laser ablation plume ions for implantation into substrates. Ablation plasma ion implantation (APII) biases the deposition substrate to a large negative voltage. APII has the advantages of direct acceleration and implantation of ions from metals or any other solid targets. This process is environmentally friendly because it avoids the use of toxic gaseous precursors. Initial experiments are directed towards the implantation of iron ions into silicon substrates at negative voltages from 2-10 kV. A KrF laser ablates iron targets at pulse energies up to 600 mJ and typical repetition rates of 10 Hz. Parameters which can be varied include laser fluence, relative timing of laser and high voltage pulse, and target-to-substrate distance. Spectroscopic diagnostics yield Fe plasma plume electron temperatures up to about 10 eV. Analysis of films will compare surface morphology, hardness and adhesion between deposited Vs accelerated-implanted plumes. A simple one dimensional theory is developed [1] to calculate the implanted ion current, extracted from the ion matrix sheath, as a function of time for various substrate-plume separations. This model accurately recovers Lieberman's classic results when the plume front is initially in contact with the substrate. [1] B. Qi, Y. Y. Lau, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. (to be published). * This research is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  7. SAMPIE (Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment). (Videotape)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    SAMPIE is an in-space technology experiment that flew on STS-62. Its intent is to investigate the potentially damaging effects of space plasma (gases) on different types, sizes, and shapes of solar cells, solar modules, and spacecraft materials.

  8. Partnership in Undergraduate Research Experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Practical laboratory and work experience has been helpful in reinforcing the undergraduate educational experience. With limited resources, individual organizations may struggle to give a student a well rounded opportunity. Most undergraduates work within internships or cooperative educational fram...

  9. Research on Plasma Synthetic Jet Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, X. K.; Nie, W. S.; Hou, Z. Y.

    2011-09-01

    Circular dielectric barrier surface discharge (DBDs) actuator is a new concept of zero mass synthetic jet actuator. The characteristic of discharge and flow control effect of annular-circular plasma synthetic jet actuator has been studied by means of of numerical simulation and experiment. The discharge current density, electron density, electrostatic body force density and flowfield have been obtained. The results show annular-circular actuator can produce normal jet whose velocity will be greater than 2.0 m/s. The jet will excite circumfluence. In order to insure the discharge is generated in the exposed electrode annular and produce centripetal and normal electrostatic body force, the width and annular diameter of exposed electrode must be big enough, or an opposite phase drove voltage potential should be applied between the two electrodes.

  10. Design Experiments in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Paul; Confrey, Jere; diSessa, Andrea; Lehrer, Richard; Schauble, Leona

    2003-01-01

    Indicates the range of purposes and variety of settings in which design experiments have been conducted, delineating five crosscutting features that collectively differentiate design experiments from other methodologies. Clarifies what is involved in preparing for and carrying out a design experiment and in conducting a retrospective analysis of…

  11. The ISPM unified radio and plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Caldwell, J.; Deconchy, Y.; Deschanciaux, C.; Ebbett, R.; Epstein, G.; Groetz, K.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoang, S.; Howard, R.

    1983-01-01

    Hardware for the International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM) Unified Radio and Plasma (URAP) wave experiment is presented. The URAP determines direction and polarization of distant radio sources for remote sensing of the heliosphere, and studies local wave phenomena which determine the transport coefficients of the ambient plasma. Electric and magnetic field antennas and preamplifiers; the electromagnetic compatibility plan and grounding; radio astronomy and plasma frequency receivers; a fast Fourier transformation data processing unit waveform analyzer; dc voltage measurements; a fast envelope sampler for the solar wind, and plasmas near Jupiter; a sounder; and a power converter are described.

  12. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stenson, E. V.; Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Saitoh, H.; Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.; Hugenschmidt, C.

    2015-06-29

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities.

  13. Diagnosis in Complex Plasmas for Microgravity Experiments (PK-3 plus)

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Yasuaki; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Adachi, Satoshi

    2008-09-07

    Microgravity gives the complex (dusty) plasmas, where dust particles are embedded in complete charge neutral region of bulk plasma. The dust clouds as an uncompressed strongly coupled Coulomb system correspond to atomic model with several physical phenomena, crystallization, phase transition, and so on. As the phenomena tightly connect to plasma states, it is significant to understand plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature. The present work shows the electron density in the setup for microgravity experiments currently onboard on the International Space Station.

  14. Contoured-gap coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. D.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Cassibry, J. T.; Hsu, S. C.

    2014-10-01

    Arrays of supersonic, high momentum flux plasma jets can be used as standoff compression drivers for generating spherically imploding plasma liners for driving magneto-inertial fusion, hence the name plasma-jet-driven MIF (PJMIF). HyperV developed linear plasma jets for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL where two guns were successfully tested. Further development at HyperV resulted in achieving the PLX goal of 8000 μg at 50 km/s. Prior work on contoured-gap coaxial guns demonstrated an approach to control the blowby instability and achieved substantial performance improvements. For future plasma liner experiments we propose to use contoured-gap coaxial guns with small Minirailgun injectors. We will describe such a gun for a 60-gun plasma liner experiment. Discussion topics will include impurity control, plasma jet symmetry and topology (esp. related to uniformity and compactness), velocity capability, and techniques planned for achieving gun efficiency of >50% using tailored impedance matched pulse forming networks. Mach2 and UAH SPH code simulations will be included. Work supported by US DOE DE-FG02-05ER54810.

  15. The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment and Plasma Source Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Fields, S. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Young, D. T.; Burch, J. L.; Eaker, N.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; McComas, D. J.; Nordholdt, J. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Berthelier, J. J.; Robson, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) have been developed in response to the requirements of the ISTP Program for three-dimensional (3D) plasma composition measurements capable of tracking the circulation of low-energy (0-500 eV) plasma through the polar magnetosphere. This plasma is composed of penetrating magnetosheath and escaping ionospheric components. It is in part lost to the downstream solar wind and in part recirculated within the magnetosphere, participating in the formation of the diamagnetic hot plasma sheet and ring current plasma populations. Significant obstacles which have previously made this task impossible include the low density and energy of the outflowing ionospheric plasma plume and the positive spacecraft floating potentials which exclude the lowest-energy plasma from detection on ordinary spacecraft. Based on a unique combination of focusing electrostatic ion optics and time of flight detection and mass analysis, TIDE provides the sensitivity (seven apertures of about 1 cm squared effective area each) and angular resolution (6 x 18 degrees) required for this purpose. PSI produces a low energy plasma locally at the POLAR spacecraft that provides the ion current required to balance the photoelectron current, along with a low temperature electron population, regulating the spacecraft potential slightly positive relative to the space plasma. TIDE/PSI will: (a) measure the density and flow fields of the solar and terrestrial plasmas within the high polar cap and magnetospheric lobes; (b) quantify the extent to which ionospheric and solar ions are recirculated within the distant magnetotail neutral sheet or lost to the distant tail and solar wind; (c) investigate the mass-dependent degree energization of these plasmas by measuring their thermodynamic properties; (d) investigate the relative roles of ionosphere and solar wind as sources of plasma to the plasma sheet and ring current.

  16. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, B. |; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, P.

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  17. Status of Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chavers, D. Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Gregory, Judith; Cecil, Jim; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; McCaskill, Greg; Cassibry, Jason; Li Zhongmin

    2006-01-20

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer, lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue if the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment is being performed to test the theory regarding the MHD detachment scenario. The status of that experiment will be discussed in this paper.

  18. [Research on cells ablation characters by laser plasma].

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-hua; Zhang, Xin-gang; Cai, Xiao-tang; Duan, Tao; Feng, Guo-ying; Yang, Li-ming; Zhang, Ya-jun; Wang, Shao-peng; Li, Shi-wen

    2012-08-01

    The study on the mechanism of laser ablated cells is of importance to laser surgery and killing harmful cells. Three radiation modes were researched on the ablation characteristics of onion epidermal cells under: laser direct irradiation, focused irradiation and the laser plasma radiation. Based on the thermodynamic properties of the laser irradiation, the cell temperature rise and phase change have been analyzed. The experiments show that the cells damage under direct irradiation is not obvious at all, but the focused irradiation can cause cells to split and moisture removal. The removal shape is circular with larger area and rough fracture edges. The theoretical analysis found out that the laser plasma effects play a key role in the laser ablation. The thermal effects, radiation ionization and shock waves can increase the deposition of laser pulses energy and impact peeling of the cells, which will greatly increase the scope and efficiency of cell killing and is suitable for the cell destruction. PMID:23156745

  19. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  20. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    A small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) has been constructed at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL) to utilize the reputed high densities at low pressure (.01 T) [1], in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. With the initial construction phase complete, HPX has produced its first plasmas. Efforts to develop and enhance the high temperature and density (10^13 cm-3 and higher) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01 T) reported by Toki, Shinohara, et. al. continue. Currently, particle probes to measure plasmas' temperatures and densities, necessary to discern the plasma mode transitions, are in development. Construction of independent mach and triple probes for single point surface investigations are underway and once installed, they will be followed by a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view. Progress on the construction and findings of these probes on HPX will be reported.

  1. Research in pulsed power plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinshelwood, David; Rose, David

    1993-11-01

    The research was conducted in support of light-ion-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for the Department of Energy (DOE), and nuclear weapon effects simulation (NWES) for the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA). Accomplishments related to ion beams include: development of a practical backup approach to ion beam transport; the first studies of ion-beam interaction with a neutral gas; initial investigations of a promising industrial application of ion beam technology; and detailed theoretical evaluation of several different ion beam transport schemes. Major accomplishments relating to opening switches include: the first direct measurement of the electron density in an opening switch; detailed studies of switch conduction-time scaling; evaluation of several different switch plasma sources; and extensive studies of switch performance into diode loads, leading to the development of a new (and now generally accepted) model of switch behavior.

  2. Burning plasma regime for Fussion-Fission Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    2010-11-01

    The basic aspects of burning plasma regimes of Fusion-Fission Research Facility (FFRF, R/a=4/1 m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, P^DT=50-100 MW, P^fission=80-4000 MW, 1 m thick blanket), which is suggested as the next step device for Chinese fusion program, are presented. The mission of FFRF is to advance magnetic fusion to the level of a stationary neutron source and to create a technical, scientific, and technology basis for the utilization of high-energy fusion neutrons for the needs of nuclear energy and technology. FFRF will rely as much as possible on ITER design. Thus, the magnetic system, especially TFC, will take advantage of ITER experience. TFC will use the same superconductor as ITER. The plasma regimes will represent an extension of the stationary plasma regimes on HT-7 and EAST tokamaks at ASIPP. Both inductive discharges and stationary non-inductive Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) will be possible. FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion (LiWF) plasma regimes, the development of which will be done on NSTX, HT-7, EAST in parallel with the design work. This regime will eliminate a number of uncertainties, still remaining unresolved in the ITER project. Well controlled, hours long inductive current drive operation at P^DT=50-100 MW is predicted.

  3. Initial Plasma Experiment in the Levitated Ring Trap RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Ogawa, Y.; Morikawa, J.; Watanabe, S.; Yano, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-10-01

    Studies on toroidal flowing plasma have started in a superconductor levitated coil device, Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) [1]. RT-1 generates a magnetosphere-like dipole magnetic field configuration that enables various kinds of experiments related to flowing plasmas. The main purpose of the Ring Trap Experiment is to explore a new high-b relaxation state of plasmas predicted by two-fluid relaxation theory of flowing plasmas [2]. Magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 also enables stable pure-magnetic trap of non-neutral plasmas [3], which is potentially suitable for the confinement of charged particles including anti-matters. As an initial experiment, hydrogen plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating using 8.2GHz microwave generated by a klystron with the maximum power of 100kW for 1s pulse operation. The high-Tc superconductor (Bi-2223) ring with a total coil current of 250kAT is magnetically levitated in a vacuum chamber using a PID feedback control system. The field strength in the trap region is 0.03T to 0.3T. Diagnostics for the RT-1 experiment includes spectroscopy, soft X-ray pulse-height analysis with Si (Li) detector, magnetic probes, and Langmuir probes for edge plasma measurement. The initial experimental results and basic plasma parameters of RT-1 will be presented in the meeting. 1. Z. Yoshida et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 1, 008 (2006). 2. Z. Yoshida and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 095001 (2002). 3. Z. Yoshida, et al., in Nonneutral Plasma Physics III, IV.

  4. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C. M.; Brookhart, M.; Collins, C.; Khalzov, I.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B.; Wallace, J.; Clark, M.; Flanagan, K.; Li, Y.; Nonn, P.; Ding, W. X.; Whyte, D. G.; Zweibel, E.

    2014-01-15

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-β phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ∼14 m{sup 3} of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB{sub 6} cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J × B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm > 1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10 < Re < 1000, in the regime where the kinetic energy of the flow exceeds the magnetic energy (M{sub A}{sup 2}=(v/v{sub A}){sup 2}>1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  5. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin; Liu Yanming

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL SPHERICAL TORUS EXPERIMENT RESEARCH RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D.; Menard, J. E.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Diem, S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gates, D. A.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaye, S. M.; Kessel, C. E.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mansfield, D. K.; Majeski, R. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S. S.; Myra, J. R.; Park, H. K.; Paul, S. F.

    2009-07-26

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) produces plasmas, with toroidal aspect ratio as low as 1.25 and plasma currents up to 1.5 MA, which can be heated by up to 6 MW High-Harmonic Fast Waves and up to 7 MW of deuterium Neutral Beam Injection. With these capabilities, NSTX has already made considerable progress in advancing the scientific understanding of high performance plasmas needed for low-aspect-ratio reactor concepts and for ITER. In transport and turbulence research on NSTX, the role of magnetic shear is being elucidated in discharges in which electron energy transport barriers are observed. Scaling studies indicate a weaker dependence on plasma current than at conventional aspect ratio and a significant dependence on toroidal field (B{sub T}).

  7. Surface erosion studies in a plasma-propellant interaction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.; Edwards, C.M.; Nahm, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Efforts in plasma-chemical launchers are of growing interest for hypersonic mass acceleration technology. Energy transfer and mixing processes in plasma-propellant reactions are complex. The key to successful operation of electrothermal-chemical launchers (ETC) is to enhance and control the burn rate through plasma injection into the propellant. The injected plasma, as an external heat source, is usually produced from an electrothermal source ET plasma. Critical components of ETC launchers are subject to heat fluxes produced by the ET source and the additional heat generated during the combustion of the propellant. A plasma-propellant interaction experiment, PIPE, has been operated to explore the erosion behavior of candidate barrel materials under typical ETC combustion environment. The electrothermal plasma source injects a high density, low temperature plasma into a solid propellant that is followed by a material test stand. The burn rate of the propellant is calculated for each shot and the material erosion is evaluated via weight loss. The chamber pressure, discharge current and voltage, and temperature increase of the material are measured for each shot. Various coated material surfaces have been tested. Experiments were conducted on two samples of each coating, with and without propellant.

  8. Research experiments at Hangar L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Research scientist Greg Goins monitors radish growth under a sulfur-microwave light at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long- duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship.

  9. Research experiments at Hangar L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship.

  10. Scaled Laboratory Collisionless Shock Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D.; Everson, E.; Bondarenko, A.; Winske, D.; Constantin, C.; Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasmas have been investigated since the fifties and are typically studied via in-situ satellite observations, which are limited due to the large structure of collisionless shocks in space environments relative to the satellite observation platform. Scaled, repeatable experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA provide a test bed for studying collisionless shocks in the laboratory, where questions of ion and electron heating and acceleration can be addressed and examined in detail. The experiments are performed by ablating a graphite or plastic target using the Raptor kilojoule-class laser facility at UCLA. The laser provides an on-target energy in the range of 100-500 J that drives a super-Alfvénic (MA > 1) debris plasma across a background magnetic field (200-800 G) into the ambient, magnetized LAPD plasma. Typical plasma parameters in the LAPD consist of a H+ or He+ ambient plasma with a core column (diameter > 20 cm ) density ni ~ 1013 cm-3 and electron temperature Te ~ 10 eV embedded in a larger plasma discharge (diameter ~ 80 cm) of density ni ~ 1012 cm-3 and Te ~ 5 eV. The ambient ion temperature is Ti ~ 1 eV. Experimental results from the latest collisionless shock campaign will be presented and compared with two dimensional hybrid simulations of the experiment. Fielded diagnostics include Thomson scattering, ion spectroscopy, magnetic flux probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave reflectometry.

  11. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas.

  12. Experience Effect in E-Learning Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bing; Xu, WenXia; Ge, Jun

    This study is a productivity review on the literature gleaned from SSCI, SCIE databases concerning experience in E-Learning research. The result indicates that the number of literature productions on experience effect in ELearning research is still growing from 2005. The main research development country is Croatia, and from the analysis of the publication year, the number of papers is increasing to the peaking in 2010. And the main source title is British Journal of Educational Technology. In addition the subject area concentrated on Education & Educational Research. Moreover the research focuses on are mainly survey research and empirical research, in order to explore experience effect in E-Learning research. Also the limitations and future research of these research were discussed, so that the direction for further research work can be exploited

  13. Laboratory plasma interactions experiments: Results and implications to future space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip

    1986-01-01

    The experimental results discussed show the significance of the effects caused by spacecraft plasma interactions, in particular the generation of Electromagnetic Interference. As the experimental results show, the magnitude of the adverse effects induced by Plasma Interactions (PI) will be more significant for spacecraft of the next century. Therefore, research is needed to control possible adverse effects. Several techniques to control the selected PI effects are discussed. Tests, in the form of flight experiments, are needed to validate these proposed ideas.

  14. Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) electrodynamic tether experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, Mario D.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) flight of June 26, 1993 has been the most sophisticated and most successful mission that has been carried out thus far with an electrodynamic tether. Three papers from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Washington, DC concerned with the PMG, submitted at the Fourth International Space Conference on Tethers in Space, in Washington, DC, in April 1995, are contained in this document. The three papers are (1) Electromagnetic interactions between the PMG tether and the magneto-ionic medium of the Ionosphere; (2) Tether-current-voltage characteristics, as determined by the Hollow Cathode Operation Modes; and (3) Hawaii-Hilo ground observations on the occasion for the PMG flight of June 23, 1993.

  15. Research Activities at Plasma Research Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies are being developed at NASA-Ames Research Center using a multi-discipline approach. The first step is to understand the basic physics of the chemical reactions in the area of plasma reactors and processes. Low pressure glow discharges are indispensable in the fabrication of microelectronic circuits. These plasmas are used to deposit materials and also etch fine features in device fabrication. However, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of these processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. Our present research involves the study of such plasmas. An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities and lower operating pressures than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The research goal is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental

  16. Research experiments at Hangar L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Visiting scientist Cheryl Frazier monitors a prototype composting machine in Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship.

  17. Pushing the limits of plasma length in inertial fusion laser-plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D; Divol, L; London, R; Michel, P; Berger, R L; Meezan, N; Neumayer, P; Ross, J; Wallace, R; Glenzer, S H

    2007-08-02

    We demonstrate laser beam propagation and low backscatter in laser produced hohlraum plasmas of ignition plasma length. At intensities I < 5 x 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2} greater than 80% of the energy in a blue (3{omega}, 351 nm) laser is transmitted through a L=5-mm long, high-temperature (T{sub e} = 2.5 keV), high-density (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) plasma. These experiments show that the backscatter scales exponentially with plasma length which is consistent with linear theory. The backscatter calculated by a new steady state 3D laser-plasma interaction code developed for large ignition plasmas is in good agreement with the measurements.

  18. Low Pressure High Density Plasma Development on a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. W.; Allen, L. A.; Paolino, R. N.; Thayer, N.; Romano, B.; Stutzman, B. S.; Welicka, C.; Coast Guard Plasma Lab Team

    2011-10-01

    Small helicon plasmas have been employed in various capacities from industry to spacecraft propulsion. At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T), in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to operate at these high densities and pressure to create repeatedly stable Capacitively Coupled Plasma (CCP) and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, and qualitative observations from the optical and electric diagnostics are to be reported.

  19. Pushing the limits of plasma length in inertial-fusion laser-plasma interaction experiments.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Michel, P; Berger, R L; Meezan, N B; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Wallace, R; Glenzer, S H

    2008-01-11

    We demonstrate laser beam propagation and low backscatter in laser produced hohlraum plasmas of ignition plasma length. At intensities I < 5 x 10(14) W cm(-2) greater than 80% of the energy in a blue (3 omega, 351 nm) laser is transmitted through a L=5-mm long, high-temperature (Te = 2.5 keV), high-density (ne = 5 x 10(20) cm(-3)) plasma. These experiments show that the backscatter scales exponentially with plasma length which is consistent with linear theory. The backscatter calculated by a new steady state 3D laser-plasma interaction code developed for large ignition plasmas is in good agreement with the measurements. PMID:18232778

  20. Researching the Study Abroad Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Mark; Wainwright, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The authors propose a paradigm for rigorous scientific assessment of study abroad programs, with the focus being on how study abroad experiences affect psychological constructs as opposed to looking solely at study-abroad-related outcomes. Social learning theory is used as a possible theoretical basis for making testable hypotheses and guiding…

  1. Numerical Investigation of Plasma Detachment in Magnetic Nozzle Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Kamesh; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2008-01-01

    At present there exists no generally accepted theoretical model that provides a consistent physical explanation of plasma detachment from an externally-imposed magnetic nozzle. To make progress towards that end, simulation of plasma flow in the magnetic nozzle of an arcjet experiment is performed using a multidimensional numerical simulation tool that includes theoretical models of the various dispersive and dissipative processes present in the plasma. This is an extension of the simulation tool employed in previous work by Sankaran et al. The aim is to compare the computational results with various proposed magnetic nozzle detachment theories to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms that cause detachment. An applied magnetic field topology is obtained using a magnetostatic field solver (see Fig. I), and this field is superimposed on the time-dependent magnetic field induced in the plasma to provide a self-consistent field description. The applied magnetic field and model geometry match those found in experiments by Kuriki and Okada. This geometry is modeled because there is a substantial amount of experimental data that can be compared to the computational results, allowing for validation of the model. In addition, comparison of the simulation results with the experimentally obtained plasma parameters will provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to plasma detachment, revealing how they scale with different input parameters. Further studies will focus on modeling literature experiments both for the purpose of additional code validation and to extract physical insight regarding the mechanisms driving detachment.

  2. Shuttle wave experiments. [space plasma investigations: design and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1976-01-01

    Wave experiments on shuttle are needed to verify dispersion relations, to study nonlinear and exotic phenomena, to support other plasma experiments, and to test engineering designs. Techniques based on coherent detection and bistatic geometry are described. New instrumentation required to provide modules for a variety of missions and to incorporate advanced signal processing and control techniques is discussed. An experiment for Z to 0 coupling is included.

  3. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade for Fusion Tritium and Nuclear Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.

    2015-11-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of tritium plasma-driven permeation and optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  4. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  5. Plasma Physics Research at an Undergraduate Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalino, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    Undergraduate research experiences have motivated many physics majors to continue their studies at the graduate level. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at SUNY Geneseo, a primarily undergraduate institution, recognizes this simple reality and is committed to ensuring research opportunities are available to interested majors beginning as early as their freshman year. Every year for more than a decade, as many as two dozen students and 8 faculty members have worked on projects related to high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion during the summer months and the academic year. By working with their research sponsors, it has been possible to identify an impressive number of projects suitable for an institution such as Geneseo. These projects tend to be hands-on and require teamwork and innovation to be successful. They also take advantage of in-house capabilities such as the 2 MV tandem pelletron accelerator, a scanning electron microscope, a duoplasmatron ion deposition system and a 64 processor computing cluster. The end products of their efforts are utilized at the sponsoring facilities in support of nationally recognized programs. In this talk, I will discuss a number of these projects and point out what made them attractive and appropriate for an institution like Geneseo, the direct and indirect benefits of the research opportunities for the students and faculty, and how the national programs benefited from the cost-effective use of undergraduate research. In addition, I will discuss the importance of exposure for both students and faculty mentors to the larger scientific community through posters presentations at annual meetings such as the DPP and DNP. Finally, I will address the need for even greater research opportunities for undergraduate students in the future and the importance of establishing longer ``educational pipelines'' to satisfy the ever growing need for top-tier scientists and engineers in industry, academia and the

  6. Semiconductors open a new niche for plasma researchers

    SciTech Connect

    Glanz, J.

    1995-11-24

    This article describes a possible future niche for plasma researchers whose fusion program budgets have been slashed. The computer industry has a continuing need for chips with ever finer features, and semi-conductor makers are counting on improvements in a technique called plasma processing. Thousands of new technical and research jobs are likely to open in this area.

  7. Trends in laser-plasma-instability experiments for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1991-06-06

    Laser-plasma instability experiments for laser fusion have followed three developments. These are advances in the technology and design of experiments, advances in diagnostics, and evolution of the design of high-gain targets. This paper traces the history of these three topics and discusses their present state. Today one is substantially able to produce controlled plasma conditions and to diagnose specific instabilities within such plasmas. Experiments today address issues that will matter for future laser facilities. Such facilities will irradiate targets with {approx}1 MJ of visible or UV light pulses that are tens of nanoseconds in duration, very likely with a high degree of spatial and temporal incoherence. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE): Technical requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. Barry; Ferguson, Dale C.

    1992-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a NASA shuttle space flight experiment scheduled for launch in early 1994. The SAMPIE experiment will investigate plasma interactions of high voltage space power systems in low earth orbit. Solar cell modules, representing several technologies, will be biased to high voltages to characterize both arcing and plasma current collection. Other solar modules, specially modified in accordance with current theories of arcing and breakdown, will demonstrate the possibility of arc suppression. Finally, several test modules will be included to study the basic nature of these interactions. The science and technology goals for the project are defined in the Technical Requirements Document (TRD) which is presented here.

  9. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  10. Stark broadening data for stellar plasma research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Results of an effort to provide to astrophysicists and physicists an as much as possible complete set of Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar opacity calculations, stellar atmosphere modelling, abundance determinations and diagnostics of different plasmas in astrophysics, physics and plasma technology, are presented. Stark broadening has been considered within the semiclassical perturbation, and the modified semiempirical approaches.

  11. CO2 Laser Beat-Wave Experiment in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Hong, Sean; Evans, Russell

    2012-10-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas is a basic yet important investigation in experimental plasma physics and fusion energy research. It is even more advantageous if the wave penetration is independent of the electron acceleration process. Plasma current can be generated through beat-wave mixing process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves (φ>>φpe) into plasma. The beat wave formation process can be efficient if the difference frequency of the two pump waves is matched to a local resonant frequency of the medium, i.e. in this case the local plasma frequency. Beat wave can accelerate plasma electrons via quasi-linear Landau process, which has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves.footnotetextRogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., Phys. Rev. Lett. v68 p3877 (1992). The CO2 lasers provide the high tunability for the wave-particle interaction experiment at a variety of plasma densities with plasma frequency in THz range. Two sections of Lumonics TEA CO2 lasers have been modified to serve as the two pump wave sources with peak power over 100MW. The development of the tunable CO2 lasers, a high-density plasma target source and diagnostics system will be presented. The initial results of unbalanced beat-wave experiment using one high-power pulsed and one low-power CW CO2 lasers will be presented and discussed using the independent plasma source to control the φpe of the interaction region. This work is supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-FG02-10ER55083.

  12. Research on atmospheric pressure plasma processing sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Dong, Xiao-long; Sun, Xiao-liang

    2013-08-01

    The water pollution has become more and more serious with the industrial progress and social development, so it become a worldwide leading environmental management problem to human survival and personal health, therefore, countries are looking for the best solution. Generally speaking, in this paper the work has the following main achievements and innovation: (1) Developed a new plasma device--Plasma Water Bed. (2) At atmospheric pressure condition, use oxygen, nitrogen, argon and helium as work gas respectively, use fiber spectrometer to atmospheric pressure plasma discharge the emission spectrum of measurement, due to the different work gas producing active particle is different, so can understand discharge, different particle activity, in the treatment of wastewater, has the different degradation effects. (3) Methyl violet solution treatment by plasma water bed. Using plasma drafting make active particles and waste leachate role, observe the decolorization, measurement of ammonia nitrogen removal.

  13. PISCES Program: Plasma-materials interactions and edge-plasma physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.

    1992-07-01

    This program investigates and characterizes the behavior of materials under plasma bombordment, in divertor regions. The PISCES facility is used to study divertor and plasma edge management concepts (in particular gas target divertors), as well as edge plasma turbulence and transport. The plasma source consists of a hot LaB[sub 6] cathode with an annular, water-cooled anode and attached drift tube. This cross sectional area of the plasma can be adjusted between 3 and 10 cm. A fast scanning diagnostic probe system was used for mapping plasma density profiles during biased limiter and divertor simulation experiments. Some experimental data are given on: (1) materials and surface physics, (2) edge plasma physics, and (3) a theoretical analysis of edge plasma modelling.

  14. Constituting Information Technology Research: The Experience of IT Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pham, Binh; Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The collective consciousness of effective groups of researchers is characterized by shared understandings of their research object or territory. In this study, we adopted a phenomenographic approach to investigate information technology (IT) research, and its objects and territories, as they are constituted in the experience of IT researchers.…

  15. Experiments on planar plasma flow switches at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Wysocki, F.J.; Bowers, R.; Oona, H.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have performed a series of experiments on the Colt facility at Los Alamos to study the performance of plasma flow switches and to understand the important physics issues which affect that performance. These experiments were done in planar geometry on a small machine to allow for better diagnostic access and a higher repetition rate. The Colt facility is a capacitor bank which stores 300 kJ at maximum charge and produced a peak current of 1.1 MA in 2.0 microseconds for these experiments. The diagnostics used for these experiments included an array of b-dot probes, visible framing pictures, visible spectroscopy, and laser interferometry. Characteristics of the switch are determined from spatial and temporal profiles of the magnetic field and the spatial profile and temperature of the switch plasma. Here the authors present results from experiments for a variety of switch conditions.

  16. Academic Factors that Affect Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taraban, Roman; Logue, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences are considered an essential component in college curricula, and there is an ideological push to provide these experiences to all students. However, it is not clear whether engagement in research is better suited for higher ability undergraduates late in their programs or for all undergraduates and whether…

  17. Limitations of Experiments in Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2012-01-01

    Research based on randomized experiments (along with high-quality quasi-experiments) has gained traction in education circles in recent years. There is little doubt this has been driven in large part by the shift in research funding strategy by the Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences under Grover Whitehurst's lead, described…

  18. Development of high energy pulsed plasma simulator for plasma-lithium trench experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soonwook

    To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device, a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. An overall objective of the project is to develop a compact device that can produce 100 MW/m2 to 1 GW/m2 of plasma heat flux (a typical heat flux level in a major fusion device) in ~ 100 mus (≤ 0.1 MJ/m2) for a liquid lithium plasma facing component research. The existing theta pinch device, DEVeX, was built and operated for study on lithium vapor shielding effect. However, a typical plasma energy of 3 - 4 kJ/m2 is too low to study an interaction of plasma and plasma facing components in fusion devices. No or little preionized plasma, ringing of magnetic field, collisions of high energy particles with background gas have been reported as the main issues. Therefore, DEVeX is reconfigured to mitigate these issues. The new device is mainly composed of a plasma gun for a preionization source, a theta pinch for heating, and guiding magnets for a better plasma transportation. Each component will be driven by capacitor banks and controlled by high voltage / current switches. Several diagnostics including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, optical emission measurement, Rogowski coil, flux loop, and fast ionization gauge are used to characterize the new device. A coaxial plasma gun is manufactured and installed in the previous theta pinch chamber. The plasma gun is equipped with 500 uF capacitor and a gas puff valve. The increase of the plasma velocity with the plasma gun capacitor voltage is consistent with the theoretical predictions and the velocity is located between the snowplow model and the weak - coupling limit. Plasma energies measured with the calorimeter ranges from 0.02 - 0.065 MJ/m2 and increases with the voltage at the capacitor bank. A cross-check between the plasma energy measured with the calorimeter and the triple probe

  19. Freestanding film structures for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Klyuenkov, E B; Lopatin, A Ya; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, Nikolai N; Tsybin, N N

    2013-04-30

    The technique is developed for fabricating 5-500-nm-thick freestanding films of various materials and multilayer compositions. Apart from the traditional use in spectral filtration of soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation, the possibility of using the ultrathin films fabricated by this technique as targets in experiments on laser acceleration of ions is considered. A sample of the target in the form of a 5-nm-thick carbon film on a supporting net is fabricated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  20. Designing Effective Research Experiences for Undergraduates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones Whyte, P.; Dalbotten, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The undergraduate research experience has been recognized as a valuable component of preparation for graduate study. As competition for spaces in graduate schools become more keen students benefit from a formal introduction to the life of a scholar. Over the last twenty years a model of preparing students for graduate study with the research experience as the base has been refined at the University of Minnesota. The experience includes assignment with a faculty member and a series of seminars that support the experience. The seminars cover topics to include academic writing, scholarly literature review, writing of the abstract, research subject protection protocols, GRE test preparation, opportunities to interact with graduate student, preparing the graduate school application, and preparation of a poster to demonstrate the results of the research. The next phase of the process is to determine the role of the undergraduate research experience in the graduate school admission process.

  1. Some results of cislunar plasma research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyshlov, A. S.; Savich, N. A.; Vasilyev, M. B.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Sidorenko, A. I.; Shtern, D. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The main results of plasma cislunar investigations, carried out during Luna-19 and Luna-22 spacecraft flights by means of dual frequency dispersion interferrometry, are briefly outlined. It is shown that a thin layer of plasma, with a height of several tens of kilometers and a maximum concentration of the order 1,000 electrons/cu cm exists above the solar illuminated lunar surface. A physical model of the formation and existence of such a plasma in cislunar space is proposed, taking into account the influence of local magnetic areas on the moon.

  2. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Romano, B.; Zuniga, J.; Schlank, C.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Stutzman, B. S.

    2013-10-01

    Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab(CGAPL) has constructed a Helicon Plasma Experiment. Plasmas will be used in high-temperature and -density diagnostic development for future lab investigations of fusion-grade plasma. Efforts to develop and enhance high temperature and density (1013cm-3 and up) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01T) reported by Toki et al., continue. HPX will integrate a 32-channel National Instruments DAQ(Data Acquisition) board, designed to digitize data from tests. With LabView as the programing language, CGAPL will take samples at 12bits of precision at 2MS/s to create a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The GUI will control experimental variables (one or several concurrent tests) and monitor systems during data collection. Data collection will be conducted with particle probes, currently under construction. Probes, used to discern the plasma mode transitions, will measure plasma particle velocity, temperature, density and floating potential at different regimes. Once independent triple and mach probes for surface point investigations are installed, a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view will follow. Progress on development of GUI and construction of probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  3. The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Canik, J.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Duckworth, R. C.; Goulding, R. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Lore, J. D.; Lumsdaine, A.; McGinnis, W. D.; Meitner, S. J.; Owen, L. W.; Shaw, G. C.; Luo, G.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Next generation plasma generators have to be able to access the plasma conditions expected on the divertor targets in ITER and future devices. The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will address this regime with electron temperatures of 1--10 eV and electron densities of 1021--1020 m-3. The resulting heat fluxes are about 10 MW/m2. MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). Preliminary modeling has been used for pre-design studies of MPEX. MPEX will be capable to expose neutron irradiated samples. In this concept targets will be irradiated in ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or possibly at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and then subsequently (after a sufficient long cool-down period) exposed to fusion reactor relevant plasmas in MPEX. The current state of the pre-design of MPEX including the concept of handling irradiated samples will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  4. Evaluation of a BSW Research Experience: Improving Student Research Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Ellen E.; Hughes, Anne; Bowden, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the experience of 24 BSW students in a faculty-mentored undergraduate research experience (URE) over the course of 1 academic year. In particular, we sought to better understand students' self-perceived sense of competency across 15 specific research skills. In addition, we examined the URE's impact on students' knowledge…

  5. Experiment and simulation on one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Ji-Ting

    2014-10-15

    The transmission characteristics of microwaves passing through one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) have been investigated by experiment and simulation. The PPCs were formed by a series of discharge tubes filled with argon at 5 Torr that the plasma density in tubes can be varied by adjusting the discharge current. The transmittance of X-band microwaves through the crystal structure was measured under different discharge currents and geometrical parameters. The finite-different time-domain method was employed to analyze the detailed properties of the microwaves propagation. The results show that there exist bandgaps when the plasma is turned on. The properties of bandgaps depend on the plasma density and the geometrical parameters of the PPCs structure. The PPCs can perform as dynamical band-stop filter to control the transmission of microwaves within a wide frequency range.

  6. Simulation studies of plasma lens experiments at Daresbury laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanahoe, K.; Mete, O.; Xia, G.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.; Smith, J.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments are planned to study plasma lensing using the VELA and CLARA Front End accelerators at Daresbury Laboratory. This paper presents results of 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the proposed experiments. The variation in focusing strength and emittance growth with beam and plasma parameters are studied in the overdense (plasma density much greater than bunch density) regime for the VELA beam. The effect of spherical and longitudinal aberrations on the beam emittance was estimated through numerical and theoretical studies. Simulation results show that a focusing strength equivalent to a magnetic field gradient of 10 T m-1 can be achieved using VELA, and a gradient of 247 T m-1 can be achieved using CLARA Front End.

  7. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10's of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  8. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-07-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10`s of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  9. Plasma stability studies of the gasdynamic mirror fusion propulsion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, William Julius, Jr.

    The gasdynamic mirror has been proposed as a concept which could form the basis of a highly efficient fusion rocket engine. Gasdynamic mirrors differ from most other mirror type plasma confinement schemes in that they have much larger aspect ratios and operate at somewhat higher plasma densities. These differences are postulated to permit gasdynamic mirrors to confine plasmas in a stable manner without the additional complicated equipment required by low aspect ratio, low plasma density mirror machines. To verify that a gasdynamic mirror could indeed confine plasmas in a stable manner for long periods of time, a small scale experimental gasdynamic mirror was built and tested. The gasdynamic mirror which was constructed is 2.5 meters long and can accommodate plasmas up to 20 centimeters in diameter. The device is able to support mirror magnetic fields of up to two tesla and central cell magnetic fields of up to a third of a tesla. A reciprocating Langmuir probe was used to determine the radial plasma density and electron temperature profiles upon which the experimental results of this study are based. The objective of this experiment was to determine ranges of mirror ratios and plasma densities over which gasdynamic mirror could maintain stable plasmas. Theoretical analyses indicated that plasma magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were likely to occur during subsonic to supersonic flow transitions in the mirror throat region of the gasdynamic mirror. The experimental evidence based upon data derived from the Langmuir probe measurements seems to confirm this analysis. These instabilities result in a loss of plasma confinement and would almost certainly prevent the initiation of fusion reactions. The assumption that a gasdynamic mirror using a simple mirror geometry could be used as a propulsion system, therefore, appears questionable. Fairly simple modifications to the simple mirror concept are presented, however, which if incorporated into the simple mirror

  10. New X-Ray Detector for Caltech Plasma Jet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Ryan; Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process that occurs in plasmas where magnetic field lines break and re-attach to form a different topology having lower energy. Since the magnetic field is changing very fast in the reconnection region, Faraday's Law states that there is a large electric field that accelerates electrons which can then create x-rays. X-rays have been previously observed in the Caltech plasma jet experiment and in similar experiments. We have assembled a new detector consisting of a scintillator that is more than 10 times the volume of the previous one and a light guide that allows the photomultiplier tube to be 2 meters from the experiment so that electrical noise is reduced. The setup has been tested using a weak natural Thorium source and will soon be mounted on the Caltech jet experiment in front of a kapton vacuum window that allows x-rays to pass. Kapton has good transmission above 5 KeV.

  11. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  12. Plasma Jet Experiments Using LULI 2000 Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Koenig, M.; Bouquet, S.; Ozaki, N.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Michaut, C.; Goahec, M. Rabec Le; Nazarov, W.; Courtois, C.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.

    2007-01-01

    We present experiments performed with the LULI2000 nanosecond laser facility. We generated plasma jets by using specific designed target. The main measured quantities related to the jet such as its propagation velocity, temperature and emissive radius evolution are presented. We also performed analytical work, which explains the jet evolution in some cases.

  13. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  14. Complex plasma research on ISS: PK-3 Plus, PK-4 and impact/plasmalab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, P.; Seurig, R.; Stettner, A.; Burfeindt, J.; Morfill, G.; Thomas, H.; Thoma, M.; Höfner, H.; Fortov, W.; Molotkov, W.; Petrov, O.; Lipaev, A.

    2008-07-01

    Complex plasma research under microgravity conditions is one of the present key research topics in fundamental physics and material science on the International Space Station, ISS. In 2001 the so-called PKE-Nefedov facility performed its first experiments in radiofrequency induced complex plasmas. This bilateral German-Russian research facility operated successfully in over 13 missions nearly five years until its internal resources were consumed-resulting so far in over 30 peer-reviewed scientific publications. The next generation experiment apparatus PK-3 Plus with refined and more powerful instruments and diagnostics had its on-orbit commissioning in January 2006. It is performing flawlessly since then and has already been successfully employed during various ISS increments including Russian cosmonauts and ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter. The next generation of plasma research facilities on the ISS is the European-German-Russian PK-4 facility presently under development to investigate direct current induced complex plasmas. PK-4 is planned to be launched at the end of 2009 with the C/D development phase starting in 2007. Plans and studies to continue these research topics after PK-4 are already ongoing. Scientific next generation complex plasma research inserts may be either a part of the IMPACT (International Multi-User Plasma, Atmospheric and Cosmic Dust Twin) research laboratory in the ESA Columbus Module or more likely, part of a multi-purpose accommodation site titled "Plasma Laboratory" in the new Russian research module "MLM" scheduled for launch in 2009. The paper first presents some key results from the PK-3 Plus sessions on the ISS in 2006 and 2007. Second, the paper summarizes the status of PK-4 and highlights future potential research fields/inserts for "Plasma Lab".

  15. Synergy Between Experiments and Simulations in Laser and Beam-Driven Plasma Acceleration and Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Warren B.

    2015-11-01

    Computer simulations have been an integral part of plasma physics research since the early 1960s. Initially, they provided the ability to confirm and test linear and nonlinear theories in one-dimension. As simulation capabilities and computational power improved, then simulations were also used to test new ideas and applications of plasmas in multi-dimensions. As progress continued, simulations were also used to model experiments. Today computer simulations of plasmas are ubiquitously used to test new theories, understand complicated nonlinear phenomenon, model the full temporal and spatial scale of experiments, simulate parameters beyond the reach of current experiments, and test the performance of new devices before large capital expenditures are made to build them. In this talk I review the progress in simulations in a particular area of plasma physics: plasma based acceleration (PBA). In PBA a short laser pulse or particle beam propagates through long regions of plasma creating plasma wave wakefields on which electrons or positrons surf to high energies. In some cases the wakefields are highly nonlinear, involve three-dimensional effects, and the trajectories of plasma particles cross making it essential that fully kinetic and three-dimensional models are used. I will show how particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations were initially used to propose the basic idea of PBA in one dimension. I will review some of the dramatic progress in the experimental demonstration of PBA and show how this progress was dramatically helped by a synergy between experiments and full-scale multi-dimensional PIC simulations. This will include a review of how the capability of PIC simulation tools has improved. I will also touch on some recent progress on improvements to PIC simulations of PBA and discuss how these improvements may push the synergy further towards real time steering of experiments and start to end modeling of key components of a future linear collider or XFEL based on PBA

  16. Solar array experiments on the SPHINX satellite. [Space Plasma High voltage INteraction eXperiment satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Space Plasma, High Voltage Interaction Experiment (SPHINX) is the name given to an auxiliary payload satellite scheduled to be launched in January 1974. The principal experiments carried on this satellite are specifically designed to obtain the engineering data on the interaction of high voltage systems with the space plasma. The classes of experiments are solar array segments, insulators, insulators with pin holes and conductors. The satellite is also carrying experiments to obtain flight data on three new solar array configurations: the edge illuminated-multijunction cells, the teflon encased cells, and the violet cells.

  17. Plasma Response to Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    M.G. Bell, H.W. Kugel, R. Kaita, L.E. Zakharov, H. Schneider, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Bell, R. Maingi, S. Ding, S.M. Kaye, S.F. Paul, S.P. Gerhardt, J.M. Canik, J.C. Hosea, G. Taylor and the NSTX Research Team

    2009-08-20

    Experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have shown beneficial effects on the performance of divertor plasmas as a result of applying lithium coatings on the graphite and carbonfiber- composite plasma-facing components. These coatings have mostly been applied by a pair of lithium evaporators mounted at the top of the vacuum vessel which inject collimated streams of lithium vapor towards the lower divertor. In NBI-heated, deuterium H-mode plasmas run immediately after the application of lithium, performance modifications included decreases in the plasma density, particularly in the edge, and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron and ion temperatures and the energy confinement time. Reductions in the number and amplitude of ELMs were observed, including complete ELM suppression for periods up to 1.2 s, apparently as a result of altering the stability of the edge. However, in the plasmas where ELMs were suppressed, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities, although not of lithium itself which remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. The impurity buildup could be inhibited by repetitively triggering ELMs with the application of brief pulses of an n = 3 radial field perturbation. The reduction in the edge density by lithium also inhibited parasitic losses through the scrape-off layer of ICRF power coupled to the plasma, enabling the waves to heat electrons in the core of H-mode plasmas produced by NBI. Lithium has also been introduced by injecting a stream of chemically stabilized, fine lithium powder directly into the scrape-off layer of NBI-heated plasmas. The lithium was ionized in the SOL and appeared to flow along the magnetic field to the divertor plates. This method of coating produced similar effects to the evaporated lithium but at lower amounts.

  18. Material Surface Characteristics and Plasma Performance in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Matthew James

    The performance of a tokamak plasma and the characteristics of the surrounding plasma facing component (PFC) material surfaces strongly influence each other. Despite this relationship, tokamak plasma physics has historically been studied more thoroughly than PFC surface physics. The disparity is particularly evident in lithium PFC research: decades of experiments have examined the effect of lithium PFCs on plasma performance, but the understanding of the lithium surface itself is much less complete. This latter information is critical to identifying the mechanisms by which lithium PFCs affect plasma performance. This research focused on such plasma-surface interactions in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), a spherical torus designed to accommodate solid or liquid lithium as the primary PFC. Surface analysis was accomplished via the novel Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) diagnostic system. In a series of experiments on LTX, the MAPP x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) capabilities were used for in vacuo interrogation of PFC samples. This represented the first application of XPS and TDS for in situ surface analysis of tokamak PFCs. Surface analysis indicated that the thin (dLi ˜ 100nm) evaporative lithium PFC coatings in LTX were converted to Li2O due to oxidizing agents in both the residual vacuum and the PFC substrate. Conversion was rapid and nearly independent of PFC temperature, forming a majority Li2O surface within minutes and an entirely Li2O surface within hours. However, Li2O PFCs were still capable of retaining hydrogen and sequestering impurities until the Li2 O was further oxidized to LiOH, a process that took weeks. For hydrogen retention, Li2O PFCs retained H+ from LTX plasma discharges, but no LiH formation was observed. Instead, results implied that H+ was only weakly-bound, such that it almost completely outgassed as H 2 within minutes. For impurity sequestration, LTX plasma performance

  19. Development of a plasma driven permeation experiment for TPE

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buchenauer, Dean; Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masa; Donovan, David; Youchison, Dennis; Merrill, Brad

    2014-04-18

    Experiments on retention of hydrogen isotopes (including tritium) at temperatures less than 800 ?C have been carried out in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory [1,2]. To provide a direct measurement of plasma driven permeation in plasma facing materials at temperatures reaching 1000 ?C, a new TPE membrane holder has been built to hold test specimens (=1 mm in thickness) at high temperature while measuring tritium permeating through the membrane from the plasma facing side. This measurement is accomplished by employing a carrier gas that transports the permeating tritium from the backside of the membrane to ionmore » chambers giving a direct measurement of the plasma driven tritium permeation rate. Isolation of the membrane cooling and sweep gases from TPE’s vacuum chamber has been demonstrated by sealing tests performed up to 1000 ?C of a membrane holder design that provides easy change out of membrane specimens between tests. Simulations of the helium carrier gas which transports tritium to the ion chamber indicate a very small pressure drop (~700 Pa) with good flow uniformity (at 1000 sccm). Thermal transport simulations indicate that temperatures up to 1000 ?C are expected at the highest TPE fluxes.« less

  20. Development of a plasma driven permeation experiment for TPE

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean; Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masa; Donovan, David; Youchison, Dennis; Merrill, Brad

    2014-04-18

    Experiments on retention of hydrogen isotopes (including tritium) at temperatures less than 800 ?C have been carried out in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory [1,2]. To provide a direct measurement of plasma driven permeation in plasma facing materials at temperatures reaching 1000 ?C, a new TPE membrane holder has been built to hold test specimens (=1 mm in thickness) at high temperature while measuring tritium permeating through the membrane from the plasma facing side. This measurement is accomplished by employing a carrier gas that transports the permeating tritium from the backside of the membrane to ion chambers giving a direct measurement of the plasma driven tritium permeation rate. Isolation of the membrane cooling and sweep gases from TPE’s vacuum chamber has been demonstrated by sealing tests performed up to 1000 ?C of a membrane holder design that provides easy change out of membrane specimens between tests. Simulations of the helium carrier gas which transports tritium to the ion chamber indicate a very small pressure drop (~700 Pa) with good flow uniformity (at 1000 sccm). Thermal transport simulations indicate that temperatures up to 1000 ?C are expected at the highest TPE fluxes.

  1. Research on Orbital Plasma: Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samir, Uri; Fontheim, Ernest G.

    2000-01-01

    Enhancements of the temperature of electrons in spacecraft plasma wakes have been reported for numerous cases and this phenomenon has been discussed both empirically and theoretically. However, very few measurements seem to have been made of the ion temperature within plasma wakes-possibly because the great majority of ion measurements were focussed on obtaining geophysical parameters and, hence, were confined to the region ahead of the spacecraft. Recently, however, an enhancement of the temperature of ions was discovered in data obtained in the wake of the Space Shuttle during the Spacelab-2 mission. At the time of that publication, this was the only known observation of this type. Herein, we report an additional case of ion temperature enhancement in a plasma wake. The data were taken during the Tethered Satellite System Reflight mission (TSS-1R) in the wake of the tethered satellite during passive (no current flow) operations. The measurements were obtained with the Differential Ion Flux Probe, or DIFP.

  2. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Witherspoon, Doug; Gilmore, Marc

    2009-11-01

    Implosions of plasma liners in cylindrically or spherically convergent geometries can produce high pressures and temperatures with a confinement or dwell time of the order of the rarefaction timescale of the liner. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), to be built at LANL, will explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding plasma liners with the spherical convergence of hypersonic plasma jets. Modeling will be performed using SPHC and MACH2. According to preliminary 3D SPHC results, high Z plasma liners imploding on vacuum with ˜1.5MJ of initial stored energy will reach ˜100kbar, which is a main objective of the experimental program. Among the objectives of the theoretical PLX effort are to assist in the diagnostic analysis of the PLX, identify possible deleterious effects due to instabilities or asymmetries, identify departures from ideal behavior due to thermal and radiative transport, and help determine scaling laws for possible follow-on applications of ˜1 Mbar HEDP plasmas and magneto-inertial fusion. An overview of the plan to accomplish these objectives will be presented, and preliminary results will be summarized.

  3. Photoionized Plasma and Opacity Experiments on the Z Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-04-01

    Laboratory experiments at Z use high energy density to create plasma conditions similar to extreme astrophysical environments, including stellar interiors and accretion powered objects. The importance of radiation unifies these topics, even though the plasmas involved are very different. Understanding stellar interiors requires knowledge of radiation transport in dense, hot, collision-dominated plasma. A Z x-ray source was used to measure iron plasma transmission at 156 eV electron temperature, 2x higher than in prior work. The data provide the first experimental tests of absorption features critical for stellar interior opacity models and may provide insight into whether the present discrepancy between solar models and helioseismology originates in opacity model deficiencies or in some other aspect of the solar model. In contrast, accretion physics requires interpretation of x-ray spectra from lower density photoionization-dominated plasma. Exploiting astrophysical spectra requires a spectral model that connects the observations with a model that describes the overall picture of the astrophysical object. However, photoionized plasma spectral models are largely untested. Z-pinch radiation was used to create photoionized iron and neon plasmas with photoionization parameter 5-25 erg cm /s. Comparisons with the data improve x-ray photoionization models and promote more accurate interpretation of spectra acquired with astrophysical observatories. The prospects for new experiments at the higher radiation powers provided by the recently upgraded Z facility will be described.* In collaboration with scientists from CEA, LANL, LLNL, Oxford, Prism, Queens University, Swarthmore College, U. Nevada Reno, and Sandia ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. The plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft: Applications of laboratory simulations and active in situ experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, Uri

    1986-01-01

    Attempts to gain an understanding of spacecraft plasma dynamics via experimental investigation of the interaction between artificially synthesized, collisionless, flowing plasmas and laboratory test bodies date back to the early 1960's. In the past 25 years, a number of researchers have succeeded in simulating certain limited aspects of the complex spacecraft-space plasma interaction reasonably well. Theoretical treatments have also provided limited models of the phenomena. Several active experiments were recently conducted from the space shuttle that specifically attempted to observe the Orbiter-ionospheric interaction. These experiments have contributed greatly to an appreciation for the complexity of spacecraft-space plasma interaction but, so far, have answered few questions. Therefore, even though the plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft is fundamental to space technology, it remains largely an open issue. A brief overview is provided of the primary results from previous ground-based experimental investigations and the preliminary results of investigations conducted on the STS-3 and Spacelab 2 missions. In addition, several, as yet unexplained, aspects of the spacecraft-space plasma interaction are suggested for future research.

  5. Enhancement of the radiation yield in plasma flow switch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Buff, J. ); Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Roderick, N.F. ); Degnan, J.H. ); Frese, M.H. ); Turchi, P.J. . Dept. of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering)

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports that in a series of experiments that was performed at the Phillips Laboratory (Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico), the Shiva Star fast capacitor bank, an inductive store, and a plasma flow switch were used together to deliver multimega-ampere currents with submicrosecond rise times to cylindrical foil loads. Based on two-dimensional MHD simulations with the MACH2 code, the authors previously suggested design modifications to the switch that, when implemented in experiments, substantially increased the fraction of available current that was delivered to the load. The authors have performed a new series of numerical simulations of the plasma flow switch/imploding load system with the goal of discovering a way to boost the total power radiated by the imploding plasmas as it stagnates on the axis of symmetry. The changes to the experimental design that were investigated and which are discussed in this paper include variations of: The shape of the electrodes, size, and mass of the load foil, structure of the axial view vanes, shape and mass of the switching plasma, material from which the load is constructed, the degree to which the load is bowed, and the energy of the capacitor bank. Radiation yields in the range 6-9 TW are predicted for future experiments on Shiva Star.

  6. Laser-plasma-interaction experiments using multikilojoule lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.

    1987-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of several laser-plasma-interaction experiments using multikilojoule lasers, and considers their implications for laser fusion. The experiments used 1.06, 0.53, 0.35, and 0.26 ..mu..m light to produce relatively large, warm, planar plasmas and to study the effect of laser wavelength and density-gradient scale length on the Stimulated Raman Scattering and on the scattering of light at frequencies near the incident laser frequency by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering or other processes. The results of these experiments suggest that some laser wavelength between 0.2 and 0.6 ..mu..m will be required for high-gain laser fusion.

  7. Tritium plasma experiment: Parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Masashi; Sharpe, J. Phillip; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Causey, Rion A.

    2011-08-15

    The tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g., beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most ({approx}800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  8. Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) - parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; Robert D. Kolasinski; J. Phillip Sharpe; Rion A. Causey

    2011-08-01

    The Tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g. beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction (PWI) studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2}s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most (approximately 800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  9. Magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research - 1987-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    This review covers research performed in the area of magnetospheric plasma waves and wave-particle interactions as well as magnetospheric radio emissions. The report focuses on the near-completion of the discovery phase of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres with the successful completion of the Voyager 2 encounters of Neptune and Uranus. Consideration is given to the advances made in detailed studies and theoretical investigations of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the terrestrial magnetosphere or in magnetospheric plasmas in general.

  10. Initial Results from the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edward; Konopka, Uwe; Lynch, Brian; Adams, Stephen; Leblanc, Spencer; Artis, Darrick; Dubois, Ami; Merlino, Robert; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2014-10-01

    The MDPX device is envisioned as a flexible, multi-user, research instrument that can perform a wide range of studies in fundamental and applied plasma physics. The MDPX device consists of two main components. The first is a four-coil, open bore, superconducting magnet system that is designed to produce uniform magnetic fields of up to 4 Tesla and non-uniform magnetic fields with gradients up to up to 2 T/m configurations. Within the warm bore of the magnet is placed an octagonal vacuum chamber that has a 46 cm outer diameter and is 22 cm tall. The primary missions of the MDPX device are to: (1) investigate the structural, thermal, charging, and collective properties of a plasma as the electrons, ions, and finally charged microparticles become magnetized; (2) study the evolution of a dusty plasma containing magnetic particles (paramagnetic, super-paramagnetic, or ferromagnetic particles) in the presence of uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields; and, (3) explore the fundamental properties of strongly magnetized plasmas (``i.e., dust-free'' plasmas). This presentation will summarize the initial characterization of the magnetic field structure, initial plasma parameter measurements, and the development of in-situ and optical diagnostics. This work is supported by funding from the NSF and the DOE.

  11. Progress in Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (10^13 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1], for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range and employs an electromagnet to provide the external energy in the plasma's magnetic field to transition from the H-Mode to the Helicon Mode. An acceleration coil, currently under construction, will place the plasma in the vacuum chamber for optical and particle probing. With the initial construction phase complete and first plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel DAQ system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, magnetic coils, and qualitative observations from the optical and electric diagnostics are to be reported. [4pt] [1] K. Toki, et al., Thin Solid Films 506-507 (2005).

  12. Faculty Experiences in a Research Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Courtney M.; Kozlowski, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines the experiences of faculty in a research learning community developed to support new faculty in increasing scholarly productivity. A phenomenological, qualitative inquiry was used to portray the lived experiences of faculty within a learning community. Several themes were found including: accountability, belonging,…

  13. Embodied Experience in Educational Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengtsson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The intention of this article is to make an educational analysis of Merleau-Ponty's theory of experience in order to see what it implicates for educational practice as well as educational research. In this way, we can attain an understanding what embodied experience might mean both in schools and other educational settings and in researching…

  14. Experience With a Hepatitis-free Plasma Protein Solution

    PubMed Central

    Salsbury, A. J.; Brozovich, M.

    1968-01-01

    Clinical experience with a 4.3% solution of plasma protein treated to render it free of the agent of serum hepatitis is satisfactory. Sixty-seven transfusions of 400 ml. of the commercial preparation were given to 33 patients (25 with acute blood loss, 4 with severe burns, and 4 with hypoproteinaemia secondary to hepatic or renal disease). The solution was clinically as effective as reconstituted dried plasma in expanding plasma volume and in replacing serum protein lost in burns. Adverse effects were mild pyrexial reactions in one case and facial flushing in another. No cases of serum hepatitis occurred. The solution is available for immediate use, it can be kept at room temperature, and, as it does not cause rouleaux formation, it can be given before blood is taken for grouping and cross-matching. PMID:5662990

  15. Mission and Design of the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D. M.; Jardin, S. C.; Schmidt, J. A.; Thome, R. J.; Sauthoff, N. R.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Nelson, Brad E; Ulrickson, M. A.; Kessel, C. E.; Mandrekas, J.; Neumeyer, C. L.; Schultz, J. H.; Rutherford, P. H.; Wesley, J. C.; Young, K. M.; Nevins, W. M.; Houlberg, Wayne A; Uckan, Nermin A; Woolley, R. W.; Baker, C. C.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments are needed to test and extend present understanding of confinement, macroscopic stability, alpha-driven instabilities, and particle/power exhaust in plasmas dominated by alpha heating. A key issue is to what extent pressure profile evolution driven by strong alpha heating will act to self-organize advanced configurations with large bootstrap current fractions and internal transport barriers. A design study of a Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) is underway to assess near term opportunities for advancing the scientific understanding of self-heated fusion plasmas. The emphasis is on understanding the behavior of fusion plasmas dominated by alpha heating (Q ≥ 5) that are sustained for durations comparable to the characteristic plasma time scales (≥ 20 τE and ~ τskin, where τskin is the time for the plasma current profile to redistribute at fixed current). The programmatic mission of FIRE is to attain, explore, understand and optimize alphadominated plasmas to provide knowledge for the design of attractive magnetic fusion energy systems. The programmatic strategy is to access the alpha-heating-dominated regime with confidence using the present advanced tokamak data base (e.g., Elmy-H-mode, ≤ 0.75 Greenwald density) while maintaining the flexibility for accessing and exploring other advanced tokamak modes (e. g., reversed shear, pellet enhanced performance) at lower magnetic fields and fusion power for longer durations in later stages of the experimental program. A major goal is to develop a design concept that could meet these physics objectives with a construction cost in the range of $1B.

  16. Planning for an integrated research experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Ahle, L.E.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Kishek, R.A.; de Hoon, M.J.L.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kirhek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Sangster, T.C.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.

    2001-03-25

    We describe the goals and research program leading to the Heavy Ion Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). We review the basic constraints which lead to a design and give examples of parameters and capabilities of an IRE. We also show design tradeoffs generated by the systems code IBEAM.

  17. Los Alamos research in nozzle based coaxial plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuer, Jay; Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard; Henins, Ivars; Moses, Ronald, Jr.; Wurden, Glen

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: research approach; perspectives on efficient magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) operation; NASA and DOE supported research in ideal magnetohydrodynamic plasma acceleration and flow, electrode phenomena, and magnetic nozzles; and future research directions and plans.

  18. SUMMA hot-ion plasma heating research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    The SUMMA superconducting magnetic mirror facility and the associated hot-ion plasma research were described. SUMMA is characterized by intense magnetic fields and a large-diameter working bore (41 cm diameter) with room-temperature access. The goal of the plasma research program is to produce steady-state plasmas of fusion reactor densities and temperatures (but not confinement times). The program includes electrode development to produce a hot, dense, large-volume, steady-state plasma and diagnostics development to document the plasma properties. SUMMA and its hot-ion plasma are ideally suited to develop advanced plasma diagnostics methods. Two such methods whose requirements are well matched to SUMMA are: (1) heavy ion beam probing to measure plasma space potential; and (2) submillimeter wavelength laser Thomson scattering to measure local ion temperature.

  19. Laboratory photoionized plasma experiments at Z - Comparison with modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, D.; Lockard, T.; Durmaz, T.; Hall, I.; Mancini, R.; Bailey, J.; Rochau, G.; Loisel, G.; Heeter, R.; Liedahl, D.

    2013-10-01

    Photoionized plasmas are common in astrophysical environments, such as x-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. We discuss an experimental and modeling effort to study the atomic kinetics in plasmas of this type via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. Results from a first pass thru our 2nd-generation dataset are compared with results of several modeling codes attempting to simulate our experimental conditions. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted by the collapse of a z-pinch to produce and backlight a Neon photoionized plasma in a cm-scale gas cell at various distances from the z-pinch. The filling pressure is monitored in situ providing the plasma particle number density. High-resolution spectra from a TREX spectrometer are processed with a suite of specially designed IDL tools to produce transmission spectra, which show absorption in several ionization stages of Neon. Analysis independent of atomic kinetics calculations yields the charge state distribution and ion areal densities used to benchmark atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature, extracted from a level population ratio, is used to test heating models. This work is sponsored in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas grant program through DOE Grant DE-FG52-09NA29551, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  20. The Marshall Magnetic Mirror Beam-Plasma Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Edwards, David L.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma propulsion is an advanced propulsion concept with the potential to realize very high specific impulse. Present designs for plasma propulsion devices share a common feature, the incorporation of a magnetic mirror. A magnetic mirror is a plasma confinement scheme whereby charged particles are trapped (or reflected) between two regions of high magnetic field strength. A cylindrical geometry is most often employed to create a magnetic mirror, which is a natural geometry for propulsion devices. To utilize the magnetic mirror configuration in a plasma propulsion device, however, will require efficient coupling of power into the system. With the development of compact and efficient electron sources, such as hollow cathode sources, coupling power into a magnetic mirror using electron beams may be an attractive approach. A system, the Marshall Magnetic Mirror (M3), has been constructed to study the coupling of an electron beam into a magnetic mirror. A description of the M3 device will be provided as well as data from initial beam-plasma coupling experiments.

  1. On 45 Years of Space Plasma Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    After 47 years of immersion in space physics, I have many stories to tell, some of which are not suitable for all audiences and will remain untold today. But after a few such tales, I will recount the most satisfying research I have done and then outline a new book I am working on entitled "The Earth's Electric Field". I also will outline five sources of electric fields: thunderstorms, motions of the atmosphere, the solar wind, the magnetosphere, and wave phenomena. The most satisfying work I have published involves proof that the Earth was hit by a comet in 1908, studies of the long-lasting meteor trail during Leonids1998/9, and results of barium/TMA releases. On the human side, the most satisfying work has been with Cornell students, both undergraduate and graduate. Although many books have been written on the Earth's magnetic field, to my knowledge, none have been written on the electric field. This is not surprising since Gauss first noted that the Earth is a giant magnet hundreds of years ago. The first evidence of an electric field in the atmosphere was provided by Ben Franklin with his kite/thunderstorm experiments. We began considering the possibility of an electric field in space about 50 years ago, using the motion of auroral patches. Then, in the 1960s, Forrest Mozer and Ulf Fahleson showed that the electric field could be measured using rockets and, eventually, satellites. Luckily, I was Forrest's second student and Ulf was in Berkeley for a year, so I was in the perfect place for a graduate student. Thus began the quest for knowledge of the Earth's electric field, which continues today.

  2. NSF program gives research experience to undergrads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Daniel W.

    Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) is a new National Science Foundation (NSF) program designed to attract talented undergraduates into research careers in science, engineering, and mathematics. The program is intended to provide active research experience to students while they are still in their undergraduate years. There are two categories of support under this program: REU Sites and REU Supplements. The supplement, as the name implies, is to supplement existing NSF grants to permit an investigator to hire an undergraduate assistant. Here, I will report o n the REU site award made to the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska for summer 1987.

  3. Participatory Action Research Experiences for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sample McMeeking, L. B.; Weinberg, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REU) have been shown to be effective in improving undergraduate students' personal/professional development, ability to synthesize knowledge, improvement in research skills, professional advancement, and career choice. Adding to the literature on REU programs, a new conceptual model situating REU within a context of participatory action research (PAR) is presented and compared with data from a PAR-based coastal climate research experience that took place in Summer 2012. The purpose of the interdisciplinary Participatory Action Research Experiences for Undergraduates (PAREU) model is to act as an additional year to traditional, lab-based REU where undergraduate science students, social science experts, and community members collaborate to develop research with the goal of enacting change. The benefits to traditional REU's are well established and include increased content knowledge, better research skills, changes in attitudes, and greater career awareness gained by students. Additional positive outcomes are expected from undergraduate researchers (UR) who participate in PAREU, including the ability to better communicate with non-scientists. With highly politicized aspects of science, such as climate change, this becomes especially important for future scientists. Further, they will be able to articulate the relevance of science research to society, which is an important skill, especially given the funding climate where agencies require broader impacts statements. Making science relevant may also benefit URs who wish to apply their science research. Finally, URs will gain social science research skills by apprenticing in a research project that includes science and social science research components, which enables them to participate in future education and outreach. The model also positively impacts community members by elevating their voices within and outside the community, particularly in areas severely underserved

  4. Commercialization of Plasma-Assisted Technologies: The Indian Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, P. I.

    The paper describes an initiative by the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India in establishing links with the Indian industry for developing and commercialising advanced plasma-based industrial technologies. This has culminated in the creation of a self-financing technology development, incubation, demonstration and delivery facility. A business plan for converting the knowledge base to commercially viable technologies conceived technology as a product and the industry as the market and addressed issues like resistance to new technologies, the key role of entrepreneur, thrust areas and the necessity of technology incubation and delivery. Success of this strategy is discussed in a few case studies. We conclude by identifying the cost, environmental, strategic and techno-economic aspects, which would be the prime drivers for plasma-assisted manufacturing technology in India.

  5. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Frank, John; Karama, Jackson; Hopson, Jordan; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas (~ 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  6. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. W.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Paolino, R. N.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Crilly, P. B.

    2013-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T), for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. With the initial construction phase complete and repeatable plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  7. Radiative Shocks And Plasma Jets As Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, M.; Loupias, B.; Vinci, T.; Ozaki, N.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Rabec le Goahec, M.; Falize, E.; Bouquet, S.; Courtois, C.; Nazarov, W.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Schiavi, A.

    2007-08-02

    Dedicated laboratory astrophysics experiments have been developed at LULI in the last few years. First, a high velocity (70 km/s) radiative shock has been generated in a xenon filled gas cell. We observed a clear radiative precursor, measure the shock temperature time evolution in the xenon. Results show the importance of 2D radiative losses. Second, we developed specific targets designs in order to generate high Mach number plasma jets. The two schemes tested are presented and discussed.

  8. Plasma Simulation for the SHIP Experiment at GDT

    SciTech Connect

    Anikeev, A.V.; Bagryansky, P.A.; Collatz, S.; Noack, K

    2005-01-15

    The concept of the Synthesized Hot Ion Plasmoid (SHIP) experiment at the gas dynamic trap (GDT) facility of the Budker Institute Novosibirsk was presented at the 29{sup th} EPS Conference. During the last year several numerical simulations were made by means of the Integrated Transport Code System (ITCS) to determine the best experimental scenario for getting high plasma parameters. This contribution presents important results of the recent numerical simulations of SHIP by means of the ITCS modules.

  9. Radiative Shocks And Plasma Jets As Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, M.; Loupias, B.; Vinci, T.; Ozaki, N.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Rabec Le Goahec, M.; Falize, E.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Herpe, G.; Baroso, P.; Nazarov, W.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Courtois, C.; Woolsey, N. C.; Gregory, C. D.; Howe, J.; Schiavi, A.; Atzeni, S.

    2007-08-01

    Dedicated laboratory astrophysics experiments have been developed at LULI in the last few years. First, a high velocity (70 km/s) radiative shock has been generated in a xenon filled gas cell. We observed a clear radiative precursor, measure the shock temperature time evolution in the xenon. Results show the importance of 2D radiative losses. Second, we developed specific targets designs in order to generate high Mach number plasma jets. The two schemes tested are presented and discussed.

  10. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  11. Supersonic gas jets for laser-plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, K.; Veisz, L.

    2012-05-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of De Laval nozzles, which are ideal for gas jet generation in a wide variety of experiments. Scaling behavior of parameters especially relevant to laser-plasma experiments as jet collimation, sharpness of the jet edges and Mach number of the resulting jet is studied and several scaling laws are given. Special attention is paid to the problem of the generation of microscopic supersonic jets with diameters as small as 150 μm. In this regime, boundary layers dominate the flow formation and have to be included in the analysis.

  12. Experiments on Negative Ion Plasmas in a Q-Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Tao

    Three experiments on negative ion plasmas in the University of Iowa Q-machine IQ-2 are described in this thesis. In the Lower-Hybrid wave experiment, the low-frequency (ion-ion mode) waves are excited, waves propagate at a right angle to the magnetic field. The wave frequencies increase as the negative ion concentration increases, in agreement with the dispersion relation obtained from fluid theory. In the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiment, the negative ions have a generally destabilizing effect on the instability driven by a relative drift between ions in adjacent layers. However, for large negative ion concentrations, enhanced radial diffusion associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz oscillations tends to have a stabilizing effect due to a "mixing" of ion flows in adjacent layer. In the diffusion experiment, the K^ {+} ions experience a displacement across the magnetic filed on the order of their gyroradius upon collision with a negative ion, leading to an enhancement in the rate of cross-field diffusion over that expected in the ordinary K^{+}/electron plasma.

  13. Studies of dynamic processes related to active experiments in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Peter M.; Neubert, Torsten

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report for grant NAGw-2055, 'Studies of Dynamic Processes Related to Active Experiments in Space Plasmas', covering research performed at the University of Michigan. The grant was awarded to study: (1) theoretical and data analysis of data from the CHARGE-2 rocket experiment (1keV; 1-46 mA electron beam ejections) and the Spacelab-2 shuttle experiment (1keV; 100 mA); (2) studies of the interaction of an electron beam, emitted from an ionospheric platform, with the ambient neutral atmosphere and plasma by means of a newly developed computer simulation model, relating model predictions with CHARGE-2 observations of return currents observed during electron beam emissions; and (3) development of a self-consistent model for the charge distribution on a moving conducting tether in a magnetized plasma and for the potential structure in the plasma surrounding the tether. Our main results include: (1) the computer code developed for the interaction of electrons beams with the neutral atmosphere and plasma is able to model observed return fluxes to the CHARGE-2 sounding rocket payload; and (2) a 3-D electromagnetic and relativistic particle simulation code was developed.

  14. Measurements of Electron Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2013-10-01

    Knowing spatial profiles of electron density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (n plasma is essential to understanding LPI initiation in inertial confinement fusion research. In the recent Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) was deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. Plasmas were produced from flat CH targets illuminated by Nike KrF laser with total energies up to 1 kJ of 0.5 ~ 1 nsec FWHM pulses. The GIR resolved ne up to 3 ×1021 /cm3 in space taking 2D snapshot images of probe laser (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. The individual beamlet transmittances were also measured for Te estimation. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera simultaneously detected light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay instabilities. The measured spatial profiles are compared with simulation results from the FAST3D radiation hydrocode and their effects on the LPI observations are investigated. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  15. Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

    2002-01-29

    Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

  16. Experimental Characterization of Plasma Flow in Reconnection Scaling Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Intrator, T.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G.

    2007-11-01

    Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX) studies linear and non-linear evolution of up to four interacting current-carrying plasma cords with emphasis on kink instability and magnetic reconnection. During the kink instability, the presence of an axial flow gives rise to a Doppler shifted frequency and rotation of the kink, which makes studying the flow important. The axial velocity, plasma density, and electron temperature in one plasma column were measured on RSX with the miniaturized Mach and triple electrostatic probes installed on 3D positioning systems. Significant plasma flow with the velocity on the order of the ion acoustic speed was detected, with the velocity decreasing downstream. 2D profiles obtained at two axial locations were then employed to estimate the radial profile of the ion viscosity using the integral momentum balance equation. The results show that the ion momentum flux is dissipated by the ion-ion viscosity due to significant radial shear of axial velocity. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show temperature of about 1eV. Comparison of the measured viscosity with Braginskii's theoretical predictions demonstrates a good agreement, which is an important new result useful for both astrophysical jets and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Supported by OFES, and DOE/LANL contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  17. Experiments on Plasma Injection into a Centrifugally Confined System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I.; Elton, R.; Young, W.; Teodorescu, C.; Morales, C. H.; Ellis, R. F.

    2009-11-01

    We describe the cross-field injection of plasma into a centrifugally-confined system. Two different types of plasma railgun have been installed on the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) in an attempt to drive that plasma's rotation. The initial gun was a coaxial device designed to mitigate the blowby instability. The second one was a MiniRailgun with a rectangular bore oriented so that the MCX magnetic field augments the railgun's internal magnetic field. Tests at HyperV indicate this MiniRailgun reaches much higher densities than the original gun, although muzzle velocity is slightly reduced. We discuss the impact of these guns on MCX for various conditions. Initial results show that even for a 2 kG field, firing the MiniRailgun modifies oscillations of the MCX diamagnetic loops and can impact the core current and voltage. The gun also has a noticeable impact on MCX microwave emissions. These observations suggest plasma enters the MCX system. We also compare diagnostic data collected separately from MCX for these and other guns, focussing primarily on magnetic measurements.

  18. Plasma response to lithium-coated plasma-facing components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M. G.; Kugel, H.; Kaita, R.; Zakharov, L. E.; Schneider, H; LaBlanc, B. P.; Mansfield, D.K.; Bell, R. E.; Maingi, R.; Ding, S.; Kaye, S.; Paul, S.F.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Canik, John; Hosea, J.; Taylor, G.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment ( NSTX) have shown beneficial effects on the performance of divertor plasmas as a result of applying lithium coatings on the graphite and carbon-fiber-composite plasma-facing components. These coatings have mostly been applied by a pair of lithium evaporators mounted at the top of the vacuum vessel which inject collimated streams of lithium vapor toward the lower divertor. In neutral beam injection (NBI)-heated deuterium H-mode plasmas run immediately after the application of lithium, performance modifications included decreases in the plasma density, particularly in the edge, and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron and ion temperatures and the energy confinement time. Reductions in the number and amplitude of edge-localized modes (ELMs) were observed, including complete ELM suppression for periods of up to 1.2 s, apparently as a result of altering the stability of the edge. However, in the plasmas where ELMs were suppressed, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Z(eff) and the radiated power as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities, although not of lithium itself which remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. The impurity buildup could be inhibited by repetitively triggering ELMs with the application of brief pulses of an n = 3 radial field perturbation. The reduction in the edge density by lithium also inhibited parasitic losses through the scrape-off-layer of ICRF power coupled to the plasma, enabling the waves to heat electrons in the core of H-mode plasmas produced by NBI. Lithium has also been introduced by injecting a stream of chemically stabilized, fine lithium powder directly into the scrape-off-layer of NBI-heated plasmas. The lithium was ionized in the SOL and appeared to flow along the magnetic field to the divertor plates. This method of coating produced similar effects to the evaporated lithium but

  19. Laser plasma interaction experiments in the context of inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Lewis, K.; Michel, P.; Michard, A.; Baldis, H. A.; Hulin, S.; Pesme, D.; Hüller, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Riconda, C.; Weber, S.

    2004-12-01

    In laser fusion, the coupling and the propagation of the laser beams in the plasma surrounding the pellet must be well controlled for to succeed in producing a high energy level. To achieve thermonuclear ignition and high gain, the coupling efficiency must be as high as possible, the uniformity of the energy deposition must be very good and the fast electron generation must be minimized. This implies a deep understanding of the laser plasma interaction mechanisms to keep the nonlinear processes at a low level. Important advances in laser plasma interaction physics have been achieved thanks to the converging efforts of the experimental and theoretical approaches. Among the different studies of the last few years, we will report results on three themes which are important for future fusion experiments. The first concerns the ability of plasmas to induce temporal and spatial incoherence to the laser beams during their propagation. Beam smoothing, beam spraying and increased incoherence may in turn reduce the level of backscattering instabilities. In laser fusion, multiple beams are used to irradiate the target. The effect of the overlap of the laser beams on parametric instabilities may complicate the problem. Not only is there the interplay between instabilities driven by one beam, but also the interplay between instabilities driven by different beams. In the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) experiment, although the overall stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) reflectivity was reduced, a well-defined resonance of the amplitude of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) associated with SBS has been observed for waves propagating along the bisecting direction between two laser beams. Energy transfer between two identical laser beams has been observed and correlated with plasma induced incoherence. The nonlinear saturation of stimulated scattering instabilities is a fundamental ingredient of the understanding of the observed and future reflectivity levels

  20. Assessing Research Participants’ Perceptions of their Clinical Research Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Rhonda G.; Lee, Laura M.; Yessis, Jennifer; Coller, Barry S.; Henderson, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Participants’ perceptions of their research experiences provide valuable measures of ethical treatment, yet no validated instruments exist to measure these experiences. We conducted focus groups of research participants and professionals as the initial step in developing a validated instrument. Methods Research participants enrolled in twelve focus groups, consisting of: 1) individuals with disorders undergoing interventions or 2) in natural history studies; or 3) healthy volunteers. Research professionals participated in six separate groups of 1) IRB members, ethicists, Research Subject Advocates, 2) research nurses/coordinators, or 3) investigators. Focus groups used standard methodologies. Results 85 participants and 29 professionals enrolled at 8 academic centers. Altruism and personal relevance of the research were commonly identified motivators; financial compensation was less commonly mentioned. Participants were satisfied with informed consent processes but disappointed if not provided test results, or study outcomes. Positive relationships with research teams were valued highly. Research professionals were concerned about risks, undue influence, and informed consent. Conclusions Participants join studies for varied, complex reasons, notably altruism and personal relevance. They value staff relationships, health gains, new knowledge, and compensation, and expect professionalism and good organization. Based on these insights, we propose specific actions to enhance participant recruitment, retention and satisfaction. PMID:22212221

  1. A research program in magnetogasdynamics utilizing hypervelocity coaxial plasma generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spight, C.

    1976-01-01

    A broadly-gauged research program in magnetogasdynamics utilizing hypervelocity coaxial plasma generators is presented. A complete hypervelocity coaxial plasma generator facility was assembled and tested. Significant progress was made in the direction of understanding the important processes in the interaction of hypervelocity MGD flow with transverse applied fields. It is now proposed to utilize the accumulated experimental capability and theoretical analysis in application to the analysis and design parameterization of pulsed magnetogasdynamic direct energy convertor configurations.

  2. Experimental characterization of a coaxial plasma accelerator for a colliding plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wiechula, J.; Hock, C.; Iberler, M.; Manegold, T.; Schönlein, A.; Jacoby, J.

    2015-04-15

    We report experimental results of a single coaxial plasma accelerator in preparation for a colliding plasma experiment. The utilized device consisted of a coaxial pair of electrodes, accelerating the plasma due to J×B forces. A pulse forming network, composed of three capacitors connected in parallel, with a total capacitance of 27 μF was set up. A thyratron allowed to switch the maximum applied voltage of 9 kV. Under these conditions, the pulsed currents reached peak values of about 103 kA. The measurements were performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill at gas pressures between 10 Pa and 14 000 Pa. A gas mixture of ArH{sub 2} with 2.8% H{sub 2} served as the discharge medium. H{sub 2} was chosen in order to observe the broadening of the H{sub β} emission line and thus estimate the electron density. The electron density for a single plasma accelerator reached peak values on the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}. Electrical parameters, inter alia inductance and resistance, were determined for the LCR circuit during the plasma acceleration as well as in a short circuit case. Depending on the applied voltage, the inductance and resistance reached values ranging from 194 nH to 216 nH and 13 mΩ to 23 mΩ, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma velocity was measured using a fast CCD camera. Plasma velocities of 2 km/s up to 17 km/s were observed, the magnitude being highly correlated with gas pressure and applied voltage.

  3. Experimental characterization of a coaxial plasma accelerator for a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Hock, C.; Iberler, M.; Manegold, T.; Schönlein, A.; Jacoby, J.

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results of a single coaxial plasma accelerator in preparation for a colliding plasma experiment. The utilized device consisted of a coaxial pair of electrodes, accelerating the plasma due to J ×B forces. A pulse forming network, composed of three capacitors connected in parallel, with a total capacitance of 27 μF was set up. A thyratron allowed to switch the maximum applied voltage of 9 kV. Under these conditions, the pulsed currents reached peak values of about 103 kA. The measurements were performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill at gas pressures between 10 Pa and 14 000 Pa. A gas mixture of ArH2 with 2.8% H2 served as the discharge medium. H2 was chosen in order to observe the broadening of the Hβ emission line and thus estimate the electron density. The electron density for a single plasma accelerator reached peak values on the order of 1016 cm-3 . Electrical parameters, inter alia inductance and resistance, were determined for the LCR circuit during the plasma acceleration as well as in a short circuit case. Depending on the applied voltage, the inductance and resistance reached values ranging from 194 nH to 216 nH and 13 mΩ to 23 mΩ, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma velocity was measured using a fast CCD camera. Plasma velocities of 2 km/s up to 17 km/s were observed, the magnitude being highly correlated with gas pressure and applied voltage.

  4. Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin

    2014-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (10 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. HPX is completing construction of triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and is designing a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  5. Research Experiences in Community College Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauregard, A.

    2011-12-01

    The benefits of student access to scientific research opportunities and the use of data in curriculum and student inquiry-driven approaches to teaching as effective tools in science instruction are compelling (i.e., Ledley, et al., 2008; Gawel & Greengrove, 2005; Macdonald, et al., 2005; Harnik & Ross. 2003). Unfortunately, these experiences are traditionally limited at community colleges due to heavy faculty teaching loads, a focus on teaching over research, and scarce departmental funds. Without such hands-on learning activities, instructors may find it difficult to stimulate excitement about science in their students, who are typically non-major and nontraditional. I present two different approaches for effectively incorporating research into the community college setting that each rely on partnerships with other institutions. The first of these is a more traditional approach for providing research experiences to undergraduate students, though such experiences are limited at community colleges, and involves student interns working on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Specifically, students participate in a water quality assessment study of two local bayous. Students work on different aspects of the project, including water sample collection, bio-assay incubation experiments, water quality sample analysis, and collection and identification of phytoplankton. Over the past four years, nine community college students, as well as two undergraduate students and four graduate students from the local four-year university have participated in this research project. Aligning student and faculty research provides community college students with the unique opportunity to participate in the process of active science and contribute to "real" scientific research. Because students are working in a local watershed, these field experiences provide a valuable "place-based" educational opportunity. The second approach links cutting-edge oceanographic

  6. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Lisa Ruffe and Neil Yorio prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  7. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Neil Yorio and Lisa Ruffe prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  8. Research on Orbital Plasma-Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Wright, K.

    1994-01-01

    Since the development of probe theory by Langmuir and Blodgett, the problem of current collection by a charged spherically or cylindrically symmetric body has been investigated by a number of authors. This paper overviews the development of a fully three-dimensional particle simulation code which can be used to understand the physics of current collection in three dimensions and can be used to analyze data resulting from the future tethered satellite system (TSS). According to the TSS configurations, two types of particle simulation models were constructed: a simple particle simulation (SIPS) and a super particle simulation (SUPS). The models study the electron transient response and its asymptotic behavior around a three dimensional, highly biased satellite. The potential distribution surrounding the satellite is determined by solving Laplace's equation in the SIPS model and by solving Poisson's equation in the SUPS model. Thus, the potential distribution in space is independent of the density distribution of the particles in the SUPS model but it does depend on the density distribution of the particles in the SUPS model. The evolution of the potential distribution in the SUPS model is described. When the spherical satellite is charged to a highly positive potential and immersed in a plasma with a uniform magnetic field, the formation of an electron torus in the equatorial plane (the plane in perpendicular to the magnetic field) and elongation of the torus along the magnetic field are found in both the SIPS and the SUPS models but the shape of the torus is different. The areas of high potential that exist in the polar regions in the SUPS model exaggerate the elongation of the electron torus along the magnetic field. The current collected by the satellite for different magentic field strengths is investigated in both models. Due to the nonlinear effects present in SUPS, the oscillating phenomenon of the current collection curve during the first 10 plasma periods

  9. Advanced electric propulsion and space plasma contactor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments performed on an 8 cm dia. ring cusp magnetic field ion thruster are described. The results show the effects of anode and cathode position and size, ring cusp axial location and discharge chamber length on plasma ion energy cost and extracted ion fraction. Thruster performance is shown to be improved substantially when optimum values of these parameters are used. Investigations into the basic plasma phenomena associated with the process of plasma contacting are described. The results show the process of electron collection from a background plasma to a hollow cathode plasma contactor exhibits a higher impedance than the process of electron emission from the hollow cathode. The importance of having cold ions present to facilitate the plasma contacting process is shown. Results of experiments into the behavior of hollow cathodes operating at high interelectrode pressures (up to approx. 100 Torr) on nitrogen and ammonia are presented. They suggest that diffuse emission from the insert of a hollow cathode can be sustained at high interelectrode pressures if the cathode is made of non-conducting material and the cathode internal pressure is reduced by evacuating the cathode interior. A theoretical model of discharge chamber operation developed for inert gas thrusters is extended so it can be used to evaluste the performance of mercury ion thrusters. Predictions of the model are compared to experimental results obtained on two 30 cm dia. thrusters.

  10. International Research Students' Experiences in Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeoh, Joanne Sin Wei; Terry, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The flow of international students to study in Australia increases each year. It is a challenge for students to study abroad in a different sociocultural environment, especially for postgraduate research students, as they experience numerous difficulties in an unfamiliar and vastly different study environment. A study aimed to investigate the…