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Sample records for plasma source mass

  1. Conditioning of ion sources for mass spectrometry of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Mass spectrometry is a useful diagnostic technique for monitoring plasma species and plasma-surface interactions. In order to maximize the sensitivity of measurements of hydrogen-fueled fusion plasmas or hydrogen-based discharge cleaning and etching plasmas, the ion sources of mass spectrometers are operated at or near the high pressure limit of 10/sup -4/ Torr (10/sup -2/ Pa). Such high ambient pressures of hydrogen give rise to high background levels of residual gases such as H/sub 2/O, CO, and CH/sub 4/, due to surface reactions on the ion source electrodes. For a commonly used ion source configuration, the residual gas production is a linear function of the ambient H/sub 2/ pressure. Hydrogen conditioning can reduce the absolute residual gas levels. Steady-state residual gas production is observed in a conditioned ion source, which is related to a balance of diffusion and sorption on the electrode surfaces.

  2. Mass analyzer ``MASHA'' high temperature target and plasma ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchenkov, A. G.; Rassadov, D. N.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bystrov, V. A.; Chizov, A. Yu.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Efremov, A. A.; Guljaev, A. V.; Kozulin, E. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Starodub, G. Ya.; Voskresensky, V. M.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Paschenko, S. V.; Zelenak, A.; Tikhonov, V. I.

    2004-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer of super heavy atoms (MASHA) has been created at the FLNR JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10-3. First experiments with the FEBIAD plasma ion source have been done and give an efficiency of ionization of up to 20% for Kr with a low flow test leak (6 particle μA). We suppose a magnetic field optimization, using the additional electrode (einzel lens type) in the extracting system, and an improving of the vacuum conditions in order to increase the ion source efficiency.

  3. Unbalance magnetron plasma source for ion mass-separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperny, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.; Astrakchantsev, N. V.; Lebedev, N. V.

    2014-11-01

    The report presents the results of the preliminary studies characteristics of an unbalanced magnetron plasma source supplied with the transport system based on a curved magnetic field. The aim of these studies was to recognize if the system is suitable, in principle, for mass-separation of a multi-component plasma flow. The magnetron source has 50 mm diameter cathode manufactured of an alloy composed of Cu (64%), Pb (22.5%) and admixtures, about of 14% (Al, Zn, C). By means of an immersion time-of-flight spectrometer, a spatial distribution of ions of the cathode material was measured through the system output cross-section. Distribution of atom of these elements was measured here by the X-ray fluorescence spectrometry as well. Both methods showed that the ions of the lighter element (Cu) were concentrated in the inner part of the plasma flow deflected by the magnetic field while the distribution of the heavy element (Pb) was shifted toward the outer area of the flow. The similar effect was observed for each couple of the elements. Such a system is promising for use in plasma technology of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, namely for separation heavy radioactive fission product from nuclear waste.

  4. Plasma Ion Sources for Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources using direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) plasma have been developed in this thesis work. These ion sources can provide stable discharge currents of ~ 1 mA, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the corona discharge, a widely used API source. The plasmas can be generated and maintained in 1 atm of various buffer gases by applying -500 to -1000 V (DC plasma) or 1-15 W with a frequency of 165 kHz (RF plasma) on the needle electrode. These ion sources have been used with liquid injection to detect various organic compounds of pharmaceutical, biotechnological and environmental interest. Key features of these ion sources include soft ionization with the protonated molecule as the largest peak, and superb sensitivity with detection limits in the low picogram or femtomole range and a linear dynamic range over ~4 orders of magnitude. The RF plasma has advantages over the DC plasma in its ability to operate in various buffer gases and to produce a more stable plasma. Factors influencing the performance of the ion sources have been studied, including RF power level, liquid flow rate, chamber temperature, solvent composition, and voltage affecting the collision induced dissociation (CID). Ionization of hydrocarbons by the RF plasma API source was also studied. Soft ionization is generally produced. To obtain high sensitivity, the ion source must be very dry and the needle-to-orifice distance must be small. Nitric oxide was used to enhance the sensitivity. The RF plasma source was then used for the analysis of hydrocarbons in auto emissions. Comparisons between the corona discharge and the RF plasma have been made in terms of discharge current, ion residence time, and the ion source model. The RF plasma source provides larger linear dynamic range and higher sensitivity than the corona discharge, due to its much larger discharge current. The RF plasma was also observed to provide longer ion residence times and was not

  5. Comparison of Three Plasma Sources for Ambient Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Kirsty; Salter, Tara L.; Bowfield, Andrew; Walsh, James L.; Gilmore, Ian S.; Bradley, James W.

    2014-09-01

    Plasma-based desorption/ionization sources are an important ionization technique for ambient surface analysis mass spectrometry. In this paper, we compare and contrast three competing plasma based desorption/ionization sources: a radio-frequency (rf) plasma needle, a dielectric barrier plasma jet, and a low-temperature plasma probe. The ambient composition of the three sources and their effectiveness at analyzing a range of pharmaceuticals and polymers were assessed. Results show that the background mass spectrum of each source was dominated by air species, with the rf needle producing a richer ion spectrum consisting mainly of ionized water clusters. It was also seen that each source produced different ion fragments of the analytes under investigation: this is thought to be due to different substrate heating, different ion transport mechanisms, and different electric field orientations. The rf needle was found to fragment the analytes least and as a result it was able to detect larger polymer ions than the other sources.

  6. Plasma-based ambient sampling/ionization/transmission integrated source for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Ning; Li, Yafeng; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Chen, Yongtai; Nie, Zongxiu

    2014-11-01

    Better sensitivity and interface of ambient sampling/ionization mass spectrometry remain a challenge. Herein, a novel, plasma-based, ambient sampling/ionization/transmission (PASIT) integrated source in a pin-to-funnel configuration was developed for the sensitive analysis of complex samples. With the funnel sleeve directly affected by direct-current discharge plasma, PASIT combines the ability to sample/ionize analyte molecules and then efficiently collect/transport charged mass species under atmospheric pressure and consequently shows an improved sensitivity. The integrated source enhances the signal intensity by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with the previous pin-to-plate plasma source without significant background addition. A surface limit of detection (LOD) of 130 fmol mm-(2) (S/N = 3) has been achieved for clenbuterol on filter paper with an argon carrier gas. Demonstrated applications include the direct determination of active ingredients from drugs and symbolic compounds from natural plants and cholesterol from mouse brain tissue sections. PMID:25147876

  7. Afterglow of a microwave microstrip plasma as an ion source for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; White, Allen; Broekaert, José A. C.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    A microwave-induced plasma that was previously used for optical emission spectrometry has been repurposed as an afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry. This compact microwave discharge, termed the microstrip plasma (MSP), is operated at 20-50 W and 2.45 GHz in helium at a flow of 300 mL/min. The primary background ions present in the afterglow are ionized and protonated water clusters. An exponential dilution chamber was used to introduce volatile organic compounds into the MSP afterglow and yielded limits of detection in the 40 ppb to 7 ppm range (v/v). A hydride-generation system was also utilized for detection of volatile hydride-forming elements (arsenic, antimony, tin) in the afterglow and produced limits of detection in the 10-100 ppb range in solution. The MSP afterglow was found capable of desorption and ionization of analyte species directly from a solid substrate, suggesting its use as an ion source for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  8. Osmium isotopic ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.; Date, A.R.

    1987-04-01

    The isotopic composition of nanogram quantities of osmium was measured by using an inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometer. Sensitivity was enhanced a factor of approx.100 by the use of an osmium tetraoxide vapor generator rather than nebulization of solution. For samples less than or equal to5 ng, the ratios /sup 190/Os//sup 192/Os, /sup 189/Os//sup 192/Os, and /sup 188/Os//sup 192/Os were determined to better than +/- 0.5% (1sigma/sub m/) precision. For the minor isotopes, the ratios /sup 187/Os//sup 192/Os and /sup 186/Os//sup 192/Os were determined to +/-1%, and /sup 184/Os//sup 192/Os (4 x 10/sup -4/) was determined to approx.10%. Isotope ratios for common osmium are reported.

  9. Recent developments in inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, A.N.; Lee, Der-Chuen; Christensen, J.C.; Jones, C.E.; Hall, C.M.; Yi, Wen; Teagle, D.; Walder, A.J.; Freedman, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes advances in isotopic measurements that have been made with an inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometer and presents results of new experiments aimed at further evaluating the instrument`s capability. It is shown using standard solutions that trace element ratios such as Rb/Sr can be measured precisely without isotope dilution by comparison with reference solutions of known composition. Similarly, using a new wide flight tube, Pb isotopic compositions and U/Pb ratios can be accurately measured simultaneously without isotope dilution. The effects of deliberately inducing changes in the running conditions (RF power) are shown to be significant for measuring trace element ratios but not for mass bias and interference corrected isotopic compositions. Finally, it is demonstrated that precise and accurate isotopic compositions of elements as refractory as W can be determined relatively easily by solution nebulization and even by direct laser ablation of complex silicates. Isobaric interferences in such experiments are negligible. These experiments serve to highlight the remarkable potential that this new field offers for hitherto difficult isotopic measurements in nuclear, earth, environmental and medical sciences. Isotopic measurements can be made that are reproducible at high precision through a range of running conditions, even in the presence of isobaric interferences. The ability to correct for mass discrimination accurately using a second element of similar mass, the very high sensitivity for elements that are otherwise difficult to ionize, the demonstrated capability for laser ablation work and the ability to measure through a wide mass range simultaneously give this instrument major advantages over other more traditional techniques of isotopic measurement.

  10. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  11. Characterization of a Sealed Americium-Beryllium (AmBe) Source by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    James Sommers; Marcos Jimenez; Mary Adamic; Jeffrey Giglio; Kevin Carney

    2009-12-01

    Two Americium-Beryllium neutron sources were dismantled, sampled (sub-sampled) and analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Characteristics such as “age” since purification, actinide content, trace metal content and inter and intra source composition were determined. The “age” since purification of the two sources was determined to be 25.0 and 25.4 years, respectively. The systematic errors in the “age” determination were ± 4 % 2s. The amount and isotopic composition of U and Pu varied substantially between the sub-samples of Source 2 (n=8). This may be due to the physical means of sub-sampling or the way the source was manufactured. Source 1 was much more consistent in terms of content and isotopic composition (n=3 sub-samples). The Be-Am ratio varied greatly between the two sources. Source 1 had an Am-Be ratio of 6.3 ± 52 % (1s). Source 2 had an Am-Be ratio of 9.81 ± 3.5 % (1s). In addition, the trace element content between the samples varied greatly. Significant differences were determined between Source 1 and 2 for Sc, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ba and W.

  12. Chemometric optimization of a low-temperature plasma source design for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Anastasia; Engelhard, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature plasmas (LTPs) are attractive sources for atomic and molecular mass spectrometry (MS). In the past, the LTP probe, which was first described by Harper et al., was used successfully for direct molecular mass spectrometric analysis with minimal sample pretreatment in a variety of applications. Unfortunately, the desorption/ionization source itself is commercially not available and custom-built LTP set-ups with varying geometry and operational configurations were utilized in the past. In the present study, a rapid chemometrics approach based on systematic experiments and multivariate data analysis was used to optimize the LTP probe geometry and positioning relative to the atmospheric-pressure inlet of a mass spectrometer. Several parameters were studied including the probe geometry, electrode configuration, quartz tube dimensions, probe positioning and operating conditions. It was found that the plasma-to-MS-inlet distance, the plasma-to-sample-plate distance, and the angle between the latter are very important. Additional effects on the analytical performance were found for the outer electrode width, the positioning of the electrodes, the inner diameter of the quartz tube, the quartz wall thickness, and the gas flow. All experiments were performed using additional heating of the sample to enhance thermal desorption and maximize the signal (T = 150 °C). After software-assisted optimization, attractive detection limits were achieved (e.g., 1.8 × 10- 7 mol/L for 4-acetamidothiophenol). Moreover, relative standard deviation (RSD) improved from values of up to 30% before optimization to < 15% RSD after the procedure was completed. This chemometrics approach for method optimization is not limited to LTP-MS and considered to be attractive for other plasma-based instrumentation as well.

  13. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Ray, Steven J; Enke, Christie G; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector-the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26552388

  14. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector—the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups.

  15. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectrometric Isotopic Determination of Nuclear Wastes Sources Associated with Hanford Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, John C.; Dresel, P. Evan; Farmer, Orville T.

    2007-11-01

    The subsurface distribution of a nuclear waste tank leak on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site was sampled by slant drilling techniques in order to characterize the chemical and radiological characteristics of the leaked material and assess geochemical transport properties of hazardous constituents. Sediment core samples recovered from the borehole were subjected to distilled water and acid leaching procedures with the resulting leachates analyzed for isotopic and chemical signatures. High-sensitivity inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) techniques were used for determination of isotopic ratios for Cs, I, Mo. Analysis of the isotopic patterns of I and Mo combined with associated chemical data showed evidence for at least two separate intrusions of nuclear waste into the subsurface. Isotopic data for Cs was inconclusive with respect to a source attribution signature.

  16. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED ARGON PLASMA AS AN ION SOURCE FOR MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solution aerosols are injected into an inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) to generate a relatively high number density of positive ions derived from elemental constituents. A small fraction of these ions is extracted through a sampling orifice into a differentially pumped vac...

  17. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27291826

  18. Evaluation of a fourth-generation focal plane camera for use in plasma-source mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, Jeremy A.; Schilling, G. D.; Ray, Steven J.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M. Bonner; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2010-10-18

    A fourth-generation focal plane camera containing 1696 Faraday-strip detectors was fitted to a Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrograph and characterized for its performance with inductively coupled plasma ionization. The camera provides limits of detection in the single to tens of ng L-1 range for most elements and has a linear dynamic range of at least nine orders of magnitude. Isotope-ratio precision better than 0.02% has also been achieved with this device, and this fourth-generation system features the broadest simultaneous mass range obtainable to date with this family of focal plane camera detectors.

  19. Large area plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor); Patterson, Michael (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An all permanent magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance, large diameter (e.g., 40 cm) plasma source suitable for ion/plasma processing or electric propulsion, is capable of producing uniform ion current densities at its exit plane at very low power (e.g., below 200 W), and is electrodeless to avoid sputtering or contamination issues. Microwave input power is efficiently coupled with an ionizing gas without using a dielectric microwave window and without developing a throat plasma by providing a ferromagnetic cylindrical chamber wall with a conical end narrowing to an axial entrance hole for microwaves supplied on-axis from an open-ended waveguide. Permanent magnet rings are attached inside the wall with alternating polarities against the wall. An entrance magnet ring surrounding the entrance hole has a ferromagnetic pole piece that extends into the chamber from the entrance hole to a continuing second face that extends radially across an inner pole of the entrance magnet ring.

  20. Development of C{sub 60} plasma ion source for time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Qing; Chen Ye; Ji Lili; Hahto, Sami; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won

    2008-02-15

    Initial data from a multicusp ion source developed for buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}) cluster ion production are reported in this article. A C{sub 60}{sup +} beam current of 425 nA and a C{sub 60}{sup -} beam current of 200 nA are obtainable in continuous mode. Compared to prior work using electron impact ionization, the multicusp ion source provides at least two orders of magnitude increase in the extractable C{sub 60}{sup +} beam current. Mass spectra for both positive and negative bismuth cluster ions generated by the multicusp ion source are also included.

  1. Cd Isotopic Composition Measured by Plasma Source Mass Spectrometry on Natural and Anthropogenic Materials. A Preliminary Outline of Cd Isotope Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocent, C.

    2004-05-01

    Cadmium is a trace metal that is used as a geochemical tracer of natural processes, like biological productivity and paleoproductivity, and also of anthropogenic pollution, as Cd is known to be a toxic heavy metal that has become a major environmental and health concern. For these purposes, an outstanding issue is to determine whether Cd, like a number of metallic elements (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo, Tl), may display variable isotopic compositions in natural and/or industrial compounds. It is known that Cd may display variable isotopic composition. Indeed, isotopic fractionation processes have been documented in some meteorites and in lunar soils. Consequently, due to its relatively low boiling point (767\\deg C) and also to the large mass range covered by its isotopes (10 mass units), Cd might fractionate isotopically, for example during the outpouring of acidic volcanic magmas and/or the emplacement of granitoids. On another hand, isotopic fractionation could also occur during human activities like refuse incineration or industrial manufacturing, for instance. Finally, biologically-induced isotopic fractionation should not be ruled out, as it is clearly evidenced for other metals, like Fe. A high precision method has been developed for determining the isotopic composition of Cd by plasma source mass spectrometry (Neptune). This method holds on the standard-bracketing technique, owing to the availability of Cd solutions of known isotopic composition provided by the University of M\\H{u}nster. This allows to correct precisely for mass fractionation that occurs in the plasma source mass spectrometer. It is also critical for the analysis to be possible to work with Cd solutions of very high purity. Chemical isolation of Cd involves 3 steps, and may be also suitable for Cd isotopic measurements using solid source mass spectrometry. Preliminary results suggest that Cd is likely to fractionate during smelting activities, as indicated by measurements on mining waste. The

  2. Io Plasma Torus: Nature of the Iogenic Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M. L.; Smyth, W. H.

    1996-09-01

    The primary source of plasma for Jupiter's magnetosphere is supplied internally by Io, the innermost Galilean satellite. The Iogenic plasma source is created by gases (e.g., Na, K, O, S, and SO_2) lost from Io as they undergo electron impact and charge exchange reactions in the plasma torus. This Iogenic plasma source provides mass, momentum, pick-up electrical conductivity, and energy to the plasma torus. The three-dimensional nature of the Iogenic plasma source is an important input quantity (1) in local studies to understand the plasma torus properties (density, composition, subcorotational motion, electric currents, and temperature) and the plasma torus near-Io MHD flow and atmosphere interactions, and (2) in more global studies to understand the spacetime structure of the outward transport dynamics of the plasma torus, such as in RCM-J (Rice Convection Model for Jupiter) calculations. To elucidate and quantify the nature of the Iogenic plasma source for such studies, we have undertaken simulations of it using the AER neutral cloud models. Calculations will be presented to illustrate the spacetime nature of the Iogenic plasma source and to estimate the net-mass, momentum and energy input rates to the plasma torus and the height-integrated electrical conductivity near Io and in Jupiter's ionosphere. These calculations show that the instantaneous Iogenic plasma source is highly peaked at Io's position in the plasma torus and that its rates vary significantly with Io System III longitude and also with Io phase angle because of the east-west electric field. For the lower-velocity escape of gases by incomplete collisional cascade processes (i.e., plasma torus ion sputtering), contributions to the instantaneous Iogenic plasma source are primarily confined to a broader (but still limited) spatial region in L-shell and System III longitude angle near Io. For the higher-velocity loss of gases by charge exchange, contributions to the Iogenic plasma source are more

  3. Ferromagnetic enhanced inductive plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyak, Valery

    2013-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the review of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources enhanced with ferromagnetic cores, FMICP, found in various applications, including plasma fusion, space propulsion, light sources, plasma chemistry and plasma processing of materials. The history of FMICP, early attempts for their realization, some recent developments and examples of successful FMICP devices are given here. A comparative study of FMICPs with conventional ICPs demonstrates their certain advantages in power transfer efficiency, power factor and their ability to operate without rf plasma potentials at low plasma densities and with small gaps, while effectively controlling plasma density profile.

  4. The Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.; Ohkawa, T.; Agnew, S. F.; Cluggish, B. P.; Freeman, R. L.; Gilleland, J.; Putvinski, S.; Sevier, L.; Umstadter, K. R.

    2001-10-01

    Archimedes Technology Group is developing a plasma technology, called the Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter, which can separate a waste mixture ion by ion into mass groups and as such represents a major advance in waste separations technology. The filter is a plasma device employing a magnetic and electric field configuration that acts as a low-mass-pass filter for ions. Ions with mass above a tunable “cutoff mass” are expelled from the plasma. The Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter satisfies all of the requirements of an economic mass separator system: good single-pass separation, acceptable energy cost per ion, and high material throughput. This technology could significantly reduce the volume of radioactive waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, which is storing sixty percent of the nation’s defense nuclear waste. The potential waste reduction is dramatic because 82 wtpresently scheduled to be vitrified (immobilized and stored in glass) at Hanford are below mass number 60 while 99.9the radioactivity comes from atoms above mass number 89. We will present the plasma physics basis for the filter effect, the fundamental parameter constraints, and modeling results of filter operation.

  5. Quantification and remote detection of nitro explosives by helium plasma ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS) on a modified atmospheric pressure source designed for electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihua; Pavlov, Julius; Attygalle, Athula B

    2012-07-01

    Helium Plasma Ionization (HePI) generates gaseous negative ions upon exposure of vapors emanating from organic nitro compounds. A simple adaptation converts any electrospray ionization source to a HePI source by passing helium through the sample delivery metal capillary held at a negative potential. Compared with the demands of other He-requiring ambient pressure ionization sources, the consumption of helium by the HePI source is minimal (20-30 ml/min). Quantification experiments conducted by exposing solid deposits to a HePI source revealed that 1 ng of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on a filter paper (about 0.01 ng/mm(2)) could be detected by this method. When vapor emanating from a 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) sample was subjected to helium plasma ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS), a peak was observed at m/z 268 for (RDX●NO(2))(-). This facile formation of NO(2)(-) adducts was noted without the need of any extra additives as dopants. Quantitative evaluations showed RDX detection by HePI-MS to be linear over at least three orders of magnitude. TNT samples placed even 5 m away from the source were detected when the sample headspace vapor was swept by a stream of argon or nitrogen and delivered to the helium plasma ion source via a metal tube. Among the tubing materials investigated, stainless steel showed the best performance for sample delivery. A system with a copper tube, and air as the carrier gas, for example, failed to deliver any detectable amount of TNT to the source. In fact, passing over hot copper appears to be a practical way of removing TNT or other nitroaromatics from ambient air. PMID:22791251

  6. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  7. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  8. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Anders, Simone; Dickinson, Michael; Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  9. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  10. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human blood collected...

  11. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  12. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  13. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  14. Vacuum arc plasma mass separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperny, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.; Lebedev, N. V.; Astrakchantsev, N. V.; Chernikch, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    The propagation of a metal plasma flow in a transport system with a curvilinear magnetic field was studied experimentally. The flow was generated by a pulsed vacuum arc discharge with a composite (W+Fe) cathode. The ion energy measurements at the transport system output showed that all ion components were accelerated up to equal energies per charge unit, about 150 eV and 320 eV in the outer and inner areas of the curved plasma flow, respectively. The spatial separation of the atoms of the cathode material was measured at the system output by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The ions of the lighter element (Fe) were concentrated in the inner part of the cathodic plasma flow deflected by the magnetic field while the distribution of the heavy element (W) was substantially shifted toward the outer area of the flow. The maximum mass separation efficiency reached 45, the effective value being 7.7. Such a system is promising for use in plasma technology for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, namely for the separation of the heavy radioactive fission product from nuclear waste.

  15. Development of a novel low-flow ion source/sampling cone geometry for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and application in hyphenated techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Thorben; Janzen, Rasmus; Steingrobe, Tobias; Sperling, Michael; Franze, Bastian; Engelhard, Carsten; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    A novel ion source/sampling cone device for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) especially operated in the hyphenated mode as a detection system coupled with different separation modules is presented. Its technical setup is described in detail. Its main feature is the very low total argon consumption of less than 1.5 L min- 1, leading to significant reduction of operational costs especially when time-consuming speciation analysis is performed. The figures of merit of the new system with respect to sensitivity, detection power, long-term stability and working range were explored. Despite the profound differences of argon consumption of the new system in comparison to the conventional ICP-MS system, many of the characteristic features of the conventional ICP-MS could be maintained to a great extent. To demonstrate the ion source's capabilities, it was used as an element-selective detector for gas (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) where organic compounds of mercury and cobalt, respectively, were separated and detected with the new low-flow ICP-MS detection system. The corresponding chromatograms are shown. The applicability for trace element analysis has been validated with the certified reference material NIST 1643e.

  16. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  17. Volumetric plasma source development and characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Starbird, Robert L.; Johnston, Mark D.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Droemer, Darryl W.; National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV

    2008-09-01

    The development of plasma sources with densities and temperatures in the 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and 1-10eV ranges which are slowly varying over several hundreds of nanoseconds within several cubic centimeter volumes is of interest for applications such as intense electron beam focusing as part of the x-ray radiography program. In particular, theoretical work [1,2] suggests that replacing neutral gas in electron beam focusing cells with highly conductive, pre-ionized plasma increases the time-averaged e-beam intensity on target, resulting in brighter x-ray sources. This LDRD project was an attempt to generate such a plasma source from fine metal wires. A high voltage (20-60kV), high current (12-45kA) capacitive discharge was sent through a 100 {micro}m diameter aluminum wire forming a plasma. The plasma's expansion was measured in time and space using spectroscopic techniques. Lineshapes and intensities from various plasma species were used to determine electron and ion densities and temperatures. Electron densities from the mid-10{sup 15} to mid-10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} were generated with corresponding electron temperatures of between 1 and 10eV. These parameters were measured at distances of up to 1.85 cm from the wire surface at times in excess of 1 {micro}s from the initial wire breakdown event. In addition, a hydrocarbon plasma from surface contaminants on the wire was also measured. Control of these contaminants by judicious choice of wire material, size, and/or surface coating allows for the ability to generate plasmas with similar density and temperature to those given above, but with lower atomic masses.

  18. Plasma discharge characteristics in compact SF6 radio-frequency plasma source for plasma etching application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Taisei; Takahashi, Kazunori; Kasashima, Yuji; Uesugi, Fumihiko; Ando, Akira

    2015-09-01

    In order to create a compact plasma etching reactor, plasma discharge characteristics in compact SF6 radio-frequency (RF) plasma source which has a chamber diameter of 40 mm have been studied. Convergent magnetic field configuration produced by a solenoid coil and a permanent magnet located behind substrate is employed for efficient plasma transport downstream of plasma source. A discharge characteristics with the changes in relative emission intensity of fluorine atom of FI at 703.7 nm in compact SF6 plasma source are discussed: the dependence of relative emission intensity on the magnetic field strength, the RF input power, and the mass flow rate of the SF6 gas. The relative emission intensity was significantly increased when the RF input power is ~150 W. We present the fundamental etching performance (especially etching rate) of compact plasma source, and then the etching rate of 0.1-1.0 μm/min was obtained under the condition of a RF input power of 50-200 W, a mass flow rate of SF6 of 5.5 sccm and a bias RF power of 20 W. The results of test etching will be shown in presentation.

  19. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-10-01

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  20. Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-08-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

  1. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-10-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  2. Helicon Plasma Source Optimization Studies for VASIMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Baity, F. W.; Barber, G. C.; Carter, M. D.; ChangDiaz, F. R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D. O.; Squire J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A helicon plasma source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is being used to investigate operating scenarios relevant to the VASIMR (VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket). These include operation at high magnetic field (> = 0.4 T), high frequency (<= 30 MHz), high power (< = 3 kW), and with light ions (He+, H+). To date, He plasmas have been produced with n(sub e0) = 1.7 x 10(exp 19)/cu m (measured with an axially movable 4mm microwave interferometer), with Pin = I kW at f = 13.56 MHz and absolute value of B(sub 0) = 0.16 T. In the near future, diagnostics including a mass flow meter and a gridded energy analyzer array will be added to investigate fueling efficiency and the source power balance. The latest results, together with modeling results using the EMIR rf code, will be presented.

  3. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-05-25

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  4. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-05-26

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  5. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Durrant, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    Laser ablation for solid sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially-resolved elemental analysis is briefly reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  7. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  8. Mass spectrometry of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große-Kreul, S.; Hübner, S.; Schneider, S.; Ellerweg, D.; von Keudell, A.; Matejčík, S.; Benedikt, J.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas (APPs) are effective source of radicals, metastables and a variety of ions and photons, ranging into the vacuum UV spectral region. A detailed study of these species is important to understand and tune desired effects during the interaction of APPs with solid or liquid materials in industrial or medical applications. In this contribution, the opportunities and challenges of mass spectrometry for detection of neutrals and ions from APPs, fundamental physical phenomena related to the sampling process and their impact on the measured densities of neutrals and fluxes of ions, will be discussed. It is shown that the measurement of stable neutrals and radicals requires a proper experimental design to reduce the beam-to-background ratio, to have little beam distortion during expansion into vacuum and to carefully set the electron energy in the ionizer to avoid radical formation through dissociative ionization. The measured ion composition depends sensitively on the degree of impurities present in the feed gas as well as on the setting of the ion optics used for extraction of ions from the expanding neutral-ion mixture. The determination of the ion energy is presented as a method to show that the analyzed ions are originating from the atmospheric pressure plasma.

  9. Preparation Of Sources For Plasma Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, William J.; Sliney, Hal; Kowalski, D.

    1993-01-01

    Multicomponent metal targets serving as sources of vapor for plasma vapor deposition made in modified pressureless-sintering process. By use of targets made in modified process, one coats components with materials previously plasma-sprayed or sintered but not plasma-vapor-deposited.

  10. SDO: Complex Mass of Plasma

    NASA Video Gallery

    A small, but complex mass of solar material gyrated and spun about over the course of 40 hours above the surface of the sun on Sept. 1-3, 2015. It was stretched and pulled back and forth by powerfu...

  11. The study of helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Miao Tingting; Shang Yong; Zhao Hongwei; Liu Zhanwen; Sun Liangting; Zhang Xuezhen; Zhao Huanyu

    2010-02-15

    Helicon plasma source is known as efficient generator of uniform and high density plasma. A helicon plasma source was developed for investigation of plasma neutralization and plasma lens in the Institute of Modern Physics in China. In this paper, the characteristics of helicon plasma have been studied by using Langmuir four-probe and a high argon plasma density up to 3.9x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} have been achieved with the Nagoya type III antenna at the conditions of the magnetic intensity of 200 G, working gas pressure of 2.8x10{sup -3} Pa, and rf power of 1200 W with a frequency of 27.12 MHz. In the experiment, the important phenomena have been found: for a given magnetic induction intensity, the plasma density became greater with the increase in rf power and tended to saturation, and the helicon mode appeared at the rf power between 200 and 400 W.

  12. The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment and Plasma Source Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Fields, S. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Young, D. T.; Burch, J. L.; Eaker, N.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; McComas, D. J.; Nordholdt, J. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Berthelier, J. J.; Robson, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) have been developed in response to the requirements of the ISTP Program for three-dimensional (3D) plasma composition measurements capable of tracking the circulation of low-energy (0-500 eV) plasma through the polar magnetosphere. This plasma is composed of penetrating magnetosheath and escaping ionospheric components. It is in part lost to the downstream solar wind and in part recirculated within the magnetosphere, participating in the formation of the diamagnetic hot plasma sheet and ring current plasma populations. Significant obstacles which have previously made this task impossible include the low density and energy of the outflowing ionospheric plasma plume and the positive spacecraft floating potentials which exclude the lowest-energy plasma from detection on ordinary spacecraft. Based on a unique combination of focusing electrostatic ion optics and time of flight detection and mass analysis, TIDE provides the sensitivity (seven apertures of about 1 cm squared effective area each) and angular resolution (6 x 18 degrees) required for this purpose. PSI produces a low energy plasma locally at the POLAR spacecraft that provides the ion current required to balance the photoelectron current, along with a low temperature electron population, regulating the spacecraft potential slightly positive relative to the space plasma. TIDE/PSI will: (a) measure the density and flow fields of the solar and terrestrial plasmas within the high polar cap and magnetospheric lobes; (b) quantify the extent to which ionospheric and solar ions are recirculated within the distant magnetotail neutral sheet or lost to the distant tail and solar wind; (c) investigate the mass-dependent degree energization of these plasmas by measuring their thermodynamic properties; (d) investigate the relative roles of ionosphere and solar wind as sources of plasma to the plasma sheet and ring current.

  13. Plasma mass filtering techniques: applications and requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-10-01

    Plasma mass filters differ from conventional chemical filtering techniques in that elements are dissociated, and can therefore be processed without regard to chemical form. In addition, plasma filters can be in principle operated at larger velocities compared to their gaseous and/or liquid counterparts, so that larger throughputs are possible. On the other hand, one has to pay the price of ionization, which sets a lower limit for the processing cost. Plasma mass filtering techniques are consequently foreseen as a promising solution for separation processes which are simultaneously chemically challenging and of high added value. Such separation processes can be, for example, found within the context of nuclear waste remediation, or nuclear spent fuel reprocessing. However, although plasma separation techniques appear globally attractive for these distinct needs, the plasma parameters required to fulfill a particular separation process are expected to depend strongly on the process's attributes (volume, composition, mass difference), which may vary significantly. Such operating parameters' variations are shown to be well accommodated by a particular configuration, called the Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter. Work supported by US DOE under contract Nos DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FG02-06ER54851.

  14. Collector and source sheaths of a finite ion temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwager, L.A.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The region between a Maxwellian plasma source and an absorbing surface is described theoretically with a static, kinetic plasma--sheath model and modeled numerically with a dynamic, electrostatic particle simulation. In the kinetic theory, Poisson's equation and Vlasov equations govern the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution of the ions and electrons. The results in this paper for collector potential and plasma transport agree with the bounded model of Emmert {ital et} {ital al}. (Phys. Fluids {bold 23}, 803 (1980)). However, this approach differs from those using traditional Bohm sheath analysis by {plus minus}0.25 (in units of electron temperature) for potential drop through the collector sheath of a hydrogen plasma. In both the theory and simulation, the plasma source injects equal fluxes of ions and electrons with half-Maxwellian velocities and various mass and temperature ratios and is assumed to have a zero electric field. The potential change within a spatially distributed, full Maxwellian source region is represented with the source sheath potential drop that depends primarily on temperature ratio. This source sheath evolves over a few Debye lengths from the source to neutralize the injected plasma. The plasma flows to an electrically floating collector where the more familiar electron-repelling collector sheath appears. The collector potential {psi}{sub {ital C}} and source sheath potential drop {psi}{sub {ital P}} (in units of electron temperature) are evaluated as a function of mass and temperature ratio. The velocity moments of density, drift velocity, temperature, kinetic energy flux, and heat flux are also derived as a function of {psi}{sub {ital C}} and {psi}{sub {ital P}}. Comparisons with electrostatic particle simulations are shown for the ion/electron mass ratios of 40 and 100 and temperature ratios of 0.1, 1, and 10.

  15. Plasma Sheet Source and Loss Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    2000-01-01

    Data from the TIMAS ion mass spectrometer on the Polar satellite, covering 15 ev/e to 33 keV/e in energy and essentially 4(pi) in view angles, are used to investigate the properties of earthward (sunward) field-aligned flows of ions, especially protons, in the plasma sheet-lobe transition region near local midnight. A total of 142 crossings of this region are analyzed at 12-sec time resolution, all in the northern hemisphere, at R(SM) approx. 4 - 7 R(sub E), and most (106) in the poleward (sunward) direction. Earthward proton flows are prominent in this transition region (greater than 50% of the time), typically appearing as sudden "blasts" with the most energetic protons (approx. 33 keV) arriving first with weak flux, followed by protons of decreasing energy and increasing flux until either: (1) a new "blast" appears, (2) the flux ends at a sharp boundary, or (3) the flux fades away within a few minutes as the mean energy drops to a few keV. Frequent step-like changes (less than 12 sec) of the flux suggest that perpendicular gradients on the scale of proton gyroradii are common. Peak flux is similar to central plasma sheet proton flux (10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6)/[cq cm sr sec keV/e] and usually occurs at E approx. 4 - 12 keV. Only the initial phase of each "blast" (approx. 1 min) displays pronounced field-alignment of the proton velocity distribution, consistent with the time-of-flight separation of a more or less isotropic source distribution with df/d(nu) less than 0. The dispersive signatures are often consistent with a source at R(SM) less than or equal to 30 R(sub E). No systematic latitudinal velocity dispersion is found, implying that the equatorial plasma source is itself convecting. In short, the proton "blasts" appear as sudden local expansions of central plasma sheet particles along reconfigured ("dipolarized") magnetic field lines.

  16. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R P; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Piller, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M; Welton, R

    2012-02-01

    A prototype RF H(-) surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA∕kW. Control experiments with H(-) beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing. PMID:22380221

  17. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  18. Saturn Plasma Sources and Associated Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, M.; Andrews, D. J.; Coates, A. J.; Hamilton, D. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kotova, A.; Morooka, M.; Smith, H. T.; Westlake, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    This article reviews the different sources of plasma for Saturn's magnetosphere, as they are known essentially from the scientific results of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan. At low and medium energies, the main plasma source is the H2O cloud produced by the "geyser" activity of the small satellite Enceladus. Impact ionization of this cloud occurs to produce on the order of 100 kg/s of fresh plasma, a source which dominates all the other ones: Titan (which produces much less plasma than anticipated before the Cassini mission), the rings, the solar wind (a poorly known source due to the lack of quantitative knowledge of the degree of coupling between the solar wind and Saturn's magnetosphere), and the ionosphere. At higher energies, energetic particles are produced by energy diffusion and acceleration of lower energy plasma produced by the interchange instabilities induced by the rapid rotation of Saturn, and possibly, for the highest energy range, by contributions from the CRAND process acting inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Discussion of the transport and acceleration processes acting on these plasma sources shows the importance of rotation-induced radial transport and energization of the plasma, and also shows how much the unexpected planetary modulation of essentially all plasma parameters of Saturn's magnetosphere remains an unexplained mystery.

  19. Entropy in an Arc Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminska, A.; Dudeck, M

    2008-03-19

    The entropy properties in a D.C. argon arc plasma source are studied. The local thermodynamical entropy relations are established for a set of uniform sub-systems (Ar, Ar{sup +}, e) in order to deduce the entropy balance equation in presence of dissipative effects and in the case of a thermal non equilibrium. Phenomenological linear laws are deduced in near equilibrium situation. The flow parameters inside the plasma source are calculated by a Navier-Stokes fluid description taking into account a thermal local non equilibrium. The entropy function is calculated in the plasma source using the values of the local variables obtained from the numerical code.

  20. The Spatial Nature of Iogenic Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Marconi, M. L.

    1999-09-01

    Io, the innermost Galilean satellite of Jupiter, supplies the primary source of heavy ion plasma for the planetary magnetosphere. Understanding the temporal and three-dimensional nature of the Iogenic plasma source (pickup ions created by ionization and charge exchange of neutrals in Io's local and extended atmosphere) is highly relevant to a large number of studies for the Io-Jupiter system. These studies include the structure and outward transport of the plasma torus and a significant number of coupled electrodynamic interactions that have been observed by ground-based, earth-orbiting, and interplanetary spacecraft instruments to occur between the plasma torus, Io, and Jupiter. To explore the nature of the Iogenic plasma source, we have undertaken neutral cloud model calculations for atmospheric gases located above Io's exobase (in the corona and extended clouds) and have calculated in three dimensions their instantaneous electron impact ionization and charge exchange production rates in the plasma torus. Here we report on the spatial nature of the Iogenic plasma source that is created by realistic incomplete collisional cascade velocity distribution sources for O and S at Io's exobase. On a large circumplanetary spatial scale, the Iogenic plasma source is highly peaked at Io's instantaneous position on its orbit about Jupiter. On finer spatial scales near Io, the three-dimensional spatial structure of this sharp peak will be presented and implications discussed. This finer spatial scale description of the Iogenic plasma source is particularly relevant to understanding the Galileo Plasma Analyzer (PLS) measured downstream spatial and velocity distributions for the ions near Io (Frank et al. Science 274 394-395, 1996) and the Galileo Magnetometer (MAG) measured magnetic field reduction near Io (Kivelson et al., Science 274, 396-398, 1996) as well as new particle and field data expected during the Galileo I24 and I25 encounters with Io.

  1. Surface plasma source with anode layer plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Proposed plasma generation system can be used for high current negative ion beam production and for directed deposition by flux of sputtered neutrals and negative ions. The main mechanism of negative ion formation in surface plasma sources is the secondary emission from low work function surface bombarded by a flux of positive ion or neutrals. The emission of negative ions is enhanced significantly by introducing a small amount of cesium or other substance with low ionization potential. In the proposed source are used positive ions generated by Hall drift plasma accelerator (anode layer plasma accelerator or plasma accelerator with insulated channel, with cylindrical or race track configuration of emission slit). The target-emitter is bombarded by the ion beam accelerated in crossed ExB fields. Negative ions are extracted from the target surface with geometrical focusing and are accelerated by negative voltage applied between emitter and plasma, contacting with the plasma accelerator. Hall drift ion source has a special design with a space for passing of the emitted negative ions and sputtered particles through the positive ion source.

  2. Unthermalized plasma in bursts sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakula, S.; Tkaczyk, W.

    1985-01-01

    The pair e(+)-e(-) annihilation phenomena in hot plasma was studied in order to evaluate the photon energy spectrum. The spectra of the broadening 0.511 MeV annihilation line was calculated in the case of unthermalized plasma, i.e., T sub e(-) does not equal T sub e(+). The energy spectra from annihilation process for unthermalized positrons are characterized by the presence of flat part for energies greater than 0.511 MeV. The flattening in the spectrum of annihilation unthermalized plasma is a strong indication that the observed features of the hard tailed spectrum of the gamma bursts can be well described by annihilation of hot positrons and cold electrons. It is proposed that the mechanism for the production of unthermalized positrons is associated with the charge separation in Eddington limited accretion onto a neutron star.

  3. New plasma source based on contact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Schrittwieser, R.; Koslover, R.; Karim, R.; Rynn, N.

    1985-07-01

    A new type of plasma source is presented: A collisionless plasma is formed by producing ions on one end and electrons on the other of a cylindrical vacuum chamber in a solenoidal magnetic field. The ions are produced by contact ionization of potassium on tungsten. The source of electrons is a LaB/sub 6/ plate. In the usual single-ended Q machine the elements rhenium, iridium, and platinum are tested as ionizing metals for potassium and barium.

  4. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  5. Plasma x-ray radiation source.

    PubMed

    Popkov, N F; Kargin, V I; Ryaslov, E A; Pikar', A S

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives the results of studies on a plasma x-ray source, which enables one to obtain a 2.5-krad radiation dose per pulse over an area of 100 cm2 in the quantum energy range from 20 to 500 keV. Pulse duration is 100 ns. Spectral radiation distributions from a diode under various operation conditions of a plasma are obtained. A Marx generator served as an initial energy source of 120 kJ with a discharge time of T/4 = 10-6 s. A short electromagnetic pulse (10-7 s) was shaped using plasma erosion opening switches. PMID:21307500

  6. Pulsed RF Plasma Source for Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiruddin, Abutaher Mohammad

    A pulsed rf plasma source was evaluated for materials processing. A pulsed rf discharge of carbon tetrafluoride (CF_4), sulfur hexafluoride (SF _6), oxygen (O_2), or acetylene (C_2H_2 ) created the plasmas. The frequency and duration of the rf discharge were about 290 kHz and 30 musec, respectively. The repetition rate was 1 discharge per minute. Plasma diagnostics included Langmuir probes, a photodiode dectector, an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA), and a microwave interferometer. Langmuir probe measurements showed that at a position 67 cm away from the rf coil, CF_4 plasma arrived in separate packets. Plasma densities and electron temperatures at this position were in the range 4 times 10^{11} cm ^{-3} to 1.8 times 10^{13} cm ^{-3} and 2 eV to 8.3 eV, respectively. The OMA measurements identified neutral atomic fluorine in the CF_4 plasma and neutral atomic oxygen in the O_2 plasma. A plasma slab model of the microwave interferometer was applied to predict the interferometer response. The measured response was found to be almost identical to the predicted response. The influence of different reactor parameters on plasma parameters was studied. Metal barriers of different geometry were used to control the ratio of charged particles to atomic neutrals in the plasma chamber. Four plasma structures were identified: precursor plasma, shock induced plasma, driver plasma, and delayed glow plasma. Pulsed CF _4 and SF_6 plasmas were used to etch silicon dioxide (SiO_2 ) grown on silicon wafers. The SF_6 plasma etched SiO_2 at a rate of about 0.71 A per discharge and the CF_4 plasma deposited a non-uniform film (possibly polymer) instead of etching. The C_2H _2 plasma deposited plasma polymerized acetylene on a KBr pellet with a deposition rate of 127 A per discharge. An FT-IR spectrum of the deposited film showed that carbon -to-carbon double bonds as well as carbon-to-hydrogen bonds were present. This device can be used in plasma assisted deposition and/or synthesis

  7. Collector and source sheaths of a finite ion temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwager, L.A.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1988-04-13

    The region between a Maxwellian plasma source and an absorbing surface is modeled with an electrostatic particle simulation and with a kinetic plasma-sheath model. In the kinetic model, Poisson's equation and Vlasov equations govern the velocity distribution of the ions and electrons. Our numerical and theoretical results for collector potential and plasma transport agree with the bounded model of Emmert et al., but differ somewhat from those using traditional Bohm sheath analysis. The plasma source injects equal fluxes of half-Maxwellian ions and electrons with specified mass and temperature ratios and is assumed to have a zero electric field. Representing the potential change within a distributed full-Maxwellian source region, the source potential drop depends primarily on temperature ratio and evolves a few Debye lengths from the source to neutralize the injected plasma. The plasma flows to an electrically floating collector where the more familiar electron-repelling collector sheath appears. Profiles of potential, density, drift velocity, temperature, kinetic energy flux, and heat flux are shown from simulation; all compare very well with theory. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  9. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  10. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-21

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  11. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 1017 cm-3 has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  12. Plasma-based EUV light source

    DOEpatents

    Shumlak, Uri; Golingo, Raymond; Nelson, Brian A.

    2010-11-02

    Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

  13. Resonant power absorption in helicon plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guangye; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris N.; Lee, Charles A.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2006-12-15

    Helicon discharges produce plasmas with a density gradient across the confining magnetic field. Such plasmas can create a radial potential well for nonaxisymmetric whistlers, allowing radially localized helicon (RLH) waves. This work presents new evidence that RLH waves play a significant role in helicon plasma sources. An experimentally measured plasma density profile in an argon helicon discharge is used to calculate the rf field structure. The calculations are performed using a two-dimensional field solver under the assumption that the density profile is axisymmetric. It is found that RLH waves with an azimuthal wave number m=1 form a standing wave structure in the axial direction and that the frequency of the RLH eigenmode is close to the driving frequency of the rf antenna. The calculated resonant power absorption, associated with the RLH eigenmode, accounts for most of the rf power deposited into the plasma in the experiment.

  14. Resonant power absorption in helicon plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangye; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris N.; Lee, Charles A.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2006-12-01

    Helicon discharges produce plasmas with a density gradient across the confining magnetic field. Such plasmas can create a radial potential well for nonaxisymmetric whistlers, allowing radially localized helicon (RLH) waves. This work presents new evidence that RLH waves play a significant role in helicon plasma sources. An experimentally measured plasma density profile in an argon helicon discharge is used to calculate the rf field structure. The calculations are performed using a two-dimensional field solver under the assumption that the density profile is axisymmetric. It is found that RLH waves with an azimuthal wave number m =1 form a standing wave structure in the axial direction and that the frequency of the RLH eigenmode is close to the driving frequency of the rf antenna. The calculated resonant power absorption, associated with the RLH eigenmode, accounts for most of the rf power deposited into the plasma in the experiment.

  15. Chromatic monitoring of downstream microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serý, M.; Špatenka, P.; Pavlík, J.; Messelhäuser, J.

    2000-03-01

    The application of the chromatic sensing for monitoring of a microwave plasma source is described. The emitted radiation from the plasma excited in the argon, oxygen and CF4 mixture was measured with three PIN-diodes with integrated optical filters. The response of the chromatic signals on variation of power and gas composition was investigated. Whereas a good sensitivity of the integrated optical signal to the power was confirmed, only a limited sensitivity to the working gas mixture was found.

  16. Ion deposition by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, K.; Houk, R.S.

    1996-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is used with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) for ion deposition. The deposited element is introduced as a nebulized aqueous solution. Modifications to the ICP-MS device allow generation and deposition of a mass-resolved beam of {sup 165}Ho{sup +} at 5{times}10{sup 12} ions s{sup {minus}1}. The ICP is a universal, multielement ion source that can potentially be used for applications such as deposition of mixtures of widely varying stoichiometry or of alternating layers of different elements. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  17. A commercial plasma source ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuer, J.T.; Adler, R.A.; Horne, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Empire Hard Chrome has recently installed commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSU) equipment built by North Star Research Corporation. Los Alamos National Laboratory has assisted in this commercialization effort via two Cooperative Research and Development Agreements to develop the plasma source for the equipment and to identify low-risk commercial PSII applications. The PSII system consists of a 1 m x 1 m cylindrical vacuum chamber with a rf plasma source. The pulse modulator is capable of delivering pulses kV and peak currents of 300 A at maximum repetition rate of 400 Hz. thyratron tube to switch a pulse forming network which is tailored to match the dynamic PSII load. In this paper we discuss the PSII system, process facility, and early commercial applications to production tooling.

  18. Advances in Plasma-Filled Microwave Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    1998-11-01

    Significant improvements in the performance of high power microwave tubes have been achieved in recent years by the introduction of plasma into the beam- coupling structures of the devices. Plasma has been credited with increasing the maximum electron beam current, frequency bandwidth, electrical efficiency and reducing or eliminating the need for guiding magnetic fields in microwave sources. These advances are critically important for the development of high power, frequency agile microwave systems where size and weight are important. Conversely, plasma has been blamed for causing noise, instabilities, power variations and pulse-length limitations in microwave tubes for many years. Recent experimental and theoretical studies have demonstrated that introducing the right amount of plasma in a controlled manner can be beneficial in the areas described above. Enhanced beam propagation at lower magnetic fields and higher beam current levels due to the space-charge neutralization by plasma can be realized provided that the neutralization fraction is fairly stable and maintained near a value of one for the duration of the desired pulse length. The generation of hybrid waves in plasma-filled slow-wave structures (SWS) operating near cutoff has resulted in an increased electric field on axis and improved coupling to solid beams in both helix and coupled-cavity SWS, and wider coupling-aperture pass-bands and frequency bandwidth in coupled-cavity devices. In the event of excess plasma generation in these TWTs or BWOs, the device structures rapidly approach cutoff or breakdown and the beam forms instabilities, which degrades the output power level and pulse length. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in this field including plasma implementation techniques in the gun and circuit will be presented, and the benefits and limitations of plasma filling of microwave sources will be shown and discussed.

  19. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-15

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  20. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  1. Repetitively pulsed plasma illumination sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Robert G.; Falkos, Paul

    1997-12-01

    The acoustic environment created by turbulence in aircraft flight tests demands that illumination sources for high speed photography of munitions drops be extremely rugged. A repetitive pulsed surface discharge system has been developed to provide wide angle illumination in a bomb bay for photography at 250 - 500 Hertz. The lamp has a simple construction suitable for adverse environments and produces 100 mJ of visible light per pulse. The discharge parameters were selected to minimize the size and complexity of the power supply. The system is also capable of operating at high repetition rates; preliminary tests demonstrated 1000 pulses at 1 kHz, 200 pulses at 1.5 kHz, and 13 pulses at 2 kHz. A simple power supply capable of providing several amperes at 450 V is being completed; it will be used to extend the run times and to explore extensions to higher repetition rate.

  2. Key issues in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Matossian, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a scaleable, non-line-of-sight method for the surface modification of materials. In this paper, we consider three important issues that should be addressed before wide-scale commercialization of PSII: (1) implant conformality; (2) ion sources; and (3) secondary electron emission. To insure uniform implanted dose over complex shapes, the ion sheath thickness must be kept sufficiently small. This criterion places demands on ion sources and pulsed-power supplies. Another limitation to date is the availability of additional ion species beyond B, C, N, and 0. Possible solutions are the use of metal arc vaporization sources and plasma discharges in high-vapor-pressure organometallic precursors. Finally, secondary electron emission presents a potential efficiency and x-ray hazard issue since for many metallurgic applications, the emission coefficient can be as large as 20. Techniques to suppress secondary electron emission are discussed.

  3. Plasma uniformity of microwave ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tokiguichi, K.; Sakudo, N.; Suzuki, K.; Kanomata, I.

    1980-09-01

    The ion saturation current uniformities of two different type plasma sources, a coaxial and a Lisitano coil type, are investigated using a moveable Langmuir probe. They both operate under off-resonance microwave discharge. H/sub 2/ or Ar is used as the discharge gas. The coaxial source provides better uniformities for ion saturation current, electron temperature, and electon density than the Lisitano coil, independent of the discharge gas species. The ion saturation current with the coaxial source is uniform within approx.15% inside a 40-mm-diam circle for a 0.17 Pa H/sub 2/ discharge. However, with the Lisitano coil, uniformity is limited to a 20-mm-diam circle. Furthermore, the Lisitano coil easily suffers from heat distortion because of difficulties in realizing a cooled system. It is also experimentally confirmed that the coaxial-type source is more appropriate for obtaining high density plasma under continuous operation.

  4. Plasma source for spacecraft potential control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A stable electrical ground which enables the particle spectrometers to measure the low energy particle populations was investigated and the current required to neutralize the spacecraft was measured. In addition, the plasma source for potential control (PSPO C) prevents high charging events which could affect the spacecraft electrical integrity. The plasma source must be able to emit a plasma current large enough to balance the sum of all other currents to the spacecraft. In ion thrusters, hollow cathodes provide several amperes of electron current to the discharge chamber. The PSPO C is capable of balancing the net negative currents found in eclipse charging events producing 10 to 100 microamps of electron current. The largest current required is the ion current necessary to balance the total photoelectric current.

  5. Ion Beam Plasma Interactions in the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Kesterson, A.; Kamar, O.; Lin, Y.; Munoz, J.; Wang, X.

    2008-11-01

    A 100 KeV NEC duoplasmatron is used to produce an energetic ion beam (10 KeV < E < 100 KeV). The beam is sent through plasmas produced by the ASTRAL helicon plasma source. The beam current and beam size are measured by a device combining Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) and Faraday Cup (FC) features. ASTRAL produces bright intense He/Ne/Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field < 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. Depending on the ion beam energy and the ratio of beam density over plasma density different wave instabilities will be generated within the plasmas. A real-time spectrum analyzer will be used to identify the wave instabilities and their evolution in the plasma. We will present early experimental results together with some preliminary theoretical simulation using 2D and 3D hybrid simulation codes. In these codes, ions are treated as fully kinetic particles while electrons are treated as a fluid. Both species are moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field.

  6. Laser produced plasma light source for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomenkov, Igor V.; Ershov, Alex I.; Partlo, William N.; Myers, David W.; Brown, Daniel; Sandstrom, Richard L.; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Das, Palash; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Kevin; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rajyaguru, Chirag; De Dea, Silvia; Hou, Richard R.; Dunstan, Wayne J.; Baumgart, Peter; Ishihara, Toshihiko; Simmons, Rod D.; Jacques, Robert N.; Bergstedt, Robert A.; Brandt, David C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the development of laser-produced-plasma (LPP) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) source architecture for advanced lithography applications in high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is expected to succeed 193 nm immersion technology for sub-22 nm critical layer patterning. In this paper we discuss the most recent results from high qualification testing of sources in production. Subsystem performance will be shown including collector protection, out-of-band (OOB) radiation measurements, and intermediate-focus (IF) protection as well as experience in system use. This presentation reviews the experimental results obtained on systems with a focus on the topics most critical for an HVM source.

  7. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S.; Jones, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  8. Plasma Sources for Medical Applications - A Comparison of Spot Like Plasmas and Large Area Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Plasma applications in life science are currently emerging worldwide. Whereas today's commercially available plasma surgical technologies such as argon plasma coagulation (APC) or ablation are mainly based on lethal plasma effects on living systems, the newly emerging therapeutic applications will be based on selective, at least partially non-lethal, possibly stimulating plasma effects on living cells and tissue. Promising results could be obtained by different research groups worldwide revealing a huge potential for the application of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma in fields such as tissue engineering, healing of chronic wounds, treatment of skin diseases, tumor treatment based on specific induction of apoptotic processes, inhibition of biofilm formation and direct action on biofilms or treatment of dental diseases. The development of suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapies requires an in-depth knowledge of their physics, chemistry and parameters. Therefore much basic research still needs to be conducted to minimize risk and to provide a scientific fundament for new plasma-based medical therapies. It is essential to perform a comprehensive assessment of physical and biological experiments to clarify minimum standards for plasma sources for applications in life science and for comparison of different sources. One result is the DIN-SPEC 91315, which is now open for further improvements. This contribution intends to give an overview on the status of commercial cold plasma sources as well as cold plasma sources still under development for medical use. It will discuss needs, prospects and approaches for the characterization of plasmas from different points of view. Regarding the manageability in everyday medical life, atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) and dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) are of special interest. A comprehensive risk-benefit assessment including the state of the art of commercial sources for medical use

  9. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  10. Mass content around Galactic VHE sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ona Wilhelmi, Emma; Pedaletti, Giovanna; Torres, Diego; Natale, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    A large number of Galactic very-high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray sources have been discovered in the past years with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes, being a large fraction of them still unidentified. The association of these VHE sources with regions of the sky rich in dust and gas has been noticed in the study of individual VHE sources. These regions are usually associated with environments with high stellar activity, implying the presence of evolved objects like supernova remnants or pulsar wind nebulae. The estimation of the mass content around VHE sources is crucial to understand acceleration in such sources, specially when the emission is due to hadronic interaction of accelerated particles with the target mass. Using the recently released all-sky maps of astrophysical foregrounds of the Planck satellite, we tested the correlation level at large scale between the Galactic VHE population and mass enhancement. We also explored the possibility that the unidentified sources are located in ambients particularly rich in material content unaccounted by traditional radio (CO lines) tracers. The results of this investigation will be presented and the implications on the VHE emission discussed.

  11. Plasma Sources and Magnetospheric Consequences at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's magnetospheric dynamics are dominated by two facts: 1) the planet rotates very rapidly (~10-hour period); and 2) the moon Enceladus, only 500 km in diameter, orbits Saturn at a distance of 4 Rs. This tiny moon produces jets of water through cracks in its icy surface, filling a large water-product torus of neutral gas that surrounds Saturn near Enceladus' orbit. Through photoionization and electron-impact ionization, the torus forms the dominant source of Saturn's magnetospheric plasma. This inside-out loading of plasma, combined with the rapid rotation of the magnetic field, leads to outward transport through a nearly continuous process of discrete flux-tube interchange. The magnetic flux that returns to the inner magnetosphere during interchange events brings with it hotter, more-tenuous plasma from the outer magnetosphere. When dense, relatively cold plasma from the inner magnetosphere flows outward in the tail region, the magnetic field is often not strong enough to confine it, and magnetic reconnection allows the plasma to break off in plasmoids that escape the magnetospheric system. This complicated ballet of production, transport, and loss is carried on continuously. In this talk we will investigate its temporal variability, on both short and long timescales.

  12. Mass Communication: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). McLennan Library.

    For the study of mass communication in social, cultural and political contexts, this annotated resource guide presents a list of materials available in the McGill University Libraries in Montreal, Canada. As a select bibliography, the guide concentrates on current sources, although some historical coverage of newspaper and journalism is included.…

  13. Californium-252 plasma desorption with Fourier transform mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, J.A; Williams, E.R.; Amster, I.J.; Furlong, J.J.P.; Wang, B.H.; McLafferty, F.W.; Chait, B.T.; Field, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Plasma desorption (PD) such, as that induced by the 100-MeV fission products of /sup 252/Cf, is a particularly promising ionization method for large molecules, yielding molecular ion species even from trypsin, molecular weight 23,463. Further, with trypsin using nitrocellulose as the substrate, (M + 3H)/sup 3 +/ is the most abundant molecular ion species and (M + 6H)/sup 6 +/ is measurable, which greatly extends the mass values (m) observable for instruments with an upper m/z limit (z = number of charges). However, a 50-..mu..Ci /sup 252/Cf source only produces 55,000 fissions s/sup -1/, yielding ion currents that are generally much too low for scanning instruments. An instrument with unusual capabilities for these, as well as for simultaneous ion detection over a wide mass range, is the Fourier transform (FT) mass spectrometer. With FTMS, Hunt has measured (M + H)/sup +/ ions of cytochrome c, molecular weight 12,384, ionized in an exterior fast-atom-bombardment source. Here the authors describe techniques for obtaining PD/FT mass spectra for a variety of compounds with abundant molecular ion species of masses as high as 2016 (alamethicin).

  14. A dc Penning surface-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Geisik, C.; Schmitt, D.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Stelzer, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    After developing a pulsed-8X source for H{sup {minus}} beams, we are now testing a cooled, dc version. The design dc power density on the cathode surface is 900 W/cm{sup 2}, much higher than achieved in any previously-reported Penning surface-plasma source (SPS). The source is designed to accommodate dc arc power levels up to 30 kW by cooling the electrode surfaces with pressurized, hot water. After striking the arc using a 600-V pulser, a 350-V dc power supply is switched in to sustain the 100-V discharge. Now our tests are concentrating on arc pulse lengths {le}1 s. Ultimately, the discharge will be operated dc. The source is described and the initial arc test results are presented.

  15. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  16. Hubble-induced mass from MSSM plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takesako, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2013-04-01

    We evaluate the effective mass of a scalar field φ coupled to thermal plasma through Planck-suppressed interactions. We find it useful to rescale the coupled fields so that all the φ-dependences are absorbed into the yukawa and gauge couplings, which allows us to read off the leading order contributions to the effective mass m-tilde {sub φ} from the 2-loop free energy calculated with the rescaled couplings. We give an analytical expression for m-tilde {sub φ} at a sufficiently high temperature in the case where φ is coupled to the MSSM chiral superfields through non-minimal Kähler potential. We find that | m-tilde {sub φ}{sup 2}| is about 10{sup −3}H{sup 2} ∼ 10{sup −2}H{sup 2} at the leading order in terms of the couplings for typical parameter sets, where H is the Hubble expansion rate in the radiation-dominated era.

  17. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. (a) Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food...

  18. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. (a) Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food...

  19. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 18, Jan. 3, 2012. (a) Upon approval by...

  20. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. (a) Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food...

  1. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. (a) Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food...

  2. Plasma uniformity of microwave ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokiguichi, K.; Sakudo, N.; Suzuki, K.; Kanomata, I.

    1980-10-01

    The ion saturation current uniformities of two different type plasma sources, a coaxial and a Lisitano coil type, are investigated using a moveable Langmuir probe. They both operate under off-resonance microwave discharge; H2 or Ar is used as the discharge gas. The coaxial source provides better uniformities for ion saturation current, electron temperature, and electron density than the Lisitano coil, independent of the discharge gas species. The ion saturation current with the coaxial source is uniform within about 15% inside a 40-mm-diam circle for a 0.17 Pa H2 discharge. However, with the Lisitano coil uniformity is limited to a 20-mm-diam circle and the coil is subject to heat distortion because of difficulties in realizing a cooled system

  3. Advances and problems in plasma-optical mass-separation

    SciTech Connect

    Bardakov, V. M.; Ivanov, S. D.; Strokin, N. A.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a short review of plasma-optical mass-separation and defines the fields for its possible application. During theoretical studies, numerical simulations, and experiments, the effect of the azimuthator finite size and of the vacuum conditions on the mass separator characteristics was revealed, as well as the quality of different-mass ion separation. The problems, solving which may lead to a successful end of the mass-separation plasma-optical technique implementation, were specified.

  4. Two-dimensional, three-fluid modeling of capillary plasma discharges in electrothermal mass accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmond, M. J.; Winfrey, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Electrothermal (ET) plasma launchers have a wide array of applications as mass acceleration devices. An ET plasma launcher utilizes an ET plasma discharge to accelerate a projectile. ET plasma discharges are arc-driven capillary discharges that ablate liner materials and form partially ionized plasmas. ET plasma discharges are generated by driving current pulses through a capillary source. Current pulses typically have peak currents on the order of tens of kA with pulse lengths on the order of hundreds of μs. These types of plasma discharges have been explored for their application to military ballistics, electric thrusters, and nuclear fusion power. ET plasma discharges have been studied using 0D, 1D, and semi-2D fluid models. In this work, a three-fluid, fully two-dimensional model of ET plasma discharges is presented. First approximations used in the newly developed model and code are discussed and simulation results are compared with experiment. Simulation results indicate the development of back flow inside ET plasma discharges due to collisional drag forces between individual plasma species. This back flow is observed for simulations of ET plasma discharges receiving current pulses with peak currents of 10, 20, 30, and 40 kA. Simulation results also reveal the development of fluid perturbations near the breech of the plasma source. These perturbations cause variations in the plasma electrical conductivity and ultimately cause changes in the local ablation rate of the source liner. At higher current pulses, these perturbations are more localized in the region of the source closest to the breech. This effect causes a decrease in the ablated mass in this region relative to the region of the source experiencing the highest ablation.

  5. Magnetic plasma confinement for laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Adeyemi, A; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Kondo, K; Dabrowski, R

    2010-02-01

    A laser ion source (LIS) can easily provide a high current beam. However, it has been difficult to obtain a longer beam pulse while keeping a high current. On occasion, longer beam pulses are required by certain applications. For example, more than 10 micros of beam pulse is required for injecting highly charged beams to a large sized synchrotron. To extend beam pulse width, a solenoid field was applied at the drift space of the LIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The solenoid field suppressed the diverging angle of the expanding plasma and the beam pulse was widened. Also, it was observed that the plasma state was conserved after passing through a few hundred gauss of the 480 mm length solenoid field. PMID:20192365

  6. Forty years of surface plasma source development

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    The cesiation effect, a significant enhancement of negative ion emission from a gas discharge with decrease of co-extracted electron current below negative ion current, was observed for the first time on July 1, 1971 by placing into the discharge a compound with 1 mg of cesium. Subsequent developments of surface plasma sources (SPS) for highly efficient negative ion production caused by the interaction of plasma particles with electrodes on which the adsorbed cesium reduced the surface work function are described. In the last 40 years, the intensity of negative ion beams has increased by cesiation up to 10{sup 4} times from 3 mA to tens of amperes. Here, the main attention is concentrated on earlier SPS developments because recent results are well known and widely available.

  7. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    PubMed

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties. PMID:27109191

  8. Features of semiplanotron surface plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Features of the semiplanotron surface plasma sources (SPS) with cesiation used for high efficient negative ion beam production from first development to modern condition are considered. Design features of semiplanotrons SPS with cylindrical and spherical geometric focusing and the features of the negative ion production in the semiplanotrons are reviewed. Several versions of semiplanotrons with efficiency up to 0.1 A of H{sup -} per kW of discharge power are discussed. Modifications of the semiplanotrons for dc operation and for heavy negative ion production are reviewed.

  9. Conical slow wave antenna as a plasma source.

    PubMed

    Grubb, D P; Lovell, T

    1978-01-01

    A simple conical helix has been successfully employed as a slow wave structure to generate plasmas by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). The plasma is typical of plasmas created by ''Lisitano coil'' sources, n approximately 10(10)-10(12) cm(-3) with T(e) approximately 2-20 eV. This source, however, is much simpler to fabricate. The ease of fabrication allows the user some flexibility in designing the source to fit a specific plasma physics experiment. PMID:18698943

  10. Production of H, D, and He Plasmas in the ORNL High Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O.

    2011-10-01

    The ORNL high particle flux helicon source is has been operated with various light ions at power levels up to 30 kW. It is being studied as an electrodeless source for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Γp >1023m-3s-1 , and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high heat fluxes ~ 10 MW /m2 . The maximum magnetic field strength | B | in the plasma production region for which high density operation is possible at the present power level has been found to increase with increasing ion mass. Operation with | B | ~ 0 . 5 T has been achieved with He as the working gas. The radial density profile is found to be strongly dependent on the axial magnetic field geometry, and both strongly centrally peaked and flat profiles have been obtained. Maximum plasma densities > 4 ×1019m-3 have been achieved with He, and > 2 . 5 ×1019m-3 with H. The device has been modeled using the EMS2D (G. Chen et al., Phys Plasmas 13 (2006) 123507) and SOLPS (R. Schneider, X. Bonnin et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 46 (2006) 3) codes. The latest results will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Batelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept of Energy under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  11. Laboratory Plasma Source as an MHD Model for Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The significance of the work described herein lies in the demonstration of Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun (MCG) devices like CPS-1 to produce energetic laboratory magneto-flows with embedded magnetic fields that can be used as a simulation tool to study flow interaction dynamic of jet flows, to demonstrate the magnetic acceleration and collimation of flows with primarily toroidal fields, and study cross field transport in turbulent accreting flows. Since plasma produced in MCG devices have magnetic topology and MHD flow regime similarity to stellar and extragalactic jets, we expect that careful investigation of these flows in the laboratory will reveal fundamental physical mechanisms influencing astrophysical flows. Discussion in the next section (sec.2) focuses on recent results describing collimation, leading flow surface interaction layers, and turbulent accretion. The primary objectives for a new three year effort would involve the development and deployment of novel electrostatic, magnetic, and visible plasma diagnostic techniques to measure plasma and flow parameters of the CPS-1 device in the flow chamber downstream of the plasma source to study, (1) mass ejection, morphology, and collimation and stability of energetic outflows, (2) the effects of external magnetization on collimation and stability, (3) the interaction of such flows with background neutral gas, the generation of visible emission in such interaction, and effect of neutral clouds on jet flow dynamics, and (4) the cross magnetic field transport of turbulent accreting flows. The applicability of existing laboratory plasma facilities to the study of stellar and extragalactic plasma should be exploited to elucidate underlying physical mechanisms that cannot be ascertained though astrophysical observation, and provide baseline to a wide variety of proposed models, MHD and otherwise. The work proposed herin represents a continued effort on a novel approach in relating laboratory experiments to

  12. Comparison of Plasma Sources in Solar System Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    The plasma sources of Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn have been described in this issue in great detail. Much less information exists about the plasma sources of Uranus and Neptune. Only one flyby of the Voyager 2 spacecraft through the highly complex and time variable magnetospheres of those ice giants gives us a limited snapshot of the main plasma sources in those systems. The basic knowledge derived from those flybys are described briefly in this paper for completeness. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the plasma sources of all planetary magnetospheres and compare the similarities and differences of those huge plasma laboratories in our solar system.

  13. Determination of osmium concentrations and (187)Os/(188)Os of crude oils and source rocks by coupling high-pressure, high-temperature digestion with sparging OsO(4) into a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Sen, Indra S; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard

    2014-03-18

    The (187)Os/(188)Os ratio that is based on the β(-)-decay of (187)Re to (187)Os (t1/2 = 41.6 billion years) is widely used to investigate petroleum system processes. Despite its broad applicability to studies of hydrocarbon deposits worldwide, a suitable matrix-matched reference material for Os analysis does not exist. In this study, a method that enables Os isotope measurement of crude oil with in-line Os separation and purification from the sample matrix is proposed. The method to analyze Os concentration and (187)Os/(187)Os involves sample digestion under high pressure and high temperature using a high pressure asher (HPA-S, Anton Paar), sparging of volatile osmium tetroxide from the sample solution, and measurements using multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). This methods significantly reduced the total procedural time compared to conventional Carius tube digestion followed by Os separation and purification using solvent extraction, microdistillation and N-TIMS analysis. The method yields Os concentration (28 ± 4 pg g(-1)) and (187)Os/(188)Os (1.62 ± 0.15) of commercially available crude oil reference material NIST 8505 (1 S.D., n = 6). The reference material NIST 8505 is homogeneous with respect to Os concentration at a test portion size of 0.2 g. Therefore, (187)Os/(188)Os composition and Os concentration of NIST 8505 can serve as a matrix-matched reference material for Os analysis. Data quality was assessed by repeated measurements of the USGS shale reference material SCo-1 (sample matrix similar to petroleum source rock) and the widely used Liquid Os Standard solution (LOsSt). The within-laboratory reproducibility of (187)Os/(188)Os for a 5 pg of LOsSt solution, analyzed with this method over a period of 12 months was ∼1.4% (1 S.D., n = 26), respectively. PMID:24552484

  14. Inductively Coupled Plasma Zoom-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    A zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been coupled to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source. Zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (zoom-TOFMS) combines two complementary types of velocity-based mass separation. Specifically, zoom-TOFMS alternates between conventional, constant-energy acceleration (CEA) TOFMS and energy-focused, constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) (zoom) TOFMS. The CMA mode provides a mass-resolution enhancement of 1.5-1.7× over CEA-TOFMS in the current, 35-cm ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument geometry. The maximum resolving power (full-width at half-maximum) for the ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument is 1200 for CEA-TOFMS and 1900 for CMA-TOFMS. The CMA mode yields detection limits of between 0.02 and 0.8 ppt, depending upon the repetition rate and integration time—compared with single ppt detection limits for CEA-TOFMS. Isotope-ratio precision is shot-noise limited at approximately 0.2% relative-standard deviation (RSD) for both CEA- and CMA-TOFMS at a 10 kHz repetition rate and an integration time of 3-5 min. When the repetition rate is increased to 43.5 kHz for CMA, the shot-noise limited, zoom-mode isotope-ratio precision is improved to 0.09% RSD for the same integration time.

  15. New Applications of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Rob Henry; Dagmar Koller; Phil Marriott

    1998-12-31

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) complements the traditional methods of quantitation of radioactive isotopes. Because of the favorable ionization potential of most actinides and their daughter products, the argon plasma provides a rich, stable source of ions, which are introduced through a plasma-mass spectrometer interface into the mass spectrometer for isotopic separation. Samples are normally introduced in solution, although direct solids analysis has also been achieved using laser ablation of the sample into the argon plasma. Since 1983, improvements in ICP-MS sensitivity have resulted in correspondingly lower mass detection capability. This development has in turn expanded the number of isotopes accessible to measurement at the levels required in the nuclear industry.

  16. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  17. Plasma mass filtering for separation of actinides from lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-06-01

    Separating lanthanides from actinides is a key process in reprocessing nuclear spent fuel. Plasma mass filters, which operate on dissociated elements, offer conceptual advantages for such a task as compared with conventional chemical methods. The capabilities of a specific plasma mass filter concept, called the magnetic centrifugal mass filter, are analyzed within this particular context. Numerical simulations indicate separation of americium ions from a mixture of lanthanides ions for plasma densities of the order of 1012 cm-3, and ion temperatures of about 10 eV. In light of collision considerations, separating small fractions of heavy elements from a larger volume of lighter ones is shown to enhance the separation capabilities.

  18. Atomic modeling of the plasma EUV sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Koike, Fumihiro; Tanuma, Hajime

    2009-09-01

    We present the development of population kinetics models for tin plasmas that can be employed to design an EUV source for microlithography. The atomic kinetic code is constrained for the requirement that the model must be able to calculate spectral emissivity and opacity that can be used in radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Methods to develop compact and reliable atomic model with an appropriate set of atomic states are discussed. Specifically, after investigation of model dependencies and comparison experiment, we improve the effect of configuration interaction and the treatment of satellite lines. Using the present atomic model we discuss the temperature and density dependencies of the emissivity, as well as conditions necessary to obtain high efficiency EUV power at λ = 13.5 nm.

  19. The development of space plasma testing facility using RF source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamieneski, Richard; Hyde, Alexander; Batishchev, Oleg

    2012-10-01

    A new testing facility is being developed to simulate space and atmospheric plasmas. It utilizes modified helicon plasma source [1] to ionize gases common to space and ionosphere, namely hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen. Emission spectra of ionized gases are analyzed by vacuum spectrometer to understand plasma composition. The design of computerized controls and data acquisition system are discussed. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev, Minihelicon Plasma Thruster, IEEE Trans. Plasma Science, 37 (8) 1563, 2009.

  20. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  1. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produced large (about 25-cm-diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}-cm{sup -3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Mass dependency of turbulent parameters in stationary glow discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, A. B.; Wiggins, D. L.; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-05-15

    A direct current glow discharge tube is used to determine how mass changes the effects of certain turbulence characteristics in a weakly ionized gas. Helium, neon, argon, and krypton plasmas were created, and an axial magnetic field, varied from 0.0 to 550.0 Gauss, was used to enhance mass dependent properties of turbulence. From the power spectra of light emission variations associated with velocity fluctuations, determination of mass dependency on turbulent characteristic unstable modes, energy associated with turbulence, and the rate at which energy is transferred from scale to scale are measured. The magnetic field strength is found to be too weak to overcome particle diffusion to the walls to affect the turbulence in all four types of plasmas, though mass dependency is still detected. Though the total energy and the rate at which the energy moves between scales are mass invariant, the amplitude of the instability modes that characterize each plasma are dependent on mass.

  3. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, M.G.

    1997-07-22

    A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

  4. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, Michel G.

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  5. Operating a radio-frequency plasma source on water vapor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sonca V T; Foster, John E; Gallimore, Alec D

    2009-08-01

    A magnetically enhanced radio-frequency (rf) plasma source operating on water vapor has an extensive list of potential applications. In this work, the use of a rf plasma source to dissociate water vapor for hydrogen production is investigated. This paper describes a rf plasma source operated on water vapor and characterizes its plasma properties using a Langmuir probe, a residual gas analyzer, and a spectrometer. The plasma source operated first on argon and then on water vapor at operating pressures just over 300 mtorr. Argon and water vapor plasma number densities differ significantly. In the electropositive argon plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i) approximately = n(e), where n(i) is the positive ion density. But in the electronegative water plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i+) = n(i-) + n(e). The positive ion density and electron density of the water vapor plasma are approximately one and two orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of argon plasma. These results suggest that attachment and dissociative attachment are present in electronegative water vapor plasma. The electron temperature for this water vapor plasma source is between 1.5 and 4 eV. Without an applied axial magnetic field, hydrogen production increases linearly with rf power. With an axial magnetic field, hydrogen production jumps to a maximum value at 500 W and then saturates with rf power. The presence of the applied axial magnetic field is therefore shown to enhance hydrogen production. PMID:19725651

  6. Gas-discharge plasma sources for nonlocal plasma technology

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Simonov, V. Ya.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlocal plasma technology is based on the effect of self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume [V. I. Demidov, C. A. DeJoseph, Jr., and A. A. Kudryavtsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 215002 (2006)]. This effect can be achieved by changing the ratio of fast electron flux to ion flux incident on the plasma boundaries. This in turn leads to a significant change in plasma properties and therefore can be useful for technological applications. A gas-discharge device which demonstrates control of the plasma properties by this method is described.

  7. Gold fingerprinting by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watling, R. John; Herbert, Hugh K.; Delev, Dianne; Abell, Ian D.

    1994-02-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been applied to the characterization of the trace element composition "fingerprint" of selected gold samples from Western Australia and South Africa. By comparison of the elemental associations it is possible to relate gold to a specific mineralizing event, mine or bullion sample. This methodology facilitates identification of the provenance of stolen gold or gold used in salting activities. In this latter case, it is common for gold from a number of sources to be used in the salting process. Consequently, gold in the prospect being salted will not come from a single source and identification of multiple sources for this gold will establish that salting has occurred. Preliminary results also indicate that specific elemental associations could be used to identify the country of origin of gold. The technique has already been applied in 17 cases involving gold theft in Western Australia, where it is estimated that up to 2% of gold production is "relocated" each year as a result of criminal activities.

  8. Plasma-based ambient mass spectrometry techniques: The current status and future prospective.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuelu; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    Plasma-based ambient mass spectrometry is emerging as a frontier technology for direct analysis of sample that employs low-energy plasma as the ionization reagent. The versatile sources of ambient mass spectrometry (MS) can be classified according to the plasma formation approaches; namely, corona discharge, glow discharge, dielectric barrier discharge, and microwave-induced discharge. These techniques allow pretreatment-free detection of samples, ranging from biological materials (e.g., flies, bacteria, plants, tissues, peptides, metabolites, and lipids) to pharmaceuticals, food-stuffs, polymers, chemical warfare reagents, and daily-use chemicals. In most cases, plasma-based ambient MS performs well as a qualitative tool and as an analyzer for semi-quantitation. Herein, we provide an overview of the key concepts, mechanisms, and applications of plasma-based ambient MS techniques, and discuss the challenges and outlook. PMID:24338668

  9. Measurements of the Plasma Parameters and Low Frequency Oscillations in the Fisk Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Edward, Jr.; Wallace, Kent; Lampkin, Gregory; Watson, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A new plasma device, the Fisk Plasma Source (FPS), has been developed at Fisk University. This plasma device is used to study the physics of low temperature plasmas and plasma-material interactions. The FPS device is a stainless steel vacuum 6-way cross vacuum vessel with at 10-inch inner diameter. Low temperature argon plasmas are generated using DC glow discharge and thermionic filament techniques. Spatial profiles of the plasma density, plasma potential, and electron temperature are measured using Langmuir probes. We present initial experimental measurements of density and temperature profiles in the FPS device. Experimental and theoretical studies of low frequency oscillations observed in the FPS device are also presented.

  10. Source apportionment using reconstructed mass calculations.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Naila; Waheed, Shahida

    2014-01-01

    A long-term study was undertaken to investigate the air quality of the Islamabad/Rawalpindi area. In this regard fine and coarse particulate matter were collected from 4 sites in the Islamabad/Rawalpindi region from 1998 to 2010 using Gent samplers and polycarbonate filters and analyzed for their elemental composition using the techniques of Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Proton Induced X-ray Emission/Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIXE/PIGE) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Spectroscopy. The elemental data along with the gravimetric measurements and black carbon (BC) results obtained by reflectance measurement were used to approximate or reconstruct the particulate mass (RCM) by estimation of pseudo sources such as soil, smoke, sea salt, sulfate and black carbon or soot. This simple analysis shows that if the analytical technique used does not measure important major elements then the data will not be representative of the sample composition and cannot be further utilized for source apportionment studies or to perform transboundary analysis. In this regard PIXE/PIGE and XRF techniques that can provide elemental compositional data for most of the major environmentally important elements appear to be more useful as compared to NAA. Therefore %RCM calculations for such datasets can be used as a quality assurance (QA) measure to treat data prior to application of chemometrical tools such as factor analysis (FA) or cluster analysis (CA). PMID:24345244

  11. Solar Sources of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) originate in the solar corona.Due to recent ample solar images from space missions, especially the STEREO mission, we know that CMEs initiate not only from flaring active regions of strong magnetic field, prominence (filaments) in decayed active regions, but also from coronal structures in higher coronaover regions no apparent strong magnetic fields on the solar disk. Regardless the differences of their appearances, these regionsmust all include non-potential magnetic field or free magnetic energy in order to produce CMEs. When an energized magnetic structure erupts, the free magnetic energy converts to kinetic energy and few other types ofenergy, and the magnetic structure leaves the corona and propagates into the interplanetary space. At the source regions, the initiations of CMEs often accompany with solar flares, filament eruptions, coronalEUV dimmings and waves, and post eruption loop brightennings. Studying the CME source regions and the processes is essential for the understanding of CME initiation and their interplanetary consequences.

  12. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotk, Robert; Jasiński, Mariusz; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the tuning characteristics of waveguide-supplied metal-cylinder-based nozzleless microwave plasma source. This analysis has enabled to estimate the electron concentration ne and electron frequency collisions ν in the plasma generated in nitrogen and in a mixture of nitrogen and ethanol vapour. The parameters ne and ν are the basic quantities that characterize the plasma. The presented new plasma diagnostic method is particularly useful, when spectroscopic methods are useless. The presented plasma source is currently used in research of a hydrogen production from liquids.

  13. Multifunctional bulk plasma source based on discharge with electron injection

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, A. S.; Medovnik, A. V.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Savkin, K. P.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Vizir, A. V.

    2013-01-15

    A bulk plasma source, based on a high-current dc glow discharge with electron injection, is described. Electron injection and some special design features of the plasma arc emitter provide a plasma source with very long periods between maintenance down-times and a long overall lifetime. The source uses a sectioned sputter-electrode array with six individual sputter targets, each of which can be independently biased. This discharge assembly configuration provides multifunctional operation, including plasma generation from different gases (argon, nitrogen, oxygen, acetylene) and deposition of composite metal nitride and oxide coatings.

  14. Initial experimental test of a helicon plasma based mass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Evans, E. S.; Zweben, S. J.; Fisch, N. J.; Levinton, F.

    2016-06-01

    High throughput plasma mass separation requires rotation control in a high density multi-species plasmas. A preliminary mass separation device based on a helicon plasma operating in gas mixtures and featuring concentric biasable ring electrodes is introduced. Plasma profile shows strong response to electrode biasing. In light of floating potential measurements, the density response is interpreted as the consequence of a reshaping of the radial electric field in the plasma. This field can be made confining or de-confining depending on the imposed potential at the electrodes, in a way which is consistent with single particle orbit radial stability. Concurrent spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements suggest ion separation, with heavy to light ion emission line ratio increasing with radius when a specific potential gradient is applied to the electrodes.

  15. Initial experimental test of a helicon plasma based mass filter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gueroult, R.; Evans, E. S.; Zweben, S. J.; Fisch, N. J.; Levinton, F.

    2016-05-12

    High throughput plasma mass separation requires rotation control in a high density multi-species plasmas. A preliminary mass separation device based on a helicon plasma operating in gas mixtures and featuring concentric biasable ring electrodes is introduced. Plasma profile shows strong response to electrode biasing. In light of floating potential measurements, the density response is interpreted as the consequence of a reshaping of the radial electric field in the plasma. This field can be made confining or de-confining depending on the imposed potential at the electrodes, in a way which is consistent with single particle orbit radial stability. In conclusion, concurrentmore » spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements suggest ion separation, with heavy to light ion emission line ratio increasing with radius when a specific potential gradient is applied to the electrodes.« less

  16. Light ion mass spectrometer for space-plasma investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Fields, S. A.; Lewter, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Direct satellite measurements and ground-based techniques have given a comprehensive view of the density distribution of the cold plasma population in the earth's magnetosphere. There were, however, no direct measurements of the low-energy plasma mass composition, temperature, density, pitch-angle distribution, or plasma flow velocity. A description is presented of the evolution and development of an instrument, the Light Ion Mass Spectrometer (LIMS), designed to make these low-energy plasma measurements. The instrument was developed for flight on the spacecraft SCA-THA, a satellite to study satellite charging at high altitudes. This satellite, whose primary mission was to study spacecraft-plasma interactions and electrostatic charging, was launched into a near-geosynchronous orbit. The design requirements regarding the instrument are discussed, and attention is given to the calibration procedures, the flight configuration, and some examples of flight data.

  17. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoshan

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the {open_quotes}Fassel{close_quotes} TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  18. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1983-01-01

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  19. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1980-12-12

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  20. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  1. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate. PMID:26932094

  2. Antitumor action of non thermal plasma sources, DBD and Plasma Gun, alone or in combined protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Eric; Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Le Pape, Alain; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-01

    The presentation deals with the assessment on two non thermal plasma sources developed and optimized for oncology applications. The first plasma source is a floating-electrode dielectric barrier discharge powered at a few hundreds of Hz which deliver air-plasma directly on the surface of cell culture medium in dishes or on the skin or organs of mice bearing cancer tumors. The second plasma source, so called Plasma Gun, is a plasma jet source triggered in noble gas, transferred in high aspect ratio and flexible capillaries, on targeting cells or tumors after plasma transfer in air through the ``plasma plume'' generated at the capillary outlet. In vitro evidence for massive cancer cell destruction and in vivo tumor activity and growth rate reductions have been measured with both plasma sources. DNA damages, cell cycle arrests and apoptosis induction were also demonstrated following the application of any of the two plasma source both in vitro and in vivo. The comparison of plasma treatment with state of the art chemotherapeutic alternatives has been performed and last but not least the benefit of combined protocols involving plasma and chemotherapeutic treatments has been evidenced for mice bearing orthotopic pancreas cancer and is under evaluation for the colon tumors.

  3. DETERMINATION OF BROMATE IN DRINKING WATERS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromate is a disinfection by-product in drinking water, formed during the ozonation of source water containing bromide. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer is combined with an ion chromatograph for the analysis of bromate in drinking waters. Three chromatographic colu...

  4. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Haselton, Halsey H.

    1994-01-01

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm.sup.2 at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance.

  5. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.

    1994-03-08

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

  6. LOW IONIZATION STATE PLASMA IN CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Raymond, John C.

    2012-10-20

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory often observes low ionization state coronal mass ejection (CME) plasma at ultraviolet wavelengths. The CME plasmas are often detected in O VI (3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K), C III (8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K), Ly{alpha}, and Ly{beta}, with the low ionization plasma confined to bright filaments or blobs that appear in small segments of the UVCS slit. On the other hand, in situ observations by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) have shown mostly high ionization state plasmas in the magnetic clouds in interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events, while low ionization states are rarely seen. In this analysis, we investigate whether the low ionization state CME plasmas observed by UVCS occupy small enough fractions of the CME to be consistent with the small fraction of ACE ICMEs that show low ionization plasma, or whether the CME plasma must be further ionized after passing the UVCS slit. To do this, we determine the covering factors of low ionization state plasma for 10 CME events. We find that the low ionization state plasmas in CMEs observed by UVCS show average covering factors below 10%. This indicates that the lack of low ionization state ICME plasmas observed by the ACE results from a small probability that the spacecraft passes through a region of low ionization plasma. We also find that the low ionization state plasma covering factors in faster CMEs are smaller than in slower CMEs.

  7. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam ChargeNeutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson,Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-10-01

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage ({approx} 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K{sup +} ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments.

  8. Pacific Islands Mass Communications; Selected Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richstad, Jim; McMillan, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of materials on such area of mass communications in the Pacific Islands as broadcasting, radio and television, cinema, communication research, mass media in education, Honululu Media Council, newspapers and newspapermen, and printing and satellite communication. (JEG)

  9. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Topala, I. E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp; Nagatsu, M. E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp

    2015-02-02

    In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

  10. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

    2014-04-01

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  11. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  12. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  13. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse. PMID:22380206

  14. Public Data Set: Impedance of an Intense Plasma-Cathode Electron Source for Tokamak Plasma Startup

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hinson, Edward T. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:000000019713140X); Barr, Jayson L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177685931); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Perry, Justin M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000171228609)

    2016-05-31

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in E.T. Hinson et al., 'Impedance of an Intense Plasma-Cathode Electron Source for Tokamak Plasma Startup,' Physics of Plasmas 23, 052515 (2016).

  15. Atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. Y.; Park, S. J.; Choi, M. Y.; Koo, I. G.; Byun, J. H.; Hong, J. W.; Sim, J. Y.; Collins, G. J.; Lee, J. K.

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs) have attracted great interest and have been widely applied in biomedical applications, as due to their non-thermal and reactive properties, they interact with living tissues, cells and bacteria. Various types of plasma sources generated at atmospheric pressure have been developed to achieve better performance in specific applications. This article presents an overview of the general characteristics of APPs and a brief summary of their biomedical applications, and reviews a wide range of these sources developed for biomedical applications. The plasma sources are classified according to their power sources and cover a wide frequency spectrum from dc to microwaves. The configurations and characteristics of plasma sources are outlined and their biomedical applications are presented.

  16. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Maschwitz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  17. Counter-facing plasma guns for efficient extreme ultra-violet plasma light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kuwabara, Hajime; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial guns was proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. We applied Li as the source of plasma for improvement of the conversion efficiency, the spectral purity, and the repetition capability. For operation of the system with ideal counter-facing plasma focus mode, we changed the system from simple coaxial geometry to a multi-channel configuration. We applied a laser trigger to make synchronous multi-channel discharges with low jitter. The results indicated that the configuration is promising to make a high energy density plasma with high spectral efficiency.

  18. A high efficiency thermal ionization source adapted to mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, E.P.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-07-01

    The high-temperature ion source used on the isotope separators at Los Alamos is unsuitable for mass spectrometry use, because it is bulky, expensive to fabricate, requires careful assembly, etc. A modified source was designed, using the following objectives: reduced number of parts and complexity, one-piece crucible, modular construction, little or no water cooling. The source is shown mounted on a quadrupole mass spectrometer; the ion beam is matched into a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  19. POST-CORONAL MASS EJECTION PLASMA OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Raymond, J. C.; Miralles, M. P.; Hara, H.

    2012-05-20

    In the present work we study the evolution of an active region after the eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) using observations from the EIS and XRT instruments on board Hinode. The field of view includes a post-eruption arcade, a current sheet, and a coronal dimming. The goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive set of measurements for all these aspects of the CME phenomenon made on the same CME event. The main physical properties of the plasma along the line of sight-electron density, thermal structure, plasma composition, size, and, when possible, mass-are measured and monitored with time for the first three hours following the CME event of 2008 April 9. We find that the loop arcade observed by EIS and XRT may not be related to the post-eruption arcade. Post-CME plasma is hotter than the surrounding corona, but its temperature never exceeds 3 MK. Both the electron density and thermal structure do not show significant evolution with time, while we found that the size of the loop arcade in the Hinode plane of the sky decreased with time. The plasma composition is the same in the current sheet, in the loop arcade, and in the ambient plasma, so all these plasmas are likely of coronal origin. No significant plasma flows were detected.

  20. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  1. New source of dense, cryogenic positron plasmas.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, L V; Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a new method, based on the ballistic transfer of preaccumulated plasmas, to obtain large and dense positron plasmas in a cryogenic environment. The method involves transferring plasmas emanating from a region with a low magnetic field (0.14 T) and relatively high pressure (10(-9) mbar) into a 15 K Penning-Malmberg trap immersed in a 3 T magnetic field with a base pressure better than 10(-13) mbar. The achieved positron accumulation rate in the high field cryogenic trap is more than one and a half orders of magnitude higher than the previous most efficient UHV compatible scheme. Subsequent stacking resulted in a plasma containing more than 1.2 x 10(9) positrons, which is a factor 4 higher than previously reported. Using a rotating wall electric field, plasmas containing about 20 x 10(6) positrons were compressed to a density of 2.6 x 10(10) cm(-3). This is a factor of 6 improvement over earlier measurements. PMID:16090691

  2. Characterization of the cold atmospheric plasma hybrid source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárdoš, L.; Baránková, H.

    2005-07-01

    Parameters of the hybrid hollow electrode activated discharge (H-HEAD) source for cold atmospheric plasma applications are described. The source with a simple cylindrical electrode terminated by a gas nozzle combines the microwave antenna plasma with the hollow cathode plasma generated inside the nozzle by a pulsed dc power. The source can produce over 15 cm long plasma plumes at less than 200 sccm of argon and 100 sccm of neon flowing in open air at the microwave power of 400 W (2.4 GHz). Parameters of the hybrid plasma are controlled by both the microwave power and the power delivered to the hollow cathode. An anomalous effect of a sharp increase in the length of the plasma plume at low gas flows is discussed. Results of the optical emission spectroscopy in argon and neon are presented. Optical spectra confirmed the presence of Ti and Fe from the hollow cathode in the plasma. The production of metal increases with the power applied to the hollow cathode. Traces of Ti from the hollow cathode have been found at substrates positioned as far as 2 cm from the cathode. This finding confirms the possibility to use the H-HEAD source for atmospheric physical vapor deposition (PVD) and hybrid PVD and plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of composite films.

  3. Matching network for RF plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  4. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  5. A new plasma source based on contact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Koslover, R.; Karim, R.; Rynn, N.

    1985-07-01

    A new type of plasma source is presented: A collisionless plasma is formed by producing ions on one end and electrons on the other of a cylindrical vacuum chamber in a solenoidal magnetic field. The ions are produced by contact ionization of potassium on tungsten. The source of electrons is a LaB6 plate. In the usual single-ended Q machine the elements rhenium, iridium, and platinum are tested as ionizing metals for potassium and barium.

  6. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2008-06-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus them to a small spot size and compress their axial length. The plasma source should operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally-applied fields. To produce long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients have been developed. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) is covered with ceramic material. High voltage ({approx} 8 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A BaTiO{sub 3} source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested and characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma in the 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} density range. The source was integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments, and yielded current compression ratios {approx} 120. Present research is developing multi-meter-long and higher density sources to support beam compression experiments for high energy density physics applications.

  7. Helicon Plasma Source Configuration Analysis by Means of Density Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Angrilli, F.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.; Maggiora, R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D.O.

    1999-11-13

    Initial results have been obtained from operation of a helicon plasma source built to conduct optimization studies for space propulsion applications. The source features an easily reconfigurable antenna to test different geometries. Operating with He as the source gas, peak densities >= 1.6X10{sup 19} m{sup -3} have been achieved. Radial and axial plasma profiles have been obtained using a microwave interferometer that can be scanned axially and a Langmuir probe. The source will be used to investigate operation at high magnetic field, frequency, and input power.

  8. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  9. Characteristics of Plasma Using a Ferromagnetic Enhanced Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyong Nam; Hyeuk Lim, Jong; Park, Jung Kyun; Lim, Jong Tae; Yeom, Geun Young

    2008-09-01

    Plasma characteristics and electrical parameters of an internal linear inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source with a U-type antenna with/without a Ni-Zn ferromagnetic material installed near the antenna were investigated. The application of the ferromagnetic material to the antenna increased the plasma density, improved the plasma uniformity, lowered the antenna voltage, and increased the stability of the plasma during the operation. For the U-type ferromagnetic enhanced internal linear ICP source, a high density plasma on the order of 4.5×1011 cm-3 which is about three higher than that obtained for the source without the ferromagnetic material could be obtained at the pressure of 10 mTorr Ar and at the RF power of 600 W at 13.56 MHz.

  10. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, C. D.; Davis, G. B.; Bastow, T. P.; Woodbury, R. J.; Rao, P. S. C.; Annable, M. D.; Rhodes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L3/L2/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L2/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104 g day- 1 to 24-31 g day- 1 (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions also

  11. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C D; Davis, G B; Bastow, T P; Woodbury, R J; Rao, P S C; Annable, M D; Rhodes, S

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L(3)/L(2)/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L(2)/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104gday(-1) to 24-31gday(-1) (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions

  12. Erosion resistant nozzles for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources

    DOEpatents

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Bernardez, II, Luis J.

    2000-01-04

    A gas nozzle having an increased resistance to erosion from energetic plasma particles generated by laser plasma sources. By reducing the area of the plasma-facing portion of the nozzle below a critical dimension and fabricating the nozzle from a material that has a high EUV transmission as well as a low sputtering coefficient such as Be, C, or Si, it has been shown that a significant reduction in reflectance loss of nearby optical components can be achieved even after exposing the nozzle to at least 10.sup.7 Xe plasma pulses.

  13. The Spatial Nature of the Iogenic Plasma Source near Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Marconi, M. L.

    1998-09-01

    Io, the innermost Galilean satellite of Jupiter, supplies the primary source of heavy ion plasma for the planetary magnetosphere. Understanding the temporal and three-dimensional nature of the Iogenic plasma source (the pickup ions created by ionization and charge exchange of neutrals in Io's local and extended atmosphere) is highly relevant to a large number of studies for the Io-Jupiter system. These studies include the structure and outward transport of the plasma torus, the densest portion of the planetary magnetosphere located about Io's orbit, and a significant number of coupled electrodynamic interactions that have been observed by ground-based, earth-orbiting, and interplanetary spacecraft instruments to occur between the plasma torus, Io, and Jupiter. To explore the nature of the Iogenic plasma source, we have undertaken neutral cloud model calculations for atmospheric gases located above Io's exobase (in the corona and extended clouds) and have calculated in three dimensions their instantaneous electron impact ionization and charge exchange production rates in the plasma torus. Calculations for O and S presented at an earlier meeting (Marconi and Smyth, BAAS 28, 1154-1155, 1996) examined the spatial nature of these Iogenic plasma sources on a large circumplanetary spatial scale and showed that they were highly peaked at Io's instantaneous position on its orbit about Jupiter. Calculations presented here for O and S will focus on the three-dimensional spatial structure of the peak in the Iogenic plasma source at Io. This finer spatial scale description of the Iogenic plasma source near Io is particularly relevant for the December 5, 1995 Galileo spacecraft encounter with Io to investigate the Galileo Plasma Analyzer (PLS) downstream spatial and velocity distributions of the ions (Frank et al. Science 274 394-395, 1996) and the Galileo Magnetometer (MAG) magnetic field reduction near Io (Kivelson et al., Science 274, 396-398, 1996). Recent estimates of the

  14. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Han, Baoxi; Johnson, Rolland P.; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H- ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by long time plasma electrode activation, without adding Cs from Cs supply, by heating the collar to high temperature using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, perfect cesiation was produced (without additional Cs supply) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces.

  15. Analysis of radioactive metals by spark source mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A J; Kozy, A; Morris, R N

    1969-04-01

    A spark source mass spectrograph with photographic plate recording has been adapted for the analysis of plutonium and americium metals. Over seventy elements can be determined simultaneously in these metals. A comparison has been made between results obtained by mass spectrography and by conventional methods for impurity elements. The operations involved in handling radioactive materials in the mass spectrograph are also discussed. PMID:18960537

  16. Fundamental mass transfer models for indoor air pollution sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.; Guo, Z.; Sparks, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses a simple, fundamental mass transfer model, based on Fick's Law of Diffusion, for indoor air pollution wet sorbent-based sources. (Note: Models are needed to predict emissions from indoor sources. While empirical approaches based on dynamic chamber data are useful, a more fundamental approach is needed to fully elucidate the relevant mass transfer processes). In the model, the mass transfer rate is assumed to be gas-phase limited and controlled by the boundary layer mass transfer coefficient, the saturation vapor pressure of the material being emitted, and the mass of volatile material remaining. Results of static and dynamic chamber tests, as well as test house studies, are presented.

  17. Spectroscopic Techniques for the Characterisation of Spectrochemical Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkers, J.; de Regt, J. M.; van der Sijde, B.; van der Mullen, J. A. M.

    In spectrochemistry, various plasma sources are used for the analysis of samples. The simplest way to characterise these plasma sources is to determine the absolute intensities of several atomic lines of the main plasma gas (argon or helium). From these measurements absolute population densities of excited states can be deduced and, via a so-called Boltzmann plot, the electron temperature Te and density ne. This method works quite well as long as the plasma is relatively close to equilibrium. The reason why spectrochemical plasmas can show strong deviations from equilibrium will be discussed. An other limitation of emission spectroscopy is the lack of accurate transition probabilities for transitions from highly excited states. For argon 15 of these probabilities have been determined with an uncertainty of ±25%.

  18. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  19. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources.

    PubMed

    Veitzer, Seth A; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H; Beckwith, Kristian R C

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H(-) source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H(-) ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD

  20. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H- source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H- ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD models

  1. Identification of Neutral Particle Sources in MST Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norval, Ryan; Munaretto, Stefano; Goetz, John; Schmitz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The plasma wall interaction (PWI) in the MST RFP has yet to be studied systematically to determine the effects of the edge plasma on overall plasma performance. Two imaging views of the MST plasma currently exist. The first views the outboard toroidal and poloidal belt limiters at the main poloidal gap limiter. The second views the inboard poloidal limiter, as well as a section of the outboard toroidal limiter away from the man gap limiter. Data from viewing outboard limiters reveals PWI structures correlate with the plasma conditions. In standard RFP plasmas at lower plasma currents the PWI is dominated by non-axisymmetric radiation belts. As the RFP plasma current rises, increasing axisymmetry is seen from the edge. When in the 3D equilibria of the quasi-single helicity (QSH) state the PWI correlates with the main magnetic mode of the plasma. The dominant source of light observed from the MST edge is from hydrogen recycling. This will be used to inform neutral particle sourcing in the EIRENE neutral transport code. EIRENE will be used to compare how variations in fueling could affect the neutral profile in MST. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Development of a long-slot microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Miyamoto, N.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    A 20 cm long 10 cm wide microwave plasma source was realized by inserting two 20 cm long 1.5 mm diameter rod antennas into the plasma. Plasma luminous distributions around the antennas were changed by magnetic field arrangement created by permanent magnets attached to the source. The distributions appeared homogeneous in one direction along the antenna when the spacing between the antenna and the source wall was 7.5 mm for the input microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Plasma density and temperature at a plane 20 cm downstream from the microwave shield were measured by a Langmuir probe array at 150 W microwave power input. The measured electron density and temperature varied over space from 3.0 × 109 cm-3 to 5.8 × 109 cm-3, and from 1.1 eV to 2.1 eV, respectively.

  3. Development of a long-slot microwave plasma source.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Y; Kasuya, T; Miyamoto, N; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    A 20 cm long 10 cm wide microwave plasma source was realized by inserting two 20 cm long 1.5 mm diameter rod antennas into the plasma. Plasma luminous distributions around the antennas were changed by magnetic field arrangement created by permanent magnets attached to the source. The distributions appeared homogeneous in one direction along the antenna when the spacing between the antenna and the source wall was 7.5 mm for the input microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Plasma density and temperature at a plane 20 cm downstream from the microwave shield were measured by a Langmuir probe array at 150 W microwave power input. The measured electron density and temperature varied over space from 3.0 × 10(9) cm(-3) to 5.8 × 10(9) cm(-3), and from 1.1 eV to 2.1 eV, respectively. PMID:26932114

  4. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  5. The ionospheric source of magnetospheric plasma is not a black box input for global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, D. T.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2016-06-01

    Including ionospheric outflow in global magnetohydrodynamic models of near-Earth outer space has become an important step toward understanding the role of this plasma source in the magnetosphere. Of the existing approaches, however, few tie the outflowing particle fluxes to magnetospheric conditions in a self-consistent manner. Doing so opens the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to nonlinear mass-energy feedback loops, profoundly changing the behavior of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Based on these new results, it is time for the community eschew treating ionospheric outflow as a simple black box source of magnetospheric plasma.

  6. Plasma lasers (a strong source of coherent radiation in astrophysics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1981-01-01

    The generation of electromagnetic radiation from the free energy available in electron streams is discussed. The fundamental principles involved in a particular class of coherent plasma radiation sources, i.e., plasma lasers, are reviewed, focusing on three wave coupling, nonlinear parametric instabilities, and negative energy waves. The simplest case of plasma lasers, that of an unmagnetized plasma containing a finite level of density fluctuations and electrons streaming with respect to the ions, is dealt with. A much more complicated application of plasma lasers to the case of auroral kilometric radiation is then examined. The concept of free electron lasers, including the role of relativistic scattering, is elucidated. Important problems involving the escape of the excited radiation from its generation region, effects due to plasma shielding and nonlinear limits, are brought out.

  7. Plasma spectroscopy of metal ions for hyper-electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the optical line spectra of metal ions from ECR plasma were observed using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for the beam tuning process, because it allows to conduct the extraction of the desired metal ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research provides a new approach for its simplification. In this paper the grating monochromator method for metal ion beam tuning such as (40)Ca(12+), (56)Fe(15+), and (85)Rb(20+) of hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron is described. PMID:24593484

  8. Immediate Influence of External Sources on Turbulent Plasma Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuga, Yusuke; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    Immediate impact of external sources on pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and turbulent transport (without waiting the evolution of global parameters and those in mean velocity distribution function) is discussed. The case, where an external source directly couples with plasma fluctuations in particle source and momentum source, is investigated. Theoretical analysis is developed by use of Hasegawa-Wakatani model equations. It is shown that the momentum source can induce the immediate influence on the turbulence and turbulent transport. The effect of this coupling between source and fluctuations on the momentum theorem is also explained.

  9. Operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Luo, G.-N.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~ 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). Ion cyclotron heating (~ 30 kW) will be via a magnetic beach approach. Plasma diagnostics include Thomson Scattering and a retarding field energy analyzer near the target, while a microwave interferometer and double-Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters elsewhere in the system. Filterscopes are being used to measure D-alpha emission and He line ratios at multiple locations, and IR cameras image the target plates to determine heat deposition. High plasma densities in the helicon region have been produced in He (>3x1019/m3) and D (>1.5x1019/m3) , and operation with on-axis magnetic field strength >1 T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results and future plans for studying plasma surface/RF antenna interactions will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  10. Plasma Characteristics Using Superimposed Dual Frequency Inductively Coupled Plasma Source for Next Generation Device Processing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Lee, Chul Hee; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kyong Nam

    2015-11-01

    U-shaped inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source was investigated as a linear plasma source for the next generation roll-to-toll flexible display processing. For the radio frequency power to the source, the dual frequency composed of 13.56 MHz and 2 MHz was used and the effect of dual frequency to the U-shaped ICP source on the plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma uniformity was investigated. As the operating condition, 200 mTorr Ar was used without operating turbo pumps. The use of superimposed dual frequency composed of 13.56 MHz + 2 MHz instead the single frequency of 13.56 MHz increased the plasma density slightly at the same total power. In addition, the addition of 2 MHz rf power to 0.4 kW while maintaining 1 kW 13.56 MHz rf power not only decreased electron temperature but also improved both the plasma uniformity and the process uniformity measured by photoresist etching. Therefore, by using the dual frequency to the U-shaped ICP source, not only the plasma density but also plasma uniformity could be improved in addition to the decrease of possible damage to the substrate. PMID:26726573

  11. Imploding plasma radiation sources: basic concepts. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Guillory, J.; Davis, J.

    1984-07-31

    This document is prepared as a briefing aid and technical primer for persons unfamiliar and uninitiated with the theory of imploding plasma radiation sources. It is hoped that it will prove helpful in introducing the basic physics concepts of these sources and in presenting these concepts to newcomers and potential users.

  12. An interchangeable-cathode vacuum arc plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, David K.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Hart, Grant W.

    2010-01-15

    A simplified vacuum arc design [based on metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) concepts] is employed as a plasma source for a study of a {sup 7}Be non-neutral plasma. The design includes a mechanism for interchanging the cathode source. Testing of the plasma source showed that it is capable of producing on the order of 10{sup 12} charges at confinable energies using a boron-carbide disk as the cathode target. The design is simplified from typical designs for lower energy and lower density applications by using only the trigger spark rather than the full vacuum arc in high current ion beam designs. The interchangeability of the cathode design gives the source the ability to replace only the source sample, simplifying use of radioactive materials in the plasma source. The sample can also be replaced with a completely different conductive material. The design can be easily modified for use in other plasma confinement or full MeVVA applications.

  13. Gallium ion extraction from a plasma sputter-type ion source.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, M; Imakita, S; Kasuya, T; Maeno, S; Wada, M

    2010-02-01

    A broad mixed ion beam containing positive ions of gallium (Ga) was produced with a plasma sputter-type ion source. Liquid Ga was suspended on a tungsten reservoir to be sputtered and postionized in argon (Ar) plasma excited by a radio frequency (rf) power at 13.56 MHz. Optical emission spectra from the plasma near the Ga sputtering target had indicated that the release of Ga into plasma increased with increasing negative bias to the sputtering target. The ratio of Ga(+) current to Ar(+) current was measured to be about 1% with a quadrupole mass analyzer at 100 V extraction voltage for incident rf power as low as 30 W. Ions in the plasma were extracted through a pair of multiaperture electrodes. The homogeneity of Ga flux was examined by making a Ga deposition pattern on a glass substrate located behind the extractor electrodes. PMID:20192457

  14. Gallium ion extraction from a plasma sputter-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. Jr.; Imakita, S.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.; Maeno, S.

    2010-02-15

    A broad mixed ion beam containing positive ions of gallium (Ga) was produced with a plasma sputter-type ion source. Liquid Ga was suspended on a tungsten reservoir to be sputtered and postionized in argon (Ar) plasma excited by a radio frequency (rf) power at 13.56 MHz. Optical emission spectra from the plasma near the Ga sputtering target had indicated that the release of Ga into plasma increased with increasing negative bias to the sputtering target. The ratio of Ga{sup +} current to Ar{sup +} current was measured to be about 1% with a quadrupole mass analyzer at 100 V extraction voltage for incident rf power as low as 30 W. Ions in the plasma were extracted through a pair of multiaperture electrodes. The homogeneity of Ga flux was examined by making a Ga deposition pattern on a glass substrate located behind the extractor electrodes.

  15. What Are the Sources of Solar Energetic Particles? Element Abundances and Source Plasma Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2015-11-01

    We have spent 50 years in heated discussion over which populations of solar energetic particles (SEPs) are accelerated at flares and which by shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The association of the large "gradual" SEP events with shock acceleration is supported by the extensive spatial distribution of SEPs and by the delayed acceleration of the particles. Recent STEREO observations have begun to show that the particle onset times correspond to the observed time of arrival of the shock on the observer's magnetic flux tube and that the SEP intensities are related to the local shock speed. The relative abundances of the elements in these gradual events are a measure of those in the ambient solar corona, differing from those in the photosphere by a widely-observed function of the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements. SEP events we call "impulsive", the traditional "3He-rich" events with enhanced heavy-element abundances, are associated with type III radio bursts, flares, and narrow CMEs; they selectively populate flux tubes that thread a localized source, and they are fit to new particle-in-cell models of magnetic reconnection on open field lines as found in solar jets. These models help explain the strong enhancements seen in heavy elements as a power (of 2-8) in the mass-to-charge ratio A/Q throughout the periodic table from He to Pb. A study of the temperature dependence of A/Q shows that the source plasma in impulsive SEP events must lie in the range of 2-4 MK to explain the pattern of abundances. This is much lower than the temperatures of >10 MK seen on closed loops in solar flares. Recent studies of A/Q-dependent enhancements or suppressions from scattering during transport show source plasma temperatures in gradual SEP events to be 0.8-1.6 MK in 69 % of the events, i.e. coronal plasma; 24 % of the events show reaccelerated impulsive-event material.

  16. Honeycomblike large area LaB6 plasma source for Multi-Purpose Plasma facility.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun; You, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Lho, Taihyeop; Choh, Kwon Kook; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Yong Ho; Lee, Bongju; Yoo, Suk Jae; Kwon, Myeon

    2007-10-01

    A Multi-Purpose Plasma (MP(2)) facility has been renovated from Hanbit mirror device [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 686 (2003)] by adopting the same philosophy of diversified plasma simulator (DiPS) [Chung et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 46, 354 (2006)] by installing two plasma sources: LaB(6) (dc) and helicon (rf) plasma sources; and making three distinct simulators: divertor plasma simulator, space propulsion simulator, and astrophysics simulator. During the first renovation stage, a honeycomblike large area LaB(6) (HLA-LaB(6)) cathode was developed for the divertor plasma simulator to improve the resistance against the thermal shock fragility for large and high density plasma generation. A HLA-LaB(6) cathode is composed of the one inner cathode with 4 in. diameter and the six outer cathodes with 2 in. diameter along with separate graphite heaters. The first plasma is generated with Ar gas and its properties are measured by the electric probes with various discharge currents and magnetic field configurations. Plasma density at the middle of central cell reaches up to 2.6 x 10(12) cm(-3), while the electron temperature remains around 3-3.5 eV at the low discharge current of less than 45 A, and the magnetic field intensity of 870 G. Unique features of electric property of heaters, plasma density profiles, is explained comparing with those of single LaB(6) cathode with 4 in. diameter in DiPS. PMID:17979417

  17. Honeycomblike large area LaB6 plasma source for Multi-Purpose Plasma facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun; You, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Lho, Taihyeop; Choh, Kwon Kook; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Yong Ho; Lee, Bongju; Yoo, Suk Jae; Kwon, Myeon

    2007-10-01

    A Multi-Purpose Plasma (MP2) facility has been renovated from Hanbit mirror device [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 686 (2003)] by adopting the same philosophy of diversified plasma simulator (DiPS) [Chung et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 46, 354 (2006)] by installing two plasma sources: LaB6 (dc) and helicon (rf) plasma sources; and making three distinct simulators: divertor plasma simulator, space propulsion simulator, and astrophysics simulator. During the first renovation stage, a honeycomblike large area LaB6 (HLA-LaB6) cathode was developed for the divertor plasma simulator to improve the resistance against the thermal shock fragility for large and high density plasma generation. A HLA-LaB6 cathode is composed of the one inner cathode with 4in. diameter and the six outer cathodes with 2in. diameter along with separate graphite heaters. The first plasma is generated with Ar gas and its properties are measured by the electric probes with various discharge currents and magnetic field configurations. Plasma density at the middle of central cell reaches up to 2.6×1012 cm-3, while the electron temperature remains around 3-3.5eV at the low discharge current of less than 45A, and the magnetic field intensity of 870G. Unique features of electric property of heaters, plasma density profiles, is explained comparing with those of single LaB6 cathode with 4in. diameter in DiPS.

  18. Coupling modes in a dipolar microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, Ana; Baele, Pierre; Maurau, Remy; Bechu, Stephane; Bes, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    The multi-dipolar microwave plasma is a suitable technology for the scaling-up of high density plasma processing in the very low pressure range. Effectively, a large area or volume of plasma can be achieved by a mere distribution, over 2 or 3 dimensions, of a number of elementary plasma sources. To enhance the microwave coupling efficiency and optimize the spatial repartition of the elementary plasma sources, it could be helpful to localize the production regions and coupling modes that govern the energy transfer from the wave to the electrons. The main objective of this work is to identify the possible coupling modes as a function of operating parameters. Accordingly, the plasma parameters (electron temperature, density) were correlated together with the electromagnetic radiation, as well as with different coupling modes observed as a function of microwave power. High plasma densities, up to 10 times the critical density (for one source), can be achieved through an efficient transfer of the electrostatic wave energy to the electrons.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of the plasma in a hollow anode with an incorporated ferroelectric plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Krokhmal, A.; Gleizer, J.Z.; Krasik, Ya.E.; Yarmolich, D.; Felsteiner, J.; Bernshtam, V.

    2004-10-01

    Spectroscopic measurements are reported of the plasma formed inside a hollow anode (HA) with a ferroelectric plasma source (FPS) incorporated in it. The HA was used as a cathode in a diode supplied by an accelerating pulse ({<=}300 kV, {<=}400 ns). It was found that the HA discharge (1.2 kA, 10 {mu}s) is accompanied by the formation of a dense ({approx_equal}8x10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) plasma layer at the surface of the FPS. This surface plasma serves as a practically unlimited source of electrons. In the bulk of the HA plasma the density is {approx_equal}3x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and it remains the same during the accelerating pulse whereas the plasma electron temperature increases from 4 to 11 eV.

  20. A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion source characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Wan, X; Jin, D Z; Tan, X H; Huang, Z X; Tan, G B

    2015-03-01

    A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer with overall dimension of about 413 × 250 × 414 mm based on orthogonal injection and angle reflection has been developed for ion source characterization. Configuration and principle of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer are introduced in this paper. The mass resolution is optimized to be about 1690 (FWHM), and the ion energy detection range is tested to be between about 3 and 163 eV with the help of electron impact ion source. High mass resolution and compact configuration make this spectrometer useful to provide a valuable diagnostic for ion spectra fundamental research and study the mass to charge composition of plasma with wide range of parameters. PMID:25832275

  1. A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion source characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. Wan, X.; Jin, D. Z.; Tan, X. H.; Huang, Z. X.; Tan, G. B.

    2015-03-15

    A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer with overall dimension of about 413 × 250 × 414 mm based on orthogonal injection and angle reflection has been developed for ion source characterization. Configuration and principle of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer are introduced in this paper. The mass resolution is optimized to be about 1690 (FWHM), and the ion energy detection range is tested to be between about 3 and 163 eV with the help of electron impact ion source. High mass resolution and compact configuration make this spectrometer useful to provide a valuable diagnostic for ion spectra fundamental research and study the mass to charge composition of plasma with wide range of parameters.

  2. A comparative study of radiofrequency antennas for Helicon plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melazzi, D.; Lancellotti, V.

    2015-04-01

    Since Helicon plasma sources can efficiently couple power and generate high-density plasma, they have received interest also as spacecraft propulsive devices, among other applications. In order to maximize the power deposited into the plasma, it is necessary to assess the performance of the radiofrequency (RF) antenna that drives the discharge, as typical plasma parameters (e.g. the density) are varied. For this reason, we have conducted a comparative analysis of three Helicon sources which feature different RF antennas, namely, the single-loop, the Nagoya type-III and the fractional helix. These antennas are compared in terms of input impedance and induced current density; in particular, the real part of the impedance constitutes a measure of the antenna ability to couple power into the plasma. The results presented in this work have been obtained through a full-wave approach which (being hinged on the numerical solution of a system of integral equations) allows computing the antenna current and impedance self-consistently. Our findings indicate that certain combinations of plasma parameters can indeed maximize the real part of the input impedance and, thus, the deposited power, and that one of the three antennas analyzed performs best for a given plasma. Furthermore, unlike other strategies which rely on approximate antenna models, our approach enables us to reveal that the antenna current density is not spatially uniform, and that a correlation exists between the plasma parameters and the spatial distribution of the current density.

  3. A pulsed xenon megawatt arc plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The exhaust of the source flowing into vacuum was measured by Thomson scattering diagnosis. Mean electron temperatures and densities were found to be 4-8 eV and of order ten to the 13th power cm/3 respectively over the 8 cm exhaust diameter at 30 cm from the source. Large shot to shot variations were noted. After a transient spike passes, these conditions persist during the power time of 125 microsecond. These exhaust conditions are marginal for evaluation of a proposed near resonant charge exchange pumped laser theory.

  4. Generation of metal ions in the beam plasma produced by a forevacuum-pressure electron beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G. Zolotukhin, D. B.; Klimov, A. S.; Savkin, K. P.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the production of metal ions of magnesium and zinc in the beam plasma formed by a forevacuum-pressure electron source. Magnesium and zinc vapor were generated by electron beam evaporation from a crucible and subsequently ionized by electron impact from the e-beam itself. Both gaseous and metallic plasmas were separately produced and characterized using a modified RGA-100 quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The fractional composition of metal isotopes in the plasma corresponds to their fractional natural abundance.

  5. NEUTRON SOURCE USING MAGNETIC COMPRESSION OF PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Quinn, W.E.; Elmore, W.C.; Little, E.M.; Boyer, K.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-31

    A fusion reactor is described that utilizes compression and heating of an ionized thermonuclear fuel by an externally applied magnetic field, thus avoiding reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. The device consists of a gas-confining ceramic container surrounded by a single circumferential coil having a shape such as to produce a magnetic mirror geometry. A sinusoidally-oscillating, exponentially-damped current is passed circumferentially around the container, through the coil, inducing a circumferential current in the gas. Maximum compression and plasma temperature are obtained at the peak of the current oscillations, coinciding with maximum magnetic field intensity. Enhanced temperatures are obtained in the second and succeeding half cycles because the thermal energy accumulates from one half cycle to the next. (AEC)

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MASS FLUX REDUCTION AND SOURCE-ZONE MASS REMOVAL: ANALYSIS OF FIELD DATA

    PubMed Central

    DiFilippo, Erica L.

    2010-01-01

    The magnitude of contaminant mass flux reduction associated with a specific amount of contaminant mass removed is a key consideration for evaluating the effectiveness of a source-zone remediation effort. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing, estimating, and predicting relationships between mass flux reduction and mass removal. Published data collected for several field studies were examined to evaluate relationships between mass flux reduction and source-zone mass removal. The studies analyzed herein represent a variety of source-zone architectures, immiscible-liquid compositions, and implemented remediation technologies. There are two general approaches to characterizing the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship, end-point analysis and time-continuous analysis. End-point analysis, based on comparing masses and mass fluxes measured before and after a source-zone remediation effort, was conducted for 21 remediation projects. Mass removals were greater than 60% for all but three of the studies. Mass flux reductions ranging from slightly less than to slightly greater than one-to-one were observed for the majority of the sites. However, these single-snapshot characterizations are limited in that the antecedent behavior is indeterminate. Time-continuous analysis, based on continuous monitoring of mass removal and mass flux, was performed for two sites, both for which data were obtained under water-flushing conditions. The reductions in mass flux were significantly different for the two sites (90% vs. ~8%) for similar mass removals (~40%). These results illustrate the dependence of the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship on source-zone architecture and associated mass-transfer processes. Minimal mass flux reduction was observed for a system wherein mass removal was relatively efficient (ideal mass transfer and displacement). Conversely, a significant degree of mass flux reduction was observed for a site wherein mass removal was inefficient

  7. Plasma-based ambient ionization mass spectrometry in bioanalytical sciences.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Silberring, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-based ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques are gaining growing interest due to their specific features, such as the need for little or no sample preparation, its high analysis speed, and the ambient experimental conditions. Samples can be analyzed in gas, liquid, or solid forms. These techniques allow for a wide range of applications, like warfare agent detection, chemical reaction control, mass spectrometry imaging, polymer identification, and food safety monitoring, as well as applications in biomedical science, e.g., drug and pharmaceutical analysis, medical diagnostics, biochemical analysis, etc. Until now, the main drawback of plasma-based techniques is their quantitative aspect, but a lot of efforts have been done to improve this obstacle. PMID:25988731

  8. Plasma ionization under simulated ambient Mars conditions for quantification of methane by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taghioskoui, Mazdak; Zaghloul, Mona

    2016-04-01

    Ambient ionization techniques enable ion production in the native sample environment for mass spectrometry, without a need for sample preparation or separation. These techniques provide superior advantages over conventional ionization methods and are well developed and investigated for various analytical applications. However, employing ambient ionization techniques for in situ extra-terrestrial chemical analysis requires these techniques to be designed and developed according to the ambient conditions of extra-terrestrial environments, which substantially differ from the ambient conditions of Earth. Here, we report a plasma ionization source produced under simulated ambient Mars conditions for mass spectrometry. The plasma ionization source was coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of trace amounts of methane, as an analyte of interest in Mars discovery missions, were demonstrated. The miniature plasma source was operational at a net power as low as ∼1.7 W in the pressure range of 4-16 Torr. A detection limit as low as ∼0.15 ppm (v/v) at 16 Torr for methane was demonstrated. PMID:26947458

  9. Are Spicules the Primary Source of Hot Coronal Plasma?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of Type II spicules has generated considerable excitement. It has even been suggested that these ejections can account for a majority of the hot plasma observed in the corona, thus obviating the need for "coronal" heating. If this is the case, however, then there should be observational consequences. We have begun to examine some of these consequences and find reason to question the idea that spicules are the primary source of hot coronal plasma.

  10. Dual radio frequency plasma source: Understanding via electrical asymmetry effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-04-21

    On the basis of the global model, the influences of driving voltage and frequency on electron heating in geometrically symmetrical dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma have been investigated. Consistent with the experimental and simulation results, non-monotonic behavior of dc self bias and plasma heating with increasing high frequency is observed. In addition to the local maxima of plasma parameters for the integer values of the ratio between the frequencies ({xi}), ourstudies also predict local maxima for odd integer values of 2{xi} as a consequence of the electrical asymmetry effect produced by dual frequency voltage sources.

  11. e+e- Plasma Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, Ed P.

    2013-12-06

    This note addresses the idea of a photon source that is based on an e+e- plasma created by co-propagating beams of e+ and e-. The plasma has a well-defined temperature, and the thermal distribution of the charged particles is used to average over the relative velocity cross section multiplied by the relative velocity. Two relevant cross sections are the direct “free-free” annihilation of e+e- pairs in the plasma, and the radiative recombination of e+e- pairs into positronium (Ps) which subsequently undergoes annihilation.

  12. Atomic oxygen patterning from a biomedical needle-plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Seán; Turner, Miles M.

    2013-09-01

    A "plasma needle" is a cold plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure. Such sources interact strongly with living cells, but experimental studies on bacterial samples show that this interaction has a surprising pattern resulting in circular or annular killing structures. This paper presents numerical simulations showing that this pattern occurs because biologically active reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are produced dominantly where effluent from the plasma needle interacts with ambient air. A novel solution strategy is utilised coupling plasma produced neutral (uncharged) reactive species to the gas dynamics solving for steady state profiles at the treated biological surface. Numerical results are compared with experimental reports corroborating evidence for atomic oxygen as a key bactericidal species. Surface losses are considered for interaction of plasma produced reactants with reactive solid and liquid interfaces. Atomic oxygen surface reactions on a reactive solid surface with adsorption probabilities above 0.1 are shown to be limited by the flux of atomic oxygen from the plasma. Interaction of the source with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface.

  13. Atomic oxygen patterning from a biomedical needle-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Seán; Turner, Miles M.

    2013-09-28

    A “plasma needle” is a cold plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure. Such sources interact strongly with living cells, but experimental studies on bacterial samples show that this interaction has a surprising pattern resulting in circular or annular killing structures. This paper presents numerical simulations showing that this pattern occurs because biologically active reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are produced dominantly where effluent from the plasma needle interacts with ambient air. A novel solution strategy is utilised coupling plasma produced neutral (uncharged) reactive species to the gas dynamics solving for steady state profiles at the treated biological surface. Numerical results are compared with experimental reports corroborating evidence for atomic oxygen as a key bactericidal species. Surface losses are considered for interaction of plasma produced reactants with reactive solid and liquid interfaces. Atomic oxygen surface reactions on a reactive solid surface with adsorption probabilities above 0.1 are shown to be limited by the flux of atomic oxygen from the plasma. Interaction of the source with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface.

  14. Development and Characterization of Inverted Helicon Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Benjamin; Ruzic, David

    2007-11-01

    Helicon plasmas are useful as hot, dense sources requiring low magnetic fields. Since Boswell's^1 use of helicon waves in low pressure gas, research has strived to determine the wave-plasma coupling mechanism. Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes^2 remain a strong candidate. An inverted helicon plasma source uses a Nagoya Type III dielectric-covered helicon antenna, placed within a vacuum chamber. The antenna is 8.2 cm long, 2.2 cm in radius, using an frequency of 13.56 MHz. Basic dispersion relation theory is developed as an extension of existing helicon theory which includes TG modes and annular helicons^3. With this arrangement, diagnostic measurements are made inside and outside the antenna volume. To characterize the plasma, an RF-compensated Langmuir probe measures ne and Te, and 3 B-dot probes measure the field shape of the R, Theta and Z components about the antenna region in the R and Z directions. Typical ne and Te in an Ar plasma were found to be 3x10^18/m^3 and 3 eV. The goal of this work is to find another configuration to determine the method of efficient plasma heating. [1] R.W. Boswell, Phys. Lett. 33A, 457 (1970) [2] A.W. Trivelpiece and R.W. Gould, Jour. App. Phys. 30 (11) (1959) [3] M. Yano and M.L.R. Walker, Phys. of Plasmas. 13 (063501) (2006)

  15. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2012-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  16. Modelling and Simulation of the Advanced Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Benjamin; Peter, Ralf; Harhausen, Jens; Ohl, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    Plasma ion assisted-deposition (PIAD) is a combination of conventional thermal evaporation deposition and plasma-beam surface modification; it serves as a well-established technology for the creation of high quality coatings on mirrors, lenses, and other optical devices. It is closely related to ion-assisted deposition to the extent that electrons preserve quasineutrality of the ion beam. This paper investigates the Advanced Plasma Source (APS), a plasma beam source employed for PIAD. A field enhanced glow discharge generates a radially expanding plasma flow with an ion energy of about 80-120 eV. Charge exchange collisions with the neutral background gas (pressure 0.1 Pa and below) produce a cold secondary plasma, which expands as well. A model is developed which describes the primary ions by a simplified Boltzmann equation, the secondary ions by the equations of continuity and momentum balance, and the electrons by the condition of Boltzmann equilibrium. Additionally, quasineutrality is assumed. The model can be reduced to a single nonlinear differential equation for the velocity of the secondary ions, which has several removable singularities and one essential singularity, identified as the Bohm singularity. Solving the model yields macroscopic plasma features, such as fluxes, densities, and the electrical field. An add-on Monte-Carlo simulation is employed to calculate the ion energy distribution function at the substrate. All results compare well to experiments conducted at a commercial APS system.

  17. Investigation of radiofrequency plasma sources for space travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.; Takahashi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Optimization of radiofrequency (RF) plasma sources for the development of space thrusters differs from other applications such as plasma processing of materials since power efficiency, propellant usage, particle acceleration or heating become driving parameters. The development of two RF (13.56 MHz) plasma sources, the high-pressure (˜1 Torr) capacitively coupled ‘pocket rocket’ plasma micro-thruster and the low-pressure (˜1 mTorr) inductively coupled helicon double layer thruster (HDLT), is discussed within the context of mature and emerging electric propulsion devices. The density gradient in low-pressure expanding RF plasmas creates an electric field that accelerates positive ions out of the plasma. Generally, the total potential drop is similar to that of a wall sheath allowing the plasma electrons to neutralize the ion beam. A high-pressure expansion with no applied magnetic field can result in large dissociation rates and/or a collimated beam of ions of small area and a flowing heated neutral beam (‘pocket rocket’). A low-pressure expansion dominated by a magnetic field can result in the formation of electric double layers which produce a very directed neutralized beam of ions of large area (HDLT).

  18. Predicting DNAPL mass discharge from pool-dominated source zones.

    PubMed

    Christ, John A; Ramsburg, C Andrew; Pennell, Kurt D; Abriola, Linda M

    2010-05-20

    Models that link simplified descriptions of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone architecture with predictions of mass flux can be effective screening tools for evaluation of source zone management strategies. Recent efforts have focused on the development and implementation of upscaled models to approximate the relationship between mass removal and flux-averaged, down-gradient contaminant concentration (or mass flux) reduction. The efficacy of these methods has been demonstrated for ganglia-dominated source zones. This work extends these methods to source zones dominated by high-saturation DNAPL pools. An existing upscaled mass transfer model was modified to reproduce dissolution behavior in pool-dominated scenarios by employing a two-domain (ganglia and pools) representation of the source zone. The two-domain upscaled model is parameterized using the initial fraction of the source zone that exists as pool regions, the initial fraction of contaminant eluting from these pool regions, and the flux-averaged down-gradient contaminant concentration. Comparisons of model predictions with a series of three-dimensional source zone numerical simulations and data from two-dimensional aquifer cell experiments demonstrate the ability of the model to predict DNAPL dissolution from ganglia- and pool-dominated source zones for all levels of mass recovery. PMID:20227132

  19. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R. F.

    2011-09-26

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H{sup -} ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by plasma electrode 'activation', without supplying additional Cs, by heating the collar to high temperature for several hours using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, optimum cesiation was produced (without additional Cs) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces. Such activation by accumulation of impurities on electrode surfaces can be a reason for H{sup -} emission enhancement in other so-called 'volume' negative ion sources.

  20. Efficient cesiation in RF driven surface plasma negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belchenko, Yu.; Ivanov, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on hydrogen negative ions production in the large radio-frequency negative ion source with cesium seed are described. The system of directed cesium deposition to the plasma grid periphery was used. The small cesium seed (˜0.5 G) provides an enhanced H- production during a 2 month long experimental cycle. The gradual increase of negative ion yield during the long-term source runs was observed after cesium addition to the source. The degraded H- production was recorded after air filling to the source or after the cesium washing away from the driver and plasma chamber walls. The following source conditioning by beam shots produces the gradual recovery of H- yield to the high value. The effect of H- yield recovery after cesium coverage passivation by air fill was studied. The concept of cesium coverage replenishment and of H- yield recovery due to sputtering of cesium from the deteriorated layers is discussed.

  1. Efficient cesiation in RF driven surface plasma negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Belchenko, Yu; Ivanov, A; Konstantinov, S; Sanin, A; Sotnikov, O

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on hydrogen negative ions production in the large radio-frequency negative ion source with cesium seed are described. The system of directed cesium deposition to the plasma grid periphery was used. The small cesium seed (∼0.5 G) provides an enhanced H(-) production during a 2 month long experimental cycle. The gradual increase of negative ion yield during the long-term source runs was observed after cesium addition to the source. The degraded H(-) production was recorded after air filling to the source or after the cesium washing away from the driver and plasma chamber walls. The following source conditioning by beam shots produces the gradual recovery of H(-) yield to the high value. The effect of H(-) yield recovery after cesium coverage passivation by air fill was studied. The concept of cesium coverage replenishment and of H(-) yield recovery due to sputtering of cesium from the deteriorated layers is discussed. PMID:26932015

  2. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  3. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  4. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  5. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  6. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  7. Hot Plasma Associated with a Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Miralles, M. P.; Raymond, J. C.; Hara, H.

    2013-11-01

    We analyze coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board Hinode of an X-ray Plasma Ejection (XPE) that occurred during the coronal mass ejection (CME) event of 2008 April 9. The XPE was trailing the CME core from behind, following the same trajectory, and could be identified both in EIS and XRT observations. Using the EIS spectrometer, we have determined the XPE plasma parameters, measuring the electron density, thermal distribution, and elemental composition. We have found that the XPE composition and electron density were very similar to those of the pre-event active region plasma. The XPE temperature was higher, and its thermal distribution peaked at around 3 MK also, typical flare lines were absent from EIS spectra, indicating that any XPE component with temperatures in excess of 5 MK was likely either faint or absent. We used XRT data to investigate the presence of hotter plasma components in the XPE that could have gone undetected by EIS and found that—if at all present—these components have small emission measure values and their temperature is in the 8-12.5 MK range. The very hot plasma found in earlier XPE observations obtained by Yohkoh seems to be largely absent in this CME, although plasma ionization timescales may lead to non-equilibrium ionization effects that could make bright lines from ions formed in a 10 MK plasma not detectable by EIS. Our results supersede the XPE findings of Landi et al., who studied the same event with older response functions for the XRT Al-poly filter; the differences in the results stress the importance of using accurate filter response functions.

  8. Reasonable structure for the discharge type plasma source. [In Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    An, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments conducted with a magnetoplasma thruster in which plasma production and acceleration were treated separately indicate that different plasma source geometries have the most direct effect on energy conversion efficiency. An analysis of cup and tube type constraining structures shows the cup type to incur the greatest losses. It is noted that a parallel rail-type open structure such as that employed by the Chinese MDT-2A thruster leads to substantial discharge process dispersion. It is emphasized that the type and performance characteristics of a plasma source have a critical influence on thruster behavior. 5 references.

  9. Simple microwave preionization source for ohmic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, W.; Kwon, Gi-Chung; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Jayhyun; Jeon, Sang-Jean; Huh, Songwhe

    2000-07-01

    A simple economical 2.45 GHz microwave system has been developed and utilized for preionization on the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)-TOKAMAK. The magnetron microwave source was obtained from a widely used, household microwave oven. Since ac operation of the magnetron is not suitable for tokamak application, the magnetron cathode bias circuit was modified to obtain continuous and stable operation of the magnetron for several hundred milliseconds. Application of the developed microwave system to KAIST-TOKAMAK resulted in a reduction of ohmic flux consumption.

  10. Glow discharge electron impact ionization source for miniature mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Song, Qingyu; Noll, Robert J; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2007-05-01

    A glow discharge electron impact ionization (GDEI) source was developed for operation using air as the support gas. An alternative to the use of thermoemission from a resistively heated filament electron source for miniature mass spectrometers, the GDEI source is shown to have advantages of long lifetime under high-pressure operation and low power consumption. The GDEI source was characterized using our laboratory's handheld mass spectrometer, the Mini 10. The effects of the discharge voltage and pressure were investigated. Design considerations are illustrated with calculations. Performance is demonstrated in a set of experimental tests. The results show that the low power requirements, mechanical ruggedness, and quality of the data produced using the small glow discharge ion source make it well-suited for use with a portable handheld mass spectrometer. PMID:17441220

  11. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-01

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data. PMID:25182276

  12. Modeling the chemistry of plasma polymerization using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, D F; Stockhaus, J; Scheide, F; Winkelhake, Oliver; Streuber, Oliver

    2003-04-01

    The goal of the project is a solvent free painting shop. The environmental technologies laboratory is developing processes of plasma etching and polymerization. Polymerized thin films are first-order corrosion protection and primer for painting. Using pure acetylene we get very nice thin films which were not bonded very well. By using air as bulk gas it is possible to polymerize, in an acetylene plasma, well bonded thin films which are stable first-order corrosion protections and good primers. UV/Vis spectroscopy shows nitrogen oxide radicals in the emission spectra of pure nitrogen and air. But nitrogen oxide is fully suppressed in the presence of acetylene. IR spectroscopy shows only C=O, CH(2) and CH(3) groups but no nitrogen species. With the aid of UV/Vis spectra and the chemistry of ozone formation it is possible to define reactive traps and steps, molecule depletion and processes of proton scavenging and proton loss. Using a numerical model it is possible to evaluate these processes and to calculate theoretical mass spectra. Adjustment of theoretical mass spectra to real measurements leads to specific channels of polymerization which are driven by radicals especially the acetyl radical. The estimated theoretical mass spectra show the specific channels of these chemical processes. It is possible to quantify these channels. This quantification represents the mass flow through this chemical system. With respect to these chemical processes it is possible to have an idea of pollutant production processes. PMID:12707764

  13. Comparison of Plasma Activation of Thin Water Layers by Direct and Remote Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma activation of liquids is now being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. The plasma sources used for this activation can be generally classified as direct (the plasma is in contact with the surface of the liquid) or remote (the plasma does not directly touch the liquid). The direct plasma source may be a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) where the surface of the liquid is a floating electrode or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave forming the plasma plume reaches the liquid. The remote plasma source may be a DBD with electrodes electrically isolated from the liquid or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave in the plume does not reach the liquid. In this paper, a comparison of activation of thin water layers on top of tissue, as might be encountered in wound healing, will be discussed using results from numerical investigations. We used the modeling platform nonPDPSIM to simulate direct plasma activation of thin water layers using DBDs and remote activation using plasma jets using up to hundreds of pulses. The DBDs are sustained in humid air while the plasma jets consist of He/O2 mixtures flowed into humid air. For similar number of pulses and energy deposition, the direct DBD plasma sources produce more acidification and higher production of nitrates/nitrites in the liquid. This is due to the accumulation of NxOy plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with newly produced reactive species. in the gas phase. In the plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with

  14. RF plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon S.; Logan, B. Grant

    2003-05-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being used as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus the ion beam to a small spot size. A radio frequency (RF) plasma source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The goal is to operate the source at pressures {approx} 10{sup -5} Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10{sup -4}-10{sup -1} Torr and electron densities in the range of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Recently, pulsed operation of the source has enabled operation at pressures in the 10{sup -6} Torr range with densities of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Near 100% ionization has been achieved. The source has been integrated with the NTX facility and experiments have begun.

  15. Atomic mass dependent electrostatic diagnostics of colliding laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Fallon, C.; Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T.; School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University , Dublin 7

    2013-09-15

    The behaviours of colliding laser plasma plumes (C{sub p}) compared with single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) are investigated for 14 different atomic mass targets. A Faraday cup, situated at the end of a drift tube (L = 0.99 m), is employed to record the time-of-flight (TOF) current traces for all elements and both plume configurations, for a fixed laser intensity of I{sub p} = 4.2 × 10{sup 10} W cm{sup −2} (F = 0.25 kJ cm{sup −2}). The ratio of the peak current from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the peak current ratio while the ratio of the integrated charge yield from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the charge yield ratio. Variation of the position of the Faraday cup within the drift tube (L = 0.33, 0.55, and 0.99 m) in conjunction with a lower laser fluence (F = 0.14 kJ cm{sup −2}) facilitated direct comparison of the changing TOF traces from both plasma configurations for the five lightest elements studied (C, Al, Si, Ti, and Mn). The results are discussed in the frame of laser plasma hydrodynamic modelling to approximate the critical recombination distance L{sub CR}. The dynamics of colliding laser plasma plumes and the atomic mass dependence trends observed are presented and discussed.

  16. Cometary particulate analyzer. [mass spectrometry of laser plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Miller, D. J.; Utterback, N. G.

    1979-01-01

    A concept for determining the relative abundance of elements contained in cometary particulates was evaluated. The technique utilizes a short, high intensity burst of laser radiation to vaporize and ionize collected particulate material. Ions extracted from this laser produced plasma are analyzed in a time of flight mass spectrometer to yield an atomic mass spectrum representative of the relative abundance of elements in the particulates. Critical aspects of the development of this system are determining the ionization efficiencies for various atomic species and achieving adequate mass resolution. A technique called energy-time focus, which utilizes static electric fields to alter the length of the ion flight path in proportion to the ion initial energy, was used which results in a corresponding compression to the range of ion flight times which effectively improves the inherent resolution. Sufficient data were acquired to develop preliminary specifications for a flight experiment.

  17. FUNDAMENTAL MASS TRANSFER MODELS FOR INDOOR AIR POLLUTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a simple, fundamental mass transfer model, based on Fick's Law of Diffusion, for indoor air pollution wet sorbent-based sources. (Note: Models are needed to predict emissions from indoor sources. hile empirical approaches based on dynamic chamber data are usef...

  18. Initial planning for interferometry measurements on triggered plasma opening switch source.

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G.; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Sharpe, Rob A.; Gilmore, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    The Triggered Plasma Opening Switch (TPOS) at SNL is a unique device that exploits the high conductivity and low mass properties of plasma. The TPOS's objective is to take the initial {approx}0.8 MA ({approx}250 ns rise time) storage inductor current and deliver {approx}0.5 MA at {approx}2.4 MV ({approx}10 ns rise time) to a load of {approx}5-10 Omega. Configuration advantages include low current jitter and resistive voltage drop, power gain, and minimization of trigger input power as the result of using two stages in series. This two-stage design is novel and is the first to demonstrate operation of magnetically triggered stages. Study of TPOS characteristics is in progress via an offline interferometer diagnostic; specifically, a laser interferometer will be used to make density measurements of the source plasma. It is thought that the gross plasma source density is {approx}10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, but details of the spatial structure and temporal evolution have not previously been studied. In order to better understand switch operation, these details are essential. Presently two interferometer systems are planned for testing: a temporary 1 mum system for initial plasma characterization, and a 10.6 mum laser system for routine use. We will start with a single chord measurement then upgrade to a multi-chord system. Future plans involve varying plasma source parameters, such as magnetic field strength and plasma fill time, in order to understand the density dependence on these parameters. Improved knowledge of the plasma source density behavior should allow for improved switch operation.

  19. Characterization of an Inverted Geometry Helicon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Benjamin; Ruzic, David

    2006-10-01

    Helicon plasmas are useful as hot, dense sources requiring low magnetic fields. Since Boswell's^1 use of helicon waves in low pressure gas, no single theory fully explains the wave-plasma coupling mechanism. However, Trivelpiece-Gould modes^2 remain a strong candidate. An inverted geometry helicon plasma source is further explored, using a dielectric-covered helicon antenna, placed within a vacuum chamber, in contrast to conventional antennas that surround a dielectric cylinder. A Nagoya Type III antenna is used, other antennas are equally feasible. Many industrial advantages of such a system exist; namely, more efficient electromagnets, as well as producing a plasma with a larger radius than the antenna. With this arrangement, diagnostic measurements can be made arbitrarily close to the antenna. To characterize the plasma, an RF-compensated Langmuir probe measures electron temperature and density, while a B-dot probe measures the field shape inside and outside of the antenna region. In addition, optical emission spectroscopy observes changes in plasma intensity for mode jumps, and measures line ratios. 1. R.W. Boswell, Phys. Lett. 33A, 457 (1970) 2. A.W. Trivelpiece and R.W. Gould, Jour. App. Phys. 30 (11) (1959)

  20. Operation of Ferroelectric Plasma Sources in a Gas Discharge Mode

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2004-03-08

    Ferroelectric plasma sources in vacuum are known as sources of ablative plasma, formed due to surface discharge. In this paper, observations of a gas discharge mode of operation of the ferroelectric plasma sources (FPS) are reported. The gas discharge appears at pressures between approximately 20 and approximately 80 Torr. At pressures of 1-20 Torr, there is a transition from vacuum surface discharge to the gas discharge, when both modes coexist and the surface discharges sustain the gas discharge. At pressures between 20 and 80 Torr, the surface discharges are suppressed, and FPS operate in pure gas discharge mode, with the formation of almost uniform plasma along the entire surface of the ceramics between strips. The density of the expanding plasma is estimated to be about 1013 cm-3 at a distance of 5.5 mm from the surface. The power consumption of the discharge is comparatively low, making it useful for various applications. This paper also presents direct measurements of the yield of secondary electron emission from ferroelectric ceramics, which, at low energies of primary electrons, is high and dependent on the polarization of the ferroelectric material

  1. A low-energy linear oxygen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2007-01-08

    A new version of a Constricted Plasma Source is described,characterized by all metal-ceramic construction, a linear slit exit of180 mm length, and cw-operation (typically 50 kHz) at an average power of1.5 kW. The plasma source is here operated with oxygen gas, producingstreaming plasma that contains mainly positive molecular and atomic ions,and to a much lesser degree, negative ions. The maximum total ion currentobtained was about 0.5 A. The fraction of atomic ions reached more than10 percent of all ions when the flow rate was less then 10 sccm O2,corresponding to a chamber pressure of about 0.5 Pa for the selectedpumping speed. The energy distribution functions of the different ionspecies were measured with a combinedmass spectrometer and energyanalyzer. The time-averaged distribution functions were broad and rangedfrom about 30eV to 90 eV at 200 kHz and higher frequencies, while theywere only several eV broad at 50 kHz and lower frequencies, with themaximum located at about 40 eV for the grounded anode case. This maximumwas shifted down to about 7 eV when the anode was floating, indicatingthe important role of the plasma potential for the ion energy for a givensubstrate potential. The source could be scaled to greater length and maybe useful for functionalization of surfaces and plasma-assisteddeposition of compound films.

  2. Determination of plasma parameters in solar zebra radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We present a new method for determining the magnetic field strength and plasma density in the solar zebra radio sources. Methods: Using the double plasma resonance (DPR) model of the zebra emission, we analytically derived the equations for computing the gyroharmonic number s of selected zebra lines and then solved these equations numerically. Results: The method was successfully tested on artificially generated zebras and then applied to observed ones. The magnetic field strength and plasma density in the radio sources were determined. Simultaneously, we evaluated the parameter Lnb = 2Lb/ (2Ln - Lb), where Ln and Lb are the characteristic scale-heights of the plasma density and magnetic field strength in the zebra source, respectively. Computations show that the maximum frequency of the low-polarized zebras is about 8 GHz, in very good agreement with observations. For the high-polarized zebras, this limit is about four times lower. Microwave zebras are preferentially generated in the regions with steep gradients of the plasma density, such as in the transition region. In models with smaller density gradients, such as those with a barometric density profile, the microwave zebras cannot be produced owing to the strong bremsstrahlung and cyclotron absorptions. We also show that our DPR model is able to explain the zebras with frequency-equidistant zebra lines.

  3. Study on Performance Parameters of the Plasma Source for a Short-Conduction-Time Plasma Opening Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weixi; Zeng, Zhengzhong; Wang, Liangping; Lei, Tianshi; Hu, Yixiang; Huang, Tao; Sun, Tieping

    2012-12-01

    Plasma source performance parameters, including plasma ejection density and velocity, greatly affect the operation of a short-conduction-time plasma opening switch (POS). In this paper, the plasma source used in the POS of Qiangguang I generator is chosen as the study object. At first the POS working process is analyzed. The result shows that the opening performance of the POS can be improved by increasing the plasma ejection velocity and decreasing the plasma density. The influence of the cable plasma gun structure and number on the plasma ejection parameters is experimentally investigated with two charge collectors. Finally a semi-empirical model is proposed to describe the experimental phenomenon.

  4. Invitation to the World of the Plasma for Light Source 3.Light Source Measurement 3.1 Laser Diagnostics of Plasmas for Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Hideki; Jinno, Masafumi

    Examples and basic theories of various methods of laser diagnostics of plasmas for light sources are introduced. Most introduced papers were presented at International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources (LS), which is the only international symposium on the science and technology of light sources.

  5. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, J.R.

    1988-08-16

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner. 7 figs.

  6. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, John R.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner.

  7. The magnetosphere of Uranus - Plasma sources, convection, and field configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, G.-H.; Hill, T. W.; Dessler, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested by qualitative considerations based on analogy with earth, Jupiter, and Saturn that the magnetosphere of Uranus may lack a plasma source able to produce significant internal currents, internal convection, and associated effects. A class of approximately self-consistent quantitative magnetohydrostatic equilibrium configurations for the case of a pole-on magnetosphere with variable plasma parameters is presently constructed in order to test this hypothesis by means of forthcoming Voyager measurements. The configurations that can be computed for the geometries of the magnetic field and of the tail current sheet, for a given distribution of plasma pressure, have a single, funnel-shaped polar cusp pointing into the solar wind and a cylindrical tail plasma sheet whose currents close within the tail, rather than on the tail magnetopause. Interconnection of interplanetary and magnetospheric fields yields a highly asymmetric tail-field configuration.

  8. Line-type inductively coupled plasma source with ferromagnetic module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeuk Lim, Jong; Kim, Kyong Nam; Gweon, Gwang Ho; Yeom, Geun Young

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of a line-type, internal antenna for an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source installed with a ferromagnetic module were investigated for possible application to roll-to-roll processing of next-generation display devices. The use of 2 MHz instead of 13.56 MHz for the 2300 mm long ICP source improved the plasma uniformity to less than 11% along the antenna line. In addition, the use of Ni-Zn ferromagnetic material in the line-type antenna improved the plasma density to about 3.1 × 1011 cm-3 at 3500 W of 2 MHz radio frequency power by confining the induced, time-varying magnetic field between the antenna line and the substrate. When the photoresist-covered glass substrate was etched at 4000 W using 40 mTorr and Ar/O2 (7 : 3), an etch uniformity of about 5-6% was obtained along the antenna line.

  9. Hollow cathode plasma source for active spacecraft charge control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, William D.; Aston, Graeme; Pless, Lewis C.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype plasma source spacecraft discharge device has been developed to control overall and differential spacecraft surface charging. The plasma source is based on a unique hollow cathode discharge, where the plasma generation process is contained completely within the cathode. This device can be operated on argon, krypton, or xenon and has a rapid cold start time of less than 4 s. The discharge system design includes a spacecraft-discharge/net-charge sensing circuit which provides the ability to measure the polarity, magnitude, pulse shape, and time duration of a discharging event. Ion currents of up to 325 microA and electron currents ranging from 0.02 to 6.0 A have been extracted from the device. In addition, the spacecraft discharge device successfully discharged capacitively biased plates, from as high as + or - 2500 V, to ground potential, and discharged and clamped actively biased plates at +5 V with respect to ground potential during ground simulation testing.

  10. Initial Results from the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert

    2003-10-01

    The Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity (ASTRAL) is 2 m long Helicon source designed to investigate basic plasma and space plasma processes. The device produces a plasma with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 20 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.1 eV. A series of large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.2 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce up to 2 kWatt of RF power into the plasma through a matching pi circuit. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device. A RF compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure electron temperature and plasma density. A 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator with a high performance CCD camera is used to measure impurity concentration and to develop novel spectroscopy diagnostic. A diode laser based Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is used to obtain ion temperature and ion drift in the plasma column. A microwave interferometer is also used to calibrate the Langmuir probe. First experimental results associated with this new facility are presented.