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Sample records for plasma switches

  1. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  2. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  3. Plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Savage, Mark E.; Mendel, Jr., Clifford W.

    2001-01-01

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  4. Numerical simulation of plasma opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.; Bergman, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Opening Switches have been examined numerically with the aid of the ANTHEM plasma simulation model. A generic bi-cylindrical switch is studied. The switching of generator pulses ranging from 50 ns to 1 ..mu..sec is reviewed, for a variety of plasma fill lengths and densities, and for a range of resistive loads. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  5. ANTHEM simulation of plasma opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.; Bergman, C.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Opening Switches have been examined numerically with the aid of the ANTHEM plasma simulation model. A generic bi-cylindrical switch is studied. The switching of generator pulses ranging from 50 ns to 1 /mu/sec is reviewed, for a variety of plasma fill lengths and densities, and for a range of resistive loads. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Characteristics of switching plasma in an inverse-pinch switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.; Nam, Sang H.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of the plasma that switches on tens of giga volt-ampere in an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) have been made. Through optical and spectroscopic diagnostics of the current carrying plasma, the current density, the motion of current paths, dominant ionic species have been determined in order to access their effects on circuit parameters and material erosion. Also the optimum operational condition of the plasma-puff triggering method required for azimuthally uniform conduction in the INPIStron has been determined.

  7. Simulations of a plasma flow switch

    SciTech Connect

    Buff, J.; Frese, M.H.; Giancola, A.J.; Peterkin, R.E.; Roderick, N.F.

    1987-12-01

    In a portion of the experimental program using the SHIVA Star capacitor bank at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), a cylindrical foil load is imploded using an inductive store and a plasma flow switch. The authors performed a number of two-dimensional simulations of the switch and load using the MHD code MACH2. In addition to explaining the data from the first series of experiments, the simulations led to design modifications of the basic plasma flow switch that resulted in improved current delivery and in enhanced radiation yield. The key modification was closing portions of the vane structure. The switch must be sealed shut or else substantial current will flow in the diffuse gas that is ablated from the walls of the switch barrel.

  8. Theoretical model for plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.

    1980-07-01

    The theory of an explosive plasma switch is developed and compared with the experimental results of Pavlovskii and work at Sandia. A simple analytic model is developed, which predicts that such switches may achieve opening times of approximately 100 ns. When the switching time is limited by channel mixing it scales as t = C(m d/sub 0/)/sup 1/2/P/sub 0//sup 2/P/sub e//sup -5/2/ where m is the foil mass per unit area, d/sub 0/ the channel thickness and P/sub 0/ the channel pressure (at explosive breakout), P/sub e/ the explosive pressure, C a constant of order 10 for c.g.s. units. Thus faster switching times may be achieved by minimizing foil mass and channel pressure, or increasing explosive product pressure, with the scaling exponents as shown suggesting that changes in pressures would be more effective.

  9. Simulation of plasma erosion opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the modeling of Plasma Erosion Opening Switches is reviewed, and new results from both fluid and particle simulation compared. Three-fluid simulations with the ANTHEM code for switches on the NRL GAMBLE I machine and SNL PBFA II machine have shown strong dependence of the opening dynamics on the anode structure, the threshold for electron emission, on the possible presence of anomalous resistivity, and on advection of the magnetic field with cathode emitted electrons. Simulations with the implicit particle-in-cell code ISIS confirm these observations, but manifest broader current channels---in better agreement with GAMBLE I experimental results. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Plasma flow switch experiments on the Pegasus facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C. Jr.; Anderson, B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.; Findley, C.; Greene, A.; Kruse, H.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Peterson, D.; Sandoval, G. ); Lee, P.H.Y. ); Turchi, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Plasma flow switch experiments conducted on Pegasus have shown that a conducting layer of plasma shunts the load slot preventing efficient switching of current to the load. This effect is seen computationally. The magnitude of the effect depends on the specific parameters of the switch plasma and current level. Computations have also shown that a plasma boundary layer trap'' would effectively remove enough plasma from the inner conductor of the power flow channel so that efficient switching would occur. This plasma trap has been successfully demonstrated when used with a static load. It has not yet been tested with an imploding load. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, Rodney J.

    1996-01-01

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources.

  12. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, R.J.

    1996-10-22

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode is disclosed. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources. 12 figs.

  13. Plasma opening switch research for DECADE

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, J.R.; Kortbawi, D.; Childers, F.K.; Sincerny, P.S.; Weber, B.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Commisso, R.J.; Thompson, J.R.; Babineau, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    Plasma opening switch (POS) research for the DECADE radiation effects test facility is reviewed. This research was first performed on a half-scale generator. DECADE Prototype Module 1, and indicated the importance of the POS electrode geometry to obtain the required impedance at appropriate conduction times. It also was demonstrated that the conduction time jitter was suitable for a multimodule system. Preliminary experiments at full energy were then conducted on DECADE Module 1 that indicated significant current loss when using a bremsstrahlung load, limiting the output radiation to about half of the DECADE requirement. These results initiated an effort to thoroughly diagnose the power-flow region downstream of the switch, an effort that ultimately provided improved understanding of POS operation and improved coupling to bremsstrahlung loads. At the conclusion of this effort, it had been demonstrated that it is possible for the POS-driven system to meet the DECADE requirements.

  14. Current-level triggered plasma-opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1989-01-01

    An opening switch for very high power electrical pulses uses a slow magnetic field to confine a plasma across a gap between two electrodes. The plasma conducts the electric pulse across the gap while the switch is closed. A magnetic field generated by the pulse repels the slow magnetic field from the negative electrode to push the plasma from the electrode, opening the switch. A plurality of radial vanes may be used to enhance the slow magnetic field.

  15. Current-level triggered plasma-opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, C.W.

    1987-06-29

    An opening switch for very high power electrical pulses uses a slow magnetic field to confine a plasma across a gap between two electrodes. The plasma conducts the electric pulse across the gap while the switch is closed. A magnetic field generated by the pulse repels the slow magnetic field from the negative electrode to push the plasma from the electrode, opening the switch. A plurality of radial vanes may be used to enhance the slow magnetic field. 5 figs.

  16. Current-level triggered plasma-opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W.

    1989-03-14

    An opening switch for very high power electrical pulses uses a slow magnetic field to confine a plasma across a gap between two electrodes. The plasma conducts the electrical pulse across the gap while the switch is closed. A magnetic field generated by the pulse repels the slow magnetic field from the negative electrode to push the plasma from the electrode, opening the switch. A plurality of radial vanes may be used to enhance the slow magnetic field.

  17. Radial Plasma Flow Switch on GIT-12 Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Shishlov, A. V.; Fedunin, A. V.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Fursov, F. I.

    2006-01-01

    The preliminary experiments were performed on wire array implosion driven by a radial plasma flow switch on the GIT-12 generator operating in a microsecond mode. Imploding gas puff z-pinch plasma was used to provide fast switching of the current to an aluminum wire array. The experimental results are presented in the paper.

  18. Design and characterization of the Pegasus I plasma flow switch

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, F.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.; Cochrane, J.C.; Greene, A.E.; Ladish, J.S.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Parker, J.V.; Peterson, D.L.; Benage, J.F.; Gribble, R.F.; Shlachter, J.S.; Scudder, D.W. ); Roderick, N.F. ); Turchi, P.J. )

    1992-01-01

    A plasma flow switch (PFS) based on an experimental design utilized at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) has been fielded on the Pegasus I system. Currents of as much as 5.8 MA have been switched on a time scale (10--90%) of 200 ns into a static load. Tests with a foil load have resulted in a less than ideal current transfer because of interaction between the dynamic load and the plasma flow switch. Two-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) calculations have been used to characterize the behavior of the PFS and to aid in the design. These calculations have also been used to investigate several classes of perturbations in the switch-plasma, the interaction of the switch-plasma with the coaxial electrodes, and their effect on switching efficiency. The Pegasus I PFS experiments reproduce the results obtained at AFWL throughout the switch initiation and switching phases. However, early in the foil implosion the switched current drops significantly. We believe this current drop results from a small amount of residual plasma left behind in the PFS region that impedes the magnetic-flux transport, thereby preventing efficient foil implosion. The experimental results suggest that the method of PFS initiation (viz. chordal wire arrays) may be an important factor in switch operation.

  19. Design for megavolt inverse-pinch plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    1989-06-01

    To meet the requirements for the output switch of an ultra-high-power (greater than 30 GW) pulser, an upgrading design for an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIS) is considered. The hold-off voltage of 1 MV is met by adopting multistage rim-fire electrodes and using SF6 as the dielectric gas of the switch. The inductance and capacitance of the switch, which are restricted by the short rise-time (less than 0.1 microsec) requirement, were met by adjusting the dimensions of the coaxial electrodes of the switch. The input/output transmission lines attached to the switch will be immersed in oil to meet the high voltage insulation and impedance-matching requirements. Since the forwarding current is relatively low with respect to the switch capability, the lifetime of the switch is expected to exceed the requirement of 10,000 shots.

  20. Experiments on a current-toggled plasma-opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Savage, M.E.; Zagar, D.M.; Simpson, W.W.; Grasser, T.W.; Quintenz, J.P. )

    1992-04-15

    Plasma-opening switches have been used to improve pulsed-power wave shapes for over a decade. These switches have used the inertia of the plasma to hold the switch closed. This results in conflicting requirements when long hold-off time and fast opening are required, and also results in variation in opening current due to variation in initial plasma fill. The current-toggled plasma-opening switch attempts to overcome these problems by using external magnetic fields rather than inertia to control the plasma conductor. Data will be presented showing several features of the operation of this switch. These data will be compared to models used to design the switch. The comparisons indicate that the mass can be measured approximately from fast coil data and that the slow coil flux does set the opening level of the current. They also indicate that the opening current is somewhat dependent upon plasma mass, and that the design of the field coils that provide the control fields must be done more carefully to provide a switch that opens satisfactorily.

  1. Plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Han, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. The optimal fill gas pressures for the azimuthally uniform plasma-puff were about 120 mTorr less than P(opt) less than 450 Torr for He and N2. For Argon 120 mTorr less than P(opt) less than 5 Torr for argon. The inverse pinch switch was triggered with the plasma-puff and the switching capability under various electrical parameters and working gas pressures of Ar, He and N2 was determined. It was also shown that the azimuthally uniform switching discharges were dependent on the type of fill gas and its fill pressure. A new concept of plasma-focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of the inverse pinch switch with the plasma-focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr. In order to assess the effects of plasma current density on material erosion of electrodes, emissions from both an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) and from a spark gap switch under test were studied with an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). The color temperature of the argon plasma was approximately 4,000 K which corresponded with the peak continuum emission near 750 nm. There are the strong line emissions of argon in the 650 - 800 nm range and a lack of line emissions of copper and other solid material used in the switch. This indicates that the plasma current density during closing is low and the hot spot or hot filament in the switch is negligible. This result also indicates considerable reduction of line emission with the INPIStron switch over that of a spark-gap switch. However, a strong carbon line

  2. Plasma puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Choi, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for the azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide range of fill gas pressure of Ar, He and N2. The optimal fill gas pressure for the azimuthally uniform plasma-puff was about 120 mTorr and 450 Torr for He and N2, and between 120 mTorr and 5 Torr for Ar. The inverse pinch switch was triggered with the plasma-puff and the switching capability under various electrical parameters and working gas pressures of Ar, He and N2 was determined. It was also shown that the azimuthally uniform switching discharges were dependent on the type of fill gas and its fill pressure. A new concept of plasma-focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of inverse pinch switch with plasma-focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr.

  3. Anthem simulational studies of the plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    For a deeper understanding of the physical processes governing the Plasma Opening Switch (POS) we use the ANTHEM 2D implicit simulation code to study: (1) ion dynamical effects on electrohydrodynamic (EHD) waves propagating along steep density interfaces in the switch plasmas. At radial interfaces where the density jumps toward the anode, these waves can drive a finger of magnetic field into the plasma toward the load. Ion dynamics can open the rear of such fingers into a wedge-like density gap. Then: (2) we examine ion effects in uniform switch plasmas. These first develop potential hill structures at the drive edge of the cathode from the competition between electron velocity advection and EHD magnetic exclusion waves. Magnetic pressure gradients at the hill periphery and EHD effects then establish a density gap propagating along the cathode with radial electron emission from its tip. Similar results are obtained under both multi-fluid and PIC modeling of the plasma components.

  4. Anthem simulational studies of the plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.

    1992-07-01

    For a deeper understanding of the physical processes governing the Plasma Opening Switch (POS) we use the ANTHEM 2D implicit simulation code to study: (1) ion dynamical effects on electrohydrodynamic (EHD) waves propagating along steep density interfaces in the switch plasmas. At radial interfaces where the density jumps toward the anode, these waves can drive a finger of magnetic field into the plasma toward the load. Ion dynamics can open the rear of such fingers into a wedge-like density gap. Then: (2) we examine ion effects in uniform switch plasmas. These first develop potential hill structures at the drive edge of the cathode from the competition between electron velocity advection and EHD magnetic exclusion waves. Magnetic pressure gradients at the hill periphery and EHD effects then establish a density gap propagating along the cathode with radial electron emission from its tip. Similar results are obtained under both multi-fluid and PIC modeling of the plasma components.

  5. Low voltage drop plasma switch for inverter and modulator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, D. M.; Poeschel, R. L.; Schumacher, R. W.

    1993-08-01

    A low forward voltage drop plasma switch has been developed for high-efficiency inverter and modulator applications. The switch, called the HOLLOTRON, is based on a grid-controlled, thermionic hollow-cathode discharge. A low forward voltage drop (10-20 V) is achieved by operating the hollow-cathode discharge in a static gas pressure of xenon. The dense plasma generated in the Ba-oxide dispenser hollow cathode is spread over a relatively large control grid area by a diverging magnetic field superimposed on the discharge. Interruption of the discharge current at high current densities (≳4 A/cm2) over the grid area is achieved by biasing the control grid sufficiently negative with respect to the plasma. The HOLLOTRON switch has demonstrated voltage stand-off of up to 20 kV, switching times of ≤0.3 μs, and pulse repetition frequencies of 20 kHz at 50% duty.

  6. High power Tesla driven miniature plasma opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh

    The plasma opening switch (POS) is used in pulsed power systems where a very fast opening and high current switch is required. Plasma is injected into the switch, which carries a large conduction current, before it opens in a process that lasts for a few nanosecond and transfers the current to a parallel-connected load at a much increased voltage and with a much shorter rise time. The conduction and opening times of the switch are dependent on plasma parameters such as the distribution, speed and species, all of which are determined by the plasma source. Most of the earlier reported work involves large dimension POSs and a correspondingly high input current (more than 100 kA) and uses carbon plasma. One main objective of the present research was to achieve a low input current (20 kA) and miniaturised POS by using hydrogen plasma rather than carbon plasma on account of its lower mass. A cable gun was selected for producing the plasma, since although this produces both hydrogen and carbon plasma these arise different times during its operation.. For the present application a Tesla transformer was used in preference to a Marx generator to produce an initial high voltage pulse for the system, on the basis of its simpler design and cost effectiveness. This transformer together with an associated water PFL (pulse forming line) and pressurised switch was capable of producing a load current in excess of 20 kA with a rise time of 53 ns, which was fed through the POS to the final load. Special diagnostics arrangements were necessary to measure the fast high current and voltage pulse a in nonintrusive way. Faraday cups and a high speed camera were used to measure the plasma parameters. The overall system built (i.e. including the POS) is capable of producing a 22 kA current with a rise time of 5 ns, and of generating a power of more than 10 GW..

  7. Theoretical and computational studies of plasma opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindman, Erick L., Jr.; Kindel, Joseph M.

    1989-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in understanding the operation of plasma opening switches (POS) in support of the Light-Ion Fusion Program at Sandia National Laboratories. Our efforts began with scoping studies using the particle-in-cell (PIC) code, MAGIC, which was written by Bruce Goplen and co-workers at MRC for pulsed-power applications. The version of MAGIC currently at Sandia National Laboratories is supported by Dave Seidel and Tim Pointon. MAGIC continues to play an important role as our studies moved into many different areas. Working closely with Cliff Mendel, we performed initial studies of switches using his fast B sub z concept. Working with Mary Ann Sweeney, Jeff Quintez and Cliff Mendel we performed studies of the effects of plasma density, cylindrical curvature, load impedance, rise time, and emission threshold on switch performance. In addition, we studied B-field penetration, turbulence, anomalous resistivity, and electron heating in plasma opening switches. This work has allowed us to identify the physical mechanisms that are important in the operation of plasma opening switches. Based on our knowledge of the physics we have established scaling relations for comparable switch performance under different experimental conditions. We studied the code requirements for POS simulation and numerical problems in MAGIC and in other PIC codes. And, more recently, we have begun to participate more strongly in the experimental program being carried out on PBFA II. Our conclusions based on these studies are summarized here.

  8. Theoretical and computational studies of plasma opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Lindman, E.L. Jr.; Kindel, J.M.

    1989-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in understanding the operation of plasma opening switches (POS) in support of the Light-Ion Fusion Program at Sandia National Laboratories. Our efforts began with scoping studies using the particle-in-cell (PIC) code, MAGIC, which was written by Bruce Goplen and co-workers at MRC for pulsed-power applications. The version of MAGIC currently at Sandia National Laboratories is supported by Dave Seidel and Tim Pointon. MAGIC continues to play an important role as our studies moved into many different areas. Working closely with Cliff Mendel, we performed initial studies of switches using his fast B/sub z/ concept. Working with Mary Ann Sweeney, Jeff Quintez and Cliff Mendel we performed studies of the effects of plasma density, cylindrical curvature, load impedance, rise time, and emission threshold on switch performance. In addition, we studied B-field penetration, turbulence, anomalous resistivity, and electron heating in plasma opening switches. This work has allowed us to identify the physical mechanisms that are important in the operation of plasma opening switches. Based on our knowledge of the physics we have established scaling relations for comparable switch performance under different experimental conditions. We studied the code requirements for POS simulation and numerical problems in MAGIC and in other PIC codes. And, more recently, we have begun to participate more strongly in the experimental program being carried out on PBFA II. Our conclusions based on these studies are summarized here. 42 refs., 104 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Experiments on planar plasma flow switches at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Wysocki, F.J.; Bowers, R.; Oona, H.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have performed a series of experiments on the Colt facility at Los Alamos to study the performance of plasma flow switches and to understand the important physics issues which affect that performance. These experiments were done in planar geometry on a small machine to allow for better diagnostic access and a higher repetition rate. The Colt facility is a capacitor bank which stores 300 kJ at maximum charge and produced a peak current of 1.1 MA in 2.0 microseconds for these experiments. The diagnostics used for these experiments included an array of b-dot probes, visible framing pictures, visible spectroscopy, and laser interferometry. Characteristics of the switch are determined from spatial and temporal profiles of the magnetic field and the spatial profile and temperature of the switch plasma. Here the authors present results from experiments for a variety of switch conditions.

  10. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10's of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  11. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-07-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10`s of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  12. Spectroscopic investigation of species separation in opening switch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, S. L.; Phipps, D. G.; Richardson, A. S.; Commisso, R. J.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Murphy, D. P.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Boyer, C. N.; Doron, R.; Biswas, S.; Maron, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between magnetic fields and current-carrying plasmas that lead to the separation of plasma species in multi-species plasmas are being studied in a plasma opening switch geometry. Several Marshall guns are used to inject single or multi-species plasmas between coaxial conductors connected to the output of the Naval Research Laboratory's Hawk pulsed-power generator. Following injection of the plasma, the generator is used at roughly half power to apply an electrical pulse with a peak current of 450 kA, a peak voltage of 400 kV, and a rise time of 1.2 μs. The resulting magnetic field interacts with the plasma through a combination of field penetration and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pushing that is not well understood but can lead to the separation of plasma species in multi-species plasmas. An ICCD-coupled spectrometer has been used in combination with magnetic probes, a ribbon-beam interferometer, and particle-in-cell (PIC) modeling to diagnose and understand conditions in the plasma from the time it is injected until the end of the conduction phase of the opening switch. This work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program and the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Research on plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. Research is presented and resulting conference papers are attached. These papers include 'Characteristics of Plasma-Puff Trigger for an Inverse-Pinch Plasma Switch'; 'Ultra-High-Power Plasma Switch INPUTS for Pulse Power Systems'; 'Characteristics of Switching Plasma in an Inverse-Pinch Switch'; 'Comparative Study of INPIStron and Spark Gap'; and 'INPIStron Switched Pulsed Power for Dense Plasma Pinches.'

  14. Ultralow switching current in HfOx/ZnO bilayer with tunable switching power enabled by plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yunfeng; Zeng, Zecun; Liao, Chenghao; Cheng, Shuying; Yu, Jinling; Zheng, Qiao; Lin, Peijie

    2016-08-01

    Decreasing switching power of a memory cell to meet demands of further downsizing is feasible with several methods. However, effects of plasma treatment on switching current and power are scarcely investigated. We therefore replaced traditional single storage layer with a HfOx/ZnO bilayer and also treated its interface with argon plasma. The switching current could be suppressed to μA due to a Schottky barrier at the HfOx/ZnO interface. Additionally, argon plasma treatment on the interface enables tunability of switching power and current, which is attributed to the tunable barrier height with the absorbed oxygen species introduced by plasma treatment.

  15. Nonlinear magnetic field transport in opening switch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J. ); Auer, P.L.; Sudan, R.N.; Oliver, B.V.; Seyler, C.E.; Greenly, J.B. )

    1993-04-01

    The nonlinear transport of magnetic field in collisionless plasmas, as present in the plasma opening switch (POS), using the implicit multifluid simulation code ANTHEM [J. Comput. Phys. [bold 71], 429 (1987)] is studied. The focus is on early time behavior in the electron--magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) limit, with the ions fixed, and the electrons streaming as a fluid under the influence of [bold v][sub [ital e

  16. Enhancement of the radiation yield in plasma flow switch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Buff, J. ); Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Roderick, N.F. ); Degnan, J.H. ); Frese, M.H. ); Turchi, P.J. . Dept. of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering)

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports that in a series of experiments that was performed at the Phillips Laboratory (Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico), the Shiva Star fast capacitor bank, an inductive store, and a plasma flow switch were used together to deliver multimega-ampere currents with submicrosecond rise times to cylindrical foil loads. Based on two-dimensional MHD simulations with the MACH2 code, the authors previously suggested design modifications to the switch that, when implemented in experiments, substantially increased the fraction of available current that was delivered to the load. The authors have performed a new series of numerical simulations of the plasma flow switch/imploding load system with the goal of discovering a way to boost the total power radiated by the imploding plasmas as it stagnates on the axis of symmetry. The changes to the experimental design that were investigated and which are discussed in this paper include variations of: The shape of the electrodes, size, and mass of the load foil, structure of the axial view vanes, shape and mass of the switching plasma, material from which the load is constructed, the degree to which the load is bowed, and the energy of the capacitor bank. Radiation yields in the range 6-9 TW are predicted for future experiments on Shiva Star.

  17. Initiation and assembly of the plasma in a plasma flow switch

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Greene, A.E.; Peterson, D.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Cochrane, J.C.; Kruse, H.; Roderick, N.F.

    1996-04-01

    A series of fast opening switch experiments was carried out on the Pegasus pulsed power facility. The first series of experiments characterized the assembly and run down of a 50 mg plasma flow switch operating in the 6 MA regime. The switch plasma arises from the vaporization of a wire array and a barrier foil. Arrays with different numbers of wires were examined. Two-dimensional (2-D) radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the initial vaporization stage of the array plasma and its assembly on the barrier foil are presented, which include the effects of initial perturbations on the evolution of the switch plasma as it moves down a coaxial gun barrel. Sparse wire arrays were observed to perform poorly. A change in the experimental design, motivated by 2-D simulations, led to improved performance. Computational results which lead to these changes are discussed, and the results are compared with experimental data.

  18. Plasma RF Switching Elements for Cell Phone Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linardakis, Peter; Borg, Gerard G.; Harris, Jeffrey H.

    2002-10-01

    The functionality of modern multi-band, multi-system cell phones is provided by a large number of RF switches. Future phones will require an even greater number of these switches to implement hardware such as agile antennas. The ever increasing need for higher performance and lower power consumption have brought the RF PIN diode to the edge of its capabilities in these applications. RF micro-electromechanical (MEMS) switches can easily provide the required low insertion loss, low inter-modulation and low power consumption combination, but their reliability limits are not yet satisfactory to industry. In conjunction with Motorola Personal Communications Sector (PCS), PRL is undertaking a project to examine the possibility of using plasma in a completely novel type of RF switch. A basic concept of variable ``plasma capacitors'' constructed from DC commercial fluorescent tubes has been analyzed up to 1.3 GHz. The four different configurations tested show some consistent behavior and a definite impedance change between the on and off states. A simple model reliant on RF sheath theory also shows some agreement.

  19. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  20. Plasma opening switch for long-pulse intense ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Mason, R.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Greenly, J.B.; Rej, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    A Plasma Opening Switch (POS) is being developed at Los Alamos, as part of an intense ion beam experiment with special application to materials processing. The switch must conduct up to 100 kA for 600 ns, and open quickly to avoid premature gap closure in the ion beam diode load. Power multiplication is not a necessity, but prepulse suppression is. A positive central polarity is desirable, since with it an ion beam can be conveniently launched beyond the switch from the central anode toward a negatively charged target. Thus, otherwise by virtue of traditional scaling rules, a POS was designed with a 1.25 cm radius inner anode, and a 4.75 cm radius outer cathode. This has been constructed, and subjected to circuit, and simulational analysis. The computations are being performed with the 2D ANTHEM implicit code. Preliminary results show a marked difference in switching dynamics, when the central positive polarity is used in place of the more conventional opposite choice. Opening goes by the fast development of a central anode magnetic layer, rather than by the more conventional slow evolution of a cathode gap. With the central anode, higher fill densities are needed to achieve desired conduction times. This has suggested switch design improvements, which are discussed.

  1. Plasma opening switch for long-pulse intense ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Mason, R.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Greenly, J.B.; Rej, D.J.

    1992-08-01

    A Plasma Opening Switch (POS) is being developed at Los Alamos, as part of an intense ion beam experiment with special application to materials processing. The switch must conduct up to 100 kA for 600 ns, and open quickly to avoid premature gap closure in the ion beam diode load. Power multiplication is not a necessity, but prepulse suppression is. A positive central polarity is desirable, since with it an ion beam can be conveniently launched beyond the switch from the central anode toward a negatively charged target. Thus, otherwise by virtue of traditional scaling rules, a POS was designed with a 1.25 cm radius inner anode, and a 4.75 cm radius outer cathode. This has been constructed, and subjected to circuit, and simulational analysis. The computations are being performed with the 2D ANTHEM implicit code. Preliminary results show a marked difference in switching dynamics, when the central positive polarity is used in place of the more conventional opposite choice. Opening goes by the fast development of a central anode magnetic layer, rather than by the more conventional slow evolution of a cathode gap. With the central anode, higher fill densities are needed to achieve desired conduction times. This has suggested switch design improvements, which are discussed.

  2. INPIStron switched pulsed power for dense plasma pinches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1993-01-01

    The inverse plasma switch INPIStron was employed for 10kJ/40kV capacitor bank discharge system to produce focused dense plasmas in hypocycloidal-pinch (HCP) devices. A single unit and an array of multiple HCP's were coupled as the load of the pulsed power circuit. The geometry and switching plasma dynamics were found advantageous and convenient for commutating the large current pulse from the low impedance transmission line to the low impedance plasma load. The pulse power system with a single unit HCP, the system A, was used for production of high temperature plasma focus and its diagnostics. The radially running down plasma dynamics, revealed in image converter photographs, could be simulated by a simple snow-plow model with a correction for plasma resistivity. The system B with an array of 8-HCP units which forms a long coaxial discharge chamber was used for pumping a Ti-sapphire laser. The intense UV emission from the plasma was frequency shifted with dye-solution jacket to match the absorption band of the Ti crystal laser near 500 nm. An untuned laser pulse energy of 0.6 J/pulse was obtained for 6.4 kJ/40 kV discharge, or near 103 times of the explosion limit of conventional flash lamps. For both systems the advantages of the INPIStron were well demonstrated: a single unit is sufficient for a large current (greater than 50 kA) without increasing the system impedance, highly reliable and long life operation and implied scalability for the high power ranges above I(sub peak) = 1 MA and V(sub hold) = 100 kV.

  3. MACH2 modeling of LANL plasma-flow-switch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, F.J.

    1994-12-31

    The plasma-flow opening-switch (PFS) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the Athena Program. The present goal is to switch 10--20 MA of current into a cylindrical-foil implosion load in 300--400 ns. Primary drivers currently in use include the Pegasus-II capacitor bank which delivers 8--10 MA to the PFS in 3--4 {mu}s and the Procyon explosively-driven flux-compression generator which delivers 15--18 MA in 2--3 {mu}s. A series of experiments using Pegasus-II and Procyon have characterized the PFS performance for a variety of experimental conditions. Issues examined with Pegasus-II include switch-mass (50-mg vs. 100-mg), switch fabrication (wire-array vs. graded-thickness-foil), current level (7 MA vs. 10 MA), presence or absence of a plasma trap, and static load vs. implosion load. Procyon has been used to characterize a PFS with a 1/r aerial-mass-density profile (as opposed to the Pegasus-II 1/r{sup 2} profile). The MACH2 two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code has been used to model these experiments and comparison of simulation data to the experimental data has been made. This includes direct comparison of data from an array of B-dot probes present on all tests (19--23 probes), direct comparison of x-ray yield and power for those tests with implosion loads, and qualitative comparison to framing and streak data. The agreement between simulation data and experimental data is reasonably good.

  4. Modeling of plasma flow switches at low, intermediate and high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Greene, A.E.; Peterson, D.L.; Roderick, N.; Turchi, P.

    1992-12-31

    Inductively stored pulsed power technology has been used over the past thirty years to produce multi-megaamp currents to implode low inductance loads and produce x-radiation. Because of the large difference in timescales for the delivery of magnetic energy to the load and the desire for high power x-radiation output (short timescale for the implosion), most inductively stored systems require at least one opening switch. The design and understanding of fast, efficient opening switches for multi-megaamp systems represents a long standing problem in pulsed power research. The Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project uses inductively stored magnetic energy to implode thin metallic liners. A plasma flow switch (PFS) has been investigated as the final pulse shaping step for this systems. The PFS consists of a wire array and a barrier foil located upstream from the load region. Several stages can be identified in the performance of the plasma flow switch. These are: (1) the vaporization of the wire array; (2) the assembly of the initiated plasma on tie barrier foil to form the switch plasma; (3) the motion of the switch plasma down the coaxial barrel; and (4) current switching to the load (the actual switching stage). The fourth stage affects the switch`s efficiency, as well as the quality of the load implosion. Instabilities may develop during any of these four stages, and their presence may seriously degrade the structure of the switch plasma. Two primary criteria may be used to characterize good switching. The first is switching efficiency. A second criterion is transferred to the load during or after switching. This paper summarizes the computational design of the PFS experiments carried out on Pegasus 1. We conclude by considering the implications of these results for the design of a PFS for the higher energy regime (Procyon) regime.

  5. Plasma flow switch experiments on Pegasus-II

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, J.S.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Pegasus-II, a 4.3 MJ capacitor bank facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, has a current rise time of 5 {mu}s and requires the use of a fast ({approx} 500 ns) opening switch with long conduction time for some applications. Development of plasma flow opening switches (PFS), based on the design of the Shiva Star experiments, has been conducted during the last year. The PFS for these experiments consisted of two components: an annular aluminum conductor bridging the gap between the coaxial conductors in the Pegasus-II power-flow channel and an annular mylar foil located 6.3 mm downstream of the aluminum. The authors have investigated assemblies with 1/r{sup 2} mass distributions, designed to produce planar motion down the power flow channel. The total mass of the PFS assembly has been varied as has the construction of the aluminum component. The downstream load in the load slot was either a high inductance, 1-cm radius non-imploding pipe or a cylindrical, 12.7-mg pure aluminum imploding foil with 5-cm radius. Experiments have been conducted both with and without a trap region in the downstream inner conductor; the trap is one mechanism for preventing PFS material from entering the load slot.

  6. Modeling of plasma flow switches at low, intermediate and high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Greene, A.E.; Peterson, D.L.; Roderick, N.; Turchi, P.

    1992-01-01

    Inductively stored pulsed power technology has been used over the past thirty years to produce multi-megaamp currents to implode low inductance loads and produce x-radiation. Because of the large difference in timescales for the delivery of magnetic energy to the load and the desire for high power x-radiation output (short timescale for the implosion), most inductively stored systems require at least one opening switch. The design and understanding of fast, efficient opening switches for multi-megaamp systems represents a long standing problem in pulsed power research. The Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project uses inductively stored magnetic energy to implode thin metallic liners. A plasma flow switch (PFS) has been investigated as the final pulse shaping step for this systems. The PFS consists of a wire array and a barrier foil located upstream from the load region. Several stages can be identified in the performance of the plasma flow switch. These are: (1) the vaporization of the wire array; (2) the assembly of the initiated plasma on tie barrier foil to form the switch plasma; (3) the motion of the switch plasma down the coaxial barrel; and (4) current switching to the load (the actual switching stage). The fourth stage affects the switch's efficiency, as well as the quality of the load implosion. Instabilities may develop during any of these four stages, and their presence may seriously degrade the structure of the switch plasma. Two primary criteria may be used to characterize good switching. The first is switching efficiency. A second criterion is transferred to the load during or after switching. This paper summarizes the computational design of the PFS experiments carried out on Pegasus 1. We conclude by considering the implications of these results for the design of a PFS for the higher energy regime (Procyon) regime.

  7. Study on Performance Parameters of the Plasma Source for a Short-Conduction-Time Plasma Opening Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weixi; Zeng, Zhengzhong; Wang, Liangping; Lei, Tianshi; Hu, Yixiang; Huang, Tao; Sun, Tieping

    2012-12-01

    Plasma source performance parameters, including plasma ejection density and velocity, greatly affect the operation of a short-conduction-time plasma opening switch (POS). In this paper, the plasma source used in the POS of Qiangguang I generator is chosen as the study object. At first the POS working process is analyzed. The result shows that the opening performance of the POS can be improved by increasing the plasma ejection velocity and decreasing the plasma density. The influence of the cable plasma gun structure and number on the plasma ejection parameters is experimentally investigated with two charge collectors. Finally a semi-empirical model is proposed to describe the experimental phenomenon.

  8. Design of a Command-Triggered Plasma Opening Switch for Terawatt Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SAVAGE,MARK E.; MENDEL,C.W.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.

    1999-10-29

    Inductive energy storage systems can have high energy density, lending to smaller, less expensive systems. The crucial element of an inductive energy storage system is the opening switch. This switch must conduct current while energy is stored in an inductor, then open quickly to transfer this energy to a load. Plasma can perform this function. The Plasma Opening Switch (POS) has been studied for more than two decades. Success with the conventional plasma opening switch has been limited. A system designed to significantly improve the performance of vacuum opening switches is described in this paper. The gap cleared of plasma is a rough figure-of-merit for vacuum opening switches. Typical opened gaps of 3 mm are reported for conventional switches. The goal for the system described in this paper is more than 3 cm. To achieve this, the command-triggered POS adds an active opening mechanism, which allows complete separation of conduction and opening. This separation is advantageous because of the widely different time scales of conduction and opening. The detrimental process of magnetic field penetration into the plasma during conduction is less important in this switch. The opening mechanism duration is much shorter than the conduction time, so penetration during opening is insignificant. Opening is accomplished with a fast magnetic field that pushes plasma out of the switch region. Plasma must be removed from the switch region to allow high voltage. This paper describes some processes important during conduction and opening, and show calculations on the trigger requirements. The design of the switch is shown. This system is designed to demonstrate both improved performance and nanosecond output jitter at levels greater than one terawatt. An amplification mechanism is described which reduces the trigger energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the system are also shown.

  9. Implicit two-fluid simulation of electron transport in a plasma erosion opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Wallace, J.M.; Lee, K.

    1986-01-01

    The two-dimensional implicit code ANTHEM is used to model electron transport in Plasma Opening Switches. We look at low density (approx.4 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup -3/) switches at initial plasma temperatures as low as 5 eV. Two-fluid modeling (ions and electrons with inertia) and implicit determination of the fields is employed to allow time steps well in excess of the inverse plasma period, and cell sizes much larger than a Debye length - with the avoidance of the finite grid anomalous plasma heating characteristic of particle codes. Features indicative of both erosion and E > B plasma drift are manifest in the simulations.

  10. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanhong; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Tie, Weihao; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2016-06-01

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from "plasmoid" to "plasma flow," and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through "cloud," "core-cloud," and "branch" in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted "U"-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the "branch" channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%-90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  11. MW-scale ICRF plasma heating using IGBT switches in a multi-pulse scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Kogan, K.; Seemann, O.

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state silicon switches are cheap and reliable option for 1-10 MHz RF power sources, required for plasma ion cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). The large `on' resistance of MOSFET and similar devices limits their power delivery to a few tens of kW per switch. Low resistivity devices, such as IGBT, suffer from large `off' switching time, which limits their useful frequency range and increases the power dissipated in the switch. Here we demonstrate more than 0.8 MW circulated RF power at 2 MHz using only three high voltage IGBT switches. The circuit uses the fast `on' switching capability of the IGBTs to generate high-Q pulse train. This operation mode also simplifies the measurement of RF coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  12. Combined Flux Compression and Plasma Opening Switch on the Saturn Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Felber, Franklin S.; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Mazarakis, Michael G.

    2010-05-07

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 {mu}s. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  13. Characterization of the plasma-switch interaction in the LBL HIF ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W. ); Rutkowski, H.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A new way to characterize the performance of the LBL HIF ion source has been found. In the LBL source, ions are drawn from an arc-generated plasma reservoir in which the electrons are confined by a negative-biased switch'' mesh. Stagnation of the plasma is prevented by absorption of the excess ion flow on this mesh. The ion beam is generated by an external negative voltage that provides Child-Langmuir extraction of the ions through the switch mesh. We elucidate the physics requirements of the source and deduce switch mesh parameters needed for successful operation. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Characterization of the plasma-switch interaction in the LBL HIF ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W. ); Rutkowski, H.L. )

    1990-12-10

    A new way to characterize the performance of the LBL HIF ion source has been found. In the LBL source, ions are drawn from an arc-generated plasma reservoir in which the electrons are confined by a negative-biased switch'' mesh. Stagnation of the plasma is prevented by absorption of the excess ion flow on this mesh. The ion beam is generated by an external negative voltage that provides Child-Langmuir extraction of the ions through the switch mesh. We elucidate the physics requirements of the source and deduce switch mesh parameters needed for successful operation. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Ultra-high-power plasma switch INPIS for pulse power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, En H.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.

    1990-01-01

    A novel plasma switch, the inverse pinch switch (IN-PIS), with a combination geometry based on an inverse-pinch mechanism, has been tested and shown to alleviate the shortcomings of conventional spark gaps. The INPIS switch or INPIStron is currently being upscaled for high-voltage (approximately 1 MV) operation with a multigap arrangement similar to Sandia's rimfire electrodes used for ultra-high-voltage hold off. Preliminary results of the multigap INPIS tests at 230 kV and plasma-puff initiation methods are presented, and an application to compact pulser systems is discussed.

  16. Dynamics of the plasma injected into the gap of a plasma opening switch across a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgachev, G. I.; Maslennikov, D. D.; Ushakov, A. G.; Fedotkin, A. S.; Khodeev, I. A.; Shvedov, A. A.

    2011-02-15

    A method is proposed to increase the linear charge density transferred through a plasma opening switch (POS) and, accordingly, reduce the POS diameter by enhancing the external magnetic field in the POS gap. Results are presented from experimental studies of the dynamics of the plasma injected into the POS gap across a strong magnetic field. The possibility of closing the POS gap by the plasma injected across an external magnetic field of up to 60 kG is demonstrated.

  17. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 [times] 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V[sub x] ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V[sub x], the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90[degree]. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 [times] 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  18. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 {times} 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V{sub x} ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V{sub x}, the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90{degree}. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 {times} 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches.

  19. Design and experimental results on a terawatt magnetically controlled plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, M.E.; Simpson, W.W.; Mendel, C.W. Jr.; McDaniel, D.H.; Levine, J.S.; Tucker, T.S.

    1998-05-01

    The magnetically controlled plasma opening switch (MCPOS) is an advanced plasma opening switch that utilizes magnetic fields to improve operation. Magnetic fields always dominate terawatt, pulsed power plasma opening switches. For that reason, the MCPOS uses controlled applied magnetic fields with magnitude comparable to the self-magnetic field of the storage inductor. One applied field holds the plasma in place while energy accumulates in the storage inductor, then another applied field pushes the plasma away from the cathode to allow energy to flow downstream. Over a ten month period, an MCPOS was designed, built, and tested on DECADE Module 2 at Physics International. The peak drive current was 1.8 MA in 250 ns. The output parameters were up to 1 MA into an electron beam load. The radiation temporal pulse width averaged 60 nanoseconds full-width at half-maximum. The peak load voltage ranged from one to two megavolts. The experiments demonstrated efficient power flow through a long, low-impedance magnetically insulated transmission line between the magnetically controlled plasma opening switch and the load.

  20. Complex plasma in g ×B configurations: Stability switching and stationary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahshoor, M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    In a low-pressure magneto-gravitated complex plasma, the stability state of dust gravitational drift wave is switched at a critical wavenumber and the propagating dust magneto-gravitational drift wave is transformed into an aperiodic stationary structure at a cut-off wavenumber. In this paper, two analytical formulas have been derived for the critical wavenumber of stability switching and the cut-off wavenumber of stationary structure. The critical wavenumber is equal to the ratio of ion plasma frequency to ion streaming velocity and the cut-off wavenumber is proportional to the ratio of dust plasma frequency to dust g ×B drift velocity. These scaling formulas are in excellent agreement with exact numerical solutions of dispersion relations. These scenarios are expected to be observed in fully magnetized dusty plasma experiments as the next frontier for complex plasma research.

  1. Analysis of the operating regimes of microsecond-conduction-time plasma opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassany, B.; Grua, P.

    1995-07-01

    A theoretical model for the microsecond-conduction-time plasma opening switch (POS) based on magnetohydrodynamics is presented. The operating processes are associated with the magnetic field transport in the switch. The concept of the freezing-in of magnetic field in fluids is used to analyse the dynamics of this field in the plasma. One-dimensional and two-dimensional numerical simulations lead to the identification of two operating regimes, related to the Hall and the snowplow effects. The transition between these two regimes is determined by the plasma density. Scaling relations are developed from this model. In particular the electrical charge Q, conducted by the POS during the conduction time, provides a useful tool for comparisons between theory and experiments; it is shown to be the essential parameter for the switch design.

  2. Multi-megampere operation of plasma compression opening switches in planar geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, J.H.; Erickson, D.J.; Williams, A.H.; Greene, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are described in which a plasma compression opening switch is used in planar geometry to sharpen the output pulse of an explosive-driven magnetic flux compression generator. Included are data from tests where peak opening switch currents range from 5.7 to 9.3 MA. The switch is used to transfer current to a static low-inductance load (approx.10 nH) with an efficiency of 50% or better and a risetime as low as 0.45 ..mu..s. Results related to current transfer are interpreted within a simple analytical model.

  3. Calculated non-linear magnetic field penetration of plasma opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.; Wilson, D.C.; Bergman, C.; Thiem, K. ); Grossmann, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F. )

    1990-06-15

    We examine magnetic field penetration in the Plasma Opening Switch, exploring, in particular, advective field penetration arising in conjunction with radial density gradients across the cathode anode gap. Our calculations have been completed with the implicit multi-fluid, ANTHEM code. We show favored penetration along a radial density jump, unstable plain wave penetration for a 1/(y {minus} y{sub {alpha}+{epsilon}}) density dependence (with y measured from cathode to anode at Y{sub {alpha}}) in planar switches, and the penetration of finger-like magnetic field perturbations, when the fill plasmas bears initial sinusoidal disturbances on its generator interface. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Research on 2x1 plasma electrode electro-optical switch with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiong Jun; Zheng, Kui Xing; Feng, B.; Wu, D. S.; Lu, J. P.; Tian, X. L.; Jin, F.; Sui, Zhan; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2005-01-01

    In conceptual design of the prototype for SG-III facility, a full aperture electro-optical switch was placed between the cavity mirror and the main amplifier to isolate the reflected beams. The beam on the cavity mirror is 240mm×240mm square. Pockells cells of conversional design with coaxial ring electrodes can not scale to such large square aperture. In the 1980s, a plasma electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) concept was invented at LLNL. It uses transparent plasma electrode formed through gas discharge as the electrodes to apply the voltage across switching crystal to rotate the polarization of a transmitted laser beam. And it can be scaled to large aperture with thin crystal. So the switch which would be used in SG-III is based on this technology. The technical integration line as a prototype of SG-III laser is actually a 4×2 beam bundle. And the full aperture optical switch is mechanically designed four apertures as a removable unit, and electrically two 2×1 PEPC putting together. So we built a 2×1 PEPC to develop the technology first. The 2×1 PEPC is a sandwich structure made of an insulating mid plane between a pair of plasma chambers. The frame of both plasma chambers are machining in duralumin. Each chamber is installed with a planar magnetic cathode and four segments spherical anodes made from stainless steel. The cathode and anode are insulated from the housing with a special shell made from plastic, and plasma is insulated from the housing by an 80-μm-thick anodic coating on the duralumin. The two plasma chambers are separated by a mid plane of glass frame with two square holes. The two holes are filled by two electro-optical crystals with a 240-mm square aperture. With the optimized operating pressure and the electrical parameters, a very good homogeneity and low resistivity plasma electrode is obtained. Finally we tested its switching performance to simulate the case that it will be used in the SG-III prototype facility. It works with a quarter wave

  5. Plasma density evolution in plasma opening switch obtained by a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Ren, Jing; Guo, Fan; Zhou, LiangJi; Li, Ye; He, An; Jiang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation process of vacuum gap in coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch (POS), we have made measurements of the line-integrated plasma density during switch operation using a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer. The conduction current and conduction time in experiments are about 120 kA and 1 μs, respectively. As a result, more than 85% of conduction current has been transferred to an inductive load with rise time of 130 ns. The radial dependence of the density is measured by changing the radial location of the line-of-sight for shots with the same nominal POS parameters. During the conduction phase, the line-integrated plasma density in POS increases at all radial locations over the gun-only case by further ionization of material injected from the guns. The current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A vacuum gap forms rapidly in the plasma at 5.5 mm from the center conductor, which is consistent with the location where magnetic pressure is the largest, allowing current to be transferred from the POS to the load.

  6. Cyclic resistive switching effect in plasma electrolytically oxidized mesoporous Pt/TiO2 structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullam, S.; Ray, N. J.; Karpov, E. G.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the resistive switching phenomenon in metal oxide semiconductors is necessary in producing reliable resistive random access memory and other variable resistance devices. An alternative technique for fabricating resistive switching elements is presented. Using plasma electrolytic oxidation, 10-11 μ m thick oxide layers were galvanostatically grown on Ti substrates in a 3 M H2SO4 electrolyte. Analysis of the TiO2 layer by SEM, AFM, and XRD found the mesoporous titania surface to have a high ratio of rutile to anatase phases. The samples demonstrated pinched I-V hysteresis attributed to the resistive switching effect, when subjected to cyclic loading (±2.5, 1.6, 0.7 V; 23-736 μ Hz) at room temperature. Ratio with magnitude of 6 is reported for the resistance switching effect during 1.6 V 368 μ Hz loads.

  7. Implicit collisional three-fluid simulation of the plasma erosion opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Wallace, J.M.; Grossmann, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.

    1987-12-01

    The plasma erosion opening switch (PEOS) has been studied with the aid of the ANTHEM implicit simulation code. This switch consists of fill plasma injected into a transmission line. The plasma is ultimately removed by self-electrical forces, permitting energy delivery to a load. Here, ANTHEM treats the ions and electrons of the fill plasma and the electrons emitted from the transmission-line cathode as three distinct Eulerian fluids - with electron inertia retained. This permits analysis of charge separation effects, and avoids the singularities that plague conventional MHD codes at low density. E and BETA fields are computed by the implicit moment method, allowing for time steps well in excess of the electron plasma period ..delta..t >> ..omega../sub rho//sup -1/, and cells much wider than a Debye length, ..delta..chi >> lambda/sub D/. Switch dynamics are modeled as a function of the driving electrical pulse characteristics, the fill plasma parameters, and the emission properties of the transmission line walls - for both collisionless and anomalously collisional electrons. Our low-fill-density (n/sub e/ less than or equal to 4 X 10/sup 12/ electrons/cm/sup 3/) collisionless calculations are in accord with earlier particle code results. Our high-density computations (n/sub e/ greater than or equal to 2 X 10/sup 13/ electrons/cm/sup 3/) show the opening of the switch proceeding through both ion erosion and magnetic pressure effects. The addition of anomalous electron collisions is found to diffuse the driving BETA field into the fill plasma, producing broad current channels and reduced magnetic pressure effects, in some agreement with NRL experimental measurements.

  8. Self-induced gaseous plasma as high power microwave opening switch medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.; Liu, C.

    2015-04-15

    Self-induced gaseous plasma is evaluated as active opening switch medium for pulsed high power microwave radiation. The self-induced plasma switch is investigated for N{sub 2} and Ar environments under pressure conditions ranging from 25 to 700 Torr. A multi-pass TE{sub 111} resonator is used to significantly reduce the delay time inherently associated with plasma generation. The plasma forms under the pulsed excitation of a 4 MW magnetron inside the central dielectric tube of the resonator, which isolates the inner atmospheric gas from the outer vacuum environment. The path from the power source to the load is designed such that the pulse passes through the plasma twice with a 35 ns delay between these two passes. In the first pass, initial plasma density is generated, while the second affects the transition to a highly reflective state with as much as 30 dB attenuation. Experimental data revealed that virtually zero delay time may be achieved for N{sub 2} at 25 Torr. A two-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the plasma formation times for comparison with experimental data. The delay time predicted from this model agrees well with the experimental values in the lower pressure regime (error < 25%), however, due to filamentary plasma formation at higher pressures, simulated delay times may be underestimated by as much as 50%.

  9. Development of compact high voltage switched mode power supply for microwave plasma sources supply for low pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdtongmee, P.; Srinoum, D.; Nisoa, M.

    2011-08-01

    Although microwave induced plasmas are well known as high efficiency plasma sources, their uses in laboratories are limited since the microwave power systems are complicated and expensive. The output power of commercially available low-cost microwave ovens is fixed and discontinuous resulting from the high voltage doubler topology of the magnetron tube power supply. In this paper, a high voltage switched mode power supply of forward topology has been developed for continuous microwave power radiation. The forward converter can generate a no-load high voltage output maximum of 7 kV. When driving the magnetron tube, the microwave output power could be varied from 0 to 35 W while the high voltage output level was constantly regulated at -3.4 kV. A microwave induced plasma system was setup to investigate the plasma produced. A low pressure argon plasma was produced with only 2 W over a wide range of pressures.

  10. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  11. Initial planning for interferometry measurements on triggered plasma opening switch source.

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G.; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Sharpe, Rob A.; Gilmore, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    The Triggered Plasma Opening Switch (TPOS) at SNL is a unique device that exploits the high conductivity and low mass properties of plasma. The TPOS's objective is to take the initial {approx}0.8 MA ({approx}250 ns rise time) storage inductor current and deliver {approx}0.5 MA at {approx}2.4 MV ({approx}10 ns rise time) to a load of {approx}5-10 Omega. Configuration advantages include low current jitter and resistive voltage drop, power gain, and minimization of trigger input power as the result of using two stages in series. This two-stage design is novel and is the first to demonstrate operation of magnetically triggered stages. Study of TPOS characteristics is in progress via an offline interferometer diagnostic; specifically, a laser interferometer will be used to make density measurements of the source plasma. It is thought that the gross plasma source density is {approx}10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, but details of the spatial structure and temporal evolution have not previously been studied. In order to better understand switch operation, these details are essential. Presently two interferometer systems are planned for testing: a temporary 1 mum system for initial plasma characterization, and a 10.6 mum laser system for routine use. We will start with a single chord measurement then upgrade to a multi-chord system. Future plans involve varying plasma source parameters, such as magnetic field strength and plasma fill time, in order to understand the density dependence on these parameters. Improved knowledge of the plasma source density behavior should allow for improved switch operation.

  12. How do plasma flow switches scale with current? Issues in the 6 MA to 30 MA regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Greene, A.E.; Nakafuji, G.; Peterson, D.L.; Roderick, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    Point mass calculations are used to model switched implosions on several pulsed power machines. The model includes a lumped circuit representation of the pulsed power source. A simple switching model is used to describe a standard plasma flow switch. Implosion kinetic energies are obtained at a convergence ratio of 20 to 1. Heuristic arguments are used to estimate the plasma temperature at pinch, the total x-ray output and the radiation pulse width. Switched models are presented for Pegasus II, Shiva Star, Procyon and Atlas.

  13. Design of a Command-Triggered Plasma Opening Switch for Terawatt Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, Jr., C.W.; Savage, M.E.; Seidel, D.B.; Shoup, R.W.

    1999-06-23

    Inductive energy storage pulsed power systems can have high energy density, leading to smaller, less expensive systems. The crucial element of an inductive energy storage system is the opening switch. In microsecond and nanosecond pulsed power systems the plasma opening switch has been in use for more than twenty years. Though widely studied, application of the plasma opening switch (POS) has been limited in both performance ad understanding. The development of the triggered switch is aimed to address three important areas. First, complete de-coupling of the closed phase and the opening phase will allow improved performance, especialiy at longer conduction times. Second, the simplified physics allows for easier modeling because of a betterdefined geometry. Third, naturally, triggering will reduce jitter of the output pulse. Improving performance will allow longer conduction time, and triggering will negate the naturaIIy increased self- operating jitter at longer conduction time. The triggered switch system is based on moving the plasma switch armature with a magnetic field. Up unti} the time the armature is pushed away, it is held in place against the drive current magnetic pressure by a second magnetic field. We have demonstrated the components of this system [1], but never before has a plasma opening switch been opened by an independent signal. Our system is designed to deliver 1-2 terawatts of usable load power at multi-megavolt potentiak. We define usable load power as the product of load voltage and load cathode (boundary) current. The length of the vacuum storage inductor defines the 35 ns pulse length. This paper will show the design of the switch and rngger system, which is conservatively designed to provide a wide range of trigger signals. The trigger power for this system is important for cost reasons. The first experiments will use a trigger level of ten percent of the output pulse; we will describe design features intended to reduce the amount of

  14. Improved performance of a plasma opening switch using a novel anode configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, J.R.; Kortbawi, D.; Sincerny, P.S. )

    1994-06-01

    The performance of a plasma opening switch (POS), as measured by the peak opening voltage developed, has been improved from [approx] 1.2 to [approx] 2.3 MV through a simple modification of the anode electrode. This modification was motivated by observation of electron damage to the anode in the POS region, and consisted of the removal of any metallic surfaces that exhibited significant damage and were not essential to the integrity of the switch. Because present analytic theories and PIC simulations of the switch have not yet addressed the effect modifications to the anode may have to the opening phase in depth, it is hoped that in addition to providing a technique for improving POS operation, the work reported here may also provide incentive for further theoretical investigation.

  15. Note: Design and investigation of a multichannel plasma-jet triggered gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Weihao; Liu, Xuandong; Zhang, Qiaogen; Liu, Shanhong

    2014-07-01

    We described the fabrication and testing of a multichannel plasma-jet triggered gas switch (MPJTGS). A novel six-channel annular micro-plasma-gun was embedded in the trigger electrode to generate multichannel plasma jets as a nanosecond trigger pulse arrived. The gas breakdown in multiple sites of the spark gap was induced and fixed around jet orifices by the plasma jets. We tested the multichannel discharge characteristics of the MPJTGS in two working modes with charge voltage of 50 kV, trigger voltage of +40 kV (25 ns rise time), and trigger energy of 240 J, 32 J, and 2 J, respectively, at different working coefficients. Results show that the average number of discharge channels increased as the trigger energy increased, and decreased as the working coefficient decreased. At a working coefficient of 87.1% and trigger energy of 240 J, the average number of discharge channels in Mode II could reach 4.1.

  16. A Plasma Opening Switch Based on a Gas-Puff/Axial Wire Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Joseph; de Grouchy, Philip; Ouart, Nicholas; Qi, Niansheng; Atoyan, Levon; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce; Giuliani, John

    2015-11-01

    We are investigating an idea for switching current from a gas-puff shell to an axial metal wire as a mechanism for generating inductive voltage spikes and x-rays above 10 keV. The outer annulus of a 7 cm. diameter triple-annular gas-puff nozzle is used to inject gas into the electrode gap of the COBRA 1 MA generator, with a single wire on-axis. We show that the current pulse produced by COBRA initially travels through the lower inductance pre-ionized outer shell plasma, generating an azimuthal magnetic field which drives this shell radially inwards. Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth occurs on the outer edge of this imploding plasma, which disrupts the current carrying column, inhibiting the axial flow of current through the gas-puff plasma and possibly causing the current to switch to the higher inductance wire. A disruption to the current through the gas-puff shell caused by instability growth should be measurable as a voltage spike, as the current finds a new path either through the wire or elsewhere in the imploding plasma shell. We investigate this effect as instability conditions are varied, by adjusting the density and species of the injected gas. This work was sponsored by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE cooperative agreement.

  17. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2−/− B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2−/− mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs. PMID:20953163

  18. Simple determination of terbutaline in dog plasma by column-switching liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z R

    2004-06-15

    Terbutaline is a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist that acts as a bronchodilator in the treatment of asthma and chronic bronchitis. In the present work, a column-switching high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed to monitor terbutaline sulphate in dog plasma. The system consists of a C2 pre-column (PC) and a C18 analytical column connected in series via a switching valve. Atenolol was used as the internal standard. Good linearity was achieved in the range of 5-800 ng/ml plasma. The mean intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients for this analysis were 2.3 and 4.7%, respectively. The average recovery for terbutaline was 87.4% from plasma. The mean concentration after three freeze-thaw cycles was 99.4% of the normal value. The analytical sensitivity and accuracy of this assay is adequate for characterisation of the pharmacokinetics of oral administration of terbutaline to dogs and has been successfully used to provide pharmacokinetic data using pulsatile and immediate-release tablets. PMID:15135092

  19. Switched ferroelectric plasma ionizer (SwiFerr) for ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2011-01-01

    We present the implementation of a switched ferroelectric plasma ionizer (SwiFerr) for ambient analysis of trace substances by mass spectrometry. The device utilizes the ferroelectric properties of barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) to take advantage of the high electric field resulting from polarization switching in the material. The source comprises a [001]-oriented barium titanate crystal (5 × 5 × 1 mm) with a metallic rear electrode and a metallic grid front electrode. When a high voltage AC waveform is applied to the rear electrode to switch polarization, the resulting electric field on the face of the crystal promotes electron emission and results in plasma formation between the crystal face and the grounded grid at ambient pressure. Interaction with this plasma and the resulting reagent ions effects ionization of trace neutrals. The source requires less than 1 W of power to operate under most circumstances, ionizes molecules with acidic and basic functional groups easily, and has proven quite versatile for ambient analysis of both vapor phase and aspirated powdered solid samples. Ionization of vapor phase samples of the organics triethylamine, tripropylamine, tributylamine, and pyridine results in observation of the singly protonated species in the positive ion mass spectrum with sensitivity extending into the high ppb range. With acetic acid, deprotonated clusters dominate the negative ion mass spectrum. Aerodynamic sampling of powdered samples is used to record mass spectra of the pharmaceuticals loperamide and ibuprofen. Chemical signatures, including protonated loperamide and deprotonated ibuprofen, are observed for each drug. The robust, low power source lends itself easily to miniaturization and incorporation in field-portable devices used for the rapid detection and characterization of trace substances and hazardous materials in a range of different environments. PMID:21128617

  20. A Tesla-pulse forming line-plasma opening switch pulsed power generator.

    PubMed

    Novac, B M; Kumar, R; Smith, I R

    2010-10-01

    A pulsed power generator based on a high-voltage Tesla transformer which charges a 3.85 Ω/55 ns water-filled pulse forming line to 300 kV has been developed at Loughborough University as a training tool for pulsed power students. The generator uses all forms of insulation specific to pulsed power technology, liquid (oil and water), gas (SF(6)), and magnetic insulation in vacuum, and a number of fast voltage and current sensors are implemented for diagnostic purposes. A miniature (centimeter-size) plasma opening switch has recently been coupled to the output of the pulse forming line, with the overall system comprising the first phase of a program aimed at the development of a novel repetitive, table-top generator capable of producing 15 GW pulses for high power microwave loads. Technical details of all the generator components and the main experimental results obtained during the program and demonstrations of their performance are presented in the paper, together with a description of the various diagnostic tools involved. In particular, it is shown that the miniature plasma opening switch is capable of reducing the rise time of the input current while significantly increasing the load power. Future plans are outlined in the conclusions. PMID:21034107

  1. Plasma Etching of n-Type 4H-SiC for Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Huseyin; Kuryatkov, Vladimir V.; Mauch, Daniel L.; Dickens, James C.; Nikishin, Sergey A.

    2015-05-01

    Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) fabricated on high-purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrates (000) are capable of switching high currents in compact packages with long device lifetimes. A heavily doped n-type SiC epitaxial layer of appropriate thickness is required to form low-resistance ohmic contacts with these devices. In addition, to enhance the performance of the PCSSs, the SiC surface between the ohmic contacts must be extremely smooth. We report a chlorine-based, inductively coupled plasma reactive ion-etching process yielding n-type SiC epitaxial layers with the required smoothness. The rate of etching and post-etching surface morphology were dependent on plasma conditions. We found that the surface smoothness of epitaxial layers can be improved by including BCl3 in the argon-chlorine mixture. The optimum etching process yielded very smooth surfaces (˜0.3 nm RMS) at a relatively high rate of etching of ˜220 nm/min. This new fabrication approach significantly reduced the on-state resistance of the PCSS device and improved its durability of operation.

  2. A study of parameters useful for describing plasma-opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Seidel, D.B.; Rosenthal, S.E.

    1998-09-01

    Plasma opening switches (POS) have been used continually and studied since their introduction in 1975. During that period they have performed well for prepulse suppression and sharpening the front of the power pulse. Their use for long conduction time and rapid opening to stand off high voltage in the same POS has met with very limited success. There has been a large theoretical effort involving models and particle-in-cell simulations (PICS), but the connection between theory and experiment has been tenuous at best, and convincing agreement with experiment has been minimal. The authors believe progress toward long conduction and rapid opening would be faster if macroscopic physical parameters describing the physics of the switch were used to compare experiment to simulation. One of these parameters (electron flow impedance) has been used to describe the electrical characteristics of the POS. This parameter provides a good description of both the standard POS (SPOS) and the magnetically controlled POS (MCPOS) because its value is sensibly independent of load current. An additional parameter, the effective mass of the plasma, was measured in one MCPOS experiment. In this article they describe other parameters important to operation of the SPOS and the MCPOS, and parameters important in designing PICS used to study these devices.

  3. A Tesla-pulse forming line-plasma opening switch pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novac, B. M.; Kumar, R.; Smith, I. R.

    2010-10-01

    A pulsed power generator based on a high-voltage Tesla transformer which charges a 3.85 Ω/55 ns water-filled pulse forming line to 300 kV has been developed at Loughborough University as a training tool for pulsed power students. The generator uses all forms of insulation specific to pulsed power technology, liquid (oil and water), gas (SF6), and magnetic insulation in vacuum, and a number of fast voltage and current sensors are implemented for diagnostic purposes. A miniature (centimeter-size) plasma opening switch has recently been coupled to the output of the pulse forming line, with the overall system comprising the first phase of a program aimed at the development of a novel repetitive, table-top generator capable of producing 15 GW pulses for high power microwave loads. Technical details of all the generator components and the main experimental results obtained during the program and demonstrations of their performance are presented in the paper, together with a description of the various diagnostic tools involved. In particular, it is shown that the miniature plasma opening switch is capable of reducing the rise time of the input current while significantly increasing the load power. Future plans are outlined in the conclusions.

  4. Note: Design and investigation of a multichannel plasma-jet triggered gas switch.

    PubMed

    Tie, Weihao; Liu, Xuandong; Zhang, Qiaogen; Liu, Shanhong

    2014-07-01

    We described the fabrication and testing of a multichannel plasma-jet triggered gas switch (MPJTGS). A novel six-channel annular micro-plasma-gun was embedded in the trigger electrode to generate multichannel plasma jets as a nanosecond trigger pulse arrived. The gas breakdown in multiple sites of the spark gap was induced and fixed around jet orifices by the plasma jets. We tested the multichannel discharge characteristics of the MPJTGS in two working modes with charge voltage of 50 kV, trigger voltage of +40 kV (25 ns rise time), and trigger energy of 240 J, 32 J, and 2 J, respectively, at different working coefficients. Results show that the average number of discharge channels increased as the trigger energy increased, and decreased as the working coefficient decreased. At a working coefficient of 87.1% and trigger energy of 240 J, the average number of discharge channels in Mode II could reach 4.1. PMID:25085190

  5. High-Power Plasma Switch for 11.4 GHz Microwave Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2010-03-04

    Results obtained in several experiments on active RF pulse compression at X-band using a magnicon as the high-power RF source are presented. In these experiments, microwave energy was stored in high-Q TE01 and TE02 modes of two parallel-fed resonators, and then discharged using switches activated with rapidly fired plasma discharge tubes. Designs and high-power tests of several versions of the compressor are described. In these experiments, coherent pulse superposition was demonstrated at a 5–9 MW level of incident power. The compressed pulses observed had powers of 50–70 MW and durations of 40–70 ns. Peak power gains were measured to be in the range of 7:1–11:1 with efficiency in the range of 50–63%.

  6. TOF-SIMS study on surface modification of reed switch blades by pulsing nitrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arushanov, K. A.; Drozdov, M. N.; Karabanov, S. M.; Zeltser, I. A.; Tolstogouzov, A.

    2013-01-01

    A TOF.SIMS-5 by ION-TOF operating with pulsed 25 keV Bi+ for analysis and 2 keV Cs+ for sputtering was used to study depth compositional changes in near-surface layers of permalloy (iron-nickel) blades after treatment by pulsed nitrogen plasma directly in sealed reed switches. The formation of 350 nm-thick oxy-nitride coating in the contacting region of the blades was observed. It was found that the origin of this coating cannot be explained just by nitrogen and oxygen diffusion inside the treated material. Rather, cathode sputtering and re-deposition of sputtered products, thermal decomposition of nitrides and oxides along with sputter-induced surface roughening can also contribute in the formation of the modified layers.

  7. Multichannel microwave interferometer with an antenna switching system for electron density measurement in a laboratory plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Mase, Atsushi; Nishida, Yasushi; Cheng, C. Z.

    2014-02-15

    This study presents a simple and powerful technique for multichannel measurements of the density profile in laboratory plasmas by microwave interferometry. This technique uses electromechanical microwave switches to temporally switch the connection between multiple receiver antennas and one phase-detection circuit. Using this method, the phase information detected at different positions is rearranged into a time series that can be acquired from a minimum number of data acquisition channels (e.g., two channels in the case of quadrature detection). Our successfully developed multichannel microwave interferometer that uses the antenna switching method was applied to measure the radial electron density profiles in a magnetized plasma experiment. The advantage of the proposed method is its compactness and scalability to multidimensional measurement systems at low cost.

  8. Experimental investigation on the effect of plasma jet in the triggered discharge process of a gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, W.; Liu, S.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-08-01

    The temporal and spatial evolution of a plasma jet generated by a spark discharge was observed. The electron temperature and density were obtained under different time and gas pressures by optical emission spectroscopy. Moreover, the discharge process of the plasma-jet triggered gas switch was recorded and analyzed at the lowest working coefficient. The results showed that the plasma jet moved forward in a bullet mode, and the advancing velocity increased with the decrease of pressure, and decreased with time growing. At initial time, the maximum velocity of a plasma jet could reach 3.68 × 106 cm/s. The electron temperature decreased from 2.0 eV to 1.3 eV, and the electron density increased from 3.1 × 1015/cm3 to 6.3 × 1015/cm3 at the initial moment as the gas pressure increases from 0.1 MPa to 0.32 MPa. For a two-gap gas switch, the discharge performances were more depended on the second discharge spark gap (gap 2). Because plasma jet promoted the discharge in Gap 2, the gas switch operating in mode II had better triggered discharge characteristics. In the discharge process, the plasma-jet triggering had the effect of non-penetrating inducing, which not only provided initial electrons for reducing statistical lag but also enhanced the local electric field. The discharge was initiated and accelerated from electron avalanche to streamer. Therefore, a fast discharge was occurred in the gas switch.

  9. Single-pulse driven, large-aperture 2×1 array plasma-electrodes optical switch for SG-II upgrading facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Dengsheng; Zheng, Jiangang; Zheng, Kuixing; Zhu, Qihua; Zhang, Xiongjun

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the design and performance of an optical switch that has been constructed for the SG-II upgrading facility. The device is a longitudinal, potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP), 360 mm×360 mm aperture, and 2×1 array electro-optical switch driven by a 20 kV output switching-voltage pulse generator through two plasma electrodes produced at the rise edge of the switching-voltage pulse. The results show that the temporal responses and the spatial performance of the optical switch fulfill the operation requirements of the SG-II upgrading facility.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Chordal Wire-Array Plasma Flow Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2015-11-01

    The coaxial plasma flow switch (PFS) using a chordal wire array armature was first studied experimentally and computationally in the 1980's. That work revealed significant current interruption (dI/dt ~ 5 MA/ μs) as well as continuum x-ray emission representative of 30-45 keV bremsstrahlung. The work concluded that the voltage spike associated with the current interruption accelerated highly magnetized ions downstream at high velocity, and that energy exchange between the ions and electrons and their subsequent acceleration at the downstream boundary of the apparatus were responsible for the x-ray production. This work revisits the PFS operation up to and just beyond the point of armature lift-off from the coaxial section, where the magnetohydrodynamic model is valid and relevant. The early-time energy deposition in the wires from the pulse discharge is modeled in high-resolution 1-D and is used to set the initial conditions for the full-scale 3-D calculation. The wire array is assumed to have expanded from the initial r =0.01 cm uniformly and only in the axial direction, while the areal mass density retains its intended variation with radius. 3-D calculations are used to examine the armature, including magnetic field diffusion, as it is propelled along the coaxial geometry. These calculations will be used to set the initial conditions for follow-on particle or particle-fluid hybrid calculations of the propagation of ions and electrons to downstream obstacles and to calculate the x-ray production from the interactions of the flowing plasma with the obstacles.

  11. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with laser plasma initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakova, R. P.; Shikanov, A. E.

    1987-10-01

    An analysis was made of the results of an investigation of switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with a laser plasma and a vacuum arc. The dependences of the neutron yield on the electrical energy of the diode were recorded and analyzed. The results indicated a possible way of simple construction of an acceleration tube with switching via a laser-plasma source.

  12. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  13. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  14. A novel low-jitter plasma-jet triggered gas switch operated at a low working coefficient.

    PubMed

    Tie, Weihao; Liu, Shanhong; Liu, Xuandong; Zhang, Qiaogen; Pang, Lei; Liu, Longchen

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we described the fabrication and testing of a novel plasma-jet triggered gas switch (PJTGS) operated at extremely low working coefficients with excellent triggered jitters. While the structure of the PJTGS is similar to that of a traditional three-electrode field-distortion gas switch, to improve its triggered performance we used a conical micro-plasma-gun with a needle-to-plate spark gap embedded in the trigger electrode. Applying a nanosecond pulse to the trigger electrode caused a spark discharge in the micro-plasma-gun. The electric field drove the discharge plasma to spray into the spark gap of the gas switch, causing fast breakdown. We tested the PJTGS with charging voltages of ±25 kV and a trigger voltage of +80 kV (5 ns rise time and 80 ns full width at half maximum) in two working modes. The PJTGS operated in Mode II had a lower triggered jitter and could be operated over a wider range of working coefficients than in Mode I under the same conditions. At working coefficients higher than 70%, we obtained sub-ns triggered jitters (<0.89 ns) from the PJTGS, at working coefficients lower than 50%, we obtained triggered jitters of 1.6-3.5 ns without no-fires or pre-fires. Even at a working coefficient of 27.4%, the PJTGS could still be triggered reliably with a delay time of 96.1 ns and a triggered jitter of 3.5 ns, respectively. PMID:24593358

  15. Initial design and results from an ion current collection diagnostic for the triggered plasma opening switch experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Seidel, David Bruce; Gilmore, Mark; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.

    2005-06-01

    Study of the triggered plasma opening switch (TPOS) characteristics is in progress via an ion current collection diagnostic (ICCD), in addition to offline apparatus. This initial ion current collection diagnostic has been designed, fabricated, and tested on the TPOS in order to explore the opening profile of the main switch. The initial ion current collection device utilizes five collectors which are positioned perpendicularly to the main switch stage in order to collect radially traveling ions. It has been shown through analytical prowess that this specific geometry can be treated as a planar case of the Child-Langmuir law with only a 6% deviation from the cylindrical case. Additionally, magnetostatic simulations with self consistent space charge emitting surfaces of the main switch using the Trak code are under way. It is hoped that the simulations will provide evidence in support of both the analytical derivations and experimental data. Finally, an improved design of the ICCD (containing 12 collectors in the axial direction) is presently being implemented.

  16. Mathematical modeling of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings-switched electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Pustovalov, AS

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings in modulating the electrical parameters. Mathematical models are based on physical models of gas-dynamic mechanisms more dynamic and thermal processes of the plasma jet. As an example the modeling of dynamic processes of heterogeneous plasma jet, modulated current pulses indirect arc plasma torch.

  17. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics of low temperature grown ZnO thin films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jian; Yang Hui; Zhang Qilong; Dong Shurong; Luo, J. K.

    2013-01-07

    ZnO films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) have been used to investigate resistive memory behavior. The bipolar resistance switching properties were observed in the Al/PEALD-ZnO/Pt devices. The resistance ratio for the high and low resistance states (HRS/LRS) is more than 10{sup 3}, better than ZnO devices deposited by other methods. The dominant conduction mechanisms of HRS and LRS are trap-controlled space charge limited current and Ohmic behavior, respectively. The resistive switching behavior is induced upon the formation/disruption of conducting filaments. This study demonstrated that the PEALD-ZnO films have better properties for the application in 3D resistance random access memory.

  18. Discharge dynamics and plasma density recovery by on/off switches of additional gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Oh, SeungJu; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of the plasma density is investigated to study plasma dynamics by adding reactive gas (O2) or rare gas (He) in Ar plasmas. When the O2 or He gas is added, plasma density is suddenly decreased, while the plasma density recovers slowly with gas off. It is found that the recovery time is strongly dependent on the gas flow rate, and it can be explained by effect of gas residence time. When the He gas is off in the Ar plasma, the plasma density is overshot compared to the case of the O2 gas pulsing due to enhanced ionizations by metastable atoms. Analysis and calculation for correlation between the plasma density dynamics and the gas pulsing are also presented in detail.

  19. Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Krasik, Yakov E.; Hadas, Yoav; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2014-05-07

    Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

  20. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to <1 ns) in the delay of the output pulses' appearance with respect to the time of the beam's entrance into the switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  1. Simultaneous determination of triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori in human plasma by reversed phase chromatography with online wavelength switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sameh; Atia, Noha N.

    2015-02-01

    The infection of gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori (HP) is an essential cofactor in the aetiology of gastroduodenal ulcer and gastric carcinoma. Because of the bacterial resistance, combination therapy containing omeprazole (OME), tinidazole (TNZ) and clarithromycin (CLA) is commonly used for eradication of HP. However, the simultaneous determination of the triple therapy in human plasma was not reported. A simple, reproducible, and selective HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the triple therapy mixture used for management of HP infections in human plasma. An HPLC procedure based on a liquid-liquid extraction, enrichment of the analytes and subsequent reversed-phase chromatography with UV detection was used. To enable sensitive and selective detection, the method involved the use of online wavelength switching detection, with two different detection wavelengths; 280 nm for detection of OME and TNZ and 210 nm for detection of CLA. Separations were performed on C18 analytical column with acetonitrile-10 mM phosphate buffer of pH = 3.0 at flow rate of 1.0 mL min-1. The linear ranges in human plasma were 0.05-10 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficients >0.9990. The detection limits in human plasma were 0.02-0.07 μg mL-1. Validation parameters were assessed in compliance with US-FDA guidelines. The method proved to be valuable for the therapeutic drug monitoring after oral administration of triple therapy tablets.

  2. Simultaneous determination of triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori in human plasma by reversed phase chromatography with online wavelength switching.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sameh; Atia, Noha N

    2015-02-01

    The infection of gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori (HP) is an essential cofactor in the aetiology of gastroduodenal ulcer and gastric carcinoma. Because of the bacterial resistance, combination therapy containing omeprazole (OME), tinidazole (TNZ) and clarithromycin (CLA) is commonly used for eradication of HP. However, the simultaneous determination of the triple therapy in human plasma was not reported. A simple, reproducible, and selective HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the triple therapy mixture used for management of HP infections in human plasma. An HPLC procedure based on a liquid-liquid extraction, enrichment of the analytes and subsequent reversed-phase chromatography with UV detection was used. To enable sensitive and selective detection, the method involved the use of online wavelength switching detection, with two different detection wavelengths; 280nm for detection of OME and TNZ and 210nm for detection of CLA. Separations were performed on C18 analytical column with acetonitrile-10mM phosphate buffer of pH=3.0 at flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1). The linear ranges in human plasma were 0.05-10μgmL(-1) with correlation coefficients >0.9990. The detection limits in human plasma were 0.02-0.07μgmL(-1). Validation parameters were assessed in compliance with US-FDA guidelines. The method proved to be valuable for the therapeutic drug monitoring after oral administration of triple therapy tablets. PMID:25459696

  3. Hall-MHD and PIC Modeling of the Conduction-to-Opening Transition in a Plasma Opening Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumer, J. W.; SwanekampDdagger, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.; Commisso, R. J.; Weber, B. V.

    1998-11-01

    Utilizing the fast opening characteristics of a plasma opening switch (POS), inductive energy storage devices can generate short-duration high-power pulses (<0.1 μ s, >1 TW) with current rise-times on the order of 10 ns. Plasma redistribution and thinning during the POS conduction phase can be modeled adequately with MHD methods. By including the Hall term in Ohm's Law, MHD methods can simulate plasmas with density gradient scale lengths between c/ω_pe < Ln < c/ω_pi. However, the neglect of electron inertia (c/ω_pe) and space-charge separation (λ_De) by single-fluid theory eventually becomes invalid in small gap regions that form during POS opening. PIC methods are well-suited for low-density plasmas, but are numerically taxed by high-density POS regions. An interface converts MHD (Mach2) output into PIC (Magic) input suitable for validating various transition criteria through comparison of current and density distributions from both methods. We will discuss recent progress in interfacing Hall-MHD and PIC simulations. Work supported by Defense Special Weapons Agency. ^ NRL-NRC Research Associate. hspace0.25in ^ JAYCOR, Vienna, VA 22102.

  4. Bipolar resistive switching properties of AlN films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Qilong; Yang, Hui; Wu, Huayu; Zhou, Juehui; Hu, Liang

    2014-10-01

    AlN thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) have been used to investigate the resistive switching (RS) behavior. The bipolar RS properties were observed in the Cu/PEALD-AlN/Pt devices, which are induced upon the formation/disruption of Cu conducting filaments, as confirmed by the temperature dependent resistances relationships at different resistance states. The resistance ratio of the high and low resistance states (HRS/LRS) is 102-105. The dominant conduction mechanisms at HRS and LRS are trap-controlled space charge limited current and Ohmic behavior, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PEALD-AlN films have a great potential for the applications in high-density resistance random access memory.

  5. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  6. Quantitation of polar analytes using column-switching: application to oxycodone and three metabolites in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M; Bourgogne, E; Varesio, E; Hopfgartner, G

    2010-03-01

    We present herein a sensitive and selective assay for the determination of oxycodone and its main metabolites, oxymorphone, noroxycodone and noroxymorphone in human plasma, using column-switching and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Sample preparation comprised protein precipitation with perchloric acid. After neutralization, the supernatant was injected without any evaporation step onto a polymeric, pH-resistant cartridge (HySphere Resin GP 10-12 microm) for sample clean-up (Prospekt II). The latter operation was achieved by using alkaline conditions to ensure retention of analytes and methanol for matrix interference removal. More than two hundred plasma samples could be analyzed with a single cartridge. Analytes were desorbed in the backflush mode and were separated on a conventional reversed phase column (XTerra MS 4.6 x 50 mm, 3.5 microm), using an acidic mobile phase (i.e. containing 0.1% of formic acid). Mass spectrometric detection was achieved with a 4000 Q TRAP equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source, in positive ionization mode, operated in the selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM). Starting from a plasma volume of 250 microl, quantification ranges were 25-10,000 pg/ml for OXM and NOXM and 50-10,000 pg/ml for OXC and NOXC. Accuracy was found to be within 98% and 108% and precision better than 7%. Replicate determination of incurred or study samples ensured the method to be reproducible and usable for clinical studies. PMID:20138595

  7. 5.8kV SiC PiN Diode for Switching of High-Efficiency Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Hudgins, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster (IPPT) pulse circuits, such as those needed to operate the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT), are required to quickly switch capacitor banks operating at a period of µs while conducting current at levels on the order of at least 10 kA. [1,2] For all iterations of the PIT to date, spark gaps have been used to discharge the capacitor bank through an inductive coil. Recent availability of fast, high-power solid state switching devices makes it possible to consider the use of semiconductor switches in modern IPPTs. In addition, novel pre-ionization schemes have led to a reduction in discharge energy per pulse for electric thrusters of this type, relaxing the switching requirements for these thrusters. [3,4] Solid state switches offer the advantage of greater controllability and reliability, as well as decreased drive circuit dimensions and mass relative to spark gap switches. The use of solid state devices such as Integrated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs), Gate Turn-off Thyristors (GTOs) and Silicon-Controlled Rectifiers (SCRs) often involves the use of power diodes. These semiconductor devices may be connected antiparallel to the switch for protection from reverse current, or used to reduce power loss in a circuit by clamping off current ringing. In each case, higher circuit efficiency may be achieved by using a diode that is able to transition, or 'switch,' from the forward conducting state ('on' state) to the reverse blocking state ('off' state) in the shortest amount of time, thereby minimizing current ringing and switching losses. Silicon Carbide (SiC) PiN diodes offer significant advantages to conventional fast-switching Silicon (Si) diodes for high power and fast switching applications. A wider band gap results in a breakdown voltage 10 times that of Si, so that a SiC device may have a thinner drift region for a given blocking voltage. [5] This leads to smaller, lighter devices for high voltage applications, as well as reduced

  8. Comparison of Fabrication Techniques for Micro-Scale Spark Gap Plasma Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, Matthew; Staack, David

    2014-10-01

    Microplasma spark gaps with 2D geometries were fabricated by two techniques on alumina, first using photolithography and metal sputtering with thicknesses of hundreds of nanometers, and second using thermal-spray several microns thick, but with lower feature resolution. Several high temperature metals were tested as electrode material for the microplamsa device, including tungsten and chromium; however the chromium samples were not robust enough, eroding away too quickly for extensive testing. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were taken before and after testing to determine the wear on the samples. The sputtered tungsten thin films and thermal-spray deposited nickel films on alumina were compared after testing in 1 atm of helium running for one hour at a current of 1 mA. Slight wear and discoloration were noted on the anodes, yet significant erosion occurred on the cathodes; no wear was noted on the alumina. The thermally-sprayed nickel sample had the least wear, while the thin tungsten sample had the most wear. Discoloration was also seen on the nearby floating-voltage electrodes despite not being a part of the circuit, most likely due to heating. As the electrodes eroded, the plasma attachment point moved unpredictably. This work was supported in part by the Department of Defense Army Research Office under Grant W911NF1210007.

  9. Influence of focal point properties on energy transfer and plasma evolution during laser ignition process with a passively q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Bärwinkel, Mark; Lorenz, Sebastian; Stäglich, Robert; Brüggemann, Dieter

    2016-07-11

    Miniaturized passively q-switched laser ignition systems are a promising alternative to conventional ignition sources to ensure a reliable ignition under difficult conditions. In this study the influences of focal point properties on energy transfer from laser to plasma as well as plasma formation and propagation are investigated as the first steps of the laser induced ignition process. Maximum fluence and fluence volume are introduced to characterize focal point properties for varying laser pulse energies and focusing configurations. The results show that the transferred laser energy increases with increasing maximum fluence. During laser emission plasma propagates along the beam path of the focused laser beam. Rising maximum fluence results in increased plasma volume, but expansion saturates when fluence volume reaches its maximum. PMID:27410797

  10. Determination of the antifungal agent voriconazole in human plasma using a simple column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Saori; Suzuki, Riho; Yamazaki, Reiko; Kusuhara, Yoko; Mitsumoto, Shoko; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Shimoeda, Sadahiko; Ohta, Shin; Yamato, Susumu

    2008-03-01

    A simple column-switching high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method that does not require any complicated pretreatment has been developed to determine voriconazole in human plasma samples. An internal standard (IS) and borate buffer (pH 9.0) were added to plasma samples, which were then injected directly into the column-switching HPLC system using MAYI-ODS as a pre-column. The calibration curve for voriconazole showed good linearity in the range of 0.2-10 mug/ml in human plasma. The mean RSD (%) value of intra-day (n=6) and inter-day (n=5) precision were less than 5.4% and 8.2%, respectively. This system could make more than three hundred successive, accurate measurements when a washing step with ammonium acetate solution was added. This method was successfully applied to measure the therapeutic voriconazole level in patients' plasma, and was used in a study of voriconazole pharmacokinetics after oral administration. PMID:18310944

  11. Quantitation of efletirizine in human plasma and urine using automated solid-phase extraction and column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Coe, R A; DeCesare, L S; Lee, J W

    1999-07-01

    A heart-cut column-switching, ion-pair, reversed-phase HPLC system was used for the quantitation of efletirizine (EFZ) in biological fluids. The analyte and an internal standard (I.S.) were extracted from human EDTA plasma by C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) using a RapidTrace workstation. The eluent from the SPE was evaporated, reconstituted and injected onto the HPLC column. Urine samples were diluted and injected directly without the need of extraction. The compounds of interest were separated from most of the extraneous matrix materials by the first C18 column, and switched onto a second C18 column for further separation using a mobile phase of stronger eluting capability. Linearity range was 10-2000 ng ml(-1) for plasma and 0.05-10 microg ml(-1) for urine. The lower limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 10 ng from 1 ml of plasma, with a signal-to-noise ratio of 15:1. Inter-day precision and bias of quality control samples (QCs) were <5% for plasma and <7% for urine. Selectivity was established against six other antihistamines, three analogs of efletirizine, and on 12 control plasma lots and nine control urine lots. Recovery was 90.0% for EFZ and 89.5% for I.S. from plasma. One hundred samples can be processed in every 2.75 h on a 10-module RapidTrace workstation with minimal human attention. Method ruggedness were tested on three brands of SPE and six different lots of one SPE brand. Performance ruggedness was demonstrated by different analysts on multiple HPLC systems. Analyte stability through sample storage, extraction process (benchtop, freeze-thaw, refrigeration after extraction) and chromatography (on-system, reinjection) was established. PMID:10448959

  12. Analysis of drugs in plasma samples from schizophrenic patients by column-switching liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with organic-inorganic hybrid cyanopropyl monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Diego Soares; Souza, Israel Donizeti de; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia Costa

    2015-07-01

    This study reports on the development of a rapid, selective, and sensitive column-switching liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to analyze sixteen drugs (antidepressants, anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, and antipsychotics) in plasma samples from schizophrenic patients. The developed organic-inorganic hybrid monolithic column with cyanopropyl groups was used for the first dimension of the column-switching arrangement. This arrangement enabled online pre-concentration of the drugs (monolithic column) and their subsequent analytical separation on an XSelect SCH C18 column. The drugs were detected on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer (multiple reactions monitoring mode) with an electrospray ionization source in the positive ion mode. The developed method afforded adequate linearity for the sixteen target drugs; the coefficients of determination (R(2)) lay above 0.9932, the interassay precision had coefficients of variation lower than 6.5%, and the relative standard error values of the accuracy ranged from -14.0 to 11.8%. The lower limits of quantification in plasma samples ranged from 63 to 1250pgmL(-1). The developed method successfully analyzed the target drugs in plasma samples from schizophrenic patients for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). PMID:25984963

  13. Damage threshold and focusability of mid-infrared free-electron laser pulses gated by a plasma mirror with nanosecond switching pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaolong; Nakajima, Takashi; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-11-04

    The presence of a pulse train structure of an oscillator-type free-electron laser (FEL) results in the immediate damage of a solid target upon focusing. We demonstrate that the laser-induced damage threshold can be significantly improved by gating the mid-infrared FEL pulses with a plasma mirror. Although the switching pulses we employ have a nanosecond duration which does not guarantee the clean wavefront of the gated FEL pulses, the high focusability is experimentally confirmed through the observation of spectral broadening by a factor of 2.1 when we tightly focus the gated FEL pulses onto the Ge plate.

  14. New technology of ion-plasma modification of the contact surfaces of reed switches in oscillatory discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arushanov, K. A.; Zeltser, I. A.; Karabanov, S. M.; Maizels, R. M.; Moos, Y. N.

    2012-02-01

    The iron-nickel contact surfaces of reed switches after ion-induced modification have been studied using methods of Auger-electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical microscopy. It was demonstrated that the corrosion stability and erosion resistance of the modified contacts is associated with the features of surface topography as well as with a formation of nitride layers. Experimental grounds for a production possibility of reed switches with the modified contact surface instead of electroplating based on the precious metals are given.

  15. A pH Switch Regulates the Inverse Relationship between Membranolytic and Chaperone-like Activities of HSP-1/2, a Major Protein of Horse Seminal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Sudheer; Swamy, Musti J

    2016-07-01

    HSP-1/2, a major protein of horse seminal plasma binds to choline phospholipids present on the sperm plasma membrane and perturbs its structure by intercalating into the hydrophobic core, which results in an efflux of choline phospholipids and cholesterol, an important event in sperm capacitation. HSP-1/2 also exhibits chaperone-like activity (CLA) in vitro and protects target proteins against various kinds of stress. In the present study we show that HSP-1/2 exhibits destabilizing activity toward model supported and cell membranes. The membranolytic activity of HSP-1/2 is found to be pH dependent, with lytic activity being high at mildly acidic pH (6.0-6.5) and low at mildly basic pH (8.0-8.5). Interestingly, the CLA is also found to be pH dependent, with high activity at mildly basic pH and low activity at mildly acidic pH. Taken together the present studies demonstrate that the membranolytic and chaperone-like activities of HSP-1/2 have an inverse relationship and are regulated via a pH switch, which is reversible. The higher CLA observed at mildly basic pH could be correlated to an increase in surface hydrophobicity of the protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting regulation of two different activities of a chaperone protein by a pH switch. PMID:27292547

  16. Human CD38hiCD138+ Plasma Cells Can Be Generated In Vitro from CD40-Activated Switched-Memory B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Itoua Maïga, Rayelle; Tremblay Rochette, Josiane; Néron, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocyte differentiation into long-lived plasma cells is the keystone event for the production of long-term protective antibodies. CD40-CD154 and CD27-CD70 interactions are involved in human B lymphocyte differentiation into CD38hiCD138+ cells in vivo as well as in vitro. In this study, we have compared these interactions in their capacity to drive switched-memory B lymphocytes differentiation into CD38hiCD138+ plasma cells. The targeted B lymphocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood, expanded for 19 days, and then submitted to CD70 or CD154 interactions for 14 days. The expanded B lymphocytes were constitutively expressing CD39, whereas CD31's expression was noticed only following the in vitro differentiation step (day 5) and was exclusively present on the CD38hi cell population. Furthermore, the generated CD38hiCD138+ cells showed a higher proportion of CD31+ cells than the CD38hiCD138− cells. Besides, analyses done with human blood and bone marrow plasma cells showed that in vivo and de novo generated CD38hiCD138+ cells have a similar CD31 expression profile but are distinct according to their reduced CD39 expression level. Overall, we have evidences that in vitro generated plasma cells are heterogeneous and appear as CD39+ precursors to the ones present in bone marrow niches. PMID:25759831

  17. uv preilluminated gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L.P.; Orham, E.L.; Stowers, I.F.; Braucht, J.R.

    1980-06-03

    We have designed, built, and characterized uv preilluminated gas switches for a trigger circuit and a low inductance discharge circuit. These switches have been incorporated into a 54 x 76 x 150 cm pulser module to produce a 1 Ma output current rising at 5 x 10/sup 12/ amps/sec with 1 ns jitter. Twenty such modules will be used on the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser System for plasma retropulse shutters.

  18. Single-pulse picking at kHz repetition rates using a Ge plasma switch at the free-electron laser FELBE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. Helm, M.; Winnerl, S.; Seidel, W.; Schneider, H.; Bauer, C.; Gensch, M.

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate a system for picking of mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) radiation pulses from the free-electron laser (FEL) FELBE operating at a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Single pulses are reflected by a dense electron-hole plasma in a Ge slab that is photoexcited by amplified near-infrared (NIR) laser systems operating at repetition rates of 1 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively. The peak intensity of picked pulses is up to 400 times larger than the peak intensity of residual pulses. The required NIR fluence for picking pulses at wavelengths in the range from 5 μm to 30 μm is discussed. In addition, we show that the reflectivity of the plasma decays on a time scale from 100 ps to 1 ns dependent on the wavelengths of the FEL and the NIR laser. The plasma switch enables experiments with the FEL that require high peak power but lower average power. Furthermore, the system is well suited to investigate processes with decay times in the μs to ms regime, i.e., much longer than the 77 ns long pulse repetition period of FELBE.

  19. Automated analysis of fluvoxamine in rat plasma using a column-switching system and ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shicheng; Shinkai, Norihiro; Kakubari, Ikuhiro; Saitoh, Hideo; Noguchi, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hitoshi

    2008-12-01

    We have established a robust, fully automated analytical method for the analysis of fluvoxamine in rat plasma using a column-switching ion-pair high-performance chromatography system. The plasma sample was injected onto a precolumn packed with Shim-pack MAYI-ODS (50 microm), where the drug was automatically purified and enriched by on-line solid-phase extraction. After elution of the plasma proteins, the analyte was back-flushed from the precolumn and then separated isocratically on a reversed-phase C18 column (L-column ODS) with a mobile phase (acetonitrile-0.1% phosphoric acid, 36:64, v/v) containing 2 mM sodium 1-octanesulfonate. The analyte was monitored by a UV detector at a wavelength of 254 nm. The calibration line for fluvoxamine showed good linearity in the range of 5-5000 ng/mL (r > 0.999) with the limit of quantification of 5 ng/mL (RSD = 6.51%). Accuracy ranged from -2.94 to 4.82%, and the within- and between-day precision of the assay was better than 8% across the calibration range. The analytical sensitivity and accuracy of this assay is suitable for characterization of the pharmacokinetics of orally-administered fluvoxamine in rats. PMID:18655223

  20. Single-pulse picking at kHz repetition rates using a Ge plasma switch at the free-electron laser FELBE.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Winnerl, S; Seidel, W; Bauer, C; Gensch, M; Schneider, H; Helm, M

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a system for picking of mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) radiation pulses from the free-electron laser (FEL) FELBE operating at a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Single pulses are reflected by a dense electron-hole plasma in a Ge slab that is photoexcited by amplified near-infrared (NIR) laser systems operating at repetition rates of 1 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively. The peak intensity of picked pulses is up to 400 times larger than the peak intensity of residual pulses. The required NIR fluence for picking pulses at wavelengths in the range from 5 μm to 30 μm is discussed. In addition, we show that the reflectivity of the plasma decays on a time scale from 100 ps to 1 ns dependent on the wavelengths of the FEL and the NIR laser. The plasma switch enables experiments with the FEL that require high peak power but lower average power. Furthermore, the system is well suited to investigate processes with decay times in the μs to ms regime, i.e., much longer than the 77 ns long pulse repetition period of FELBE. PMID:26133824

  1. Impact of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Bone Height Changes around Platform Switched Implants Supporting Mandibular Overdentures in Controlled Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Eldeen, Amany Mohy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The platform switching concept was recently introduced to implant dentistry involving the reduction of restoration abutment diameter with respect to the diameter of dental implant. Long-term follow-up around these implants showed higher levels of bone preservation and proper stress distribution and improved esthetics. AIM: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the changes in bone height by means of radiographic examination around platform switched implant supporting mandibular overdentures in controlled diabetic patients. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Fourteen male complete edentulous patients were selected and enrolled in a follow-up study plan. Split mouth technique was applied; one side implant chosen randomly with Platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) and the other without PRP, bone height changes was assessed by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) radiographic examination after 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 1 year later. RESULTS: There was increase in bone height loss in both sides but with no statistical significance difference between the two sides after 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 1 year respectively. CONCLUSION: The result of this article satisfied the patients both esthetically and functionally with recorded increase in bone height loss. PMID:27275316

  2. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  3. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  4. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  5. Energy losses in switches

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Seamen, J.F.; Jobe, D.O.

    1993-07-01

    The authors experiments show energy losses between 2 and 10 times that of the resistive time predictions. The experiments used hydrogen, helium, air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6} polyethylene, and water for the switching dielectric. Previously underestimated switch losses have caused over predicting the accelerator outputs. Accurate estimation of these losses is now necessary for new high-efficiency pulsed power devices where the switching losses constitute the major portion of the total energy loss. They found that the switch energy losses scale as (V{sub peak}I{sub peak}){sup 1.1846}. When using this scaling, the energy losses in any of the tested dielectrics are almost the same. This relationship is valid for several orders of magnitude and suggested a theoretical basis for these results. Currents up to .65 MA, with voltages to 3 MV were applied to various gaps during these experiments. The authors data and the developed theory indicates that the switch power loss continues for a much longer time than the resistive time, with peak power loss generally occurring at peak current in a ranging discharge instead of the early current time. All of the experiments were circuit code modeled after developing a new switch loss version based on the theory. The circuit code predicts switch energy loss and peak currents as a function of time. During analysis of the data they noticed slight constant offsets between the theory and data that depended on the dielectric. They modified the plasma conductivity for each tested dielectric to lessen this offset.

  6. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  7. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  8. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  9. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  10. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  11. X-ray crystal structures of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase with switch region binding inhibitors enable rational design of squaramides with an improved fraction unbound to human plasma protein

    PubMed Central

    Molodtsov, Vadim; Fleming, Paul R.; Eyermann, Charles J.; Ferguson, Andrew D.; Foulk, Melinda A.; McKinney, David C.; Masse, Craig E.; Buurman, Ed T.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2015-01-01

    Squaramides constitute a novel class of RNA polymerase inhibitors of which genetic evidence and computational modeling previously have suggested an inhibitory mechanism mediated by binding to the RNA polymerase switch region. An iterative chemistry program increased the fraction unbound to human plasma protein from below minimum detection levels, i.e. <1%, to 4~6%, while retaining biochemical potency. Since in vitro antimicrobial activity against an efflux-negative strain of Haemophilus influenzae was 4~8-fold higher, the combined improvement was at least 20~60-fold. Co-crystal structures of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase with two key squaramides showed displacement of the switch 2, predicted to interfere with the conformational change of clamp domain and/or with binding of non-template DNA, a mechanism akin to that of natural product myxopyronin. Furthermore, the structures confirmed the chemical features required for biochemical potency. The terminal isoxazole and benzyl rings bind into distinct relatively narrow, hydrophobic pockets and both are required for biochemical potency. In contrast, the linker composed of squarate and piperidine accesses different conformations in their respective co-crystal structures with RNA polymerase, reflecting its main role of proper orientation of the aforementioned terminal rings. These observations further explain the tolerance of hydrophilic substitutions in the linker region that was exploited to improve the fraction unbound to human plasma protein while retaining biochemical potency. PMID:25798859

  12. Nanoelectromechanical contact switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Owen Y.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2012-05-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches are similar to conventional semiconductor switches in that they can be used as relays, transistors, logic devices and sensors. However, the operating principles of NEM switches and semiconductor switches are fundamentally different. These differences give NEM switches an advantage over semiconductor switches in some applications -- for example, NEM switches perform much better in extreme environments -- but semiconductor switches benefit from a much superior manufacturing infrastructure. Here we review the potential of NEM-switch technologies to complement or selectively replace conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology, and identify the challenges involved in the large-scale manufacture of a representative set of NEM-based devices.

  13. THYRATRON SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.; Bourgeois, N.A. Jr.

    1959-04-21

    An arrangement for utilizing a thyratron as a noise free switch is described. It has been discovered that the voltage between plate and cathode of a thyratron will oscillate, producing voltage spikes, if the tube carries only a fraction of its maximum rated current. These voltage spikes can produce detrimental effects where the thyratron is used in critical timing circuits. To alleviate this problem the disclosed circuit provides a charged capacitor and a resistor in parallel with the tube and of such value that the maximum current will flow from the capacitor through the thyratron when it is triggered. During this time the signal current is conducted through the tube, before the thyratron voltage starts to oscillate, and the signal current output is free of noise spikes.

  14. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, Julius; Henesian, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A low pressure gas electrode utilizing ionized gas in a glow discharge regime forms a transparent electrode for electro-optical switches. The transparent electrode comprises a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the electrode is a transparent electrode. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. The plasma can be created either by the main high voltage pulser used to charge up the crystal or by auxiliary discharges or external sources of ionization. A typical configuration utilizes 10 torr argon in the discharge region adjacent to each crystal face.

  15. An improved LC-MS/MS method for the determination of taspoglutide in plasma and urine using orthogonal HILIC-RP column switching, ultra-performance LC separation and 'wrong-way-round' electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Heinig, Katja; Wirz, Thomas; Yuan, Moucun; Tingler, Michael; Mylott, William

    2011-11-01

    The synthetic peptide drug taspoglutide, developed for treatment of diabetes, must be quantified at low pg/mL levels in biological samples. This manuscript describes the improvement of a previous method, featuring orthogonal hydrophilic interaction to reversed-phase chromatography column switching and tandem mass spectrometric detection. Signal-to-noise ratio was enhanced and isobaric interferences were reduced by ultra-performance separation using a basic mobile phase in 'wrong-way-round' ionization mode and monitoring a selective fragment ion. Tedious solid-phase extraction cleanup was abandoned in favor of simple protein precipitation. Urine required the addition of surfactants to prevent adsorptive drug loss. Dissociation of complexes with possibly formed anti-drug antibodies was achieved with formic acid. Lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) were 4 pg/mL in human plasma and 10 pg/mL in urine using a 250 μL sample, and an LLOQ of 50 pg/mL was obtained in animal plasma using 50 μL. Precision, accuracy and incurred samples reproducibility fulfilled regulatory requirements. Simultaneous determination of unlabeled and stable isotope labeled taspoglutide, interesting for clearance studies in which both compounds are co-administered, was realized using a structural analog as internal standard. The described method offered excellent sensitivity with low sample consumption, reasonable throughput, moderate costs and high robustness for routine analysis. PMID:21308702

  16. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  17. Miniature intermittent contact switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, A.

    1972-01-01

    Design of electric switch for providing intermittent contact is presented. Switch consists of flexible conductor surrounding, but separated from, fixed conductor. Flexing of outside conductor to contact fixed conductor completes circuit. Advantage is small size of switch compared to standard switches.

  18. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  19. Cytochrome P450 1A1 promoter as a genetic switch for the regulatable and physiological expression of a plasma protein in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D; Wong, E; Ginsberg, M

    1995-12-01

    Transgenic and gene knockout techniques allow for in vivo study of the consequences of adding or subtracting specific genes. However, in some instances, such as the study of lethal mutations or of the physiological consequences of changing gene expression, turning on and off an introduced gene at will would be advantageous. We have used cytochrome p450 1A1 promoter to drive expression of the human apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene in transgenic mice. In six independent lines, robust expression of the transgene depended upon injection of the inducer beta-naphthoflavone, whereas the seventh line had high basal expression that was augmented further by the inducer. The low level of basal expression in an inducer-dependent line was confirmed upon breeding the transgene onto the hypercholesterolemic apoE-deficient background. In the basal state transgene expression was physiologically insignificant, as these mice were as hypercholesterolemic as their nontransgenic apoE-deficient littermates. When injected with the inducer, plasma cholesterol levels of the transgenic mice decreased dramatically as apoE expression was induced to yield greater than physiological levels in plasma. The inducer could pass transplacentally from an injected mother to her fetuses with concomitant induction of fetal transgene mRNA. Inducer could also pass via breast milk from an injected mother to her suckling neonatal pups, giving rise to the induction of human apoE in neonate plasma. These finding suggest a strategy to temporarily ameliorate genetic deficiencies that would otherwise lead to fetal or neonatal lethality. PMID:8524876

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Selective Modulation of microRNAs and mRNAs by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in B Cells Induced to Undergo Class-Switch DNA Recombination and Plasma Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian; Sanchez, Helia N.; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    As we have suggested, epigenetic factors, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), can interact with genetic programs to regulate B cell functions, thereby informing antibody and autoantibody responses. We have shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDI) inhibit the differentiation events critical to the maturation of the antibody response: class-switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM), and plasma cell differentiation, by modulating intrinsic B cell mechanisms. HDI repress the expression of AID and Blimp-1, which are critical for CSR/SHM and plasma cell differentiation, respectively, in mouse and human B cells by upregulating selected miRNAs that silenced AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 mRNAs, as demonstrated by multiple qRT-PCRs (J Immunol 193:5933–5950, 2014). To further define the selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of miRNA and gene expression, we performed genome-wide miRNA-Seq and mRNA-Seq analysis in B cells stimulated by LPS plus IL-4 and treated with HDI or nil. Consistent with what we have shown using qRT-PCR, these HDI-treated B cells displayed reduced expression of Aicda and Prdm1, and increased expression of miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361, which target Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b, which target Prdm1. In B cells induced to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation, about 23% of over 22,000 mRNAs analyzed were expressed at a significantly high copy number (more than 20 copies/cell). Only 18 (0.36%) of these highly expressed mRNAs, including Aicda, Prdm1, and Xbp1, were downregulated by HDI by 50% or more. Further, only 16 (0.30%) of the highly expressed mRNAs were upregulated (more than twofold) by HDI. The selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of gene expression was emphasized by unchanged expression of the genes that are involved in regulation, targeting, or DNA repair processes of CSR, as well as unchanged expression of the genes encoding epigenetic regulators and factors that are important for cell signaling or

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Selective Modulation of microRNAs and mRNAs by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in B Cells Induced to Undergo Class-Switch DNA Recombination and Plasma Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tian; Sanchez, Helia N; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    As we have suggested, epigenetic factors, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), can interact with genetic programs to regulate B cell functions, thereby informing antibody and autoantibody responses. We have shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDI) inhibit the differentiation events critical to the maturation of the antibody response: class-switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM), and plasma cell differentiation, by modulating intrinsic B cell mechanisms. HDI repress the expression of AID and Blimp-1, which are critical for CSR/SHM and plasma cell differentiation, respectively, in mouse and human B cells by upregulating selected miRNAs that silenced AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 mRNAs, as demonstrated by multiple qRT-PCRs (J Immunol 193:5933-5950, 2014). To further define the selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of miRNA and gene expression, we performed genome-wide miRNA-Seq and mRNA-Seq analysis in B cells stimulated by LPS plus IL-4 and treated with HDI or nil. Consistent with what we have shown using qRT-PCR, these HDI-treated B cells displayed reduced expression of Aicda and Prdm1, and increased expression of miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361, which target Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b, which target Prdm1. In B cells induced to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation, about 23% of over 22,000 mRNAs analyzed were expressed at a significantly high copy number (more than 20 copies/cell). Only 18 (0.36%) of these highly expressed mRNAs, including Aicda, Prdm1, and Xbp1, were downregulated by HDI by 50% or more. Further, only 16 (0.30%) of the highly expressed mRNAs were upregulated (more than twofold) by HDI. The selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of gene expression was emphasized by unchanged expression of the genes that are involved in regulation, targeting, or DNA repair processes of CSR, as well as unchanged expression of the genes encoding epigenetic regulators and factors that are important for cell signaling or

  2. Simultaneous determination of amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide in human plasma by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionisation.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Hang, Taijun; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Li; Ge, Ping; Ma, Pengcheng

    2007-01-01

    A new method for simultaneous determination of amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide by liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) operated in positive and negative ionization switching mode was developed and validated. Protein precipitation with acetonitrile was selected for sample preparation. The analytes were separated on a Phenomenex Curosil-PFP (250x4.6 mm, 5 microm) column by a gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of 0.15% formic acid solution containing 0.23% ammonium acetate and methanol pumped at a flow rate of 1.0 mL.min(-1). Rizatriptan was used as the internal standard (IS) for quantification. The determination was carried out on a Waters Quattro-micro triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using the following transitions monitored simultaneously: positive m/z 230-->171 for amiloride, m/z 270-->158 for rizatriptan, and negative m/z 296-->205 for hydrochlorothiazide. The lower limits of quantification (LLOQs) were 0.1 and 1.0 ng.mL(-1) for amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide, respectively, which were lower than other published methods by using ultraviolet (UV), fluorimetric or mass spectrometric detection. The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy were studied at three different concentration levels and were always better than 15% (n=5). This simple and robust LC/MS/MS method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of compound amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide tablets in healthy male Chinese volunteers. PMID:17902196

  3. Switch of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Expression in the Plasma Membrane of Chondrogenic Cells Affects Cytosolic Ca2+-Oscillations and Cartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Fodor, János; Katona, Éva; Bartok, Adam; Oláh, Tamás; Sebe, Attila; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Zákány, Róza

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the key elements of signaling of chondroprogenitor cells at the earliest steps of differentiation may substantially improve our opportunities for the application of mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering, which is a promising approach of regenerative therapy of joint diseases. Ion channels, membrane potential and Ca2+-signaling are important regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. Our aim was to identify such plasma membrane ion channels involved in signaling during chondrogenesis, which may serve as specific molecular targets for influencing chondrogenic differentiation and ultimately cartilage formation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using patch-clamp, RT-PCR and Western-blot experiments, we found that chondrogenic cells in primary micromass cell cultures obtained from embryonic chicken limb buds expressed voltage-gated NaV1.4, KV1.1, KV1.3 and KV4.1 channels, although KV1.3 was not detectable in the plasma membrane. Tetrodotoxin (TTX), the inhibitor of NaV1.4 channels, had no effect on cartilage formation. In contrast, presence of 20 mM of the K+ channel blocker tetraethyl-ammonium (TEA) during the time-window of the final commitment of chondrogenic cells reduced KV currents (to 27±3% of control), cell proliferation (thymidine incorporation: to 39±4.4% of control), expression of cartilage-specific genes and consequently, cartilage formation (metachromasia: to 18.0±6.4% of control) and also depolarized the membrane potential (by 9.3±2.1 mV). High-frequency Ca2+-oscillations were also suppressed by 10 mM TEA (confocal microscopy: frequency to 8.5±2.6% of the control). Peak expression of TEA-sensitive KV1.1 in the plasma membrane overlapped with this period. Application of TEA to differentiated chondrocytes, mainly expressing the TEA-insensitive KV4.1 did not affect cartilage formation. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that the differentiation and proliferation of chondrogenic cells depend

  4. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  5. IEEE International conference on plasma science: Conference record--Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The conference covered the following topics: basic plasma physics; vacuum electronics; gaseous and electrical gas discharges; laser-produced plasma; space plasmas; computational plasma science; plasma diagnostics; electron, ion and plasma sources; intense electron and ion beams; intense beam microwaves; fast wave M/W devices; microwave-plasma interactions; magnetic fusion; MHD; plasma focus; ultrafast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; plasma processing; fast-opening switches; EM and ETH launchers; solid-state plasmas and switches; plasmas for lighting; ball lightning and spherical plasma configurations; and environmental/energy issues. Separate abstracts were prepared for 379 items in this conference.

  6. Creation of Principally New Generation of Switching Technique Elements (Reed Switches) with Nanostructured Contact Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabanov, S. M.; Zeltser, I. A.; Maizels, R. M.; Moos, E. N.; Arushanov, K. A.

    2011-04-01

    The cycle of activities of the creation of principally new generation of reed switches with nanostructured contact surfaces was implemented. Experimental justification of the opportunity of reed switches creation with modified contact surface was given (instead of precious metals-based galvanic coating). Principally new technological process of modification of magnetically operated contacts contacting surfaces was developed, based on the usage of the ion-plasma methods of nanolayers and nanostructures forming having specified contact features.

  7. Simultaneous determination of carisoprodol and aspirin in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in polarity switch mode: application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Vudagandla; Ramesh, Mullangi; Kumar, Inamadugu Jaswanth; Babu, Ravi Vasu; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Krishnaiah, Abburi

    2013-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid LC-MS/MS-ESI method has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of the carisoprodol and aspirin in human plasma. Carisoprodol was detected in positive ion mode, whereas aspirin was detected in negative ion mode. Carbamazepine and furosemide were used as internal standards (IS) for quantification of carisoprodol and aspirin, respectively. The extraction procedure involves a liquid-liquid extraction method with ter-butyl methyl ether. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax XDB-Phenyl (4.6 × 75 mm, 3.5 µm) column using an isocratic mobile phase (5 mm ammonium acetate:methanol, 20:80, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min with a total run time of 2.2 min. A detailed method validation was performed as per the FDA guidelines. The standard curves found to be linear in the range of 25.5-4900 and 15.3-3000 ng/mL for carisoprodol and aspirin, respectively. The results met the acceptance criteria. Carisoprodol and aspirin were found to be stable in various stability studies. The validated method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study following co-administration of carisoprodol (250 mg) and aspirin (75 mg) tablets by oral route to human volunteers. PMID:22674769

  8. High-Voltage MOSFET Switching Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Circuit reliably switches power at supply potential of minus 1,500 V, with controlled frequency and duty cycle. Used in argon-plasma ion-bombardment equipment for texturing copper electrodes, as described in "Texturing Copper To Reduce Secondary Emission of Electrons" (LEW-15898), also adapted to use in powering gaseous flash lamps and stroboscopes.

  9. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  10. Heat switches for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  11. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  12. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  13. Resistive switching of aluminum oxide for flexible memory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sungho; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2008-06-02

    The unipolar resistive switching of the Al/Al{sub x}O{sub y}/Al structure is investigated for nonvolatile memory. Following the production of aluminum oxide film (Al{sub x}O{sub y}) by plasma oxidation, a high ratio of on-state and off-state currents ({>=}10{sup 4}) is achieved, and characteristics of switching endurance are reported. Due to the good ductility of aluminum, the performance of resistive switching on a flexible substrate is not degraded by severe substrate bending. The low process temperature of the plasma oxidation process is advantageous for the fabrication of flexible electronic devices and modern interconnection processes.

  14. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Gui-Jia; Peng, Fang Z.

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  15. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  16. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  17. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  18. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  19. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  20. Alarm toe switch

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, Floyd P.

    1982-01-01

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit n a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch. The reed switch is hermetically sealed with the magnet acting through the wall so the switch assembly S is capable of reliable operation even in wet and corrosive environments.

  1. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  2. Optically switched submillimeter-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Michael G.; Tang, Xiao

    1994-02-01

    There exists a critical need for efficient local oscillators for heterodyne mixers operating in the 300 to 3000 GHz region. Applications include space-based submillimeter wave imaging arrays, airborne atmosphere spectroscopy, all-weather imaging radar, non-destructive testing, plasma diagnostics, weapon and contraband detection, and communications. In order to address these problems, we propose a novel low power semiconductor device which uses time delays from a common optical pulse train to achieve a much higher frequency electrical pulse train, which contains a strong component and appreciable power of the desired submillimeter-wave harmonic for the output and which can be readily coupled electrically or radiatively to a receiver. In our effort, we developed a concept of linear array of ten optical switches. The microwave output from the switches can be in the 100 - 200 GHz frequency range. In order to implement this concept, a single photo-conductive switch of polycrystalline InGaAs was fabricated and tested.

  3. Simultaneous determination of lovastatin and its metabolite lovastatin acid in rat plasma using UPLC-MS/MS with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization: Application to a pharmacokinetic study of lovastatin nanosuspension.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengran; Zhao, Longshan; Li, Mo; Fu, Qiang; Pu, Xiaohui; Liu, Bingyang; He, Zhonggui; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Lovastatin (LOV) is an antihyperlipidemic agent which exhibits low bioavailability due to its poor solubility. Therefore, a nanosuspension (NS) was developed as an efficient strategy to improve its oral bioavailability. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of LOV-NS, a novel, sensitive, and rapid UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of LOV and its metabolite lovastatin acid (LOVA) in rat plasma. Simvastatin (IS) was chosen as the internal standard, and a liquid-liquid extraction method was used to isolate LOV and LOVA from biological matrices. The analytes were analyzed on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column, and a gradient program was applied at a flow rate of 0.2mL/min. Then, a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization interface was employed to detect the analytes. Quantitation of the analytes was performed in the multiple reaction monitoring mode to monitor the transitions of m/z 427.1→325.0 for LOV and m/z 441.1→325.0 for IS in the positive ion mode and m/z 421.0→101.0 for LOVA in the negative ion mode, respectively. The method was validated over the concentration range 0.25-500ng/mL (r(2)≥0.99) for both LOV and LOVA. The intra-day and inter-day precision (RSD%) of LOV and LOVA were less than 12.87% and the accuracy (RE%) was less than 5.22%. The average extraction recoveries were 90.1% and 91.9% for LOV and LOVA, and the matrix effects were found to be between 85% and 115%. The stability study showed that both analytes were stable during the experiment. Finally, this method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats following a single oral dose of 10mg/kg LOV-NS. PMID:27200472

  4. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  5. Multidimensional set switching.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sowon; Andersen, George J; Kramer, Arthur F

    2003-06-01

    The present study examined the organization of preparatory processes that underlie set switching and, more specifically, switch costs. On each trial, subjects performed one of two perceptual judgment tasks, color or shape discrimination. Subjects also responded with one of two different response sets. The task set and/or the response set switched from one to the other after 2-6 repeated trials. Response set, task set, and double set switches were performed in both blocked and randomized conditions. Subjects performed with short (100-msec) and long (800-msec) preparatory intervals. Task and response set switches had an additive effect on reaction times (RTs) in the blocked condition. Such a pattern of results suggests a serial organization of preparatory processes when the nature of switches is predictable. However, task and response set switches had an underadditive effect on RTs in the random condition when subjects performed with a brief cue-to-target interval. This pattern of results suggests overlapping task and response set preparation. These findings are discussed in terms of strategic control of preparatory processes in set switching. PMID:12921431

  6. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  7. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  8. A Novel Molecular Switch

    PubMed Central

    Daber, Robert; Lewis, Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a fundamental process for regulating the flux of all metabolic pathways. For the last several decades, the lac operon has served as a valuable model for studying transcription. More recently, the switch that controls the operon has also been successfully adapted to function in mammalian cells. Here we describe how, using directed evolution, we have created a novel switch that recognizes an asymmetric operator sequence. The new switch has a repressor with altered headpiece domains for operator recognition, and a redesigned dimer interface to create a heterodimeric repressor. Quite unexpectedly, the heterodimeric switch functions better than the natural system. It can repress more tightly than the naturally occurring switch of the lac operon; it is less leaky and can be induced more efficiently. Ultimately these novel repressors could be evolved to recognize eukaryotic promoters and used to regulate gene expression in mammalian systems. PMID:19540845

  9. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C.; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-06-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 1012 with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications.

  10. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  11. Switch on, switch off: stiction in nanoelectromechanical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Till J. W.; Vella, Dominic

    2013-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of stiction in nanoscale electromechanical contact switches. We develop a mathematical model to describe the deflection of a cantilever beam in response to both electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Particular focus is given to the question of whether adhesive van der Waals forces cause the cantilever to remain in the ‘ON’ state even when the electrostatic forces are removed. In contrast to previous studies, our theory accounts for deflections with large slopes (i.e. geometrically nonlinear). We solve the resulting equations numerically to study how a cantilever beam adheres to a rigid electrode: transitions between ‘free’, ‘pinned’ and ‘clamped’ states are shown to be discontinuous and to exhibit significant hysteresis. Our findings are compared to previous results from linearized models and the implications for nanoelectromechanical cantilever switch design are discussed.

  12. Switch on, switch off: stiction in nanoelectromechanical switches.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Till J W; Vella, Dominic

    2013-07-12

    We present a theoretical investigation of stiction in nanoscale electromechanical contact switches. We develop a mathematical model to describe the deflection of a cantilever beam in response to both electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Particular focus is given to the question of whether adhesive van der Waals forces cause the cantilever to remain in the 'ON' state even when the electrostatic forces are removed. In contrast to previous studies, our theory accounts for deflections with large slopes (i.e. geometrically nonlinear). We solve the resulting equations numerically to study how a cantilever beam adheres to a rigid electrode: transitions between 'free', 'pinned' and 'clamped' states are shown to be discontinuous and to exhibit significant hysteresis. Our findings are compared to previous results from linearized models and the implications for nanoelectromechanical cantilever switch design are discussed. PMID:23759938

  13. Towards single molecule switches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  14. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  15. Optical packet switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekel, Eyal; Ruschin, Shlomo; Majer, Daniel; Levy, Jeff; Matmon, Guy; Koenigsberg, Lisa; Vecht, Jacob; Geron, Amir; Harlavan, Rotem; Shfaram, Harel; Arbel, Arnon; McDermott, Tom; Brewer, Tony

    2005-02-01

    We report here a scalable, multichassis, 6.3 terabit core router, which utilizes our proprietary optical switch. The router is commercially available and deployed in several customer sites. Our solution combines optical switching with electronic routing. An internal optical packet switching network interconnects the router"s electronic line cards, where routing and buffering functions take place electronically. The system architecture and performance will be described. The optical switch is based on Optical Phased Array (OPA) technology. It is a 64 x 64, fully non-blocking, optical crossbar switch, capable of switching in a fraction of a nanosecond. The basic principles of operation will be explained. Loss and crosstalk results will be presented, as well as the results of BER measurements of a 160 Gbps transmission through one channel. Basic principles of operation and measured results will be presented for the burst-mode-receivers, arbitration algorithm and synchronization. Finally, we will present some of our current research work on a next-generation optical switch. The technological issues we have solved in our internal optical packet network can have broad applicability to any global optical packet network.

  16. Triggered vacuum flashover switch for high-power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kellogg, J.C.; Boller, J.R.; Commisso, R.J.; Jenkins, D.J. ); Ford, R.D. ); Lupton, W.H. ); Shipman, J.D. Jr. )

    1991-11-01

    A command triggered, high-power, surface-flashover closing switch that operates in vacuum has been developed for use on a prototype inductive-storage pulsed power generator, Pawn. This vacuum flashover switch isolates the high-pressure-gas tamped wire fuse from a second opening switch. The switch consists of an insulating ring sandwiched between electrodes. Plasma and ultraviolet light from eight small spark discharges driven by a 5 keV pulse initiate a flashover across the switch insulator. The entire triggering unit resides inside one of Pawn's metallic conductors. The switch can be triggered after holding off voltage for {congruent}15 {mu}s. Normally, switch closure occurs at 22--45 kV. Time to closure at a voltage of {congruent}30 kV is {congruent}320 ns, with a typical jitter of {plus minus}50 ns. Peak current is typically {congruent}1 MA. Current density in the switch is approximately 25 kA/cm{sup 2}. The average risetime of the fuse output current pulse can be varied by a factor of 2 by triggering the switch at different closing voltages.

  17. Ferroelectric opening switches for large-scale pulsed power drivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Glover, Steven Frank

    2009-11-01

    Fast electrical energy storage or Voltage-Driven Technology (VDT) has dominated fast, high-voltage pulsed power systems for the past six decades. Fast magnetic energy storage or Current-Driven Technology (CDT) is characterized by 10,000 X higher energy density than VDT and has a great number of other substantial advantages, but it has all but been neglected for all of these decades. The uniform explanation for neglect of CDT technology is invariably that the industry has never been able to make an effective opening switch, which is essential for the use of CDT. Most approaches to opening switches have involved plasma of one sort or another. On a large scale, gaseous plasmas have been used as a conductor to bridge the switch electrodes that provides an opening function when the current wave front propagates through to the output end of the plasma and fully magnetizes the plasma - this is called a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Opening can be triggered in a POS using a magnetic field to push the plasma out of the A-K gap - this is called a Magnetically Controlled Plasma Opening Switch (MCPOS). On a small scale, depletion of electron plasmas in semiconductor devices is used to affect opening switch behavior, but these devices are relatively low voltage and low current compared to the hundreds of kilo-volts and tens of kilo-amperes of interest to pulsed power. This work is an investigation into an entirely new approach to opening switch technology that utilizes new materials in new ways. The new materials are Ferroelectrics and using them as an opening switch is a stark contrast to their traditional applications in optics and transducer applications. Emphasis is on use of high performance ferroelectrics with the objective of developing an opening switch that would be suitable for large scale pulsed power applications. Over the course of exploring this new ground, we have discovered new behaviors and properties of these materials that were here to fore unknown. Some of

  18. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  19. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  20. Photoconductive switch package

    DOEpatents

    Ca[rasp, George J

    2013-10-22

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  1. Photoconductive switch package

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.

    2015-10-27

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  2. Electromechanical magnetization switching

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Jaafar, Reem

    2015-03-14

    We show that the magnetization of a torsional oscillator that, in addition to the magnetic moment also possesses an electrical polarization, can be switched by the electric field that ignites mechanical oscillations at the frequency comparable to the frequency of the ferromagnetic resonance. The 180° switching arises from the spin-rotation coupling and is not prohibited by the different symmetry of the magnetic moment and the electric field as in the case of a stationary magnet. Analytical equations describing the system have been derived and investigated numerically. Phase diagrams showing the range of parameters required for the switching have been obtained.

  3. Miniature Intermittent Contact Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, Antony

    1972-01-01

    This tech brief concerns work to provide a shock-resistant switch capable of being actuated by forces of varying magnitude and direction, primarily for use as a sensor on remote control (tele-operator) and prosthetic devices.

  4. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  5. An optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-04-30

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch having an electron attaching gas wherein electron attachment is brought about by indirect excitation of molecules to long live states by exposure to laser light. 3 figs.

  6. Switching and stopping antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  7. Switching power supply filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Prithvi R. (Inventor); Abare, Wayne (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A filter for a switching power supply. The filter includes a common mode inductor with coil configurations allowing differential mode current from a dc source to pass through but attenuating common mode noise from the power supply so that the noise does not reach the dc source. The invention also includes the use of feed through capacitors at the switching power supply input terminals to provide further high-frequency noise attenuation.

  8. Cygnus Water Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Mitton, George D. Corrow, Mark D. Hansen, David J. Henderson, et al.

    2008-03-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources - Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following x-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rad at 1 m, 50-ns Full Width Half Max. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests which are performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse–forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance is jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the diode pulse. Therefore, PFL switch jitter contributes to shot-to-shot variation in source endpoint energy and dose. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and give the correlation with diode performance. For this analysis the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition to this analysis, PFL switch performance for different switch gap settings taken recently will be examined. Lastly, implications of source jitter for radiographic diagnosis of subcritical shots will be discussed.

  9. Irreversible magnetic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an irreversible magnetic switch containing a ferromagnetic amorphous metal having a predetermined crystallization temperature in its inductor magnetic path. With the incorporation of such material, the magnetic properties after cooling from a high temperature excursion above its crystallization temperature are only a fraction of the original value. The difference is used to provide a safety feature in the magnetic switch.

  10. Cygnus PFL Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mitton, G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, et al.

    2007-07-21

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following X-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rads at 1 m, 50-ns full-widthhalf-maximum. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are Marx generator, water-filled pulse forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, threecell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance may be jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the source X-ray spectrum and dose. Therefore, PFL switch jitter may contribute to shot-to-shot variation in these parameters, which are crucial to radiographic quality. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and present the correlation with dose. For this analysis, the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting, which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition the PFL switch performance for one larger switch gap setting will be examined.

  11. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  12. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  13. Low inductance gas switching.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

    2007-10-01

    The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and

  14. Switching Power Universality in Unipolar Resistive Switching Memories

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongmin; Jung, Kyooho; Kim, Yongmin; Jo, Yongcheol; Cho, Sangeun; Woo, Hyeonseok; Lee, Seongwoo; Inamdar, A. I.; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jeon-Kook; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resistive switching power from unipolar resistive switching current-voltage characteristics in various binary metal oxide films sandwiched by different metal electrodes, and find a universal feature (the so-called universality) in the switching power among these devices. To experimentally derive the switching power universality, systematic measurements of the switching voltage and current are performed, and neither of these correlate with one another. As the switching resistance (R) increases, the switching power (P) decreases following a power law P ∝ R−β, regardless of the device configurations. The observed switching power universality is indicative of the existence of a commonly applicable switching mechanism. The origin of the power universality is discussed based on a metallic filament model and thermo-chemical reaction. PMID:27033695

  15. Switching Power Universality in Unipolar Resistive Switching Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Jung, Kyooho; Kim, Yongmin; Jo, Yongcheol; Cho, Sangeun; Woo, Hyeonseok; Lee, Seongwoo; Inamdar, A. I.; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jeon-Kook; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the resistive switching power from unipolar resistive switching current-voltage characteristics in various binary metal oxide films sandwiched by different metal electrodes, and find a universal feature (the so-called universality) in the switching power among these devices. To experimentally derive the switching power universality, systematic measurements of the switching voltage and current are performed, and neither of these correlate with one another. As the switching resistance (R) increases, the switching power (P) decreases following a power law P ∝ R‑β, regardless of the device configurations. The observed switching power universality is indicative of the existence of a commonly applicable switching mechanism. The origin of the power universality is discussed based on a metallic filament model and thermo-chemical reaction.

  16. Switching Power Universality in Unipolar Resistive Switching Memories.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongmin; Jung, Kyooho; Kim, Yongmin; Jo, Yongcheol; Cho, Sangeun; Woo, Hyeonseok; Lee, Seongwoo; Inamdar, A I; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jeon-Kook; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resistive switching power from unipolar resistive switching current-voltage characteristics in various binary metal oxide films sandwiched by different metal electrodes, and find a universal feature (the so-called universality) in the switching power among these devices. To experimentally derive the switching power universality, systematic measurements of the switching voltage and current are performed, and neither of these correlate with one another. As the switching resistance (R) increases, the switching power (P) decreases following a power law P ∝ R(-β), regardless of the device configurations. The observed switching power universality is indicative of the existence of a commonly applicable switching mechanism. The origin of the power universality is discussed based on a metallic filament model and thermo-chemical reaction. PMID:27033695

  17. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level. PMID:26670551

  18. Thermionic gas switch

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, G.L.; Brummond, W.A.; Barrus, D.M.

    1984-04-05

    The present invention is directed to an improved temperature responsive thermionic gas switch utilizing a hollow cathode and a folded emitter surface area. The folded emitter surface area of the thermionic switch substantially increases the on/off ratio by changing the conduction surface area involved in the two modes thereof. The improved switch of this invention provides an on/off ratio of 450:1 compared to the 10:1 ratio of the prior known thermionic switch, while providing for adjusting the on current. In the improved switch of this invention the conduction area is made small in the off mode, while in the on mode the conduction area is made large. This is achieved by utilizing a folded hollow cathode configuration and utilizing a folded emitter surface area, and by making the dimensions of the folds small enough so that a space charge will develop in the convolutions of the folds and suppress unignited current, thus limiting the current carrying surface in the off mode.

  19. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  20. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 10(12) with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications. PMID:26108890

  1. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  2. Switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Mihalka, A.M.

    1984-06-05

    The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

  3. SWITCH user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The planning program, SWITCH, and its surrounding changed-goal-replanning program, Runaround, are described. The evolution of SWITCH and Runaround from an earlier planner, DEVISER, is recounted. SWITCH's plan representation, and its process of building a plan by backward chaining with strict chronological backtracking, are described. A guide for writing knowledge base files is provided, as are narrative guides for installing the program, running it, and interacting with it while it is running. Some utility functions are documented. For the sake of completeness, a narrative guide to the experimental discrepancy-replanning feature is provided. Appendices contain knowledge base files for a blocksworld domain, and a DRIBBLE file illustrating the output from, and user interaction with, the program in that domain.

  4. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  5. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  6. Bearingless switched reluctance motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A switched reluctance motor has a stator with a first set of poles directed toward levitating a rotor horizontally within the stator. A disc shaped portion of a hybrid rotor is affected by the change in flux relative to the current provided at these levitation poles. A processor senses the position of the rotor and changes the flux to move the rotor toward center of the stator. A second set of poles of the stator are utilized to impart torque upon a second portion of the rotor. These second set of poles are driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by the processor.

  7. SHOCKPROOF MAGNETIC REED SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Medal, E.

    1962-03-13

    A shockproof magnetic reed switch is described which comprises essentially a plurality of pairs of reed contacts of magnetic, electrical conducting material which are arranged generally in circumferential spaced relationship. At least two of the pairs are disposed to operate at a predetermined angle with respect to each other, and the contacts are wired in the circuit, so that the continuity, or discontinuity, of the circuit is not affected by a shock imposed on the switch. The contacts are hermetically sealed within an outer tubular jacket. (AEC)

  8. 35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  9. 36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS FROM OPERATOR'S POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  10. 43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  11. 41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  12. Main electrical switch banks, plant switch house, looking to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Main electrical switch banks, plant switch house, looking to the North - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  13. High-speed switching characteristics of integrated optoelectronic crossbar switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, Francois L.; Almeida, Carlos; Callender, Claire L.; Robitaille, Lucie; Noad, Julian P.

    1999-04-01

    Optoelectronic (OE) switching is a promising approach for routing signals in fiber optic networks. Recently, the integration of a 4 X 4 MSM array with optical surface waveguides has been reported. This technique greatly simplifies the packaging of an OE switch. The on-chip polyimide optical waveguides perform the optical signal distribution to a matrix of MSMs which are responsible for the switching operation itself. Photoresponse bandwidths exceeding 4 GHz have been demonstrated. Another important characteristic of a switch is the switching speed since it determines the reconfiguration time. Mechanical and thermal optical waveguide switches offer switching speeds of the order of milliseconds which is sufficient for network traffic management but too slow for packet switching. We report measurements on the switching characteristics of a 4 X 4 optoelectronic switch performed in both the frequency and time domain. In the time domain, the individual crosspoints exhibit a rise time of 3 ns. However, a sizeable overshoot and ringing settles only after 35 ns. This constitutes the reconfiguration time at present. This is confirmed by measurements in the frequency domain of the electrical transmission from control line to output line. The 3-dB switching bandwidth is a few hundred megahertz. The 35 ns reconfiguration time indicates that it is already suitable for packet switching in a 10 Mb/s network. Switching speed measurements on individual MSMs suggests that modifications to the switch circuit could improve the switching time. The switch could also find application as a component in the wavelength conversion circuit of a WDM fiber optic network.

  14. Kiowa Creek Switching Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a new Kiowa Creek Switching Station near Orchard in Morgan County, Colorado. Kiowa Creek Switching Station would consist of a fenced area of approximately 300 by 300 feet and contain various electrical equipment typical for a switching station. As part of this new construction, approximately one mile of an existing 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will be removed and replaced with a double circuit overhead line. The project will also include a short (one-third mile) realignment of an existing line to permit connection with the new switching station. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 40 CFR Parts 1500--1508, the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required for the proposed project. This determination is based on the information contained in this environmental assessment (EA) prepared by Western. The EA identifies and evaluates the environmental and socioeconomic effects of the proposed action, and concludes that the advance impacts on the human environment resulting from the proposed project would not be significant. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Multipath star switch controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.

    1980-01-01

    Device concept permits parallel computers to scan several commonnetwork-connected data stations at maximum rate. Sequencers leap-frog to bypass ports already being serviced by another computer. Two-path system for 16-port star switch controller is cost effective if added bandwidth or increased reliability is desired. Triple-path system would be cost effective for 32-port controller.

  16. Oscillating Thermal Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, S. Walter

    1991-01-01

    Proposed heat switch transfers heat from source to sink in regular cycles. Self-sustaining; actuated by transferred heat, contains no moving parts, and needs no external heaters or electronic circuitry to synchronize heat-transfer periods or control heat-transfer rates. Intended for use in gas-sorption refrigerator.

  17. Waveguide switch protector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Device for detecting excessive operation of electric motors used to drive waveguide switches is described. Purpose of device is to prevent burnout of electric motor in event of waveguide stoppage at some point other than extreme limits of travel. Operation of equipment, components used to sense motor performance, and schematic diagram are included.

  18. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  19. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V) revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) associated with the device. The analysis of the device I–V characteristics suggests the source of the

  20. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  1. Automatic thermal switch. [spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, J. W.; Wing, L. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes two thermally conductive plates and a thermally conductive switch saddle pivotally mounted to the first plate. A flexible heat carrier is connected between the switch saddle and the second plate. A phase-change power unit, including a piston coupled to the switch saddle, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element biases the switch saddle in a predetermined position with respect to the first plate. When the phase-change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first place, the piston extends and causes the switch saddle to pivot, thereby varying the thermal conduction between the two plates through the switch saddle and flexible heat carrier. The biasing element, switch saddle, and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally opened thermally conductive path between the two plates.

  2. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, Kristian

    1983-01-01

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  3. Operation of a homeostatic sleep switch.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Diogo; Donlea, Jeffrey M; Talbot, Clifford B; Song, Seoho M; Thurston, Alexander J F; Miesenböck, Gero

    2016-08-18

    Sleep disconnects animals from the external world, at considerable risks and costs that must be offset by a vital benefit. Insight into this mysterious benefit will come from understanding sleep homeostasis: to monitor sleep need, an internal bookkeeper must track physiological changes that are linked to the core function of sleep. In Drosophila, a crucial component of the machinery for sleep homeostasis is a cluster of neurons innervating the dorsal fan-shaped body (dFB) of the central complex. Artificial activation of these cells induces sleep, whereas reductions in excitability cause insomnia. dFB neurons in sleep-deprived flies tend to be electrically active, with high input resistances and long membrane time constants, while neurons in rested flies tend to be electrically silent. Correlative evidence thus supports the simple view that homeostatic sleep control works by switching sleep-promoting neurons between active and quiescent states. Here we demonstrate state switching by dFB neurons, identify dopamine as a neuromodulator that operates the switch, and delineate the switching mechanism. Arousing dopamine caused transient hyperpolarization of dFB neurons within tens of milliseconds and lasting excitability suppression within minutes. Both effects were transduced by Dop1R2 receptors and mediated by potassium conductances. The switch to electrical silence involved the downregulation of voltage-gated A-type currents carried by Shaker and Shab, and the upregulation of voltage-independent leak currents through a two-pore-domain potassium channel that we term Sandman. Sandman is encoded by the CG8713 gene and translocates to the plasma membrane in response to dopamine. dFB-restricted interference with the expression of Shaker or Sandman decreased or increased sleep, respectively, by slowing the repetitive discharge of dFB neurons in the ON state or blocking their entry into the OFF state. Biophysical changes in a small population of neurons are thus linked to the

  4. Easily-wired toggle switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. T.; Stringer, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Crimp-type connectors reduce assembly and disassembly time. With design, no switch preparation is necessary and socket contracts are crimped to wires inserted in module attached to back of toggle switch engaging pins inside module to make electrical connections. Wires are easily removed with standard detachment tool. Design can accommodate wires of any gage and as many terminals can be placed on switch as wire gage and switch dimensions will allow.

  5. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  6. Radiation sensitive solid state switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutto, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A mechanically operable solid state switch suited for use in achieving a variable circuit-switching function is described. This switch is characterized by an annular array of photoresponsive switching devices, disposed in communication with an included source of radiation, and a plurality of interchangeable, mechanically operable interrupter disks. Each disk has a predetermined pattern of transparent and opaque portions. Operative displacement of each disk serves to make and break selected electrical circuits through the photo responsive devices of said array.

  7. High speed switching in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Cassell, R.E.; Villa, F.

    1989-02-01

    A fast, efficient and reliable switch is the basic ingredient of a pulse power accelerator. Two switches have been proposed so far: the solid state switch, and the vacuum photodiode switch. The solid state version has been tested to some extent, albeit at low (few kilovolts) level, with risetime around 10 ps in the radial line transformer configuration. The vacuum photodiode is being investigated by Fisher and Rao at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Common to both switches is the need of a short laser pulse; near infrared for the solid state switch, and ultraviolet for the vacuum photodiode switch. Another common feature is the poor energy gain of these switches: the gain being the ratio between the electrical energy switched and the laser energy needed to drive the switch. For the solid state switch, calculations and experimental data show that the energy gain cannot exceed a value between 5 and 10. For the vacuum photodiode, the situation is somewhat similar, unless very high quantum efficiency, rugged photocathodes can be found. A closing switch also can be used to produce short pulses of rf at frequencies related to its closing time, using a well-known device called the frozen wave generator. For a risetime of the order of 30 ps, one could produce several Gigawatts of rf at Xband at very low cost. 12 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Illuminated push-button switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwagiri, T.

    1983-01-01

    An illuminated push-button switch is described. It is characterized by the fact that is consists of a switch group, an operator button opening and closing the switch group, and a light-emitting element which illuminates the face of the operator button.

  9. Organic Materials For Optical Switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1993-01-01

    Equations predict properties of candidate materials. Report presents results of theoretical study of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials. Such materials used in optical switching devices for computers and telecommunications, replacing electronic switches. Optical switching potentially offers extremely high information throughout in compact hardware.

  10. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  11. Language Switching and Language Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, Teresa; Paolieri, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the asymmetrical language switching cost in a word reading task (Experiment 1) and in a categorization task (Experiment 2 and 3). In Experiment 1, Spanish-English bilinguals named words in first language (L1) and second language (L2) in a switching paradigm. They were slower to switch from their weaker L2 to their more dominant…

  12. Design and performance of the beamlet optical switch

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.W.; DeYoreo, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments are typically designed with large apertures (>30 cm) to keep the fluence below the damage threshold of the various optical components. Until recently, no optical switch technology could be scaled to the aperture size, aperture shape (square), and switching speed required for the next generation of ICF drivers. This step is critical: The Beamlet multipass amplifier cavity uses a full-aperture optical switch to trap the laser pulse within the cavity and to divert the pulse out of the cavity when it reaches the required energy. By rotating the polarization of the beam, a Pockels cell in the switch controls whether the beam is transmitted through, or reflected from, the polarizer. In this article the authors describe an optical switch technology that does scale to the required aperture size and shape for Beamlet and the porposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, and can employ a thin crystal. This switch consists of a thin-film polarizer and a plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC), the latter originally invented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the 1980s and under further development since 1991. After discussing the PEPC concept, they present the design and optical performance of a 32 x 32 cm{sup 2} prototype PEPC, including discussions of the crystals, the PEPC assembly, the vacuum and gas system, and the high-voltage pulsers. Then they describe the performance of the 37 x 37 cm{sup 2} PEPC construced specifically for the Beamlet laser. Finally, they discuss important technology issues that arose during PEPC development: cathode sputtering, cathode heating, nonuniformities in the switching profile, switch-pulse leakage current, and an estimate of the plasma density and temperature produced during PEPC operation.

  13. Abacus switch: a new scalable multicast ATM switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, H. Jonathan; Park, Jin-Soo; Choe, Byeong-Seog

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a new architecture for a scalable multicast ATM switch from a few tens to thousands of input ports. The switch, called Abacus switch, has a nonblocking memoryless switch fabric followed by small switch modules at the output ports; the switch has input and output buffers. Cell replication, cell routing, output contention resolution, and cell addressing are all performed distributedly in the Abacus switch so that it can be scaled up to thousnads input and output ports. A novel algorithm has been proposed to resolve output port contention while achieving input and output ports. A novel algorithm has been proposed to reolve output port contention while achieving input buffers sharing, fairness among the input ports, and multicast call splitting. The channel grouping concept is also adopted in the switch to reduce the hardware complexity and improve the switch's throughput. The Abacus switch has a regular structure and thus has the advantages of: 1) easy expansion, 2) relaxed synchronization for data and clock signals, and 3) building the switch fabric using existing CMOS technology.

  14. Biochemical switching device: how to turn on (off) the switch.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Sakai, T; Hayashi, K

    1989-01-01

    We previously showed with computer simulations that cyclic enzyme systems have the reliability of ON-OFF types of operation (McCulloch-Pitts' neuronic equation) and the applicability for a switching circuit in a biocomputer. The switching time was inevitably determined in accordance with the difference in amount between two inputs of the system. This characteristic is, however, a disadvantage for practical use of a switching device; we need to improve the system in order for the switching time to optionally be changed. We shall present here how to turn on (off) the switch independently of the modes of two inputs. By introducing pulse perturbation, we could optionally set up the switching time of a cyclic enzyme system (biochemical switching device). PMID:2720139

  15. High gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches: Switch longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Mar, A.

    1998-07-01

    Optically activated, high gain GaAs switches are being tested for many different pulsed power applications that require long lifetime (longevity). The switches have p and n contact metallization (with intentional or unintentional dopants) configured in such a way as to produce p-i-n or n-i-n switches. The longevity of the switches is determined by circuit parameters and by the ability of the contacts to resist erosion. This paper will describe how the switches performed in test-beds designed to measure switch longevity. The best longevity was achieved with switches made with diffused contacts, achieving over 50 million pulses at 10 A and over 2 million pulses at 80 A.

  16. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts: 1996 IEEE international conference on plasma science

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This meeting covered the following topics: space plasmas; non-equilibrium plasma processing; computer simulation of vacuum power tubes; vacuum microelectronics; microwave systems; basic phenomena in partially ionized gases -- gaseous electronics, electrical discharges; ball lightning/spherical plasma configuration; plasma diagnostics; plasmas for lighting; dense plasma focus; intense ion and electron beams; plasma, ion, and electron sources; flat panel displays; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; thermal plasma processing; computational plasma physics; magnetic confinement fusion; microwave-plasma interactions; space plasma engineering; EM and ETH launchers; fast wave devices; intense beam microwaves; slow wave devices; space plasma measurements; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasma -- waves, instabilities, plasma theory, etc; plasma closing switches; fast opening switches; and laser-produced plasma. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this conference.

  17. Fast Electromechanical Switches Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Wong, Eric; Epp, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated nanoelectromechanical switches based on carbon nanotubes have been fabricated and tested in a continuing effort to develop high-speed switches for a variety of stationary and portable electronic equipment. As explained below, these devices offer advantages over electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical switches, which, heretofore, have represented the state of the art of rapid, highly miniaturized electromechanical switches. Potential applications for these devices include computer memories, cellular telephones, communication networks, scientific instrumentation, and general radiation-hard electronic equipment. A representative device of the present type includes a single-wall carbon nanotube suspended over a trench about 130 nm wide and 20 nm deep in an electrically insulating material. The ends of the carbon nanotube are connected to metal electrodes, denoted the source and drain electrodes. At bottom of the trench is another metal electrode, denoted the pull electrode (see figure). In the off or open switch state, no voltage is applied, and the nanotube remains out of contact with the pull electrode. When a sufficiently large electric potential (switching potential) is applied between the pull electrode and either or both of the source and drain electrodes, the resulting electrostatic attraction bends and stretches the nanotube into contact with the pull electrode, thereby putting the switch into the "on" or "closed" state, in which substantial current (typically as much as hundreds of nanoamperes) is conducted. Devices of this type for use in initial experiments were fabricated on a thermally oxidized Si wafer, onto which Nb was sputter-deposited for use as the pull-electrode layer. Nb was chosen because its refractory nature would enable it to withstand the chemical and thermal conditions to be subsequently imposed for growing carbon nanotubes. A 200- nm-thick layer of SiO2 was formed on top of the Nb layer by plasma

  18. Optical fiber switch

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  19. Neurotransmitter Switching? No Surprise

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the many forms of brain plasticity, changes in synaptic strength and changes in synapse number are particularly prominent. However, evidence for neurotransmitter respecification or switching has been accumulating steadily, both in the developing nervous system and in the adult brain, with observations of transmitter addition, loss, or replacement of one transmitter with another. Natural stimuli can drive these changes in transmitter identity, with matching changes in postsynaptic transmitter receptors. Strikingly, they often convert the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or vice versa, providing a basis for changes in behavior in those cases in which it has been examined. Progress has been made in identifying the factors that induce transmitter switching and in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which it is achieved. There are many intriguing questions to be addressed. PMID:26050033

  20. A plasmonic Fano switch.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Lassiter, J Britt; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Sobhani, Heidar; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonic clusters can support Fano resonances, where the line shape characteristics are controlled by cluster geometry. Here we show that clusters with a hemicircular central disk surrounded by a circular ring of closely spaced, coupled nanodisks yield Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra for orthogonal incident polarization orientations. When this structure is incorporated into an uniquely broadband, liquid crystal device geometry, the entire Fano resonance spectrum can be switched on and off in a voltage-dependent manner. A reversible transition between the Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra is induced by relatively low (∼6 V) applied voltages, resulting in a complete on/off switching of the transparency window. PMID:22924610

  1. The quantum cryptographic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinatha, N.; Omkar, S.; Srikanth, R.; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pathak, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    We illustrate the principle of a cryptographic switch for a quantum scenario, in which a third party (Charlie) can control to a continuously varying degree the amount of information the receiver (Bob) receives, after the sender (Alice) has sent her information through a quantum channel. Suppose Charlie transmits a Bell state to Alice and Bob. Alice uses dense coding to transmit two bits to Bob. Only if the 2-bit information corresponding to the choice of the Bell state is made available by Charlie to Bob can the latter recover Alice's information. By varying the amount of information Charlie gives, he can continuously alter the information recovered by Bob. The performance of the protocol as subjected to the squeezed generalized amplitude damping channel is considered. We also present a number of practical situations where a cryptographic switch would be of use.

  2. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  3. Cryogenic switched MOSFET characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Both p channel and n channel enhancement mode MOSFETs can be readily switched on and off at temperatures as low as 2.8 K so that switch sampled readout of a VLWIR Ge:Ga focal plane is electronically possible. Noise levels as low as 100 rms electrons per sample (independent of sample rate) can be achieved using existing p channel MOSFETs, at overall rates up to 30,000 samples/second per multiplexed channel (e.g., 32 detectors at a rate of almost 1,000 frames/second). Run of the mill devices, including very low power dissipation n channel FETs would still permit noise levels of the order of 500 electrons/sample.

  4. Evolution of genetic switch complexity

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Gregory W.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2013-01-01

    The circuitry of the phage λ genetic switch determining the outcome of lytic or lysogenic growth is well-integrated and complex, raising the question as to how it evolved. It is plausible that it arose from a simpler ancestral switch with fewer components that underwent various additions and refinements, as it adapted to vast numbers of different hosts and conditions. We have recently identified a new class of genetic switches found in mycobacteriophages and other prophages, in which immunity is dependent on integration. These switches contain only three genes (integrase, repressor and cro) and represent a major departure from the λ-like circuitry, lacking many features such as xis, cII and cIII. These small self-contained switches represent an unrealized, elegant circuitry for controlling infection outcome. In this addendum, we propose a model of possible events in the evolution of a complex λ-like switch from a simpler integration-dependent switch. PMID:23819104

  5. CREE: Making the Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, David; Palmer, John

    2014-03-06

    CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

  6. CREE: Making the Switch

    ScienceCinema

    Grider, David; Palmer, John

    2014-04-09

    CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

  7. Composite Material Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  8. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  9. MCT/MOSFET Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1990-01-01

    Metal-oxide/semiconductor-controlled thyristor (MCT) and metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) connected in switching circuit to obtain better performance. Offers high utilization of silicon, low forward voltage drop during "on" period of operating cycle, fast turnon and turnoff, and large turnoff safe operating area. Includes ability to operate at high temperatures, high static blocking voltage, and ease of drive.

  10. Field emission in actuation pads of radio frequency microelectromechanical systems ohmic switches: A potential contamination mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoureli, M.; Reig, B.; Papandreou, E.; Poulain, C.; Souchon, F.; Deborgies, F.; Papaioannou, G.

    2016-01-01

    The field emission current generated across the actuation pads in ohmic MEMS switches during ON state is shown to constitute an additional source of degradation. Switches with Au/Au and Au/Ru contacts have been subjected to 24 h continuous stress. In both cases the switch ohmic contact resistance and field emission current across actuation pads were monitored simultaneously. The experimental results revealed a negligible degradation in Au/Au contact devices while the Au/Ru contact devices show a fast degradation. The experimental results from Au/Au and Ru/Au contact switches have been compared taking into account the plasma generation in the actuation pads.

  11. Extended lifetime railgap switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D.B.; Mendoza, P.J.

    1988-02-02

    In a railgap switch of the type having an elongate blade electrode made of conductive material, an elongate housing made of insulating material for supporting the blade electrode and plate electrode in opposed relation extending in the same direction with the blade centered over the plate and separated therefrom by a gap, and a gas filling the housing and the gap, the gas being selected to breakdown and switch from a highly insulative state to a highly conductive state upon application of a high voltage across the blade and plate electrodes, the improvement is described comprising: forming the blade with laterally extending transverse wing portions at the edge of the blade and adjacent the gap so as to extend in spaced parallel relation to the surface of the plate, the blade generally following the contour thereof to form an inverted T-shape structure with the wing portions extending transversely of the elongate dimension of the blade. The wing portions terminating in a pair of spaced parallel edges extending along the elongate direction of the blade to thereby create two spaced elongate edges along which arcs form serving to divide the erosion effects of discharge between them, the current through each edge being one-half of that in single-edge devices with ablation wear reduced accordingly to give significantly larger switch lifetime. The blade and wing portions limiting ablation erosion of the edges in a direction generally align with the plate contour so that the edge-to-plate separation remains substantially constant.

  12. Ferroelectric switching of elastin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanming; Cai, Hong-Ling; Zelisko, Matthew; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Jinglan; Yan, Fei; Ma, Feiyue; Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Zheng, Hairong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sharma, Pradeep; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectricity has long been speculated to have important biological functions, although its very existence in biology has never been firmly established. Here, we present compelling evidence that elastin, the key ECM protein found in connective tissues, is ferroelectric, and we elucidate the molecular mechanism of its switching. Nanoscale piezoresponse force microscopy and macroscopic pyroelectric measurements both show that elastin retains ferroelectricity at 473 K, with polarization on the order of 1 μC/cm2, whereas coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations predict similar polarization with a Curie temperature of 580 K, which is higher than most synthetic molecular ferroelectrics. The polarization of elastin is found to be intrinsic in tropoelastin at the monomer level, analogous to the unit cell level polarization in classical perovskite ferroelectrics, and it switches via thermally activated cooperative rotation of dipoles. Our study sheds light onto a long-standing question on ferroelectric switching in biology and establishes ferroelectricity as an important biophysical property of proteins. This is a critical first step toward resolving its physiological significance and pathological implications. PMID:24958890

  13. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  14. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-08-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to 1 kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than 1 nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and waveforms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and technology to practical systems antennas and bounded wave developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia-designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > Khz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  15. "Platform switching": serendipity.

    PubMed

    Kalavathy, N; Sridevi, J; Gehlot, Roshni; Kumar, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Implant dentistry is the latest developing field in terms of clinical techniques, research, material science and oral rehabilitation. Extensive work is being done to improve the designing of implants in order to achieve better esthetics and function. The main drawback with respect to implant restoration is achieving good osseointegration along with satisfactory stress distribution, which in turn will improve the prognosis of implant prosthesis by reducing the crestal bone loss. Many concepts have been developed with reference to surface coating of implants, surgical techniques for implant placement, immediate and delayed loading, platform switching concept, etc. This article has made an attempt to review the concept of platform switching was in fact revealed accidentally due to the nonavailability of the abutment appropriate to the size of the implant placed. A few aspect of platform switching, an upcoming idea to reduce crestal bone loss have been covered. The various methods used for locating and preparing the data were done through textbooks, Google search and related articles. PMID:24992863

  16. Cygnus Diverter Switch Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton et al.

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 50-ns x-ray sources fielded in an underground laboratory at the Nevada Test Site. The tests performed in this laboratory involve study of the dynamic properties of plutonium and are called subcritical experiments. From end-to-end, the Cygnus machines utilize the following components: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), waterfilled coaxial transmission line (WTL), 3-cell inductive voltage adder (IVA), and rod-pinch diode. The upstream WTL interface to the PFL is via a radial insulator with coaxial geometry. The downstream WTL terminates in a manifold where the center conductor splits into three lines which individually connect to each of the IVA cell inputs. There is an impedance mismatch at this juncture. It is a concern that a reflected pulse due to anomalous behavior in the IVA or diode might initiate breakdown upon arrival at the upstream PFL/WTL insulator. Therefore near the beginning of the WTL a radial diverter switch is installed to protect the insulator from over voltage and breakdown. The diverter has adjustable gap spacing, and an in-line aqueous-solution (sodium thiosulfate) resistor array for energy dissipation. There are capacitive voltage probes at both ends of the WTL and on the diverter switch. These voltage signals will be analyzed to determine diverter performance. Using this analysis the usefulness of the diverter switch will be evaluated.

  17. Organic optical bistable switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate an organic optical bistable switch by integrating an efficient organic photodetector on top of a transparent electrophosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (TOLED). The bistability is achieved with an external field-effect transistor providing positive feedback. In the "LOW" state, the TOLED is off and the current in the photodetector is solely its dark current. In the "HIGH" state, the TOLED emits light that is directly coupled into the integrated photodetector through the transparent cathode. The photocurrent then is fed back to the TOLED, maintaining it in the HIGH state. The green electrophosphorescent material, fac tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy)3] doped into a 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl host was used as the luminescent material in the TOLED, while alternating thin layers of copper phthalocyanine and 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic bis-benzimidazole were used as the active region of the organic photodetector. The circuit has a 3 dB bandwidth of 25 kHz, and can be switched between HIGH and LOW using pulses as narrow as 60 ns. The bistable switch can be both electrically and optically reset, making it a candidate for image-retaining displays (e.g., electronic paper) and other photonic logic applications. The integrated organic device also has broad use as a linear circuit element in applications such as automatic brightness control.

  18. Microwave pulse compression from a storage cavity with laser-induced switching

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Paul R.

    1992-01-01

    A laser-induced switch and a multiple cavity configuration are disclosed for producing high power microwave pulses. The microwave pulses are well controlled in wavelength and timing, with a quick rise time and a variable shape and power of the pulse. In addition, a method of reducing pre-pulse leakage to a low level is disclosed. Microwave energy is directed coherently to one or more cavities that stores the energy in a single mode, represented as a standing wave pattern. In order to switch the stored microwave energy out of the main cavity and into the branch waveguide, a laser-actuated switch is provided for the cavity. The switch includes a laser, associated optics for delivering the beam into the main cavity, and a switching gas positioned at an antinode in the main cavity. When actuated, the switching gas ionizes, creating a plasma, which becomes reflective to the microwave energy, changing the resonance of the cavity, and as a result the stored microwave energy is abruptly switched out of the cavity. The laser may directly pre-ionize the switching gas, or it may pump an impurity in the switching gas to an energy level which switches when a pre-selected cavity field is attained. Timing of switching the cavities is controlled by varying the pathlength of the actuating laser beam. For example, the pathlengths may be adjusted to output a single pulse of high power, or a series of quick lower power pulses.

  19. IEEE conference record -- abstracts: 1995 IEEE international conference on plasma science

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Topics covered at this meeting are: computational plasma physics; slow wave devices; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasmas; microwave-plasma interactions; space plasmas; fast wave devices; plasma processing; plasma, ion, and electron sources; vacuum microelectronics; basic phenomena in partially ionized gases; microwave systems; plasma diagnostics; magnetic fusion theory/experiment; fast opening switches; laser-produced plasmas; dense plasma focus; intense ion and electron beams; plasmas for lighting; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; intense beam microwaves; ball lightning/spherical plasma configuration; environmental plasma science; EM and ETH launchers; and environmental/energy issues in plasma science. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the individual papers.

  20. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  1. The design and analysis of multi-megawatt distributed single pole double throw (SPDT) microwave switches

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.

    1999-05-01

    We present design methodology and analysis for an SPDT switch that is capable of handling hundreds of megawatts of power at X-band. The switch is designed for application in high power rf systems in particular future Linear Colliders (1). In these systems switching need to be fast in one direction only. We use this to our advantage to reach a design for a super high power switch. In our analysis we treat the problem from an abstract point of view. We introduce a unified analysis for the microwave circuits irrespective of the switching elements. The analysis is, then, suitable for different kinds of switching elements such as photoconductrs. PIN diodes, and plasma discharge in low-pressure gases. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Butyrate Infusions in the Ovine Fetus Delay the Biologic Clock for Globin Gene Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Rudolph, Abraham; Faller, Douglas V.; Roman, Christine; Cohen, Ruth A.; Chen, Shao-Jing; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1988-11-01

    The switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin expression is regulated in many mammalian species by a developmental clock-like mechanism and determined by the gestational age of the fetus. Prolonging fetal globin gene expression is of considerable interest for therapeutic potential in diseases caused by abnormal β -globin genes. Butyric acid, which is found in increased plasma concentrations in infants of diabetic mothers who have delayed globin gene switching, was infused into catheterized fetal lambs in utero during the time of the normal globin gene switch period. The globin gene switch was significantly delayed in three of four butyrate-treated fetuses compared with controls and was entirely prevented in one fetus in whom the infusion was begun before the globin switch was under way. These data provide a model for investigating and arresting the biologic clock of hemoglobin switching.

  3. Development and simulation study of a new inverse-pinch high Coulomb transfer switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.

    1989-01-01

    The inverse-pinch plasma switch was studied using a computer simulation code. The code was based on a 2-D, 2-temperature magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The application of this code was limited to the disk-type inverse-pinch plasma switch. The results of the computer analysis appear to be in agreement with the experimental results when the same parameters are used. An inverse-pinch plasma switch for closing has been designed and tested for high-power switching requirements. An azimuthally uniform initiation of breakdown is a key factor in achieving an inverse-pinch current path in the switch. Thus, various types of triggers, such as trigger pins, wire-brush, ring trigger, and hypocycloidal-pinch (HCP) devices have been tested for uniform breakdown. Recently, triggering was achieved by injection of a plasma-ring (plasma puff) that is produced separately with hypocycloidal-pinch electrodes placed under the cathode of the main gap. The current paths at switch closing, initiated by the injection of a plasma-ring from the HCP trigger are azimuthally uniform, and the local current density is significantly reduced, so that damage to the electrodes and the insulator surfaces is minimized. The test results indicate that electron bombardment on the electrodes and the insulator surfaces is minimized. The test results indicate that electron bombardment on the electrodes is four orders of magnitude less than that of a spark-gap switch for the same switching power. Indeed, a few thousand shots with peak current exceeding a mega-ampere and with hold-off voltage up to 20 kV have been conducted without showing measurable damage to the electrodes and insulators.

  4. Power transistor switching characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The switching properties of power transistors are investigated. The devices studied were housed in IO-3 cases and were of an n(+)-p-n(-)-n(+) vertical dopant structure. The effects of the magnitude of the reverse-base current and temperature on the reverse-bias second breakdown characteristics are discussed. Brief discussions of device degradation due to second breakdown and of a constant voltage turn-off circuit are included. A description of a vacuum tube voltage clamp circuit which reduces clamped collector voltage overshoot is given.

  5. Biological switches and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Albert, Reka; Goldbeter, Albert; Ruoff, Peter; Sible, Jill

    2008-01-01

    To introduce this special issue on biological switches and clocks, we review the historical development of mathematical models of bistability and oscillations in chemical reaction networks. In the 1960s and 1970s, these models were limited to well-studied biochemical examples, such as glycolytic oscillations and cyclic AMP signalling. After the molecular genetics revolution of the 1980s, the field of molecular cell biology was thrown wide open to mathematical modellers. We review recent advances in modelling the gene–protein interaction networks that control circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression, signal processing and the design of synthetic gene networks. PMID:18522926

  6. Composite Thermal Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Robert; Brawn, Shelly; Harrison, Katherine; O'Toole, Shannon; Moeller, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Lithium primary and lithium ion secondary batteries provide high specific energy and energy density. The use of these batteries also helps to reduce launch weight. Both primary and secondary cells can be packaged as high-rate cells, which can present a threat to crew and equipment in the event of external or internal short circuits. Overheating of the cell interior from high current flows induced by short circuits can result in exothermic reactions in lithium primary cells and fully charged lithium ion secondary cells. Venting of the cell case, ejection of cell components, and fire have been reported in both types of cells, resulting from abuse, cell imperfections, or faulty electronic control design. A switch has been developed that consists of a thin layer of composite material made from nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon that conducts electrons at room temperature and switches to an insulator at an elevated temperature, thus interrupting current flow to prevent thermal runaway caused by internal short circuits. The material is placed within the cell, as a thin layer incorporated within the anode and/or the cathode, to control excess currents from metal-to-metal or metal-to-carbon shorts that might result from cell crush or a manufacturing defect. The safety of high-rate cells is thus improved, preventing serious injury to personnel and sensitive equipment located near the battery. The use of recently available nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon permits an improved, homogeneous material with the potential to be fine-tuned to a unique switch temperature, sufficiently below the onset of a catastrophic chemical reaction. The smaller particles also permit the formation of a thinner control film layer (<50 m), which can be incorporated into commercial high-rate lithium primary and secondary cells. The innovation permits incorporation in current lithium and lithium-ion cell designs with a minimal impact on cell weight and volume. The composite thermal

  7. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  8. Investigation on properties of ultrafast switching in a bulk gallium arsenide avalanche semiconductor switch

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Yuan, Xuelin

    2014-03-07

    Properties of ultrafast switching in a bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) avalanche semiconductor switch based on semi-insulating wafer, triggered by an optical pulse, were analyzed using physics-based numerical simulations. It has been demonstrated that when a voltage with amplitude of 5.2 kV is applied, after an exciting optical pulse with energy of 1 μJ arrival, the structure with thickness of 650 μm reaches a high conductivity state within 110 ps. Carriers are created due to photons absorption, and electrons and holes drift to anode and cathode terminals, respectively. Static ionizing domains appear both at anode and cathode terminals, and create impact-generated carriers which contribute to the formation of electron-hole plasma along entire channel. When the electric field in plasma region increases above the critical value (∼4 kV/cm) at which the electrons drift velocity peaks, a domain comes into being. An increase in carrier concentration due to avalanche multiplication in the domains reduces the domain width and results in the formation of an additional domain as soon as the field outside the domains increases above ∼4 kV/cm. The formation and evolution of multiple powerfully avalanching domains observed in the simulations are the physical reasons of ultrafast switching. The switch exhibits delayed breakdown with the characteristics affected by biased electric field, current density, and optical pulse energy. The dependence of threshold energy of the exciting optical pulse on the biased electric field is discussed.

  9. Investigation on properties of ultrafast switching in a bulk gallium arsenide avalanche semiconductor switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Yuan, Xuelin

    2014-03-01

    Properties of ultrafast switching in a bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) avalanche semiconductor switch based on semi-insulating wafer, triggered by an optical pulse, were analyzed using physics-based numerical simulations. It has been demonstrated that when a voltage with amplitude of 5.2 kV is applied, after an exciting optical pulse with energy of 1 μJ arrival, the structure with thickness of 650 μm reaches a high conductivity state within 110 ps. Carriers are created due to photons absorption, and electrons and holes drift to anode and cathode terminals, respectively. Static ionizing domains appear both at anode and cathode terminals, and create impact-generated carriers which contribute to the formation of electron-hole plasma along entire channel. When the electric field in plasma region increases above the critical value (˜4 kV/cm) at which the electrons drift velocity peaks, a domain comes into being. An increase in carrier concentration due to avalanche multiplication in the domains reduces the domain width and results in the formation of an additional domain as soon as the field outside the domains increases above ˜4 kV/cm. The formation and evolution of multiple powerfully avalanching domains observed in the simulations are the physical reasons of ultrafast switching. The switch exhibits delayed breakdown with the characteristics affected by biased electric field, current density, and optical pulse energy. The dependence of threshold energy of the exciting optical pulse on the biased electric field is discussed.

  10. Heat pipe thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, D. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A thermal switch for controlling the dissipation of heat between a body is described. The thermal switch is comprised of a flexible bellows defining an expansible vapor chamber for a working fluid located between an evaporation and condensation chamber. Inside the bellows is located a coiled retaining spring and four axial metal mesh wicks, two of which have their central portions located inside of the spring while the other two have their central portions located between the spring and the side wall of the bellows. The wicks are terminated and are attached to the inner surfaces of the outer end walls of evaporation and condensation chambers respectively located adjacent to the heat source and heat sink. The inner surfaces of the end walls furthermore include grooves to provide flow channels of the working fluid to and from the wick ends. The evaporation and condensation chambers are connected by turnbuckles and tension springs to provide a set point adjustment for setting the gap between an interface plate on the condensation chamber and the heat sink.

  11. Neuromorphic Atomic Switch Networks

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Shieh, Hsien Hang; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system. PMID:22880101

  12. Data center coolant switch

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  13. The 26th IEEE international conference on plasma science

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    Some of the sessions covered by this conference are: Basic Processes in Fully and Partially Ionized Plasmas; Slow Wave Devices; Laser-Produced Plasma; Non-Equilibrium Plasma Processing; Space Plasmas and Partially Ionized Gases; Microwave Plasmas; Inertial Confinement Fusion; Plasma Diagnostics; Computational Plasma Physics; Microwave Systems; Laser Produced Plasmas and Dense Plasma Focus; Intense Electron and Ion Beams; Fast Wave Devices; Spherical Configurations and Ball Lightning; Thermal Plasma Chemistry and Processing and Environmental Issues in Plasma Science; Plasma, Ion, and Electron Sources; Fast Wave Devices and Intense Beams; Fast Z-pinches and X-ray Lasers; Plasma Opening Switches; Plasma for Lighting; Intense Beams; Vacuum Microwaves; Magnetic Fusion Energy; and Plasma Thrusters and Arcs. Separate abstracts were prepared for some of the papers in this volume.

  14. Hybrid switch for resonant power converters

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Yu, Wensong

    2014-09-09

    A hybrid switch comprising two semiconductor switches connected in parallel but having different voltage drop characteristics as a function of current facilitates attainment of zero voltage switching and reduces conduction losses to complement reduction of switching losses achieved through zero voltage switching in power converters such as high-current inverters.

  15. A high capacity satellite switched TDMA microwave switch matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cory, B. J.; Berkowitz, M.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of the conceptual design of a high-capacity satellite switched-time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) microwave switch matrix fabricated with GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), including integration of both microwave and control logic circuits into the monolithic design. The technology required for a 30/20 GHz communications system includes an on-board SS-TDMA switch matrix. A conceptual design study that has been completed for a wideband, high-capacity (typically 100 x 100) channel switch matrix using technology anticipated for 1987 is described, noting that the study resulted in a switch matrix design concept using a coupled crossbar architecture implemented with MMIC. The design involves basic building block MMIC, permitting flexible growth and efficient wraparound redundancy to increase reliability.

  16. Research in pulsed power plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinshelwood, David; Rose, David

    1993-11-01

    The research was conducted in support of light-ion-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for the Department of Energy (DOE), and nuclear weapon effects simulation (NWES) for the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA). Accomplishments related to ion beams include: development of a practical backup approach to ion beam transport; the first studies of ion-beam interaction with a neutral gas; initial investigations of a promising industrial application of ion beam technology; and detailed theoretical evaluation of several different ion beam transport schemes. Major accomplishments relating to opening switches include: the first direct measurement of the electron density in an opening switch; detailed studies of switch conduction-time scaling; evaluation of several different switch plasma sources; and extensive studies of switch performance into diode loads, leading to the development of a new (and now generally accepted) model of switch behavior.

  17. Characterisation of the Current Switch Mechanism in Two-stage Wire Array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, Guy; Lebedev, S.; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Hall, G.; Swadling, G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S.; Pickworth, L.; de Grouchy, P.; Suttle, L.; Waisman, E.

    2015-11-01

    We describe the operation of a two-stage wire array z-pinch driven by the 1.4 MA, 240 ns rise-time Magpie generator at Imperial College London. In this setup an inverse wire array acts as a fast current switch, delivering a current pre-pulse into a cylindrical load wire array, before rapidly switching the majority of the generator current into the load after a 100-150 ns dwell time. Preconditioning of the load array dramatically alters the ensuing implosion dynamics; the ablation phase is eliminated and no trailing mass remains at the initial array radius during the final implosion. The main current switch occurs as the inverse array begins to explode and plasma expands into the load region. Electrical and imaging diagnostics indicate that the main current switch may evolve as a plasma flow switch, driven by the expansion of a magnetic cavity and plasma bubble along the length of the load array. Analysis of implosion trajectories suggests that approximately 1 MA switches into the load in 100 ns. Attempts to measure the current profile throughout the current switch will be presented. Potential scaling of the device to higher current machines is discussed.

  18. Convertible resistive switching characteristics between memory switching and threshold switching in a single ferritin-based memristor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaochao; Shang, Jie; Xue, Wuhong; Tan, Hongwei; Pan, Liang; Yang, Xi; Guo, Shanshan; Hao, Jian; Liu, Gang; Li, Run-Wei

    2016-04-01

    A bio-memristor fabricated with ferritin exhibits novel resistive switching characteristics wherein memory switching and threshold switching are made steadily coexistent and inter-convertible through controlling the magnitude of compliance current presets. PMID:26967024

  19. Study of optoelectronic switch for satellite-switched time-division multiple access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Shing-Fong; Jou, Liz; Lenart, Joe

    1987-01-01

    The use of optoelectronic switching for satellite switched time division multiple access will improve the isolation and reduce the crosstalk of an IF switch matrix. The results are presented of a study on optoelectronic switching. Tasks include literature search, system requirements study, candidate switching architecture analysis, and switch model optimization. The results show that the power divided and crossbar switching architectures are good candidates for an IF switch matrix.

  20. Phenotypic switching in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrin, Jack

    Living matter is a non-equilibrium system in which many components work in parallel to perpetuate themselves through a fluctuating environment. Physiological states or functionalities revealed by a particular environment are called phenotypes. Transitions between phenotypes may occur either spontaneously or via interaction with the environment. Even in the same environment, genetically identical bacteria can exhibit different phenotypes of a continuous or discrete nature. In this thesis, we pursued three lines of investigation into discrete phenotypic heterogeneity in bacterial populations: the quantitative characterization of the so-called bacterial persistence, a theoretical model of phenotypic switching based on those measurements, and the design of artificial genetic networks which implement this model. Persistence is the phenotype of a subpopulation of bacteria with a reduced sensitivity to antibiotics. We developed a microfluidic apparatus, which allowed us to monitor the growth rates of individual cells while applying repeated cycles of antibiotic treatments. We were able to identify distinct phenotypes (normal and persistent) and characterize the stochastic transitions between them. We also found that phenotypic heterogeneity was present prior to any environmental cue such as antibiotic exposure. Motivated by the experiments with persisters, we formulated a theoretical model describing the dynamic behavior of several discrete phenotypes in a periodically varying environment. This theoretical framework allowed us to quantitatively predict the fitness of dynamic populations and to compare survival strategies according to environmental time-symmetries. These calculations suggested that persistence is a strategy used by bacterial populations to adapt to fluctuating environments. Knowledge of the phenotypic transition rates for persistence may provide statistical information about the typical environments of bacteria. We also describe a design of artificial

  1. EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-10-01

    In nature, molecules exploit interaction with their environment to realize complex functionalities on the nanometer length scale. Physical, chemical and/or biological specificity is frequently achieved by the switching of molecules between microscopically different states. Paradigmatic examples are the energy production in proton pumps of bacteria or the signal conversion in human vision, which rely on switching molecules between different configurations or conformations by external stimuli. The remarkable reproducibility and unparalleled fatigue resistance of these natural processes makes it highly desirable to emulate nature and develop artificial systems with molecular functionalities. A promising avenue towards this goal is to anchor the molecular switches at surfaces, offering new pathways to control their functional properties, to apply electrical contacts, or to integrate switches into larger systems. Anchoring at surfaces allows one to access the full range from individual molecular switches to self-assembled monolayers of well-defined geometry and to customize the coupling between molecules and substrate or between adsorbed molecules. Progress in this field requires both synthesis and preparation of appropriate molecular systems and control over suitable external stimuli, such as light, heat, or electrical currents. To optimize switching and generate function, it is essential to unravel the geometric structure, the electronic properties and the dynamic interactions of the molecular switches on surfaces. This special section, Molecular Switches at Surfaces, collects 17 contributions describing different aspects of this research field. They analyze elementary processes, both in single molecules and in ensembles of molecules, which involve molecular switching and concomitant changes of optical, electronic, or magnetic properties. Two topical reviews summarize the current status, including both challenges and achievements in the field of molecular switches on

  2. Task Switching: A PDP Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Shallice, Tim

    2002-01-01

    When subjects switch between a pair of stimulus-response tasks, reaction time is slower on trial N if a different task was performed on trial N--1. We present a parallel distributed processing (PDP) model that simulates this effect when subjects switch between word reading and color naming in response to Stroop stimuli. Reaction time on "switch…

  3. Battery switch for downhole tools

    DOEpatents

    Boling, Brian E.

    2010-02-23

    An electrical circuit for a downhole tool may include a battery, a load electrically connected to the battery, and at least one switch electrically connected in series with the battery and to the load. The at least one switch may be configured to close when a tool temperature exceeds a selected temperature.

  4. Component Processes in Task Switching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiran, Nachshon; Chorev, Ziv; Sapir, Ayelet

    2000-01-01

    Studied task switching in 4 experiments involving 111 Israeli undergraduates. Results show the preparation for a task switch is not a by-product of general preparation by phasic alertness or predicting target onset and establish reconfiguration as a separate preparatory process. Suggests that there are at least three components of task switching…

  5. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  6. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  7. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  8. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  9. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  10. FAST OPENING SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Bender, M.; Bennett, F.K.; Kuckes, A.F.

    1963-09-17

    A fast-acting electric switch is described for rapidly opening a circuit carrying large amounts of electrical power. A thin, conducting foil bridges a gap in this circuit and means are provided for producing a magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil, whereby the foil is rapidly broken to open the circuit across the gap. Advantageously the foil has a hole forming two narrow portions in the foil and the means producing the magnetic field and eddy currents comprises an annular coil having its annulus coaxial with the hole in the foil and turns adjacent the narrow portions of the foil. An electrical current flows through the coil to produce the magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil. (AEC)

  11. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.

    2010-02-23

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  12. ''Smart'' watchdog safety switch

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that opens to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals. 21 figures.

  13. "Smart" watchdog safety switch

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that opens to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals.

  14. Smart watchdog safety switch

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1989-05-12

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that open to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals. 6 figs.

  15. Automatic thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.; Cunningham, J. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes a first thermally conductive plate, a second thermally conductive plate and a thermal transfer plate pivotally mounted between the first and second plates. A phase change power unit, including a plunger connected to the transfer plate, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element, connected to the transfer plate, biases the transfer plate in a predetermined position with respect to the first and second plates. When the phase change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first plate, the plunger extends and pivots the transfer plate to vary the thermal conduction between the first and second plates through the transfer plate. The biasing element, transfer plate and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally open thermally conductive path between the first and second plates.

  16. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-04

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  17. Switched power workshop: Introduction and summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.

    This paper discusses the design of a switched power electron gun. Particular topics discussed are: vacuum photodiode switch; laser switched solid state diodes; gun performance; charging supply; and laser requirements.

  18. Switching Phenomena in a System with No Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-02-01

    It is widely believed that switching phenomena require switches, but this is actually not true. For an intriguing variety of switching phenomena in nature, the underlying complex system abruptly changes from one state to another in a highly discontinuous fashion. For example, financial market fluctuations are characterized by many abrupt switchings creating increasing trends ("bubble formation") and decreasing trends ("financial collapse"). Such switching occurs on time scales ranging from macroscopic bubbles persisting for hundreds of days to microscopic bubbles persisting only for a few seconds. We analyze a database containing 13,991,275 German DAX Future transactions recorded with a time resolution of 10 msec. For comparison, a database providing 2,592,531 of all S&P500 daily closing prices is used. We ask whether these ubiquitous switching phenomena have quantifiable features independent of the time horizon studied. We find striking scale-free behavior of the volatility after each switching occurs. We interpret our findings as being consistent with time-dependent collective behavior of financial market participants. We test the possible universality of our result by performing a parallel analysis of fluctuations in transaction volume and time intervals between trades. We show that these financial market switching processes have properties similar to those of phase transitions. We suggest that the well-known catastrophic bubbles that occur on large time scales—such as the most recent financial crisis—are no outliers but single dramatic representatives caused by the switching between upward and downward trends on time scales varying over nine orders of magnitude from very large (≈102 days) down to very small (≈10 ms).

  19. Channelized coplanar waveguide pin-diode switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Simons, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    Three different types of p-i-n diode, reflective CPW switches are presented. The first two switches are the series and the shunt mounted diode switches. Each has achieved greater than 15 dB of isolation over a broad bandwidth. The third switch is a narrow band, high isolation switched filter which has achieved 19 dB of isolation. Equivalent circuits and measured performance for each switch is presented.

  20. Liquid metal switches for electromagnetic railgun systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitcham, A.J.; Prothero, D.H.; Brooks, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The need for a reliable and effective commutating switch is essential to the operation of an HPG-driven railgun system. This switch must offer the lowest possible resistance during the current build up time and then must commutate the current quickly and efficiently into the railgun barrel. This paper considers the essential requirements for such a switch and, after briefly reviewing the available switch technologies, describes a new type of switch based on a liquid metal switching medium.

  1. High-Voltage, High-Power Gaseous Electronics Switch For Electric Grid Power Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing a high-voltage, high-power gas switch for use in low-cost power conversion terminals on the electric power grid. Direct-current (dc) power transmission has many advantages over alternating current (ac) transmission, but at present the high cost of ac-dc power interconversion limits the use of dc. The gas switch we are developing conducts current through a magnetized cold cathode plasma in hydrogen or helium to reach practical current densities > 1 A/cm2. Thermal and sputter damage of the cathode by the incident ion flux is a major technical risk, and is being addressed through use of a ``self-healing'' liquid metal cathode (eg, gallium). Plasma conditions and cathode sputtering loss are estimated by analyzing plasma spectral emission. A particle-in-cell plasma model is used to understand various aspects of switch operation, including the conduction phase (where plasma densities can exceed 1013 cm-3), the switch-open phase (where the high-voltage must be held against gas breakdown on the left side of Paschen's curve), and the switching transitions (especially the opening process, which is initiated by forming an ion-matrix sheath adjacent to a control grid). The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  2. Simultaneous determination of ten antiepileptic drugs in human plasma by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization and its application in therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lei; Wang, Tingting; Shi, Meiyun; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Xiaojun; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai

    2016-03-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantitation of ten antiepileptic drugs in human plasma has been developed and validated. The method required only 10 μL of plasma. After simple protein precipitation using acetonitrile, the analytes and internal standard diphenhydramine were separated on a Zorbax SB-C18 column (50 × 4.6 mm, 2.7 μm) using acetonitrile/water as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The total run time was 6 min for each sample. The validation results of specificity, matrix effects, recovery, linearity, precision, and accuracy were satisfactory. The lower limit of quantification was 0.04 μg/mL for carbamazepine, 0.02 μg/mL for lamotrigine, 0.01 μg/mL for oxcarbazepine, 0.4 μg/mL for 10-hydroxycarbazepine, 0.1 μg/mL for carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, 0.15 μg/mL for levetiracetam, 0.06 μg/mL for phenytoin, 0.3 μg/mL for valproic acid, 0.03 μg/mL for topiramate, and 0.15 μg/mL for phenobarbital. The intraday precision and interday precision were less than 7.6%, with the accuracy ranging between -8.1 and 7.9%. The method was successfully applied to therapeutic drug monitoring of 1237 patients with epilepsy after administration of standard antiepileptic drugs. The method has been proved to meet the high-throughput requirements in therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:26711223

  3. Scaling experiments on a magnetically insulated thermionic vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Eninger, J.E.; Vanderberg, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    Magnetic insulation of the electron flow in a cylindrical thermionic vacuum diode has been proposed as a way to achieve a fast high-voltage high-power opening switch. The expected performance of this type of device can be derived from a set of basic scaling laws combined with empirical relationships obtained from experimental studies. Switch losses are mainly due to anode dissipation W{sub a}, which can be normalized to the transferred pulse energy. Leakage current and switch hold-off voltage depend on device geometry, materials, vacuum conditions etc and must be determined experimentally. For this purpose, the MX-1 experiment has been designed and operated. This device is basically a smooth-bore cylindrical magnetron with a 5 cm radius, 400 cm{sup 2} area thermionic dispenser cathode separated from the coaxial water-cooled anode by a few mm wide gap. This design allows pulsed operation at up to {approximately}100 kV, {approximately}4 kA and average power levels of {approximately}1 MW. The MX-1 switch is used as an opening switch to produce 1--2 {mu}s long square pulses from an inductive storage PFN. The current-voltage characteristics of the switch are determined as a function of the applied magnetic field and load condition. Plasma wave measurements are performed to investigate the stability of the electron flow. Results are summarized in the form of scaling diagrams for the important switch parameters, showing possible performance levels and physical and technical limitations identified as far in this work.

  4. Alarm toe switch. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, F.P.

    1980-11-18

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit in a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch.

  5. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale. PMID:25832255

  6. Synchronized Switching in a Josephson Junction Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity.

  7. Synchronized switching in a josephson junction crystal.

    PubMed

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity. PMID:24949766

  8. Self-assembled nanostructured resistive switching memory devices fabricated by templated bottom-up growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji-Min; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Metal-oxide-based resistive switching memory device has been studied intensively due to its potential to satisfy the requirements of next-generation memory devices. Active research has been done on the materials and device structures of resistive switching memory devices that meet the requirements of high density, fast switching speed, and reliable data storage. In this study, resistive switching memory devices were fabricated with nano-template-assisted bottom up growth. The electrochemical deposition was adopted to achieve the bottom-up growth of nickel nanodot electrodes. Nickel oxide layer was formed by oxygen plasma treatment of nickel nanodots at low temperature. The structures of fabricated nanoscale memory devices were analyzed with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). The electrical characteristics of the devices were directly measured using conductive AFM. This work demonstrates the fabrication of resistive switching memory devices using self-assembled nanoscale masks and nanomateirals growth from bottom-up electrochemical deposition. PMID:26739122

  9. Self-assembled nanostructured resistive switching memory devices fabricated by templated bottom-up growth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ji-Min; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Metal-oxide-based resistive switching memory device has been studied intensively due to its potential to satisfy the requirements of next-generation memory devices. Active research has been done on the materials and device structures of resistive switching memory devices that meet the requirements of high density, fast switching speed, and reliable data storage. In this study, resistive switching memory devices were fabricated with nano-template-assisted bottom up growth. The electrochemical deposition was adopted to achieve the bottom-up growth of nickel nanodot electrodes. Nickel oxide layer was formed by oxygen plasma treatment of nickel nanodots at low temperature. The structures of fabricated nanoscale memory devices were analyzed with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). The electrical characteristics of the devices were directly measured using conductive AFM. This work demonstrates the fabrication of resistive switching memory devices using self-assembled nanoscale masks and nanomateirals growth from bottom-up electrochemical deposition. PMID:26739122

  10. Switching kinetics in nanoferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D. J.; Kim, Kinam; Scott, J. F.

    2005-08-01

    We have measured the switching in ferroelectric capacitors of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) over three orders of magnitude in lateral area, from A = 166 to 0.19 µm2 (the latter being the size of the smallest ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) cells in production), and over three orders of magnitude in ramp rate of applied voltage (d E(t)/d t = 107-1010 V cm-1 s-1). In accord with the model of Scott (1998 Ferroelectr. Rev. 1 1), the submicron cells follow a different dependence to the larger cells: for A\\gg 1~\\micmu {\\mathrm {m}}^{2} , the data fit a theory due to Landauer et al (the LYD model), which neglects nucleation; whereas the nanoscale devices satisfy the functional dependence predicted by Pulvari and Kuebler (the PK model), albeit with a modified coefficient. This crossover behaviour has implications for Gbit FRAM device performance at high speed. Fringing field effects measured agree with a simple model from Feynman.

  11. Low impedance switch

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, Donald F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A low inductance switch comprising a pair of spaced apart, annularly shaped, plate members of conducting material supported in substantially parallel, insulated relationship, said plate members being provided with a plurality of radially extending, spoke-like extensions whereby said members may be connected into a plurality of electrical circuits, and an electrical discharge means connected across said spaced plate members for effecting the simultaneous closing of the electrical circuits connected thereto, said electrical discharge means including an elongated, sealed envelope which contains an ionizable gas and which is supported on one of said plate members with the major axis of said envelope extending generally perpendicular to the plane of said plate members, a pair of elongated, spaced apart, insulated electrodes supported within said envelope and extending axially thereof, one of said electrodes being connected to each of said plate members, and a third, firing or trigger electrode supported within said envelope intermediate said main electrodes and being insulated from said main electrodes.

  12. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, J.D.

    1998-06-02

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a series combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electrically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided. 14 figs.

  13. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a seriesed combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided.

  14. The magnetoelectrochemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Lunca Popa, Petru; Kemp, Neil T.; Majjad, Hicham; Dalmas, Guillaume; Faramarzi, Vina; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo; Doudin, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of spintronics, the archetype solid-state two-terminal device is the spin valve, where the resistance is controlled by the magnetization configuration. We show here how this concept of spin-dependent switch can be extended to magnetic electrodes in solution, by magnetic control of their chemical environment. Appropriate nanoscale design allows a huge enhancement of the magnetic force field experienced by paramagnetic molecular species in solutions, which changes between repulsive and attractive on changing the electrodes’ magnetic orientations. Specifically, the field gradient force created within a sub-100-nm-sized nanogap separating two magnetic electrodes can be reversed by changing the orientation of the electrodes’ magnetization relative to the current flowing between the electrodes. This can result in a breaking or making of an electric nanocontact, with a change of resistance by a factor of up to 103. The results reveal how an external field can impact chemical equilibrium in the vicinity of nanoscale magnetic circuits. PMID:25009179

  15. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  16. The magnetoelectrochemical switch.

    PubMed

    Popa, Petru Lunca; Kemp, Neil T; Majjad, Hicham; Dalmas, Guillaume; Faramarzi, Vina; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo; Doudin, Bernard

    2014-07-22

    In the field of spintronics, the archetype solid-state two-terminal device is the spin valve, where the resistance is controlled by the magnetization configuration. We show here how this concept of spin-dependent switch can be extended to magnetic electrodes in solution, by magnetic control of their chemical environment. Appropriate nanoscale design allows a huge enhancement of the magnetic force field experienced by paramagnetic molecular species in solutions, which changes between repulsive and attractive on changing the electrodes' magnetic orientations. Specifically, the field gradient force created within a sub-100-nm-sized nanogap separating two magnetic electrodes can be reversed by changing the orientation of the electrodes' magnetization relative to the current flowing between the electrodes. This can result in a breaking or making of an electric nanocontact, with a change of resistance by a factor of up to 10(3). The results reveal how an external field can impact chemical equilibrium in the vicinity of nanoscale magnetic circuits. PMID:25009179

  17. Task Switching versus Cue Switching: Using Transition Cuing to Disentangle Sequential Effects in Task-Switching Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    Recent methodological advances have allowed researchers to address confounds in the measurement of task-switch costs in task-switching performance by dissociating cue switching from task switching. For example, in the transition-cuing procedure, which involves presenting cues for task transitions rather than for tasks, cue transitions (cue…

  18. Vanadium Dioxide Phase Change Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Mark; Hillman, Christopher; Stupar, Philip; Hacker, Jonathan; Griffith, Zachary; Lee, Kang-Jin

    2015-03-01

    We have built RF switches using vanadium dioxide thin films fabricated within a section of inverted transmission line with integrated on chip heaters to provide local thermal control. On heating the films above the metal insulator transition we obtain record low switch insertion loss of -0.13 dB at 50 GHz and -0.5 dB at 110 GHz. We investigate the device physics of these switches including the effect of a deposited insulator on the VO2 switching characteristics, the self-latching of the devices under high RF powers and the effect of resistance change with temperature on the device linearity. Finally we show how these devices can be integrated with silicon germanium RF circuits to produce a field programmable device where the RF signal routing can be selected under external control. Supported under the DARPA RF-FPGA Program, Contract HR0011-12-C-0092.

  19. Hobetron current regulating switch tube

    SciTech Connect

    True, R.B.; Hansen, R.J.; Deb, D.N.; Good, G.R.; Reass, W.A.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a novel high power electron tube that can hold off voltages up to hundreds of kilovolts, and switch hundreds of amps of current. They call the divide the Hobertron since it utilizes a hollow electron beam. Unlike magnetron injection gun (MIG) switch tubes, it does not require a magnet. Further, it uses nonintercepting control laments, and a dispenser cathode for long life and reliability. Finally, it features a double walled Faraday cage collector for high power dissipation capability. Current is very tightly controlled against changes in voltage across the switch (it is an almost perfect pentode), thus this tube is ideally suited for direct series switching applications. In the paper, various Hobertron designs, and the computer codes and methods used to create them, will be described.

  20. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, James S.

    2012-01-20

    Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) have been investigated since the late 1970s. Some devices have been developed that withstand tens of kilovolts and others that switch hundreds of amperes. However, no single device has been developed that can reliably withstand both high voltage and switch high current. Yet, photoconductive switches still hold the promise of reliable high voltage and high current operation with subnanosecond risetimes. Particularly since good quality, bulk, single crystal, wide bandgap semiconductor materials have recently become available. In this chapter we will review the basic operation of PCSS devices, status of PCSS devices and properties of the wide bandgap semiconductors 4H-SiC, 6H-SiC and 2H-GaN.

  1. Characterisation of the current switch mechanism in two-stage wire array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hall, G. N.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Khoory, E.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; de Grouchy, P.; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Waisman, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the operation of a two-stage wire array z-pinch driven by the 1.4 MA, 240 ns rise-time Magpie pulsed-power device at Imperial College London. In this setup, an inverse wire array acts as a fast current switch, delivering a current pre-pulse into a cylindrical load wire array, before rapidly switching the majority of the generator current into the load after a 100-150 ns dwell time. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the load array during the pre-pulse is presented. Measurements of the load resistivity and energy deposition suggest significant bulk heating of the array mass occurs. The ˜5 kA pre-pulse delivers ˜0.8 J of energy to the load, leaving it in a mixed, predominantly liquid-vapour state. The main current switch occurs as the inverse array begins to explode and plasma expands into the load region. Electrical and imaging diagnostics indicate that the main current switch may evolve in part as a plasma flow switch, driven by the expansion of a magnetic cavity and plasma bubble along the length of the load array. Analysis of implosion trajectories suggests that approximately 1 MA switches into the load in 100 ns, corresponding to a doubling of the generator dI/dt. Potential scaling of the device to higher current machines is discussed.

  2. Transmission line switch design for the investigation of sub-nanosecond electrical breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, A. R.; MacGregor, S. J.; Pate, R. C.

    2002-04-01

    Ultrafast plasma closing switches rely on sub-nanosecond electrical breakdown of the insulating gas. Until recently, little information was available on gas breakdown occurring within this timescale, because of the difficulties in designing an experimental system for such a study. Recently published papers have reported on the results of studies carried out using two devices designed specifically for the investigation of fast (sub-nanosecond) electrical breakdown processes. The devices are essentially modified transmission line plasma closing switches, and in this paper we describe their structure and operation. Because electromagnetic wave behaviour plays a significant role in sub-nanosecond switching, especially reflections from impedance mismatches, the design of the devices is based on transmission line concepts, rather than those of lumped parameters. One of the switches has a conical transmission line topology and is designed for the study of fast switch closure at insulating gas pressures less than 0.6 MPa. The second has a hybrid radial transmission line/conical transmission line topology and is designed for the study of fast switch closure at pressures up to 10 MPa. The paper also includes details of the D-dot monitors used to investigate sub-nanosecond processes in the two transmission line plasma devices.

  3. Characterisation of the current switch mechanism in two-stage wire array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hall, G. N.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Khoory, E.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; Grouchy, P. de; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Waisman, E. M.

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, we describe the operation of a two-stage wire array z-pinch driven by the 1.4 MA, 240 ns rise-time Magpie pulsed-power device at Imperial College London. In this setup, an inverse wire array acts as a fast current switch, delivering a current pre-pulse into a cylindrical load wire array, before rapidly switching the majority of the generator current into the load after a 100–150 ns dwell time. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the load array during the pre-pulse is presented. Measurements of the load resistivity and energy deposition suggest significant bulk heating of the array mass occurs. The ∼5 kA pre-pulse delivers ∼0.8 J of energy to the load, leaving it in a mixed, predominantly liquid-vapour state. The main current switch occurs as the inverse array begins to explode and plasma expands into the load region. Electrical and imaging diagnostics indicate that the main current switch may evolve in part as a plasma flow switch, driven by the expansion of a magnetic cavity and plasma bubble along the length of the load array. Analysis of implosion trajectories suggests that approximately 1 MA switches into the load in 100 ns, corresponding to a doubling of the generator dI/dt. Potential scaling of the device to higher current machines is discussed.

  4. High PRF high current switch

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Stuart L.; Hutcherson, R. Kenneth

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  5. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  6. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  7. Sealed reed relay limit switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. P.; Svintsov, G. P.; Yefimova, M. A.; Lebedev, A. V.; Samsonov, Y. P.

    1986-01-01

    Sealed reed relay limit switches are described which overcome the inherent deficiencies traditionally present in these devices: high material, labor consumption, and difficult operation. Series VSG limit switches developed at the All-Union Scientific Research and Technological Planning Institute for Relay Engineering (Cheboksary) for use in buildings are described. The VSG1 has a single switching contact, the VSG2 a single normally open contact, and the VSG3 a single normally closed contact. The VSG1 employs type MKS-27103 sealed reed relays, while the VSG2 and VSG3 employ KEM-1 reed relays. The magnet system, which consists of magnets and a plate, and the sealed reed relay are contained in a nonmagnetic casing with a slit in it. The mathematical expression defining the geometric dimensions of the magnet system is given. The basic parameteres of all three types of switches are tabulated. The VSG series switches can be used to replace VBK and BVK switches, thus saving electricity, labor, and materials, including silver.

  8. On the Grammar of Code-Switching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Rakesh M.

    1996-01-01

    Explores an Optimality-Theoretic approach to account for observed cross-linguistic patterns of code switching that assumes that code switching strives for well-formedness. Optimization of well-formedness in code switching is shown to follow from (violable) ranked constraints. An argument is advanced that code-switching patterns emerge from…

  9. Working Memory Costs of Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liefooghe, Baptist; Barrouillet, Pierre; Vandierendonck, Andre; Camos, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Although many accounts of task switching emphasize the importance of working memory as a substantial source of the switch cost, there is a lack of evidence demonstrating that task switching actually places additional demands on working memory. The present study addressed this issue by implementing task switching in continuous complex span tasks…

  10. Electronic logic for enhanced switch reliability

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.A.

    1984-01-20

    A logic circuit is used to enhance redundant switch reliability. Two or more switches are monitored for logical high or low output. The output for the logic circuit produces a redundant and fail-safe representation of the switch outputs. When both switch outputs are high, the output is high. Similarly, when both switch outputs are low, the logic circuit's output is low. When the output states of the two switches do not agree, the circuit resolves the conflict by memorizing the last output state which both switches were simultaneously in and produces the logical complement of this output state. Thus, the logic circuit of the present invention allows the redundant switches to be treated as if they were in parallel when the switches are open and as if they were in series when the switches are closed. A failsafe system having maximum reliability is thereby produced.

  11. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  12. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  13. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  14. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  15. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  16. Non-latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A non-latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes a permanent magnet and an electromagnet. The respective sections are arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch has a "normal" position and is selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly. The switch returns to the "normal" position when the overriding electromagnetic assembly is inactive.

  17. Electro-optic harmonic conversion switch for large-aperture multipass laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Goldhar, J.; Haas, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    The authors have demonstrated electro-optically tuned second-harmonic generation using Type I KDP inside a plasma-electrode discharge cell. An axial voltage of +/- 52 kV is required to switch a 1.064-..mu..m beam by conversion to 0.53 ..mu..m, in agreement with theory. Electro-optically tuned harmonic generation may be combined with a recently developed transparent plasma electrode to produce a large-aperture switch for multipass laser systems. 7 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  18. Design and Prototype of an Automated Column-Switching HPLC System for Radiometabolite Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vasdev, Neil; Collier, Thomas Lee

    2016-01-01

    Column-switching high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is extensively used for the critical analysis of radiolabeled ligands and their metabolites in plasma. However, the lack of streamlined apparatus and consequently varying protocols remain as a challenge among positron emission tomography laboratories. We report here the prototype apparatus and implementation of a fully automated and simplified column-switching procedure to allow for the easy and automated determination of radioligands and their metabolites in up to 5 mL of plasma. The system has been used with conventional UV and coincidence radiation detectors, as well as with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. PMID:27548189

  19. Low-pressure pseudospark switches for ICF pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K.; Bickes, Ch; Ernst, U.; Iberler, M.; Meier, J.; Prucker, U.; Schlaug, M.; Schwab, J.; Urban, J.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    Hollow-electrode pseudospark switches are gas-filled, low-pressure, high-current plasma switches which are based on cold cathode emission. They have the capability to satisfy at least a part of switching requirements for different applications in ICF drivers. The main purpose of the submitted paper is therefore to discuss the following realistic ways for the use of pseudospark switches. There are intense international activities aimed at investigating different approaches for the ignition of an ICF capsule. Most of these efforts utilize lasers of varying wavelengths to deliver the energy to initiate the ablation of the target, the compression and ignition of the fuel, and the propagation of the fusion burn. One alternative to this scheme is to provide the drive energy in form of a light ion beam produced by an efficient pulse power accelerator. A related method uses beams of heavy ion beams from high intensity versions of traditional high-energy accelerators. Dependent on the ICF driver for the power conditioning unit (PCU) arise totally different demands. These extremely different requirements mainly rely on the very specific character of the load. Flashlamps, pumping high power lasers represent a non-linear, low-impedance load. Relatively low switching voltage is necessary, but a high charge-transfer capability. Induction cells or magnetic compression units have a high impedance. Consequently high voltage (up to several 100 kV) is required to feed the energy in Marx modules and the following voltage adders produce megavolt voltages, which determines likewise the specific data of the used switch.

  20. High speed packet switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report prepared by Proteon, Inc. of Westborough, Massachusetts under contract NAS 5-30629 entitled High-Speed Packet Switching (SBIR 87-1, Phase 2) prepared for NASA-Greenbelt, Maryland. The primary goal of this research project is to use the results of the SBIR Phase 1 effort to develop a sound, expandable hardware and software router architecture capable of forwarding 25,000 packets per second through the router and passing 300 megabits per second on the router's internal busses. The work being delivered under this contract received its funding from three different sources: the SNIPE/RIG contract (Contract Number F30602-89-C-0014, CDRL Sequence Number A002), the SBIR contract, and Proteon. The SNIPE/RIG and SBIR contracts had many overlapping requirements, which allowed the research done under SNIPE/RIG to be applied to SBIR. Proteon funded all of the work to develop new router interfaces other than FDDI, in addition to funding the productization of the router itself. The router being delivered under SBIR will be a fully product-quality machine. The work done during this contract produced many significant findings and results, summarized here and explained in detail in later sections of this report. The SNIPE/RIG contract was completed. That contract had many overlapping requirements with the SBIR contract, and resulted in the successful demonstration and delivery of a high speed router. The development that took place during the SNIPE/RIG contract produced findings that included the choice of processor and an understanding of the issues surrounding inter processor communications in a multiprocessor environment. Many significant speed enhancements to the router software were made during that time. Under the SBIR contract (and with help from Proteon-funded work), it was found that a single processor router achieved a throughput significantly higher than originally anticipated. For this reason, a single processor router was

  1. Low voltage operation of plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, S. K.; Banerjee, P.; Das, R.; Deb, P.; Prabahar, T.; Das, B. K.; Adhikary, B.; Shyam, A.

    2010-08-15

    Plasma foci of compact sizes and operating with low energies (from tens of joules to few hundred joules) have found application in recent years and have attracted plasma-physics scientists and engineers for research in this direction. We are presenting a low energy and miniature plasma focus which operates from a capacitor bank of 8.4 {mu}F capacity, charged at 4.2-4.3 kV and delivering approximately 52 kA peak current at approximately 60 nH calculated circuit inductance. The total circuit inductance includes the plasma focus inductance. The reported plasma focus operates at the lowest voltage among all reported plasma foci so far. Moreover the cost of capacitor bank used for plasma focus is nearly 20 U.S. dollars making it very cheap. At low voltage operation of plasma focus, the initial breakdown mechanism becomes important for operation of plasma focus. The quartz glass tube is used as insulator and breakdown initiation is done on its surface. The total energy of the plasma focus is approximately 75 J. The plasma focus system is made compact and the switching of capacitor bank energy is done by manual operating switch. The focus is operated with hydrogen and deuterium filled at 1-2 mbar.

  2. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James Stephen

    Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches Semi-insulating Gallium Nitride, 4H and 6H Silicon Carbide are attractive materials for compact, high voltage, extrinsic, photoconductive switches due to their wide bandgap, high dark resistance, high critical electric field strength and high electron saturation velocity. These wide bandgap semiconductors are made semi-insulating by the addition of vanadium (4H and 6H-SiC) and iron (2H-GaN) impurities that form deep acceptors. These deep acceptors trap electrons donated from shallow donor impurities. The electrons can be optically excited from these deep acceptor levels into the conduction band to transition the wide bandgap semiconductor materials from a semi-insulating to a conducting state. Extrinsic photoconductive switches with opposing electrodes have been constructed using vanadium compensated 6H-SiC and iron compensated 2H-GaN. These extrinsic photoconductive switches were tested at high voltage and high power to determine if they could be successfully used as the closing switch in compact medical accelerators. The successful development of a vanadium compensated, 6H-SiC extrinsic photoconductive switch for use as a closing switch for compact accelerator applications was realized by improvements made to the vanadium, nitrogen and boron impurity densities. The changes made to the impurity densities were based on the physical intuition outlined and simple rate equation models. The final 6H-SiC impurity 'recipe' calls for vanadium, nitrogen and boron densities of 2.5 e17 cm-3, 1.25e17 cm-3 and ≤ 1e16 cm-3, respectively. This recipe was originally developed to maximize the quantum efficiency of the vanadium compensated 6H-SiC, while maintaining a thermally stable semi-insulating material. The rate equation models indicate that, besides increasing the quantum efficiency, the impurity recipe should be expected to also increase the carrier recombination time. Three generations of 6H-SiC materials were tested. The

  3. Photoresistance Switching of Plasmonic Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (∼1–2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification. PMID:25514824

  4. High power solid state switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundersen, Martin

    1991-11-01

    We have successfully produced an optically triggered thyristor based in Gallium Arsenide, developed a model for breakdown, and are developing two related devices, including a Gallium Arsenide based static inductor thyristor. We are getting at the basic limitations of Gallium Arsenide for these applications, and are developing models for the physical processes that will determine device limitations. The previously supported gas phase work - resulting in the back-lighted thyratron (BLT) - has actually resulted in a very changed view of how switching can be accomplished, and this is impacting the design of important machines. The BLT is being studied internationally: in Japan for laser fusion and laser isotope separation. ITT has built a BLT that has switched 30 kA at 60 kV in testing at NSWC Dahlgren and the device is being commercialized by another American company. Versions of the switch are now being tested for excimer laser and other applications. Basically, the switch, which arose from pulse power physics studies at USC, can switch more current faster (higher di/dt), with less housekeeping, and with other advantageous properties. There are a large number of other new applications, include kinetic energy weapons, pulsed microwave sources and R.F. accelerators.

  5. Photoresistance switching of plasmonic nanopores.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Nicoli, Francesca; Chen, Chang; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; Zandbergen, Henny W; Dekker, Cees; Van Dorpe, Pol; Jonsson, Magnus P

    2015-01-14

    Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (∼ 1-2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification. PMID:25514824

  6. HOLLOTRON switch for megawatt lightweight space inverters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; Goebel, D. M.; Schumacher, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of satisfying the switching requirements for a megawatt ultralight inverter system using HOLLOTRON switch technology was determined. The existing experimental switch hardware was modified to investigate a coaxial HOLLOTRON switch configuration and the results were compared with those obtained for a modified linear HOLLOTRON configuration. It was concluded that scaling the HOLLOTRON switch to the current and voltage specifications required for a megawatt converter system is indeed feasible using a modified linear configuration. The experimental HOLLOTRON switch operated at parameters comparable to the scaled coaxial HOLLOTRON. However, the linear HOLLOTRON data verified the capability for meeting all the design objectives simultaneously including current density (greater than 2 A/sq cm), voltage (5 kV), switching frequency (20 kHz), switching time (300 ns), and forward voltage drop (less than or equal to 20 V). Scaling relations were determined and a preliminary design was completed for an engineering model linear HOLLOTRON switch to meet the megawatt converter system specifications.

  7. Packet switching in 1990's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybczynski, A.

    The author assesses wide-area networking end-user needs as they evolve into the 1990s. He then turns to the network operator environment, both public and private, by examining service evolution trends. The author concludes with an assessment of how packet switching services and technologies are evolving to continue to match the identified market requirements, with specific emphasis on Northern Telecom's DPN Data Networking System. Key evolving DPN capabilities include the introduction of the high-end DPN100 30-kb/s switch, a variety of access options including ISDN (integrated services digital network) packet mode services, higher throughput virtual circuits, megabit trunking for improved network throughput and end-user transit delay, and SNA session switching, the latter being an example of adding value to packet networking through communication processing.

  8. Optical switch using Risley prisms

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2003-04-15

    An optical switch using Risley prisms and rotary microactuators to independently rotate the wedge prisms of each Risley prism pair is disclosed. The optical switch comprises an array of input Risley prism pairs that selectively redirect light beams from a plurality of input ports to an array of output Risley prism pairs that similarly direct the light beams to a plurality of output ports. Each wedge prism of each Risley prism pair can be independently rotated by a variable-reluctance stepping rotary microactuator that is fabricated by a multi-layer LIGA process. Each wedge prism can be formed integral to the annular rotor of the rotary microactuator by a DXRL process.

  9. Optical Switch Using Risley Prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2005-02-22

    An optical switch using Risley prisms and rotary microactuators to independently rotate the wedge prisms of each Risley prism pair is disclosed. The optical switch comprises an array of input Risley prism pairs that selectively redirect light beams from a plurality of input ports to an array of output Risley prism pairs that similarly direct the light beams to a plurality of output ports. Each wedge prism of each Risley prism pair can be independently rotated by a variable-reluctance stepping rotary microactuator that is fabricated by a multi-layer LIGA process. Each wedge prism can be formed integral to the annular rotor of the rotary microactuator by a DXRL process.

  10. A piezoelectric cryogenic heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios of about 100-200 at lowest and highest measures temperature were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N, respectively. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an ideal PZHS.

  11. A piezoelectric cryogenic heat switch.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Amir E; Sullivan, Dan F

    2014-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios of about 100-200 at lowest and highest measures temperature were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N, respectively. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an ideal PZHS. PMID:24985863

  12. Switch Using Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for use as a switch. In one embodiment, the switch comprises at least one RFID tag, each RFID tag comprising an antenna element and an RFID integrated circuit, at least one source element, and at least one lever arm. Each lever arm is connected to one of the RFID tags, and each lever arm is capable of two positions. One of the positions places the lever arm and the RFID tag connected thereto into alignment with the source element. Other embodiments are also described.

  13. Explosive opening switch work at Westinghouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aivaliotis, E.; Peterhans, M.

    1989-01-01

    An explosive switch that commutated 315 kA into a resistor and a second version designed to switch up to 1 MA into an HPG (homopolar generator)-driven railgun system are presented. These switches are located very near the load and consist of a set of main busbars in a low-inductance configuration shorted by a thinner switch busbar. Linear-shaped charges are used to sever this switch busbar at several locations when a preselected current level is attained, commutating the current into the load. The feasibility of multishot explosive switches for electromagnetic-launch systems is also considered.

  14. System for automatically switching transformer coupled lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwinell, W. S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system is presented for automatically controlling transformer coupled alternating current electric lines. The secondary winding of each transformer is provided with a center tap. A switching circuit is connected to the center taps of a pair of secondary windings and includes a switch controller. An impedance is connected between the center taps of the opposite pair of secondary windings. The switching circuit has continuity when the AC lines are continuous and discontinuity with any disconnect of the AC lines. Normally open switching means are provided in at least one AC line. The switch controller automatically opens the switching means when the AC lines become separated.

  15. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  16. Multiserver switch scheduling for high speed optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, Prasad; Blanton, John; Damm, Gerard

    2003-10-01

    A switch matrix implemented as an optical crossbar using semiconductor optical amplifiers is able to accommodate extreme concentrations of data traffic. Due to the need to reduce optical guard band overhead it is beneficial to switch fixed size bursts of data cells on a time slot basis. The high capacity of the optical matrix supports multiple optical ports per burst card, and the implementation of multiple queue servers per burst card helps make better use of the multiplicity of ports. Problems associated with arbitrating multiple ports and multiple servers per burst card have been resolved by extending the operation of existing iterative, single server scheduling algorithms. The multiserver arbitration time will be in proportion to the number of servers -- corresponding to the channels of DWDM link -- unless a reconciliation stage is used after each iteration when an arbiter per server is used. The reconciliation stage sets the problem of broken data dependencies between server arbitrations in this case. Further, to address the time limitations for computing the scheduling solution, parallel arbiter implementations have been developed and tested against single arbiter designs. Again, the broken dependencies between iterations of an arbitration are addressed through the use of a grant reconciliation stage. The use of multiple queue servers per burst card also resolves some of the data loss problems related to polarized traffic. Simulations of the multiple server and parallel arbiter implementations have demonstrated their efficiency compared to previous implementations. Compounded to this problem is maintaining high throughput of the switch matrix while observing data transit time limits. This involves balancing two contradictory requirements; switch or line card efficiency and data transit times. To improve efficiency it is desirable to transmit only full packets. However, to prevent loss of data due to timeout it will be necessary to transmit some incomplete

  17. Pre-switching bifurcation of a slender jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audier, P.; Sciamarella, D.; Artana, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the near-field of the jet flow exiting a slot-model with aspect ratio 7.5:1. The core of the slender jet separates into two streams which subsequently merge recomposing a single core jet. Axis switching occurs downstream following self-similarity rules. In order to unveil the 3D dynamics of this pre-switching bifurcation, stereo-PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) measurements are performed and a phase-locking technique is implemented using surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators. The device forces the flow with low-amplitude localized disturbances to produce a lock-on phenomenon. The symmetric modes of the Crow instability, developing between the counter-rotating vortex tubes formed at the slot exit, are found to account for the bifurcation process.

  18. Method and apparatus for multiplexing switch signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaford, Blake (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus for multiplexing switch state signals comprises a plurality of switches and parallel weighted resistors connected in series between circuit ground and a node at a utilization device. The resistors are weighted as a function of a power of the same base, such as the power of the base 2, for coding the multiplexed switch state signals. A constant current source connected between the node and circuit ground drives current over a single cable conductor through the resistor. Each switch may be independently closed to change the switch state voltage signals multiplexed to the node. An analog-to-digital converter connected between the node and circuit ground demultiplexes the switch state signals received at the node and provides a switch state signal at each analog-to-digital output corresponding to the state of the switches at the moment. A potentiometer may replace a resistor and bypass switch combination in a position where the potentiometer has a maximum value of the lowest power of the base in order to multiplex a true analog voltage signal while switch state signals are unambiguously coded and multiplexed. The potentiometer in the least significant position permits the analog value to be in the range from 0 to a maximum corresponding to the least significant position of the switch state encoding. The invention may be used in redundancy systems by duplicating the invention with corresponding switches in each duplication ganged to open and close simultaneously upon operation of a pushbutton switch.

  19. High voltage MOSFET switching circuit

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-07-26

    The problem of source lead inductance in a MOSFET switching circuit is compensated for by adding an inductor to the gate circuit. The gate circuit inductor produces an inductive spike which counters the source lead inductive drop to produce a rectangular drive voltage waveform at the internal gate-source terminals of the MOSFET. 2 figs.

  20. Fast all-optical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Poliakov, Evgeni Y. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method wherein polarization rotation in alkali vapors or other mediums is used for all-optical switching and digital logic and where the rate of operation is proportional to the amplitude of the pump field. High rates of speed are accomplished by Rabi flopping of the atomic states using a continuously operating monochromatic atomic beam as the pump.

  1. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, James S.

    2013-07-03

    Semi-insulating Gallium Nitride, 4H and 6H Silicon Carbide are attractive materials for compact, high voltage, extrinsic, photoconductive switches due to their wide bandgap, high dark resistance, high critical electric field strength and high electron saturation velocity. These wide bandgap semiconductors are made semi-insulating by the addition of vanadium (4H and 6HSiC) and iron (2H-GaN) impurities that form deep acceptors. These deep acceptors trap electrons donated from shallow donor impurities. The electrons can be optically excited from these deep acceptor levels into the conduction band to transition the wide bandgap semiconductor materials from a semi-insulating to a conducting state. Extrinsic photoconductive switches with opposing electrodes have been constructed using vanadium compensated 6H-SiC and iron compensated 2H-GaN. These extrinsic photoconductive switches were tested at high voltage and high power to determine if they could be successfully used as the closing switch in compact medical accelerators.

  2. High voltage MOSFET switching circuit

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of source lead inductance in a MOSFET switching circuit is compensated for by adding an inductor to the gate circuit. The gate circuit inductor produces an inductive spike which counters the source lead inductive drop to produce a rectangular drive voltage waveform at the internal gate-source terminals of the MOSFET.

  3. Anode initiated surface flashover switch

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; Koss, Robert J.

    2003-04-29

    A high voltage surface flashover switch has a pair of electrodes spaced by an insulator. A high voltage is applied to an anode, which is smaller than the opposing, grounded, cathode. When a controllable source of electrons near the cathode is energized, the electrons are attracted to the anode where they reflect to the insulator and initiate anode to cathode breakdown.

  4. Switching processes in financial markets

    PubMed Central

    Preis, Tobias; Schneider, Johannes J.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    For an intriguing variety of switching processes in nature, the underlying complex system abruptly changes from one state to another in a highly discontinuous fashion. Financial market fluctuations are characterized by many abrupt switchings creating upward trends and downward trends, on time scales ranging from macroscopic trends persisting for hundreds of days to microscopic trends persisting for a few minutes. The question arises whether these ubiquitous switching processes have quantifiable features independent of the time horizon studied. We find striking scale-free behavior of the transaction volume after each switching. Our findings can be interpreted as being consistent with time-dependent collective behavior of financial market participants. We test the possible universality of our result by performing a parallel analysis of fluctuations in time intervals between transactions. We suggest that the well known catastrophic bubbles that occur on large time scales—such as the most recent financial crisis—may not be outliers but single dramatic representatives caused by the formation of increasing and decreasing trends on time scales varying over nine orders of magnitude from very large down to very small. PMID:21521789

  5. Optical switches based on semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, Robert F.; Dias, Antonio R.; Chau, Kelvin K.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber-optic switching systems typically exhibit large losses associated with splitting and combining of the optical power, and with excess component losses. These losses increase quickly with switch size. To obtain acceptable signal-to-noise performance through large optical switching, optical amplifiers can be used. In applications requiring optical switching, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are preferred over erbium-doped fiber amplifiers due to their fast switching speeds and the possibility of their integration in monolithic structures with passive waveguides and electronics. We present a general analysis of optical switching systems utilizing SOAs. These systems, in which the gain provided by SOAs is distributed throughout the optical system, are referred to as distributed optical gain (DOG) systems. Our model predicts the performance and achievable sizes of switches based on the matrix-vector multiplier crossbar and Benes network. It is found that for realistic SOA parameters optical switches accommodating extremely large numbers of nodes are, in principle, achievable.

  6. Design concept for pressure switch calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slingerland, M. G.

    1966-01-01

    Calibrator and switch design enables pressure switches to operate under 150 g shock loads. The design employs a saturated liquid-to-vapor phase transition at constant pressure to produce a known force independent of displacement over a usable range.

  7. Ultrafast Beam Switching Using Coupled VCSELs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Goorjian, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new approach to performing ultrafast beam switching using two coupled Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The strategy is demonstrated by numerical simulation, showing a beam switching of 10 deg at 42 GHz.

  8. Rugged switch responds to minute pressure differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, L. C.; Shaub, K. D.

    1967-01-01

    Pressure responsive switching device exhibits high sensitivity but is extremely rugged and resistant to large amplitude shock and velocity loading. This snap-action, single pole-double throw switch operates over a wide temperature range.

  9. 49 CFR 213.135 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... closed positions to allow wheels to pass the switch point. Lateral and vertical movement of a stock rail.... (h) Unusually chipped or worn switch points shall be repaired or replaced. Metal flow shall...

  10. 49 CFR 213.135 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... closed positions to allow wheels to pass the switch point. Lateral and vertical movement of a stock rail.... (h) Unusually chipped or worn switch points shall be repaired or replaced. Metal flow shall...

  11. 49 CFR 213.135 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... closed positions to allow wheels to pass the switch point. Lateral and vertical movement of a stock rail.... (h) Unusually chipped or worn switch points shall be repaired or replaced. Metal flow shall...

  12. 49 CFR 213.135 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... closed positions to allow wheels to pass the switch point. Lateral and vertical movement of a stock rail.... (h) Unusually chipped or worn switch points shall be repaired or replaced. Metal flow shall...

  13. 49 CFR 213.135 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... closed positions to allow wheels to pass the switch point. Lateral and vertical movement of a stock rail.... (h) Unusually chipped or worn switch points shall be repaired or replaced. Metal flow shall...

  14. Characterization of electrical explosion of Schottky diode for one-shot switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Jiao, Jianshe; Zhu, Peng; Wu, Lizhi; Ye, Yinghua; Shen, Ruiqi

    2014-12-01

    The electrical explosion characteristics of Schottky diode for one-shot switch applications were acquired by analysis of photographs of high speed camera and current-voltage histories. Four types of connections among Schottky diode, top electrode and discharge capacitor were studied. Results show that type B has the longest time (1.4 ms) of optical radiation and highest energy consumption, which makes it easier to turn on the switch. The charge flux of plasma was determined to be 24.5 Q/(s m2) by parallel electrode plates method. Atomic emission spectroscopic measurements were devoted to determine plasma temperature and density during electrical explosion. Results show that temperature is between 4000 K and 5000 K, and density is about 1024 m-3. The one-shot switch based on ceramics has been fabricated and characterized and the results show that the peak current and the rise time are about 963.77 A and 381.6 ns, respectively.

  15. Low temperature grown GaNAsSb: A promising material for photoconductive switch application

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. H.; Yoon, S. F.; Wicaksono, S.; Loke, W. K.; Li, D. S.; Saadsaoud, N.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Lampin, J. F.; Decoster, D.; Chazelas, J.

    2013-09-09

    We report a photoconductive switch using low temperature grown GaNAsSb as the active material. The GaNAsSb layer was grown at 200 °C by molecular beam epitaxy in conjunction with a radio frequency plasma-assisted nitrogen source and a valved antimony cracker source. The low temperature growth of the GaNAsSb layer increased the dark resistivity of the switch and shortened the carrier lifetime. The switch exhibited a dark resistivity of 10{sup 7} Ω cm, a photo-absorption of up to 2.1 μm, and a carrier lifetime of ∼1.3 ps. These results strongly support the suitability of low temperature grown GaNAsSb in the photoconductive switch application.

  16. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  17. Spark gap switch with spiral gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Brucker, John P.

    1989-01-01

    A spark gap switch having a contaminate removal system using an injected gas. An annular plate concentric with an electrode of the switch defines flow paths for the injected gas which form a strong spiral flow of the gas in the housing which is effective to remove contaminates from the switch surfaces. The gas along with the contaminates is exhausted from the housing through one of the ends of the switch.

  18. Degree of Conversational Code-Switching Enhances Verbal Task Switching in Cantonese-English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Odilia; Bialystok, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The study examined individual differences in code-switching to determine the relationship between code-switching frequency and performance in verbal and non-verbal task switching. Seventy-eight Cantonese-English bilinguals completed a semi-structured conversation to quantify natural code-switching, a verbal fluency task requiring language…

  19. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, D.B.

    1994-07-19

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination. 9 figs.

  20. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, Dario B.

    1994-01-01

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination.

  1. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  2. RF switch positioner for communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, A. G.; Griesser, H. P.; Grant, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The RF switch positioner is a simple, lightweight, redundant positioning mechanism used to reconfigure the antenna beam on the INTELSAT VI satellite. It simultaneously rotates approximately 100 squareax waveguide switches through a full 360 deg. The RF switch positioner has been space qualified and has performed to expectations in conjunction with the feed networks in range testing.

  3. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  4. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  5. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  6. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  7. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  8. A CW Gunn Diode Switching Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Marco; Rosenbaum, Fred J.

    As part of a study of the application of communication satellites to educational development, certain technical aspects of such a system were examined. A current controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode is reported on here. With modest circuits switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by…

  9. 46 CFR 111.105-19 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switches. 111.105-19 Section 111.105-19 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-19 Switches. A switch that is explosionproof or flameproof, or...

  10. A new very high voltage semiconductor switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    A new family of semiconductor switches using double injection techniques and compensated deep impurities is described. They have the potential to raise switching voltages a factor of 10 higher (up to 100 kV) than p-n junction devices while exhibiting extremely low (or zero) forward voltage. Several potential power switching applications are indicated.

  11. Photoconductive switching for high power microwave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M.D.; Hofer, W.W.

    1990-10-01

    Photoconductive switching is a technology that is being increasingly applied to generation of high power microwaves. Two primary semiconductors used for these devices are silicon and gallium arsenide. Diamond is a promising future candidate material. This paper discusses the important material parameters and switching modes, critical issues for microwave generation, and future directions for this high power, photoconductive switching technology.

  12. 46 CFR 112.43-1 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switches. 112.43-1 Section 112.43-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-1 Switches. An emergency lighting system must not have a switch,...

  13. 46 CFR 112.43-1 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switches. 112.43-1 Section 112.43-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-1 Switches. An emergency lighting system must not have a switch,...

  14. 46 CFR 112.43-1 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switches. 112.43-1 Section 112.43-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-1 Switches. An emergency lighting system must not have a switch,...

  15. 46 CFR 112.43-1 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switches. 112.43-1 Section 112.43-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-1 Switches. An emergency lighting system must not have a switch,...

  16. 46 CFR 112.43-1 - Switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switches. 112.43-1 Section 112.43-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-1 Switches. An emergency lighting system must not have a switch,...

  17. Bilingual Control: Sequential Memory in Language Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Declerck, Mathieu; Philipp, Andrea M.; Koch, Iring

    2013-01-01

    To investigate bilingual language control, prior language switching studies presented visual objects, which had to be named in different languages, typically indicated by a visual cue. The present study examined language switching of predictable responses by introducing a novel sequence-based language switching paradigm. In 4 experiments,…

  18. A Bilingual Advantage in Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Anat; MacWhinney, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility that lifelong bilingualism may lead to enhanced efficiency in the ability to shift between mental sets. We compared the performance of monolingual and fluent bilingual college students in a task-switching paradigm. Bilinguals incurred reduced switching costs in the task-switching paradigm when compared with…

  19. 47 CFR 69.106 - Local switching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Local switching. 69.106 Section 69.106... Computation of Charges § 69.106 Local switching. (a) Except as provided in § 69.118, charges that are... switching facilities for the provision of interstate or foreign services. (b) The per minute...

  20. Voluntary Task Switching: Chasing the Elusive Homunculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Catherine M.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2005-01-01

    In the voluntary task switching procedure, subjects choose the task to perform on a series of bivalent stimuli, requiring top-down control of task switching. Experiments 1-3 contrasted voluntary task switching and explicit task cuing. Choice behavior showed small, inconsistent effects of external stimulus characteristics, supporting the assumption…

  1. Switch Detection in Preschoolers' Cognitive Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Wiebe, Sandra A.; Huber, Kristina L.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews

    2011-01-01

    The current study addressed the role of switch detection in cognitive flexibility by testing the effect of transition cues (i.e., cues that directly signal the need to switch or maintain a given task goal) in a cued set-shifting paradigm at 5 years of age. Children performed better, especially on switch trials, when transition cues were combined…

  2. Light activated solid-state opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Petr, R.A.; Kachen, G.I.; Reilly, J.P.; Schaefer, R.B. ); Heyse, M.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Light-activated solid-state opening switches are shown to be a viable approach for switching inductive circuits. Measured photoswitch performance indicates that light-activated opening switches have the power density ratings needed to develop compact inductive power systems.

  3. Light activated solid-state opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petr, R. A.; Kachen, G. I.; Reilly, J. P.; Schaefer, R. B.; Heyse, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The paper shows light-activated solid-state opening switches to be a viable approach for switching inductive circuits. Measured photoswitch performance indicates that light-activated opening switches have the power density ratings required to develop compact inductive power systems.

  4. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  5. Electronic logic to enhance switch reliability in detecting openings and closures of redundant switches

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, James A.

    1986-01-01

    A logic circuit is used to enhance redundant switch reliability. Two or more switches are monitored for logical high or low output. The output for the logic circuit produces a redundant and failsafe representation of the switch outputs. When both switch outputs are high, the output is high. Similarly, when both switch outputs are low, the logic circuit's output is low. When the output states of the two switches do not agree, the circuit resolves the conflict by memorizing the last output state which both switches were simultaneously in and produces the logical complement of this output state. Thus, the logic circuit of the present invention allows the redundant switches to be treated as if they were in parallel when the switches are open and as if they were in series when the switches are closed. A failsafe system having maximum reliability is thereby produced.

  6. Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Bataller, A. Koulakis, J.; Pree, S.; Putterman, S.

    2014-12-01

    Spark discharges in high-pressure gas are known to emit a broadband spectrum during the first 10 s of nanoseconds. We present calibrated spectra of high-pressure discharges in xenon and show that the resulting plasma is optically thick. Laser transmission data show that such a body is opaque to visible light, as expected from Kirchoff's law of thermal radiation. Nanosecond framing images of the spark absorbing high-power laser light are presented. The sparks are ideal candidates for nanosecond, high-power laser switches.

  7. Crossbar switch backplane and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Deepe, J.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Pham, T.; Zmuda, T.; Eichten, E.

    1988-11-01

    A crossbar switch backplane design (Bus Switch Backplane) based on TI's crossbar switch chip is described. This backplane holds a maximum of 16 modules and allows simultaneous communications between up to 8 pairs of modules. The aggregate data transfer rate on the backplane is 160 Mbyte/sec. The Bus Switch Backplane is an essential part of the ACP Multi Array Processor, a supercomputer for site oriented problems. The first application of this machine is in Lattice Gauge Theory calculations. The Bus Switch Backplane also finds ready application in data acquisition schemes based on the ACP multi-microprocessor system. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Ultrafast all-optical switching in bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukhdev; Singh, C. P.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2001-04-01

    All-optical switching has been demonstrated in bacteriorhodopsin based on excited-state nonlinear absorption. A probe laser beam at 640 nm corresponding to the O-state absorption maximum is switched due to a strong pulsed pump laser beam at 570 nm, that corresponds to the maximum ground state absorption. We have studied the effect of variation in pulse width and in small signal absorption coefficient on the switching characteristics. The switching time decreases as the pulse width of the pump beam decreases and the small signal absorption coefficient increases. The switching contrast depends mainly on the peak pumping intensity.

  9. Resistive Switching Memory Devices Based on Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Meng, Fanben; Zhu, Bowen; Leow, Wan Ru; Liu, Yaqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Resistive switching memory constitutes a prospective candidate for next-generation data storage devices. Meanwhile, naturally occurring biomaterials are promising building blocks for a new generation of environmentally friendly, biocompatible, and biodegradable electronic devices. Recent progress in using proteins to construct resistive switching memory devices is highlighted. The protein materials selection, device engineering, and mechanism of such protein-based resistive switching memory are discussed in detail. Finally, the critical challenges associated with protein-based resistive switching memory devices are presented, as well as insights into the future development of resistive switching memory based on natural biomaterials. PMID:25753764

  10. Switched control of a nonholonomic mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.; Mahindrakar, Arun D.

    2009-05-01

    We present a switched control algorithm to stabilize a car-like mobile robot which possesses velocity level nonholonomic constraint. The control approach rests on splitting the system into several second-order subsystems and then stabilizing the system sequentially using finite-time controllers, finally resulting in the mobile robot being moved from one point to another point. State dependent switching control is employed in which the controllers switches on a thin surface in the state-space. Robustness analysis is presented by redefining the switching signal using relaxed switching surface. Both, non-robust and robust controllers are validated through numerical simulation.

  11. CMOS-compatible RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakamraju, Narendra V.; Kim, Bruce; Phillips, Stephen M.

    2004-08-01

    Mobile technologies have relied on RF switches for a long time. Though the basic function of the switch has remained the same, the way they have been made has changed in the recent past. In the past few years work has been done to use MEMS technologies in designing and fabricating an RF switch that would in many ways replace the electronic and mechanical switches that have been used for so long. The work that is described here is an attempt to design and fabricate an RF MEMS switch that can handle higher RF power and have CMOS compatible operating voltages.

  12. Secure videoconferencing equipment switching system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Michael E.

    2009-01-13

    A switching system and method are provided to facilitate use of videoconference facilities over a plurality of security levels. The system includes a switch coupled to a plurality of codecs and communication networks. Audio/Visual peripheral components are connected to the switch. The switch couples control and data signals between the Audio/Visual peripheral components and one but nor both of the plurality of codecs. The switch additionally couples communication networks of the appropriate security level to each of the codecs. In this manner, a videoconferencing facility is provided for use on both secure and non-secure networks.

  13. Experimental investigation of plasma relaxation using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott; University of New Mexico Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation in a low density background plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear HelCat device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes within the intergalactic medium. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5-10 kV and ~100 kA. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities ~1.2Cs and densities ~1020 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  14. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  15. Shape memory thermal conduction switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal conduction switch includes a thermally-conductive first member having a first thermal contacting structure for securing the first member as a stationary member to a thermally regulated body or a body requiring thermal regulation. A movable thermally-conductive second member has a second thermal contacting surface. A thermally conductive coupler is interposed between the first member and the second member for thermally coupling the first member to the second member. At least one control spring is coupled between the first member and the second member. The control spring includes a NiTiFe comprising shape memory (SM) material that provides a phase change temperature <273 K, a transformation range <40 K, and a hysteresis of <10 K. A bias spring is between the first member and the second member. At the phase change the switch provides a distance change (displacement) between first and second member by at least 1 mm, such as 2 to 4 mm.

  16. Electrical switching in cadmium boracite single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, T.; Yamada, O.

    1981-01-01

    Cadmium boracite single crystals at high temperatures ( 300 C) were found to exhibit a reversible electric field-induced transition between a highly insulative and a conductive state. The switching threshold is smaller than a few volts for an electrode spacing of a few tenth of a millimeter corresponding to an electric field of 100 to 1000 V/cm. This is much smaller than the dielectric break-down field for an insulator such as boracite. The insulative state reappears after voltage removal. A pulse technique revealed two different types of switching. Unstable switching occurs when the pulse voltage slightly exceeds the switching threshold and is characterized by a pre-switching delay and also a residual current after voltage pulse removal. A stable type of switching occurs when the voltage becomes sufficiently high. Possible device applications of this switching phenomenon are discussed.

  17. Switch for Good Community Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Tabitha; Amran, Martha

    2013-11-19

    Switch4Good is an energy-savings program that helps residents reduce consumption from behavior changes; it was co-developed by Balfour Beatty Military Housing Management (BB) and WattzOn in Phase I of this grant. The program was offered at 11 Navy bases. Three customer engagement strategies were evaluated, and it was found that Digital Nudges (a combination of monthly consumption statements with frequent messaging via text or email) was most cost-effective.

  18. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  19. Switching strategies to optimize search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2016-03-01

    Search strategies are explored when the search time is fixed, success is probabilistic and the estimate for success can diminish with time if there is not a successful result. Under the time constraint the problem is to find the optimal time to switch a search strategy or search location. Several variables are taken into account, including cost, gain, rate of success if a target is present and the probability that a target is present.

  20. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  1. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  2. Investigations of the Sheath Effect on the Resultant Magnetic Field of a Cylindrical Monopole Plasma Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. Emetere

    2015-02-01

    The functionality of the plasma antenna has been narrowed to types and brand names only. The physics of its operation has been neglected and has stagnated technological innovations. The magnetic field in the sheath and plasma were investigated. Notable specifications were worked out in the proposed improved cylindrical monopole plasma antenna. The occurrence of femto spin demagnetization was discovered between the duration of switch on and switch off of the antenna. This phenomenon seems transient because magnetization is highest at the switch on/off point.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVE DYNAMICS IN MAGNETIZED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmol K. Podder

    2009-03-17

    In this four-year project (including one-year extension), the project director and his research team built a shock-wave-plasma apparatus to study shock wave dynamics in glow discharge plasmas in nitrogen and argon at medium pressure (1–20 Torr), carried out various plasma and shock diagnostics and measurements that lead to increased understanding of the shock wave acceleration phenomena in plasmas. The measurements clearly show that in the steady-state dc glow discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave velocity increases, its amplitude decreases, and the shock wave disperses non-linearly as a function of the plasma current. In the pulsed discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity increase as a function of the delay between the switch-on of the plasma and shock-launch. In the afterglow plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity decrease as a function of the delay between the plasma switch-off and shock-launch. These changes are found to be opposite and reversing towards the room temperature value which is the initial condition for plasma ignition case. The observed shock wave properties in both igniting and afterglow plasmas correlate well with the inferred temperature changes in the two plasmas.

  4. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  5. Topics in high voltage pulsed power plasma devices and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao

    Pulsed power technology is one of the tools that is used by scientists and engineers nowadays to produce gas plasmas. The transient ultra high power is able to provide a huge pulse of energy which is sometimes greater than the ionization energy of the gas, and therefore separates the ions and electrons to form the plasma. Sometimes, the pulsed power components themselves are plasma devices. For example, the gas type switches can "turn on" the circuit by creating the plasma channel between the switch electrodes. Mini Back Lighted Thyratron, or as we call it, mini-BLT, is one of these gas type plasma switches. The development of the reduced size and weight "mini-BLT" is presented in this dissertation. Based on the operation characteristics testing of the mini-BLT, suggestions of optimizing the design of the switch are proposed. All the factors such as the geometry of the hollow electrodes and switch housing, the gas condition, the optical triggering source, etc. are necessary to consider when we design and operate the mini-BLT. By reducing the diameter of the cylindrical gas path between the electrodes in the BLT, a novel high density plasma source is developed, producing the plasma in the "squeezed" capillary. The pulsed power generator, of course, is inevitably used to provide the ionization energy for hydrogen gas sealed in the capillary. Plasma diagnostics are necessarily analyzed and presented in detail to properly complete and understand the capillary plasma. This high density plasma source (1019 cm-3) has the potential applications in the plasma wakefield accelerator. The resonant oscillation behavior of the particles in plasmas allows for dynamically generated accelerating electric fields that have orders of magnitude larger than those available in the conventional RF accelerators. Finally, the solid state switches are introduced as a comparison to the gas type switch. Pulsed power circuit topologies such as the Marx Bank, magnetic pulse compression and diode

  6. Waveguide switches using asymmetric coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Kenneth J.; Horst, Scott C.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains the results of a three-year effort to investigate the use of Asymmetric Coupled Quantum Well in optical waveguide cross bar switches. The two types of devices investigated are the standard delta beta switch and the delta alpha switch. The delta alpha switch uses the imaginary part of the refractive index to modulate the intensity along different waveguide paths in the switch structure. Both types of switch were fabricated and tested. The delta beta switches produced are suitable as 1-input 2-output devices. The delta alpha switches were demonstrated as 2 by 2 cross bar switches with up to 40% throughput. To compensate for losses in the switches the use of amplifying elements was investigated. To provide gain at a longer wavelength than that of the excitons in the modulation waveguides, the quantum wells in the modulation waveguides were blue shifted using vacancy induced disordering (VID). The VID shifted quantum wells showed less Stark shift than the unshifted quantum wells. This effect is explained by the nearly parabolic shape of the disordered wells. Coupled quantum wells can be used to create a structure that will maintain a strongly Stark shifted spatially indirect transition even after VID. Modeling of the various waveguide structures used is also discussed.

  7. Insulator charging in RF MEMS capacitive switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucko, Jay F.

    2005-11-01

    While capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical (RF MEM) switches are poised to provide a low cost, low power alternative to current RF switch technologies, there are still reliability issues limiting switch lifetime. Previous research identified insulator charging as a primary cause of switch failure. Changes in switch pull-in and release voltages were measured to provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for charging and switch failure. A spatial and temporal dependent model was developed to describe silicon nitride's time-dependent charging as a function of applied bias. This model was verified by applying constant biases to metal-silicon nitride-silicon capacitors and tracking flatband voltage shifts. This knowledge of silicon nitride was then applied to MEM switches. Using novel waveforms and exploiting differences in actuation characteristics allowed the determination of charging characteristics and the investigation of switch failure. Results show tunneling is responsible for changes in the pull-in voltages---this includes a super-saturation effect explained by a steady-state trap charge and discharge condition. A program that models switch actuation was enhanced to include the time-dependent tunneling model. Finally, it was discovered insulator charging cannot explain permanent switch failure; instead, stiction from a contaminant on the insulator surface is likely the cause.

  8. Optically-switched submillimeter-wave oscillator and radiator having a switch-to-switch propagation delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael G. (Inventor); Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A submillimeter wave-generating integrated circuit includes an array of N photoconductive switches biased across a common voltage source and an optical path difference from a common optical pulse of repetition rate f sub 0 providing a different optical delay to each of the switches. In one embodiment, each incoming pulse is applied to successive ones of the N switches with successive delays. The N switches are spaced apart with a suitable switch-to-switch spacing so as to generate at the output load or antenna radiation of a submillimeter wave frequency f on the order of N f sub 0. Preferably, the optical pulse has a repetition rate of at least 10 GHz and N is of the order of 100, so that the circuit generates radiation of frequency of the order of or greater than 1 Terahertz.

  9. Performance of large-aperture optical switches for high-energy inertial-confinement fusion lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Roberts, D.; Atherton, L.J.

    1995-08-20

    We describe the design and performance of large-aperture ({lt}30 cm {times} 30 cm) optical switches that have demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, active switching of a high-energy ({lt}5 kJ) optical pulse in an inertial-confinement fusion laser. These optical switches, which consist of a plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) and a passive polarizer, permit the design of efficient, multipass laser amplifiers. In a PEPC, plasma discharges on the faces of a thin (1-cm) electro-optic crystal (KDP or KD{bold |}P) act as highly conductive and transparent electrodes. These plasma electrodes facilitate rapid ({lt}100 ns) and uniform charging of the crystal to the half-wave voltage and discharging back to 0 V. We discuss the operating principles, design, optical performance, and technical issues of a 32 cm {times} 32 cm prototype PEPC with both KDP and KD{bold |}P crystals, and a 37 cm {times} 37 cm PEPC with a KDP crystal for the Beamlet laser. This PEPC recently switched a 6-kJ, 3-ns pulse in a four-pass cavity.

  10. Finite Ground Coplanar Waveguide Shunt MEMS Switches for Switched Line Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Simons, Rainee N.; Scardelletti, Maximillian; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    Switches with low insertion loss and high isolation are required for switched line phase shifters and the transmit/receive switch at the front end of communication systems. A Finite Ground Coplanar (FGC) waveguide capacitive, shunt MEMS switch has been implemented on high resistivity Si. The switch has demonstrated an insertion loss of less than 0.3 dB and a return loss greater than 15 dB from 10 to 20, GHz. The switch design, fabrication, and characteristics are presented.

  11. Gold-based thin multilayers for ohmic contacts in RF-MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulloni, V.; Iannacci, J.; Bartali, R.; Micheli, V.; Colpo, S.; Laidani, N.; Margesin, B.

    2011-06-01

    In RF-MEMS switches many reliability issues are related to the metal contacts in the switching area. The characteristics of this contact influence not only contact resistance and insertion loss, but also the most relevant switch failure mechanisms that are wear of ohmic contact, adhesion and stiction. Gold is widely used for this purpose because of its good conductivity and chemical inertness, but is a soft metal, and the development of hard contact materials with low resistivity is of great interest for RF-MEMS switch reliability. It is possible to increase the contact hardness preserving the convenient gold properties alternating gold layers with thin layers of different metals. The material becomes harder not only by simple alloying but also by the presence of interfaces which act as barriers for mechanical dislocation migration. A detailed study of mechanical, electrical and morphological properties of gold-chromium, gold-platinum and gold-palladium multilayers is presented and discussed. It is found that the annealing treatments are important for tuning hardness values, and a careful choice of the alloying metal is essential when the material is inserted in a real switch fabrication cycle, because hardness improvements can vanish during oxygen plasma treatments usually involved in RF-switches fabrication. Platinum is the only metal tested that is unaffected by oxidation, and also modifies the chromium adhesion layer diffusion on the contact surface.

  12. Components of attentional set-switching.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, M F S; Passingham, R E; Nobre, A C

    2005-01-01

    A series of distinct event-related potentials (ERPs) have been recorded from the scalp of human subjects as they switch from one task to another. It is possible that task switching may depend on different mechanisms depending on whether the switch requires a change in attentional set, in other words the redirecting of attention to different aspects of a sensory stimulus, or whether it requires a change in intentional set, in others words a change in the way that responses are selected. To address this issue, the current study recorded ERPs while subjects switched between attentional sets and the results were compared with those of a previous investigation in which subjects switched between intentional sets. Subjects selected stimuli according to two conflicting attentional sets, each emphasizing one visual stimulus dimension (colour, shape). Pairs of stimuli, only one of which was to be attended, were presented for between eight and seventeen trials then either a switch or a stay cue was shown. The switch cue instructed subjects to switch from the current attentional set to the other set, while the stay cue instructed subjects to maintain the current set. Comparing ERPs time-locked to the switch and stay cues revealed neural correlates of the initiation of a task switch. Comparing the ERPs time locked to the first stimuli after either stay or switch cues identified neural correlates of the implementation of a task switch. A similar modulation over parietal electrodes was seen when subjects were switching between either attentional or intentional sets. While an intentional set switch began with a medial frontal modulation, attentional set switching began with a lateral frontal modulation. Implementing a new attentional set was associated with modulation of relatively early visual potentials, while implementing a new intentional set was associated with modulation of later response-related potentials. The results confirm that task switching consists of a number of

  13. Plasma x-ray radiation source.

    PubMed

    Popkov, N F; Kargin, V I; Ryaslov, E A; Pikar', A S

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives the results of studies on a plasma x-ray source, which enables one to obtain a 2.5-krad radiation dose per pulse over an area of 100 cm2 in the quantum energy range from 20 to 500 keV. Pulse duration is 100 ns. Spectral radiation distributions from a diode under various operation conditions of a plasma are obtained. A Marx generator served as an initial energy source of 120 kJ with a discharge time of T/4 = 10-6 s. A short electromagnetic pulse (10-7 s) was shaped using plasma erosion opening switches. PMID:21307500

  14. Switching control of an R/C hovercraft: stabilization and smooth switching.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Iwasaki, M; Wang, H O

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents stable switching control of an radio-controlled (R/C) hovercraft that is a nonholonomic (nonlinear) system. To exactly represent its nonlinear dynamics, more importantly, to maintain controllability of the system, we newly propose a switching fuzzy model that has locally Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy models and switches them according to states, external variables, and/or time. A switching fuzzy controller is constructed by mirroring the rule structure of the switching fuzzy model of an R/C hovercraft. We derive linear matrix inequality (LMI) conditions for ensuring the stability of the closed-loop system consisting of a switching fuzzy model and controller. Furthermore, to guarantee smooth switching of control input at switching boundaries, we also derive a smooth switching condition represented in terms of LMIs. A stable switching fuzzy controller satisfying the smooth switching condition is designed by simultaneously solving both of the LMIs. The simulation and experimental results for the trajectory control of an R/C hovercraft show the validity of the switching fuzzy model and controller design, particularly, the smooth switching condition. PMID:18244851

  15. Diamond switches for high temperature electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.R.; Rondeau, G.; Qi, Niansheng

    1996-04-25

    Diamond switches are well suited for use in high temperature electronics. Laboratory feasibility of diamond switching at 1 kV and 18 A was demonstrated. DC blocking voltages up to 1 kV were demonstrated. A 50 {Omega} load line was switched using a diamond switch, with switch on-state resistivity {approx}7 {Omega}-cm. An electron beam, {approx}150 keV energy, {approx}2 {mu}s full width at half maximum was used to control the 5 mm x 5 mm x 100 {mu}m thick diamond switch. The conduction current temporal history mimics that of the electron beam. These data were taken at room temperature.

  16. MEMS switches having non-metallic crossbeams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximillian C (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A RF MEMS switch comprising a crossbeam of SiC, supported by at least one leg above a substrate and above a plurality of transmission lines forming a CPW. Bias is provided by at least one layer of metal disposed on a top surface of the SiC crossbeam, such as a layer of chromium followed by a layer of gold, and extending beyond the switch to a biasing pad on the substrate. The switch utilizes stress and conductivity-controlled non-metallic thin cantilevers or bridges, thereby improving the RF characteristics and operational reliability of the switch. The switch can be fabricated with conventional silicon integrated circuit (IC) processing techniques. The design of the switch is very versatile and can be implemented in many transmission line mediums.

  17. Stable nonlinear Mach-Zehnder fiber switch

    DOEpatents

    Digonnet, Michel J. F.; Shaw, H. John; Pantell, Richard H.; Sadowski, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    An all-optical fiber switch is implemented within a short Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration. The Mach-Zehnder switch is constructed to have a high temperature stability so as to minimize temperature gradients and other thermal effects which result in undesirable instability at the output of the switch. The Mach-Zehnder switch of the preferred embodiment is advantageously less than 2 cm in length between couplers to be sufficiently short to be thermally stable, and full switching is accomplished by heavily doping one or both of the arms between the couplers so as to provide a highly nonlinear region within one or both of the arms. A pump input source is used to affect the propagation characteristics of one of the arms to control the output coupling ratio of the switch. Because of the high nonlinearity of the pump input arm, low pump powers can be used, thereby alleviating difficulties and high cost associated with high pump input powers.

  18. Pulse switching for high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A saturable inductor switch for compressing the width and sharpening the rise time of high voltage pulses from a relatively slow rise time, high voltage generator to an electric discharge gas laser (EDGL) also provides a capability for efficient energy transfer from a high impedance primary source to an intermediate low impedance laser discharge network. The switch is positioned with respect to a capacitive storage device, such as a coaxial cable, so that when a charge build-up in the storage device reaches a predetermined level, saturation of the switch inductor releases or switches energy stored in the capactive storage device to the EDGL. Cascaded saturable inductor switches for providing output pulses having rise times of less than ten nanoseconds and a technique for magnetically biasing the saturable inductor switch are disclosed.

  19. Molecular Switches and Motors on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathem, Bala Krishna; Claridge, Shelley A.; Zheng, Yue Bing; Weiss, Paul S.

    2013-04-01

    Molecular switches and motors respond structurally, electronically, optically, and/or mechanically to external stimuli, testing and potentially enabling extreme miniaturization of optoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. The assembly of motors and switches on surfaces makes it possible both to measure the properties of individual molecules as they relate to their environment and to couple function between assembled molecules. In this review, we discuss recent progress in assembling molecular switches and motors on surfaces, measuring static and dynamic structures, understanding switching mechanisms, and constructing functional molecular materials and devices. As demonstrative examples, we choose a representative molecule from three commonly studied classes including molecular switches, photochromic molecules, and mechanically interlocked molecules. We conclude by offering perspectives on the future of molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

  20. Switched steerable multiple beam antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Richard S.

    1988-09-01

    A steerable multibeam five element cross-feed cluster antenna system is described. The feed power is divided into five branches. Each branch includes a switching network comprised of a plurality of time delay elements each individually controlled by a respective electromagnetic latching switch. Frequency independent individual two-dimensional beam steering at intermediate (IF) scanning frequencies is thereby provided wherein discrete incremental time delays are introduced by the switching networks into each branch and the signals recombined thereafter to form each beam. The electromagnetic latched switching reduces power consumption and permits higher power switching and reciprocal coincident tranmsit and receive operation. Frequency independence due to incremental time delay switching permits coincident reciprocal operation and steering for transmit-receive signal paths carrying different transmit-receive frequencies. Diagonal quarter wave plates in the waveguides alter polarization from the circular to orthogonal linear to provide transmitter-receiver isolation.

  1. Cobra communications switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Robert J.; Haworth, Loran A.; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Murray, F. Gerald

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a design modification to reduce the visual and manual workload associated with the radio selection and communications tasks in the U.S. Army AH-1 Cobra helicopter. The modification involves the integration of the radio selection and microphone actuating tasks into a single operation controlled by the transmit-intercom switch. Ground-based and flight tests were conducted to evaluate the modified configuration during twelve flight tasks. The results show that the proposed configuration performs twice as fast as the original configuration.

  2. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  3. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  4. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  5. Microwave-triggered laser switch

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.

    1982-05-19

    A high-repetition rate switch is described for delivering short duration, high-powered electrical pulses from a pulsed-charged dc power supply. The present invention utilizes a microwave-generating device such as a magnetron that is capable of producing high-power pulses at high-pulse repetition rates and fast-pulse risetimes for long periods with high reliability. The rail-gap electrodes provide a large surface area that reduces induction effects and minimizes electrode erosion. Additionally, breakdown is initiated in a continuous geometric fashion that also increases operating lifetime of the device.

  6. Microwave-triggered laser switch

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1984-01-01

    A high-repetition rate switch for delivering short duration, high-power electrical pulses from a pulsed-charged dc power supply. The present invention utilizes a microwave-generating device such as a magnetron that is capable of producing high-power pulses at high-pulse repetition rates and fast-pulse risetimes for long periods with high reliability. The rail-gap electrodes provide a large surface area that reduces induction effects and minimizes electrode erosion. Additionally, breakdown is initiated in a continuous geometric fashion that also increases operating lifetime of the device.

  7. SWITCHING TRANSMITTER POSITIONING OF SYNCHROS

    DOEpatents

    Wolff, H.

    1962-03-13

    A transformer apparatus is designed for effecting the step positioning of synchro motors. The apparatus is provided with ganged switches and pre- selected contacts to permit the units and tens selection of the desired angular position for the synchro motor rotor with only the movement of two selector knobs required. With the selection thus made, the appropriate pre-selected signal is delivered to the synchro motor for positioning the rotor of the latter as selected. The transformer apparatus is divided into smaller arrangements to conform with coraputed trigonometric relations which will give the desired results. (AEC)

  8. Laser activated diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch which is capable of changing from a conducting state to an insulating state in the presence of electrons upon the introduction of laser light. The mixture is composed of a buffer gas such as nitrogen or argon and an electron attaching gas such as C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SH, C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SCH.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CHO and CF.sub.3 CHO wherein the electron attachment is brought on by indirect excitation of molecules to long-lived states by exposure to laser light.

  9. Optical switching system and method

    DOEpatents

    Ranganathan, Radha; Gal, Michael; Taylor, P. Craig

    1992-01-01

    An optically bistable device is disclosed. The device includes a uniformly thick layer of amorphous silicon to constitute a Fabry-Perot chamber positioned to provide a target area for a probe beam. The probe beam has a maximum energy less than the energy band gap of the amorphous semiconductor. In a preferred embodiment, a multilayer dielectric mirror is positioned on the Fabry-Perot chamber to increase the finesse of switching of the device. The index of refraction of the amorphous material is thermally altered to alter the transmission of the probe beam.

  10. Bulk-titanium for MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Changsong

    RF-MEMS switches offer great potential benefits such as high isolation, low insertion loss, low power consumption, and excellent linearity characteristics. Most MEMS switches are fabricated using surface micromachining techniques by taking advantage of the IC processing techniques. Little work has been done on bulk micromachining for fabricating MEMS switches. This work contributes to two main areas in the MEMS switch field, (1) a Sacrificial-Layer-Free (SLF) method to fabricate switches using bulk titanium MEMS (BT-MEMS) and multilayer lamination techniques, and (2) development of a novel composite contact material and integration into BT-MEMS switches for testing. This approach for fabricating MEMS switches offers advantages from five aspects to attack the fabrication and reliability issues. Four generations of Bulk-Ti MEMS (BT-MEMS) switches were developed. They were improved through developments of high aspect ratio bulk Ti etching, Titanium-On-Insulator structure, multilayer lamination, mechanical design, and a new contact material. The first generation proved the feasibility of the concept of the BT-MEMS switch. The second generation had a good contact resistance. Development of the novel Nano-Structured-Titania (NST) composite material allowed further improvement of the third generation. We used the BT-MEMS switch as a platform for testing this new, novel contact material. Due to the preferred surface properties of the NST-metal composite material such as roughness and hardness, the third generation switched above 15 billion contact cycles without adhesion failure. Contact resistance was further improved in the fourth generation switch by integrating the NST-metal composite material into the top part as bumps. Above 100 million cycles with good contact resistance values were achieved.

  11. A new switched power linac structure

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, F.

    1989-03-01

    A new pulse power structure has been described that utilizes an easily accessible rectilinear switch. The new structure is more ''forgiving'' (as far as risetime is concerned) than the radial line transformer, and contains fewer switching structures/unit length. The combination of the new structure with the switch proposed seems to offer interesting possibilities for a future linear collider. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Electro-optic Q-switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin (Inventor); Chen, Qiushui (Inventor); Zhang, Run (Inventor); Jiang, Hua (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An electro-optic Q-switch for generating sequence of laser pulses was disclosed. The Q-switch comprises a quadratic electro-optic material and is connected with an electronic unit generating a radio frequency wave with positive and negative pulses alternatively. The Q-switch is controlled by the radio frequency wave in such a way that laser pulse is generated when the radio frequency wave changes its polarity.

  13. New methods in plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.

    1990-02-23

    The development of implicit methods of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulation in recent years, and their merger with older hybrid methods have created a new arsenal of simulation techniques for the treatment of complex practical problems in plasma physics. The new implicit hybrid codes are aimed at transitional problems that lie somewhere between the long time scale, high density regime associated with MHD modeling, and the short time scale, low density regime appropriate to PIC particle-in-cell techniques. This transitional regime arises in ICF coronal plasmas, in pulsed power plasma switches, in Z-pinches, and in foil implosions. Here, we outline how such a merger of implicit and hybrid methods has been carried out, specifically in the ANTHEM computer code, and demonstrate the utility of implicit hybrid simulation in applications. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  14. State-dependent switching control of switched positive fractional-order systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of switching stabilization for a class of continuous-time switched positive fractional-order systems is studied by using state-dependent switching. First, the asymptotic stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems with state-dependent switching is given, which is based on the fractional co-positive Lyapunov method. Moreover, by the sliding sector method, the stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems whose subsystems are possibly all unstable is obtained. A variable structure (VS) switching law with sliding sector is also proposed to guarantee the switched positive fractional-order system to be asymptotically stable. Finally, two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of our developed results. PMID:26922493

  15. Electrophysiological evidence for preparatory reconfiguration before voluntary task switches but not cued task switches.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Suk; Diraddo, Adrienne; Logan, Gordon D; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2014-04-01

    An unresolved issue in the task-switching literature is whether preparatory reconfiguration occurs before a change of task. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to determine whether preparatory reconfiguration occurs during two different task-switching procedures: voluntary and cued task switching. We focused on two ERP components that index different cognitive operations. The contingent negative variation (CNV) is a sensitive measure of a participant's preparedness to use a specific stimulus-response mapping. In contrast, the P3 indexes memory updating. We found a pronounced modulation of the CNV before voluntary task switches, but not before cued task switches. Instead, cued task switches were preceded by a larger P3, as compared with task repetitions. Our findings suggest that task set reconfiguration is carried out prior to voluntary task switches, whereas memory processes dominate cued task switches. PMID:23979831

  16. Mechanism of conductance switching: An optical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Anirban; Chowdhury, Arabinda; Pal, Amlan J.

    2006-09-01

    Electronic conductance switching in devices based on thin films of an organic molecule has been studied. Switching between two conducting states has been induced by voltage pulse, while the states have been probed by optical and electrical measurements simultaneously. In situ optical measurements showed that electroreduction of molecules led to conductance switching and appearance of high-conducting state in the device. We could "write" or "erase" a state by applying electrical pulse and "read" it by measuring electronic absorbance and conductivity. The "write" and "read" processes have been carried out for many cycles to exhibit a correspondence between conductance switching and electrochromism.

  17. Picosecond High Pressure Gas Switch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, E.K.; Goerz, D.A.; Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1993-08-01

    A high Pressure Gas Switch has been developed and tested at LLNL. Risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere pressures. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at higher pressures and electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With such high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized using the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with experimental data. Modifications made to the WASP HV pulser in order to drive the HPGS will also be discussed. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were required when it was necessary to over-voltage the switch.

  18. Ferrofluid-based reconfigurable optofluidic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, Gianna; Mongeau, Eric; Gu, Yu

    2014-03-01

    We present a low-cost, reconfigurable optofluidic switch exploiting both the optical and magnetic properties of a water-based ferrofluid. This switch is composed of an integrated waveguide orthogonally crossing a microfluidic channel containing high-index oil and a ferrofluid plug. The switch is turned ``ON'' or ``OFF'' by the movement of the ferrofluid plug in response to an external magnetic field. Each switch exhibits a high contrast ratio and millisecond response time. Parallel geometries for both mode and multi-mode waveguides are shown. Saint Joseph's University summer research fund, McNulty Fellows Program.

  19. Ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches.

    PubMed

    Boerneke, Mark A; Hermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches represent a new class of simple switching modules that adopt well-defined ligand-free and bound conformational states, distinguishing them from metabolite-sensing riboswitches. Initially discovered in the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of hepatitis C virus (HCV), these RNA switch motifs were found in the genome of diverse other viruses. Although large variations are seen in sequence and local secondary structure of the switches, their function in viral translation initiation that requires selective ligand recognition is conserved. We recently determined the crystal structure of an RNA switch from Seneca Valley virus (SVV) which is able to functionally replace the switch of HCV. The switches from both viruses recognize identical cognate ligands despite their sequence dissimilarity. Here, we describe the discovery of 7 new switches in addition to the previously established 5 examples. We highlight structural and functional features unique to this class of ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches and discuss implications for therapeutic development and the construction of RNA nanostructures. PMID:26158858

  20. Power Actuation and Switching Module Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W.; Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Sauers, Jim; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The Deep Space Avionics (DSA) Project is developing a Power Actuation and Switching Module (PASM). This component enables a modular and scalable design approach for power switching applications, which can result in a wide variety of power switching architectures using this simple building block. The PASM is designed to provide most of the necessary power switching functions of spacecraft for various Deep Space missions including future missions to Mars, comets, Jupiter and its moons. It is fabricated using an A SIC process that is tolerant of high radiation. The development includes two application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and support circuitry all packaged using High Density Interconnect (HDI) technology. It can be operated in series or parallel with other PASMs, It can be used as a high-side or low-side switch and it can drive thruster valves, pyrotechnic devices such as NASA standard initiators, bus shunt resistors, and regular spacecraft component loads. Each PASM contains two independent switches with internal current limiting and over-current trip-off functions to protect the power subsystem from load faults. During turnon and turnoff each switch can limit the rate of current change (di/dt) to a value determined by the user. Threeway majority-voted On/Off commandability and full switch status telemetry (both analog and digital) are built into the module. This paper describes the development process used to design, model, fabricate, and test these compact and versatile power switches. Preliminary test results from prototype HDI PASM hardware are also discussed.

  1. On-chip Josephson junction microwave switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, O.; Abutaleb, M. O.; Kirby, C.; Rennie, M.

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the design and measurement of a reflective single-pole single-throw microwave switch with no internal power dissipation, based on a superconducting circuit containing a single Josephson junction. The data demonstrate the switch operation with 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth centered at 10 GHz, low insertion loss, and better than 20 dB on/off ratio. The switch's measured performance agrees well with simulations for input powers up to -100 dBm. An extension of the demonstrated circuit to implement a single-pole double-throw switch is shown in simulation.

  2. Digital switching noise as a stochastic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, Giorgio; Trucco, Gabriella; Liberali, Valentino

    2007-06-01

    Switching activity of logic gates in a digital system is a deterministic process, depending on both circuit parameters and input signals. However, the huge number of logic blocks in a digital system makes digital switching a cognitively stochastic process. Switching activity is the source of the so-called "digital noise", which can be analyzed using a stochastic approach. For an asynchronous digital network, we can model digital switching currents as a shot noise process, deriving both its amplitude distribution and its power spectral density. From spectral distribution of digital currents, we can also calculate the spectral distribution and the power of disturbances injected into the on-chip power supply lines.

  3. High-temperature superconducting vector switch

    SciTech Connect

    Chelluri, B.; Barber, J.; Clements, N.; Johnson, D. ); Spyker, R.; Sarkar, A.K.; Kozlowoski, G. )

    1991-04-15

    The feasibility of a high-temperature superconducting switch based on the principle of the superconducting vector switch (SVS) is discussed. This switch exploits the anisotropy in electrical conductivities of the high-temperature superconductors. Underlying the SVS mechanism is the ability to turn on/off large superconducting currents confined to the CuO{sub 2} planes that characterize these materials using lower currents flowing normal to the planes. The required conditions to optimize the switch and increase the gain are presented.

  4. Magnetic switch coupling to synchronize magnetic modulators

    DOEpatents

    Reed, K.W.; Kiekel, P.

    1999-04-27

    Apparatus for synchronizing the output pulses from a pair of magnetic switches is disclosed. An electrically conductive loop is provided between the pair of switches with the loop having windings about the core of each of the magnetic switches. The magnetic coupling created by the loop removes voltage and timing variations between the outputs of the two magnetic switches caused by any of a variety of factors. The only remaining variation is a very small fixed timing offset caused by the geometry and length of the loop itself. 13 figs.

  5. Magnetic switch coupling to synchronize magnetic modulators

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Kim W.; Kiekel, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus for synchronizing the output pulses from a pair of magnetic switches. An electrically conductive loop is provided between the pair of switches with the loop having windlings about the core of each of the magnetic switches. The magnetic coupling created by the loop removes voltage and timing variations between the outputs of the two magnetic switches caused by any of a variety of factors. The only remaining variation is a very small fixed timing offset caused by the geometry and length of the loop itself.

  6. Multi-megavolt low jitter multistage switch

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, D.R.; Penn, K.J. Jr.

    1985-06-19

    It is one object of the present invention to provide a multistage switch capable of holding off numerous megavolts, until triggered, from a particle beam accelerator of the type used for inertial confinement fusion. The invention provides a multistage switch having low timing jitter and capable of producing multiple spark channels for spreading current over a wider area to reduce electrode damage and increase switch lifetime. The switch has fairly uniform electric fields and a short spark gap for laser triggering and is engineered to prevent insulator breakdowns.

  7. Mercury switch with non-wettable electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1987-03-24

    This patent describes a mercury switch having spaced conductive electrodes with contacts thereon which are bridged by a mercury pool when the switch is closed and free of the mercury pool when the switch is open. The improvement described here comprises: contacts on the conductive electrodes formed of a material selected from the group consisting of metallic borides, nitrides and silicides, with the proviso that the silicides do not include the silicides of Cr, Mo and W; whereby mercury wetting of the contacts is precluded, thereby avoiding undesired bridging of the contacts in the open position of the switch.

  8. Magnetization switching by current and microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Saida, Daisuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Kubota, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical model of magnetization switching in a ferromagnetic multilayer by both electric current and microwaves. The electric current gives a spin transfer torque on the magnetization, while the microwaves induce a precession of the magnetization around the initial state. Based on numerical simulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, it is found that the switching current is significantly reduced compared with the switching caused solely by the spin transfer torque when the microwave frequency is in a certain range. We develop a theory of switching from the LLG equation averaged over a constant energy curve. It was found that the switching current should be classified into four regions, depending on the values of the microwave frequency. Based on the analysis, we derive an analytical formula of the optimized frequency minimizing the switching current, which is smaller than the ferromagnetic resonance frequency. We also derive an analytical formula of the minimized switching current. Both the optimized frequency and the minimized switching current decrease with increasing the amplitude of the microwave field. The results will be useful to achieve high thermal stability and low switching current in spin torque systems simultaneously.

  9. Globin gene switching in primates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert M; Gumucio, Deborah; Goodman, Morris

    2002-11-01

    Evolutionary approaches to the identification of DNA sequences required for transcription of the genes of the beta-globin cluster are reviewed. Sequence alignments of non-coding regions from widely divergent species revealed many conserved motifs (phylogenetic footprints) that were putative transcription factor binding sites and candidate binding proteins were identified. The differential timing of the prosimian and simian gamma-globin genes was analyzed by identifying base changes in the vicinity of the phylogenetic footprints. These differential phylogenetic footprints were shown to bind different nuclear factors, and the behavior of constructs with human or galago gamma-promoters in transgenic mice indicated that DNA motifs near the gamma-globin genes are sufficient to determine the developmental stage of expression. Locus control region alignments have identified many conserved sequence differences outside of the hypersensitive sites. Globin protein and mRNA expression profiles during embryological development in a series of catarrhine (Old World monkeys and apes) and platyrrhine (New World monkeys) primates have been determined. While all catarrhines examined to date have globin expression patterns that are highly similar to the well-established human switching behavior, platyrrhines have inactivated their gamma 1 genes by a variety of mechanisms, and have an earlier gamma-beta switch. PMID:12443943

  10. Sequential Effects in Deduction: Cost of Inference Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milan, Emilio G.; Moreno-Rios, Sergio; Espino, Orlando; Santamaria, Carlos; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The task-switch paradigm has helped psychologists gain insight into the processes involved in changing from one activity to another. The literature has yielded consistent results about switch cost reconfiguration (abrupt offset in regular task-switch vs. gradual reduction in random task-switch; endogenous and exogenous components of switch cost;…

  11. Ultrafast nanoelectromechanical switches for VLSI power management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venumbaka, Sri Ramya

    Power consumption is a major concern in the present chip design industry. Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology scaling has led to an exponential increase in the leakage power. The excessive power dissipation can result in more heat generation, which in turn increases the temperature. According to Intel's source, power density increased to a value of 1000 W/cm2 and is approaching the value which is equal to the radiation from the sun's surface (10000 W/cm2). This leads to reliability issues in nanometer-scale CMOS as Silicon starts melting at 1687K. To resolve this issue, we introduce a novel architecture to design nanoelectromechanical switches and implementation results with virtually zero leakage current, ˜1 V operation voltage, ˜1 GHz resonant frequency and nanometer-scale footprint. Microelectromechanical Switches (MEMS) have very low "on" and very high "off" resistances. Their switching voltages are usually high (5-50 V), switching speeds are usually low (1 MHz) and their footprints tend to be very large (many um2). We have designed and fabricated devices with very low actuation voltages and very high speed using tuning fork geometry compatible with conventional CMOS fabrication technologies. This unique switch geometry decreases the actuation voltage by a factor of 1.4 and doubles the switching speed. It consists of a cantilever beam that acts as a ground plane. Upon actuation, both the ground plane and the switch's main beam move towards each other that makes the center of mass stationary during switching and thus, the switching speed doubles. These tuning fork nanoelectromechanical switches can be readily implemented in Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits to manage leakage power. The thesis will describe the Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) structures, their characteristics, leakage reduction techniques, reliability of the devices and piezo actuator structures to determine contact resistance and longevity of switches.

  12. Dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Winske, D.; Keinigs, R.; Lemons, D.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of dusty plasmas at the Laboratory. While dusty plasmas are found in space in galactic clouds, planetary rings, and cometary tails, and as contaminants in plasma enhanced fabrication of microelectronics, many of their properties are only partially understood. Our work has involved both theoretical analysis and self-consistent plasma simulations to understand basic properties of dusty plasmas related to equilibrium, stability, and transport. Such an understanding can improve the control and elimination of plasma dust in industrial applications and may be important in the study of planetary rings and comet dust tails. We have applied our techniques to the study of charging, dynamics, and coagulation of contaminants in plasma processing reactors for industrial etching and deposition processes and to instabilities in planetary rings and other space plasma environments. The work performed in this project has application to plasma kinetics, transport, and other classical elementary processes in plasmas as well as to plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities.

  13. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schein, Jochen (Inventor); Gerhan, Andrew N. (Inventor); Woo, Robyn L. (Inventor); Au, Michael Y. (Inventor); Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a vacuum arc plasma source device using a low mass, compact inductive energy storage circuit powered by a low voltage DC supply acts as a vacuum arc plasma thruster. An inductor is charged through a switch, subsequently the switch is opened and a voltage spike of Ldi/dt is produced initiating plasma across a resistive path separating anode and cathode. The plasma is subsequently maintained by energy stored in the inductor. Plasma is produced from cathode material, which allows for any electrically conductive material to be used. A planar structure, a tubular structure, and a coaxial structure allow for consumption of cathode material feed and thereby long lifetime of the thruster for long durations of time.

  14. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  15. Circuit model for the inverse Z-pinch wire array switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Lebedev, Sergey V.

    2010-06-01

    A 0D circuit code is introduced to study the wire array switch concept introduced in. It has been implemented and researched at Imperial College. An exploding wire array, the switch, is in parallel with the load, an imploding wire array. Most of the current flows in the exploding array until it expands and becomes highly resistive. The 0D code contains simple models of Joule energy deposition and plasma expansion for W and Al wires. The purpose of the device is to produce fast Z-pinch implosion, below 100ns on MAGPIE and the Sandia Z machine. Self and mutual inductances are taken into consideration as well as the rocket model for wire ablation. The switch characteristics of the exploding array are prescribed and tuned up to agree with MAGPIE shots. The dependence of the device on the configuration of the arrays is studied and scaling to ZR conditions is explored.

  16. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  17. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  18. High-frequency switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, D R

    1992-01-01

    Most strains of Candida albicans are capable of switching frequently and reversibly between a number of phenotypes distinguishable by colony morphology. A number of different switching systems have been defined according to the limited set of phenotypes in each switching repertoire, and each strain appears to possess a single system. Switching can affect many aspects of cellular physiology and morphology and appears to be a second level of phenotypic variability superimposed upon the bud-hypha transition. The most dramatic switching system so far identified is the "white-opaque transition." This system dramatizes the extraordinary effects switching can have on the budding cell phenotype, including the synthesis of opaque-specific antigens, the expression of white-specific and opaque-specific genes, and the genesis of unique cell wall structures. Switching has been demonstrated to occur at sites of infection and between episodes of recurrent vaginitis, and it may function to generate variability in commensal and infecting populations for adaptive reasons. Although the molecular mechanisms involved in the switch event are not understood, recent approaches to its elucidation are discussed and an epigenetic mechanism is proposed. Images PMID:1576587

  19. Optical switching technologies and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Meli, F.; Grasso, Giorgio

    2001-05-01

    In this paper system applications, geometry, physical effects and materials of optical switching devices are reviewed. Main system scenarios are presented and some key features such as size, loss, speed, scalability and granularity are highlighted. Two principal categories of optical switches are considered, i.e. guided-wave switches and free-space switches. In the first category some sub- classes have been identified according to their geometrical configuration, principle of operation and, then physical mechanism and materials. As for the geometry, the most frequently used configurations are briefly described together with their advantages and disadvantages. Different physical effects suitable to obtain the index change, which the switching function is based on, are also described with reference to the material substrates. Switches based on semiconductor optical amplifier gate are also analyzed. In the free-space category the main sub-classes are represented by the opto-mechanical devices and micro-opto-electro- mechanical systems switches. The last technology combines the free-space interconnecting with the integration capability on a single silica chip. The main advantages such as the ability to scaling up to large switch fabric and some issues such as packaging and reliability are analyzed. Finally, devices based on polarization change, acousto- optics interaction, total internal reflection and holography are illustrated.

  20. The evolution of mating type switching.

    PubMed

    Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Kuijper, Bram

    2016-07-01

    Predictions about the evolution of sex determination mechanisms have mainly focused on animals and plants, whereas unicellular eukaryotes such as fungi and ciliates have received little attention. Many taxa within the latter groups can stochastically switch their mating type identity during vegetative growth. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that mating type switching overcomes distortions in the distribution of mating types due to drift during asexual growth. Using a computational model, we show that smaller population size, longer vegetative periods and more mating types lead to greater distortions in the distribution of mating types. However, the impact of these parameters on optimal switching rates is not straightforward. We find that longer vegetative periods cause reductions and considerable fluctuations in the switching rate over time. Smaller population size increases the strength of selection for switching but has little impact on the switching rate itself. The number of mating types decreases switching rates when gametes can freely sample each other, but increases switching rates when there is selection for speedy mating. We discuss our results in light of empirical work and propose new experiments that could further our understanding of sexuality in isogamous eukaryotes. PMID:27271362

  1. Self-protecting solid state isolated switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. C.; Gooder, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    Solid state switch has following capabilities: (1) Hybrid or IC from compatible with direct mounting on solar array substrate; (2) Continuous signal is not required to hold it in either on or off state; (3) Separate signal lines for on and off control; (4) Electrically isolated from input signals; and (5) Current surges will not cause switch failure.

  2. A sub-1-volt nanoelectromechanical switching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Oen; Song, Yong-Ha; Kim, Min-Wu; Kang, Min-Ho; Oh, Jae-Sub; Yang, Hyun-Ho; Yoon, Jun-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches have received widespread attention as promising candidates in the drive to surmount the physical limitations currently faced by complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The NEM switch has demonstrated superior characteristics including quasi-zero leakage behaviour, excellent density capability and operation in harsh environments. However, an unacceptably high operating voltage (4-20 V) has posed a major obstacle in the practical use of the NEM switch in low-power integrated circuits. To utilize the NEM switch widely as a core device component in ultralow power applications, the operation voltage needs to be reduced to 1 V or below. However, sub-1 V actuation has not yet been demonstrated because of fabrication difficulties and irreversible switching failure caused by surface adhesion. Here, we report the sub-1 V operation of a NEM switch through the introduction of a novel pipe clip device structure and an effective air gap fabrication technique. This achievement is primarily attributed to the incorporation of a 4-nm-thick air gap, which is the smallest reported so far for a NEM switch generated using a `top-down' approach. Our structure and process can potentially be utilized in various nanogap-related applications, including NEM switch-based ultralow-power integrated circuits, NEM resonators, nanogap electrodes for scientific research and sensors.

  3. Ames Lab 101: Ultrafast Magnetic Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Jigang Wang

    2013-04-08

    Ames Laboratory physicists have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies. Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery potentially opens the door to terahertz and faster memory speeds.

  4. High-explosive driven crowbar switch

    DOEpatents

    Dike, Robert S.; Kewish, Jr., Ralph W.

    1976-01-13

    The disclosure relates to a compact explosive driven switch for use as a low resistance, low inductance crowbar switch. A high-explosive charge extrudes a deformable conductive metallic plate through a polyethylene insulating layer to achieve a hard current contact with a supportive annular conductor.

  5. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  6. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  7. Ultrafast Directional Beam Switching in Coupled VCSELs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Goorjian, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new approach to performing ultrafast directional beam switching using two coupled Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The proposed strategy is demonstrated for two VCSELs of 5.6 microns in diameter placed about 1 micron apart from the edges, showing a switching speed of 42 GHz with a maximum far-field angle span of about 10 degrees.

  8. Lifetime characterization of powercapacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin

    2007-04-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution for many RF/microwave applications these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 1W (30 dBm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented. The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 10 10 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 30 dbm RF power.

  9. Lifetime characterization of capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin; Dean, Thierry; Polizzi, Jean-Philippe

    2004-12-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution to many RF/microwave applications and these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters and reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 1W (30 dbm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented. The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 1010 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 30 dbm RF power.

  10. Lifetime characterization of capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin; Dean, Thierry; Mancuso, Yves

    2005-05-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution to many RF/microwave applications and these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters and reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 1W (30 dbm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented. The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 1010 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 30 dbm RF power.

  11. Lifetime characterization of capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin; Dean, Thierry; Polizzi, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution to many RF/microwave applications and these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters and reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 1W (30 dbm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented. The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 1010 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 30 dbm RF power.

  12. Improved Two-Phase Switching Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Coupled-inductor polyphase regulator has better efficiency and lower inductor losses. Improved two-phase switching regulator employs negative coupling between inductors to achieve better power-to-weight ratio while reducing peak switching currents and inductor losses. Improvement of about 35 percent using new technique.

  13. Traveling-Wave Switches and Marx Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, C. E.

    This chapter considers a possible technique for reducing the rise time of high-voltage switches by placing an array of smaller voltage switches in a traveling-wave geometry. This same technique can also be incorporated in a Marx generator.

  14. Stability of stochastic switched SIRS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaoying; Liu, Xinzhi; Deng, Feiqi

    2011-11-01

    Stochastic stability problems of a stochastic switched SIRS model with or without distributed time delay are considered. By utilizing the Lyapunov methods, sufficient stability conditions of the disease-free equilibrium are established. Stability conditions about the subsystem of the stochastic switched SIRS systems are also obtained.

  15. Preventing Simultaneous Conduction In Switching Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, William T.

    1990-01-01

    High voltage spikes and electromagnetic interference suppressed. Power-supply circuit including two switching transistors easily modified to prevent simultaneous conduction by both transistors during switching intervals. Diode connected between collector of each transistor and driving circuit for opposite transistor suppresses driving signal to transistor being turned on until transistor being turned off ceases to carry current.

  16. Proceedings of the switched power workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain most of the presentations given at a workshop on the current state of research in techniques for switched power acceleration. The proceedings are divided, as was the workshop itself, into two parts. Part 1, contains the latest results from a number of groups active in switched power research. The major topic here is a method for switching externally supplied power onto a transmission line. Advocates for vacuum photodiode switching, solid state switching, gas switching, and synthetic pulse generation are all presented. Other important areas of research described in this section concern: external electrical and laser pulsing systems; the properties of the created electromagnetic pulse; structures used for transporting the electromagnetic pulse to the region where the electron beam is located; and possible applications. Part 2 of the proceedings considers the problem of designing a high brightness electron gun using switched power as the power source. This is an important first step in demonstrating the usefulness of switched power techniques for accelerator physics. In addition such a gun could have immediate practical importance for advanced acceleration studies since the brightness could exceed that of present sources by several orders of magnitude. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Kathleen Tuohy and Patricia Tuttle for their assistance in organizing and running the workshop. Their tireless efforts contribute greatly to a very productive meeting.

  17. Semiautomated switched capacitor filter design system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thelen, D.

    1990-01-01

    A software system is described which reduces the time required to design monolithic switched capacitor filters. The system combines several software tools into an integrated flow. Switched capacitor technology and alternative technologies are discussed. Design time using the software system is compared to typical design time without the system.

  18. Pseudospark switches -- Technological aspects and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tkotz, R.; Goertler, A.; Christiansen, J.

    1995-06-01

    The authors report results of the development of fast closing switches, so-called pseudospark switches, at Erlangen University. Two different parameter regimes are under investigation: medium power switches (32 kV anode voltage, 30 kA anode current and 0.02 C charge transfer per shot) for pulsed gas discharge lasers and high power switches (30 kV anode voltage, 400 kA anode current and 3.4 C charge transfer per shot) for high current applications. The lifetime of these switches is determined by erosion of the cathode. The total charge transfer of devices with one discharge channel is about 220 kC for the medium and 27 kC for the high power switch. At currents exceeding 45 kA a sudden increase in erosion rate was observed. Multichannel devices are suited to increase lifetime as the current per channel can be reduced. Successful experiments with radial and coaxial arrangements of the discharge channels were performed. In these systems the discharge channels move due to magnetic forces. A skillful use of this phenomena will result in a considerably increase of switch lifetime. Multigap devices enable an increase of anode voltage. A three gap switch has run reliably at an anode voltage of 70 kV.

  19. Radio-controlled, sound-operated switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, T. D.; Soloman, D. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Switch presently provides remote control switching, by radio signals, or pollution sampling devices. Can be used for remote weather station interrogation, firing of pyrotechnics, control of dangerous equipment, or control of device in location where it is impractical to run metallic conductors because of time limitations, distance, or terrain.

  20. Morphological Priming Survives a Language Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdonschot, Rinus G.; Middelburg, Renee; Lensink, Saskia E.; Schiller, Niels O.

    2012-01-01

    In a long-lag morphological priming experiment, Dutch (L1)-English (L2) bilinguals were asked to name pictures and read aloud words. A design using non-switch blocks, consisting solely of Dutch stimuli, and switch-blocks, consisting of Dutch primes and targets with intervening English trials, was administered. Target picture naming was facilitated…