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Sample records for plasma source ion

  1. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  2. Key issues in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Matossian, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a scaleable, non-line-of-sight method for the surface modification of materials. In this paper, we consider three important issues that should be addressed before wide-scale commercialization of PSII: (1) implant conformality; (2) ion sources; and (3) secondary electron emission. To insure uniform implanted dose over complex shapes, the ion sheath thickness must be kept sufficiently small. This criterion places demands on ion sources and pulsed-power supplies. Another limitation to date is the availability of additional ion species beyond B, C, N, and 0. Possible solutions are the use of metal arc vaporization sources and plasma discharges in high-vapor-pressure organometallic precursors. Finally, secondary electron emission presents a potential efficiency and x-ray hazard issue since for many metallurgic applications, the emission coefficient can be as large as 20. Techniques to suppress secondary electron emission are discussed.

  3. Plasma uniformity of microwave ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tokiguichi, K.; Sakudo, N.; Suzuki, K.; Kanomata, I.

    1980-09-01

    The ion saturation current uniformities of two different type plasma sources, a coaxial and a Lisitano coil type, are investigated using a moveable Langmuir probe. They both operate under off-resonance microwave discharge. H/sub 2/ or Ar is used as the discharge gas. The coaxial source provides better uniformities for ion saturation current, electron temperature, and electon density than the Lisitano coil, independent of the discharge gas species. The ion saturation current with the coaxial source is uniform within approx.15% inside a 40-mm-diam circle for a 0.17 Pa H/sub 2/ discharge. However, with the Lisitano coil, uniformity is limited to a 20-mm-diam circle. Furthermore, the Lisitano coil easily suffers from heat distortion because of difficulties in realizing a cooled system. It is also experimentally confirmed that the coaxial-type source is more appropriate for obtaining high density plasma under continuous operation.

  4. A commercial plasma source ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuer, J.T.; Adler, R.A.; Horne, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Empire Hard Chrome has recently installed commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSU) equipment built by North Star Research Corporation. Los Alamos National Laboratory has assisted in this commercialization effort via two Cooperative Research and Development Agreements to develop the plasma source for the equipment and to identify low-risk commercial PSII applications. The PSII system consists of a 1 m x 1 m cylindrical vacuum chamber with a rf plasma source. The pulse modulator is capable of delivering pulses kV and peak currents of 300 A at maximum repetition rate of 400 Hz. thyratron tube to switch a pulse forming network which is tailored to match the dynamic PSII load. In this paper we discuss the PSII system, process facility, and early commercial applications to production tooling.

  5. Plasma uniformity of microwave ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokiguichi, K.; Sakudo, N.; Suzuki, K.; Kanomata, I.

    1980-10-01

    The ion saturation current uniformities of two different type plasma sources, a coaxial and a Lisitano coil type, are investigated using a moveable Langmuir probe. They both operate under off-resonance microwave discharge; H2 or Ar is used as the discharge gas. The coaxial source provides better uniformities for ion saturation current, electron temperature, and electron density than the Lisitano coil, independent of the discharge gas species. The ion saturation current with the coaxial source is uniform within about 15% inside a 40-mm-diam circle for a 0.17 Pa H2 discharge. However, with the Lisitano coil uniformity is limited to a 20-mm-diam circle and the coil is subject to heat distortion because of difficulties in realizing a cooled system

  6. Magnetic plasma confinement for laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Adeyemi, A; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Kondo, K; Dabrowski, R

    2010-02-01

    A laser ion source (LIS) can easily provide a high current beam. However, it has been difficult to obtain a longer beam pulse while keeping a high current. On occasion, longer beam pulses are required by certain applications. For example, more than 10 micros of beam pulse is required for injecting highly charged beams to a large sized synchrotron. To extend beam pulse width, a solenoid field was applied at the drift space of the LIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The solenoid field suppressed the diverging angle of the expanding plasma and the beam pulse was widened. Also, it was observed that the plasma state was conserved after passing through a few hundred gauss of the 480 mm length solenoid field. PMID:20192365

  7. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1983-01-01

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  8. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1980-12-12

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  9. Ion Beam Plasma Interactions in the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Kesterson, A.; Kamar, O.; Lin, Y.; Munoz, J.; Wang, X.

    2008-11-01

    A 100 KeV NEC duoplasmatron is used to produce an energetic ion beam (10 KeV < E < 100 KeV). The beam is sent through plasmas produced by the ASTRAL helicon plasma source. The beam current and beam size are measured by a device combining Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) and Faraday Cup (FC) features. ASTRAL produces bright intense He/Ne/Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field < 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. Depending on the ion beam energy and the ratio of beam density over plasma density different wave instabilities will be generated within the plasmas. A real-time spectrum analyzer will be used to identify the wave instabilities and their evolution in the plasma. We will present early experimental results together with some preliminary theoretical simulation using 2D and 3D hybrid simulation codes. In these codes, ions are treated as fully kinetic particles while electrons are treated as a fluid. Both species are moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field.

  10. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 μm-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25

  11. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse. PMID:22380206

  12. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  13. Conditioning of ion sources for mass spectrometry of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Mass spectrometry is a useful diagnostic technique for monitoring plasma species and plasma-surface interactions. In order to maximize the sensitivity of measurements of hydrogen-fueled fusion plasmas or hydrogen-based discharge cleaning and etching plasmas, the ion sources of mass spectrometers are operated at or near the high pressure limit of 10/sup -4/ Torr (10/sup -2/ Pa). Such high ambient pressures of hydrogen give rise to high background levels of residual gases such as H/sub 2/O, CO, and CH/sub 4/, due to surface reactions on the ion source electrodes. For a commonly used ion source configuration, the residual gas production is a linear function of the ambient H/sub 2/ pressure. Hydrogen conditioning can reduce the absolute residual gas levels. Steady-state residual gas production is observed in a conditioned ion source, which is related to a balance of diffusion and sorption on the electrode surfaces.

  14. Plasma Ion Sources for Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources using direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) plasma have been developed in this thesis work. These ion sources can provide stable discharge currents of ~ 1 mA, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the corona discharge, a widely used API source. The plasmas can be generated and maintained in 1 atm of various buffer gases by applying -500 to -1000 V (DC plasma) or 1-15 W with a frequency of 165 kHz (RF plasma) on the needle electrode. These ion sources have been used with liquid injection to detect various organic compounds of pharmaceutical, biotechnological and environmental interest. Key features of these ion sources include soft ionization with the protonated molecule as the largest peak, and superb sensitivity with detection limits in the low picogram or femtomole range and a linear dynamic range over ~4 orders of magnitude. The RF plasma has advantages over the DC plasma in its ability to operate in various buffer gases and to produce a more stable plasma. Factors influencing the performance of the ion sources have been studied, including RF power level, liquid flow rate, chamber temperature, solvent composition, and voltage affecting the collision induced dissociation (CID). Ionization of hydrocarbons by the RF plasma API source was also studied. Soft ionization is generally produced. To obtain high sensitivity, the ion source must be very dry and the needle-to-orifice distance must be small. Nitric oxide was used to enhance the sensitivity. The RF plasma source was then used for the analysis of hydrocarbons in auto emissions. Comparisons between the corona discharge and the RF plasma have been made in terms of discharge current, ion residence time, and the ion source model. The RF plasma source provides larger linear dynamic range and higher sensitivity than the corona discharge, due to its much larger discharge current. The RF plasma was also observed to provide longer ion residence times and was not

  15. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam ChargeNeutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson,Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-10-01

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage ({approx} 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K{sup +} ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments.

  16. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H- source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H- ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD models

  17. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources.

    PubMed

    Veitzer, Seth A; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H; Beckwith, Kristian R C

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H(-) source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H(-) ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD

  18. Double-layer ion acceleration triggered by ion magnetization in expanding radiofrequency plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-10-04

    Ion energy distribution functions downstream of the source exit in magnetically expanding low-pressure plasmas are experimentally investigated for four source tube diameters ranging from about 5 to 15 cm. The magnetic-field threshold corresponding to a transition from a simple expanding plasma to a double layer-containing plasma is observed to increase with a decrease in the source tube diameter. The results demonstrate that for the four geometries, the double layer and the accelerated ion beam form when the ion Larmour radius in the source becomes smaller than the source tube radius, i.e., when the ions become magnetized in the source tube.

  19. The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment and Plasma Source Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Fields, S. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Young, D. T.; Burch, J. L.; Eaker, N.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; McComas, D. J.; Nordholdt, J. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Berthelier, J. J.; Robson, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) have been developed in response to the requirements of the ISTP Program for three-dimensional (3D) plasma composition measurements capable of tracking the circulation of low-energy (0-500 eV) plasma through the polar magnetosphere. This plasma is composed of penetrating magnetosheath and escaping ionospheric components. It is in part lost to the downstream solar wind and in part recirculated within the magnetosphere, participating in the formation of the diamagnetic hot plasma sheet and ring current plasma populations. Significant obstacles which have previously made this task impossible include the low density and energy of the outflowing ionospheric plasma plume and the positive spacecraft floating potentials which exclude the lowest-energy plasma from detection on ordinary spacecraft. Based on a unique combination of focusing electrostatic ion optics and time of flight detection and mass analysis, TIDE provides the sensitivity (seven apertures of about 1 cm squared effective area each) and angular resolution (6 x 18 degrees) required for this purpose. PSI produces a low energy plasma locally at the POLAR spacecraft that provides the ion current required to balance the photoelectron current, along with a low temperature electron population, regulating the spacecraft potential slightly positive relative to the space plasma. TIDE/PSI will: (a) measure the density and flow fields of the solar and terrestrial plasmas within the high polar cap and magnetospheric lobes; (b) quantify the extent to which ionospheric and solar ions are recirculated within the distant magnetotail neutral sheet or lost to the distant tail and solar wind; (c) investigate the mass-dependent degree energization of these plasmas by measuring their thermodynamic properties; (d) investigate the relative roles of ionosphere and solar wind as sources of plasma to the plasma sheet and ring current.

  20. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, J.R.

    1988-08-16

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner. 7 figs.

  1. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, John R.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner.

  2. A double-plasma source of continuous bipolar ion-ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dudin, S. V.; Rafalskyi, D. V.

    2013-01-21

    A double-plasma source capable of the generation of a continuous bipolar ion-ion beam is described. The quasi-neutral ion-ion flow to an extraction electrode is formed in the system containing primary inductively coupled plasma separated from a secondary plasma by an electrostatic grid-type filter. The total current of each ion species to the 250 mm diameter extraction electrode is about 80 mA; the electron current does not exceed 30% of the ion current. Method of positive/negative ion current ratio control is proposed, allowing the ion currents ratio variation in wide range.

  3. Efficient cesiation in RF driven surface plasma negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belchenko, Yu.; Ivanov, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on hydrogen negative ions production in the large radio-frequency negative ion source with cesium seed are described. The system of directed cesium deposition to the plasma grid periphery was used. The small cesium seed (˜0.5 G) provides an enhanced H- production during a 2 month long experimental cycle. The gradual increase of negative ion yield during the long-term source runs was observed after cesium addition to the source. The degraded H- production was recorded after air filling to the source or after the cesium washing away from the driver and plasma chamber walls. The following source conditioning by beam shots produces the gradual recovery of H- yield to the high value. The effect of H- yield recovery after cesium coverage passivation by air fill was studied. The concept of cesium coverage replenishment and of H- yield recovery due to sputtering of cesium from the deteriorated layers is discussed.

  4. Efficient cesiation in RF driven surface plasma negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Belchenko, Yu; Ivanov, A; Konstantinov, S; Sanin, A; Sotnikov, O

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on hydrogen negative ions production in the large radio-frequency negative ion source with cesium seed are described. The system of directed cesium deposition to the plasma grid periphery was used. The small cesium seed (∼0.5 G) provides an enhanced H(-) production during a 2 month long experimental cycle. The gradual increase of negative ion yield during the long-term source runs was observed after cesium addition to the source. The degraded H(-) production was recorded after air filling to the source or after the cesium washing away from the driver and plasma chamber walls. The following source conditioning by beam shots produces the gradual recovery of H(-) yield to the high value. The effect of H(-) yield recovery after cesium coverage passivation by air fill was studied. The concept of cesium coverage replenishment and of H(-) yield recovery due to sputtering of cesium from the deteriorated layers is discussed. PMID:26932015

  5. Collector and source sheaths of a finite ion temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwager, L.A.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The region between a Maxwellian plasma source and an absorbing surface is described theoretically with a static, kinetic plasma--sheath model and modeled numerically with a dynamic, electrostatic particle simulation. In the kinetic theory, Poisson's equation and Vlasov equations govern the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution of the ions and electrons. The results in this paper for collector potential and plasma transport agree with the bounded model of Emmert {ital et} {ital al}. (Phys. Fluids {bold 23}, 803 (1980)). However, this approach differs from those using traditional Bohm sheath analysis by {plus minus}0.25 (in units of electron temperature) for potential drop through the collector sheath of a hydrogen plasma. In both the theory and simulation, the plasma source injects equal fluxes of ions and electrons with half-Maxwellian velocities and various mass and temperature ratios and is assumed to have a zero electric field. The potential change within a spatially distributed, full Maxwellian source region is represented with the source sheath potential drop that depends primarily on temperature ratio. This source sheath evolves over a few Debye lengths from the source to neutralize the injected plasma. The plasma flows to an electrically floating collector where the more familiar electron-repelling collector sheath appears. The collector potential {psi}{sub {ital C}} and source sheath potential drop {psi}{sub {ital P}} (in units of electron temperature) are evaluated as a function of mass and temperature ratio. The velocity moments of density, drift velocity, temperature, kinetic energy flux, and heat flux are also derived as a function of {psi}{sub {ital C}} and {psi}{sub {ital P}}. Comparisons with electrostatic particle simulations are shown for the ion/electron mass ratios of 40 and 100 and temperature ratios of 0.1, 1, and 10.

  6. Collector and source sheaths of a finite ion temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwager, L.A.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1988-04-13

    The region between a Maxwellian plasma source and an absorbing surface is modeled with an electrostatic particle simulation and with a kinetic plasma-sheath model. In the kinetic model, Poisson's equation and Vlasov equations govern the velocity distribution of the ions and electrons. Our numerical and theoretical results for collector potential and plasma transport agree with the bounded model of Emmert et al., but differ somewhat from those using traditional Bohm sheath analysis. The plasma source injects equal fluxes of half-Maxwellian ions and electrons with specified mass and temperature ratios and is assumed to have a zero electric field. Representing the potential change within a distributed full-Maxwellian source region, the source potential drop depends primarily on temperature ratio and evolves a few Debye lengths from the source to neutralize the injected plasma. The plasma flows to an electrically floating collector where the more familiar electron-repelling collector sheath appears. Profiles of potential, density, drift velocity, temperature, kinetic energy flux, and heat flux are shown from simulation; all compare very well with theory. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-02-28

    Efficient deposition of high-quality coatings often requires controlled application of excited or ionized particles. These particles are either condensing (film-forming) or assisting by providing energy and momentum to the film growth process, resulting in densification, sputtering/etching, modification of stress, roughness, texture, etc. In this review, the technical means are surveyed enabling large area application of ions and plasmas, with ion energies ranging from a few eV to a few keV. Both semiconductortype large area (single wafer or batch processing with {approx} 1000 cm{sup 2}) and in-line web and glass-coating-type large area (> 10{sup 7} m{sup 2} annually) are considered. Characteristics and differences between plasma and ion sources are explained. The latter include gridded and gridless sources. Many examples are given, including sources based on DC, RF, and microwave discharges, some with special geometries like hollow cathodes and E x B configurations.

  8. Sources and Transport of Plasma Sheet Ions During Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Raeder, J.; Walker, R. J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the sources and transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that took place on November 24, 1996. The sources and acceleration mechanisms of ions observed at Geotail were determined by calculating the trajectories of thousands of ions backward in time. We found that during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and were already in the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase more plasma mantle ions reached the Geotail location. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the energy gained was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration during the ions' crossing of the equatorial current sheet just prior to the detection of the ions.

  9. RF plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon S.; Logan, B. Grant

    2003-05-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being used as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus the ion beam to a small spot size. A radio frequency (RF) plasma source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The goal is to operate the source at pressures {approx} 10{sup -5} Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10{sup -4}-10{sup -1} Torr and electron densities in the range of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Recently, pulsed operation of the source has enabled operation at pressures in the 10{sup -6} Torr range with densities of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Near 100% ionization has been achieved. The source has been integrated with the NTX facility and experiments have begun.

  10. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  11. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled bymore » the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.« less

  12. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  13. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2008-06-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus them to a small spot size and compress their axial length. The plasma source should operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally-applied fields. To produce long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients have been developed. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) is covered with ceramic material. High voltage ({approx} 8 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A BaTiO{sub 3} source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested and characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma in the 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} density range. The source was integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments, and yielded current compression ratios {approx} 120. Present research is developing multi-meter-long and higher density sources to support beam compression experiments for high energy density physics applications.

  14. Mass analyzer ``MASHA'' high temperature target and plasma ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchenkov, A. G.; Rassadov, D. N.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bystrov, V. A.; Chizov, A. Yu.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Efremov, A. A.; Guljaev, A. V.; Kozulin, E. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Starodub, G. Ya.; Voskresensky, V. M.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Paschenko, S. V.; Zelenak, A.; Tikhonov, V. I.

    2004-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer of super heavy atoms (MASHA) has been created at the FLNR JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10-3. First experiments with the FEBIAD plasma ion source have been done and give an efficiency of ionization of up to 20% for Kr with a low flow test leak (6 particle μA). We suppose a magnetic field optimization, using the additional electrode (einzel lens type) in the extracting system, and an improving of the vacuum conditions in order to increase the ion source efficiency.

  15. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Vodopianov, A V; Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Yushkov, G Yu

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 micros and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10(12) cm(-3), required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T(e) approximately = 20 eV. PMID:20192326

  16. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vodopianov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2010-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 {mu}s and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T{sub e}{approx_equal}20 eV.

  17. Negative hydrogen ion production in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, J. Corr, C. S.; Manoharan, R.; O'Byrne, S.

    2015-09-15

    In order to develop very high energy (>1 MeV) neutral beam injection systems for applications, such as plasma heating in fusion devices, it is necessary first to develop high throughput negative ion sources. For the ITER reference source, this will be realised using caesiated inductively coupled plasma devices, containing either hydrogen or deuterium discharges, operated with high rf input powers (up to 90 kW per driver). It has been suggested that due to their high power coupling efficiency, helicon devices may be able to reduce power requirements and potentially obviate the need for caesiation due to the high plasma densities achievable. Here, we present measurements of negative ion densities in a hydrogen discharge produced by a helicon device, with externally applied DC magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 8.5 mT at 5 and 10 mTorr fill pressures. These measurements were taken in the magnetised plasma interaction experiment at the Australian National University and were performed using the probe-based laser photodetachment technique, modified for the use in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. A peak in the electron density is observed at ∼3 mT and is correlated with changes in the rf power transfer efficiency. With increasing magnetic field, an increase in the negative ion fraction from 0.04 to 0.10 and negative ion densities from 8 × 10{sup 14 }m{sup −3} to 7 × 10{sup 15 }m{sup −3} is observed. It is also shown that the negative ion densities can be increased by a factor of 8 with the application of an external DC magnetic field.

  18. Subcutoff microwave driven plasma ion sources for multielemental focused ion beam systems.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jose V; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2008-06-01

    A compact microwave driven plasma ion source for focused ion beam applications has been developed. Several gas species have been experimented including argon, krypton, and hydrogen. The plasma, confined by a minimum B multicusp magnetic field, has good radial and axial uniformity. The octupole multicusp configuration shows a superior performance in terms of plasma density (~1.3 x 10(11) cm(-3)) and electron temperature (7-15 eV) at a power density of 5-10 Wcm(2). Ion current densities ranging from a few hundreds to over 1000 mA/cm(2) have been obtained with different plasma electrode apertures. The ion source will be combined with electrostatic Einzel lenses and should be capable of producing multielemental focused ion beams for nanostructuring and implantations. The initial simulation results for the focused beams have been presented. PMID:18601405

  19. Studies of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Space-charge forces limit the possible transverse compression of high perveance ion beams that are used in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics applications; the minimum radius to which a beam can be focused is an increasing function of perveance. The limit can be overcome if a plasma is introduced in the beam path between the focusing element and the target in order to neutralize the space charge of the beam. This concept has been implemented on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL using Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPS). In our experiment at PPPL, we propagate a perveance-dominated ion beam through a FEPS to study the effect of the neutralizing plasma on the beam envelope and its evolution in time. A 30-60 keV space-charge-dominated Argon beam is focused with an Einzel lens into a FEPS located at the beam waist. The beam is intercepted downstream from the FEPS by a movable Faraday cup that provides time-resolved 2D current density profiles of the beam spot on target. We report results on: (a) dependence of charge neutralization on FEPS plasma density; (b) effects on beam emittance, and (c) time evolution of the beam envelope after the FEPS pulse. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Challenges in plasma and extraction modelling of negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, Taneli

    2013-09-01

    The physical processes taking place in negative ion source plasmas are modelled by state-of-the-art 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. These codes are used to gain understanding and to find optimal solutions for negative ion beam production. The PIC codes can be made to match to the reality if all relevant processes were included. This is unfortunately limited by the availability of data about the processes and the huge amount of computational resources needed for the simulations. The optimization of the extraction system and beam transport ion optics is often made using computationally less intensive methods utilized in so-called gun codes. These codes use simplified plasma models to provide a starting point for the extracted beams being simulated. The relatively fast computation allows systematic studies, which are not practical with PIC codes. The gun codes often match well to reality, but they do have difficulties reproducing some effects, especially in negative ion extraction, due to the approximations made in the plasma model. Could the future solutions for beam production modelling couple the two types of simulations?

  1. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H- ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    An RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ~1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a mean for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  2. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H(-) ion sources.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2014-02-01

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H(-) ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed. PMID:24593570

  3. Unbalance magnetron plasma source for ion mass-separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperny, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.; Astrakchantsev, N. V.; Lebedev, N. V.

    2014-11-01

    The report presents the results of the preliminary studies characteristics of an unbalanced magnetron plasma source supplied with the transport system based on a curved magnetic field. The aim of these studies was to recognize if the system is suitable, in principle, for mass-separation of a multi-component plasma flow. The magnetron source has 50 mm diameter cathode manufactured of an alloy composed of Cu (64%), Pb (22.5%) and admixtures, about of 14% (Al, Zn, C). By means of an immersion time-of-flight spectrometer, a spatial distribution of ions of the cathode material was measured through the system output cross-section. Distribution of atom of these elements was measured here by the X-ray fluorescence spectrometry as well. Both methods showed that the ions of the lighter element (Cu) were concentrated in the inner part of the plasma flow deflected by the magnetic field while the distribution of the heavy element (Pb) was shifted toward the outer area of the flow. The similar effect was observed for each couple of the elements. Such a system is promising for use in plasma technology of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, namely for separation heavy radioactive fission product from nuclear waste.

  4. Ion extraction from a saddle antenna RF surface plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Breitschopf, J.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm2 per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency and SPS reliability and availability. At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ˜1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ˜4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H- beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the AlN discharge chamber for a long time at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the small test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to 1.8 kW from the generator (˜1.2 kW in the plasma) with production up to Ic=7 mA. Long term operation was tested with 1.2 kW from the RF generator (˜0.8 kW in the plasma) with production of Ic=5 mA, Iex ˜15 mA (Uex=8 kV, Uc=14 kV).

  5. Ion extraction from a saddle antenna RF surface plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V. Johnson, R. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Breitschopf, J.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H{sup +} and H{sup −} ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm{sup 2} per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H{sup −} ion production efficiency and SPS reliability and availability. At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm{sup 2} per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H{sup −} beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the AlN discharge chamber for a long time at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the small test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to 1.8 kW from the generator (∼1.2 kW in the plasma) with production up to Ic=7 mA. Long term operation was tested with 1.2 kW from the RF generator (∼0.8 kW in the plasma) with production of Ic=5 mA, Iex ∼15 mA (Uex=8 kV, Uc=14 kV)

  6. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established ˜5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. It is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  7. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-27

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15V before neutralization to 0.3 V,more » implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established similar to –5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-mu s surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of mu s after the high voltage pulse is applied. Lastly, it is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.« less

  8. Gallium ion extraction from a plasma sputter-type ion source.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, M; Imakita, S; Kasuya, T; Maeno, S; Wada, M

    2010-02-01

    A broad mixed ion beam containing positive ions of gallium (Ga) was produced with a plasma sputter-type ion source. Liquid Ga was suspended on a tungsten reservoir to be sputtered and postionized in argon (Ar) plasma excited by a radio frequency (rf) power at 13.56 MHz. Optical emission spectra from the plasma near the Ga sputtering target had indicated that the release of Ga into plasma increased with increasing negative bias to the sputtering target. The ratio of Ga(+) current to Ar(+) current was measured to be about 1% with a quadrupole mass analyzer at 100 V extraction voltage for incident rf power as low as 30 W. Ions in the plasma were extracted through a pair of multiaperture electrodes. The homogeneity of Ga flux was examined by making a Ga deposition pattern on a glass substrate located behind the extractor electrodes. PMID:20192457

  9. Gallium ion extraction from a plasma sputter-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. Jr.; Imakita, S.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.; Maeno, S.

    2010-02-15

    A broad mixed ion beam containing positive ions of gallium (Ga) was produced with a plasma sputter-type ion source. Liquid Ga was suspended on a tungsten reservoir to be sputtered and postionized in argon (Ar) plasma excited by a radio frequency (rf) power at 13.56 MHz. Optical emission spectra from the plasma near the Ga sputtering target had indicated that the release of Ga into plasma increased with increasing negative bias to the sputtering target. The ratio of Ga{sup +} current to Ar{sup +} current was measured to be about 1% with a quadrupole mass analyzer at 100 V extraction voltage for incident rf power as low as 30 W. Ions in the plasma were extracted through a pair of multiaperture electrodes. The homogeneity of Ga flux was examined by making a Ga deposition pattern on a glass substrate located behind the extractor electrodes.

  10. Plasma spectroscopy of metal ions for hyper-electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the optical line spectra of metal ions from ECR plasma were observed using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for the beam tuning process, because it allows to conduct the extraction of the desired metal ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research provides a new approach for its simplification. In this paper the grating monochromator method for metal ion beam tuning such as (40)Ca(12+), (56)Fe(15+), and (85)Rb(20+) of hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron is described. PMID:24593484

  11. Cost estimates for commercial plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J. ); Alexander, R.B. )

    1994-07-01

    A semiempirical model for the cost of a commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSII) facility is presented. Amortized capital and operating expenses are estimated as functions of the surface area throughput [ital T]. The impact of secondary electron emission and batch processing time is considered. Treatment costs are found to decrease monotonically with [ital T] until they saturate at large [ital T] when capital equipment payback and space rental dominate the expense. A reasonably sized PSII treatment facility should be able to treat a surface area of 10[sup 4] m[sup 2] per year at a cost of $0.01 per cm[sup 2].

  12. Magnetic insulation of secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Wood, B.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-09-01

    The uncontrolled loss of accelerated secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation (PSII) can significantly reduce system efficiency and poses a potential x-ray hazard. This loss might be reduced by a magnetic field applied near the workpiece. The concept of magnetically-insulated PSII is proposed, in which secondary electrons are trapped to form a virtual cathode layer near the workpiece surface where the local electric field is essentially eliminated. Subsequent electrons that are emitted can then be reabsorbed by the workpiece. Estimates of anomalous electron transport from microinstabilities are made. Insight into the process is gained with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  13. Pulsed, Inductively Generated, Streaming Plasma Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Steven C. Glidden; Howard D Sanders; John B. Greenly; Daniel L. Dongwoo

    2006-04-28

    This report describes a compact, high current density, pulsed ion source, based on electrodeless, inductively driven gas breakdown, developed to meet the requirements on normalized emittance, current density, uniformity and pulse duration for an ion injector in a heavy-ion fusion driver. The plasma source produces >10 μs pulse of Argon plasma with ion current densities >100 mA/cm2 at 30 cm from the source and with strongly axially directed ion energy of about 80 eV, and sub-eV transverse temperature. The source has good reproducibility and spatial uniformity. Control of the current density during the pulse has been demonstrated with a novel modulator coil method which allows attenuation of the ion current density without significantly affecting the beam quality. This project was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 used source configurations adapted from light ion sources to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. In Phase 2 the performance of the source was enhanced and quantified in greater detail, a modulator for controlling the pulse shape was developed, and experiments were conducted with the ions accelerated to >40 kV.

  14. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  15. Plasma Sputter-type Ion Source with Wire Electrodes for Low-energy Gallium Ion Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. Jr.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.; Maeno, S.; Miyamoto, N.

    2011-01-07

    Low-energy ions of gallium (Ga) and argon (Ar) were extracted from a plasma sputter-type ion source system that utilized a tungsten (W) wire extractor geometry. The 90% transparent W wire extractor configuration had shown that the system was capable of producing an ion beam with the energy as low as 10 eV in a dc filament discharge and 50 eV in a radio frequency (rf) excited system. In the present investigation, Ar plasma was sustained in an ion source chamber through an inductively coupled 13.56 MHz rf power source. Negatively biased liquid Ga target suspended on a W reservoir was sputtered and postionized prior to extraction. Mass spectral analyses revealed a strong dependence of the Ga{sup +} current on the induced target bias.

  16. Ion temperature in the ASTRAL helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert

    2005-10-01

    Ion temperature is measured in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source by means of a diode laser based Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic. ASTRAL produces plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 15 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. The 1.5 MHz bandwidth diode laser has a Littrow external cavity with a mode-hop free tuning range up to 15 GHz and with a total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, the laser tuned at 668.61 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F7/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 level. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 levels (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT. Other diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device. They included a RF compensated Langmuir probe which is used to measure both electron temperature and plasma density. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator and a CCD camera is used for spectroscopy studies of the plasma.

  17. Plasma Source Ion Implantation of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kevin Carl

    Three plasma source ion implantation (PSII) schemes applied to three aluminum systems have been studied. Pure aluminum, and aluminum alloys 7075 (Al-Cu-Mg-Zn) and A390 (Al-17Si-Cu-Fe) were (1) argon ion sputter-cleaned and nitrogen-implanted, (2) nitrogen-implanted without sputter -cleaning, and (3) argon-implanted. Nitrogen implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by transformation of the surface to aluminum-nitride. Argon implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by inducing radiation damage. All implantation schemes were accomplished using a glow discharge mode of the PSII process. Implanted surfaces were investigated using Auger depth profiling and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The profiles indicated a stoichiometric layer, ~ 0.15 μm thick, of AlN on the nitrogen-implanted samples. Electron microscopy confirmed the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Knoop microhardness tests showed an increase in surface hardness, especially at low loads. The improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning and were approximately equal for the studied aluminum systems. Pin-on-disk wear tests were conducted using a ruby stylus and isopropanol lubrication. Argon implantation decreased the wear resistance of pure aluminum and 7075. Nitrogen implantation improved the wear rates by a factor of ~10 for pure aluminum and 7075. These improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning. The coefficient of friction was not significantly influenced by the implantation schemes. Due to a coarse microstructure, tribological tests of ion-implanted A390 were inconclusive. Corrosion studies performed in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution (seawater) indicated nitrogen implantation gave pure aluminum improved corrosion resistance. The improvement is due to the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Because of pre-existing precipitates, the corrosion properties of 7075 and A390 were not

  18. Improvement of a plasma uniformity of the 2nd ion source of KSTAR neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S. H.; Kim, T. S.; Lee, K. W.; Chang, D. H.; In, S. R.; Bae, Y. S.

    2014-02-01

    The 2nd ion source of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) NBI (Neutral Beam Injector) had been developed and operated since last year. A calorimetric analysis revealed that the heat load of the back plate of the ion source is relatively higher than that of the 1st ion source of KSTAR NBI. The spatial plasma uniformity of the ion source is not good. Therefore, we intended to identify factors affecting the uniformity of a plasma density and improve it. We estimated the effects of a direction of filament current and a magnetic field configuration of the plasma generator on the plasma uniformity. We also verified that the operation conditions of an ion source could change a uniformity of the plasma density of an ion source.

  19. Improvement of a plasma uniformity of the 2nd ion source of KSTAR neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S H; Kim, T S; Lee, K W; Chang, D H; In, S R; Bae, Y S

    2014-02-01

    The 2nd ion source of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) NBI (Neutral Beam Injector) had been developed and operated since last year. A calorimetric analysis revealed that the heat load of the back plate of the ion source is relatively higher than that of the 1st ion source of KSTAR NBI. The spatial plasma uniformity of the ion source is not good. Therefore, we intended to identify factors affecting the uniformity of a plasma density and improve it. We estimated the effects of a direction of filament current and a magnetic field configuration of the plasma generator on the plasma uniformity. We also verified that the operation conditions of an ion source could change a uniformity of the plasma density of an ion source. PMID:24593593

  20. Investigation of helium ion production in constricted direct current plasma ion source with layered-glows

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Park, Yeong-Shin; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    Generation of helium ions is experimentally investigated with a constricted direct current (DC) plasma ion source operated at layered-glow mode, in which electrons could be accelerated through multiple potential structures so as to generate helium ions including He{sup 2+} by successive ionization collisions in front of an extraction aperture. The helium discharge is sustained with the formation of a couple of stable layers and the plasma ball with high density is created near the extraction aperture at the operational pressure down to 0.6 Torr with concave cathodes. The ion beam current extracted with an extraction voltage of 5 kV is observed to be proportional to the discharge current and inversely proportional to the operating pressure, showing high current density of 130 mA/cm{sup 2} and power density of 0.52 mA/cm{sup 2}/W. He{sup 2+} ions, which were predicted to be able to exist due to multiple-layer potential structure, are not observed. Simple calculation on production of He{sup 2+} ions inside the plasma ball reveals that reduced operating pressure and increased cathode area will help to generate He{sup 2+} ions with the layered-glow DC discharge.

  1. Investigation of helium ion production in constricted direct current plasma ion source with layered-glows.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Park, Yeong-Shin; Hwang, Y S

    2014-02-01

    Generation of helium ions is experimentally investigated with a constricted direct current (DC) plasma ion source operated at layered-glow mode, in which electrons could be accelerated through multiple potential structures so as to generate helium ions including He(2+) by successive ionization collisions in front of an extraction aperture. The helium discharge is sustained with the formation of a couple of stable layers and the plasma ball with high density is created near the extraction aperture at the operational pressure down to 0.6 Torr with concave cathodes. The ion beam current extracted with an extraction voltage of 5 kV is observed to be proportional to the discharge current and inversely proportional to the operating pressure, showing high current density of 130 mA/cm(2) and power density of 0.52 mA/cm(2)/W. He(2+) ions, which were predicted to be able to exist due to multiple-layer potential structure, are not observed. Simple calculation on production of He(2+) ions inside the plasma ball reveals that reduced operating pressure and increased cathode area will help to generate He(2+) ions with the layered-glow DC discharge. PMID:24593635

  2. Characteristics and potential applications of an ORNL microwave ECR multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source that has two ECR plasma production regions and uses multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasma over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2} and could be scaled up to produce uniform plasma over 700 cm{sup 2} or larger. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The working gases used were argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of the discharge parameters. The discharge characteristics and a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source are described and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam sources for manufacturing advanced microelectronics, for space electric propulsion, and for fusion research, are discussed. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Operations manual for the plasma source ion implantation economics program

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeault, M.L.; Thayer, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a surface modification technique for metal. PSIICOSTMODEL95 is an EXCEL-based program that estimates the cost for implementing a PSII system in a manufacturing setting where the number of parts to be processed is over 5,000 parts per day and the shape of each part does not change from day to day. Overall, the manufacturing process must be very well defined and should not change. This document is a self-contained manual for PSIICOSTMODEL95. It assumes the reader has some general knowledge of the technical requirements for PSII. Configuration of the PSII process versus design is used as the methodology in PSIICOSTMODEL95. The reason behind this is twofold. First, the design process cannot be programmed into a computer when the relationships between design variables are not understood. Second, the configuration methodology reduces the number of assumptions that must be programmed into our software. Misuse of results are less likely to occur if the user has fewer assumptions to understand.

  4. Optimum plasma grid bias for a negative hydrogen ion source operation with Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, Marthe; Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; McAdams, Roy

    2016-02-01

    The functions of a biased plasma grid of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source for both pure volume and Cs seeded operations are reexamined. Proper control of the plasma grid bias in pure volume sources yields: enhancement of the extracted negative ion current, reduction of the co-extracted electron current, flattening of the spatial distribution of plasma potential across the filter magnetic field, change in recycling from hydrogen atomic/molecular ions to atomic/molecular neutrals, and enhanced concentration of H- ions near the plasma grid. These functions are maintained in the sources seeded with Cs with additional direct emission of negative ions under positive ion and neutral hydrogen bombardment onto the plasma electrode.

  5. Study of the negative ion extraction mechanism from a double-ion plasma in negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, I.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a 2D3V-PIC model of the extraction region, aiming to clarify the basic extraction mechanism of H- ions from the double-ion plasma in H- negative ion sources. The result shows the same tendency of the H- ion density nH- as that observed in the experiments, i.e.,nH- in the upstream region away from the plasma meniscus (H- emitting surface) has been reduced by applying the extraction voltage. At the same time, relatively slow temporal oscillation of the electric potential compared with the electron plasma frequency has been observed in the extraction region. Results of the systematic study using a 1D3V-PIC model with the uniform magnetic field confirm the result that the electrostatic oscillation is identified to be lower hybrid wave. The effect of this oscillation on the H- transport will be studied in the future.

  6. Roles of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.; McAdams, R.

    2015-04-01

    The plasma grid is electrically biased with respect to other parts of source chamber wall in both volume sources and sources seeded with alkali metals. The roles of the plasma grid in these two kinds of sources will be described. The main functions of the plasma grid in volume sources are: optimizing the extracted negative ion current, reducing the co-extracted electron current, controlling the axial plasma potential profile, recycling the hydrogen atoms to molecules, concentrating the negative ions near its surface and, when biased positive, depleting the electron population near its surface. These functions are maintained in the sources seeded with alkali metals. However an additional function appears in the Cs seeded sources, namely direct emission of negative ions under positive ion and neutral hydrogen bombardment.

  7. Roles of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.; McAdams, R.

    2015-04-08

    The plasma grid is electrically biased with respect to other parts of source chamber wall in both volume sources and sources seeded with alkali metals. The roles of the plasma grid in these two kinds of sources will be described. The main functions of the plasma grid in volume sources are: optimizing the extracted negative ion current, reducing the co-extracted electron current, controlling the axial plasma potential profile, recycling the hydrogen atoms to molecules, concentrating the negative ions near its surface and, when biased positive, depleting the electron population near its surface. These functions are maintained in the sources seeded with alkali metals. However an additional function appears in the Cs seeded sources, namely direct emission of negative ions under positive ion and neutral hydrogen bombardment.

  8. Characterization of the plasma-switch interaction in the LBL HIF ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W. ); Rutkowski, H.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A new way to characterize the performance of the LBL HIF ion source has been found. In the LBL source, ions are drawn from an arc-generated plasma reservoir in which the electrons are confined by a negative-biased switch'' mesh. Stagnation of the plasma is prevented by absorption of the excess ion flow on this mesh. The ion beam is generated by an external negative voltage that provides Child-Langmuir extraction of the ions through the switch mesh. We elucidate the physics requirements of the source and deduce switch mesh parameters needed for successful operation. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Characterization of the plasma-switch interaction in the LBL HIF ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W. ); Rutkowski, H.L. )

    1990-12-10

    A new way to characterize the performance of the LBL HIF ion source has been found. In the LBL source, ions are drawn from an arc-generated plasma reservoir in which the electrons are confined by a negative-biased switch'' mesh. Stagnation of the plasma is prevented by absorption of the excess ion flow on this mesh. The ion beam is generated by an external negative voltage that provides Child-Langmuir extraction of the ions through the switch mesh. We elucidate the physics requirements of the source and deduce switch mesh parameters needed for successful operation. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Spence, David; Lykke, Keith

    1998-01-01

    A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H.sup.+, D.sup.+, O.sup.+, N.sup.+, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H.sub.2 O, D.sub.2 O, O.sub.2, and SF.sub.6, among others, with the most effective being water (H.sub.2 O) and deuterated water (D.sub.2 O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H.sup.+) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D.sup.+). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H.sub.2.sup.+,H.sub.3.sup.+ and D.sub.2.sup.+, D.sub.3.sup.+, into the desired ion species, H.sup.+ and D.sup.+, respectively.

  11. Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Spence, D.; Lykke, K.

    1998-08-04

    A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H{sup +}, D{sup +}, O{sup +}, N{sup +}, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}, among others, with the most effective being water (H{sub 2}O) and deuterated water (D{sub 2}O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H{sup +}) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D{sup +}). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 2}{sup +}, D{sub 3}{sup +}, into the desired ion species, H{sup +} and D{sup +}, respectively. 4 figs.

  12. Ablation plasma transport using multicusp magnetic field for laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Umezawa, M.; Uchino, T.; Ikegami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a plasma guiding method using multicusp magnetic field to transport the ablation plasma keeping the density for developing laser ion sources. To investigate the effect of guiding using the magnetic field on the ablation plasma, we demonstrated the transport of the laser ablation plasma in the multicusp magnetic field. The magnetic field was formed with eight permanent magnets and arranged to limit the plasma expansion in the radial direction. We investigated the variation of the plasma ion current density and charge distribution during transport in the magnetic field. The results indicate that the plasma is confined in the radial direction during the transport in the multicusp magnetic field.

  13. X-ray-spectroscopy analysis of electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J. P.; Martins, M. C.; Parente, F.; Costa, A. M.; Marques, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2010-12-15

    Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted by highly charged ions in an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) may be used as a tool to estimate the charge-state distribution (CSD) in the source plasma. For that purpose, knowledge of the electron energy distribution in the plasma, as well as the most important processes leading to the creation and de-excitation of ionic excited states are needed. In this work we present a method to estimate the ion CSD in an ECRIS through the analysis of the x-ray spectra emitted by the plasma. The method is applied to the analysis of a sulfur ECRIS plasma.

  14. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Beam current enhancement of microwave plasma ion source utilizing double-port rectangular cavity resonator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuna; Park, Yeong-Shin; Jo, Jong-Gab; Yang, J J; Hwang, Y S

    2012-02-01

    Microwave plasma ion source with rectangular cavity resonator has been examined to improve ion beam current by changing wave launcher type from single-port to double-port. The cavity resonators with double-port and single-port wave launchers are designed to get resonance effect at TE-103 mode and TE-102 mode, respectively. In order to confirm that the cavities are acting as resonator, the microwave power for breakdown is measured and compared with the E-field strength estimated from the HFSS (High Frequency Structure Simulator) simulation. Langmuir probe measurements show that double-port cavity enhances central density of plasma ion source by modifying non-uniform plasma density profile of the single-port cavity. Correspondingly, beam current from the plasma ion source utilizing the double-port resonator is measured to be higher than that utilizing single-port resonator. Moreover, the enhancement in plasma density and ion beam current utilizing the double-port resonator is more pronounced as higher microwave power applied to the plasma ion source. Therefore, the rectangular cavity resonator utilizing the double-port is expected to enhance the performance of plasma ion source in terms of ion beam extraction. PMID:22380295

  16. Beam current enhancement of microwave plasma ion source utilizing double-port rectangular cavity resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuna; Park, Yeong-Shin; Jo, Jong-Gab; Yang, J. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2012-02-15

    Microwave plasma ion source with rectangular cavity resonator has been examined to improve ion beam current by changing wave launcher type from single-port to double-port. The cavity resonators with double-port and single-port wave launchers are designed to get resonance effect at TE-103 mode and TE-102 mode, respectively. In order to confirm that the cavities are acting as resonator, the microwave power for breakdown is measured and compared with the E-field strength estimated from the HFSS (High Frequency Structure Simulator) simulation. Langmuir probe measurements show that double-port cavity enhances central density of plasma ion source by modifying non-uniform plasma density profile of the single-port cavity. Correspondingly, beam current from the plasma ion source utilizing the double-port resonator is measured to be higher than that utilizing single-port resonator. Moreover, the enhancement in plasma density and ion beam current utilizing the double-port resonator is more pronounced as higher microwave power applied to the plasma ion source. Therefore, the rectangular cavity resonator utilizing the double-port is expected to enhance the performance of plasma ion source in terms of ion beam extraction.

  17. Confinement of laser plasma by solenoidal field for laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.; Kanesue,T.; Kondo, K.; Dabrowski, R.

    2010-05-23

    A laser ion source can provide high current, highly charged ions with a simple structure. However, it was not easy to control the ion pulse width. To provide a longer ion beam pulse, the plasma drift length, which is the distance between laser target and extraction point, has to be extended and as a result the plasma is diluted severely. Previously, we applied a solenoid field to prevent reduction of ion density at the extraction point. Although a current enhancement by a solenoid field was observed, plasma behavior after a solenoid magnet was unclear because plasma behavior can be different from usual ion beam dynamics. We measured a transverse ion distribution along the beam axis to understand plasma motion in the presence of a solenoid field.

  18. Compact surface plasma H- ion source with geometrical focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Dudnikova, G.

    2016-02-01

    Factors limiting operating lifetime of a Compact Surface Plasma Sources (CSPS) are analyzed and possible treatments for lifetime enhancement are considered. Increased cooling permeate increased discharge power and increased beam intensity and duty factor. A design of an advanced CSPS with geometrical focusing of H- flux is presented.

  19. Plasma and Beam Production Experiments with HYBRIS, a Microwave-assisted H- Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R.; Kwan, J.; Hahto, S.; Regis, M.; Wallig, J.

    2007-08-01

    A two-stage ion source concept was presented a few years ago, consisting of a proven H- ion source and a 2.45-GHz Electron Cyclotron-Resonance (ECR) type ion source, here used as a plasma cathode. This paper describes the experimental development path pursued at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, from the early concept to a working unit that produces plasma in both stages and creates a negative particle beam. Without cesiation applied to the second stage, the H- fraction of this beam is very low, yielding 75 micro-amperes of extracted ion beam current at best. The apparent limitations of this approach and envisaged improvements are discussed.

  20. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  1. Plasma And Beam Homogeneity Of The RF-Driven Negative Hydrogen Ion Source For ITER NBI

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Wuenderlich, D.; Gutser, R.; Berger, M.

    2009-03-12

    The neutral beam injection (NBI) system of ITER is based on a large RF driven negative hydrogen ion source. For good beam transmission ITER requires a beam homogeneity of better than 10%. The plasma uniformity and the correlation with the beam homogeneity are being investigated at the prototype ion sources at IPP. Detailed studies are carried out at the long pulse test facility MANITU with a source of roughly 1/8 of the ITER source size. The plasma homogeneity close to plasma grid is measured by optical emission spectroscopy and by fixed Langmuir probes working in the ion saturation region. The beam homogeneity is measured with a spatially resolved H{sub {alpha}} Doppler-shifted beam spectroscopy system. The plasma top-to-bottom symmetry improves with increasing RF power and increasing bias voltage which is applied to suppress the co-extracted electron current. The symmetry is better in deuterium than in hydrogen. The boundary layer near the plasma grid determines the plasma symmetry. At high ion currents with a low amount of co-extracted electrons the plasma is symmetrical and the beam homogeneity is typically 5-10%(RMS). The size scaling and the influence of the magnetic field strength of the filter field created by a plasma grid current is studied at the test facility RADI (roughly a 1/2 size ITER source) at ITER relevant RF power levels. In volume operation in deuterium (non-cesiated source), the plasma illumination of the grid is satisfying.

  2. Negative ion production in the RF multiaperture surface-plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrashitov, G.; Belchenko, Yu.; Dranichnikov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Gorbovsky, A.; Kapitonov, V.; Kolmogorov, V.; Kondakov, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Sanin, A.; Selivanov, A.; Selivanov, P.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Sotnikov, O.; Stupishin, N.; Tiunov, M.; Binderbauer, M.; Putvinski, S.; Smirnov, A.; Sevier, L.

    2015-04-01

    The experiments on negative hydrogen ion beam production in a multi-aperture long-pulse surface-plasma source are described. H- ions are produced on the surface of a plasma grid covered by cesium and illuminated by fast plasma particles. The source uses a radio-frequency driver to generate plasma. A composite magnet system made of external permanent magnets confines and filters electrons in the plasma region, and deflects them in the extraction area. A multiaperture, multi-electrode ion optical system is used for beam formation. The electrode heating and cooling during long pulses is accomplished by circulating a heat transfer fluid through channels drilled in the electrodes bodies. H- ions extraction through a single aperture and 21 apertures was performed and studied. A stable H- beam with the current up to 0.7 A, energy up to 74 kV, and pulse duration up to 7 s was routinely obtained

  3. Negative ion production in the RF multiaperture surface-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Abdrashitov, G.; Belchenko, Yu. Dranichnikov, A.; Gorbovsky, A.; Kapitonov, V.; Kolmogorov, V.; Kondakov, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Sanin, A.; Selivanov, A.; Selivanov, P.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Stupishin, N.; Tiunov, M.; Ivanov, A.; Sotnikov, O.; Binderbauer, M.; Putvinski, S.; Smirnov, A.; Sevier, L.

    2015-04-08

    The experiments on negative hydrogen ion beam production in a multi-aperture long-pulse surface-plasma source are described. H- ions are produced on the surface of a plasma grid covered by cesium and illuminated by fast plasma particles. The source uses a radio-frequency driver to generate plasma. A composite magnet system made of external permanent magnets confines and filters electrons in the plasma region, and deflects them in the extraction area. A multiaperture, multi-electrode ion optical system is used for beam formation. The electrode heating and cooling during long pulses is accomplished by circulating a heat transfer fluid through channels drilled in the electrodes bodies. H- ions extraction through a single aperture and 21 apertures was performed and studied. A stable H- beam with the current up to 0.7 A, energy up to 74 kV, and pulse duration up to 7 s was routinely obtained.

  4. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  5. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  6. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H⁻ ion source.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, S R; Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H(-) beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10(21) m(-3), whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon. PMID:26932004

  7. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H- beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 1021 m-3, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  8. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H{sup −} ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X. Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2014-02-15

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H{sup −} ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  9. Research progress on ionic plasmas generated in an intense hydrogen negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Takeiri, Y. Tsumori, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Ikeda, K.; Nakano, H.; Kisaki, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Osakabe, M.; Kondo, T.; Sato, M.; Shibuya, M.; Komada, S.; Sekiguchi, H.; Geng, S.

    2015-04-08

    Characteristics of ionic plasmas, observed in a high-density hydrogen negative ion source, are investigated with a multi-diagnostics system. The ionic plasma, which consists of hydrogen positive- and negative-ions with a significantly low-density of electrons, is generated in the ion extraction region, from which the negative ions are extracted through the plasma grid. The negative ion density, i.e., the ionic plasma density, as high as the order of 1×10{sup 17}m{sup −3}, is measured with cavity ring-down spectroscopy, while the electron density is lower than 1×10{sup 16}m{sup −3}, which is confirmed with millimeter-wave interferometer. Reduction of the negative ion density is observed at the negative ion extraction, and at that time the electron flow into the ionic plasma region is observed to conserve the charge neutrality. Distribution of the plasma potential is measured in the extraction region in the direction normal to the plasma grid surface with a Langmuir probe, and the results suggest that the sheath is formed at the plasma boundary to the plasma grid to which the bias voltage is applied. The beam extraction should drive the negative ion transport in the ionic plasma across the sheath formed on the extraction surface. Larger reduction of the negative ions at the beam extraction is observed in a region above the extraction aperture on the plasma grid, which is confirmed with 2D image measurement of the Hα emission and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The electron distribution is also measured near the plasma grid surface. These various properties observed in the ionic plasma are discussed.

  10. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-08

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H{sup −} ions. The influence is particularly large for H{sup −} ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H{sup −} ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H{sup −} ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  11. Very Large Area/Volume Microwave ECR Plasma and Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor); Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing very large area and large volume plasmas. The invention utilizes electron cyclotron resonances in conjunction with permanent magnets to produce dense, uniform plasmas for long life ion thruster applications or for plasma processing applications such as etching, deposition, ion milling and ion implantation. The large area source is at least five times larger than the 12-inch wafers being processed to date. Its rectangular shape makes it easier to accommodate to materials processing than sources that are circular in shape. The source itself represents the largest ECR ion source built to date. It is electrodeless and does not utilize electromagnets to generate the ECR magnetic circuit, nor does it make use of windows.

  12. Development of a volume production type hydrogen negative ion source by using sheet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoki; Iijima, Takaaki; Tonegawa, Akira; Sato, Kohnosuke; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    2014-10-01

    Stationary production of negative ions are important to play an essential role in Neutral beam injection (NBI). Cesium seeded Surface-production of negative ion sources are used for NBI. However, Cesium seeded surface- production of negative ion sources are not desirable from the point of view of operating steady state ion sources. We carried out the development of negative ion sources by volume-production in hydrogen sheet plasma. Production of hydrogen negative ions through volume processes needs both high energy electron region and low energy electron region. The sheet plasma is suitable for the production of negative ions, because the electron temperature in the central region of the plasma as high as 10-15 eV, whereas in the periphery of the plasma, a low temperature of a few eV of obtained. The hydrogen negative ions density were detected using an omegatron mass analyzer, while the electron density and temperature were measured using a Langmuir probe. Negative ions current extracted from the grid are measured by Faraday-cup.

  13. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  14. Diagnostics of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source helium plasma with the injection of 23Na1+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Galatà, A.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Thuillier, T.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the utilization of an injected 23Na1+ ion beam as a diagnostics of the helium plasma of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The obtained data allows estimating the upper limit for the ion-ion collision mean-free path of the incident sodium ions, the lower limit of ion-ion collision frequencies for all charge states of the sodium ions and the lower limit of the helium plasma density. The ion-ion collision frequencies of high charge state ions are shown to be at least on the order of 1-10 MHz and the plasma density is estimated to be on the order of 1011 cm-3 or higher. The experimental results are compared to simulations of the 23Na1+ capture into the helium plasma. The results indicate that the lower breeding efficiency of light ions in comparison to heavier elements is probably due to different capture efficiencies in which the in-flight ionization of the incident 1 + ions plays a vital role.

  15. Plasma ignition and steady state simulations of the Linac4 H(-) ion source.

    PubMed

    Mattei, S; Ohta, M; Yasumoto, M; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J; Grudiev, A

    2014-02-01

    The RF heating of the plasma in the Linac4 H(-) ion source has been simulated using a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision method. This model is applied to investigate the plasma formation starting from an initial low electron density of 10(12) m(-3) and its stabilization at 10(18) m(-3). The plasma discharge at low electron density is driven by the capacitive coupling with the electric field generated by the antenna, and as the electron density increases the capacitive electric field is shielded by the plasma and induction drives the plasma heating process. Plasma properties such as e(-)/ion densities and energies, sheath formation, and shielding effect are presented and provide insight to the plasma properties of the hydrogen plasma. PMID:24593555

  16. Plasma ignition and steady state simulations of the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, S. Lettry, J.; Grudiev, A.; Ohta, M.; Yasumoto, M.; Hatayama, A.

    2014-02-15

    The RF heating of the plasma in the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source has been simulated using a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision method. This model is applied to investigate the plasma formation starting from an initial low electron density of 10{sup 12} m{sup −3} and its stabilization at 10{sup 18} m{sup −3}. The plasma discharge at low electron density is driven by the capacitive coupling with the electric field generated by the antenna, and as the electron density increases the capacitive electric field is shielded by the plasma and induction drives the plasma heating process. Plasma properties such as e{sup −}/ion densities and energies, sheath formation, and shielding effect are presented and provide insight to the plasma properties of the hydrogen plasma.

  17. Plasma ignition and steady state simulations of the Linac4 H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, S.; Ohta, M.; Yasumoto, M.; Hatayama, A.; Lettry, J.; Grudiev, A.

    2014-02-01

    The RF heating of the plasma in the Linac4 H- ion source has been simulated using a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision method. This model is applied to investigate the plasma formation starting from an initial low electron density of 1012 m-3 and its stabilization at 1018 m-3. The plasma discharge at low electron density is driven by the capacitive coupling with the electric field generated by the antenna, and as the electron density increases the capacitive electric field is shielded by the plasma and induction drives the plasma heating process. Plasma properties such as e-/ion densities and energies, sheath formation, and shielding effect are presented and provide insight to the plasma properties of the hydrogen plasma.

  18. Modeling of surface-dominated plasmas: From electric thruster to negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, F.; Schneider, R.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2008-02-15

    This contribution shows two important applications of the particle-in-cell/monte Carlo technique on ion sources: modeling of the Hall thruster SPT-100 for space propulsion and of the rf negative ion source for ITER neutral beam injection. In the first case translational degrees of freedom are involved, while in the second case inner degrees of freedom (vibrational levels) are excited. Computational results show how in both cases, plasma-wall and gas-wall interactions play a dominant role. These are secondary electron emission from the lateral ceramic wall of SPT-100 and electron capture from caesiated surfaces by positive ions and atoms in the rf negative ion source.

  19. Study of the negative ion extraction mechanism from a double-ion plasma in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, I.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.

    2015-04-08

    We have developed a 2D3V-PIC model of the extraction region, aiming to clarify the basic extraction mechanism of H{sup −} ions from the double-ion plasma in H{sup −} negative ion sources. The result shows the same tendency of the H{sup −} ion density n{sub H{sup −}} as that observed in the experiments, i.e.,n{sub H{sup −}} in the upstream region away from the plasma meniscus (H{sup −} emitting surface) has been reduced by applying the extraction voltage. At the same time, relatively slow temporal oscillation of the electric potential compared with the electron plasma frequency has been observed in the extraction region. Results of the systematic study using a 1D3V-PIC model with the uniform magnetic field confirm the result that the electrostatic oscillation is identified to be lower hybrid wave. The effect of this oscillation on the H{sup −} transport will be studied in the future.

  20. Effect of plasma grid bias on extracted currents in the RF driven surface-plasma negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Belchenko, Yu; Ivanov, A; Sanin, A; Sotnikov, O; Shikhovtsev, I

    2016-02-01

    Extraction of negative ions from the large inductively driven surface-plasma negative ion source was studied. The dependencies of the extracted currents vs plasma grid (PG) bias potential were measured for two modifications of radio-frequency driver with and without Faraday screen, for different hydrogen feeds and for different levels of cesium conditioning. The maximal PG current was independent of driver modification and it was lower in the case of inhibited cesium. The maximal extracted negative ion current depends on the potential difference between the near-PG plasma and the PG bias potentials, while the absolute value of plasma potential in the driver and in the PG area is less important for the negative ion production. The last conclusion confirms the main mechanism of negative ion production through the surface conversion of fast atoms. PMID:26932001

  1. Effect of plasma grid bias on extracted currents in the RF driven surface-plasma negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belchenko, Yu.; Ivanov, A.; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O.; Shikhovtsev, I.

    2016-02-01

    Extraction of negative ions from the large inductively driven surface-plasma negative ion source was studied. The dependencies of the extracted currents vs plasma grid (PG) bias potential were measured for two modifications of radio-frequency driver with and without Faraday screen, for different hydrogen feeds and for different levels of cesium conditioning. The maximal PG current was independent of driver modification and it was lower in the case of inhibited cesium. The maximal extracted negative ion current depends on the potential difference between the near-PG plasma and the PG bias potentials, while the absolute value of plasma potential in the driver and in the PG area is less important for the negative ion production. The last conclusion confirms the main mechanism of negative ion production through the surface conversion of fast atoms.

  2. Monitoring Surface Condition of Plasma Grid of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kasuya, T.; Tokushige, S.; Kenmotsu, T.

    2011-09-26

    Surface condition of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source is controlled so as to maximize the beam current under a discharge operation with introducing Cs into the ion source. Photoelectric current induced by laser beams incident on the plasma grid can produce a signal to monitor the surface condition, but the signal detection can be easily hindered by plasma noise. Reduction in size of a detection electrode embedded in the plasma grid can improve signal-to-noise ratio of the photoelectric current from the electrode. To evaluate the feasibility of monitoring surface condition of a plasma gird by utilizing photoelectric effect, a small experimental setup capable of determining quantum yields of a surface in a cesiated plasma environment is being assembled. Some preliminary test results of the apparatus utilizing oxide cathodes are reported.

  3. [Preliminary study of atomic emission spectrometry of Ti (H) plasma produced by vacuum arc ion source].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-Feng; Wu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Fu; Lu, Biao; Wen, Zhong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the discharge process of vacuum arc ion source, make a detail description of the discharge plasma, and lay the foundation for further research on ion source, atomic emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the parameters of plasma produced by vaccum arc ion source. In the present paper, two kinds of analysis method for the emission spectra data collected by a spectrometer were developed. Those were based in the stark broadening of spectral lines and Saba-Boltzmann equation. Using those two methods, the electron temperature, electron number density and the ion temperature of the plasma can be determined. The emission spectroscopy data used in this paper was collected from the plasma produced by a vacuum are ion source whose cathode was made by Ti material (which adsorbed hydrogen during storage procedure). Both of the two methods were used to diagnose the plasma parameters and judge the thermal motion state of the plasma. Otherwise, the validity of the diagnostic results by the two methods were analyzed and compared. In addition, the affection from laboratory background radiation during the spectral acquisition process was discussed. PMID:25208416

  4. Brightness enhancement of plasma ion source by utilizing anode spot for nano applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Park, Man-Jin; Moon, Dae Won

    2012-02-15

    Anode spots are known as additional discharges on positively biased electrode immersed in plasmas. The anode spot plasma ion source (ASPIS) has been investigated as a high brightness ion source for nano applications such as focused ion beam (FIB) and nano medium energy ion scattering (nano-MEIS). The generation of anode spot is found to enhance brightness of ion beam since the anode spot increases plasma density near the extraction aperture. Brightness of the ASPIS has been estimated from measurement of emittance for total ion beam extracted through sub-mm aperture. The ASPIS is installed to the FIB system. Currents and diameters of the focused beams with/without anode spot are measured and compared. As the anode spot is turned on, the enhancement of beam current is observed at fixed diameter of the focused ion beam. Consequently, the brightness of the focused ion beam is enhanced as well. For argon ion beam, the maximum normalized brightness of 12 300 A/m{sup 2} SrV is acquired. The ASPIS is applied to nano-MEIS as well. The ASPIS is found to increase the beam current density and the power efficiency of the ion source for nano-MEIS. From the present study, it is shown that the ASPIS can enhance the performance of devices for nano applications.

  5. Develpoment of a one-meter plasma source for heavy ion beam chargeneutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, RonaldC.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-01-18

    Highly ionized plasmas are being employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-1 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. A radio frequency (RF) source was constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization. Pulsing the source enabled operation at pressures {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr with plasma densities of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Near 100% ionization was achieved. The plasma was 10 cm in length, but future experiments require a source 1 m long. The RF source does not easily scale to the length. Consequently, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. A 1 m long section of the drift tube inner surface of NTX will be covered with ceramic. A high voltage ({approx} 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. Plasma densities of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} and neutral pressures {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr are expected. A test stand to produce 20 cm long plasma is being constructed and will be tested before a 1 m long source is developed.

  6. Plasma source ion implantation to increase the adhesion of subsequently deposited coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Walter, K.C.; Taylor, T.N.

    1997-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) an object is placed in a plasma and pulse biased to a high negative potential, so as to implant the plasma ions into the surface of the object. Although ion implantation, by itself, can yield desirable surface modification, it is even more useful as a method of creating a functionally graded interface between the substrate material and a subsequently deposited coating, which may be produced by altering operating conditions on the same plasma source. Although this interfacial region is very thin - as little as 20 nm - it can greatly increase the adhesion of the deposited coatings. We present here a description of this process, and compare a simulation of the graded interface with an XPS depth profile of the interfacial region for erbium metal implanted into steel.

  7. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  8. Application of a pulsed, RF-driven, multicusp source for low energy plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wengrow, A.B.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Rickard, M.; Williams, M.D.; Tucker, M.

    1996-06-01

    The multicusp ion source can produce large volumes of uniform, quiescent, high density plasmas. A plasma chamber suited for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was readily made. Conventional PIII pulses the bias voltage applied to the substrate which is immersed in a CW mode plasma. Here, a method by which the plasma itself is pulsed was developed. Typically pulse lengths of 500 {mu}s are used and are much shorter than that of the substrate voltage pulse (5-15 ms). This approach, together with low gas pressures and low bias voltages, permits the constant energy implantation of an entire wafer simultaneously without glow discharge. Results show that this process can yield implant currents of up to 2.5 mA/cm{sup 2}; thus very short implant times can be achieved. Uniformity of the ion flux is also discussed. As this method can be scaled to any dimension, it can be made to handle any size wafer.

  9. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Takahashi, K; Okamura, M; Horioka, K

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons. PMID:26931973

  10. Plasma Structure in the Extraction Region of a Hybrid Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, F.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2009-03-12

    Production, destruction and transport of negative ions in the extraction region of a hybrid negative ion source are investigated with a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell electrostatic code. The influence of the plasma grid bias and of the magnetic filter on the plasma parameter profiles is taken into account. In particular, a transition from classical to complete reverse sheath is observed using a positively biased plasma grid, while the effect of the magnetic filter is relatively small proofing that H{sup -} production is dominated by surface neutral conversion.

  11. Characteristics of laser produced plasmas and lasers for pulsed ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Suzuki, T.; Itoh, Y.; Kamiya, T.; Watanabe, M.; Kawakita, Y.; Shioda, K.; Kanazawa, H.

    1996-05-01

    Preliminary experiments were performed to investigate the fundamental characteristics of the laser produced plasmas and the KrF lasers for the pulsed ion beam production. (1) Lithium target was irradiated by a small e-beam pumped KrF laser and the exhausted plasmas were measured. (2) A larger KrF laser of the same kind was operated and the output characteristics were observed. (3) The mode patterns of a discharge-pumped KrF laser was also measured most recently to prepare the future target irradiation to produce ion-source plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  13. High frequency operation of a hot filament cathode for a magnetized plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    A tungsten filament cathode has been operated with an ac heating current to excite a plasma in a linear magnetic field. Both the discharge current and the ion saturation current in plasma near the extraction hole of the ion source exhibited fluctuations. The discharge current fluctuated with the amplitude less than 2% of the average, and the frequency two times the frequency of the heating current. Fluctuation amplitude of the ion saturation current was about 10% of the average, while the frequency was the same as that of the heating current. The ac operation has prolonged the lifetime of a hot filament cathode by about 50%.

  14. Ion source for neutral beam injection meant for plasma and magnetic field diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton, Fred

    2008-02-15

    At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory a diagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasma parameters, flow velocity, and local magnetic field is being developed. The system is designed to have a 90% proton fraction and small divergence with beam current at 5-6 A and a pulse length of {approx}1 s occurring once every 1-2 min. The ion source needs to generate uniform plasma over a large (8x5 cm{sup 2}) extraction area. For this application, we have compared rf driven multicusp ion sources operating with either an external or an internal antenna in similar ion source geometry. The ion beam will be made of an array of six sheet-shaped beamlets. The design is optimized using computer simulation programs.

  15. Ion Source for Neutral beam injection meant for plasma and magnetic field diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton, Fred

    2007-06-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) a diagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasma parameters, flow velocity, and local magnetic field is being developed. The systems is designed to have a 90 % proton fraction and small divergence with beam current at 5-6 A and a pulse length of {approx}1 s occurring once every 1-2 min. The ion source needs to generate uniform plasma over a large (8 cm x 5 cm) extraction area. For this application, we have compared RF driven multicusp ion sources operating with either an external or an internal antenna in similar ion source geometry. The ion beam will be made of an array of six sheet-shaped beamlets. The design is optimized using computer simulation programs.

  16. A study on vacuum aspects of electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Taki, G. S.; Mallick, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2008-05-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is special type hot plasma machine where the high temperature electrons co-exist with multiply charge state ions and neutrals. A few years ago 6.4 GHz. ECR ion source (VEC-ECR) was developed indigenously at VECC. This multiply charged ion source is being used continuously to inject heavy ion beams into the cyclotron. Vacuum plays the major role in ECR ion source. The water cooled plasma chamber is made from an oxygen free high conductivity copper billet to meet the suitable surface condition for vacuum purpose. The entire volume of the ion source is pumped by two 900 1/s special type oil diffusion pumps to achieve 5×10-8 Torr. Usually main plasma chamber is pumped by the plasma itself. Moreover a few 1/s additional pumping speed is provided through extraction hole and pumping slot on the extraction electrode. A study has been carried out to understand the role of vacuum on the multiply charged heavy ion production process. Considering the ion production and loss criteria, it is seen that for getting Ar18+ better vacuum is essential for lower frequency operation. So, an ECR ion source can give better charge state current output operating at higher frequency and stronger confining magnetic field under a specific vacuum condition. The low pressure condition is essential to minimize charge exchange loss due to recombination of multiply charged ions with the neutral atoms. A fixed ratio of neutral to electron density must be maintained for optimizing a particular charge state in the steady state condition. As the electron density is proportional to square of the injected microwave frequency (nevpropf2) a particular operating pressure is essential for a specific charge state. From the study, it has been obtained that the production of Ar18+ ions needs a pressure ~ 9.6×10-8 Torr for 6.4 GHz. ECR ion source. It is also obtained that an ECR ion source, works at a particular vacuum level, can give better charge state

  17. Broadband frequency ECR ion source concepts with large resonant plasma volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    New techniques are proposed for enhancing the performances of ECR ion sources. The techniques are based on the use of high-power, variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, or broadband microwave radiation, derived from standard TWT technology, to effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR sources. The creation of a large ECR plasma ``volume`` permits coupling of more power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present forms of the ECR ion source. If successful, these developments could significantly impact future accelerator designs and accelerator-based, heavy-ion-research programs by providing multiply-charged ion beams with the energies and intensities required for nuclear physics research from existing ECR ion sources. The methods described in this article can be used to retrofit any ECR ion source predicated on B-minimum plasma confinement techniques.

  18. Development of a plasma generator for a long pulse ion source for neutral beam injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Tobari, H.; Kashiwagi, M.; Inoue, T.; Hanada, M.; Jeong, S. H.; Chang, D. H.; Kim, T. S.; Kim, B. R.; Seo, C. S.; Jin, J. T.; Lee, K. W.; In, S. R.; Oh, B. H.; Kim, J.; Bae, Y. S.

    2011-06-01

    A plasma generator for a long pulse H+/D+ ion source has been developed. The plasma generator was designed to produce 65 A H+/D+ beams at an energy of 120 keV from an ion extraction area of 12 cm in width and 45 cm in length. Configuration of the plasma generator is a multi-cusp bucket type with SmCo permanent magnets. Dimension of a plasma chamber is 25 cm in width, 59 cm in length, and 32.5 cm in depth. The plasma generator was designed and fabricated at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Source plasma generation and beam extraction tests for hydrogen coupling with an accelerator of the KSTAR ion source have been performed at the KSTAR neutral beam test stand under the agreement of Japan-Korea collaborative experiment. Spatial uniformity of the source plasma at the extraction region was measured using Langmuir probes and ±7% of the deviation from an averaged ion saturation current density was obtained. A long pulse test of the plasma generation up to 200 s with an arc discharge power of 70 kW has been successfully demonstrated. The arc discharge power satisfies the requirement of the beam production for the KSTAR NBI. A 70 keV, 41 A, 5 s hydrogen ion beam has been extracted with a high arc efficiency of 0.9 -1.1 A/kW at a beam extraction experiment. A deuteron yield of 77% was measured even at a low beam current density of 73 mA/cm2.

  19. Development of a plasma generator for a long pulse ion source for neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Tobari, H.; Kashiwagi, M.; Inoue, T.; Hanada, M.; Jeong, S. H.; Chang, D. H.; Kim, T. S.; Kim, B. R.; Seo, C. S.; Jin, J. T.; Lee, K. W.; In, S. R.; Oh, B. H.; Kim, J.; Bae, Y. S.

    2011-06-15

    A plasma generator for a long pulse H{sup +}/D{sup +} ion source has been developed. The plasma generator was designed to produce 65 A H{sup +}/D{sup +} beams at an energy of 120 keV from an ion extraction area of 12 cm in width and 45 cm in length. Configuration of the plasma generator is a multi-cusp bucket type with SmCo permanent magnets. Dimension of a plasma chamber is 25 cm in width, 59 cm in length, and 32.5 cm in depth. The plasma generator was designed and fabricated at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Source plasma generation and beam extraction tests for hydrogen coupling with an accelerator of the KSTAR ion source have been performed at the KSTAR neutral beam test stand under the agreement of Japan-Korea collaborative experiment. Spatial uniformity of the source plasma at the extraction region was measured using Langmuir probes and {+-}7% of the deviation from an averaged ion saturation current density was obtained. A long pulse test of the plasma generation up to 200 s with an arc discharge power of 70 kW has been successfully demonstrated. The arc discharge power satisfies the requirement of the beam production for the KSTAR NBI. A 70 keV, 41 A, 5 s hydrogen ion beam has been extracted with a high arc efficiency of 0.9 -1.1 A/kW at a beam extraction experiment. A deuteron yield of 77% was measured even at a low beam current density of 73 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-08

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  1. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  2. First results from the Los Alamos plasma source ion implantation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Gribble, R.J.; Henins, I.; Kodali, P.; Nastasi, M.; Reass, W.A.; Tesmer, J.; Walter, K.C.; Wood, B.P.; Conrad, J.R.; Horswill, N.; Shamim, M.; Sridharan, K.

    1993-12-01

    A new facility is operational at Los Alamos to examine plasma source ion implantation on a large scale. Large workpieces can be treated in a 1.5-m-diameter, 4.6-m-long plasma vacuum chamber. Primary emphasis is directed towards improving tribological properties of metal surfaces. First experiments have been performed at 40 kV with nitrogen plasmas. Both coupons and manufactured components, with surface areas up to 4 m{sup 2}, have been processed. Composition and surface hardness of implanted materials are evaluated. Implant conformality and dose uniformity into practical geometries are estimated with multidimensional particle-in-cell computations of plasma electron and ion dynamics, and Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport in solids.

  3. Investigation of a rf inductively coupled plasma ion source capable of highly uniform and collimated ion-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanarov, V.; Hayes, A.; Yevtukhov, R.; Kameyama, I.; Siegfried, D.; Waahlin, E.

    2006-03-15

    In accordance with advanced data storage device fabrication requirements, we have evaluated a new broad-beam rf ion source for ion beam etching and deposition application. This source utilizes a novel reentrant shaped plasma inductively coupled plasma generator for improved radial plasma density uniformity and a dynamic magnetic field for improved static etch uniformity. It has the capability of reproducibly generating extremely uniform ion beams from 500 to 1500 eV with divergence angle <3 deg. and high directionality [Kanarov et al. (patent pending)]. For a 150 mm diameter wafer, an etch uniformity of <1% {sigma}/mean in static condition or <0.5% with wafer rotation is obtained over an ion incident angle range of 0 deg. - 65 deg. Recently, we have investigated extending the operation of this source to the critical low energy range, 100-500 eV, required for fabricating thin film magnetic head sensors. It was found that, under optimum operating conditions, excellent static etch uniformity (1%-1.5% {sigma}/mean) could be obtained at high ion beam current densities, up to 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, over the entire low-energy range while still achieving low divergence angles (<5 deg.) and high beam directionality. The ion beam performance was consistent with results obtained by simulation and by experiment using a 19-hole array ion optic test stand with scanning ion probe [E. Waahlin (unpublished)]. In this article we will describe the design of the ion source and then present the experimental performance data including plasma density distribution measured by an array of flat Langmuir probes, beam divergence distribution obtained by a 'pepper-pot' etch measurement technique, and etching rate distributions.

  4. Laser assisted works for pulsed ion sources: Plasma productions, diagnostics and related computations

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Watanabe, M.; Matsuno, S.; Kamiya, T.; Suzuki, T.; Hushiki, T.; Horioka, K.; Kawakita, Y.; Kuwahara, T.; Shioda, K.; Kanazawa, H.; Okuda, H. )

    1994-10-05

    Recent laser assisted works for pulsed ion beam drivers are described in this paper. The first one is a plasma production by a KrF laser light which may be applicable to an ion source. The second item is a transverse-mode-diagnostic of a discharge-pumped laser. The third one is a one-dimensional computation of the latter laser. [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

  5. Fabrication of Genesis Sample Simulants Using Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma source ion implantation can be used to fabricate simulant samples for the Genesis mission. These simulants will be needed by investigators to validate sample preparation and analysis techniques for the returned Genesis samples. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Plasma source ion implantation research and applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, C.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Henins, I.

    1996-12-31

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation research at Los Alamos Laboratory includes direct investigation of the plasma and materials science involved in target surface modification, numerical simulations of the implantation process, and supporting hardware engineering. Target materials of Al, Cr, Cu-Zn, Mg, Ni, Si, Ti, W, and various Fe alloys have been processed using plasmas produced from Ar, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gases. Individual targets with surface areas as large as {approximately}4 m{sup 2}, or weighing up to 1200 kg, have been treated in the large LANL facility. In collaboration with General Motors and the University of Wisconsin, a process has been developed for application of hard, low friction, diamond-like-carbon layers on assemblies of automotive pistons. Numerical simulations have been performed using a 2{1/2}-D particle- in-cell code, which yields time-dependent implantation energy, dose, and angle of arrival for ions at the target surface for realistic geometries. Plasma source development activities include the investigation of pulsed, inductively coupled sources capable of generating highly dissociated N{sup +} with ion densities n{sub i} {approximately} 10{sup 11}/cm{sup 3}, at {approximately}100 W average input power. Cathodic arc sources have also been used to produce filtered metallic and C plasmas for implantation and deposition either in vacuum, or in conjunction with a background gas for production of highly adherent ceramic coatings.

  7. A Negative Hydrogen-Ion Source for SNS Using a Helicon Plasma Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R. H.; Welton, R. F.; Baity, F. W.; Crisp, D. W.; Fadnek, A.; Kang, Y.; Murray, S. N.; Sparks, D. O.; Stockli, M. P.

    2007-09-28

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a world-class facility for materials research based on neutron scattering. It consists of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source, linear accelerator, proton accumulator ring, and liquid Hg target. A power upgrade is planned for the device, which will require significant improvements in the negative ion source, including the production of H-beam currents of 70-95 mA ({approx}2xthe present SNS source value), with a pulse length of 1 ms and duty factor of {approx}7%. No H-sources currently in existence meet these combined requirements. A proof-of-principle experiment is being constructed in which the rf inductive plasma generator in the present source is replaced by a helicon plasma generator. This is expected to produce a factor of three or better increase in the maximum source plasma density at a reduced rf power level, resulting in significantly increased negative ion current with reduced heat removal requirements.

  8. A Negative Hydrogen-Ion Source for SNS Using a Helicon Plasma Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, Richard Howell; Welton, Robert F; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Crisp, Danny W; Fadnek, Andy; Kang, Yoon W; Murray Jr, S N; Sparks, Dennis O; Stockli, Martin P

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Labo ratory is a world-class facility for materials research based on neutron scattering. It consists of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source, linear accelerator, proton accumulator ring, and liquid Hg target. A power up grade is planned for the device, which will require significant improvements in the negative ion source, including the production of H- beam currents of 70-95 mA (~2 the present SNS source value), with a pulse length of 1 ms and duty factor of ~ 7%. No H- sources currently in existence meet these combined requirements. A proof-of-principle experiment is being constructed in which the rf inductive plasma generator in the present source is replaced by a helicon plasma generator. This is expected to produce a factor of three or better in crease in the maximum source plasma density at a reduced rf power level, resulting in significantly increased negative ion current with reduced heat removal requirements.

  9. Cesium control and diagnostics in surface plasma negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Chapovsky, Pavel; Dudnikov, Andrei

    2010-02-15

    For efficient and reliable negative ion generation it is very important to improve a cesium control and diagnostics. Laser beam attenuation and resonance fluorescence can be used for measurement of cesium distribution and cesium control. Resonant laser excitation and two-photon excitation can be used for improved cesium ionization and cesium trapping in the discharge chamber. Simple and inexpensive diode lasers can be used for cesium diagnostics and control. Cesium migration along the surface is an important mechanism of cesium escaping. It is important to develop a suppression of cesium migration and cesium accumulation on the extraction system.

  10. Modeling of surface-dominated plasmas: from electric thruster to negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Taccogna, F; Schneider, R; Longo, S; Capitelli, M

    2008-02-01

    This contribution shows two important applications of the particle-in-cell/monte Carlo technique on ion sources: modeling of the Hall thruster SPT-100 for space propulsion and of the rf negative ion source for ITER neutral beam injection. In the first case translational degrees of freedom are involved, while in the second case inner degrees of freedom (vibrational levels) are excited. Computational results show how in both cases, plasma-wall and gas-wall interactions play a dominant role. These are secondary electron emission from the lateral ceramic wall of SPT-100 and electron capture from caesiated surfaces by positive ions and atoms in the rf negative ion source. PMID:18315218

  11. Nature and location of the source of plasma sheet boundary layer ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Onsager, T. G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.

    1995-02-01

    Onsager et al. (1991) have put forward a model of the formation of the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) which relies on a steady source of plasma from a spatially extended plasma sheet, together with steady equatorward and earthward ExB convection of field lines due to reconnection at a downtail neutral line. This model is a synthesis of earlier proposals and it explains such features as an electron layer exterior to the ion boundary layer, ion velocity dispersion, counter streaming beams, low-speed cutoffs in the beams. It also explains the apparent evolution of the ion beams through 'kidney bean' shaped velocity-space distributions toward quasi-isotropic shells without invoking pitch angle scattering or energy diffusion. In this paper we explore two ramifications of the model. In principle we can map, as a function of time, the downtail neutral line distance and establish whether or not it is retreating during substorm recovery. We can also reconstruct the plasma distribution function near the neutral line to see if it is most consistent with mantle or plasma sheet plasma. We perform this analysis using International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) Fast Plasma Experiment (FPE) data for two plasma sheet recovery events, one on March 1, 1978, and the other on April 18, 1978. On March 1, 1978, we find evidence for an initial retreat from around 110 to 160 R(sub E) in the first 15 min; little further retreat occurs thereafter. On April 18, 1978, the neutral line location ranges from as little as 40 R(sub E) tailward of the satellite to as much as 200 R(sub E), but there is no evidence for a systematic retreat. The reconstructed ion distributions for these events are most consistent with a plasma sheet origin for the March 1 case and possibly plasma mantle or low-latitude boundary layer for the April 18 case.

  12. Inductively driven surface-plasma negative ion source for N-NBI use (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belchenko, Yu.; Abdrashitov, G.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A.; Gorbovsky, A.; Kondakov, A.; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O.; Shikhovtsev, I.

    2016-02-01

    The long-pulse surface-plasma source prototype is developed at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for negative-ion based neutral beam injector use. The essential source features are (1) an active temperature control of the ion-optical system electrodes by circulation of hot thermal fluid through the channels, drilled in the electrode bodies, (2) the concaved transverse magnetic field in the extraction and acceleration gaps, preventing the electrons trapping and avalanching, and (3) the directed cesium deposition via distribution tubes adjacent to the plasma grid periphery. The long term effect of cesium was obtained just with the single cesium deposition. The high voltage strength of ion-optical system electrodes was improved with actively heated electrodes. A stable H- beam with a current ˜1 A and energy 90 keV was routinely extracted and accelerated.

  13. Initial study of the optical spectrum of the ISIS H{sup -} ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Philippe, K.

    2012-02-15

    The front end test stand is being constructed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, with the aim of producing a 60 mA, 2 ms, 50 Hz, perfectly chopped H{sup -} ion beam. To meet the beam requirements, a more detailed understanding of the ion source plasma is required. To this end, an initial study is made of the optical spectrum of the plasma using a digital spectrometer. The atomic and molecular emission lines of hydrogen and caesium are clearly distinguished and a quantitative comparison is made when the ion source is run in different conditions. The electron temperature is 0.6 eV and measured line widths vary by up to 75%.

  14. Inductively driven surface-plasma negative ion source for N-NBI use (invited).

    PubMed

    Belchenko, Yu; Abdrashitov, G; Deichuli, P; Ivanov, A; Gorbovsky, A; Kondakov, A; Sanin, A; Sotnikov, O; Shikhovtsev, I

    2016-02-01

    The long-pulse surface-plasma source prototype is developed at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for negative-ion based neutral beam injector use. The essential source features are (1) an active temperature control of the ion-optical system electrodes by circulation of hot thermal fluid through the channels, drilled in the electrode bodies, (2) the concaved transverse magnetic field in the extraction and acceleration gaps, preventing the electrons trapping and avalanching, and (3) the directed cesium deposition via distribution tubes adjacent to the plasma grid periphery. The long term effect of cesium was obtained just with the single cesium deposition. The high voltage strength of ion-optical system electrodes was improved with actively heated electrodes. A stable H(-) beam with a current ∼1 A and energy 90 keV was routinely extracted and accelerated. PMID:26932044

  15. Interaction of plasmas in laser ion source with double laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Y.; Ikeda, S.; Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Tokyo ; Kumaki, M.; Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo ; Sekine, M.; Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo ; Cinquegrani, D.; Romanelli, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.; Iwashita, Y.

    2014-02-15

    Multiple laser shots could be used to elongate an ion beam pulse width or to intensify beam current from laser ion sources. In order to confirm the feasibility of the multiple shot scheme, we investigated the properties of plasmas produced by double laser shots. We found that when the interval of the laser shots is shorter than 10 μs, the ion current profile had a prominent peak, which is not observed in single laser experiments. The height of this peak was up to five times larger than that of single laser experiment.

  16. Plasma meniscus and extraction electrode studies of the ISIS H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Pozimski, J. K.

    2010-02-15

    In order to reduce the emittance and increase the transported beam current from the ISIS Penning-type H{sup -} ion source, improvements to the extraction system are required. This ion source is currently being commissioned on the front end test stand at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, which demands higher extraction energies, higher beam currents, and smaller emittances. To facilitate this, the present geometry requires optimization. This paper details the experimental and simulation studies performed of the plasma meniscus and the possible electrode geometry modifications needed to extract the highest quality beam.

  17. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Belchenko, Yu I; Davydenko, V I; Ivanov, I A; Kolmogorov, V V; Listopad, A A; Mishagin, V V; Putvinsky, S V; Shulzhenko, G I; Smirnov, A

    2014-02-01

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB6 cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode. PMID:24593569

  18. Arc plasma generator of atomic driver for steady-state negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. A.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kolmogorov, V. V.; Listopad, A. A. Mishagin, V. V.; Shulzhenko, G. I.; Putvinsky, S. V.; Smirnov, A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper reviews the results of development of steady-state arc-discharge plasma generator with directly heated LaB{sub 6} cathode. This arc-discharge plasma generator produces a plasma jet which is to be converted into an atomic one after recombination on a metallic plate. The plate is electrically biased relative to the plasma in order to control the atom energies. Such an intensive jet of hydrogen atoms can be used in negative ion sources for effective production of negative ions on a cesiated surface of plasma grid. All elements of the plasma generator have an augmented water cooling to operate in long pulse mode or in steady state. The thermo-mechanical stresses and deformations of the most critical elements of the plasma generator were determined by simulations. Magnetic field inside the discharge chamber was optimized to reduce the local power loads. The first tests of the steady-state arc plasma generator prototype have performed in long-pulse mode.

  19. Spatial and temporal evolution of negative ions in a pulsed inductively coupled hydrogen plasma source across a magnetic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nulty, Stuart; Corr, Cormac

    2015-09-01

    Low-temperature electronegative plasmas have important applications in high-energy sources for fusion energy, plasma thrusters and materials processing. Neutral beam injection systems and space thruster technology such as the PEGASUS propulsion system rely on efficiently producing extractable negative ions. In this work we investigate the production of hydrogen negative ions in a pulsed inductively coupled plasma across a magnetic filter. The electron energy distribution function, plasma density and electron temperature are determined using an RF compensated Langmuir probe, and time-resolved laser photo-detachment is used to measure the negative ion fraction. The spatial and temporal evolution of these plasma parameters within the plasma source will be presented. Using a pulsed plasma and a magnetic filter, the electron temperature can be efficiently controlled and a higher density of negative ions compared to electrons can be obtained at certain locations within the source.

  20. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources.

    PubMed

    Odorici, F; Malferrari, L; Montanari, A; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Neri, L

    2016-02-01

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to "screen" the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models. PMID:26931958

  1. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odorici, F.; Malferrari, L.; Montanari, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.

    2016-02-01

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to "screen" the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models.

  2. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma.

    PubMed

    Vodopyanov, A V; Golubev, S V; Khizhnyak, V I; Mansfeld, D A; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu

    2008-02-01

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 micros, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed. PMID:18315170

  3. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vodopyanov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Khizhnyak, V. I.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2008-02-15

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 {mu}s, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  4. Plasma transfer process in hydrogen negative ions source based on reflective discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Goretsky, V.P.; Ryabtsev, A.V.; Soloshenko, I.A.; Tarasenko, A.F.; Schedrin, A.I.

    1996-07-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of stationary volume source of hydrogen negative ions based on reflective discharge are presented in the report. Measurements of plasma parameters and emission characteristics are accomplished, and the optimization of ion source geometry is provided. The best parameters of ion beam extracted from the source across a magnetic field are the following: current 40 mA, current density 80 mA/cm{sup 2}, emittance along a magnetic field 3{center_dot}10{sup {minus}5} cm{center_dot}rad, emittance across a magnetic field 1{center_dot}10{sup {minus}5} cm{center_dot}rad. The calculation of beam basic properties is performed by numeric solving of Boltzman equation for electrons, balance equations for more than 300 elementary processes in gas discharge plasma, and equations of ions and electrons motion. Calculated dependencies of hydrogen negative ions current density in a plane of emission slit on the gas pressure and the discharge current are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Development of a compact permanent magnet helicon plasma source for ion beam bioengineering

    SciTech Connect

    Kerdtongmee, P.; Srinoum, D.; Nisoa, M.

    2011-10-15

    A compact helicon plasma source was developed as a millimeter-sized ion source for ion beam bioengineering. By employing a stacked arrangement of annular-shaped permanent magnets, a uniform axial magnetic flux density up to 2.8 kG was obtained. A cost effective 118 MHz RF generator was built for adjusting forward output power from 0 to 40 W. The load impedance and matching network were then analyzed. A single loop antenna and circuit matching elements were placed on a compact printed circuit board for 50 {Omega} impedance matching. A plasma density up to 1.1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} in the 10 mm diameter tube under the magnetic flux density was achieved with 35 W applied RF power.

  6. Development of a compact permanent magnet helicon plasma source for ion beam bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Kerdtongmee, P; Srinoum, D; Nisoa, M

    2011-10-01

    A compact helicon plasma source was developed as a millimeter-sized ion source for ion beam bioengineering. By employing a stacked arrangement of annular-shaped permanent magnets, a uniform axial magnetic flux density up to 2.8 kG was obtained. A cost effective 118 MHz RF generator was built for adjusting forward output power from 0 to 40 W. The load impedance and matching network were then analyzed. A single loop antenna and circuit matching elements were placed on a compact printed circuit board for 50 Ω impedance matching. A plasma density up to 1.1 × 10(12) cm(-3) in the 10 mm diameter tube under the magnetic flux density was achieved with 35 W applied RF power. PMID:22047290

  7. Study of pulsed electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma near breakdown: The preglow

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Izotov, I. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Marie-Jeanne, M.

    2008-02-15

    A careful study of pulsed mode operation of the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has clearly demonstrated the reality of an unexpected transient current peak, occurring at the very beginning of the plasma breakdown. This regime was named the preglow, as an explicit reference to the afterglow occurring at the microwave pulse end. After the transient preglow peak, the plasma regime relaxes to the classical steady state one. Argon preglow experiments performed at LPSC are presented. A theoretical model of ECR gas breakdown in a magnetic trap, developed at IAP, showing satisfactory agreement with the experimental results is suggested.

  8. High-resolution spectral analysis of light from neutral beams and ion source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D H; Kim, J

    1980-05-01

    The spectral distributions of Balmer alpha emission from 7- and 22-cm-diam neutral hydrogen beams have been measured with a Fabry-Perot interferometer to obtain information on the beam energy, divergence, and species composition. Results of these measurements are compared with other data on the beam properties to evaluate high-resolution spectroscopy as a beam diagnostic technique. Measurements on ion source plasmas and on beam-produced background plasmas yield average neutral atom energies of approximately 0.3 and 2.5 eV, respectively.

  9. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentecoste, Lucile; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal; Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (1011-1014 ions.cm2.s-1) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He+), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  10. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, Giuseppe; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Sorbello, Gino; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Isernia, Tommaso; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 1011-1013 cm-3 and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called "frequency sweep" method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented.

  11. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, Giuseppe; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Sorbello, Gino; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Isernia, Tommaso; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 10(11)-10(13) cm(-3) and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called "frequency sweep" method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented. PMID:26932081

  12. Initial operation of a large-scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Henins, I.; Gribble, R.J.; Reass, W.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Nastasi, M.A.; Rej, D.J.

    1993-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII), a workpiece to be implanted is immersed in a weakly ionized plasma and pulsed to a high negative voltage. Plasma ions are accelerated toward the workpiece and implanted in its surface. Experimental PSII results reported in the literature have been for small workpieces. A large scale PSII experiment has recently been assembled at Los Alamos, in which stainless steel and aluminum workpieces with surface areas over 4 m{sup 2} have been implanted in a 1.5 m-diameter, 4.6 m-length cylindrical vacuum chamber. Initial implants have been performed at 50 kV with 20 {mu}s pulses of 53 A peak current, repeated at 500 Hz, although the pulse modulator will eventually supply 120 kV pulses of 60 A peak current at 2 kHz. A 1,000 W, 13.56 MHz capacitively-coupled source produces nitrogen plasma densities in the 10{sup 15} m{sup {minus}3} range at neutral pressures as low as 0.02 mtorr. A variety of antenna configurations have been tried, with and without axial magnetic fields of up to 60 gauss. Measurements of sheath expansion, modulator voltage and current, and plasma density fill-in following a pulse are presented. The authors consider secondary electron emission, x-ray production, workpiece arcing, implant conformality, and workpiece and chamber heating.

  13. First plasma of the A-PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Angot, J.

    2008-02-15

    A-PHOENIX is a new compact hybrid electron cyclotron resonance ion source using a large permanent magnet hexapole (1.92 T at the magnet surface) and high temperature superconducting Solenoids (3 T) to make min-vertical bar B vertical bar structure suitable for 28 GHz cw operation. The final assembly of the source was achieved at the end of June 2007. The first plasma of A-PHOENIX at 18 GHz was done on the 16th of August, 2007. The technological specificities of A-PHOENIX are presented. The large hexapole built is presented and experimental magnetic measurements show that it is nominal with respect to simulation. A fake plasma chamber prototype including thin iron inserts showed that the predicted radial magnetic confinement can be fulfilled up to 2.15 T at the plasma chamber wall. Scheduled planning of experiments until the end of 2008 is presented.

  14. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Laulainen, J.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2015-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  15. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  16. BROADBAND ANTENNA MATCHING NETWORK DESIGN AND APPLICATION FOR RF PLASMA ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ki; Kang, Yoon W; Piller, Chip; Fathy, Aly

    2011-01-01

    The RF ion source at Spallation Neutron Source has been upgraded to meet higher beam power requirement. One important subsystem for efficient operation of the ion source is the 2MHz RF impedance matching network. The real part of the antenna impedance is very small and is affected by plasma density for 2MHz operating frequency. Previous impedance matching network for the antenna has limited tuning capability to cover this potential variation of the antenna impedance since it employed a single tuning element and an impedance transformer. A new matching network with two tunable capacitors has been built and tested. This network can allow precision matching and increase the tunable range without using a transformer. A 5-element broadband matching network also has been designed, built and tested. The 5-element network allows wide band matching up to 50 kHz bandwidth from the resonance center of 2 MHz. The design procedure, simulation and test results are presented.

  17. Selective ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  18. Selective ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  19. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-07-19

    An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

  20. Diamond-like carbon produced by plasma source ion implantation as a corrosion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Taylor, T.N.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-03-01

    There currently exists a broad range of applications for which the ability to produce an adherent, hard, wear and, corrosion-resistant coating plays a vital role. These applications include engine components, orthopedic devices, textile manufacturing components, hard disk media, optical coatings, and cutting and machining tools (e.g., punches, taps, scoring dies, and extrusion dies). Ion beam processing can play an important role in all of these technologies. Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is an emerging technology which has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional ion implantation by: (1) reducing the time and expense for implanting onto complex shapes and large areas and (2) extending the thickness of the modification zone through ion beam enhanced plasma growth of surface coatings. In PSII, targets are placed directly in a plasma source and then pulse biased to produce a non-line-of-sight process for complex-shaped targets without complex fixturing. If the pulse bias is a relatively high negative potential (20 to 100 kV) ion implantation will result. If however, a low voltage (50--1,200 eV) high duty cycle pulse bias is applied, film deposition from the chamber gas will result, thereby increasing the extent of the surface modification into the 1--10 micron regime. To evaluate the potential for DLC to be used as a corrosion barrier, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and traditional electrochemistry techniques were used to investigate the breakdown mechanism in chloride and nonchloride containing environments. The effect of surface preparation on coating breakdown was also evaluated.

  1. COASTING ARC ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1957-09-10

    An improved ion source is described and in particular a source in which the ions are efficiently removed. The plasma is generated in a tubular amode structure by the oscillation of electrons in an axial magnetic field, as in the Phillips Ion Gage. The novel aspect of the source is the expansion of the plasma as it leaves the anode structure, so as to reduce the ion density at the axis of the anode and present a uniform area of plasma to an extraction grid. The structure utilized in the present patent to expand the plasma comprises flange members of high permeability at the exitgrid end of the amode to diverge the magnetic field adjacent the exit.

  2. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  3. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate. PMID:26932094

  4. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27291826

  5. Modeling of a negative ion source. II. Plasma-gas coupling in the extraction region

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, F.; Schneider, R.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2008-10-15

    The production, destruction, and transport of H{sup -} in the extraction region of a negative ion source are investigated with a 1D(z)-3V particle-in-cell electrostatic code. The motion of charged particles (e, H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sup -}) in their self-consistent electric field is coupled with the neutral particles [H(n=1) and H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, v=0,...,14)] dynamics and vibrational kinetics of H{sub 2}. Neutral influxes into the domain are determined by the simulation of the expansion region. Surface and volumetric processes involving plasma and neutrals have been included by using different Monte Carlo collision methods. Calculations show the influence of the plasma grid bias and of the magnetic filter on the plasma parameter profiles. In particular, a transition from classical to complete reverse sheath is observed using a positively biased plasma grid. The influence of the magnetic filter is small. The importance of the hot-atom mechanism on the surface negative ion production is shown.

  6. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, M.; Takagi, T.

    2002-05-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (~10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%.

  7. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  8. Afterglow of a microwave microstrip plasma as an ion source for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; White, Allen; Broekaert, José A. C.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    A microwave-induced plasma that was previously used for optical emission spectrometry has been repurposed as an afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry. This compact microwave discharge, termed the microstrip plasma (MSP), is operated at 20-50 W and 2.45 GHz in helium at a flow of 300 mL/min. The primary background ions present in the afterglow are ionized and protonated water clusters. An exponential dilution chamber was used to introduce volatile organic compounds into the MSP afterglow and yielded limits of detection in the 40 ppb to 7 ppm range (v/v). A hydride-generation system was also utilized for detection of volatile hydride-forming elements (arsenic, antimony, tin) in the afterglow and produced limits of detection in the 10-100 ppb range in solution. The MSP afterglow was found capable of desorption and ionization of analyte species directly from a solid substrate, suggesting its use as an ion source for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  9. Effect of fast positive ions incident on caesiated plasma grid of negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.

    2012-02-15

    This paper describes the effect on negative ion formation on a caesiated surface of the backscattering of positive ions approaching it with energy of a few tens of eV. For a positive ion energy of 45 eV, the surface produced negative ion current density due to these fast positive ions is 12 times larger than that due to thermal atoms, thus dominating the negative ion surface production instead of the thermal atoms, as considered until now.

  10. Surface-plasma negative ion source for the medicine accelerator (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belchenko, Y. I.; Grigoryev, E. V.

    2002-02-01

    A neutron source for boron capture neutron therapy is under development at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP). It is based on a tandem vacuum-isolated accelerator using a dc negative hydrogen ion source. A compact dc ion source model having reliable operation and simplified maintenance was developed at BINP as a prototype of the high current source for the medicine accelerator. The compact model (CM) uses a glow discharge with modified Penning geometry of the electrodes and explores surface-plasma negative ion (NI) production on the cesiated anode surface. The CM optimal parameters are as follows: discharge voltage 60-80 V, discharge current up to 6 A, hydrogen pressure 4-5 Pa, cesium consumption <1 mg/h, transverse magnetic field 0.5-1 kG s, optimal anode temperature 250-350 °C. A built-in heater provides the CM a quick start and simplifies CM electrode conditioning. The CM delivers a NI beam with a current of 5 mA, beam energy of 17 keV, normalized emittance of about 0.3 π mm mrad and an emission current density of about 0.1 A/cm2. NI beam current is directly proportional to the discharge current and to the emission hole area. The CM quick start and stable dc operation for several hour runs were multiply tested. No essential erosion of electrodes was recorded.

  11. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source. PMID:26302662

  12. Development of a Co-Axial Hot Cathode for Magnetized Ion Source Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N.; Hamamoto, N.; Imakita, S.; Mendenilla, A. G.; Wada, M.

    2008-11-03

    Directly heated high temperature cathodes of refractory metals such as tungsten run electric current of more than several tens of amperes. The electric current makes magnetic field around the cathode wire, and the magnetic field causes inhomogeneous emission of electrons from the cathode. To solve this problem we have designed the cathode having a co-axial heater current flow structure, and mounted it in a Bernas-type ion source. A plasma produced by co-axial hot cathode showed a clearer column along the external magnetic field and less displacement in the direction perpendicular to the field than that produced by a hair-pin filament. Stable discharge current as high as 5000 mA was obtained for Ar and BF{sub 3} gases with the co-axial cathode. Boron and phosphorus ion beams were extracted from the source on an actual ion implanter. The ion beam currents were 1.5 times as large as those obtained with a hair-pin filament.

  13. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  14. Development of a radio frequency ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for neutral beam injection system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Kyumin; Jung, Bongki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    Despite of high plasma density, helicon plasma has not yet been applied to a large area ion source such as a driver for neutral beam injection (NBI) system due to intrinsically poor plasma uniformity in the discharge region. In this study, a radio-frequency (RF) ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for high plasma density with good uniformity has been designed and constructed for the NBI system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus at Seoul National University. The ion source consists of a rectangular plasma expansion chamber (120 × 120 × 120 mm{sup 3}), four helicon plasma injectors with annular permanent magnets and RF power system. Main feature of the source is downstream plasma confinement in the cusp magnetic field configuration which is generated by arranging polarities of permanent magnets in the helicon plasma injectors. In this paper, detailed design of the multi-helicon plasma injector and plasma characteristics of the ion source are presented.

  15. Development of a radio frequency ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for neutral beam injection system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kyumin; Jung, Bongki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y S

    2014-02-01

    Despite of high plasma density, helicon plasma has not yet been applied to a large area ion source such as a driver for neutral beam injection (NBI) system due to intrinsically poor plasma uniformity in the discharge region. In this study, a radio-frequency (RF) ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for high plasma density with good uniformity has been designed and constructed for the NBI system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus at Seoul National University. The ion source consists of a rectangular plasma expansion chamber (120 × 120 × 120 mm(3)), four helicon plasma injectors with annular permanent magnets and RF power system. Main feature of the source is downstream plasma confinement in the cusp magnetic field configuration which is generated by arranging polarities of permanent magnets in the helicon plasma injectors. In this paper, detailed design of the multi-helicon plasma injector and plasma characteristics of the ion source are presented. PMID:24593595

  16. Inner Surface Modification of a Tube by Magnetic Glow-Arc Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gu-Ling; Wang, Jiu-Li; Wu, Xing-Fang; Feng, Wen-Ran; Chen, Guang-Liang; Gu, Wei-Chao; Niu, Er-Wu; Fan, Song-Hua; Liu, Chi-Zi; Yang, Si-Ze

    2006-05-01

    A new method named the magnetic glow-arc plasma source ion implantation (MGA-PSII) is proposed for inner surface modification of tubes. In MGA-PSII, under the control of an axial magnetic field, which is generated by an electric coil around the tube sample, glow arc plasma moves spirally into the tube from its two ends. A negative voltage applied on the tube realized its inner surface implantation. Titanium nitride (TiN) films are prepared on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube in diameter 90 mm and length 600 mm. Hardness tests show that the hardness at the tube centre is up to 20 GPa. XRD, XPS and AES analyses demonstrate that good quality of TiN films can be achieved.

  17. Designing of a lead ion model source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. N.; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Samokhin, A. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma sources of model substances are required for solving problems associated with the development of a plasma separation method for spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Lead is chosen as the substance simulating the kinetics and dynamics of the heavy SNF component. We report on the results of analysis of the discharge in lead vapor with a concentration of 1012-1013 cm-3. Ionization is produced by an electron beam (with electron energy up to 500 eV) in the centimeter gap between planar electrodes. The discharge is simulated using the hydrodynamic and one-particle approximations. The current-voltage characteristics and efficiencies of single ionization depending on the vapor concentrations and thermoelectron current are obtained. The experimentally determined ion currents on the order of 100 μA for an ionization efficiency on the order of 0.1% are in conformity with the result of simulation.

  18. Comparison between conventional and plasma source ion-implanted femoral knee components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Scheuer, J. T.; Ritter, C.; Alexander, R. B.; Conrad, J. R.

    1991-12-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation of Ti-6Al-4V knee joint femoral components was carried out by both plasma source ion implantation (PSII), a non-line of sight technique, and conventional beamline implantation. Implantation using the PSII process was performed on a flat sample as well as a 2×2 square array of components to demonstrate batch processing capability. The retained dose of the flat sample and at different locations on the implanted components was measured by a scanning auger microprobe (SAM). The variation in dose of the PSII treated component was found to be within the SAM error, while the dose at one location on the beamline implanted component was found to be significantly low. For the beamline case, the SAM results show good agreement with the PC profile computer simulation, which includes the angular dependence of sputtering.

  19. Generation of metal ions in the beam plasma produced by a forevacuum-pressure electron beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G. Zolotukhin, D. B.; Klimov, A. S.; Savkin, K. P.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the production of metal ions of magnesium and zinc in the beam plasma formed by a forevacuum-pressure electron source. Magnesium and zinc vapor were generated by electron beam evaporation from a crucible and subsequently ionized by electron impact from the e-beam itself. Both gaseous and metallic plasmas were separately produced and characterized using a modified RGA-100 quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The fractional composition of metal isotopes in the plasma corresponds to their fractional natural abundance.

  20. Development of cesium-free negative hydrogen ion source by using sheet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Takuya; Iijima, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yuta; Takimoto, Tosikio; Tonegawa, Akira; Sato, Kohnosuke; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrated the production of hydrogen negative ions in cesium-free discharge by using the magnetized sheet plasma. Plasma crossed with a vertical gas flow system and extracting H- beams from the sheet plasma. Under a secondary hydrogen gas entering the hydrogen plasma, the peak position of the hydrogen plasma is localized in the periphery of the sheet plasma. The maximum negative ion beam is successfully extracted using grids located in the periphery of the sheet plasma. The extraction current density is about 8 mA/cm2 at extraction voltage is 2 kV and discharge current of 30 A. The extraction negative ion current density is saturated at the extraction voltage is 2 kV for the limit of the negative ion density in the periphery region of the sheet plasma. On the other hand, the extraction current is saturated (3 mA/cm2) with increasing extraction voltage and the negative ions are not detected without the secondary gas flow (0 sccm). This curve depends on the electrons present. Therefore, it is considered that the negative ion current against the extraction current is around 60% from the ratio of the extraction current and the extraction electron current.

  1. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  2. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W. M.

    1959-04-14

    This patent deals with calutrons and more particularly to an arrangement therein whereby charged bottles in a calutron source unit may be replaced without admitting atmospheric air to the calutron vacuum chamber. As described, an ion unit is disposed within a vacuum tank and has a reservoir open toward a wall of the tank. A spike projects from the source into the reservoir. When a charge bottle is placed in the reservoir, the spike breaks a frangible seal on the bottle. After the contents of the bottle are expended the bottle may be withdrawn and replaced with another charge bottle by a vacuum lock arrangement in conjunction with an arm for manipulating the bottle.

  3. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-04-14

    This patent deals with calutrons and more particularly to an arrangement therein whereby charged bottles in a calutron source unit may be replaced without admitting atmospheric air to the calutron vacuum chamber. As described, an ion unit is disposed within a vacuum tank and has a reservoir open toward a wall of the tank. A spike projects from thc source into the reservoir. When a charge bottle is placed in the reservoir, the spike breaks a frangible seal on the bottle. After the contents of the bottle are expended the bottle may be withdrawn and replaced with another charge bottle by a varuum lock arrangement in conjunction with an arm for manipulating the bottle.

  4. Multi-Frequency Microwaves Plasma Production for Active Profile Control of Ion Beams on a Large Bore ECR Ion Source with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Naoki; Kato, Yushi; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-07

    A new concept on magnetic field of plasma production and confinement by using permanent magnets, i.e. cylindrically comb-shaped magnets, has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure and also the low microwave power. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequency are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequency microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  5. A collisional radiative model of hydrogen plasmas developed for diagnostic purposes of negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanova, Snejana; Paunska, Tsvetelina

    2016-02-01

    A collisional radiative model of low-pressure hydrogen plasmas is elaborated and applied in optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a single element of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions. The model accounts for the main processes determining both the population densities of the first ten states of the hydrogen atom and the densities of the positive hydrogen ions H+, H2+, and H3+. In the calculations, the electron density and electron temperature are varied whereas the atomic and molecular temperatures are included as experimentally obtained external parameters. The ratio of the Hα to Hβ line intensities is calculated from the numerical results for the excited state population densities, obtained as a solution of the set of the steady-state rate balance equations. The comparison of measured and theoretically obtained ratios of line intensities yields the values of the electron density and temperature as well as of the degree of dissociation, i.e., of the parameters which have a crucial role for the volume production of the negative ions.

  6. Production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Verigin, A.A.; Volkov, S.N.; Krasik, Y.E.; Podkatov, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    An experimental study of the production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode is reported. The ions had various ratios Z/M. When the anode plasma is produced in a preliminary charging pulse of the accelerator, the plasma density is too low for operation under charge-limited emission conditions. In this case, an ion beam is observed to be produced from the plasma formed by the direct heating of the anode material by oscillating electrons. When an anode plasma resulting from the breakdown of a dielectric insert or of the vacuum gap of a composite andode by an external voltage source is used to produce an ion beam, the reflex triode operating conditions depend on delaying the operation of the accelerator with respect to the external source. The highest efficiency (approx. =20%) in the production of an ion beam is observed at t/sub d/ = 3--6 ..mu..s. In this case, the reflex triode operates under increasing or constant impedance conditions. It was shown in the course of the experiments that the ion beam which is produced is nonuniform. There are three groups of ions: H/sup +/, C/sup n//sup +/, and Cu/sup n//sup +/. The energy of the heavy ions depends on the applied anode potential. The different mass components of the ion beam do not appear at the same time. The macroscopic divergence of the beam is 4--6/sup 0/ at the periphery and drops off to approx. <1/sup 0/ at the center. The microscopic divergence of the beam is 3/sup 0/. The total energy of the ion beam which is produced is less than 120 J at an average current approx. =2.8 kA.

  7. Adherent diamond like carbon coatings on metals via plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on various materials. Many of these techniques use metallic interlayers, such as Ti or Si, to improve the adhesion of a DLC coating to a ferrous substrate. An alternative processing route would be to use plasma source ion implantation (PSII) to create a carbon composition gradient in the surface of the ferrous material to serve as the interface for a DLC coating. The need for interlayer deposition is eliminated by using a such a graded interfaces PSII approach has been used to form adherent DLC coatings on magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, brass, nickel, and tungsten. A PSII process tailored to create a graded interface allows deposition of adherent DLC coatings even on metals that exhibit a positive heat of formation with carbon, such as magnesium, iron, brass and nickel.

  8. Development of C{sub 60} plasma ion source for time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Qing; Chen Ye; Ji Lili; Hahto, Sami; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won

    2008-02-15

    Initial data from a multicusp ion source developed for buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}) cluster ion production are reported in this article. A C{sub 60}{sup +} beam current of 425 nA and a C{sub 60}{sup -} beam current of 200 nA are obtainable in continuous mode. Compared to prior work using electron impact ionization, the multicusp ion source provides at least two orders of magnitude increase in the extractable C{sub 60}{sup +} beam current. Mass spectra for both positive and negative bismuth cluster ions generated by the multicusp ion source are also included.

  9. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  10. Helicon Plasma Source and Ion Beam Creation Characteristics of the MadHex Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, J.; Wiebold, M.; He, R.

    2009-12-01

    Non-invasive measurements are performed on a pulsed and steady-state argon helicon plasma thruster with a static axial magnetic nozzle field (1 kG source, 1.5 kG nozzle peak). The helicon wave propagation is closely related to whistler modes that propagate in the Earth's ionosphere. Flow rates obtained are from less than 1 to 30 sccm with coupled 13.56 MHz rf power levels of between 700 W and 10 kW. Ion beam acceleration from electric fields caused by neutral depletion and double layers (DLs) similar to those detected by satellites in the Earth's aurora are observed. Collisional-radiative (CR) models for Ar II and Ar I are used to spectroscopically determine the electron temperature (Te) and the neutral density, respectively. The electron density (nemax=8 x 10^13/cc) is measured via 105 GHz microwave interferometry (IF) and is an input to the CR models. In collisionless, highly neutral-depleted regions, Te rises linearly with power while ne remains constrained. Regions of pressure balance and pressure gradients are present, and evidence of substantial axially accelerated ion flows is observed. Regimes where cooler (5 eV) and hotter (>20 eV) electron temperatures are observed for lower and higher flow rates. The axial ion energy distribution function and its acceleration is measured from the helicon source region thru the magnetic nozzle using tunable diode laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). We will present results of RF creation and optimization of thermal- and hot-electron components to enhance the thrust of the helicon double layer and discuss the character of the ion beam distribution as it moves through the DL region. The experiment will optimize rf power, mass flow rate, magnetic field, and helicon dynamic frequency with LIF, mm wave IF diagnostic measurements. A description of the ion acceleration process that has potential applications for spacecraft propulsion and is related to ion acceleration processes observed in the Earth's aurora will be discussed.

  11. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED ARGON PLASMA AS AN ION SOURCE FOR MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solution aerosols are injected into an inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) to generate a relatively high number density of positive ions derived from elemental constituents. A small fraction of these ions is extracted through a sampling orifice into a differentially pumped vac...

  12. Dynamic regimes of cyclotron instability in the afterglow mode of minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, D.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the dynamic regimes of cyclotron instabilities in non-equilibrium plasma of a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source operated in pulsed mode. The instability appears in decaying ion source plasma shortly (1-10 ms) after switching off the microwave radiation of the klystron, and manifests itself in the form of powerful pulses of electromagnetic emission associated with precipitation of high-energy electrons along the magnetic field lines. Recently it was shown that this plasma instability causes perturbations of the extracted ion current, which limits the performance of the ion source and generates strong bursts of bremsstrahlung emission. In this article we present time-resolved diagnostics of electromagnetic emission bursts related to cyclotron instability in the decaying plasma. The temporal resolution is sufficient to study the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of the electromagnetic emission at different operating regimes of the ion source. It was found that at different values of magnetic field and heating power the dynamic spectra demonstrate common features: Decreasing frequency from burst to burst and an always falling tone during a single burst of instability. The analysis has shown that the instability is driven by the resonant interaction of hot electrons, distributed between the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) zone and the trap center, with slow extraordinary wave propagation quasi-parallel with respect to the external magnetic field.

  13. Numerical study of plasma generation process and internal antenna heat loadings in J-PARC RF negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Nishida, K; Mochizuki, S; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Hatayama, A; Ueno, A; Oguri, H; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Asano, H; Naito, F

    2016-02-01

    A numerical model of plasma transport and electromagnetic field in the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) radio frequency ion source has been developed to understand the relation between antenna coil heat loadings and plasma production/transport processes. From the calculation, the local plasma density increase is observed in the region close to the antenna coil. Electrons are magnetized by the magnetic field line with absolute magnetic flux density 30-120 Gauss which leads to high local ionization rate. The results suggest that modification of magnetic configuration can be made to reduce plasma heat flux onto the antenna. PMID:26932010

  14. Metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIIID) on screw-shaped titanium implant: The effects of ion source, ion dose and acceleration voltage on surface chemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung-Soo; Sul, Young-Taeg; Jeong, Yongsoo; Byon, Eungsun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Cho, Suyeon; Oh, Se-Jung; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2011-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIIID) process parameters, i.e., plasma sources of magnesium and calcium, ion dose, and acceleration voltage on the surface chemistry and morphology of screw-type titanium implants that have been most widely used for osseointegrated implants. It is found that irrespective of plasma ion source, surface topography and roughness showed no differences at the nanometer level; that atom concentrations increased with ion dose but decreased with acceleration voltage. Data obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and auger electron spectroscopy suggested that MePIIID process produces 'intermixed' layer of cathodic arc deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation. The MePIIID process may create desired bioactive surface chemistry of dental and orthopaedic implants by tailoring ion and plasma sources and thus enable investigations of the effect of the surface chemistry on bone response. PMID:21334957

  15. Microwave ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  16. Modifications in surface, structural and mechanical properties of brass using laser induced Ni plasma as an ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, M. Shahid; Yousaf, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Laser induced Ni plasma has been employed as source of ion implantation for surface, structural and mechanical properties of brass. Excimer laser (248 nm, 20 ns, 120mJ and 30 Hz) was used for the generation of Ni plasma. Thomson parabola technique was employed to estimate the energy of generated ions using CR39 as a detector. In response to stepwise increase in number of laser pulses from 3000 to 12000, the ion dose varies from 60 × 1013 to 84 × 1016 ions/cm2 with constant energy of 138 KeV. SEM analysis reveals the growth of nano/micro sized cavities, pores, pits, voids and cracks for the ion dose ranging from 60 × 1013 to 70 × 1015 ions/cm2. However, at maximum ion dose of 84 × 1016 ions/cm2 the granular morphology is observed. XRD analysis reveals that new phase of CuZnNi (200) is formed in the brass substrate after ion implantation. However, an anomalous trend in peak intensity, crystallite size, dislocation line density and induced stresses is observed in response to the implantation with various doses. The increase in ion dose causes to decrease the Yield Stress (YS), Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) and hardness. However, for the maximum ion dose the highest values of these mechanical properties are achieved. The variations in the mechanical properties are correlated with surface and crystallographical changes of ion implanted brass.

  17. Characterization of plasma ion source utilizing anode spot with positively biased electrode for stable and high-current ion beam extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2011-12-15

    The operating conditions of a rf plasma ion source utilizing a positively biased electrode have been investigated to develop a stably operating, high-current ion source. Ion beam characteristics such as currents and energies are measured and compared with bias currents by varying the bias voltages on the electrode immersed in the ambient rf plasma. Current-voltage curves of the bias electrode and photographs confirm that a small and dense plasma, so-called anode spot, is formed near an extraction aperture and plays a key role to enhance the performance of the plasma ion source. The ion beam currents from the anode spot are observed to be maximized at the optimum bias voltage near the knee of the characteristic current-voltage curve of the anode spot. Increased potential barrier to obstruct beam extraction is the reason for the reduction of the ion beam current in spite of the increased bias current indicating the density of the anode spot. The optimum bias voltage is measured to be lower at higher operating pressure, which is favorable for stable operation without severe sputtering damage on the electrode. The ion beam current can be further enhanced by increasing the power for the ambient plasma without increasing the bias voltage. In the same manner, noble gases with higher atomic number as a feedstock gas are preferable for extracting higher beam current more stably. Therefore, performance of the plasma ion source with a positively biased electrode can be enhanced by controlling the operating conditions of the anode spot in various manners.

  18. In vitro corrosion resistance of plasma source ion nitrided austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Le, M K; Zhu, X M

    2001-04-01

    Plasma source ion nitriding has emerged as a low-temperature, low-pressure nitriding approach for low-energy implanting nitrogen ions and then diffusing them into steel and alloy. In this work, a single high nitrogen face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) phase (gammaN) formed on the 1Cr18Ni9Ti and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels with a high nitrogen concentration of about 32 at % was characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance of the gammaN-phase layer was studied by the electrochemical cyclic polarization measurement in Ringer's solutions buffered to pH from 3.5 to 7.2 at a temperature of 37 degrees C. No pitting corrosion in the Ringer's solutions with pH = 7.2 and 5.5 was detected for the gammaN-phase layers on the two stainless steels. The high pitting potential for the gammaN-phase layers is higher, about 500 and 600 mV, above that of the two original stainless steels, respectively, in the Ringer's solution with pH = 3.5. The corroded surface morphologies of the gammaN-phase layers observed by scanning electron microscopy are consistent with the results of the electrochemical polarization measurement. PMID:11246957

  19. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M. Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2014-11-15

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors’ holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  20. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brombin, M.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2014-11-01

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors' holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  1. Effects of bias potential upon H{sup -} density near a plasma grid of a negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2006-03-15

    A molybdenum plasma grid was installed in a 30-cm-long 16-cm-diam 16-pole magnetic multicusp ion source to simulate the effect of a plasma electrode bias of a negative ion source. Effects caused by the bias voltage applied to the electrode upon the plasma parameters, the density of negative hydrogen ions (H{sup -}), and the drift velocity of plasma perturbed by the photodetachment of H{sup -} were investigated with the direct current laser photodetachment method. The electron density at the distance of 0.5 cm from the plasma grid decreased from 8x10{sup 10} to 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} by increasing the grid bias from 0 to +4 V, while the H{sup -} density increased from 8x10{sup 8} to 4.5x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}. The drift velocity of plasma perturbation was changed by a factor of 3 corresponding with the gradient of the plasma potential near the electrode.

  2. Study of ion-ion plasma formation in negative ion sources by a three-dimensional in real space and three-dimensional in velocity space particle in cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Miyamoto, K.; Hatayama, A.; Fukano, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, in large-scale hydrogen negative ion sources, the experimental results have shown that ion-ion plasma is formed in the vicinity of the extraction hole under the surface negative ion production case. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the mechanism of the ion-ion plasma formation by our three dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. In the present model, the electron loss along the magnetic filter field is taken into account by the " √{τ///τ⊥ } model." The simulation results show that the ion-ion plasma formation is due to the electron loss along the magnetic filter field. Moreover, the potential profile for the ion-ion plasma case has been looked into carefully in order to discuss the ion-ion plasma formation. Our present results show that the potential drop of the virtual cathode in front of the plasma grid is large when the ion-ion plasma is formed. This tendency has been explained by a relationship between the virtual cathode depth and the net particle flux density at the virtual cathode.

  3. Method For Plasma Source Ion Implantation And Deposition For Cylindrical Surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Fetherston, Robert P. , Shamim, Muhammad M. , Conrad, John R.

    1997-12-02

    Uniform ion implantation and deposition onto cylindrical surfaces is achieved by placing a cylindrical electrode in coaxial and conformal relation to the target surface. For implantation and deposition of an inner bore surface the electrode is placed inside the target. For implantation and deposition on an outer cylindrical surface the electrode is placed around the outside of the target. A plasma is generated between the electrode and the target cylindrical surface. Applying a pulse of high voltage to the target causes ions from the plasma to be driven onto the cylindrical target surface. The plasma contained in the space between the target and the electrode is uniform, resulting in a uniform implantation or deposition of the target surface. Since the plasma is largely contained in the space between the target and the electrode, contamination of the vacuum chamber enclosing the target and electrodes by inadvertent ion deposition is reduced. The coaxial alignment of the target and the electrode may be employed for the ion assisted deposition of sputtered metals onto the target, resulting in a uniform coating of the cylindrical target surface by the sputtered material. The independently generated and contained plasmas associated with each cylindrical target/electrode pair allows for effective batch processing of multiple cylindrical targets within a single vacuum chamber, resulting in both uniform implantation or deposition, and reduced contamination of one target by adjacent target/electrode pairs.

  4. Effect of basic physical parameters to control plasma meniscus and beam halo formation in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2013-09-14

    Our previous study shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources: the negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. In this article, the detail physics of the plasma meniscus and beam halo formation is investigated with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that the basic physical parameters such as the H{sup −} extraction voltage and the effective electron confinement time significantly affect the formation of the plasma meniscus and the resultant beam halo since the penetration of electric field for negative ion extraction depends on these physical parameters. Especially, the electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of electron diffusion across the magnetic field. The plasma meniscus penetrates deeply into the source plasma region when the effective electron confinement time is short. In this case, the curvature of the plasma meniscus becomes large, and consequently the fraction of the beam halo increases.

  5. Ion source research and development at University of Jyväskylä: Studies of different plasma processes and towards the higher beam intensities.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, H; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Komppula, J; Laulainen, J; Kronholm, R; Ranttila, K; Tuunanen, J; Thuillier, T; Xie, D; Machicoane, G

    2016-02-01

    Several ion source related research and development projects are in progress at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). The work can be divided into investigation of the ion source plasma and development of ion sources, ion beams, and diagnostics. The investigation covers the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma instabilities, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and visible light emission, photon induced electron emission, and the development of plasma diagnostics. The ion source development covers the work performed for radiofrequency-driven negative ion source, RADIS, beam line upgrade of the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS, and the development of a new room-temperature-magnet 18 GHz ECRIS, HIISI. PMID:26931943

  6. Operation of a 0.2-1.1 keV ion source within a magnetized laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmer, H.; Edrich, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Zhao, L.; Leneman, D.

    2004-04-01

    To study the physics of energetic ions in magnetized plasma, a rf ion beam is inserted into the 1 kG, ˜3 eV, ˜1012 cm-3 plasma produced by the upgraded LArge Plasma Device (LAPD). The commercial 100-1000 eV argon source normally operates in an unmagnetized microelectronics production environment. Successful operation in the LAPD requires numerous modifications, including electrical isolation of the source housing, relocation of the matching network for the rf, reduction of the gas pressure, pulsed operation to avoid overheating, and care to preserve current neutralization in the presence of a strong magnetic field. With these modifications, a ˜500 eV, milliampere beam that propagates axially more than 6 m is obtained.

  7. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  8. Development of the front end test stand and vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses negative hydrogen ion sources at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Perkins, M.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Gabor, C.; Back, J.

    2014-02-15

    The ISIS pulsed spallation neutron and muon facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK uses a Penning surface plasma negative hydrogen ion source. Upgrade options for the ISIS accelerator system demand a higher current, lower emittance beam with longer pulse lengths from the injector. The Front End Test Stand is being constructed at RAL to meet the upgrade requirements using a modified ISIS ion source. A new 10% duty cycle 25 kV pulsed extraction power supply has been commissioned and the first meter of 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole has been delivered. Simultaneously, a Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analyses is under construction in a new laboratory at RAL. The detailed measurements of the plasma and extracted beam characteristics will allow a radical overhaul of the transport optics, potentially yielding a simpler source configuration with greater output and lifetime.

  9. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Malapit, Giovanni M.; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S.; Poral, Matthew D.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2012-02-15

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.

  10. Electrical-thermal-structural finite element simulation and experimental study of a plasma ion source for the production of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; Meneghetti, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Vivian, G.

    2016-03-01

    The production target and the ion source constitute the core of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility. In this complex experimental apparatus for the production of radioactive ion beams, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The transfer line enables the unstable isotopes generated by the 238U fissions in the target to reach the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work, the plasma ion source currently adopted for the SPES facility is analyzed in detail by means of electrical, thermal, and structural numerical models. Next, theoretical results are compared with the electric potential difference, temperature, and displacement measurements. Experimental tests with stable ion beams are also presented and discussed.

  11. Electrical-thermal-structural finite element simulation and experimental study of a plasma ion source for the production of radioactive ion beams.

    PubMed

    Manzolaro, M; Meneghetti, G; Andrighetto, A; Vivian, G

    2016-03-01

    The production target and the ion source constitute the core of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility. In this complex experimental apparatus for the production of radioactive ion beams, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 10(13) fissions per second. The transfer line enables the unstable isotopes generated by the (238)U fissions in the target to reach the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work, the plasma ion source currently adopted for the SPES facility is analyzed in detail by means of electrical, thermal, and structural numerical models. Next, theoretical results are compared with the electric potential difference, temperature, and displacement measurements. Experimental tests with stable ion beams are also presented and discussed. PMID:27036768

  12. Comparative analysis of continuous-wave surface-plasma negative ion sources with various discharge geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Belchenko, Yu; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O.

    2014-02-15

    Negative ion extraction from continuous-wave (CW) magnetron and semiplanotron discharges was studied and it was compared with that for the source with Penning electrode geometry. The CW negative ion beam up current to 13 mA was extracted from the magnetron source with emission aperture of 3.5 mm in diameter, while the beam with current up to 8 mA was obtained from the semiplanotron source modification. Characteristics of CW magnetron and semiplanotron sources are presented and analyzed.

  13. First results with a surface conversion H ion source based on helicon wave mode-driven plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie A; Geros, Ernest; Rouleau, Gary; Zaugg, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The currently employed converter-type negative ion source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H{sup -} ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. The extracted H{sup -} beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density, which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which degrades the performance of the H{sup -} conversion surface. In order to overcome these limitations we have designed and tested a prototype of a surface conversion H{sup -} ion source, based on excitation of helicon plasma wave mode with an external antenna. The source has been operated with and without cesium injection. An H{sup -} beam current of over 12 mA has been transported through the low energy beam transport of the LANSCE ion source test stand. The results of these experiments and the effects of different source parameters on the extracted beam current are presented. The limitations of the source prototype are discussed and future improvements are proposed based on the experimental observations.

  14. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of a negative ion source with a magnetic filter: impact of biasing the plasma electrode on the plasma asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    The effect on the plasma characteristics of biasing positively the plasma electrode (PE) in negative ion sources with a magnetic filter is analysed using a 3D particle-in-cell model with Monte-Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). We specialize to the one driver (i.e. one inductively coupled radio-frequency discharge) BATMAN negative ion source and the 4-drivers (large volume) ELISE device. Both are ITER prototype high power tandem-type negative ion sources developed for the neutral beam injector (NBI) system. The plasma is generated in the driver and diffuses inside the second chamber which is magnetized. Asymmetric plasma profiles originate from the formation of an electric field transverse to the electron current flowing through the magnetic filter (Hall effect). The model shows that the importance of the asymmetry increases with the PE bias potential, i.e. with the electron flow from the driver to the extraction region and depends on the shape of the magnetic filter field. We find that although the plasma density and potential profiles may be more or less asymmetric depending on the filter field configuration, the electron current to the plasma grid is always strongly asymmetric.

  16. Work function measurements during plasma exposition at conditions relevant in negative ion sources for the ITER neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gutser, R.; Wimmer, C.; Fantz, U.

    2011-02-15

    Cesium seeded sources for surface generated negative hydrogen ions are major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER. The stability and delivered current density depend highly on the work function during vacuum and plasma phases of the ion source. One of the most important quantities that affect the source performance is the work function. A modified photocurrent method was developed to measure the temporal behavior of the work function during and after cesium evaporation. The investigation of cesium exposed Mo and MoLa samples under ITER negative hydrogen ion based neutral beam injection relevant surface and plasma conditions showed the influence of impurities which result in a fast degradation when the plasma exposure or the cesium flux onto the sample is stopped. A minimum work function close to that of bulk cesium was obtained under the influence of the plasma exposition, while a significantly higher work function was observed under ITER-like vacuum conditions.

  17. Large area plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor); Patterson, Michael (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An all permanent magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance, large diameter (e.g., 40 cm) plasma source suitable for ion/plasma processing or electric propulsion, is capable of producing uniform ion current densities at its exit plane at very low power (e.g., below 200 W), and is electrodeless to avoid sputtering or contamination issues. Microwave input power is efficiently coupled with an ionizing gas without using a dielectric microwave window and without developing a throat plasma by providing a ferromagnetic cylindrical chamber wall with a conical end narrowing to an axial entrance hole for microwaves supplied on-axis from an open-ended waveguide. Permanent magnet rings are attached inside the wall with alternating polarities against the wall. An entrance magnet ring surrounding the entrance hole has a ferromagnetic pole piece that extends into the chamber from the entrance hole to a continuing second face that extends radially across an inner pole of the entrance magnet ring.

  18. First plasma of megawatt high current ion source for neutral beam injector of the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak on the test bed

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Chundong; Xie Yahong; Liu Sheng; Xie Yuanlai; Jiang Caichao; Song Shihua; Li Jun; Liu Zhimin

    2011-02-15

    High current ion source is the key part of the neutral beam injector. In order to develop the project of 4 MW neutral beam injection for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) on schedule, the megawatt high current ion source is prestudied in the Institute of Plasma Physics in China. In this paper, the megawatt high current ion source test bed and the first plasma are presented. The high current discharge of 900 A at 2 s and long pulse discharge of 5 s at 680 A are achieved. The arc discharge characteristic of high current ion source is analyzed primarily.

  19. A Study of Ion Outflow as a Source of Plasma for the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    Spacecraft measurements beginning in the early 1970 s gave indications that the ionosphere was a contributor to the energetic particle population of the Earth s magnetosphere This surprising result ran counter to the previously accepted model that the magnetospheric plasmas, because of their higher energies, must have come from the solar wind. Indeed, the original discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts, with energies of millions of electron volts, set a strong community belief in the sun as the plasma source because of the dramatic difference in the radiation belt energy and that of the Earth s ionospheric source.

  20. Optical shaping of gas targets for laser-plasma ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, N. P.; Cook, N.; Tresca, O.; Ettlinger, O.; Maharjan, C.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Shkolnikov, P.; Pogorelsky, I.; Najmudin, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a technique to generate steep density gradients in gas-jet targets of interest to laser-plasma ion acceleration. By using an intentional low-energy prepulse, we generated a hydrodynamic blast wave in the gas to shape the target prior to the arrival of an intense CO2 λ≈ 10m drive pulse. This technique has been recently shown to facilitate the generation of ion beams by shockwave acceleration (Tresca et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 115 (9), 2015, 094802). Here, we discuss and introduce a model to understand the generation of these blast waves and discuss in depth the experimental realisation of the technique, supported by hydrodynamics simulations. With appropriate prepulse energy and timing, this blast wave can generate steepened density gradients as short as &ap 20μm (1/e), opening up new possibilities for laser-plasma studies with near-critical gaseous targets.

  1. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Anders, Simone; Dickinson, Michael; Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  2. Multimodal Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ion (VaPI) Source with Transmission Mode and Laser Ablation Sampling Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelor, Joel D.; Farnsworth, Paul B.; Weber, Arthur L.; Abbott-Lyon, Heather; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multimodal ion source design that can be configured on the fly for various analysis modes, designed for more efficient and reproducible sampling at the mass spectrometer atmospheric pressure (AP) interface in a number of different applications. This vacuum-assisted plasma ionization (VaPI) source features interchangeable transmission mode and laser ablation sampling geometries. Operating in both AC and DC power regimes with similar results, the ion source was optimized for parameters including helium flow rate and gas temperature using transmission mode to analyze volatile standards and drug tablets. Using laser ablation, matrix effects were studied, and the source was used to monitor the products of model prebiotic synthetic reactions.

  3. Multimodal Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ion (VaPI) Source with Transmission Mode and Laser Ablation Sampling Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Keelor, Joel D; Farnsworth, Paul B; L Weber, Arthur; Abbott-Lyon, Heather; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multimodal ion source design that can be configured on the fly for various analysis modes, designed for more efficient and reproducible sampling at the mass spectrometer atmospheric pressure (AP) interface in a number of different applications. This vacuum-assisted plasma ionization (VaPI) source features interchangeable transmission mode and laser ablation sampling geometries. Operating in both AC and DC power regimes with similar results, the ion source was optimized for parameters including helium flow rate and gas temperature using transmission mode to analyze volatile standards and drug tablets. Using laser ablation, matrix effects were studied, and the source was used to monitor the products of model prebiotic synthetic reactions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26883531

  4. Microwave electron cyclotron electron resonance (ECR) ion source with a large, uniformly distributed, axially symmetric, ECR plasma volume

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1996-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source includes a primary mirror coil disposed coaxially around a vacuum vessel in which a plasma is induced and introducing a solenoidal ECR-producing field throughout the length of the vacuum vessel. Radial plasma confinement is provided by a multi-cusp, multi-polar permanent magnet array disposed azimuthally around the vessel and within the primary mirror coil. Axial confinement is provided either by multi-cusp permanent magnets at the opposite axial ends of the vessel, or by secondary mirror coils disposed on opposite sides of the primary coil.

  5. Coherence imaging for ion temperature and flow measurements in a low-temperature helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, R.; Zhai, Y.; Corr, C.; Howard, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a coherence imaging system designed for spectroscopic Doppler measurements of ion light in a low-temperature (T e   <  10 eV) helicon-produced argon plasma. Observation of the very small Doppler broadening of the Ar II 488 nm emission line requires very high spectral resolution, or equivalently, very large interferometric optical path delay (comparable with the coherence length of the emission line). For these polarization interferometers, this can only be achieved using large thicknesses (100 mm) of birefringent crystal. This poses special design challenges including the application of field-widening techniques and the development of passive thermal stabilization of the optical phase offset. We discuss the measurement principles and the optical design of these systems and present measurements of the line-integrated emissivity, and ion flow and ion temperatures along with tomographic reconstructions of the local values, for a cylindrical low temperature helicon discharge in a linear magnetized device with downstream magnetic mirror. Key results reveal a hollow edge-peaked temperature profile (central temperature  ∼0.1 eV) and sheared rigid-body rotational flows and axial flows which are comparable with the ion thermal speed. The emission line brightness, ion temperature and azimuthal ion flows are all found to increase with increased mirror magnetic field strength.

  6. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector—the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups.

  7. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Ray, Steven J; Enke, Christie G; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector-the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26552388

  8. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source--Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%).

  9. Study of plasma meniscus formation and beam halo in negative ion source using the 3D3VPIC model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Fukano, A.

    2015-04-08

    In this paper, the effect of the electron confinement time on the plasma meniscus and the fraction of the beam halo is investigated by 3D3V-PIC (three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space) (Particle in Cell) simulation in the extraction region of negative ion source. The electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of diffusion across the magnetic field. Our 3D3V-PIC results support the previous result by 2D3V-PIC results i.e., it is confirmed that the penetration of the plasma meniscus becomes deep into the source plasma region when the effective confinement time is short.

  10. Improved ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-05-04

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

  11. Understanding extraction and beam transport in the ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Jolly, S.; Pozimski, J.; Savage, P.; Woods, M.

    2008-02-15

    The ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma source has been developed to produce beam currents up to 70 mA and pulse lengths up to 1.5 ms at 50 Hz. This paper details the investigation into beam extraction and beam transport in an attempt to understand the beam emittance and to try to improve the emittance. A scintillator profile measurement technique has been developed to assess the performance of different plasma electrode apertures, extraction electrode geometries, and postextraction acceleration configurations. This work shows that the present extraction, beam transport, and postacceleration system are suboptimal and further work is required to improve it.

  12. Plasma-spray ionization (PLASI): a multimodal atmospheric pressure ion source for liquid stream analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaylor, Adam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Pittman, Jennifer J; Monge, María Eugenia; Cheng, Guilong; Li, Shelly; Fernández, Facundo M

    2014-10-01

    A new ion generation method, named plasma-spray ionization (PLASI) for direct analysis of liquid streams, such as in continuous infusion experiments or liquid chromatography (LC), is reported. PLASI addresses many of the analytical limitations of electrospray ionization (ESI) and has potential for real time process stream analysis and reaction monitoring under atmospheric conditions in non-ESI friendly scenarios. In PLASI-mass spectrometry (MS), the liquid stream is pneumatically nebulized and partially charged at low voltages; the resultant aerosol is thus entrained with a gaseous plasma plume from a distal glow discharge prior to MS detection. PLASI-MS not only overcomes ESI-MS limitations but also generates simpler mass spectra with minimal adduct and cluster formation. PLASI utilizes the atomization capabilities of an ESI sprayer operated below the ESI threshold to generate gas-phase aerosols that are then ionized by the plasma stream. When operated at or above the ESI threshold, ionization by traditional ESI mechanisms is achieved. The multimodal nature of the technique enables readily switching between plasma and ESI operation. It is expected that PLASI will enable analyzing a wide range of analytes in complex matrices and less-restricted solvent systems, providing more flexibility than that achievable by ESI alone. PMID:25001384

  13. Characterization of a compact ECR plasma source and its applications to studies of helium ion damage to tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D.; Buchenauer, D.; Whaley, J.; Friddle, R.

    2016-02-01

    Exposure of tungsten to low energy (<100 eV) helium plasmas at temperatures between 900-1900 K in both laboratory experiments and tokamaks has been shown to cause severe nanoscale modification of the near surface resulting in the growth of tungsten tendrils. Tendril formation can lead to non-sputtered erosion and dust formation. Here we report on characterization of a compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) He plasma source with an ion flux of ˜2.5 × 1019 ions m-2 s-1, average fluence of 3 × 1024 ions m-2, and the surface morphology changes seen on the exposed tungsten surfaces. Exposures of polished tungsten disks at temperatures up to 1270 K have been performed and characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans. Bubbles and craters have been seen on the exposed tungsten surface growing to up to 150 nm in diameter. The ECR source has been tested for eventual use on a scanning tunneling microscopy experiment intended to study the early stages of surface morphology change due to He ion exposure.

  14. Long-pulse production of high current negative ion beam by using actively temperature controlled plasma grid for JT-60SA negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Umeda, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L. R.

    2015-04-08

    The temperature control system of the large-size plasma grid has been developed to realize the long pulse production of high-current negative ions for JT-60SA. By using this prototype system for the JT-60SA ion source, 15 A negative ions has been sustained for 100 s for the first time, which is three times longer than that obtained in JT-60U. In this system, a high-temperature fluorinated fluid with a high boiling point of 270 degree Celsius is circulated in the cooling channels of the plasma grids (PG) where a cesium (Cs) coverage is formed to enhance the negative ion production. Because the PG temperature control had been applied to only 10% of the extraction area previously, the prototype PG with the full extraction area (110 cm × 45 cm) was developed to increase the negative ion current in this time. In the preliminary results of long pulse productions of high-current negative ions at a Cs conditioning phase, the negative ion production was gradually degraded in the last half of 100 s pulse where the temperature of an arc chamber wall was not saturated. From the spectroscopic measurements, it was found that the Cs flux released from the wall might affect to the negative ion production, which implied the wall temperature should be kept low to control the Cs flux to the PG for the long-pulse high-current production. The obtained results of long-pulse production and the PG temperature control method contributes the design of the ITER ion source.

  15. Long-pulse production of high current negative ion beam by using actively temperature controlled plasma grid for JT-60SA negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Umeda, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L. R.

    2015-04-01

    The temperature control system of the large-size plasma grid has been developed to realize the long pulse production of high-current negative ions for JT-60SA. By using this prototype system for the JT-60SA ion source, 15 A negative ions has been sustained for 100 s for the first time, which is three times longer than that obtained in JT-60U. In this system, a high-temperature fluorinated fluid with a high boiling point of 270 degree Celsius is circulated in the cooling channels of the plasma grids (PG) where a cesium (Cs) coverage is formed to enhance the negative ion production. Because the PG temperature control had been applied to only 10% of the extraction area previously, the prototype PG with the full extraction area (110 cm × 45 cm) was developed to increase the negative ion current in this time. In the preliminary results of long pulse productions of high-current negative ions at a Cs conditioning phase, the negative ion production was gradually degraded in the last half of 100 s pulse where the temperature of an arc chamber wall was not saturated. From the spectroscopic measurements, it was found that the Cs flux released from the wall might affect to the negative ion production, which implied the wall temperature should be kept low to control the Cs flux to the PG for the long-pulse high-current production. The obtained results of long-pulse production and the PG temperature control method contributes the design of the ITER ion source.

  16. Ion source apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, T.; Ito, Y.

    1985-03-19

    A gas is introduced into a discharge chamber of an ion source apparatus, and a gas discharge is performed between a thermionic cathode and an anode. Ions are extracted from the plasma formed in this gas discharge by a grid electrode. The thermionic cathode has a hollow cylindrical shape. A cathode chamber is defined by the thermionic cathode and a cylindrical partition wall supporting it. A columnar auxiliary electrode is coaxially inserted in the thermionic cathode. An A.C. voltage from a power source unit is supplied between the thermionic cathode and the auxiliary electrode such that effective power for keeping the thermionic cathode at a positive potential with respect to the auxiliary electrode is higher than that for keeping the auxiliary electrode at a positive potential with respect to the thermionic cathode.

  17. Study of a polarized hydrogen ion source with deuterium plasma ionizer

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Derevyankin, G.E.; Dudnikov, V.G.; Klenov, V.S.; Nechaeva, L.P.; Plohinsky, Y.V.; Vasil`ev, G.A.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1995-07-15

    A description of the atomic beam polarized hydrogen ion source developed at the INR in Moscow is given. It is capable of producing polarized 100 {mu}sec long H{sup +} beams with currents up to 6 {mu}A. The beam is 85% polarized and has a normal emittance of 2{pi} mm mrad. Additionally polarized H{sup {minus}} beams have currents up to 200 {mu}A and normalized emittance 2.2 {pi} mm mrad. (AIP)

  18. Cubic-BN-Like Structure of B-C-N Films Synthesized by Plasma Source Ion Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming-kai; Yuan, Li-jiang; Zhang, Zhong-lin; Ma, Teng-cai

    1999-01-01

    Plasma source ion nitriding has emerged as a low-temperature, low-pressure nitriding approach for implanting nitrogen ions and then diffusing them into bulk materials. The ion-plating B-C films were nitrided to synthesize B-C-N films at a nitriding temperature from 300 to 500° C. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra analyses showed that the amorphous B-C-N films synthesized at 500° C are composed mainly of cubic-BN-like and hexagonal-BN-like plain microdomains. The higher nitriding temperature contributes to the formation of cubic-BN-like B-C-N structure in the B-C-N films.

  19. Characterization of the CW starter plasma RF matching network for operating the SNS H⁻ ion source with lower H₂ flows.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Stockli, M P; Kang, Y; Piller, C; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Welton, R F

    2016-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source H(-) ion source is operated with a pulsed 2-MHz RF (50-60 kW) to produce the 1-ms long, ∼50 mA H(-) beams at 60 Hz. A continuous low power (∼300 W) 13.56-MHz RF plasma, which is initially ignited with a H2 pressure bump, serves as starter plasma for the pulsed high power 2-MHz RF discharges. To reduce the risk of plasma outages at lower H2 flow rates which is desired for improved performance of the following radio frequency quadrupole, the 13.56-MHz RF matching network was characterized over a broad range of its two tuning capacitors. The H-α line intensity of the 13.56-MHz RF plasma and the reflected power of the 13.56-MHz RF were mapped against the capacitor settings. Optimal tunes for the maximum H-α intensity are consistent with the optimal tunes for minimum reflected power. Low limits of the H2 flow rate not causing plasma outages were explored within the range of the map. A tune region that allows lower H2 flow rate has been identified, which differs from the optimal tune for global minimum reflected power that was mostly used in the past. PMID:26932025

  20. On the role of electron energy distribution function in double frequency heating of electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L. Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2014-02-15

    Double frequency heating (DFH) is a tool to improve the output of highly charged ions particularly from modern electron cyclotron resonance ion source installations with very high RF-frequencies. In order to gain information on the DFH-mechanism and on the role of the lower injected frequency we have carried out a series of dedicated experiments where we have put emphasis on the creation of a discrete resonance surface also for this lower frequency. Our well-established method of inserting an emissive MD (metal-dielectric) liner into the plasma chamber of the source is used in these experiments as a tool of investigation. In this way, the electron temperature and density for both ECR zones is increased in a controlled manner, allowing conclusions on the role of the change of the electron-energy-distribution function with and without DFH.

  1. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs-Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure. PMID:26931918

  2. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  3. Experiments on a reflex-type sheet plasma negative-ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, A.; Kuroda, T.; Oka, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Karita, A.; Kawamoto, T. )

    1990-01-01

    Negative hydrogen ions are extracted from a reflex-type sheet plasma. Electron density and temperature profiles are measured with changing the filling gas pressure, and they are optimized to the H{sup {minus}} production at the optimum gas pressure. The optimum gas pressure is 5 mTorr for the discharge current {ital I}{sub {ital d}} =2 A. As the discharge current {ital I}{sub {ital d}} increases, H{sup {minus}} current increases linearly corresponding to the density increase in the center region, but saturates above {ital I}{sub {ital d}} =40 A. The maximum extracted H{sup {minus}} current density of 4 mA/cm{sup 2} is obtained at {ital I}{sub {ital d}}=100 A.

  4. Surface morphology changes to tungsten under exposure to He ions from an electron cyclotron resonance plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, David; Maan, Anurag; Duran, Jonah; Buchenauer, Dean; Whaley, Josh

    2015-11-01

    Exposure of tungsten to low energy (<100 eV) helium plasmas at temperatures between 900-1900 K in both laboratory experiments and tokamaks has been shown to cause severe nanoscale modification of the near surface resulting the growth of tungsten tendrils. We used a relatively low flux (2.5x1019 ions m-2 s-1) compact ECR plasma source at Sandia-California to investigate the early stages of helium induced tungsten damage. Exposures of polished tungsten discs were performed and characterized using SEM, AFM, and FIB cross section imaging. Bubbles have been seen on the exposed tungsten surface and in sub-surface cross sections growing to up to 150 nm in diameter. Comparisons were made between exposures of warm rolled Plansee tungsten discs and ALMT ITER grade tungsten samples. A similar He plasma exposure stage has now been developed at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville with an improved compact ECR plasma source. Status of the new UTK exposure stage will be discussed as well as planned experiments and new material characterization techniques (EBSD, GIXRD). Work supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 and the PSI Science Center.

  5. Spherical ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. G.

    1969-01-01

    Radial focusing of electrons in ion source produces greater ion densities, resulting in higher resolution and focus capability for a given source volume. Electron beam is focused near exit aperture by spherical fields. High density ions allow focusing ion beam to high density at echo, allowing high current through small aperture.

  6. High-current vacuum-arc ion and plasma source ``Raduga-5'' application to intermetallic phase formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Igor B.; Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Kozlov, Eduard V.; Sharkeev, Yurii P.; Shulepov, Ivan A.; Kurzina, Irina A.; Sivin, Denis O.

    2006-03-01

    Phase composition, structural state, and mechanical properties of the ion-doped surface layers of Ni, Ti, and Fe targets with Al and Ti ions implanted into using the metal ion beam and plasma source Raduga 5 have been investigated. The high-intensity mode of implantation allowed us to obtain the ion-doped layers with the thickness exceeding the ion projected range by several orders of magnitude. By the transmission electron microscopy, it has been found that the fine-dispersed equilibrium intermetallic phases (Me3Al, MeAl) and the solid solution of aluminum were formed in the doped Ni, Ti, and Fe surface layers at the depth of up to 2600nm. The maximum dopant concentration reached 75%. It has been shown that the average size of the formed phases was of 70nm. The microhardness of the different target surface layers increased by 1.5-3 times. The wear resistance of the samples did not change within the temperature range of 300-700K.

  7. Extraction of a steady state electron beam from HCD (hollow cathode discharge) plasmas for EBIS (electron beam ion source) applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.; Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments to extract high brightness electron beams from hollow cathode discharge plasmas are now in progress. A unique feature of these plasmas, which in principle can facilitate the extraction of large current low emittance electron beams, is the existence of a relatively high energy electron population with a very narrow energy spread. This electron population was identified in a self-extraction experiment, which yielded a 35 eV, 600 mA electron beam with parallel energy spread of less than 0.5 eV. Preliminary, crude application of 2.5 kV extraction voltage yielded a steady state electron beam current of 1.2 A. The end result of this endeavor would be an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) with an electron beam current of 6 A. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Doppler shift measurement of Balmer-alpha line spectrum emission from a plasma in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Doi, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-04-08

    Balmer-α light emission from the extraction region of the LHD one-third ion source has shown a characteristic Doppler broadening in the wavelength spectrum detected by a high resolution spectrometer. The spectrum resembles Gaussian distribution near the wavelength of the intensity peak, while it has an additional component of a broader foot. The measured broadening near the wavelength of the intensity peak corresponds to 0.6 eV hydrogen atom temperature. The spectrum exhibits a larger expansion in the blue wing which becomes smaller when the line of sight is tilted toward the driver region from the original observation axis parallel to the plasma grid. A surface collision simulation model predicts the possibility of hydrogen reflection at the plasma grid surface to form a broad Balmer-α light emission spectrum.

  9. Non-invasive probe diagnostic method for electron temperature and ion current density in atmospheric pressure plasma jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Moon, Jun-Hyeon; Chung, Chin-Wook; Kim, Yunjung; Cho, Guangsup

    2015-08-15

    The electrical probe diagnostics are very hard to be applied to atmospheric plasmas due to severe perturbation by the electrical probes. To overcome this, the probe for measuring electron temperature and ion current density is indirectly contacted with an atmospheric jet source. The plasma parameters are obtained by using floating harmonic analysis. The probe is mounted on the quartz tube that surrounds plasma. When a sinusoidal voltage is applied to a probe contacting on a quartz tube, the electrons near the sheath at dielectric tube are collected and the probe current has harmonic components due to probe sheath nonlinearity. From the relation of the harmonic currents and amplitude of the sheath voltage, the electron temperature near the wall can be obtained with collisional sheath model. The electron temperatures and ion current densities measured at the discharge region are in the ranges of 2.7–3.4 eV and 1.7–5.2 mA/cm{sup 2} at various flow rates and input powers.

  10. Microwave emission related to cyclotron instabilities in a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, I.; Tarvainen, O.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) have been essential in the research and applications of nuclear physics over the past 40 years. They are extensively used in a wide range of large-scale accelerator facilities for the production of highly charged heavy ion beams of stable and radioactive elements. ECRISs are susceptible to kinetic instabilities due to resonance heating mechanism leading to anisotropic electron velocity distribution function. Instabilities of cyclotron type are a proven cause of frequently observed periodic bursts of ‘hot’ electrons and bremsstrahlung, accompanied with emission of microwave radiation and followed by considerable drop of multiply charged ions current. Detailed studies of the microwave radiation associated with the instabilities have been performed with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen and argon plasmas. It is demonstrated that during the development of cyclotron instability ‘hot’ electrons emit microwaves in sub-microsecond scale bursts at temporally descending frequencies in the 8-15 GHz range with two dominant frequencies of 11.09 and 12.59 GHz regardless of ECRIS settings i.e. magnetic field strength, neutral gas pressure or species and microwave power. The experimental data suggest that the most probable excited plasma wave is a slow extraordinary Z-mode propagating quasi-longitudinally with respect to the external magnetic field.

  11. dc field-emission analysis of GaAs and plasma-source ion-implanted stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hernandez; T. Wang; T. Siggins; D. Bullard; H. F. Dylla; C. Reece; N. D. Theodore; D. M. Manos

    2003-06-01

    Field-emission studies have been performed on a GaAs wafer and a sample of its stainless-steel (SS) support electrode that are part of a photocathode gun for the 10 kW Upgrade infrared free electron laser at Jefferson Lab. The objective of the studies presented here is to characterize the effect of both the cleanliness of the wafer and the plasma-source ion-implanted layer on the electrode to suppress field emission. Field emission is the limiting factor to achieve the required 6 MV/m at the surface of the wafer. Potential field emitters are first located on the surface of 1 in. diameter samples with a dc scanning field-emission microscope at 60 MV/m, then each emitter is characterized in a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The GaAs wafer was hydrogen cleaned before the study. The results show three emitters caused by indium contamination during wafer handling. The GaAs wafer thus shows good high-voltage characteristics and the need to maintain cleanliness during handling. The SS sample is hand polished with diamond paste to a 1-m surface finish, then implanted with N2/SiO2 in a plasma-source ion-implantation chamber in preparation for the field-emission studies.

  12. Optimization of plasma parameters with magnetic filter field and pressure to maximize H- ion density in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Kim, June Young; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-02-01

    Transverse magnetic filter field as well as operating pressure is considered to be an important control knob to enhance negative hydrogen ion production via plasma parameter optimization in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources. Stronger filter field to reduce electron temperature sufficiently in the extraction region is favorable, but generally known to be limited by electron density drop near the extraction region. In this study, unexpected electron density increase instead of density drop is observed in front of the extraction region when the applied transverse filter field increases monotonically toward the extraction aperture. Measurements of plasma parameters with a movable Langmuir probe indicate that the increased electron density may be caused by low energy electron accumulation in the filter region decreasing perpendicular diffusion coefficients across the increasing filter field. Negative hydrogen ion populations are estimated from the measured profiles of electron temperatures and densities and confirmed to be consistent with laser photo-detachment measurements of the H- populations for various filter field strengths and pressures. Enhanced H- population near the extraction region due to the increased low energy electrons in the filter region may be utilized to increase negative hydrogen beam currents by moving the extraction position accordingly. This new finding can be used to design efficient H- sources with an optimal filtering system by maximizing high energy electron filtering while keeping low energy electrons available in the extraction region.

  13. Optimization of plasma parameters with magnetic filter field and pressure to maximize H⁻ ion density in a negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Kim, June Young; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y S

    2016-02-01

    Transverse magnetic filter field as well as operating pressure is considered to be an important control knob to enhance negative hydrogen ion production via plasma parameter optimization in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources. Stronger filter field to reduce electron temperature sufficiently in the extraction region is favorable, but generally known to be limited by electron density drop near the extraction region. In this study, unexpected electron density increase instead of density drop is observed in front of the extraction region when the applied transverse filter field increases monotonically toward the extraction aperture. Measurements of plasma parameters with a movable Langmuir probe indicate that the increased electron density may be caused by low energy electron accumulation in the filter region decreasing perpendicular diffusion coefficients across the increasing filter field. Negative hydrogen ion populations are estimated from the measured profiles of electron temperatures and densities and confirmed to be consistent with laser photo-detachment measurements of the H(-) populations for various filter field strengths and pressures. Enhanced H(-) population near the extraction region due to the increased low energy electrons in the filter region may be utilized to increase negative hydrogen beam currents by moving the extraction position accordingly. This new finding can be used to design efficient H(-) sources with an optimal filtering system by maximizing high energy electron filtering while keeping low energy electrons available in the extraction region. PMID:26932018

  14. Laser-plasma source parameters for Kr, Gd, and Tb ions at 6.6 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Masnavi, Majid; Szilagyi, John; Parchamy, Homaira; Richardson, Martin C.

    2013-04-22

    There is increasing interest in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser-based lamps for sub-10-nm lithography operating in the region of 6.6 nm. A collisional-radiative model is developed as a post-processor of a hydrodynamic code to investigate emission from resonance lines in Kr, Gd, and Tb ions under conditions typical for mass-limited EUV sources. The analysis reveals that maximum conversion efficiencies of Kr occur at 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}W/cm{sup 2}, while for Gd and Tb it was Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.9%/2{pi}sr for laser intensities of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Plasma formed ion beam projection lithography system

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette; Ngo, Vinh; Zahir, Nastaran

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-formed ion-beam projection lithography (IPL) system eliminates the acceleration stage between the ion source and stencil mask of a conventional IPL system. Instead a much thicker mask is used as a beam forming or extraction electrode, positioned next to the plasma in the ion source. Thus the entire beam forming electrode or mask is illuminated uniformly with the source plasma. The extracted beam passes through an acceleration and reduction stage onto the resist coated wafer. Low energy ions, about 30 eV, pass through the mask, minimizing heating, scattering, and sputtering.

  16. Sub-Auroral Ion Drifts as a Source of Mid-Latitude Plasma Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Paraschiv, I.; Rose, D.

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during space storms. At midlatitudes, such space weather events are caused mainly by subauroral electric field structures (SAID/SAPS) [1, 2]. SAID/SAPS -related shear flows and plasma density troughs point to interchange and Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities as a possible source of plasma irregularities. A model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on the two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. A numerical code in C language to solve the derived nonlinear equations for analysis of interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere was developed. This code was used to analyze competition between interchange and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities in the equatorial region [3]. The high-resolution simulations with continuous density and velocity profiles will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the in situ Defence Military Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite low-resolution data [2] during UHF/GPS L-band subauroral scintillation events. [1] Mishin, E. (2013), Interaction of substorm injections with the subauroral geospace: 1. Multispacecraft observations of SAID, J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys., 118, 5782-5796, doi:10.1002/jgra.50548. [2] Mishin, E., and N. Blaunstein (2008), Irregularities within subauroral polarization stream-related troughs and GPS radio interference at midlatitudes. In: T. Fuller-Rowell et al. (eds), AGU Geophysical Monograph 181, MidLatitude Ionospheric Dynamics and Disturbances, pp. 291-295, doi:10.1029/181GM26, Washington, DC, USA. [3] V. Sotnikov, T. Kim, E. Mishin, T. Genoni, D. Rose, I. Paraschiv, Development of a Flow Velocity Shear Instability in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects, AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 15 - 19 December, 2014.

  17. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with laser plasma initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakova, R. P.; Shikanov, A. E.

    1987-10-01

    An analysis was made of the results of an investigation of switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with a laser plasma and a vacuum arc. The dependences of the neutron yield on the electrical energy of the diode were recorded and analyzed. The results indicated a possible way of simple construction of an acceleration tube with switching via a laser-plasma source.

  18. Industrial ion source technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm electron bombardment ion source was designed and fabricated for micromachining and sputtering applications. This source has a multipole magnetic field that employs permanent magnets between permeable pole pieces. An average ion current density of 1 ma/sq cm with 500 eV argon ions was selected as a design operating condition. The ion beam at this operating condition was uniform and well collimated, with an average variation of plus or minus 5 percent over the center 20 cm of the beam at distances up to 30 cm from the ion source. A variety of sputtering applications were undertaken with a small 10 cm ion source to better understand the ion source requirements in these applications. The results of these experimental studies are also included.

  19. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    An ion source which generates ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal magnetic field to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  20. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, John Paul; Burns, Erskine John Thomas; Draper, Charles Hadley

    1997-01-01

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  1. Surface plasma source with anode layer plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Proposed plasma generation system can be used for high current negative ion beam production and for directed deposition by flux of sputtered neutrals and negative ions. The main mechanism of negative ion formation in surface plasma sources is the secondary emission from low work function surface bombarded by a flux of positive ion or neutrals. The emission of negative ions is enhanced significantly by introducing a small amount of cesium or other substance with low ionization potential. In the proposed source are used positive ions generated by Hall drift plasma accelerator (anode layer plasma accelerator or plasma accelerator with insulated channel, with cylindrical or race track configuration of emission slit). The target-emitter is bombarded by the ion beam accelerated in crossed ExB fields. Negative ions are extracted from the target surface with geometrical focusing and are accelerated by negative voltage applied between emitter and plasma, contacting with the plasma accelerator. Hall drift ion source has a special design with a space for passing of the emitted negative ions and sputtered particles through the positive ion source.

  2. System design and operation of a 100 kilovolt, 2 kilohertz pulse modulator for plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W.A.

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the electrical design and operation of a high power modulator system implemented for the Los Alamos Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) facility. To test the viability of the PSII process for various automotive components, the modulator must accept wide variations of load impedance. Components have varying area and composition which must be processed with different plasmas. Additionally, the load impedance may change by large factors during the typical 20 uS pulse, due to plasma displacement currents and sheath growth. As a preliminary design to test the system viability for automotive component implantation, suitable for a manufacturing environment, circuit topology must be able to directly scale to high power versions, for increased component through-put. We have chosen an evolutionary design approach with component families of characterized performance, which should Ion result in a reliable modulator system with component lifetimes. The modulator utilizes a pair of Litton L-3408 hollow beam amplifier tubes as switching elements in a ``hot-deck`` configuration. Internal to the main of planar triode hot deck, an additional pair decks, configured in a totem pole circuit, provide input drive to the L-3408 mod-anodes. The modulator can output over 2 amps average current (at 100 kV) with 1 kW of modanode drive. Diagnostic electronics monitor the load and stops pulses for 100 mS when a load arcs occur. This paper, in addition to providing detailed engineering design information, will provide operational characteristics and reliability data that direct the design to the higher power, mass production line capable modulators.

  3. Analysis of H atoms in a negative ion source plasma with the non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, S.; Shibata, T.; Terasaki, R.; Kameyama, N.; Hatayama, A.; Bacal, M.; Tsumori, K.

    2012-02-15

    In negative ion sources for the neutral beam injection, it is important to calculate H atom flux onto the plasma grid (PG) surface for the evaluation of H{sup -} production on the PG surface. We have developed a neutral (H{sub 2} molecules and H atoms) transport code. In the present study, the neutral transport code is applied to the analysis of the H{sub 2} and H transport in a NIFS-R and D ion source in order to calculate the flux onto the PG surface. Taking into account non-equilibrium feature of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), i.e., the fast electron component, we have done the neutral transport simulation. The results suggest that the precise evaluation of the EEDF, especially in the energy range 15 eV < E < 30 eV is important for the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} molecules by the electron impact collision and the resultant H atom flux on the PG.

  4. 3D-full wave and kinetics numerical modelling of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources plasma: steps towards self-consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Neri, Lorenzo; Sorbello, Gino; Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Gammino, Santo

    2015-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion Sources are the most performing machines for the production of intense beams of multi-charged ions in fundamental science, applied physics and industry. Investigation of plasma dynamics in ECRIS still remains a challenge. A better comprehension of electron heating, ionization and diffusion processes, ion confinement and ion beam formation is mandatory in order to increase ECRIS performances both in terms of output beams currents, charge states, beam quality (emittance minimization, beam halos suppression, etc.). Numerical solution of Vlasov equation via kinetic codes coupled to FEM solvers is ongoing at INFN-LNS, based on a PIC strategy. Preliminary results of the modeling will be shown about wave-plasma interaction and electron-ion confinement: the obtained results are very helpful to better understand the influence of the different parameters (especially RF frequency and power) on the ion beam formation mechanism.

  5. Metal Ion Sources for Ion Beam Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W. J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Ren, X. T.

    2008-11-03

    In this paper a theme touched upon the progress of metal ion sources devoted to metal ion beam implantation (MIBI) will be reviewed. A special emphasis will be given to some kinds of ion sources such as ECR, MEVVA and Cluster ion sources. A novel dual hollow cathode metal ion source named DUHOCAMIS will be introduced and discussed.

  6. The DCU laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Yeates, P; Costello, J T; Kennedy, E T

    2010-04-01

    Laser ion sources are used to generate and deliver highly charged ions of various masses and energies. We present details on the design and basic parameters of the DCU laser ion source (LIS). The theoretical aspects of a high voltage (HV) linear LIS are presented and the main issues surrounding laser-plasma formation, ion extraction and modeling of beam transport in relation to the operation of a LIS are detailed. A range of laser power densities (I approximately 10(8)-10(11) W cm(-2)) and fluences (F=0.1-3.9 kJ cm(-2)) from a Q-switched ruby laser (full-width half-maximum pulse duration approximately 35 ns, lambda=694 nm) were used to generate a copper plasma. In "basic operating mode," laser generated plasma ions are electrostatically accelerated using a dc HV bias (5-18 kV). A traditional einzel electrostatic lens system is utilized to transport and collimate the extracted ion beam for detection via a Faraday cup. Peak currents of up to I approximately 600 microA for Cu(+) to Cu(3+) ions were recorded. The maximum collected charge reached 94 pC (Cu(2+)). Hydrodynamic simulations and ion probe diagnostics were used to study the plasma plume within the extraction gap. The system measured performance and electrodynamic simulations indicated that the use of a short field-free (L=48 mm) region results in rapid expansion of the injected ion beam in the drift tube. This severely limits the efficiency of the electrostatic lens system and consequently the sources performance. Simulations of ion beam dynamics in a "continuous einzel array" were performed and experimentally verified to counter the strong space-charge force present in the ion beam which results from plasma extraction close to the target surface. Ion beam acceleration and injection thus occur at "high pressure." In "enhanced operating mode," peak currents of 3.26 mA (Cu(2+)) were recorded. The collected currents of more highly charged ions (Cu(4+)-Cu(6+)) increased considerably in this mode of operation

  7. High Current Ion Sources and Injectors for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2005-02-15

    Heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion requires short ion beam pulses with high current and high brightness. Depending on the beam current and the number of beams in the driver system, the injector can use a large diameter surface ionization source or merge an array of small beamlets from a plasma source. In this paper, we review the scaling laws that govern the injector design and the various ion source options including the contact ionizer, the aluminosilicate source, the multicusp plasma source, and the MEVVA source.

  8. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Z.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1993-10-26

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source having an electron gun for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber of the ion source is described. The ion source has a injection enclosure and a plasma chamber tank. The plasma chamber is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets. The electron gun injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber such that ionization within the plasma chamber occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun. The electron gun has a cathode for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply. A concentric inner conductor and outer conductor carry heating current to a carbon chuck and carbon pusher which hold the cathode in place and also heat the cathode. In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, the electron gun replaces the conventional first stage used in prior electron cyclotron resonance ion generators. 5 figures.

  9. ECR ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Billquist, P.J.; Harkewicz, R.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The feasibility of using a 30-watt pulsed NdYAG laser to ablate or evaporate material directly into the ECR had some initial exploratory runs and produced two distinctly interesting results. This technique holds the possibility of using small quantities of material, with a high efficiency, and being applicable to all solids. The laser illuminates a sample through one of the radial ports in the ECR main plasma chamber. The off-line tests indicated that our surplus (free) laser is capable of ablating significant quantities of interesting materials. The first tests of the laser ablation idea were carried out using a bismuth sample. The inherent pulsed nature of the technique allowed us to immediately study the time evolution of charge states in the ECR plasma. The results are directly comparable to model calculations and are completely consistent with the sequential stepwise stripping process which was assumed to dominate the high charge state production process. A paper describing our results will be presented at the 1995 International Ion Source Conference.

  10. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  11. Plasma characteristics of single- and dual-electrode ion source systems utilized in low-energy ion extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. R.; Tokumura, S.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2014-02-15

    Discharge characteristics in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of a 50-eV positive ion beam were measured along the beam axis. Single- and dual-electrode configurations made of 0.1-mm diameter tungsten wires were tested. By varying the upstream discharge parameters, the shape of the sheath edge around the extractors, which can either be “planar” or “cylindrical,” can be controlled. The sheath eventually affected the simultaneous extraction of ions and neutralizing electrons. The dual-electrode configuration at the lower discharge current, revealed a homogeneous discharge downstream. At this condition, the edge of the sheath can be inferred to be “planar” which allowed the uniform extraction and propagation of low-energy ions at longer distances. The dual-electrode configuration was capable of transmitting low-energy ions up to 70 mm downstream.

  12. PULSED ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.E.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1958-06-17

    An ion source is described for producing very short high density pulses of ions without bcam scattering. The ions are created by an oscillating electron discharge within a magnetic field. After the ions are drawn from the ionization chamber by an accelerating electrode the ion beam is under the influence of the magnetic field for separation of the ions according to mass and, at the same time, passes between two neutralizing plntes maintained nt equal negative potentials. As the plates are formed of a material having a high ratio of secondary electrons to impinging ions, the ion bombardment of the plntes emits electrons which neutralize the frirge space-charge of the beam and tend to prevent widening of the beam cross section due to the mutual repulsion of the ions.

  13. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  14. Cesium in hydrogen negative-ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Belchenko, Yu.I.; Davydenko, V.I.

    2006-03-15

    Experimental data on the dynamics of cesium particles in the pulsed magnetron and Penning surface-plasma ion sources are presented. Cesium escape from the source emission apertures and the cesium ion current to discharge electrodes was measured. The low value of cesium flux from the source was detected. An intense cesium ion current to the cathode (up to 0.8 A/cm{sup 2}) was measured. The high value of cesium ion current to surface-plasma source cathode confirms the cesium circulation near the cathode.

  15. ION SOURCE FOR CALUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Tolmie, J.R.

    1958-09-16

    An improvement is presented in ion sources of the type employed in calutron devices. The described ion source has for its inventive contribution the incorporation of a plate-like cathode having the general configuration of a polygon including a given number of apices. When a polyphase source of current has a phase connected to each of the apices, the cathode is heated and rendered electron emissive. This particular cathode configuration is of sturdy construction and provides unuform emission over a considerable area.

  16. Effects of oxygen plasma source ion implantation on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lizhen

    Near-equiatomic NiTi is an important shape memory alloy used in both medical and non-medical applications, which are dependent upon the surface characteristics of NiTi. The work presented here is the first use of plasma source ion implantation with oxygen as the incident species to modify the surface structure of NiTi shape memory alloy. Two levels of voltage bias and three levels of ion dose were employed to investigate the effect of processing parameters on surface microstructure and surface-related properties. Several surface analytical techniques, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), were employed to analyze the effects of the surface modification on surface characteristics including oxide thickness, oxide constitution, phase distribution, morphology and topography. A two-layer surface structure consisting of an oxide layer and a precipitate accommodation layer was observed on modified NiTi. The surface morphology, roughness and hydrophilicity, which are considered to play important roles in affecting protein adsorption behavior, were found to be altered by surface modification. The effects of surface modification on surface-related properties including corrosion resistance, hardness and wear resistance were evaluated by cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests, Knoop hardness microindentation and fretting wear tests, respectively. The optimum corrosion and wear resistance of NiTi were achieved with ion implantation under high bias and moderate dose. Archard's equation was modified by incorporating the pseudoelasticity effect on wear resistance in addition to hardness. The modified Archard's equation better describes the fretting wear resistance of NiTi. A combination of nanoindentation and AES was employed to understand the relationship between mechanical properties and composition of the modified material.

  17. Laser ion source for low charge heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura,M.; Pikin, A.; Zajic, V.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.

    2008-08-03

    For heavy ion inertial fusion application, a combination of a laser ion source and direct plasma injection scheme into an RFQ is proposed. The combination might provide more than 100 mA of singly charged heavy ion beam from a single laser shot. A planned feasibility test with moderate current is also discussed.

  18. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma source by using Ku-band traveling-wave tube amplifier for broad ion-beam processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Toyohisa; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kato, Yushi; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki; Saito, Junji

    2006-03-01

    A new electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source has been developed for broad ion-beam processing. A Ku-band traveling-wave tube amplifier (11-13GHz) is adopted to generate high-density plasma under low-pressure conditions. An eight-pole magnetic field is selected to improve good uniformity and plasma confinement. The ECR zone for 11GHz microwaves, i.e., 0.393T, is formed within 6.5mm of the inner wall of a chamber. The ECR plasma is generated by low microwave power (˜200W). The radial profile of plasma density and electron temperature is measured with a Langmuir probe. The plasma density is approximately 3×1017m-3 at the microwave power of 200W. The uniformity of the density is within ±12.6% over 140mm in diameter.

  19. Negative-ion source applications.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, J

    2008-02-01

    In this paper heavy negative-ion sources which we developed and their applications for materials science are reviewed. Heavy negative ions can be effectively produced by the ejection of a sputtered atom through the optimally cesiated surface of target with a low work function. Then, enough continuous negative-ion currents for materials-science applications can be obtained. We developed several kinds of sputter-type heavy negative-ion sources such as neutral- and ionized-alkaline metal bombardment-type heavy negative-ion source and rf-plasma sputter type. In the case where a negative ion is irradiated on a material surface, surface charging seldom takes place because incoming negative charge of the negative ion is well balanced with outgoing negative charge of the released secondary electron. In the negative-ion implantation into an insulator or insulated conductive material, high precision implantation processing with charge-up free properties can be achieved. Negative-ion implantation technique, therefore, can be applied to the following novel material processing systems: the surface modification of micrometer-sized powders, the nanoparticle formation in an insulator for the quantum devices, and the nerve cell growth manipulation by precise control of the biocompatibility of polymer surface. When a negative ion with low kinetic energy approaches the solid surface, the kinetic energy causes the interatomic bonding (kinetic bonding), and formation of a metastable material is promoted. Carbon films with high constituent of sp(3) bonding, therefore, can be formed by carbon negative-ion beam deposition. PMID:18315249

  20. HIGH VOLTAGE ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-04-19

    A device is described for providing a source of molecular ions having a large output current and with an accelerated energy of the order of 600 kv. Ions are produced in an ion source which is provided with a water-cooled source grid of metal to effect maximum recombination of atomic ions to molecular ions. A very high accelerating voltage is applied to withdraw and accelerate the molecular ions from the source, and means are provided for dumping the excess electrons at the lowest possible potentials. An accelerating grid is placed adjacent to the source grid and a slotted, grounded accelerating electrode is placed adjacent to the accelerating grid. A potential of about 35 kv is maintained between the source grid and accelerating grid, and a potential of about 600 kv is maintained between the accelerating grid and accelerating electrode. In order to keep at a minimum the large number of oscillating electrons which are created when such high voltages are employed in the vicinity of a strong magnetic field, a plurality of high voltage cascaded shields are employed with a conventional electron dumping system being employed between each shield so as to dump the electrons at the lowest possible potential rather than at 600 kv.

  1. BERNAS ION SOURCE DISCHARGE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    RUDSKOY,I.; KULEVOY, T.V.; PETRENKO, S.V.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; PERSHIN, V.I.; HERSHCOVITCH, A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; OKS, E.M.; POOLE, H.J.

    2007-08-26

    The joint research and development program is continued to develop steady-state ion source of decaborane beam for ion implantation industry. Bemas ion source is the wide used ion source for ion implantation industry. The new simulation code was developed for the Bemas ion source discharge simulation. We present first results of the simulation for several materials interested in semiconductors. As well the comparison of results obtained with experimental data obtained at the ITEP ion source test-bench is presented.

  2. Development of negative ion source at the IPP Nagoya University

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, T; Okamura, H; Kaneko, O; Oka, Y

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary experiments have been made to develop a high current H/sup -/ ion surface for a neutral beam injector. Initially, an H/sup -/ ion source of the magnetron type has been investigated in order to determine its physical and technical problems. A second plasma source for negative ion production is under construction, which is based on controlled plasma production. This paper describes preliminary experimental results of the magnetron ion source and some features in the new type of plasma source.

  3. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-08-06

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  4. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-12-04

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

  5. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  6. Fluid model of the sheath in front of a floating electrode immersed in a magnetized plasma with oblique magnetic field: Some comments on ion source terms and ion temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovačič, J.

    2015-04-01

    A one-dimensional fluid model of the magnetized plasma-wall transition region in front of a floating electrode immersed in a magnetized plasma with oblique magnetic field is presented. The Boltzmann relation is assumed for the electrons, while the positive ions obey the ion continuity and momentum exchange equation. The ions are assumed to be isothermal. By comparison with a two-fluid model, it is shown that assuming the Boltzmann relation for the electrons implies that there is no creation or annihilation of the electrons. Consequently, there should not be any creation and annihilation of the positive ions either. The models that assume the Boltzmann relation for the electrons and a non-zero ion source term at the same time are therefore inconsistent, but such models have nevertheless been used extensively by many authors. So, in this work, an extensive comparison of the results obtained using the zero source term on one hand and three different non-zero source terms on the other hand is made. Four different ion source terms are considered in total: the zero source term and three different non-zero ion source terms. When the zero source term is used, the model becomes very sensitive to the boundary conditions, and in some cases, the solutions exhibit large amplitude oscillations. If any of the three non-zero ion source terms is used, those problems are eliminated, but also the consistency of the model is broken. The model equations are solved numerically in the entire magnetized plasma-wall transition region. For zero ion temperature, the model can be solved even if a very small ion velocity is selected as a boundary condition. For finite ion temperature, the system of equations becomes stiff, unless the ion velocity at the boundary is increased slightly above the ion thermal velocity. A simple method how to find a solution with a very small ion velocity at the boundary also for finite ion temperature in the entire magnetized plasma-wall transition region is

  7. Fluid model of the sheath in front of a floating electrode immersed in a magnetized plasma with oblique magnetic field: Some comments on ion source terms and ion temperature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovačič, J.

    2015-04-15

    A one-dimensional fluid model of the magnetized plasma-wall transition region in front of a floating electrode immersed in a magnetized plasma with oblique magnetic field is presented. The Boltzmann relation is assumed for the electrons, while the positive ions obey the ion continuity and momentum exchange equation. The ions are assumed to be isothermal. By comparison with a two-fluid model, it is shown that assuming the Boltzmann relation for the electrons implies that there is no creation or annihilation of the electrons. Consequently, there should not be any creation and annihilation of the positive ions either. The models that assume the Boltzmann relation for the electrons and a non-zero ion source term at the same time are therefore inconsistent, but such models have nevertheless been used extensively by many authors. So, in this work, an extensive comparison of the results obtained using the zero source term on one hand and three different non-zero source terms on the other hand is made. Four different ion source terms are considered in total: the zero source term and three different non-zero ion source terms. When the zero source term is used, the model becomes very sensitive to the boundary conditions, and in some cases, the solutions exhibit large amplitude oscillations. If any of the three non-zero ion source terms is used, those problems are eliminated, but also the consistency of the model is broken. The model equations are solved numerically in the entire magnetized plasma-wall transition region. For zero ion temperature, the model can be solved even if a very small ion velocity is selected as a boundary condition. For finite ion temperature, the system of equations becomes stiff, unless the ion velocity at the boundary is increased slightly above the ion thermal velocity. A simple method how to find a solution with a very small ion velocity at the boundary also for finite ion temperature in the entire magnetized plasma-wall transition region is

  8. Compact steady-state and high-flux Falcon ion source for tests of plasma-facing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, O.; Bizyukov, I.; Sereda, K.; Bizyukov, A.; Gutkin, M.; Sleptsov, V.

    2012-08-15

    This paper describes the design and operation of the Falcon ion source. It is based on conventional design of anode layer thrusters. This ion source is a versatile, compact, affordable, and highly functional in the research field of the fusion materials. The reversed magnetic field configuration of the source allows precise focusing of the ion beam into small spot of Almost-Equal-To 3 mm and also provides the limited capabilities for impurity mass-separation. As the result, the source generates steady-state ion beam, which irradiates surface with high heat (0.3 - 21 MW m{sup -2}) and particle fluxes (4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21}- 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}), which approaches the upper limit for the flux range expected in ITER.

  9. Industrial ion source technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    In reactive ion etching of Si, varying amounts of O2 were added to the CF4 background. The experimental results indicated an etch rate less than that for Ar up to an O2 partial pressure of about .00006 Torr. Above this O2 pressure, the etch rate with CF4 exceeded that with Ar alone. For comparison the random arrival rate of O2 was approximately equal to the ion arrival rate at a partial pressure of about .00002 Torr. There were also ion source and ion pressure gauge maintenance problems as a result of the use of CF4. Large scale (4 sq cm) texturing of Si was accomplished using both Cu and stainless steel seed. The most effective seeding method for this texturing was to surround the sample with large inclined planes. Designing, fabricating, and testing a 200 sq cm rectangular beam ion source was emphasized. The design current density was 6 mA/sq cm with 500 eV argon ions, although power supply limitations permitted operation to only 2 mA/sq cm. The use of multiple rectangular beam ion sources for continuous processing of wider areas than would be possible with a single source was also studied. In all cases investigated, the most uniform coverage was obtained with 0 to 2 cm beam overlay. The maximum departure from uniform processing at optimum beam overlap was found to be +15%.

  10. H(-) ion source developments at the SNS.

    PubMed

    Welton, R F; Stockli, M P; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Han, B; Kang, Y; Goulding, R H; Crisp, D W; Sparks, D O; Luciano, N P; Carmichael, J R; Carr, J

    2008-02-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will require substantially higher average and pulse H(-) beam currents than can be produced from conventional ion sources such as the base line SNS source. H(-) currents of 40-50 mA (SNS operations) and 70-100 mA (power upgrade project) with a rms emittance of 0.20-0.35pi mm mrad and a approximately 7% duty factor will be needed. We are therefore investigating several advanced ion source concepts based on rf plasma excitation. First, the performance characteristics of an external antenna source based on an Al(2)O(3) plasma chamber combined with an external multicusp magnetic configuration, an elemental Cs system, and plasma gun will be discussed. Second, the first plasma measurements of a helicon-driven H(-) ion source will also be presented. PMID:18315274

  11. An overview of LINAC ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Roderich

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses ion sources used in high-duty-factor proton and H{sup -} Linacs as well as in accelerators utilizing multi-charged heavy ions, mostly for nuclear physics applications. The included types are Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) sources as well as filament and rf driven multicusp sources. The paper does not strive to attain encyclopedic character but rather to highlight major lines of development, peak performance parameters and type-specific limitations and problems of these sources. The main technical aspects being discussed are particle feed, plasma generation and ion production by discharges, and plasma confinement.

  12. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  13. Coincident ion acceleration and electron extraction for space propulsion using the self-bias formed on a set of RF biased grids bounding a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A.

    2014-11-01

    We propose an alternative method to accelerate ions in classical gridded ion thrusters and ion sources such that co-extracted electrons from the source may provide beam space charge neutralization. In this way there is no need for an additional electron neutralizer. The method consists of applying RF voltage to a two-grid acceleration system via a blocking capacitor. Due to the unequal effective area of the two grids in contact with the plasma, a dc self-bias is formed, rectifying the applied RF voltage. As a result, ions are continuously accelerated within the grid system while electrons are emitted in brief instants within the RF period when the RF space charge sheath collapses. This paper presents the first experimental results and a proof-of-principle. Experiments are carried out using the Neptune thruster prototype which is a gridded Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) source operated at 4 MHz, attached to a larger beam propagation chamber. The RF power supply is used both for the ICP discharge (plasma generation) and powering the acceleration grids via a capacitor for ion acceleration and electron extraction without any dc power supplies. The ion and electron energies, particle flux and densities are measured using retarding field energy analyzers (RFEA), Langmuir probes and a large beam target. The system operates in Argon and N2. The dc self-bias is found to be generated within the gridded extraction system in all the range of operating conditions. Broad quasi-neutral ion-electron beams are measured in the downstream chamber with energies up to 400 eV. The beams from the RF acceleration method are compared with classical dc acceleration with an additional external electron neutralizer. It is found that the two acceleration techniques provide similar performance, but the ion energy distribution function from RF acceleration is broader, while the floating potential of the beam is lower than for the dc accelerated beam.

  14. CALUTRON ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1959-02-17

    An improvement is described in ion source mechanisms whereby the source structure is better adapted to withstanid the ravages of heat, erosion, and deterioration concomitant with operation of an ion source of the calutron type. A pair of molybdenum plates define the exit opening of the arc chamber and are in thermal contact with the walls of the chamber. These plates are maintained at a reduced temperature by a pair of copper blocks in thermal conducting contact therewith to form subsequent diverging margins for the exit opening.

  15. New plasma source based on contact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Schrittwieser, R.; Koslover, R.; Karim, R.; Rynn, N.

    1985-07-01

    A new type of plasma source is presented: A collisionless plasma is formed by producing ions on one end and electrons on the other of a cylindrical vacuum chamber in a solenoidal magnetic field. The ions are produced by contact ionization of potassium on tungsten. The source of electrons is a LaB/sub 6/ plate. In the usual single-ended Q machine the elements rhenium, iridium, and platinum are tested as ionizing metals for potassium and barium.

  16. Ion Temperature Anisotropies in Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkey, Matthew M.; Boiven, Robert; Keiter, Paul; Kline, John; Scime, Earl; Spangler, Robert

    1999-11-01

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the ion temperature in an argon helicon plasma indicate a substantial ion temperature anisotropy (perpendicular over parallel). The perpendicular ion temperature scales linearly with the applied magnetic field strength and also depends on the RF driving frequency and amplitude. We will present measurements of the ion temperature as a function of magnetic field, RF amplitude, and RF frequency. We will also present measurements of the electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum in the source. Preliminary measurements suggest that the RF driving wave may parametrically decay into waves that can couple to the ions, thus providing a path for RF energy directly into the ions.

  17. Nanophotonic Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolee, Jessica A.; Walker, Bennett N.; Chen, Yong; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Interactions between laser radiation and photonic structures at elevated laser intensities give rise to the production of positive and negative ions from adsorbates. These new types of ion sources exhibit properties that are significantly different from conventional laser desorption ionization sources. In this contribution comparisons are made between matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) of biomolecules with ion production from laser-induced silicon microcolumn arrays (LISMA) and nanopost arrays (NAPA). The sharp increase of ion yields from the nanophotonic ion sources follow a power law behavior with an exponent of up to n≈7, whereas in the case of MALDI n≈5. The strong field enhancement in the vicinity of the columns and posts scales with their aspect ratio. Slender high aspect ratio posts show reduced laser fluence threshold for ionization. Posts with diameters at or below the thermal diffusion length demonstrate high surface temperatures due to the radial confinement of the deposited energy. As a consequence enhanced fragmentation, i.e., lower survival yield of the molecular ions is observed. The origin of protons in the ionization of adsorbates was identified as the entrapped residues of the solvent.

  18. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline. PMID:22380298

  19. A hollow cathode hydrogen ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    High current density ion sources have been used to heat plasmas in controlled thermonuclear reaction experiments. High beam currents imply relatively high emission currents from cathodes which have generally taken the form of tungsten filaments. A hydrogen ion source is described which was primarily developed to assess the emission current capability and design requirements for hollow cathodes for application in neutral injection devices. The hydrogen source produced ions by electron bombardment via a single hollow cathode. Source design followed mercury ion thruster technology, using a weak magnetic field to enhance ionization efficiency.

  20. 11-13 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma source using cylindrically comb-shaped magnetic-field configuration for broad ion-beam processing

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, Toyohisa; Kato, Yushi; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki; Saito, Junji

    2006-11-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source for broad ion-beam processing has been upgraded by a cylindrically comb-shaped magnetic-field configuration and 11-13 GHz frequency microwaves. A pair of comb-shaped magnets surrounds a large-bore discharge chamber. The magnetic field well confines plasmas with suppressing diffusion toward the axial direction of the cylindrical chamber. The magnetic field is constructed with a multipole and two quasiring permanent magnets. The plasma density clearly increases as compared with that in a simple multipole magnetic-field configuration. The frequency of microwaves output from the traveling-wave tube amplifier can be easily changed with an input signal source. The plasma density for 13 GHz is higher than that for 11 GHz. The maximum plasma density has reached approximately 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} at a microwave power of only 350 W and a pressure of 1.0 Pa. The enhancement of plasma generation by second-harmonic resonance and microwave modes has been investigated. The plasma density and the electron temperature are raised around the second-harmonic resonance zone. And then, the ion saturation current is periodically increased with varying the position of the plate tuner. The distance between the peaks is nearly equal to half of the free-space wavelength of microwave. The efficiency of ECR has been improved by using the comb-shaped magnetic field and raising microwave frequency, and then the high-density plasma source has been accomplished at low microwave power.

  1. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  2. Fluid Model Analysis of the Distribution of the Negative Ion Density before the Extraction from a Tandem Type of a Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    St Lishev, Stiliyan; Shivarova, Antonia P.; Tarnev, Khristo Ts.

    2011-09-26

    Unified description of the expansion (through a magnetic filter) and extraction regions, including also the driver, of volume-production based sources of negative hydrogen ions is presented in the study. The model is one-dimensional, developed within the fluid plasma theory. It covers description of both the second chamber of the tandem sources and a single inductively-driven (with a planar coil) discharge of a matrix source. Four parameters have been varied in the analysis of the results: type, position and magnitude of the filter field and rf power applied for the discharge maintenance. The obtained results for the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters as well as for the electronegativity, for the negative ion beam current and its ratio to the electron current at the position of the extraction are discussed regarding optimum conditions for the source operation. The conclusion is that a magnetic field extended over a large region till the extraction favors locality in the discharge behavior and, respectively, the local production of the negative ions. This leads to high density of the extracted negative ion beam current at reasonable values of its ratio to the electron current density.

  3. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  4. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10{sup 11}, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  5. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  6. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, whichmore » was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.« less

  7. The effect of radio-frequency self bias on ion acceleration in expanding argon plasmas in helicon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebold, Matthew D.

    Time-averaged plasma potential differences up to ˜ 165 V over several hundred Debye lengths are observed in low pressure (pn < 1 mTorr) expanding argon plasmas in the Madison Helicon Experiment. The potential gradient leads to ion acceleration exceeding Ei ≈ 7 kTe in some cases. Up to 1 kW of 13.56 MHz RF power is supplied to a half-turn, double-helix antenna in the presence of a nozzle magnetic field up to 1 kG. An RPA measures the IEDF and an emissive probe measures the plasma potential. Single and double probes measure the electron density and temperature. Two distinct mode hops, the capacitive-inductive (E-H) and inductive-helicon (H-W) transitions, are identified by jumps in electron density as RF power is increased. In the capacitive mode, large fluctuations of the plasma potential (Vp--p ≳ 140 V, Vp--p/Vp ≈ 150%) exist at the RF frequency, leading to formation of a self-bias voltage. The mobile electrons can flow from the upstream region during an RF cycle whereas ions cannot, leading to an initial imbalance of flux, and the self-bias voltage builds as a result. The plasma potential in the expansion chamber is held near the floating potential for argon (Vp ≈ 5kTe/e). In the capacitive mode, the ion acceleration is not well described by an ambipolar relation. The accelerated population decay is consistent with that predicted by charge-exchange collisions. Grounding the upstream endplate increases the self-bias voltage compared to a floating endplate. In the inductive and helicon modes, the ion acceleration more closely follows an ambipolar relation, a result of decreased capacitive coupling due to the decreased RF skin depth. The scaling of the potential gradient with the argon flow rate, magnetic field and RF power are investigated, with the highest potential gradients observed for the lowest flow rates in the capacitive mode. The magnitude of the self-bias voltage agrees well with that predicted for RF sheaths. Use of the self-bias effect in a

  8. H- ion source developments at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Stockli, Martin P; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Han, Baoxi; Kang, Yoon W; Goulding, Richard Howell; Crisp, Danny W; Sparks, Dennis O; Luciano, Nicholas P; Carmichael, Justin R; Carr, Jr, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will require substantially higher average and pulse H- beam currents than can be produced from conventional ion sources such as the base line SNS source. H- currents of 40-50 mA (SNS operations) and 70-100 mA (power upgrade project) with an rms emittance of 0.20-0.35 Pi mm mrad and a ~7% duty factor will be needed. We are therefore investigating several advanced ion source concepts based on RF excitation. First, the performance characteristics of an external antenna source based on an Al2O3 plasma chamber combined with an external multicusp magnetic configuration, an elemental Cs system, and plasma gun will be discussed. Second, the first plasma measurements of a helicon-driven H- ion source will also be presented.

  9. Proceedings of the ninth symposium on ion sources and ion-assisted technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on Ion Sources and ion-assisted technology. Topics covered include: microwave ion sources; analysis on vaporized metal cluster formation by Classical Nucleation Theory; a plasma filament ion source; and an expansion cup and grid electrode system for the extraction of a wide ion beam.

  10. Plasma asymmetry due to the magnetic filter in fusion-type negative ion sources: Comparisons between two and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fubiani, G. Boeuf, J. P.

    2014-07-15

    Previously reported 2D Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) simulations of negative ion sources under conditions similar to those of the ITER neutral beam injection system have shown that the presence of the magnetic filter tends to generate asymmetry in the plasma properties in the extraction region. In this paper, we show that these conclusions are confirmed by 3D PIC-MCC simulations and we provide quantitative comparisons between the 2D and 3D model predictions.

  11. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  12. Design and simulation of ion optics for ion sources for production of singly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenak, A.; Bogomolov, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    During the last 2 years different types of the singly charged ion sources were developed for FLNR (JINR) new projects such as Dubna radioactive ion beams, (Phase I and Phase II), the production of the tritium ion beam and the MASHA mass separator. The ion optics simulations for 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance source, rf source, and the plasma ion source were performed. In this article the design and simulation results of the optics of new ion sources are presented. The results of simulation are compared with measurements obtained during the experiments.

  13. Performance of an inverted ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Araujo, W. W. R.; Spirin, R. E.; Oks, E. M.; Brown, I. G.

    2013-02-15

    Whereas energetic ion beams are conventionally produced by extracting ions (say, positive ions) from a plasma that is held at high (positive) potential, with ion energy determined by the potential drop through which the ions fall in the beam formation electrode system, in the device described here the plasma and its electronics are held at ground potential and the ion beam is formed and injected energetically into a space maintained at high (negative) potential. We refer to this configuration as an 'inverted ion source.' This approach allows considerable savings both technologically and economically, rendering feasible some ion beam applications, in particular small-scale ion implantation, that might otherwise not be possible for many researchers and laboratories. We have developed a device of this kind utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source, and explored its operation and beam characteristics over a range of parameter variation. The downstream beam current has been measured as a function of extraction voltage (5-35 kV), arc current (50-230 A), metal ion species (Ti, Nb, Au), and extractor grid spacing and beamlet aperture size (3, 4, and 5 mm). The downstream ion beam current as measured by a magnetically-suppressed Faraday cup was up to as high as 600 mA, and with parametric variation quite similar to that found for the more conventional metal vapor vacuum arc ion source.

  14. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  15. Effects of adsorption and roughness upon the collision processes at the convertor surface of a plasma sputter negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Kenmotsu, T; Wada, M

    2012-02-01

    Atomic collision processes associated with surface production of negative hydrogen ions (H(-)) by particle reflection at molybdenum surface immersed in hydrogen plasma have been investigated. To calculate sputtering yields of Cs, as well as energy spectra and angular distributions of reflected hydrogen atoms from molybdenum surface by H(+) ion and Cs(+) ion bombardments, a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) was run with the corresponding surface conditions. A fractal surface model has been developed and adopted to ACAT for evaluating the effect due to roughness of target material. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that the retention of hydrogen atoms leads to the reduction in sputtering yields of Cs, and the surface roughness does largely affect the sputtering yields of Cs. PMID:22380231

  16. Effects of adsorption and roughness upon the collision processes at the convertor surface of a plasma sputter negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    Atomic collision processes associated with surface production of negative hydrogen ions (H{sup -}) by particle reflection at molybdenum surface immersed in hydrogen plasma have been investigated. To calculate sputtering yields of Cs, as well as energy spectra and angular distributions of reflected hydrogen atoms from molybdenum surface by H{sup +} ion and Cs{sup +} ion bombardments, a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) was run with the corresponding surface conditions. A fractal surface model has been developed and adopted to ACAT for evaluating the effect due to roughness of target material. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that the retention of hydrogen atoms leads to the reduction in sputtering yields of Cs, and the surface roughness does largely affect the sputtering yields of Cs.

  17. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Murata, H; Kitami, H; Mitsubori, H; Sakuraba, J; Soga, T; Aoki, Y; Katoh, T

    2016-02-01

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P(+) beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P(+) beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH3 gas. PMID:26932118

  18. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Murata, H.; Kitami, H.; Mitsubori, H.; Sakuraba, J.; Soga, T.; Aoki, Y.; Katoh, T.

    2016-02-01

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P+ beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P+ beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH3 gas.

  19. Influence of microwave driver coupling design on plasma density at Testbench for Ion sources Plasma Studies, a 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Megía-Macías, A.; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A.; Cortázar, O. D.

    2014-03-15

    A comparative study of two microwave driver systems (preliminary and optimized) for a 2.45 GHz hydrogen Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma generator has been conducted. The influence on plasma behavior and parameters of stationary electric field distribution in vacuum, i.e., just before breakdown, along all the microwave excitation system is analyzed. 3D simulations of resonant stationary electric field distributions, 2D simulations of external magnetic field mapping, experimental measurements of incoming and reflected power, and electron temperature and density along the plasma chamber axis have been carried out. By using these tools, an optimized set of plasma chamber and microwave coupler has been designed paying special attention to the optimization of stationary electric field value in the center of the plasma chamber. This system shows a strong stability on plasma behavior allowing a wider range of operational parameters and even sustaining low density plasma formation without external magnetic field. In addition, the optimized system shows the capability to produce values of plasma density four times higher than the preliminary as a consequence of a deeper penetration of the magnetic resonance surface in relative high electric field zone by keeping plasma stability. The increment of the amount of resonance surface embedded in the plasma under high electric field is suggested as a key factor.

  20. Influence of microwave driver coupling design on plasma density at Testbench for Ion sources Plasma Studies, a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Megía-Macías, A; Cortázar, O D; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A

    2014-03-01

    A comparative study of two microwave driver systems (preliminary and optimized) for a 2.45 GHz hydrogen Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma generator has been conducted. The influence on plasma behavior and parameters of stationary electric field distribution in vacuum, i.e., just before breakdown, along all the microwave excitation system is analyzed. 3D simulations of resonant stationary electric field distributions, 2D simulations of external magnetic field mapping, experimental measurements of incoming and reflected power, and electron temperature and density along the plasma chamber axis have been carried out. By using these tools, an optimized set of plasma chamber and microwave coupler has been designed paying special attention to the optimization of stationary electric field value in the center of the plasma chamber. This system shows a strong stability on plasma behavior allowing a wider range of operational parameters and even sustaining low density plasma formation without external magnetic field. In addition, the optimized system shows the capability to produce values of plasma density four times higher than the preliminary as a consequence of a deeper penetration of the magnetic resonance surface in relative high electric field zone by keeping plasma stability. The increment of the amount of resonance surface embedded in the plasma under high electric field is suggested as a key factor. PMID:24689578

  1. Surface modification by plasma immersion ion processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kevin C.; Lee, Deok H.; He, X. M.; Baker, N. P.; Nastasi, Michael; Munson, C. P.; Scarborough, W. K.; Tuszewski, M.; Wood, B. P.

    1998-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is actively researching a surface modification technique called plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP). PIIP is the latest innovation of the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) approach to surface modification. Like PSII, PIIP allows the modification of large areas and non-planar surface geometries, however PIIP is primarily a coating deposition technology rather than solely an ion implantation technology. PIIP utilizes a pulsed-bias on a target to extract ions out of plasma for ion implantation and coating deposition. Plasmas can be made by capacitive or inductive radio frequency sources or by initiating a glow discharge during each pulse of high voltage. Plasmas of hydrocarbon gases have been used to deposit adherent diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating son a variety of ferrous and non-ferrous materials. Instead of sputter depositing interlayers to improve the adhesion of DLC, PIIP uses ion implantation to create a graded interface between the metallic substrate and the DLC coating. Demonstrating the scaleability of PIIP, a 3 m2 area has been simultaneously coated with an adherent DLC coating approximately 7 micrometers thick. Plasmas of diborane and acetylene mixtures are being used to develop deposition processes for boron-carbide coatings. Through the use of organometallics and inorganic gases, other coatings are possible. The PIIP deposition conditions, composition and tribological properties of DLC and boron-carbide coatings will be highlighted.

  2. Thirty-centimeter-diameter ion milling source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A 30-cm beam diameter ion source has been designed and fabricated for micromachining and sputtering applications. An argon ion current density of 1 mA/cu cm at 500 eV ion energy was selected as a design operating condition. The completed ion source met the design criteria at this operating condition with a uniform and well-collimated beam having an average variation in current density of + or - 5% over the center of 20 cm of the beam. This ion source has a multipole magnetic field that employs permanent magnets between permeable pole pieces. Langmuir probe surveys of the source plasma support the design concepts of a multipole field and a circumferential cathode to enhance plasma uniformity.

  3. High Duty Factor (DF) Testing of a Saddle Antenna Radio Frequency Surface Plasma Ion Source (SA RF SPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschopf, Jeffrey; Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rol; Carr, Jerry, Jr.; Welton, Robert; Han, Baoxi; Murray, Sydney, Jr.; Pennisi, Terry; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin; Dudnikova, Galina

    2014-10-01

    A SA RF SPS was tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab. Hydrogen ions were extracted from the source as described in Dudnikov et al. (2011). Modifications were installed to increase ion beam output and optimize cooling. The source was tested under a DF of 5-20% at 150 Hz as well as a continuous beam with power ranging from 0.8 kW to 3.3 kW. Cesium was also used to optimize H- beam output. The highest beam produced was 13 mA at 2.5 kW. The SA RF SPS has an ion production efficiency of ~5 mA/kW while the current ion source at the SNS produces ~1 mA/kW. The SA RF SPS will be tested with the conditions of the linear accelerator at the SNS so the recent accelerator-based pulsed neutron record of 20 GW (1.4 MW average power) can be surpassed.

  4. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; McCollister, Daryl R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  5. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, J.P.; McCollister, D.R.

    1998-04-28

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter is disclosed. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof. 4 figs.

  6. Influence of Reverse Expansion of Laser Plasma on Ions Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysoev, Alexander A.; Gracheva, O. I.; Karpov, A. V.

    Effect of laser plasma reverse extension is described in this paper. Influence of the effect on ion acceleration in a laser ion source is researched. This effect leads to sedimentation of ions on metal target, which significantly impacts acceleration time of other ions. In this case, the ions also tend to travel major part of their path with constant velocity. This allows one to consider movement of the ions in plasma drift space, when optimizing time focusing ability of the TOF analyzer.

  7. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-09-24

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

  8. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

  9. Ionization phenomena and sources of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    Negative ion source technology has rapidly advanced during the past several years as a direct consequence of the discovery of Krohn that negative ion yields can be greatly enhanced by sputtering in the presence of Group IA elements. Today, most negative ion sources use this discovery directly or the principles implied to effect negative ion formation through surface ionization. As a consequence, the more traditional direct extraction plasma and charge exchange sources are being used less frequently. However, the charge exchange generation mechanism appears to be as universal, is very competitive in terms of efficiency and has the advantage in terms of metastable ion formation. In this review, an attempt has been made to briefly describe the principal processes involved in negative ion formation and sources which are representative of a particular principle. The reader is referred to the literature for specific details concerning the operational characteristics, emittances, brightnesses, species and intensity capabilities of particular sources. 100 references.

  10. Linac4 H⁻ ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Aguglia, D; Alessi, J; Andersson, P; Bertolo, S; Briefi, S; Butterworth, A; Coutron, Y; Dallocchio, A; David, N; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Fantz, U; Fink, D A; Garlasche, M; Grudiev, A; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Haase, M; Hatayama, A; Jones, A; Koszar, I; Lallement, J-B; Lombardi, A M; Machado, C; Mastrostefano, C; Mathot, S; Mattei, S; Moyret, P; Nisbet, D; Nishida, K; O'Neil, M; Paoluzzi, M; Scrivens, R; Shibata, T; Steyaert, D; Thaus, N; Voulgarakis, G

    2016-02-01

    CERN's 160 MeV H(-) linear accelerator (Linac4) is a key constituent of the injector chain upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider that is being installed and commissioned. A cesiated surface ion source prototype is being tested and has delivered a beam intensity of 45 mA within an emittance of 0.3 π ⋅ mm ⋅ mrad. The optimum ratio of the co-extracted electron- to ion-current is below 1 and the best production efficiency, defined as the ratio of the beam current to the 2 MHz RF-power transmitted to the plasma, reached 1.1 mA/kW. The H(-) source prototype and the first tests of the new ion source optics, electron-dump, and front end developed to minimize the beam emittance are presented. A temperature regulated magnetron H(-) source developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory was built at CERN. The first tests of the magnetron operated at 0.8 Hz repetition rate are described. PMID:26932021

  11. Linac4 H- ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Aguglia, D.; Alessi, J.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Briefi, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; David, N.; Chaudet, E.; Faircloth, D.; Fantz, U.; Fink, D. A.; Garlasche, M.; Grudiev, A.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Haase, M.; Hatayama, A.; Jones, A.; Koszar, I.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lombardi, A. M.; Machado, C.; Mastrostefano, C.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; Nishida, K.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Scrivens, R.; Shibata, T.; Steyaert, D.; Thaus, N.; Voulgarakis, G.

    2016-02-01

    CERN's 160 MeV H- linear accelerator (Linac4) is a key constituent of the injector chain upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider that is being installed and commissioned. A cesiated surface ion source prototype is being tested and has delivered a beam intensity of 45 mA within an emittance of 0.3 π ṡ mm ṡ mrad. The optimum ratio of the co-extracted electron- to ion-current is below 1 and the best production efficiency, defined as the ratio of the beam current to the 2 MHz RF-power transmitted to the plasma, reached 1.1 mA/kW. The H- source prototype and the first tests of the new ion source optics, electron-dump, and front end developed to minimize the beam emittance are presented. A temperature regulated magnetron H- source developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory was built at CERN. The first tests of the magnetron operated at 0.8 Hz repetition rate are described.

  12. Examination of Ion Beam Acceleration and Self-Bias Effect in the Modified MadHeX Plasma Source with Conducting and Insulating Upstream Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yung-Ta; Devinney, Michael; Scharer, John

    2013-10-01

    The MadHeX experiment consists of a Pyrex tube connected to a stainless steel magnetic field expansion chamber (expansion ratio RE = 4.5) has been upgraded with an axial magnetic mirror field and an additional magnet in the transition region. This configuration enhances electron temperature and ionization fraction and minimizes neutral reflux. A half-turn double-helix antenna is used to excite electrostatic or inductive regime waves in the source. An ion beam of energy, E = 160 eV at 500 W RF power, has been observed in a low pressure (0.3 mtorr) argon plasma formed in the expansion region with a 340 G magnetic field with a R = 1.4 nozzle. The effects of upstream end plate boundary conditions on the plasma self-bias and ion beam acceleration are discussed. The effect of lower flow rates and pressures, higher RF powers (500 W-8 kW) and magnetic field strength dependence on the ion beam acceleration, plasma potential, electron density and temperature are explored. The axial ion velocity distribution function and temperatures at higher powers are observed by argon 668 nm laser induced fluorescence with density measurements obtained by mm wave interferometry. The EEDF and non-Maxwellian tail are examined using optical emission spectroscopy. Research supported by the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  13. The impact of plasma-wall interaction on the gas mixing efficiency in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2012-02-15

    It is generally accepted that different effects are necessary to explain the gas mixing method of increasing the output of highly charged ions from an ECRIS. The two most important effects are the mass effect and the dilution effect. Their relative weights have not been determined experimentally yet, but it is generally assumed that the mass effect is dominant in standard ECRIS installations with stainless steel plasma chambers. In order to gain more insight into the physics of the gas mixing effect and in particular on the relevance of the dilution process, we have carried out a study where we have investigated the role of the plasma-wall interaction on the gas mixing effect. In this contribution, we shall discuss Charge state distributions spectra, measured at the Frankfurt ECRIS using different working gases, pure argon, a mixture of argon and oxygen, and argon mixed with neon.

  14. CALUTRON ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheimer, F.

    1958-08-19

    The construction of an ion source is descrtbed wherein a uniform and elongated arc is established for employment in a calutron. The novel features of the . source include the positioning of a cathode at one end of an elongated extt slit of an arc chamber. and anode electrodes defintng the longitudinal margins of the exit opening. When the exit slit is orientated in a parallel relation to a magnetic field, the arc extends in the direction of the magnetic field along and between the anode electrodes, which are held at a positsve potential with respect to the cathode.

  15. Improved negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  16. Note: Ion source design for ion trap systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; Quevedo, M.; Gnade, B.; Vasselli, J.

    2013-06-01

    A small plasma (glow discharge) based ion source and circuit are described in this work. The ion source works by producing a high voltage pulsed discharge between two electrodes in a pressure range of 50-100 mTorr. A third mesh electrode is used for ion extraction. The electrodes are small stainless steel screws mounted in a MACOR ionization chamber in a linear arrangement. The electrode arrangement is driven by a circuit, design for low power operation. This design is a proof of concept intended for applications on small cylindrical ion traps.

  17. Formation of silicon hydride using hyperthermal negative hydrogen ions (H -) extracted from an argon-seeded hydrogen sheet plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Marcedon S.; Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2008-12-01

    An E × B probe (a modified Wien filter) is constructed to function both as a mass spectrometer and ion implanter. The device, given the acronym EXBII selects negative hydrogen ions (H -) from a premixed 10% argon-seeded hydrogen sheet plasma. With a vacuum background of 1.0 × 10 -6 Torr, H - extraction ensues at a total gas feed of 1.8 mTorr, 0.5 A plasma discharge. The EXBII is positioned 3 cm distance from the sheet core as this is the region densely populated by cold electrons ( Te ˜ 2 eV, Ne ˜ 3.4 × 10 11 cm -3) best suited for H - formation. The extracted H - ions of flux density ˜0.26 A/m 2 are segregated, accelerated to hyperthermal range (<100 eV) and subsequently deposited into a palladium-coated 1.1 × 1.1 cm 2, n-type Si (1 0 0) substrate held at the rear end of the EXBII, placed in lieu of its Faraday cup. The palladium membrane plays the role of a catalyst initiating the reaction between Si atoms and H - ions simultaneously capping the sample from oxidation and other undesirable adsorbents. AFM and FTIR characterization tests confirm the formation of SiH 2. Absorbance peaks between 900-970 cm -1 (bending modes) and 2050-2260 cm -1 (stretching modes) are observed in the FTIR spectra of the processed samples. It is found that varying hydrogen exposure time results in the shifting of wavenumbers which may be interpreted as changes in the frequencies of vibration for SiH 2. These are manifestations of chemical changes accompanying alterations in the force constant of the molecule. The sample with longer exposure time exhibits an additional peak at 2036 cm -1 which are hydrides of nano-crystalline silicon.

  18. Electric propulsion using ion-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanesland, A.; Meige, A.; Chabert, P.

    2009-04-01

    Recently, we have proposed to use both positive and negative ions for thrust in an electromagnetic space propulsion system. This concept is called PEGASES for Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative GASES and has been patented by the Ecole Polytechnique in France in 2007. The basic idea is to create a stratified plasma with an electron free (ion-ion plasma) region at the periphery of a highly ionized plasma core such that both positive and negative ions can be extracted and accelerated to provide thrust. As the extracted beam is globally neutral there is no need for a downstream neutralizer. The recombination of positive and negative ions is very efficient and will result in a fast recombination downstream of the thruster and hence there is no creation of a plasma plume downstream. The first PEGASES prototype, designed in 2007, has recently been installed in a small vacuum chamber for preliminary tests in our laboratory and the first results have been presented in several conferences. This paper reviews important work that has been used in the process of designing the first PEGASES prototype.

  19. Production of highly charged ion beams from ECR ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Z.Q.

    1997-09-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECR ion sources. So far at cw mode operation, up to 300 e{mu}A of O{sup 7+} and 1.15 emA of O{sup 6+}, more than 100 e{mu}A of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar{sup 13+}, Ca{sup 13+}, Fe{sup 13+}, Co{sup 14+} and Kr{sup 18+}, and tens of e{mu}A of heavy ions with charge states to Kr{sup 26+}, Xe{sup 28+}, Au{sup 35+}, Bi{sup 34+} and U{sup 34+} have been produced from ECR ion sources. At an intensity of at least 1 e{mu}A, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe{sup 36+}, Au{sup 46+}, Bi{sup 47+} and U{sup 48+}. An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I {ge} 60 enA) also has been achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECR ion sources to produce the highly charged ion beams.

  20. Characterization of the CW starter plasma RF matching network for operating the SNS H- ion source with lower H2 flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Kang, Y.; Piller, C.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source H- ion source is operated with a pulsed 2-MHz RF (50-60 kW) to produce the 1-ms long, ˜50 mA H- beams at 60 Hz. A continuous low power (˜300 W) 13.56-MHz RF plasma, which is initially ignited with a H2 pressure bump, serves as starter plasma for the pulsed high power 2-MHz RF discharges. To reduce the risk of plasma outages at lower H2 flow rates which is desired for improved performance of the following radio frequency quadrupole, the 13.56-MHz RF matching network was characterized over a broad range of its two tuning capacitors. The H-α line intensity of the 13.56-MHz RF plasma and the reflected power of the 13.56-MHz RF were mapped against the capacitor settings. Optimal tunes for the maximum H-α intensity are consistent with the optimal tunes for minimum reflected power. Low limits of the H2 flow rate not causing plasma outages were explored within the range of the map. A tune region that allows lower H2 flow rate has been identified, which differs from the optimal tune for global minimum reflected power that was mostly used in the past.

  1. Industrial ion source technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to describe the development of a coned surface texture with ion bombardment and simultaneous deposition of an impurity. A mathematical model of sputter deposition rate from a beveled target was developed in conjuction with the texturing models to provide an important input to that model. The establishment of a general procedure that will allow the treatment of manay different sputtering configurations is outlined. Calculation of cross sections for energetic binary collisions was extened to Ar, Kr.. and Xe with total cross sections for viscosity and diffusion calculated for the interaction energy range from leV to 1000eV. Physical sputtering and reactive ion etching experiments provided experimental data on the operating limits of a broad beam ion source using CF4 as a working gas to produce reactive species in a sputtering beam. Magnetic clustering effects are observed when Al is seeded with Fe and sputtered with Ar(?) ions. Silicon was textured at a micron scale by using a substrate temperature of 600 C.

  2. Off line ion source terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamanna, K.

    2014-01-01

    The off-line ion source (OLIS) terminal provides beams from stable isotopes to ISAC (see Fig. 1) experiments as well as for accelerator commissioning and for pilot beams for radioactive beam experiments. The OLIS terminal (see Fig. 2) is equipped with a microwave driven cusp source for single and double charge ions, a surface ion source for low energy spread alkali beams, and a multi-charge ion source.

  3. High intensity laser interactions with underdense plasma: a source of energetic electrons, ions, neutrons and gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2002-11-01

    With the rapid advances in laser technology, laser beams are now available that can be routinely focused to intensities approaching 10^20 Wcm-2. At these intensities all matter becomes ionised on a time scale close to the period of the laser. The subsequent interaction is therefore characterised by the interaction of an intense laser beam with a highly dissociated medium (plasma). The interaction is particularly interesting since at these intensities, the normalised momentum of the electrons in the laser field is given by a_0=0.89× I(10^18 Wcm-2× λ^2(μ m)). Hence the quiver velocity of the plasma electrons in the electric field of the laser beam becomes relativistic. The interaction of the laser beam with a plasma at such elevated intensities is highly non-linear, and can lead to a whole host of interesting phenomena. These include relativistic self-focusing, harmonic generation, and Raman type parametric instabilities. These processes are of interest, not only from a scientific perspective, but also a technological one, with the prospect that such an interaction can provide useful sources of energetic particles. In this context, plasma wave generation by laser beam self-modulation, proton acceleration by Coulomb explosions and thermonuclear fusion neutron generation by extreme heating of intense laser beams will be discussed. Recent highlights of this research include the detection of protons of energies in excess of 1 MeV, the heating of an underdense deuterium plasma to temperatures in excess of 1 keV, resulting in the detection in excess of 10^6 fusion neutrons; and the detection of electrons accelerated to greater than 200 MeV due to the generation of relativistically steepened plasma waves. The latter measurement is particularly noteworthy since it is obtained with a 1 J, 10 Hz laser system, (Salle Jaune, LOA).

  4. Hollow cathode and ion accelerator system for current ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, G.

    1981-01-01

    A small self-heating hollow cathode has been designed and tested which uses a novel flowing plasma starting concept to eliminate the need for cathode heating elements and low work function insert materials. In a magnetic field free ion source, this cathode has reliably and repeatedly produced arc currents, using argon, of 100 ampere (the power supply limit) at arc voltages of 22 volts. The cathode operates with a high gas stagnation pressure and plasma density to produce field enhanced thermionic emission from the electron emitting surface, a 0.02mm thick rolled tungsten foil cylinder, without appreciable erosion of this surface. Possible applications of larger versions of this hollow cathode for use in neutral beam injector ion sources are discussed. An ion accelerator system has also been designed and tested which combines a unique arrangement of multiple hole and slit apertures to amplify the extracted ion current density by a factor of four during the ion acceleration process.

  5. Radio frequency multicusp ion source development (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-03-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. It has been demonstrated that the source can meet the H{sup {minus}} beam current and emittance requirements for this application. By employing a porcelain-coated antenna, a clean plasma discharge with very long-life operation can be achieved. Today, the rf source is used to generate both positive and negative hydrogen ion beams and has been tested in various particle accelerator laboratories throughout the world. Applications of this ion source have been extended to other fields such as ion beam lithography, oil-well logging, ion implantation, accelerator mass spectrometry and medical therapy machines. This paper summarizes the latest rf ion source technology and development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Thermal and electrostatic simulations of the diagnostic calorimeter for the Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma beam

    SciTech Connect

    Serianni, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; Fasolo, D.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.; De Muri, M.

    2012-02-15

    To study and optimise negative ion production for the ITER neutral beam injectors, a test facility is under construction in Padova with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The instrumented calorimeter STRIKE (short-time retractable instrumented kalorimeter experiment) is being developed to characterise the SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) beam during short operations. The paper presents an investigation of the response of STRIKE measurement systems. It results that biasing is necessary to cope with the influence of secondary electrons on current measurements; moreover, despite the discretisation of the recorded thermal patterns introduced by the pixels of thermal cameras, a sufficient spatial resolution is expected.

  7. Thermal and electrostatic simulations of the diagnostic calorimeter for the Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma beama)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serianni, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; De Muri, M.; Fasolo, D.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.

    2012-02-01

    To study and optimise negative ion production for the ITER neutral beam injectors, a test facility is under construction in Padova with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The instrumented calorimeter STRIKE (short-time retractable instrumented kalorimeter experiment) is being developed to characterise the SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) beam during short operations. The paper presents an investigation of the response of STRIKE measurement systems. It results that biasing is necessary to cope with the influence of secondary electrons on current measurements; moreover, despite the discretisation of the recorded thermal patterns introduced by the pixels of thermal cameras, a sufficient spatial resolution is expected

  8. The Spatial Nature of Iogenic Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Marconi, M. L.

    1999-09-01

    Io, the innermost Galilean satellite of Jupiter, supplies the primary source of heavy ion plasma for the planetary magnetosphere. Understanding the temporal and three-dimensional nature of the Iogenic plasma source (pickup ions created by ionization and charge exchange of neutrals in Io's local and extended atmosphere) is highly relevant to a large number of studies for the Io-Jupiter system. These studies include the structure and outward transport of the plasma torus and a significant number of coupled electrodynamic interactions that have been observed by ground-based, earth-orbiting, and interplanetary spacecraft instruments to occur between the plasma torus, Io, and Jupiter. To explore the nature of the Iogenic plasma source, we have undertaken neutral cloud model calculations for atmospheric gases located above Io's exobase (in the corona and extended clouds) and have calculated in three dimensions their instantaneous electron impact ionization and charge exchange production rates in the plasma torus. Here we report on the spatial nature of the Iogenic plasma source that is created by realistic incomplete collisional cascade velocity distribution sources for O and S at Io's exobase. On a large circumplanetary spatial scale, the Iogenic plasma source is highly peaked at Io's instantaneous position on its orbit about Jupiter. On finer spatial scales near Io, the three-dimensional spatial structure of this sharp peak will be presented and implications discussed. This finer spatial scale description of the Iogenic plasma source is particularly relevant to understanding the Galileo Plasma Analyzer (PLS) measured downstream spatial and velocity distributions for the ions near Io (Frank et al. Science 274 394-395, 1996) and the Galileo Magnetometer (MAG) measured magnetic field reduction near Io (Kivelson et al., Science 274, 396-398, 1996) as well as new particle and field data expected during the Galileo I24 and I25 encounters with Io.

  9. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Zu Q.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    1993-01-01

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10) having an electron gun (52) for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber (18) of the ion source (10). The ion source (10) has a injection enclosure (12) and a plasma chamber tank (14). The plasma chamber (18) is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets (16). The electron gun (52) injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber (18) such that ionization within the plasma chamber (18) occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun (52). The electron gun (52) has a cathode (116) for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply (96) while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply (118). A concentric inner conductor (60) and Outer conductor (62) carry heating current to a carbon chuck (104) and carbon pusher (114) Which hold the cathode (116) in place and also heat the cathode (16). In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10), the electron gun (52) replaces the conventional first stage used in prior art electron cyclotron resonance ion generators.

  10. Saddle antenna radio frequency ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Santana, M.; Piller, C.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Breitschopf, J.; Dudnikova, G.

    2016-02-01

    Existing RF ion sources for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation ˜3-5 mA/cm2 kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) surface plasma source (SPS) described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency, reliability, and availability. In SA RF ion source, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 kW. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ˜1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ˜4 kW RF. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to ˜1.2 kW in the plasma with production up to Ic = 7 mA. A stable long time generation of H- beam without degradation was demonstrated in RF discharge with AlN discharge chamber.

  11. Saddle antenna radio frequency ion sources.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Santana, M; Piller, C; Stockli, M; Welton, R; Breitschopf, J; Dudnikova, G

    2016-02-01

    Existing RF ion sources for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H(+) and H(-) ion generation ∼3-5 mA/cm(2) kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) surface plasma source (SPS) described here was developed to improve H(-) ion production efficiency, reliability, and availability. In SA RF ion source, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm(2) kW. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to ∼1.2 kW in the plasma with production up to Ic = 7 mA. A stable long time generation of H(-) beam without degradation was demonstrated in RF discharge with AlN discharge chamber. PMID:26931988

  12. rf-driven ion sources for industrial applications (invited) (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-02-15

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been developing rf-driven ion sources for the last two decades. These sources are being used to generate both positive and negative ion beams. Some of these sources are operating in particle accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, while others are being employed in various industrial ion beam systems. There are four areas where the rf-driven ion sources are commonly used in industry. (1) In semiconductor manufacturing, rf-driven sources have found important applications in plasma etching, ion beam implantation, and ion beam lithography. (2) In material analysis and surface modification, miniature rf-ion sources can be found in focused ion beam systems. They can provide ion beams of essentially any element in the Periodic Table. The newly developed combined rf ion-electron beam unit improves greatly the performance of the secondary ion mass spectrometry tool. (3) For neutron production, rf ion source is a major component of compact, high flux D-D, D-T, or T-T neutron generators. These neutron sources are now being employed in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as well as in neutron imaging and material interrogation. (4) Large area rf-driven ion source will be used in an industrial design neutral beam diagnostic system for probing fusion plasmas. Such sources can be easily scaled to provide large ion beam current for future fusion reactor applications.

  13. Compact ion accelerator source

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2014-04-29

    An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

  14. Measurement of Electron Density near Plasma Grid of Large-scaled Negative Ion Source by Means of Millimeter-Wave Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Ito, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Shibuya, M.; Sato, M.; Komada, S.; Kondo, T.; Hayashi, H.; Asano, E.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2011-09-26

    A millimeter-wave interferometer with the frequency of 39 GHz ({lambda} 7.7 mm) was newly installed to a large-scaled negative ion source. The measurable line-integrated electron density (n{sub e}l) is from 2x10{sup 16} to 7x10{sup 18} m{sup -2}, where n{sub e} and l represent an electron density and the plasma length along the millimeter-wave path, respectively. Our interest in this study is behavior of negative ions and reduction of electron density in the beam extraction region near the plasma grid. The first results show the possibility of the electron density measurement by the millimeter-wave interferometer in this region. The line-averaged electron density increases proportional to the arc power under the condition without cesium seeding. The significant decrease of the electron density and significant increase of the negative ion density were observed just after the cesium seeding. The electron density measured with the interferometer agrees well with that observed with a Langmuir probe. The very high negative ion ratio of n{sub H-}/(n{sub e}+n{sub H-}) = 0.85 was achieved within 400 min. after the cesium seeding.

  15. High frequency plasma generator for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, H.; Divergilio, W. F.; Fosnight, V. V.; Komatsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program to experimentally develop two new types of plasma generators for 30 cm electrostatic argon ion thrusters are presented. The two plasma generating methods selected for this study were by radio frequency induction (RFI), operating at an input power frequency of 1 MHz, and by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) at an operating frequency of 5.0 GHz. Both of these generators utilize multiline cusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement and beam profile optimization. The program goals were to develop a plasma generator possessing the characteristics of high electrical efficiency (low eV/ion) and simplicity of operation while maintaining the reliability and durability of the conventional hollow cathode plasma sources. The RFI plasma generator has achieved minimum discharge losses of 120 eV/ion while the ECH generator has obtained 145 eV/ion, assuming a 90% ion optical transparency of the electrostatic acceleration system. Details of experimental tests with a variety of magnet configurations are presented.

  16. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-01

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H-) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H- current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  17. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  18. Ferromagnetic enhanced inductive plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyak, Valery

    2013-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the review of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources enhanced with ferromagnetic cores, FMICP, found in various applications, including plasma fusion, space propulsion, light sources, plasma chemistry and plasma processing of materials. The history of FMICP, early attempts for their realization, some recent developments and examples of successful FMICP devices are given here. A comparative study of FMICPs with conventional ICPs demonstrates their certain advantages in power transfer efficiency, power factor and their ability to operate without rf plasma potentials at low plasma densities and with small gaps, while effectively controlling plasma density profile.

  19. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  20. Io Plasma Torus: Nature of the Iogenic Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M. L.; Smyth, W. H.

    1996-09-01

    The primary source of plasma for Jupiter's magnetosphere is supplied internally by Io, the innermost Galilean satellite. The Iogenic plasma source is created by gases (e.g., Na, K, O, S, and SO_2) lost from Io as they undergo electron impact and charge exchange reactions in the plasma torus. This Iogenic plasma source provides mass, momentum, pick-up electrical conductivity, and energy to the plasma torus. The three-dimensional nature of the Iogenic plasma source is an important input quantity (1) in local studies to understand the plasma torus properties (density, composition, subcorotational motion, electric currents, and temperature) and the plasma torus near-Io MHD flow and atmosphere interactions, and (2) in more global studies to understand the spacetime structure of the outward transport dynamics of the plasma torus, such as in RCM-J (Rice Convection Model for Jupiter) calculations. To elucidate and quantify the nature of the Iogenic plasma source for such studies, we have undertaken simulations of it using the AER neutral cloud models. Calculations will be presented to illustrate the spacetime nature of the Iogenic plasma source and to estimate the net-mass, momentum and energy input rates to the plasma torus and the height-integrated electrical conductivity near Io and in Jupiter's ionosphere. These calculations show that the instantaneous Iogenic plasma source is highly peaked at Io's position in the plasma torus and that its rates vary significantly with Io System III longitude and also with Io phase angle because of the east-west electric field. For the lower-velocity escape of gases by incomplete collisional cascade processes (i.e., plasma torus ion sputtering), contributions to the instantaneous Iogenic plasma source are primarily confined to a broader (but still limited) spatial region in L-shell and System III longitude angle near Io. For the higher-velocity loss of gases by charge exchange, contributions to the Iogenic plasma source are more

  1. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  2. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shigeki Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2014-02-15

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  3. Nitrogen incorporation in saturated aliphatic C6-C8 hydrocarbons and ethanol in low-pressure nitrogen plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Chen, Lee Chuin; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi; Yamabe, Shinichi

    2016-06-01

    Ion/molecule reactions of saturated hydrocarbons (n-hexane, cyclohexane, n-heptane, n-octane and isooctane) in 28-Torr N2 plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source were investigated using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. It was found that the ions with [M+14](+) were observed as the major ions (M: sample molecule). The exact mass analysis revealed that the ions are nitrogenated molecules, [M+N](+) formed by the reactions of N3 (+) with M. The reaction, N3 (+) + M → [M+N](+) + N2 , were examined by the density functional theory calculations. It was found that N3 (+) abstracts the H atom from hydrocarbon molecules leading to the formation of protonated imines in the forms of R'R″CNH2 (+) (i.e. C-H bond nitrogenation). This result is in accord with the fact that elimination of NH3 is the major channel for MS/MS of [M+N](+) . That is, nitrogen is incorporated in the C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons. No nitrogenation was observed for benzene and acetone, which was ascribed to the formation of stable charge-transfer complexes benzene⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) and acetone⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) revealed by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270868

  4. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  5. Ion source development for various applications in Korea (invited) (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y. S.

    2008-02-15

    Ion source development in Korea has been related with various applications from accelerator to nanotechnology. Conventional ion sources such as Duoplasmatron and PIG ion sources were developed for high power proton accelerator and small cyclotron accelerators. To improve lifetime of the high current proton ion source, helicon plasma ion sources were developed with external rf antenna and applied for neutron generation in drive-in-target configuration. Negative hydrogen ion sources were also developed for tandem and cyclotron accelerators by using both rf and filament discharges. Large-area high-current ion sources for the KSTAR NBI system were developed and successfully tested for long-pulse operation of up to 300 s. Several broad beam ion sources for industrial applications such as ion implantation and surface treatment were also developed by using arc, rf, and microwave discharges. Recently, ion source applications become diversified to the area of nano- and biotechnologies. For example, C60 ion source was developed for the use of bioapplications in nanometer scale. For focused ion beam as a nanofabrication tool, liquid metal ion sources were improved and a novel plasma ion source was developed by utilizing localized sheath discharges. Research and development activities of these ion sources will be discussed with short description of appropriate applications.

  6. Modification of anisotropic plasma diffusion via auxiliary electrons emitted by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, L; Odorici, F; Veronese, G P; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Castro, G; Miracoli, R; Serafino, T

    2012-02-01

    The diffusion mechanism in magnetized plasmas is a largely debated issue. A short circuit model was proposed by Simon, assuming fluxes of lost particles along the axial (electrons) and radial (ions) directions which can be compensated, to preserve the quasi-neutrality, by currents flowing throughout the conducting plasma chamber walls. We hereby propose a new method to modify Simon's currents via electrons injected by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun. We found this improves the source performances, increasing the output current for several charge states. The method is especially sensitive to the pumping frequency. Output currents for given charge states, at different auxiliary electron currents, will be reported in the paper and the influence of the frequency tuning on the compensation mechanism will be discussed. PMID:22380190

  7. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R P; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Piller, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M; Welton, R

    2012-02-01

    A prototype RF H(-) surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA∕kW. Control experiments with H(-) beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing. PMID:22380221

  8. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  9. Ion-Assisted Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Daniel; Abraham-Shrauner, Barbara

    1996-11-01

    We analyze plasma etching of two-dimensional, long trenches where directed ions modeled by drifted Maxwellian distribution functions and isotropic neutral molecules contribute to the etch rate. Analytic expressions for the etch rates enable the user to plot the etch profiles by using standard computer packages for nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equations for the point and its slope. First, etch profiles are shown for ion-assisted etching where the thermal etching of the neutrals is enhanced by the ions. Second, we show etch profiles of a multiple layer device where one layer is n-type silicon (arsenic doped) that etches isotropically (G.S. Oehrlein, "Reactive Ion Etching," Handbook of Plasma Processing, Technology, Ed. S.M. Rossnagel, et al., Noyes Pub., NJ, 1990) The etch rates for the other layers are in the ion flux-limited regime. The lateral etching of the n-type silicon illustrates the necessity of sidewall passivation for this structure.

  10. Study of plasma meniscus and beam halo in negative ion sources using three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space particle in cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, S. Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Fukano, A.

    2014-02-15

    Our previous study by two dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space-particle in cell model shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources. The negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. The purpose of this study is to verify this mechanism with the full 3D model. It is shown that the above mechanism is essentially unchanged even in the 3D model, while the fraction of the beam halo is significantly reduced to 6%. This value reasonably agrees with the experimental result.

  11. Recent advances in vacuum arc ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.; Oks, E.M.

    1995-07-01

    Intense beams of metal ions can be formed from a vacuum arc ion source. Broadbeam extraction is convenient, and the time-averaged ion beam current delivered downstream can readily be in the tens of milliamperes range. The vacuum arc ion source has for these reasons found good application for metallurgical surface modification--it provides relatively simple and inexpensive access to high dose metal ion implantation. Several important source developments have been demonstrated recently, including very broad beam operation, macroparticle removal, charge state enhancement, and formation of gaseous beams. The authors have made a very broad beam source embodiment with beam formation electrodes 50 cm in diameter, producing a beam of width {approximately}35 cm for a nominal beam area of {approximately}1,000 cm{sup 2}, and a pulsed Ti beam current of about 7 A was formed at a mean ion energy of {approximately}100 keV. Separately, they`ve developed high efficiency macroparticle-removing magnetic filters and incorporated such a filter into a vacuum arc ion source so as to form macroparticle-free ion beams. Jointly with researchers at the High Current Electronics Institute at Tomsk, Russia, and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung at Darmstadt, Germany, they`ve developed a compact technique for increasing the charge states of ions produced in the vacuum arc plasma and thus providing a simple means of increasing the ion energy at fixed extractor voltage. Finally, operation with mixed metal and gaseous ion species has been demonstrated. Here, they briefly review the operation of vacuum marc ion sources and the typical beam and implantation parameters that can be obtained, and describe these source advances and their bearing on metal ion implantation applications.

  12. Review of Polarized Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress in polarized ion sources development is reviewed. New techniques for production of polarized H‑ ion (proton), D‑ (D+) and 3He++ ion beams will be discussed. A novel polarization technique was successfully implemented for the upgrade of the RHIC polarized H‑ ion source to higher intensity and polarization. In this technique, a proton beam inside the high magnetic field solenoid is produced by ionization of the atomic hydrogen beam (from an external source) in the He-gas ionizer cell. Polarized electron capture from the optically-pumped Rb vapor further produces proton polarization (Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source technique). The upgraded source reliably delivered beam for the 2013 polarized run in RHIC at S = 510 GeV. This was a major factor contributing to RHIC polarization increase to over 60 % for colliding beams. Feasibility studies of a new polarization technique for polarized 3He++ source based on BNL Electron Beam Ion Source is also discussed.

  13. Note: flowing ion population from a resonance cavity source.

    PubMed

    Gayetsky, Lisa E; Lynch, Kristina A

    2011-04-01

    The experimental low energy plasma for hemispherical analyzers nominal testing thermal plasma facility of Dartmouth College uses a microwave plasma source which generates an ionosphere-like plasma through a two-step process. The plasma is initially generated inside a cylindrical, insulated, resonance cavity. This initial plasma must pass through a sheath in order to enter the main experimental region. This process imparts a significant flow velocity to the ions which has been neglected in previous analysis of this plasma source. We predict the flow energy of the ions to be between 12-15 eV depending on conservation laws and show agreement with experimental results. PMID:21529056

  14. Laser ion sources for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, T. R.

    1996-05-01

    There is an interest in accelerating atomic nuclei to produce particle beams for medical therapy, atomic and nuclear physics, inertial confinement fusion and particle physics. Laser Ion Sources, in which ions are extracted from plasma created when a high power density laser beam pulse strikes a solid surface in a vacuum, are not in common use. However, some new developments in which heavy ions have been accelerated show that such sources have the potential to provide the beams required for high-energy accelerator systems.

  15. ORNL ECR multicharged ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    A multicharged ion source based on Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating has been designed and built at ORNL. The ECR ion source, which is completely dedicated for atomic physics collision studies, produces higher charge states and higher beam intensities than the present ORNL PIG multicharged ion source, and will thus permit study of collision processes involving ions of higher charge states in experiments requiring higher beam intensities than could be previously obtained in our laboratory. The source has already produced up to fully stripped C and O beams, as well as up to He-like Ar beams. Measurements of the energy spread of ions extracted from the ion source operating in both single-stage and two-stage mode are described. In addition, initial results of total cross section measurements for fully stripped light ions incident on atomic hydrogen in the energy range 0.2 to 10 keV are presented. 13 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  16. Experimental Evaluation of a Negative Ion Source for a Heavy Ion Fusion Negative Ion Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Hahto, S. K.; Hahto, S. T.; Kwan, J. W.; Leung, K. N.

    2004-06-16

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 45 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that i s used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 45 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

  17. Mini RF-driven ion source for focused ion beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Ji, Q.; Chang, A.; Leung, K.N.

    2002-08-02

    Mini RF-driven ion sources with 1.2 cm and 1.5 cm inner chamber diameter have been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Several gas species have been tested including argon, krypton and hydrogen. These mini ion sources operate in inductively coupled mode and are capable of generating high current density ion beams at tens of watts. Since the plasma potential is relatively low in the plasma chamber, these mini ion sources can function reliably without any perceptible sputtering damage. The mini RF-driven ion sources will be combined with electrostatic focusing columns, and are capable of producing nano focused ion beams for micro machining and semiconductor fabrications.

  18. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T. Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Turnbull, D.; Döppner, T.; Fletcher, L.; Galtier, E.; Hastings, J.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Chapman, D. A.; Falcone, R. W.; Fortmann, C.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.; White, T. G.; Neumayer, P.; Vorberger, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ∼3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4Å{sup −1}. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  19. Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, D.P.; Peters, J.; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

    2005-08-01

    A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

  20. Ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.

    1995-09-01

    The development of ion sources for heavy ion fusion will be reported with particular emphasis on a recently built 2 MV injector. The new injector is based on an electrostatic quadrupole configuration, and has produced pulsed K{sup +} ions of 950 mA peak from a 6.7 inch curved alumino silicate source. The ion beam has reached 2.3 MV with an energy flatness of {+-}0.2% over 1 {micro}s. The measured normalized edge emittance of less than 1 {pi} mm-mr is close to the source temperature limit. The design, construction, performance, and comparisons with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations will be described.

  1. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  2. New types of negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Borisko, V.N.; Lapshin, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    The plasma sources of negative ions which were elaborated in Kharkov State University are considered in this paper. These sources use the mechanism of dissociative stick of electrons with low energies to molecules of a working gas. The effective work of such sources needs a special system of low energy electrons formation. The effect of secondary electron emission used in negative ion sources is considered. The electrode material with a great coefficient of secondary electron emission allows one to obtain a few slow electrons per one bombarding electron. A plasma of Penning discharge is an emitter of initial elections. The electron electromagnetic trap in the secondary electron emission region allows one to enlarge volume of interaction of low energy electrons with the working gas molecules. The lifetime of slow electrons grows in this trap.

  3. RF H- Ion Source with Saddle Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim G; Johnson, Rolland P; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    In this project we are developing an RF H- surface plasma source (SPS) which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high pulsed and average current, higher brightness, longer lifetime and higher reliability by improving a power efficiency. Several versions of new plasma generators with different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in a small AlN test chamber in the SNS ion source Test Stand. Then a prototype saddle antenna was installed in the Test Stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved a peak current of 67 mA and an apparent efficiency of 1.6 mA/kW. These values are comparable to those of the present SNS sources and can be expected to be improved when the prototype is developed into an operational version in the next phase of the project.

  4. Irregularities in electronegative plasmas due to ion-ion coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P.

    1999-07-01

    In partially ionized electronegative plasmas at low neutral pressure and high plasma density, coupling between positive and negative ions through space charge effects and through Coulomb scattering can lead to turbulence and irregularities in the ion density and flux. In this regime, the force on ions due to ion-ion coulomb scattering may dominate that from ion scattering with neutrals. This can lead to the formation of a, possibly turbulent, negative ion boundary layer containing the bulk of the negative ions. Commercial inductively Coupled Plasmas reactors used in the semiconductor industry typically operate at low pressure and high plasma density. Simulations are presented for a Chlorine discharge in the GEC reactor modified for Inductively Coupled operation. Results show that ion-ion coupling can induce large variations in the plasma density, and that accurate modeling of spatial plasma structure should include these effects.

  5. Development of versatile multiaperture negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.; Minarello, A.; Sattin, M.; Serianni, G.; Antoni, V.; Bigi, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Recchia, M.; Veltri, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Barbisan, M.; Baseggio, L.; Cervaro, V.; Degli Agostini, F.; Franchin, L.; Laterza, B.; Ravarotto, D.; Rossetto, F.; Zaniol, B.; Zucchetti, S.; and others

    2015-04-08

    Enhancement of negative ion sources for production of large ion beams is a very active research field nowadays, driven from demand of plasma heating in nuclear fusion devices and accelerator applications. As a versatile test bench, the ion source NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is being commissioned by Consorzio RFX and INFN. The nominal beam current of 135 mA at −60 kV is divided into 9 beamlets, with multiaperture extraction electrodes. The plasma is sustained by a 2 MHz radiofrequency power supply, with a standard matching box. A High Voltage Deck (HVD) placed inside the lead shielding surrounding NIO1 contains the radiofrequency generator, the gas control, electronics and power supplies for the ion source. An autonomous closed circuit water cooling system was installed for the whole system, with a branch towards the HVD, using carefully optimized helical tubing. Insulation transformer is installed in a nearby box. Tests of several magnetic configurations can be performed. Status of experiments, measured spectra and plasma luminosity are described. Upgrades of magnetic filter, beam calorimeter and extraction grid and related theoretical issues are reviewed.

  6. Development of hollow anode penning ion source for laboratory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shyam, A.; Das, R.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-03-01

    The research work presented here focuses for the development of miniature penning type ion source. One hollow anode penning type ion source was developed in our laboratory. The size of the ion source is 38 mm diameter and 55 mm length. The ion source consists of two cathodes, a hollow anode and one piece of rare earth permanent magnet. The plasma was created in the plasma region between cathodes and the hollow anode. The J × B force in the region helps for efficient ionization of the gas even in the high vacuum region˜1×10 -5 Torr. The ions were extracted in the axial direction with help of the potential difference between the electrodes and the geometry of the extraction angle. The effect of the extraction electrode geometry for efficient extraction of the ions from the plasma region was examined. This ion source is a self extracted ion source. The self extracted phenomena reduce the cost and the size of the ion source. The extracted ion current was measured by a graphite probe. An ion current of more than 200 μA was observed at the probe placed 70 mm apart from the extraction electrode. In this paper, the structure of the ion source, effect of operating pressure, potential difference and the magnetic field on the extracted ion current is reported.

  7. Plasma source for spacecraft potential control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A stable electrical ground which enables the particle spectrometers to measure the low energy particle populations was investigated and the current required to neutralize the spacecraft was measured. In addition, the plasma source for potential control (PSPO C) prevents high charging events which could affect the spacecraft electrical integrity. The plasma source must be able to emit a plasma current large enough to balance the sum of all other currents to the spacecraft. In ion thrusters, hollow cathodes provide several amperes of electron current to the discharge chamber. The PSPO C is capable of balancing the net negative currents found in eclipse charging events producing 10 to 100 microamps of electron current. The largest current required is the ion current necessary to balance the total photoelectric current.

  8. Forty years of surface plasma source development

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    The cesiation effect, a significant enhancement of negative ion emission from a gas discharge with decrease of co-extracted electron current below negative ion current, was observed for the first time on July 1, 1971 by placing into the discharge a compound with 1 mg of cesium. Subsequent developments of surface plasma sources (SPS) for highly efficient negative ion production caused by the interaction of plasma particles with electrodes on which the adsorbed cesium reduced the surface work function are described. In the last 40 years, the intensity of negative ion beams has increased by cesiation up to 10{sup 4} times from 3 mA to tens of amperes. Here, the main attention is concentrated on earlier SPS developments because recent results are well known and widely available.

  9. Features of semiplanotron surface plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Features of the semiplanotron surface plasma sources (SPS) with cesiation used for high efficient negative ion beam production from first development to modern condition are considered. Design features of semiplanotrons SPS with cylindrical and spherical geometric focusing and the features of the negative ion production in the semiplanotrons are reviewed. Several versions of semiplanotrons with efficiency up to 0.1 A of H{sup -} per kW of discharge power are discussed. Modifications of the semiplanotrons for dc operation and for heavy negative ion production are reviewed.

  10. Development of a high current H(-) ion source for cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Etoh, H; Aoki, Y; Mitsubori, H; Arakawa, Y; Mitsumoto, T; Yajima, S; Sakuraba, J; Kato, T; Okumura, Y

    2014-02-01

    A multi-cusp DC H(-) ion source has been designed and fabricated for medical applications of cyclotrons. Optimization of the ion source is in progress, such as the improvement of the filament configuration, magnetic filter strength, extraction electrode's shape, configuration of electron suppression magnets, and plasma electrode material. A small quantity of Cs has been introduced into the ion source to enhance the negative ion beam current. The ion source produced 16 mA of DC H(-) ion beam with the Cs-seeded operation at a low arc discharge power of 2.8 kW. PMID:24593547

  11. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lyneis, Claude M; Leitner, D; Todd, D S; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S; Caspi, S; Ferracin, P

    2008-02-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B(ECR) will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb(3)Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development. PMID:18315111

  12. Development of a novel low-flow ion source/sampling cone geometry for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and application in hyphenated techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Thorben; Janzen, Rasmus; Steingrobe, Tobias; Sperling, Michael; Franze, Bastian; Engelhard, Carsten; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    A novel ion source/sampling cone device for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) especially operated in the hyphenated mode as a detection system coupled with different separation modules is presented. Its technical setup is described in detail. Its main feature is the very low total argon consumption of less than 1.5 L min- 1, leading to significant reduction of operational costs especially when time-consuming speciation analysis is performed. The figures of merit of the new system with respect to sensitivity, detection power, long-term stability and working range were explored. Despite the profound differences of argon consumption of the new system in comparison to the conventional ICP-MS system, many of the characteristic features of the conventional ICP-MS could be maintained to a great extent. To demonstrate the ion source's capabilities, it was used as an element-selective detector for gas (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) where organic compounds of mercury and cobalt, respectively, were separated and detected with the new low-flow ICP-MS detection system. The corresponding chromatograms are shown. The applicability for trace element analysis has been validated with the certified reference material NIST 1643e.

  13. Cold ions in the hot plasma sheet of Earth's magnetotail.

    PubMed

    Seki, Kanako; Hirahara, Masafumi; Hoshino, Masahiro; Terasawa, Toshio; Elphic, Richard C; Saito, Yoshifumi; Mukai, Toshifumi; Hayakawa, Hajime; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-04-10

    Most visible matter in the Universe exists as plasma. How this plasma is heated, and especially how the initial non-equilibrium plasma distributions relax to thermal equilibrium (as predicted by Maxwell-Boltzman statistics), is a fundamental question in studies of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. Astrophysical plasmas are often so tenuous that binary collisions can be ignored, and it is not clear how thermal equilibrium develops for these 'collisionless' plasmas. One example of a collisionless plasma is the Earth's plasma sheet, where thermalized hot plasma with ion temperatures of about 5 x 10(7) K has been observed. Here we report direct observations of a plasma distribution function during a solar eclipse, revealing cold ions in the Earth's plasma sheet in coexistence with thermalized hot ions. This cold component cannot be detected by plasma sensors on satellites that are positively charged in sunlight, but our observations in the Earth's shadow show that the density of the cold ions is comparable to that of hot ions. This high density is difficult to explain within existing theories, as it requires a mechanism that permits half of the source plasma to remain cold upon entry into the hot turbulent plasma sheet. PMID:12686993

  14. Electric Potential Near The Extraction Region In Negative Ion Sources With Surface Produced Negative Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fukano, A.; Hatayama, A.

    2011-09-26

    The potential distribution near the extraction region in negative ion sources for the plasma with the surface produced negative ions is studied analytically. The potential is derived analytically by using a plasma-sheath equation, where negative ions produced on the Plasma Grid (PG) surface are considered in addition to positive ions and electrons. A negative potential peak is formed in the sheath region near the PG surface for the case of strong surface production of negative ions or for low energy negative ions. Negative ions are reflected by the negative potential peak near the PG and returned to the PG surface. This reflection mechanism by the negative potential peak possibly becomes a factor in negative ion extraction. It is also indicated that the potential difference between the plasma region and the wall decreases by the surface produced negative ions. This also has the possibility to contribute to the negative ion extraction.

  15. Negative ion source development for fusion application (invited).

    PubMed

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2010-02-01

    Giant negative ion sources, producing high-current of several tens amps with high energy of several hundreds keV to 1 MeV, are required for a neutral beam injector (NBI) in a fusion device. The giant negative ion sources are cesium-seeded plasma sources, in which the negative ions are produced on the cesium-covered surface. Their characteristic features are discussed with the views of large-volume plasma production, large-area beam acceleration, and high-voltage dc holding. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor NBI employs a 1 MeV-40 A of deuterium negative ion source, and intensive development programs for the rf-driven source plasma production and the multistage electrostatic acceleration are in progress, including the long pulse operation for 3600 s. Present status of the development, as well as the achievements of the giant negative ion sources in the working injectors, is also summarized. PMID:20192420

  16. Negative ion source development for fusion application (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2010-02-15

    Giant negative ion sources, producing high-current of several tens amps with high energy of several hundreds keV to 1 MeV, are required for a neutral beam injector (NBI) in a fusion device. The giant negative ion sources are cesium-seeded plasma sources, in which the negative ions are produced on the cesium-covered surface. Their characteristic features are discussed with the views of large-volume plasma production, large-area beam acceleration, and high-voltage dc holding. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor NBI employs a 1 MeV-40 A of deuterium negative ion source, and intensive development programs for the rf-driven source plasma production and the multistage electrostatic acceleration are in progress, including the long pulse operation for 3600 s. Present status of the development, as well as the achievements of the giant negative ion sources in the working injectors, is also summarized.

  17. The SNS External Antenna H- Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Stockli, Martin P; Murray Jr, S N; Crisp, Danny W; Carmichael, Justin R; Goulding, Richard Howell; Han, Baoxi; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to insure that we will meet our operational commitments as well as provide for future facility upgrades with high reliability, we have developed an RF-driven, H- ion source based on a ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber [1]. This source is expected to be utilized by the SNS for neutron production starting in 2009. This report details the design of the production source which features an AlN plasma chamber, 2-layer external antenna, cooled-multicusp magnet array, Cs2CrO4 cesium system and a Molybdenum plasma ignition gun. Performance of the production source both on the SNS accelerator and SNS test stand is reported. The source has also been designed to accommodate an elemental Cs system with an external reservoir which has demonstrated unanalyzed beam currents up to ~100mA (60Hz, 1ms) on the SNS ion source test stand.

  18. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H-ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Fuja, Raymond E; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hardek, Thomas W; Lee, Sung-Woo; McCarthy, Mike; Piller, Chip; Shin, Ki; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering 38 mA H beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride AlN plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  19. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y W; Fuja, R; Goulding, R H; Hardek, T; Lee, S-W; McCarthy, M P; Piller, M C; Shin, K; Stockli, M P; Welton, R F

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering approximately 38 mA H(-) beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. PMID:20192394

  20. Note: Development of ESS Bilbao's proton ion source: Ion Source Hydrogen Positive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracoli, R.; Feuchtwanger, J.; Arredondo, I.; Belver, D.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Corres, J.; Djekic, S.; Echevarria, P.; Eguiraun, M.; Garmendia, N.; Muguira, L.

    2014-02-01

    The Ion Source Hydrogen positive is a 2.7 GHz off-resonance microwave discharge ion source. It uses four coils to generate an axial magnetic field in the plasma chamber around 0.1 T that exceeds the ECR resonance field. A new magnetic system was designed as a combination of the four coils and soft iron in order to increase the reliability of the source. The description of the simulations of the magnetic field and the comparison with the magnetic measurements are presented. Moreover, results of the initial commissioning of the source for extraction voltage until 50 kV will be reported.

  1. Extracted current saturation in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalskyy, S.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Minea, T.

    2012-06-01

    The extraction of negatively charged particles from a negative ion source is one of the crucial issues in the development of the neutral beam injector system for future experimental reactor ITER. Full 3D electrostatic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code - ONIX [S. Mochalskyy et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105011 (2010)] - is used to simulate the hydrogen plasma behaviour and the extracted particle features in the vicinity of the plasma grid, both sides of the aperture. It is found that the contribution to the extracted negative ion current of ions born in the volume is small compared with that of ions created at the plasma grid walls. The parametric study with respect to the rate of negative ions released from the walls shows an optimum rate. Beyond this optimum, a double layer builds-up by the negative ion charge density close to the grid aperture surface reducing thus extraction probability, and therefore the extracted current. The effect of the extraction potential and magnetic field magnitudes on the extraction is also discussed. Results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  2. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  3. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem was meeting commercialization goals did not succeed for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. An additional noteworthy reason for failure to commercialize is the fact that the ion implantation manufacturing industry had been in a very deep bust cycle. BNL, however, has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to the need high charge state ions in some RHIC preinjectors. Since the invention of the transistor, the trend has been to miniaturize semiconductor devices. As semiconductors become smaller (and get miniaturized), ion energy needed for implantation decreases, since shallow implantation is desired. But, due to space charge (intra-ion repulsion) effects, forming and transporting ion beams becomes a rather difficult task. A few small manufacturers of low quality semiconductors use plasma immersion to circumvent the problem. However, in plasma immersion undesired plasma impurity ions are also implanted; hence, the quality of those semiconductors is poor. For high quality miniature semiconductor manufacturing, pure, low energy ion beams are utilized. But, low energy ion implanters are characterized by low current (much lower than desirable) and, therefore, low production rates. Consequently, increasing the current of pure low energy

  4. ION SOURCE UNIT FOR CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, D.H.; Yockey, H.P.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1959-04-14

    An improvement in the mounting arrangement for an ion source within the vacuum tank of a calutron device is reported. The cathode and arc block of the source are independently supported from a stem passing through the tank wall. The arc block may be pivoted and moved longitudinally with respect to the stem to thereby align the arc chamber in the biock with the cathode and magnetic field in the tank. With this arrangement the elements of the ion source are capable of precise adjustment with respect to one another, promoting increased source efficiency.

  5. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  6. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-15

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  7. Cold Strontium Ion Source for Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2015-05-01

    We are working on a cold source of Sr Ions to be used in an ion interferometer. The beam will be generated from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of Sr atoms by optically ionizing atoms leaking out a carefully prepared hole in the MOT. A single laser cooling on the resonant transition (461 nm) in Sr should be sufficient for trapping, as we've calculated that losses to the atom beam will outweigh losses to dark states. Another laser (405 nm), together with light from the trapping laser, will drive a two photon transition in the atom beam to an autoionizing state. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  8. Low energy spread ion source with a coaxial magnetic filter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    2000-01-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending magnetic filter consisting of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy spread utilizes a cylindrical magnetic filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial magnetic filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy spread in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).

  9. Proton emission from a laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Gammino, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Margarone, D.

    2012-02-15

    At intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}, ns pulsed lasers can be employed to ablate solid bulk targets in order to produce high emission of ions at different charge state and kinetic energy. A special interest is devoted to the production of protons with controllable energy and current from a roto-translating target irradiated in repetition rate at 1-10 Hz by a Nd:Yag pulsed laser beam. Different hydrogenated targets based on polymers and hydrates were irradiated in high vacuum. Special nanostrucutres can be embedded in the polymers in order to modify the laser absorption properties and the amount of protons to be accelerated in the plasma. For example, carbon nanotubes may increase the laser absorption and the hydrogen absorption to generate high proton yields from the plasma. Metallic nanostrucutres may increase the electron density of the plasma and the kinetic energy of the accelerated protons. Ion collectors, ion energy analyzer, and mass spectrometers, used in time-of-flight configuration, were employed to characterize the ion beam properties. A comparison with traditional proton ion source is presented and discussed.

  10. H{sup -} ion source developments at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Han, B.; Kang, Y.; Goulding, R. H.; Crisp, D. W.; Sparks, D. O.; Luciano, N. P.; Carmichael, J. R.; Carr, J.

    2008-02-15

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will require substantially higher average and pulse H{sup -} beam currents than can be produced from conventional ion sources such as the base line SNS source. H{sup -} currents of 40-50 mA (SNS operations) and 70-100 mA (power upgrade project) with a rms emittance of 0.20-0.35{pi} mm mrad and a {approx}7% duty factor will be needed. We are therefore investigating several advanced ion source concepts based on rf plasma excitation. First, the performance characteristics of an external antenna source based on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} plasma chamber combined with an external multicusp magnetic configuration, an elemental Cs system, and plasma gun will be discussed. Second, the first plasma measurements of a helicon-driven H{sup -} ion source will also be presented.

  11. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  12. A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-03

    A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield like Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm2 at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

  13. A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim

    2010-02-15

    A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield such as Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm{sup 2} at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

  14. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  15. Recent negative ion source activity at JYFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Laitinen, M.; Sajavaara, T.; Koivisto, H.; Jokinen, A.; Dehnel, M. P.

    2013-02-01

    A filament-powered multicusp ion source for production of H- has been developed for the Jyväskylä Pelletron accelerator for use in ion beam lithography and particle induced X-ray emission applications. The source can be considered conventional with the exception of the filter field being created with an electric magnet for continuous adjustability. A permanent magnet dipoleantidipole electron dump is integrated in the puller electrode. The source provides 50 μA H- beam at 10 keV energy with 0.019 mm mrad 95 % normalized rms emittance through a 2 mm aperture. Lower emittance is achievable by changing the plasma electrode insert to a smaller aperture one if application requires. A new commercial MCC30/15 cyclotron has been installed at the Jyväskylä accelerator laboratory providing 30MeV H+ and 15Mev D+ for use in nuclear physics experiments and applications. The ion source delivered with the cyclotron is a a filament-powered multicusp source capable of about 130 h continuous operation at 1 mA H- output between filament changes. The ion source is located in the cyclotron vault and therefore a significant waiting time for the vault cooldown is required before filament change is possible. This kind of operation is not acceptable as 350 h and longer experiments are expected. Therefore a project for developing a CW 13.56 MHz RF ion source has been initiated. A planar RF antenna replacing the filament back plate of the existing TRIUMF-type ion source has been used in the first tests with 240 μA of H- and 21 mA of electrons measured at 1.5 kW of RF power. Tests with higher RF power levels were prevented by electron beam induced sparking. A new plasma chamber has been built and a new extraction is being designed for the RF ion source. The extraction code IBSimu has recently gone through a major update on how smooth electrode surfaces are implemented in the Poisson solvers. This has made it possible to implement a fast multigrid solver with low memory consumption. Also

  16. A new plasma source based on contact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Koslover, R.; Karim, R.; Rynn, N.

    1985-07-01

    A new type of plasma source is presented: A collisionless plasma is formed by producing ions on one end and electrons on the other of a cylindrical vacuum chamber in a solenoidal magnetic field. The ions are produced by contact ionization of potassium on tungsten. The source of electrons is a LaB6 plate. In the usual single-ended Q machine the elements rhenium, iridium, and platinum are tested as ionizing metals for potassium and barium.

  17. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human blood collected...

  18. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  19. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  20. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  1. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  2. Aspects of the physics, chemistry, and technology of high intensity heavy ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    Particular emphasis is placed on the technology of plasma discharge ion sources which utilize solid elemental or molecular compounds to produce vapor for the ionization process. A brief discussion is made of the elementary concepts underlying the formation and extraction of ion beams from plasma discharge sources. A limited review of low charge state positive ion sources suitable for accelerator use is also given.

  3. Mo layer thickness requirement on the ion source back plate for the HNB and DNB ion sources in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. J.; De Esch, H. P. L.; Hemsworth, R.; Boilson, D.

    2015-04-01

    All the inner surfaces of the ion sources and the upstream surface of the plasma grid of the ITER neutral beam ion sources are proposed to be coated with molybdenum. This is done to avoid sputtering of the base material (Cu or CuCrZr) by the ions in the source plasma (D+, D2+, D3+ or H+, H2+, H3+). The sputtering of Mo by the ions in the source plasma is low compared to that from Cu, and the threshold energy for sputtering ˜80 eV) is high compared to the energy of the ions in the source. However the D2+, H2+ and D+, H+ ions backstreaming from the accelerators will have energies that substantially exceed that threshold and it is important that the Mo layer is not eroded such that the base material is exposed to the source plasma. In the case of the HNB, the backstreaming ion power is calculated to be in the order of ˜1 MW, and the average energy of the backstreaming ions is calculated to be ˜300 keV. The ion sources in the HNB beam lines, 40 A 1 MeV D and 46 A 870 keV H beams, are supposed to operate for a period of 2 x 107 s. For the DNB, 60 A 100 keV H beams, the corresponding number is 1.4 × 106 s considering a beam duty cycle of 3s ON/20s OFF with 5 Hz modulation. The Mo layer on the ion source back plate should be thick enough to survive this operational time. Thickness estimation has been carried out taking into account the sputtering yields (atoms/ion), the energy spectrum of the backstreaming ions and the estimated profiles on the ion source back plate.

  4. STATUS OF ITEP DECABORANE ION SOURCE PROGRAM.

    SciTech Connect

    KULEVOY,T.V.; PETRENKO, S.V.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; KOZLOV, A.V.; STASEVICH, YU.B.; SITNIKOV, A.L.; SHAMAILOV, I.M.; PERSHIN, V.I.; HERSHCOVITCH, A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; OKS, E.M.; POOLE, H.J.; MASUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.

    2007-08-26

    The joint research and development program is continued to develop steady-state ion source of decaborane beam for ion implantation industry. Both Freeman and Bemas ion sources for decaborane ion beam generation were investigated. Decaborane negative ion beam as well as positive ion beam were generated and delivered to the output of mass separator. Experimental results obtained in ITEP are presented.

  5. Multi-source ion funnel

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Belov, Mikhail B.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-12-27

    A method for introducing ions generated in a region of relatively high pressure into a region of relatively low pressure by providing at least two electrospray ion sources, providing at least two capillary inlets configured to direct ions generated by the electrospray sources into and through each of the capillary inlets, providing at least two sets of primary elements having apertures, each set of elements having a receiving end and an emitting end, the primary sets of elements configured to receive a ions from the capillary inlets at the receiving ends, and providing a secondary set of elements having apertures having a receiving end and an emitting end, the secondary set of elements configured to receive said ions from the emitting end of the primary sets of elements and emit said ions from said emitting end of the secondary set of elements. The method may further include the step of providing at least one jet disturber positioned within at least one of the sets of primary elements, providing a voltage, such as a dc voltage, in the jet disturber, thereby adjusting the transmission of ions through at least one of the sets of primary elements.

  6. Measurement of ion beam from laser ion source for RHIC EBIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue,T.; Tamura, J.; Okamura, M.

    2008-06-23

    Laser ion source (LIS) is a candidate of the primary ion source for the RHIC EBIS. LIS will provide intense charge state 1+ ions to the EBIS for further ionization. We measured plasma properties of a variety of atomic species from C to Au using the second harmonics of Nd:YAG laser (532 nm wave length, up to 0.5 J/6 ns). Since properties of laser produced plasma is different from different species, laser power density for singly charged ion production should be verified experimentally for each atomic species. After plasma analysis experiments, Au ions was extracted from plasma and emittance of the ion beam was measured using a pepper pot type emittance monitor.

  7. Ion temperature evolution in an ultracold neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillen, P. Strickler, T.; Langin, T.; Killian, T. C.

    2015-03-15

    We study the long-time evolution of the ion temperature in an expanding ultracold neutral plasma using spatially resolved, laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy. Adiabatic cooling reduces the ion temperature by an order of magnitude during the plasma expansion, to temperatures as low as 0.2 K. Cooling is limited by heat exchange between ions and the much hotter electrons. We also present evidence for an additional heating mechanism and discuss possible sources. Data are described by a model of the plasma evolution, including the effects of ion-electron heat exchange. We show that for appropriate initial conditions, the degree of Coulomb coupling of ions in the plasma increases during expansion.

  8. Volumetric plasma source development and characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Starbird, Robert L.; Johnston, Mark D.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Droemer, Darryl W.; National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV

    2008-09-01

    The development of plasma sources with densities and temperatures in the 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and 1-10eV ranges which are slowly varying over several hundreds of nanoseconds within several cubic centimeter volumes is of interest for applications such as intense electron beam focusing as part of the x-ray radiography program. In particular, theoretical work [1,2] suggests that replacing neutral gas in electron beam focusing cells with highly conductive, pre-ionized plasma increases the time-averaged e-beam intensity on target, resulting in brighter x-ray sources. This LDRD project was an attempt to generate such a plasma source from fine metal wires. A high voltage (20-60kV), high current (12-45kA) capacitive discharge was sent through a 100 {micro}m diameter aluminum wire forming a plasma. The plasma's expansion was measured in time and space using spectroscopic techniques. Lineshapes and intensities from various plasma species were used to determine electron and ion densities and temperatures. Electron densities from the mid-10{sup 15} to mid-10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} were generated with corresponding electron temperatures of between 1 and 10eV. These parameters were measured at distances of up to 1.85 cm from the wire surface at times in excess of 1 {micro}s from the initial wire breakdown event. In addition, a hydrocarbon plasma from surface contaminants on the wire was also measured. Control of these contaminants by judicious choice of wire material, size, and/or surface coating allows for the ability to generate plasmas with similar density and temperature to those given above, but with lower atomic masses.

  9. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H{sup −} current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  10. Some properties of ion and cluster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gudzenko, L.I.; Derzhiev, V.I.; Yakovlenko, S.I.

    1982-11-01

    The aggregate of problems connected with the physics of ion and cluster plasma is qualitatively considered. Such a plasma can exist when a dense gas is ionized by a hard ionizer. The conditions for the formation of an ion plasma and the difference between its characteristics and those of an ordinary electron plasma are discussed; a solvated-ion model and the distribution of the clusters with respect to the number of solvated molecules are considered. The recombination rate of the positively and negatively charged clusters is roughly estimated. The parameters of a ball-lightning plasma are estimated on the basis of the cluster model.

  11. Proceedings of the 10th international workshop on ECR ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F W; Kirkpatrick, M I

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Recent Developments and Future Projects on ECR Ion Sources; Operation of the New KVI ECR Ion Source at 10 GHz; Operational Experience and Status of the INS SF-ECR Ion Source; Results of the New ECR4'' 14.5 GHz ECRIS; Preliminary Performance of the AECR; Experimental Study of the Parallel and Perpendicular Particle Losses from an ECRIS Plasma; Plasma Instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated Ion Sources; The Hyperbolic Energy Analyzer; Status of ECR Source Development; The New 10 GHz CAPRICE Source; First Operation of the Texas A M ECR Ion Source; Recent Developments of the RIKEN ECR Ion Sources; The 14 GHz CAPRICE Source; Characteristics and Potential Applications of an ORNL Microwave ECR Multicusp Plasma Ion Source; ECRIPAC: The Production and Acceleration of Multiply Charged Ions Using an ECR Plasma; ECR Source for the HHIRF Tandem Accelerator; Feasibility Studies for an ECR-Generated Plasma Stripper; Production of Ion Beams by using the ECR Plasmas Cathode; A Single Stage ECR Source for Efficient Production of Radioactive Ion Beams; The Single Staged ECR Source at the TRIUMF Isotope Separator TISOL; The Continuous Wave, Optically Pumped H{sup {minus}} Source; The H{sup +} ECR Source for the LAMPF Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source; Present Status of the Warsaw CUSP ECR Ion Source; An ECR Source for Negative Ion Production; GYRAC-D: A Device for a 200 keV ECR Plasma Production and Accumulation; Status Report of the 14.4 GHZ ECR in Legnaro; Status of JYFL-ECRIS; Report on the Uppsala ECRIS Facility and Its Planned Use for Atomic Physics; A 10 GHz ECR Ion Source for Ion-Electron and Ion-Atom Collision Studies; and Status of the ORNL ECR Source Facility for Multicharged Ion Collision Research.

  12. A study of single and binary ion plasma expansion into laboratory-generated plasma wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth Herbert, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma expansion into the wake of a large rectangular plate immersed in a collisionless, supersonic plasma was investigated in laboratory experiments. The experimental conditions address both single ion and binary ion plasma flows for the case of a body whose size is large in comparison with the Debye length, when the potential difference between the body and the plasma is relatively small. A new plasma source was developed to generate equi-velocity, binary ion plasma flows, which allows access to new parameter space that have previously been unavailable for laboratory studies. Specifically, the new parameters are the ionic mass ratio and the ionic component density ratio. In a series of experiments, a krypton-neon plasma is employed where the ambient density ratio of neon to krypton is varied more than an order of magnitude. The expansion in both the single ion and binary ion plasma cases is limited to early times, i.e., a few ion plasma periods, by the combination of plasma density, plasma drift speed, and vacuum chamber size, which prevented detailed comparison with self-similar theory.

  13. Modelling and Simulation of the Advanced Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Benjamin; Peter, Ralf; Harhausen, Jens; Ohl, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    Plasma ion assisted-deposition (PIAD) is a combination of conventional thermal evaporation deposition and plasma-beam surface modification; it serves as a well-established technology for the creation of high quality coatings on mirrors, lenses, and other optical devices. It is closely related to ion-assisted deposition to the extent that electrons preserve quasineutrality of the ion beam. This paper investigates the Advanced Plasma Source (APS), a plasma beam source employed for PIAD. A field enhanced glow discharge generates a radially expanding plasma flow with an ion energy of about 80-120 eV. Charge exchange collisions with the neutral background gas (pressure 0.1 Pa and below) produce a cold secondary plasma, which expands as well. A model is developed which describes the primary ions by a simplified Boltzmann equation, the secondary ions by the equations of continuity and momentum balance, and the electrons by the condition of Boltzmann equilibrium. Additionally, quasineutrality is assumed. The model can be reduced to a single nonlinear differential equation for the velocity of the secondary ions, which has several removable singularities and one essential singularity, identified as the Bohm singularity. Solving the model yields macroscopic plasma features, such as fluxes, densities, and the electrical field. An add-on Monte-Carlo simulation is employed to calculate the ion energy distribution function at the substrate. All results compare well to experiments conducted at a commercial APS system.

  14. Spectroscopic measurement of H(1S) and H sub 2 (v double prime ,J double prime ) in an H sup minus ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stutzin, G.C.

    1990-08-01

    Low pressure H{sub 2} discharges have been used for some time as sources of H{sup {minus}} ions. These discharges contain many different species of particles which interact with each other and with the walls of the discharge chamber. Models exist that predict the populations of the various species for given macroscopic discharge parameters. However, many of the cross sections and wall catalyzation coefficients are unknown or somewhat uncertain. Therefore, it is of interest to measure the populations of as many of these species as possible, in order to determine the validity of the models. These models predict that H{sup {minus}} is created predominantly by the two-step process of vibrational excitation of hydrogen molecules followed by dissociative attachment of slow electrons to these vibrationally-excited hydrogen molecules. Many different collisional processes must be included in the models to explain the dependence of the various populations upon macroscopic parameters. This work presents results of spectroscopic measurements of the density and translational temperature of hydrogen atoms and of specific rotationally- and vibrationally-excited states of electronic ground-state H{sub 2}, in a discharge optimized for H{sup {minus}} production, as well as conventional measurements of the various charged species within the plasma. The spectroscopic measurements are performed directly by narrowband, single-photon absorption in the vacuum ultraviolet.

  15. Operating a radio-frequency plasma source on water vapor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sonca V T; Foster, John E; Gallimore, Alec D

    2009-08-01

    A magnetically enhanced radio-frequency (rf) plasma source operating on water vapor has an extensive list of potential applications. In this work, the use of a rf plasma source to dissociate water vapor for hydrogen production is investigated. This paper describes a rf plasma source operated on water vapor and characterizes its plasma properties using a Langmuir probe, a residual gas analyzer, and a spectrometer. The plasma source operated first on argon and then on water vapor at operating pressures just over 300 mtorr. Argon and water vapor plasma number densities differ significantly. In the electropositive argon plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i) approximately = n(e), where n(i) is the positive ion density. But in the electronegative water plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i+) = n(i-) + n(e). The positive ion density and electron density of the water vapor plasma are approximately one and two orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of argon plasma. These results suggest that attachment and dissociative attachment are present in electronegative water vapor plasma. The electron temperature for this water vapor plasma source is between 1.5 and 4 eV. Without an applied axial magnetic field, hydrogen production increases linearly with rf power. With an axial magnetic field, hydrogen production jumps to a maximum value at 500 W and then saturates with rf power. The presence of the applied axial magnetic field is therefore shown to enhance hydrogen production. PMID:19725651

  16. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H- ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H- ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H- ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  17. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  18. Ion-plasma gun for ion-milling machine

    DOEpatents

    Kaminsky, Manfred S.; Campana, Jr., Thomas J.

    1976-01-01

    An ion gun includes an elongated electrode with a hollow end portion closed by a perforated end plate. The end plate is positioned parallel to a perforated flat electrode of opposite electrical polarity. An insulated sleeve encompasses the elongated electrode and extends outwardly from the perforated end towards the flat electrode. The sleeve length is separated into two portions of different materials. The first is formed of a high-temperature material that extends over the hollow portion of the elongated electrode where the arc is initiated by a point source electrode. The second sleeve portion extending over the remainder of the elongated electrode is of a resilient material for enhanced seal-forming ability and retention of plasma gas. Perforations are arranged in the flat electrode in a mutually opposing triangular pattern to project a plasma beam having a generally flat current profile towards a target requiring precision milling.

  19. Side extraction duoPIGatron-type ion source.

    SciTech Connect

    GUSHENETS,V.I.; OKS, E.M.; HERSCHOVITCH, A.; JOHNSON, B.M.

    2007-08-26

    We have designed and constructed a compact duoPIGatron-type ion source, for possible use in ion implanters, in such the ion can be extracted from side aperture in contrast to conventional duoPIGatron sources with axial ion extraction. The size of the side extraction aperture is 1x40 mm. The ion source was developed to study physical and technological aspects relevant to an industrial ion source. The side extraction duoPIGatron has stable arc, uniformly bright illumination, and dense plasma. The present work describes some of preliminary operating parameters of the ion source using Argon, BF3. The total unanalyzed beam currents are 23 mA using Ar at an arc current 5 A and 13 mA using BF3 gas at an arc current 6 A.

  20. Magnetosonic shock wave in collisional pair-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Sikdar, Arnab; Ghosh, Samiran; Khan, Manoranjan

    2016-06-01

    Nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic shock wave has been studied in collisional magnetized pair-ion plasma. The masses of both ions are same but the temperatures are slightly different. Two fluid model has been taken to describe the model. Two different modes of the magnetosonic wave have been obtained. The dynamics of the nonlinear magnetosonic wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers' equation. It has been shown that the ion-ion collision is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The numerical investigations reveal that the magnetosonic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the strength of the dissipation. The nonlinear wave exhibited the oscillatory shock wave for strong magnetic field (weak dissipation) and monotonic shock wave for weak magnetic field (strong dissipation). The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  1. Direct measurements of classical and enhanced gradient-aligned cross-field ion flows in a helicon plasma source using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, M. Umair Thompson, Derek S.; McIlvain, Julianne M.; Short, Zachary D.; Scime, Earl E.

    2015-12-15

    Direct laser induced fluorescence measurements are shown of cross-field ion flows normal to an absorbing boundary that is aligned parallel to the axial magnetic field in a helicon plasma. We show Langmuir and emissive probe measurements of local density and plasma potential in the same region, as well as floating probe spectra near the boundary. With these measurements, we investigate the influence of ion-neutral collisionality on radial ion transport by varying the ratio of the ion gyro-radius, ρ{sub i}, to the ion-neutral collision length, λ, over the range 0.34 ≤ ρ{sub i}λ{sup −1} ≤ 1.60. Classical drift-diffusion transport along density and potential gradients is sufficient to describe flow profiles for most cases. For two parameter regimes (ρ{sub i}λ{sup −1} = 0.65 and 0.44), low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations (f < 10 kHz) and enhanced cross-field bulk ion flow to the boundary are observed.

  2. Direct measurements of classical and enhanced gradient-aligned cross-field ion flows in a helicon plasma source using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, M. Umair; Thompson, Derek S.; McIlvain, Julianne M.; Short, Zachary D.; Scime, Earl E.

    2015-12-01

    Direct laser induced fluorescence measurements are shown of cross-field ion flows normal to an absorbing boundary that is aligned parallel to the axial magnetic field in a helicon plasma. We show Langmuir and emissive probe measurements of local density and plasma potential in the same region, as well as floating probe spectra near the boundary. With these measurements, we investigate the influence of ion-neutral collisionality on radial ion transport by varying the ratio of the ion gyro-radius, ρi, to the ion-neutral collision length, λ, over the range 0.34 ≤ ρiλ-1 ≤ 1.60. Classical drift-diffusion transport along density and potential gradients is sufficient to describe flow profiles for most cases. For two parameter regimes (ρiλ-1 = 0.65 and 0.44), low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations (f < 10 kHz) and enhanced cross-field bulk ion flow to the boundary are observed.

  3. Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok

    2012-02-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams.

  4. Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams. PMID:22380346

  5. Compact microwave ion source for industrial applicationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams.

  6. Ion acoustic shock waves in degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, N.; Hussain, S.

    2011-07-15

    Korteweg de Vries Burgers equation for negative ion degenerate dissipative plasma has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. The quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study the quantum ion acoustic shock waves. The effects of different parameters on quantum ion acoustic shock waves are studied. It is found that quantum parameter, electrons Fermi temperature, temperature of positive and negative ions, mass ratio of positive to negative ions, viscosity, and density ratio have significant impact on the shock wave structure in negative ion degenerate plasma.

  7. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  8. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  9. Volume production of negative ions in the reflex type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbo, K.

    1982-01-01

    The production of negative hydrogen ions is investigated in the reflex-type negative ion source. The extracted negative hydrogen currents of 9.7 mA (100 mA/cm/sup 2/) for H/sup -/ and of 4.1 mA (42 mA/cm/sup 2/) for D/sup -/ are obtained continuously. The impurity is less then 1%. An isotope effect of negative ion production is observed. When anomalous diffusion in the positive column was found by Lehnert and Hoh (1960), it was pointed out that the large particle loss produced by anomalous diffusion is compensated by the large particle production inside the plasma, i.e., the plasma tries to maintain itself. The self-sustaining property of the plasma is applied to the reflex-type negative ion source. Anomalous diffusion was artificially encouraged by changing the radial electric field inside the reflex discharge. The apparent encouragement of negative ion diffusion by the increase of density fluctuation amplitude is observed. Twice as much negative ion current was obtained with the artificial encouragement as without. It is found from the quasilinear theory that the inwardly directed radial electric field destabilizes the plasma in the reflex-type ion source. The nonlinear theory based on Yoshikawa method (1962) is extended, and the anomalous diffusion coefficient in a weakly ionized plasma is obtained. The electrostatic sheath trap, which increases the confinement of negative ions in the reflex-type ion source, is also discussed.

  10. ECR ion sources: present status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, G.

    1997-01-01

    Although now widely used for many applications, the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS), an outgrowth of the fusion plasma research, still suffer from some mystification, or at least from a lack of understanding. This article is an attempt to give a broad overview of the today ECRIS activity devoted to the production of highly charged ions: it therefore describes both physics and theory efforts, technology, performances, plans and prospects as well. An important chapter gives the status of understanding the ECRIS behavior, both the current thinking on how they operate and the experimental evidences whenever it is possible. The various existing sources, their design and main features, are then surveyed. At last the present trends of development, the potential directions for future improvement are examined.

  11. Helicon Plasma Source Optimization Studies for VASIMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Baity, F. W.; Barber, G. C.; Carter, M. D.; ChangDiaz, F. R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D. O.; Squire J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A helicon plasma source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is being used to investigate operating scenarios relevant to the VASIMR (VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket). These include operation at high magnetic field (> = 0.4 T), high frequency (<= 30 MHz), high power (< = 3 kW), and with light ions (He+, H+). To date, He plasmas have been produced with n(sub e0) = 1.7 x 10(exp 19)/cu m (measured with an axially movable 4mm microwave interferometer), with Pin = I kW at f = 13.56 MHz and absolute value of B(sub 0) = 0.16 T. In the near future, diagnostics including a mass flow meter and a gridded energy analyzer array will be added to investigate fueling efficiency and the source power balance. The latest results, together with modeling results using the EMIR rf code, will be presented.

  12. Modeling of neutrals in the Linac4 H(-) ion source plasma: hydrogen atom production density profile and Hα intensity by collisional radiative model.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Shibata, T; Ohta, M; Yasumoto, M; Nishida, K; Hatayama, A; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Sawada, K; Fantz, U

    2014-02-01

    To control the H(0) atom production profile in the H(-) ion sources is one of the important issues for the efficient and uniform surface H(-) production. The purpose of this study is to construct a collisional radiative (CR) model to calculate the effective production rate of H(0) atoms from H2 molecules in the model geometry of the radio-frequency (RF) H(-) ion source for Linac4 accelerator. In order to validate the CR model by comparison with the experimental results from the optical emission spectroscopy, it is also necessary for the model to calculate Balmer photon emission rate in the source. As a basic test of the model, the time evolutions of H(0) production and the Balmer Hα photon emission rate are calculated for given electron energy distribution functions in the Linac4 RF H(-) ion source. Reasonable test results are obtained and basis for the detailed comparisons with experimental results have been established. PMID:24593558

  13. ION SOURCE FOR A CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1957-12-24

    This patent relates to ion sources and more particularly describes an ion source for a calutron which has the advantage of efficient production of an ion beam and long operation time without recharging. The source comprises an arc block provided with an arc chamber connected to a plurality of series-connected charge chambers and means for heating the charge within the chambers. A cathode is disposed at one end of the arc chamber and enclosed hy a vapor tight housing to protect the cathode. The arc discharge is set up between the cathode and the block due to a difference in potentials placed on these parts, and a magnetic field is aligned with the arc discharge. Cooling of the arc block is accomplished by passing coolant through a hollow stem secured at one end to the block and rotatably mounted at the other end through the wall of the calutron. The ions are removed through a slit in the arc chamber by accelerating electrodes.

  14. Ion acceleration in expanding ionospheric plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Schunk, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma expansion along the ambient magnetic field in regions of density gradients provides a mechanism for accelerating ions. A brief review of the basic phenomenon of plasma expansion is given. Estimates of the energies of the accelerated ions in an expanding ionospheric plasma along geomagnetic flux tubes are obtained by solving the time-dependent hydrodynamic equations. It is found that, over certain altitude ranges, each ion species can be the most energetic; the maximum energies of the different ions are found to be limited to less than about 10 eV for H(+), 5 eV for He(+), and less than about 1.5 eV for O(+).

  15. Relating to monitoring ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

  16. Fundamental studies on the Cs dynamics under ion source conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedl, R. Fantz, U.

    2014-02-15

    The performance of surface conversion based negative hydrogen ion sources is mainly determined by the caesium dynamics. Therefore, fundamental investigations in vacuum and plasma are performed at a flexible laboratory setup with ion source parameters. Studies on the influence of Cs on the plasma parameters of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} plasmas showed that n{sub e} and T{sub e} in the bulk plasma are not affected by relevant amounts of Cs and no isotopic differences could be observed. The coating of the vessel surfaces with Cs, however, leads to a considerable gettering of hydrogen atoms from the plasma volume and to the decrease of n{sub e} close to a sample surface due to the formation of negative ions.

  17. Experimental evaluation of a negative ion source for a heavy ionfusion negative ion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leung, K.N.

    2005-01-18

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photodetached to neutrals [1,2,3]. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that is used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

  18. Emission Characteristics and Stability of Laser Ion Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Krousky, E.; Laska, L.; Rohlena, K.; Jungwirth, K.; Ullschmied, J.; Lorusso, A.; Velardi, L.; Nassisi, V.; Czarnecka, A.; Ryc, L.; Parys, P.; Wolowksi, J.

    2010-10-13

    A new classification of laser ion sources concerning their pulse-to-pulse reproducibility in the ion emission is proposed. In particular, we distinguish between plasmas according to the electron distribution changing its characteristics at a laser intensity threshold of 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Well reproducible continuous pulsed ion currents are typical for the intensity below the threshold. In contrast to this plasma the 'two-temperature' plasma arising for the intensity above this threshold shows not only a separation of charges in space and time but it also shows irregular and intense outbursts of ions similar to a self pulsing instability leading to a chaos. The sequence of fast ion outbursts visible on time-of-flight spectra is sensitive to details of non-linear interaction of the sub-nanosecond laser beam with the generated plasma.

  19. Direct plasma injection scheme with various ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.

    2010-09-15

    The laser ion source is one of the most powerful heavy ion sources. However, it is difficult to obtain good stability and to control its intense current. To overcome these difficulties, we proposed a new beam injection scheme called 'direct plasma injection scheme'. Following this it was established to provide various species with desired charge state as an intense accelerated beam. Carbon, aluminum and iron beams have been tested.

  20. Characterization of an 8-cm Diameter Ion Source System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhongmin; Hawk, C. W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Buttweiler, Mark S.; Williams, John D.; Buchholtz, Brett

    2005-01-01

    Results of tests characterizing an 8-cm diameter ion source are presented. The tests were conducted in three separate vacuum test facilities at the University of Alabama-Huntsville, Colorado State University, and L3 Communications' ETI division. Standard ion optics tests describing electron backstreaming and total-voltage-limited impingement current behavior as a function of beam current were used as guidelines for selecting operating conditions where more detailed ion beam measurements were performed. The ion beam was profiled using an in-vacuum actuating probe system to determine the total ion current density and the ion charge state distribution variation across the face of the ion source. Both current density and ExB probes were utilized. The ion current density data were used to obtain integrated beam current, beam flatness parameters, and general beam profile shapes. The ExB probe data were used to determine the ratio of doubly to singly charged ion current. The ion beam profile tests were performed at over six different operating points that spanned the expected operating range of the DAWN thrusters being developed at L3. The characterization tests described herein reveal that the 8-cm ion source is suitable for use in (a) validating plasma diagnostic equipment, (b) xenon ion sputtering and etching studies of spacecraft materials, (c) plasma physics research, and (d) the study of ion thruster optics at varying conditions.

  1. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Maschwitz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  2. Model for the description of ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.

    2010-02-15

    The finite difference method trajectory code KOBRA3-INP has been developed now for 25 years to perform the simulation of ion beam extraction in three dimensions. Meanwhile, the code has been validated for different applications: high current ion beam extraction from plasma sources for ion implantation technology, neutral gas heating in fusion devices, or ion thrusters for space propulsion. One major issue of the development of this code was to improve the flexibility of the applied model for the simulation of different types of particle sources. Fixed emitter sources might be simulated with that code as well as laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), or H{sup -} sources, which require the simulation of negative ions, negative electrons, and positive charges simultaneously. The model which has been developed for ECRIS has now been used to explore the conditions for the ion beam extraction from a still nonexisting ion source, a so called ARC-ECRIS [P. Suominen and F. Wenander, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A305 (2008)]. It has to be shown whether the plasma generator has similar properties like regular ECRIS. However, the emittance of the extracted beam seems to be much better compared to an ECRIS equipped with a hexapole.

  3. Plasma sheet ion energization during dipolarization events

    SciTech Connect

    Delcourt, D.C. ); Sauvaud, J.A. )

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents simulation results for acceleration processes for ions during what are referred to as dipolarization events associated with storm activity. Time variations of magnetic fields over cyclotron periods, and generation of electric fields parallel to the geomagnetic field, both contribute to ion acceleration in the plasma sheet. Calculations support the observation of earthward injection of ions during such events.

  4. Metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.

    1996-09-01

    Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID) is a hybrid process combining cathodic arc deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation. The properties of metal plasma produced by vacuum arcs are reviewed and the consequences for MePIIID are discussed. Different version of MePIIID are described and compared with traditional methods of surface modification such as ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). MePIIID is a very versatile approach because of the wide range of ion species and energies used. In one extreme case, films are deposited with ions in the energy range 20--50 eV, and at the other extreme, ions can be implanted with high energy (100 keV or more) without film deposition. Novel features of the technique include the use of improved macroparticle filters; the implementation of several plasma sources for multi-element surface modification; tuning of ion energy during implantation and deposition to tailor the substrate-film intermixed layer and structure of the growing film; simultaneous pulsing of the plasma potential (positive) and substrate bias (negative) with a modified Marx generator; and the use of high ion charge states.

  5. Overview of ion source characterization diagnostics in INTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, M.; Sudhir, Dass; Bhuyan, M.; Soni, J.; Tyagi, H.; Joshi, J.; Yadav, A.; Rotti, C.; Parmar, Deepak; Patel, H.; Pillai, S.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    INdian Test Facility (INTF) is envisaged to characterize ITER diagnostic neutral beam system and to establish the functionality of its eight inductively coupled RF plasma driver based negative hydrogen ion source and its beamline components. The beam quality mainly depends on the ion source performance and therefore, its diagnostics plays an important role for its safe and optimized operation. A number of diagnostics are planned in INTF to characterize the ion source performance. Negative ions and its cesium contents in the source will be monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and cavity ring down spectroscopy. Plasma near the extraction region will be studied using standard electrostatic probes. The beam divergence and negative ion stripping losses are planned to be measured using Doppler shift spectroscopy. During initial phase of ion beam characterization, carbon fiber composite based infrared imaging diagnostics will be used. Safe operation of the beam will be ensured by using standard thermocouples and electrical voltage-current measurement sensors. A novel concept, based on plasma density dependent plasma impedance measurement using RF electrical impedance matching parameters to characterize the RF driver plasma, will be tested in INTF and will be validated with OES data. The paper will discuss about the overview of the complete INTF diagnostics including its present status of procurement, experimentation, interface with mechanical systems in INTF, and integration with INTF data acquisition and control systems.

  6. Overview of ion source characterization diagnostics in INTF.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, M; Sudhir, Dass; Bhuyan, M; Soni, J; Tyagi, H; Joshi, J; Yadav, A; Rotti, C; Parmar, Deepak; Patel, H; Pillai, S; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    INdian Test Facility (INTF) is envisaged to characterize ITER diagnostic neutral beam system and to establish the functionality of its eight inductively coupled RF plasma driver based negative hydrogen ion source and its beamline components. The beam quality mainly depends on the ion source performance and therefore, its diagnostics plays an important role for its safe and optimized operation. A number of diagnostics are planned in INTF to characterize the ion source performance. Negative ions and its cesium contents in the source will be monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and cavity ring down spectroscopy. Plasma near the extraction region will be studied using standard electrostatic probes. The beam divergence and negative ion stripping losses are planned to be measured using Doppler shift spectroscopy. During initial phase of ion beam characterization, carbon fiber composite based infrared imaging diagnostics will be used. Safe operation of the beam will be ensured by using standard thermocouples and electrical voltage-current measurement sensors. A novel concept, based on plasma density dependent plasma impedance measurement using RF electrical impedance matching parameters to characterize the RF driver plasma, will be tested in INTF and will be validated with OES data. The paper will discuss about the overview of the complete INTF diagnostics including its present status of procurement, experimentation, interface with mechanical systems in INTF, and integration with INTF data acquisition and control systems. PMID:26932078

  7. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  8. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, James Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  9. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented. PMID:24593637

  10. Tailored ion energy distributions on plasma electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2013-09-15

    As microelectronic device features continue to shrink approaching atomic dimensions, control of the ion energy distribution on the substrate during plasma etching and deposition becomes increasingly critical. The ion energy should be high enough to drive ion-assisted etching, but not too high to cause substrate damage or loss of selectivity. In many cases, a nearly monoenergetic ion energy distribution (IED) is desired to achieve highly selective etching. In this work, the author briefly reviews: (1) the fundamentals of development of the ion energy distribution in the sheath and (2) methods to control the IED on plasma electrodes. Such methods include the application of “tailored” voltage waveforms on an electrode in continuous wave plasmas, or the application of synchronous bias on a “boundary electrode” during a specified time window in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas.

  11. On a simulation of ion confinement in ECRIS plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2002-02-01

    A particle-in-cell code has been developed for modeling the charged particle three-dimensional dynamics in the magnetic field of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The code incorporates the leap-frog particle pusher and Takizuka-Abé's method for simulating the small-angle Coulomb collisions between the ions. Ionization dynamics and electron-ion heating are also included. The code has been used to estimate ion confinement times in the ECRIS plasma due to ion-ion collisions. Good agreement has been obtained with results from the gas-dynamic trapping model. The charge state distributions (CSD) of extracted argon ions were obtained under different boundary conditions, and good agreement is achieved with experimentally observed CSD. It was shown that the geometry of atom fluxes inside the source chamber plays an important role in determining the electron cyclotron resonance plasma parameters. Generally, ion temperatures were obtained to be around 0.5 eV, and ion confinement times are in a range 0.2-1 ms for the typical parameters of ECRIS plasma.

  12. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.

    1979-10-25

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employing crossed electric and magnetic fields, separates the electrons from the ions as they are extracted from the ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90/sup 0/ to each other, the electrons remain at approximately the electrical potential at which they were generated. The electromagnetic forces cause the ions to be accelerated to the full accelerating supply voltage energy while being deflected through an angle of less than 90/sup 0/. The electrons precess out of the accelerating field region into an electron recovery region where they are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply energy. It is possible, by this method, to collect > 90% of the electrons extracted along with the negative ions from a negative ion source beam at < 4% of full energy.

  13. Ion composition measurement techniques for space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, George

    1990-01-01

    Plasmas found in space range from the solar wind with a typical temperature of 100,000-1,000,000 K, about 400 km/s bulk flow speed, and high ionization (charge states) of ions, to the hot, slowly moving plasmas in the outer magnetospheres of the giant planets, to the cold, corotating plasmas in inner magnetospheres. Space plasma instruments and techniques are reviewed, with an emphasis on hot plasma composition measurements. Starting with Faraday Cup detectors some 30 years ago, plasma instruments have evolved to the present time-of-flight systems with excellent mass resolution and three-dimensional viewing capabilities.

  14. Hollow target magnetron-sputter-type solid material ion source.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, D; Ieki, S; Kasuya, T; Wada, M

    2012-02-01

    A thin-walled aluminum (Al) hollow electrode has been inserted into an ion source to serve as an electrode for a radio frequency magnetron discharge. The produced plasma stabilized by argon (Ar) gas sputters the Al electrode to form a beam of Al(+) and Ar(+) ions. The total beam current extracted through a 3 mm diameter extraction hole has been 50 μA, with the Al(+) ion beam occupying 30% of the total beam current. PMID:22380320

  15. Hollow target magnetron-sputter-type solid material ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, D.; Ieki, S.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    A thin-walled aluminum (Al) hollow electrode has been inserted into an ion source to serve as an electrode for a radio frequency magnetron discharge. The produced plasma stabilized by argon (Ar) gas sputters the Al electrode to form a beam of Al{sup +} and Ar{sup +} ions. The total beam current extracted through a 3 mm diameter extraction hole has been 50 {mu}A, with the Al{sup +} ion beam occupying 30% of the total beam current.

  16. Application of a compact microwave ion source to radiocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R. J.; Reden, K. F. von; Hayes, J. M.; Wills, J. S. C.

    1999-04-26

    The compact, high current, 2.45 GHz microwave-driven plasma ion source which was built for the Chalk River TASCC facility is presently being adapted for testing as a gas ion source for accelerator mass spectrometry, at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution accelerator mass spectrometer. The special requirements for producing carbon-ion beams from micromole quantities of carbon dioxide produced from environmental samples will be discussed. These samples will be introduced into the ion source by means of argon carrier gas and a silicon capillary injection system. Following the extraction of positive ions from the source, negative ion formation in a charge exchange vapor will effectively remove the argon from the carbon beam. Simultaneous injection of the three carbon isotopes into the accelerator is planned.

  17. Chaotic ion motion in magnetosonic plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varvoglis, H.

    1984-01-01

    The motion of test ions in a magnetosonic plasma wave is considered, and the 'stochasticity threshold' of the wave's amplitude for the onset of chaotic motion is estimated. It is shown that for wave amplitudes above the stochasticity threshold, the evolution of an ion distribution can be described by a diffusion equation with a diffusion coefficient D approximately equal to 1/v. Possible applications of this process to ion acceleration in flares and ion beam thermalization are discussed.

  18. Offline Ion Source Developments for the BECOLA Facility at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Andrew; Mantica, Paul; Minamisono, Kei

    2013-04-01

    Singly-charged beams of the stable isotope(s) of K, Ca, Mn, and Fe have been produced using either a commercial plasma ion source or a home-built electron ionization source for the BEam COoler and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University. For each element, collinear laser spectroscopy was performed to confirm the presence of the respective element. Production of stable ion beams for a given element is necessary to obtain reference hyperfine spectra of species with known electromagnetic moments before such nuclear properties can be deduced from the laser hyperfine-structure measurements of rare isotopes that are planned at NSCL. The results from the commissioning tests of the plasma and electron ionization sources will be presented, and development of a new Penning Ion Gauge (PIG) ion source will be discussed.

  19. Electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion plasma waves in a symmetric pair-ion plasma cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kono, M; Vranjes, J; Batool, N

    2014-03-14

    Complicated wave behavior observed in the cylindrical pair-ion (fullerene) experiments by Oohara and co-workers are now identified to be low harmonic ion cyclotron waves combined with ion plasma oscillations inherent to kinetic theory. The electrostatic dispersion equation derived is based on an approximation for the current from the exact solutions of the characteristic cylindrical geometry form of the Vlasov plasma equation in a uniform magnetized plasma cylinder surrounded by a larger metal boundary outside a vacuum gap, which thus differs from that in unbounded plasmas. Positive and negative ions, differing only in the sign of their charge, respond to a potential in the same time scale and cooperate to reflect the enhanced kinetic orbital behaviors to the macroscopic propagation characteristics. In addition, the experimental value of the Larmor radius (comparable to the discharge radius but small enough to make the analytic approximation useful) makes higher harmonic ion cyclotron effects both observable and calculable with the appropriate approximation for the kinetic theory. PMID:24679299

  20. Molecular and negative ion production by a standard electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Juhasz, Z.; Sulik, B.

    2012-02-15

    Molecular and negative ion beams, usually produced in special ion sources, play an increasingly important role in fundamental and applied atomic physics. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a standard ECR ion source, designed to provide highly charged ion (HCI) plasmas and beams. In the present work, H{sup -}, O{sup -}, OH{sup -}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, C{sup -}, C{sub 60}{sup -} negative ions and H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +} positive molecular ions were generated in this HCI-ECRIS. Without any major modification in the source and without any commonly applied tricks (such as usage of cesium or magnetic filter), negative ion beams of several {mu}A and positive molecular ion beams in the mA range were successfully obtained.

  1. Ion optics of RHIC electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2012-02-15

    RHIC electron beam ion source has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  2. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  3. Ion thruster charge-exchange plasma flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Gabriel, S. B.; Kitamura, S.

    1982-01-01

    The electron bombardment ion thruster has been under development for a number of years and during this time, studies of the plasmas produced by the thrusters and their interactions with spacecraft have been evaluated, based on available data. Due to diagnostic techniques used and facility effects, there is uncertainty as to the reliability of data from these early studies. This paper presents data on the flow of the charge-exchange plasma produced just downstream of the thruster's ion optics. The 'end-effect' of a cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to determine ion density and directed ion velocity. Results are compared with data obtained from a retarding potential analyzer-Faraday cup.

  4. Characteristics of the Berkeley multicusp ion source.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, K W; Leung, K N

    1979-11-01

    The performance of a cubical permanent magnet generated line-cusp ion source has been investigated for use with neutral beam injectors. This source has been operated with discharge currents greater than 500 A and ion current densities higher than 400 mA/cm2 at the extraction grid. The uniformity of the density profile across the extraction area is found to be dependent on the gas pressure. By using a fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit, the electron temperature and the plasma density and potential have been analyzed for different discharge powers and gas pressures. The heat load on the plasma grid when it is electrically floating or connected to the negative cathode has been compared calorimetrically. The use of lanthanum hexaboride and impregnated oxide cathodes have been investigated for the purpose of long pulse operation. The phenomenon of mode flipping is found to occur quite frequently during a discharge with these magnetic-field-free cathodes. Species composition as a function of discharge power and chamber length is measured by a mass spectrometer. PMID:18699390

  5. Ion plasma wave and its instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2014-04-15

    Some essential features of the ion plasma wave in both kinetic and fluid descriptions are presented. The wave develops at wavelengths shorter than the electron Debye radius. Thermal motion of electrons at this scale is such that they overshoot the electrostatic potential perturbation caused by ion bunching, which consequently propagates as an unshielded wave, completely unaffected by electron dynamics. So in the simplest fluid description, the electrons can be taken as a fixed background. However, in the presence of magnetic field and for the electron gyro-radius shorter than the Debye radius, electrons can participate in the wave and can increase its damping rate. This is determined by the ratio of the electron gyro-radius and the Debye radius. In interpenetrating plasmas (when one plasma drifts through another), the ion plasma wave can easily become growing and this growth rate is quantitatively presented for the case of an argon plasma.

  6. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  7. Dense Metal Plasma in a Solenoid for Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-10-30

    Space-charge neutralization is required to compress and focus a pulsed, high-current ion beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described approaches to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary space-charge compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means, by an array of movable Langmuir probes, by a small single probe, and by evaluating Stark broadening of the Balmer H beta spectral line. In the main approach described here, the plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. It is shown that the plasma is essentially hollow, as determined by the structure of the magnetic field, though the plasma density exceeds 1014 cm-3 in practically all zones of the solenoid volume if the ring electrode is placed a few centimeters off the center of the solenoid. The plasma is non-uniform and fluctuating, however, since its density exceeds the ion beam density it is believed that this approach could provide a practical solution to the space charge neutralization challenge.

  8. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga+ liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga+ ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga+ and Au+ ion beams will be reported as well.

  9. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2012-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  10. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Li, L H; Liu, H T; Yu, K M; Xu, Y; Zuo, X J; Zhu, P Z; Ma, Y F; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering. PMID:24985818

  11. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H.; Liu, H. T.; Yu, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  12. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Yu, K. M.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-15

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  13. A low-energy linear oxygen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2007-01-08

    A new version of a Constricted Plasma Source is described,characterized by all metal-ceramic construction, a linear slit exit of180 mm length, and cw-operation (typically 50 kHz) at an average power of1.5 kW. The plasma source is here operated with oxygen gas, producingstreaming plasma that contains mainly positive molecular and atomic ions,and to a much lesser degree, negative ions. The maximum total ion currentobtained was about 0.5 A. The fraction of atomic ions reached more than10 percent of all ions when the flow rate was less then 10 sccm O2,corresponding to a chamber pressure of about 0.5 Pa for the selectedpumping speed. The energy distribution functions of the different ionspecies were measured with a combinedmass spectrometer and energyanalyzer. The time-averaged distribution functions were broad and rangedfrom about 30eV to 90 eV at 200 kHz and higher frequencies, while theywere only several eV broad at 50 kHz and lower frequencies, with themaximum located at about 40 eV for the grounded anode case. This maximumwas shifted down to about 7 eV when the anode was floating, indicatingthe important role of the plasma potential for the ion energy for a givensubstrate potential. The source could be scaled to greater length and maybe useful for functionalization of surfaces and plasma-assisteddeposition of compound films.

  14. ACCELERATORS Control system for the CSNS ion source test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-Hua; Li, Gang; Ouyang, Hua-Fu

    2010-12-01

    A penning plasma surface H- ion source test stand for the CSNS has just been constructed at the IHEP. In order to achieve a safe and reliable system, nearly all devices of the ion source are designed to have the capability of both local and remote operation function. The control system consists of PLCs and EPICS real-time software tools separately serving device control and monitoring, PLC integration and OPI support. This paper summarizes the hardware and software implementation satisfying the requirements of the ion source control system.

  15. Computer Simulation of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Masaaki; Nakadate, Hiroshi; Nakao, Setsuo; Miyagawa, Soji

    By using a newly developed simulation program "PEGASUS", plasma behavior was analyzed for the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). For plasma analysis of low pressure gas which is used in PIII&D, the software uses a particle in cell (PIC) method for the analysis of electric and magnetic fields and the motion of charged particles. A Monte Carlo collision method is used for collisions of ions, electrons and neutrals in the plasma, and the dynamic-SASAMAL code is used for the ion-solid surface interactions. Spatial distributions of potential, electron density and ion density together with the ion flux distribution on the target surface were calculated for the case where a negative pulse voltage was applied to a trench shaped target immersed in a high density Ar plasma (1010 cm-3). The time evolution of sheath length obtained by the simulations for a flat plane part of the surface agreed with the analytical result obtained by the Child-Langmuir method. In a bipolar pulse PIII&D system, a positive and a negative pulse voltages are applied alternately to a workpiece without any other external plasma source. Simulation has been conducted for a target immersed in a very low density Ar plasma (107 cm-3) to compare the plasma generated by a negative and a positive pulse voltage applied to the target. When a negative pulse voltage is applied to the target, only a weak plasma is generated. In contrast to it, when a positive pulse voltage is applied, a two-order or more high density plasma is generated under the same condition. The plasma behavior around a trench shaped target is also presented.

  16. Ion beams from laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. H.; Anderson, R. J.; Gray, L. G.; Rosenfeld, J. P.; Manka, C. K.; Carruth, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the space-charge-limited beams produced by the plasma blowoffs generated by 20-MW bursts of 1.06-micron radiation from an active Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Laser power densities near 10 to the 11th/sq cm on solid targets generate thermalized plasma plumes which drift to a 15-kV gridded extraction gap where the ions are extracted, accelerated, and electrostatically focused; the spatially defined ion beams are then magnetically analyzed to determine the charge state content in the beams formed from carbon, aluminum, copper, and lead targets. This technique preserves time-of-flight (TOF) information in the plasma drift region, which permits plasma ion temperatures and mass flow velocities to be determined from the Maxwellian ion curve TOF shapes for the individual charge species.

  17. rf-driven ion sources for industrial applications (invited) (abstract)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-02-01

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been developing rf-driven ion sources for the last two decades. These sources are being used to generate both positive and negative ion beams. Some of these sources are operating in particle accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, while others are being employed in various industrial ion beam systems. There are four areas where the rf-driven ion sources are commonly used in industry. (1) In semiconductor manufacturing, rf-driven sources have found important applications in plasma etching, ion beam implantation, and ion beam lithography. (2) In material analysis and surface modification, miniature rf-ion sources can be found in focused ion beam systems. They can provide ion beams of essentially any element in the Periodic Table. The newly developed combined rf ion-electron beam unit improves greatly the performance of the secondary ion mass spectrometry tool. (3) For neutron production, rf ion source is a major component of compact, high flux D-D, D-T, or T-T neutron generators. These neutron sources are now being employed in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as well as in neutron imaging and material interrogation. (4) Large area rf-driven ion source will be used in an industrial design neutral beam diagnostic system for probing fusion plasmas. Such sources can be easily scaled to provide large ion beam current for future fusion reactor applications.

  18. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy,and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Kwan, J. W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons - can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion - ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  19. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1]could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  20. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    L. Grisham and J.W. Kwan

    2008-08-12

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1] could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.