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Sample records for plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

  1. Dissolution behavior of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Fazan, F; Marquis, P M

    2000-12-01

    The long-term stability of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings is influenced by the dissolution behavior of the coating in in vivo conditions. Plasma-spraying generates a mixture of phases and this study has focused on how the balance of phases affects the in vitro dissolution behavior of the coatings in double distilled-deionized water and in tris-buffer solutions. The pH changes in double distilled-deionized water were monitored, whilst the pH value was maintained at 7.25 for the tris-buffer solution at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 atmosphere. The phosphate and calcium ions released were measured using UV-Visible Spectrophotometer and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy respectively. Changes in crystal and surface topology were also studied. The results indicate that the dissolution behavior of the coatings depends on several factors. The rate of release of phosphate ions was found to increase significantly for the tris-buffer solution compared to the deionized water, indicating that the presence of electrolyte constituents affects the dissolution behavior of the coatings. The Ca/P ratio in the tris-buffer solution is approximately three. Increases in the level of crystallinity of the coatings significantly decreased the dissolution rate and hence, the amount of phosphate ions released. The higher the percentage of crystallinity, the higher the stability of the coating under in vitro conditions. PMID:15348061

  2. Induction suspension plasma sprayed biological-like hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Loszach, Max; Gitzhofer, François

    2015-04-01

    Substituted hydroxyapatite coatings with different ions (Mg, Na, K, Cl, F) have been developed by the induction suspension plasma spray process. Suspensions were prepared with sol-gel. The main objective of this study was to demonstrate that induction suspension plasma spray technology possesses high material composition flexibility that allows as-sprayed coatings to closely mimic natural bone composition. Long-term in vitro behaviour of as-sprayed substituted coatings was evaluated with simulated body fluid. Data on the suspensions showed the formation of a pure hydroxyapatite phase. Transmission electron microscopy characterized various preparation stages of the suspensions. As-sprayed samples were distinguished by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Substituted elements were quantified by neutron activation. A well-crystallized hydroxyapatite phase was produced with concentration in various substitutions very close to natural bone composition. Ca/P and (Ca + Mg + Na + K)/P ratios provided evidence of the introduction of different cations into apatite structures. The immersion of samples into simulated body fluid led to the nucleation and growth of a flake-like octacalcium phosphate crystal layer at the surface of as-sprayed coatings after one week. Proof of octacalcium phosphate transformation and its partial dissolution and direct re-precipitation into apatite was disclosed by local energy dispersive spectroscopy and microstructure observation. Formation of a Ca/P ratio gradient from the precipitated layer surface to the as-sprayed coatings interface was observed after four weeks once the octacalcium phosphate crystals reached a critical size, resulting in the formation of a rich apatite layer at the interface after six weeks. A set of mechanisms has been proposed to explain these findings. PMID:25586411

  3. Advanced Microstructural Study of Suspension Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlesak, Harry; Pawlowski, Lech; D'Haese, Romain; Laureyns, Jacky; Lampke, Thomas; Bellayer, Severine

    2010-03-01

    Fine, home-synthesized, hydroxyapatite powder was formulated with water and alcohol to obtain a suspension used to plasma spray coatings onto a titanium substrate. The deposition process was optimized using statistical design of 2 n experiments with two variables: spray distance and electric power input to plasma. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine quantitatively the phase composition of obtained deposits. Raman microscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) enabled localization of the phases in different positions of the coating cross sections. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study associated with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) enabled visualization and analysis of a two-zone microstructure. One zone contained crystals of hydroxyapatite, tetracalcium phosphate, and a phase rich in calcium oxide. This zone included lamellas, usually observed in thermally sprayed coatings. The other zone contained fine hydroxyapatite grains that correspond to nanometric and submicrometric solids from the suspension that were agglomerated and sintered in the cold regions of plasma jet and on the substrate.

  4. Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings: Influence of Spraying Power on Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S. M.; Abd, M. Z.; Abd, A. N.

    2010-03-11

    The plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are used on metallic implants to enhance the bonding between the implant and bone in human body. The coating process was implemented at different spraying power for each spraying condition. The coatings formed from a rapid solidification of molten and partly molten particles that impact on the surface of substrate at high velocity and high temperature. The study was concentrated on different spraying power that is between 23 to 31 kW. The effect of different power on the coatings microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase composition was evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings surface morphology showed distribution of molten, partially melted particles and some micro-cracks. The produced coatings were found to be porous as observed from the cross-sectional morphology. The coatings XRD results indicated the presence of crystalline phase of HA and each of the patterns was similar to the initial powder. Regardless of different spraying power, all the coatings were having similar XRD patterns.

  5. Mechanical, in vitro antimicrobial, and biological properties of plasma-sprayed silver-doped hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mangal; Fielding, Gary A; Beyenal, Haluk; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-03-01

    Implant-related infection is one of the key concerns in total joint hip arthroplasties. To reduce bacterial adhesion, we used silver (Ag)/silver oxide (Ag(2)O) doping in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on titanium substrate. HA powder was doped with 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 wt % Ag, heat-treated at 800 °C and used for plasma spray coating using a 30 kW plasma spray system, equipped with supersonic nozzle. Application of supersonic plasma nozzle significantly reduced phase decomposition and amorphous phase formation in the HA coatings as evident by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis. Adhesive bond strength of more than 15 MPa ensured the mechanical integrity of the coatings. Resistance against bacterial adhesion of the coatings was determined by challenging them against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1). Live/dead staining of the adherent bacteria on the coating surfaces indicated a significant reduction in bacterial adhesion due to the presence of Ag. In vitro cell-material interactions and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) protein expressions were evaluated by culturing human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB). Our results suggest that the plasma-sprayed HA coatings doped with an optimum amount of Ag can have excellent antimicrobial property without altering mechanical property of the Ag-doped HA coatings. PMID:22313742

  6. Mechanical, In Vitro Antimicrobial and Biological Properties of Plasma Sprayed Silver-Doped Hydroxyapatite Coating

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; Fielding, Gary A.; Beyenal, Haluk; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-01-01

    Implant related infection is one of the key concerns in total joint hip arthroplasties. In order to reduce bacterial adhesion, silver (Ag) / silver oxide (Ag2O) doping was used in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on titanium substrate. HA powder was doped with 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 wt% Ag, heat treated at 800 °C and used for plasma spray coating using a 30 kW plasma spray system, equipped with supersonic nozzle. Application of supersonic plasma nozzle significantly reduced phase decomposition and amorphous phase formation in the HA coatings as evident by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis. Adhesive bond strength of more than 15 MPa ensured the mechanical integrity of the coatings. Resistance against bacterial adhesion of the coatings was determined by challenging them against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (PAO1). Live/Dead staining of the adherent bacteria on the coating surfaces indicated a significant reduction in bacterial adhesion due to the presence of Ag. In vitro cell-material interactions and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) protein expressions were evaluated by culturing human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB). Present results suggest that the plasma sprayed HA coatings doped with an optimum amount of Ag can have excellent antimicrobial property without altering mechanical property of the Ag doped HA coatings. PMID:22313742

  7. Comparison of Physical-chemical and Mechanical Properties of Chlorapatite and Hydroxyapatite Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Demnati, Imane; Grossin, David; Marsan, Olivier; Bertrand, Ghislaine; Collonges, Gérard; Combes, Christèle; Parco, Maria; Braceras, Inigo; Alexis, Joel; Balcaen, Yannick; Rey, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Chlorapatite can be considered a potential biomaterial for orthopaedic applications. Its use as plasma-sprayed coating could be of interest considering its thermal properties and particularly its ability to melt without decomposition unlike hydroxyapatite. Chlorapatite (ClA) was synthesized by a high-temperature ion exchange reaction starting from commercial stoichiometric hydroxyapatites (HA). The ClA powder showed similar characteristics as the original industrial HA powder, and was obtained in the monoclinic form. The HA and ClA powders were plasma-sprayed using a low-energy plasma spraying system with identical processing parameters. The coatings were characterized by physical-chemical methods, i.e. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, including distribution mapping of the main phases detected such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), oxyapatite (OA), and HA or ClA. The unexpected formation of oxyapatite in ClA coatings was assigned to a side reaction with contaminating oxygenated species (O2, H2O). ClA coatings exhibited characteristics different from HA, showing a lower content of oxyapatite and amorphous phase. Although their adhesion strength was found to be lower than that of HA coatings, their application could be an interesting alternative, offering, in particular, a larger range of spraying conditions without formation of massive impurities. PMID:25893015

  8. XPS and bioactivity study of the bisphosphonate pamidronate adsorbed onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kate; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Dutta, Naba; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Anderson, Gail I.; Sekel, Ron

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate bisphosphonate (BP) adsorption onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings commonly used for orthopaedic implants. BPs exhibit high binding affinity for the calcium present in HA and hence can be adsorbed onto HA-coated implants to exploit their beneficial properties for improved bone growth at the implant interface. A rigorous XPS analysis of pamidronate, a commonly used nitrogenous BP, adsorbed onto plasma sprayed HA-coated cobalt-chromium substrates has been carried out, aimed at: (a) confirming the adsorption of this BP onto HA; (b) studying the BP diffusion profile in the HA coating by employing the technique of XPS depth profiling; (c) confirming the bioactivity of the adsorbed BP. XPS spectra of plasma sprayed HA-coated discs exposed to a 10 mM aqueous BP solution (pamidronate) for periods of 1, 2 and 24 h showed nitrogen and phosphorous photoelectron signals corresponding to the BP, confirming its adsorption onto the HA substrate. XPS depth profiling of the 2 h BP-exposed HA discs showed penetration of the BP into the HA matrix to depths of at least 260 nm. The bioactivity of the adsorbed BP was confirmed by the observed inhibition of osteoclast (bone resorbing) cell activity. In comparison to the HA sample, the HA sample with adsorbed BP exhibited a 25-fold decrease in primary osteoclast cells.

  9. X-ray diffraction characterization of crystallinity and phase composition in plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevéy, Paul S.

    2000-09-01

    Orthopedic and dental implants consisting of a metallic substrate plasma spray coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) are currently used in reconstructive surgery. The crystalline phases present in the calcium phosphate ceramic and the degree of crystallinity must be controlled for medical applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is routinely employed to characterize the phase composition and percent crystallinity in both biological and sintered HA. However, application of the same XRD methods to plasma-sprayed coatings is complicated by the potential presence of several crystalline contaminant phases and an amorphous component. To overcome the complexities of characterizing plasma-sprayed HA coatings, an external standard method of XRD quantitative analysis has been developed that can be applied nondestructively. Data collection and reduction strategies allowing separation of intensity diffracted from commonly occurring phases and the amorphous fraction are presented. The method is applied to coating samples, and detection limits and sources of error are discussed. Repeability and accuracy are demonstrated with powder mixtures of known composition.

  10. Phase stability and biological property evaluation of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopedic and dental applications.

    PubMed

    Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2015-04-01

    In this work we have investigated the effects of strontium (Sr) dopant on in vitro protein release kinetics and in vivo osteogenic properties of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings, along with their dissolution behavior. Plasma sprayed HA coatings are widely used in load-bearing implants. Apart from osseointegration, the new generation of HA coating is expected to deliver biomolecules and/or drugs that can induce osteoinduction. This paper reports the preparation of crystalline and amorphous HA coatings on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray, and their stability at different solution pH. Coatings prepared at 110 mm working distance from the nozzle showed an average Ca ion release of 18 and 90 ppm in neutral and acidic environments, respectively. Decreasing the working distance to 90 mm resulted in the formation of a coating with less crystalline HA and phases with higher solubility products, and consequently higher dissolution over 32 days. A 92% release of a model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) in phosphate buffer with pH of 7.4 was measured for Sr-doped HA (Sr-HA) coating, while only a 72% release could be measured for pure HA coating. Distortion of BSA during adsorption on coatings revealed a strong interaction between the protein and the coating, with an increase in α-helix content. Osteoid formation was found on Sr-HA implants as early as 7 weeks post implantation compared to HA coated and uncoated Ti implants. After 12 weeks post implantation, osteoid new bone was formed on HA implants; whereas, bone mineralization started on Sr-HA samples. While no osteoid was formed on bare Ti surfaces, bone was completely mineralized on HA and Sr-HA coatings after 16 weeks post implantation. Our results show that both phase stability and chemistry can have a significant influence toward in vitro and in vivo response of HA coatings on Ti implants. PMID:25638672

  11. Effect of substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on residual stress in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dapei

    2015-07-01

    A thermal-mechanical coupling model was developed based on thermal-elastic- plastic theory according the special process of plasma spraying Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating upon Ti-6Al-4V substrate. On the one hand, the classical Fourier transient heat conduction equation was modified by introducing the effect item of deformation on temperature, on the other hand, the Johnson-Cook model, suitable for high temperature and high strain rate conditions, was used as constitutive equation after considering temperature softening effect, strain hardening effect and strain rate reinforcement effect. Based on the above coupling model, the residual stress field within the HA coating was simulated by using finite element method (FEM). Meanwhile, the substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on the influence of residual stress components were calculated, respectively. The failure modes of coating were also preliminary analyzed. In addition, in order to verify the reliability of calculation, the material removal measurement technique was applied to determine the residual stress of HA coating near the interface. Some important conclusions are obtained.

  12. Cytotoxicity study of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Ossa, C P O; Rogero, S O; Tschiptschin, A P

    2006-11-01

    Stainless steel has been frequently used for temporary implants but its use as permanent implants is restricted due to its low pitting corrosion resistance. Nitrogen additions to these steels improve both mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, particularly the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance. Many reports concerning allergic reactions caused by nickel led to the development of nickel free stainless steel; it has excellent mechanical properties and very high corrosion resistance. On the other hand, stainless steels are biologically tolerated and no chemical bonds are formed between the steel and the bone tissue. Hydroxyapatite coatings deposited on stainless steels improve osseointegration, due their capacity to form chemical bonds (bioactive fixation) with the bone tissue. In this work hydroxyapatite coatings were plasma-sprayed on three austenitic stainless steels: ASTM-F138, ASTM-F1586 and the nickel-free Böhler-P558. The coatings were analyzed by SEM and XDR. The cytotoxicity of the coatings/steels was studied using the neutral red uptake method by quantitative evaluation of cell viability. The three uncoated stainless steels and the hydroxyapatite coated Böhler-P558 did not have any toxic effect on the cell culture. The hydroxyapatite coated ASTM-F138 and ASTM-F1586 stainless steels presented cytotoxicity indexes (IC50%) lower than 50% and high nickel contents in the extracts. PMID:17122924

  13. Evaluation of human osteoblastic cell response to plasma-sprayed silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings over titanium substrates.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Pedro S; Botelho, Cláudia; Lopes, Maria A; Santos, José D; Fernandes, Maria H

    2010-08-01

    Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) coatings have been plasma sprayed over titanium substrates (Ti-6Al-4V) aiming to improve the bioactivity of the constructs for bone tissue repair/regeneration. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coatings has shown that, previous to the thermal deposition, no secondary phases were formed due to the incorporation of 0.8 wt % Si into HA crystal lattice. Partial decomposition of hydroxyapatite, which lead to the formation of the more soluble phases of alpha- and beta-tricalcium phosphate and calcium oxide, and increase of amorphization level only occurred following plasma spraying. Human bone marrow-derived osteoblastic cells were used to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the constructs. Cells attached and grew well on the Si-HA coatings, putting in evidence an increased metabolic activity and alkaline phosphatase expression comparing to control, i.e., titanium substrates plasma sprayed with hydroxyapatite. Further, a trend for increased differentiation was also verified by the upregulation of osteogenesis-related genes, as well as by the augmented deposition of globular mineral deposits within established cell layers. Based on the present findings, plasma spraying of Si-HA coatings over titanium substrates demonstrates improved biological properties regarding cell proliferation and differentiation, comparing to HA coatings. This suggests that incorporation of Si into the HA lattice could enhance the biological behavior of the plasma-sprayed coating. PMID:20574971

  14. Microstructural inhomogeneity in plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings and effect of post-heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yu-Peng; Xiao, Gui-Yong; Li, Shi-Tong; Sun, Rui-Xue; Li, Mu-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The microstructural inhomogeneity in the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings was characterized by using electron probe microanalyser (EPMA). A simple and artful method was developed to detect the interface characteristics. All the samples for observation were ground and polished along the direction parallel to the coating surfaces. The BSE images directly and clearly showed the inhomogeneity in the as-sprayed coatings with the amorphous regions being bright gray and crystalline regions being dark gray. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) patterns indicated that after immersion in deionized water for 20 days, bone-like apatite and α-Ca 2P 2O 7 precipitated on the polished surfaces of the as-sprayed HA coatings. The post-heat treatment could eliminate the microstructural inhomogeneity in the coatings. Only β-Ca 2P 2O 7 precipitated on the surfaces of the heat-treated HA coatings. The immersed samples were re-polished till tiny substrate was bared to investigate the effect of immersion on interface. It was shown that the immersion decreased the cohesive strength of the as-sprayed coatings. There were more and broader cracks in the splats that came into contact with the substrate and amorphous phase increased toward the coating-substrate interface. Post-heat treatment was proved to reduce the peeling off of coating during re-polishing operation. It was proposed that the distributions of amorphous phase and cracks in as-sprayed coatings are detrimental to coating properties and should be modified through improving the plasma spraying processing.

  15. Corrosion behavior of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite-silicon oxide coatings on AISI 304 for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Hazoor; Sidhu, Buta Singh

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate corrosion resistance of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) and HAsbnd silicon oxide (SiO2) coated AISI 304 substrates. In HAsbnd SiO2 coatings, 10 wt% SiO2 and 20 wt% SiO2 was mixed with HA. The feedstock and coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance was determined for the uncoated and coated samples. The corrosion resistance of the AISI 304 was found more after the deposition of the HAsbnd SiO2 coatings rather than HA coating and uncoated. All the coatings were crack free after 24 h dipping in Ringer's solution for electrochemical corrosion testing.

  16. Antibacterial and biological characteristics of plasma sprayed silver and strontium doped hydroxyapatite coatings

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Gary A.; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Infection in primary total joint prostheses is estimated to occur in up to 3% of all surgeries. As a measure to improve the antimicrobial properties of implant materials, silver (Ag) was incorporated into plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. To offset potential cytotoxic effects of Ag in the coatings, strontium (Sr) was also added as a binary dopant. HA powder were doped with 2.0 wt% Ag2O, 1.0 wt% SrO and the powder was then heat treated at 800° C. Titanium substrates were coated using a 30 kW plasma spray system equipped with a supersonic nozzle. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the phase purity and high crystallinity of the coatings. Samples were evaluated for mechanical stability by adhesive bond strength testing. Results show that the addition of dopants did not affect the overall bond strength of the coatings. The antibacterial efficacies of the coatings were tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples that contained the Ag2O dopant were found to be highly effective against the bacterial colonization. In vitro cell-material interactions using human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) cells were characterized by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for cell viability, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for cell morphology and confocal imaging for the important differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Our results showed evidence of cytotoxic effects in the Ag-HA coatings, characterized by poor cellular morphology and cell death and nearly complete impediment of functional ALP activity. The addition of SrO to Ag-HA coatings was able to effectively offset these negative effects and improve the performance when compared to pure HA coated samples. PMID:22487928

  17. Antibacterial and biological characteristics of silver containing and strontium doped plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Gary A; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-08-01

    Infection in primary total joint prostheses is estimated to occur in up to 3% of all surgery. As a measure to improve the antimicrobial properties of implant materials silver (Ag) was incorporated into plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. To offset potential cytotoxic effects of Ag in the coatings strontium (Sr) was also added as a binary dopant. HA powder was doped with 2.0 wt.% Ag(2)O, 1.0 wt.% SrO and was then heat treated at 800 °C. Titanium substrates were coated using a 30 kW plasma spray system equipped with a supersonic nozzle. X-ray diffraction confirmed the phase purity and high crystallinity of the coatings. Samples were evaluated for mechanical stability by adhesive bond strength testing. The results show that the addition of dopants did not affect the overall bond strength of the coatings. The antibacterial efficacies of the coatings were tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples that contained the Ag(2)O dopant were found to be highly effective against bacterial colonization. In vitro cell-material interactions using human fetal osteoblast cells were characterized by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay for cell viability, field emission scanning electron microscopy for cell morphology and confocal imaging for the important differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Our results showed evidence of cytotoxic effects of the Ag-HA coatings, characterized by poor cellular morphology and cell death and nearly complete loss of functional ALP activity. The addition of SrO to the Ag-HA coatings was able to effectively offset these negative effects and improve performance compared with pure HA-coated samples. PMID:22487928

  18. Low-Energy Plasma Spray (LEPS) Deposition of Hydroxyapatite/Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Biocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Parco, Maria; Stokes, Joseph; Looney, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal spraying is widely employed to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-based biocomposites on hip and dental implants. For thick HA coatings (>150 μm), problems are generally associated with the build-up of residual stresses and lack of control of coating crystallinity. HA/polymer composite coatings are especially interesting to improve the pure HA coatings' mechanical properties. For instance, the polymer may help in releasing the residual stresses in the thick HA coatings. In addition, the selection of a bioresorbable polymer may enhance the coatings' biological behavior. However, there are major challenges associated with spraying ceramic and polymeric materials together because of their very different thermal properties. In this study, pure HA and HA/poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) thick coatings were deposited without significant thermal degradation by low-energy plasma spraying (LEPS). PCL has never been processed by thermal spraying, and its processing is a major achievement of this study. The influence of selected process parameters on microstructure, composition, and mechanical properties of HA and HA/PCL coatings was studied using statistical design of experiments (DOE). The HA deposition rate was significantly increased by the addition of PCL. The average porosity of biocomposite coatings was slightly increased, while retaining or even improving in some cases their fracture toughness and microhardness. Surface roughness of biocomposites was enhanced compared with HA pure coatings. Cell culture experiments showed that murine osteoblast-like cells attach and proliferate well on HA/PCL biocomposite deposits.

  19. Effect of gun current on the microstructure and crystallinity of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morks, M. F.; Kobayashi, A.

    2007-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a bioactive material because its chemical structure is close to the natural bone. Its bioactive properties make it attractive material in biomedical applications. Gas tunnel type plasma spraying (GTPS) technique was employed in the present study to deposit HA coatings on SUS 304 stainless steel substrate. GTPS is composed of two plasma sources: gun which produces internal low power plasma (1.3-8 kW) and vortex which produces the main plasma with high power level (10-40 kW). Controlling the spraying parameters is the key role for spraying high crystalline HA coatings on the metallic implants. In this study, the arc gun current was changed while the vortex arc current was kept constant at 450 A during the spraying process of HA coatings. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of gun current on the microstructure, phase crystallinity and hardness properties of HA coatings. The surface morphology and microstructure of as-sprayed coatings were examined by scanning electron microscope. The phase structure of HA coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. HA coatings sprayed at high gun current (100 A) are dense, and have high hardness. The crystallinity of HA coatings was decreased with the increasing in the gun current. On the other hand, the hardness was slightly decreased and the coatings suffer from some porosity at gun currents 0, 30 and 50 A.

  20. Characterization of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-nanostructure titania composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugeswaran, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Ucisik, A. Hikmet; Subramanian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) can be coated onto metal implants as a ceramic biocompatible coating to bridge the growth between implants and human tissue. Meanwhile many efforts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of the HA coatings without affecting its bioactivity. In the present study, nanostructure titania (TiO2) was mixed with HA powder and HA-nanostructure TiO2 composite coatings were produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying torch under optimized spraying conditions. For this purpose, composition of 10 wt% TiO2 + 90 wt% HA, 20 wt% TiO2 + 80 wt% HA and 30 wt% TiO2 + 70 wt% HA were selected as the feedstock materials. The phase, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. The obtained results validated that the increase in weight percentage of nanostructure TiO2 in HA coating significantly increased the microhardness, adhesive strength and wear resistance of the coatings. Analysis of the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were done using conventional simulated body fluid (c-SBF) solution and cultured green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) respectively. The bioactivity results revealed that the composite coating has bio-active surface with good cytocompatibility.

  1. Recent Developments in Suspension Plasma Sprayed Titanium Oxide and Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, R.; Pawlowski, L.; Pierlot, C.; Roudet, F.; Kozerski, S.; Petit, F.

    2010-01-01

    The paper aims at reviewing of the recent studies related to the development of suspension plasma sprayed TiO2 and Ca5(PO4)3OH (hydroxyapatite, HA) coatings as well as their multilayer composites obtained onto stainless steel, titanium and aluminum substrates. The total thickness of the coatings was in the range 10 to 150 μm. The suspensions on the base of distilled water, ethanol and their mixtures were formulated with the use of fine commercial TiO2 pigment crystallized as rutile and HA milled from commercial spray-dried powder or synthesized from calcium nitrate and ammonium phosphate in an optimized reaction. The powder was crystallized as hydroxyapatite. Pneumatic and peristaltic pump liquid feeders were applied. The injection of suspension to the plasma jet was studied carefully with the use of an atomizer injector or a continuous stream one. The injectors were placed outside or inside of the anode-nozzle of the SG-100 plasma torch. The stream of liquid was tested under angle right or slightly backwards with regard to the torch axis. The sprayed deposits were submitted to the phase analysis by the use of x-ray diffraction. The content of anatase and rutile was calculated in the titanium oxide deposits as well as the content of the decomposition phases in the hydroxyapatite ones. The micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to visualize the area of appearance of some phases. Scratch test enabled to characterize the adhesion of the deposits, their microhardness and friction coefficient. The electric properties including electron emission, impedance spectroscopy, and dielectric properties of some coatings were equally tested.

  2. Induction Plasma Sprayed Nano Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium for Orthopaedic and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports preparation of a highly crystalline nano hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray and their in vitro and in vivo biological response. HA coatings were prepared on Ti using normal and supersonic plasma nozzles at different plate powers and working distances. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis show that the normal plasma nozzle lead to increased phase decomposition, high amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase formation, and severe dehydroxylation of HA. In contrast, coatings prepared using supersonic nozzle retained the crystallinity and phase purity of HA due to relatively short exposure time of HA particles in the plasma. In addition, these coatings exhibited a microstructure that varied from porous and glassy structure at the coating-substrate interface to dense HA at the top surface. The microstructural analysis showed that the coating was made of multigrain HA particles of ~200 nm in size, which consisted of recrystallized HA grains in the size range of 15– 20 nm. Apart from the type of nozzle, working distance was also found to have a strong influence on the HA phase decomposition, while plate power had little influence. Depending on the plasma processing conditions, a coating thickness between 300 and 400 μm was achieved where the adhesive bond strengths were found to be between 4.8 MPa to 24 MPa. The cytotoxicity of HA coatings was examined by culturing human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) on coated surfaces. In vivo studies, using the cortical defect model in rat femur, evaluated the histological response of the HA coatings prepared with supersonic nozzle. After 2 weeks of implantation, osteoid formation was evident on the HA coated implant surface, which could indicate early implant- tissue integration in vivo. PMID:21552358

  3. Phase transformation of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating with preferred crystalline orientation.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, M; Kameyama, T

    2007-07-01

    Highly oriented hydroxyapatite coatings (HACs) were obtained on titanium substrates through a radio-frequency thermal plasma spraying (TPS) method. XRD patterns showed that the HACs had crystallites with [001] preferred orientation vertical to the coating's surface. XRD results also indicated that tetracalcium phosphate crystallites in the as-sprayed HAC were oriented in the (100) direction. XRD peaks corresponding to tetracalcium phosphate, tricalcium phosphate and calcium oxide were absent after heat and hydrothermal treatment. The orientation degree of the HAC was influenced little by such post-heat treatments. Considering the crystallographic relationship between the tetracalcium phosphate in the as-sprayed HAC and the HA crystallites formed in the heat-treated HAC, these XRD results indicate that the tetracalcium phosphate in the as-prepared coatings transformed topotaxially into HA during the post-heat treatment. TEM and SEM analyses of the highly oriented HAC were conducted. The characteristic lamellar structure of TPS deposits was observed in cross-sections of the HAC. A prismatic texture was also observed in magnified SEM images. TEM observation showed that 200-800-nm-wide prismatic crystallites were formed in HA splats, and their longitudinal axis was oriented vertically to the coating's surface. SAD patterns showed that the longitudinal axis of the prismatic crystallites corresponded to the [001] zone axis of the HA crystal. PMID:17400290

  4. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  5. The effect on bone growth enhancement of implant coatings with hydroxyapatite and collagen deposited electrochemically and by plasma spray

    PubMed Central

    Daugaard, Henrik; Elmengaard, Brian; Bechtold, Joan E.; Jensen, Thomas; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal bone consists of hydroxyapatite (HA) [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] and collagen type I, both of which are osseoconductive. The goal of osseointegration of orthopedic and dental implants is the rapid achievement of a mechanically stable long-lasting fixation between bone and an implant surface. In this study, we evaluated the mechanical fixation and tissue distribution surrounding implants coated with three surfaces: plasma-sprayed HA coating, thinner coating of electrochemical-assisted deposition of HA, and an identical thin coating with a top layer of mineralized collagen. Uncoated plasma-sprayed titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) served as negative control. The electrochemical-assisted deposition was performed near physiological conditions. We used a canine experimental joint replacement model with four cylindrical implants (one of each treatment group) inserted in the humeri cancellous metaphyseal bone in a 1 mm gap. Observation time was 4 weeks. The mechanical fixation was quantified by push-out test to failure, and the peri-implant tissue formation by histomorphometric evaluation. HA coatings deposited by plasma spray technique or electrochemically, increased the mechanical fixation and bone ongrowth, but there was no statistical difference between the individual HA applications. Addition of collagen to the mineralized phase of the coating to create a more bone natural surface did not improve the osseoconductive effect of HA. PMID:19291683

  6. Osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity of porous hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by liquid precursor plasma spraying: in vivo biological response study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; He, Jing; Gan, Lu; Liu, Xiaoguang; Wu, Yao; Wu, Fang; Gu, Zhong-wei

    2014-12-01

    The beneficial effect of a porous structure on the biological functions of calcium phosphate bulk ceramic or scaffold has been well documented. Nevertheless, the effect of a porous structure on the in vivo performance of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings has been rarely reported, partly due to the difficulty in synthesizing porous HA coatings suitable for commercial applications. In this study, we have carried out a systematic in vivo study of porous HA-coated Ti implants (with and without surface modification) prepared by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process, in terms of its osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. The results suggest the clear advantage of the porous structure over the dense structure, despite the pore structure (about 48% porosity and less than 100 μm average pore size) being far from the ideal pore structure reported for bulk ceramic. The porous HA-coated implant significantly promotes early bone ingrowth at the pre-generated defective region, and early fixation at the bone-implant interface, especially at early implantation time (one month), showing about 120% and 40% increases respectively over those of the dense HA-coated implants prepared by the conventional atmospheric plasma spraying process. Moreover, the porous structure can be readily used to incorporate collagen/rh-BMP2, which demonstrates clear ectopic bone formation. Overall, the results suggest the augmentation of bone ingrowth is significant for HA coatings with a porous structure, which is critical for the early fixation and long-term stability of medical implants. PMID:25384201

  7. Nanostructured Si, Mg, CO3 2- Substituted Hydroxyapatite Coatings Deposited by Liquid Precursor Plasma Spraying: Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Xiao, Yanfeng; Wang, Shanling; Huang, Yi; Liu, Xiaoguang; Wu, Fang; Gu, Zhongwei

    2011-06-01

    In this study, a novel liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process was used to deposit Si, Mg, CO3 2- substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings (alone and cosubstituted) onto Ti-6Al-4V substrates. Salts of silicon, magnesium, and carbonate elements were directly added into the HA liquid precursor for subsequent plasma spraying. The phase composition, structure, and morphology of all HA coatings were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results indicated that the trace elements were successfully incorporated into the HA structure and nanostructured coatings were obtained for all doped HA formulations. The incorporation of trace elements into the HA structure reduced its crystallinity, especially when silicon, magnesium and carbonate ions entered simultaneously into the HA structure. FTIR spectra showed that the Si-HA and Mg-HA coatings had decreased intensities in both the O-H and P-O bands and that the CO3 2--HA coating was mainly a B-type carbonate-substituted HA. The results showed that the LPPS process is an effective and simple method to synthesize trace element substituted biomimetic HA coatings with nanostructure.

  8. Induction of osteoconductivity by BMP-2 gene modification of mesenchymal stem cells combined with plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang; Guo, Ying-qiang; Yin, Guang-fu; Chen, Huai-qing; Kang, Yunqing

    2008-11-01

    Success in bone implant depends greatly on the composition and surface features of the implant. The surface-modification measures not only favor the implant's osteoconductivity, but also promote both bone anchoring and biomechanical stability. This paper reports an approach to combine a hydroxyapatite (HA) coated substrate with a cellular vehicle for the delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) synergistically enhancing the osteoconductivity of implant surfaces. We examined the attachment, growth and osteoinductive activity of transfected BMP-producing bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on a plasma-sprayed HA coated substrate. It was found that the HA coated substrate could allow the attachment and growth of BMP-2 gene modified BMSCs, and this combined application synergistically enhanced osteconductivity of the substrate surface. This synergistic method may be of osseointegration value in orthopedic and dental implant surgery.

  9. In vitro biological response of plasma electrolytically oxidized and plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Wing Kiu; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Matthews, Allan; Yerokhin, Aleksey

    2013-08-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a relatively new surface modification process that may be used as an alternative to plasma spraying methods to confer bioactivity to Ti alloy implants. The aim of this study was to compare physical, chemical and biological surface characteristics of two coatings applied by PEO processes, containing different calcium phosphate (CaP) and titanium dioxide phases, with a plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. Coating characteristics were examined by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry, and wettability tests. The biological properties were determined using the human osteoblastic cell line MG-63 to assess cell viability, calcium and collagen synthesis. The tests showed that PEO coatings are significantly more hydrophilic (6%) and have 78% lower surface roughness (Ra) than the plasma-sprayed coatings. Cell behavior was demonstrated to be strongly dependent on the phase composition and surface distribution of elements in the PEO coating. MG-63 viability for the TiO2 -based PEO coating containing amorphous CaPs was significantly lower than that for the PEO coating containing crystalline HA and the plasma-sprayed coating. However, collagen synthesis on both the CaP and the TiO2 PEO coatings was significantly higher (92% and 71%, respectively) than on the plasma-sprayed coating after 14 days. PEO has been demonstrated to be a promising method for coating of orthopedic implant surfaces. PMID:23529912

  10. Structure, mechanical performance and electrochemical characterization of plasma sprayed SiO 2/Ti-reinforced hydroxyapatite biomedical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morks, M. F.; Fahim, N. F.; Kobayashi, A.

    2008-12-01

    For achieving an excellent bioactivity and mechanical properties, silica and titanium-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings were deposited onto 304 SUS substrate by using a gas-tunnel plasma spraying system. A commercial HA powder of average size 10-45 μm was blended with fused amorphous silica and titanium powders with HA:SiO 2:Ti wt.% ratios of 75:15:10 respectively. The mixed powders have been plasma sprayed at various plasma gas flow rates (Ar) of 120, 140, 160 and 170 l/min. The morphologies and structure of the resulting coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and electron dispersive spectroscopy. Hardness, abrasive wear resistance and adhesive bonding strength properties of the as-sprayed composite coatings were investigated. Silica and titanium provide reinforcement via increasing the bonding strength of HA particles and abrasion resistance. A heat treatment for the sprayed coatings was carried out at a temperature of 650 °C for 2 h in ambient oxygen and the change in the phase structure was analysed by X-ray diffraction. The results showed a formation of TiO 2 (rutile) phase due to titanium oxidation at 650 °C. On the other hand, the heat treatment enhanced the crystallinity of HA coating by transferring the non-apatite tri-calcium phosphate phase into apatite phase. The corrosion resistance measurement by polarization method confirmed the improvement of corrosion resistance of the composite HA/SiO 2/Ti coatings compared with the pure HA. However, the annealed samples showed lower corrosion resistance compared with as-sprayed samples.

  11. Design of novel plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-bond coat bioceramic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, R. B.

    1999-12-01

    Bond coats based on bioinert ceramic materials such as titania and zirconia were developed to increase the adhesion strength of the coating system hydroxyapatite-bond coat to Ti-6Al-4V alloy surfaces used for hip endoprostheses and dental root implants. The bond coats improved the adhesion strength, measured by a modified ASTM D 3167-76 peel test, by up to 100% and also the resorption resistance as determined by in vitro leaching in simulated protein-free body fluid for up to 28 days.

  12. CaO-P2O5 glass hydroxyapatite double-layer plasma-sprayed coating: in vitro bioactivity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, M P; Monteiro, F J; Santos, J D

    1999-06-15

    Double-layer composite coatings composed of a P2O5-based glass/Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HA) mixture top layer and a simple HA underlayer, on Ti-6Al-4V substrates, were prepared using a plasma-spraying technique. The in vitro bioactivity of these coatings was assessed by immersion testing in simulated body fluid. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and the ionic solution changes followed by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the molybdenum blue method demonstrated that these composite coatings induce a faster surface Ca-P layer formation than the simple HA coatings used as a control. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis demonstrated that the Ca-P layer formed was apatite. The combination of SEM and XPS analyses showed that the apatite layer was a calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite with a Ca/P ranging from 1.3 to 1.4 with CO3(2-) groups contained in the structure. PMID:10321711

  13. Vacuum plasma sprayed coatings using ionic silver doped hydroxyapatite powder to prevent bacterial infection of bone implants.

    PubMed

    Guimond-Lischer, Stefanie; Ren, Qun; Braissant, Olivier; Gruner, Philipp; Wampfler, Bruno; Maniura-Weber, Katharina

    2016-06-01

    Fast and efficient osseointegration of implants into bone is of crucial importance for their clinical success; a process that can be enhanced by coating the implant surface with hydroxyapatite (HA) using the vacuum plasma spray technology (VPS). However, bacterial infections, especially the biofilm formation on implant surfaces after a surgery, represent a serious complication. With ever-increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is great interest in silver (Ag) as an alternative to classical antibiotics due to its broad activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. In the present study, silver ions were introduced into HA spray powder by ion exchange and the HA-Ag powder was applied onto titanium samples by VPS. The Ag-containing surfaces were evaluated for the kinetics of the silver release, its antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus as well as Escherichia coli, and possible cytotoxicity against human bone cells. The HA-Ag coatings with different concentrations of Ag displayed mechanical and compositional properties that fulfill the regulatory requirements. Evaluation of the Ag release kinetic showed a high release rate in the first 24 h followed by a decreasing release rate over the four subsequent days. The HA-Ag coatings showed no cytotoxicity to primary human bone cells while exhibiting antibacterial activity to E. coli and S. aureus. PMID:26964530

  14. Physicochemical study of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite-coated implants in humans.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, D E; Betts, F; Stranick, M; Doty, S; Boskey, A L

    2001-03-15

    This study represents the first report of the physical and chemical changes occurring in coatings of failed hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated titanium implants obtained from a comprehensive, multicenter human dental implant study. A total of 53 retrieved samples were obtained and compared with unimplanted controls with the same manufacturer and similar manufacture dates. Forty-five retrieved implants were examined for surface characteristics and bulk composition. Implants were staged based on implantation history: stage 1 (implants retrieved between surgical placement and surgical uncovering), stage 2 (implants retrieved at surgical uncovering and evaluation), stage 3 (implants retrieved between surgical uncovering evaluation and occlusal loading), and stage 4 (implants retrieved after occlusal loading). Scanning electron microscopy showed progressive coating thinning with implantation time. At later stages, bare Ti metal was detected by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Increases in Ti and Al (2-7.5 atm % each) were detected at the apical ends of all stage 4 samples. In unimplanted coatings, X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated the presence of amorphous calcium phosphate, beta-tricalcium phosphate, tetracalcium phosphate, and calcium oxide in addition to large hydroxyapatite crystals (c axis size, D002 = 429 +/- 13 A; a axis size, D300 = 402 +/- 11 A, a/c aspect ratio 0.92). The nonapatitic phases disappeared with increased implantation time, although there was a persistence of amorphous calcium phosphate. Bulk coating chemical analysis showed that Ca/P ratios for implant controls (1.81 +/- 0.01) were greater than stoichiometric HA (1.67) and decreased for implant stages 3 and 4 (1.69 +/- 0.09 and 1.67 +/- 0.09, respectively), explained by the dissolution of the non apatitic phases. Crystal sizes also changed with implantation times, being smaller than the control at all but stage 4. Fourier transform infrared analyses

  15. The influence of residual stress on the shear strength between the bone and plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yung-Chin; Yang, Chyun-Yu

    2008-03-01

    Plasma-sprayed HA coating (HAC) 50 and 200 microm thick on Ti6Al4V cylinders was transcortically implanted in the femora of canines. Push-out testing of implant-bone interfaces showed that the HAC coating exhibited higher shear strength at 50 microm coating than 200 microm one. The plasma-sprayed HACs were exhibited compressive residual stresses and the thicker HAC exhibited higher residual stress than that of the thinner HAC. Due to the structure for 50 and 200 microm implants were the same, meaning similar cohesive strength of the lamellar splats. And, there was no difference in the physiological environment; hence the difference of the shear strength for the 50 and 200 microm-HAC implants could best be attributed to the compressive residual stress existed in the HA coating. PMID:17701301

  16. Spheroidized Hydroxyapatite (HA) Powders Plasma Spraying of Combustion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Wang, Y.; Cheang, P.

    1998-06-01

    Tailoring powder characteristics to suit the plasma spray process can alleviate difficulties associated with the preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. Commercial HA feedstock normally exhibit an angular morphology and a wide particle size range that present difficulties in powder transport from the powder hopper to the plasma spray gun and in nonuniform melting of the powders in the plasma flame. Hence, combustion flame spheroidized hydroxyapatite (SHA) was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying. Spherical particles within a narrow particle size range are found to be more effective for the plasma spray processes. Results show coatings generated from spheroidized HA powders have unique surface and microstructure characteristics. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation of the coating surface revealed well-formed splats that spread and flatten into disc configurations with no disintegration, reflecting adequate melting of the HA in the plasma and subsequent deposition consistency. The surface topography is generally flat with good overlapping of subsequent spreading droplets. Porosity in the form of macropores is substantially reduced. The cross-section microstructure reveals a dense coating comprised of randomly stacked lamellae. The tensile bond strengths of the SHA coatings, phase composition, and characteristics of the coatings generated with different particle sizes (125 to 75 µm, 45 to 75 µm, 20 to 45 µm, and 5 to 20 µm) showed that a high bond strength of ˜16 MPa can be obtained with SHA in the size range from 20 to 45 µm. This can be improved further by a postspray treatment by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). However, larger particle size ranges exhibited higher degrees of crystallinity and relatively higher HA content among the various calcium phosphate phases found in the coatings.

  17. Mechanical properties, electrochemical corrosion and in-vitro bioactivity of yttria stabilized zirconia reinforced hydroxyapatite coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Yugeswaran, S; Yoganand, C P; Kobayashi, A; Paraskevopoulos, K M; Subramanian, B

    2012-05-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia reinforced hydroxyapatite coatings were deposited by a gas tunnel type plasma spray torch under optimum spraying conditions. For this purpose, 10, 20 and 30 wt% of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders were premixed individually with hydroxyapatite (HA) powder and were used as the feedstocks for the coatings. The effect of YSZ reinforcement on the phase formation and mechanical properties of the coatings such as hardness, adhesive strength and sliding wear rates was examined. The results showed that the reinforcement of YSZ in HA could significantly enhance the hardness and adhesive strength of the coatings. The potentiodynamic polarization and impedance measurements showed that the reinforced coatings exhibited superior corrosion resistance compared to the HA coating in SBF solution. Further the results of the bioactivity test conducted by immersion of coatings in SBF showed that after 10 days of immersion of the obtained coatings with all the above compositions commonly exhibited the onset of bioactive apatite formation except for HA+10%YSZ coating. The cytocompatibility was investigated by culturing the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) on the coating surface. The cell culture results revealed that the reinforced coatings have superior cell growth than the pure HA coatings. PMID:22498280

  18. Cyclic delamination behavior of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Hayato; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effect of a simulated body fluid (SBF) on the cyclic delamination behavior of a plasma-sprayed hydroxapatite (HAp) coating. A HAp coating is deposited on the surfaces of surgical metallic materials in order to enhance the bond between human bone and such surfaces. However, the HAp coating is susceptible to delamination by cyclic loading from the patient's gait. Although hip joints are subjected to both positive and negative moments, only the effects of tensile bending stresses on vertical crack propagation behavior have been investigated. Thus, the cyclic delamination behavior of a HAp coating was observed at the stress ratio R=-1 in order to determine the effects of tensile/compressive loading on the delamination behavior. The delamination growth rate increased with SBF immersion, which decreased the delamination life. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the selective phase dissolution in the HAp coating was promoted at interfaces. Finite element analysis revealed that the energy release rate Gmax showed a positive value even in cases with compressive loading, which is a driving force for the delamination of a HAp coating. A prediction model for the delamination growth life was developed that combines a fracture mechanics parameter with the assumed stress-dependent dissolution rate. The predicted delamination life matched the experimental data well in cases of lower stress amplitudes with SBF. PMID:27287152

  19. Plasma-Sprayed Coatings on Porous Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibert, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Need for combining benefits of duplex thermal-barrier coatings with film cooling on gas-turbine vanes and blades stimulated development of improved method for plasma spraying these coatings. Method reduces blocking of holes by plasma-sprayed material and at same time reduces base-metal oxidation during coating operation. Features provide potential for increased engine efficiency and power, reduced fuel consumption, use of less costly materials or construction procedures, and extended life and durability.

  20. A human retrieval study of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite-coated plateau root form implants after 2 months to 13 years in function.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Estevam A; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Giro, Gabriela; Suzuki, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bioactive ceramics in various physical and chemical formulations have been extensively utilized as biomaterials for bone regeneration/conduction. However, the determination of their in vivo temporal behavior from the short to long term in humans has been a challenge due to the lack of physical reference for morphologic and morphometric evaluation. The present study evaluated bone morphology and morphometry (bone-to-implant contact [BIC]) around plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (PSHA)-coated endosseous implants that were retrieved due to prosthetic reasons while successfully in function at the posterior region of the jaws from as early as 2 months to ∼13 years after a 6-month healing period after placement. Bone morphology was evaluated by light microscopy, and BIC was determined using computer software. Irrespective of the time in vivo, lamellar bone was observed in close contact with the implant PSHA-coated surface and between plateaus. BIC ranged from ∼35-95%, was highly directional, and Haversian-like osteonic morphology between plateaus was observed for most implants. The PSHA coating was present with little variation in thickness between the samples retrieved regardless of time in vivo. PMID:21488826

  1. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  2. Monitoring Coating Thickness During Plasma Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution video measures thickness accurately without interfering with process. Camera views cylindrical part through filter during plasma spraying. Lamp blacklights part, creating high-contrast silhouette on video monitor. Width analyzer counts number of lines in image of part after each pass of spray gun. Layer-by-layer measurements ensure adequate coat built up without danger of exceeding required thickness.

  3. Scratch and wear behaviour of plasma sprayed nano ceramics bilayer Al2O3-13 wt%TiO2/hydroxyapatite coated on medical grade titanium substrates in SBF environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-10-01

    Among the various coating techniques, plasma spray coating is an efficient technique to protect the metal surface from the various surface problems like wear and corrosion. The aim of this present work is to design and produce a bilayer coating on the non- toxic commercially pure titanium (denoted as CP-Ti) implant substrate in order to improve the biocompatibility and surface properties. To achieve that, Al2O3-13 wt%TiO2 (AT13) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) were coated on CP-Ti implant substrate using plasma spray coating technique. Further, the coated substrates were subjected to various characterization techniques. The crystallite size of coated HAP and its morphological studies were carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. The wear test on the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti implant surface was conducted using ball-on-disc tester under SBF environment at 37 °C, in order to determine the wear rate and the coefficient of friction. The adhesion strength of the bilayer coated surface was evaluated by micro scratch tester under the ramp load conditions with load range of 14-20 N. The above said studies were repeated on the single layer coated HAP and AT13 implant surfaces. The results reveal that the bilayer (AT13/HAP) coated CP-Ti surface has the improved wear rate, coefficient of friction in compared to single layer coated HAP and AT13 surfaces.

  4. Deposition of Hard Chrome Coating onto Heat Susceptible Substrates by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma spray requires relatively low power, which is lower than 1 kW in comparison to other plasma spraying method. Until now, we are able to deposit Cu and Hydroxyapatite coating onto heat susceptible substrate, CFRP which are difficult for conventional plasma spray due to the excessive heat input. In this paper, a hard chromium coating was deposited onto SUS304 and CFRP by a low power microwave plasma spray technique. By controlling the working gas flow rate and spraying distance, a hard chrome coating with thickness of approximately 30 μm was successfully deposited onto CFRP substrate with hardness of 1110 Hv0.05. Furthermore, the coating produced here is higher than that produced by hard chrome plating.

  5. Calcium phosphate coating on titanium using laser and plasma spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mangal

    Though calcium phosphate (CaP) coated implants are commercially available, its acceptance is still not wide spread due to challenges related to weaker interfacial bonding between metal and ceramic, and low crystallinity of hydroxyapatite (HA). The objectives of this research are to improve interfacial strength, crystallinity, phase purity and bioactivity of CaP coated metallic implants for orthopaedic applications. The rationale is that forming a diffuse and gradient metal-ceramic interface will improve the interfacial strength. Moreover, reducing CaP particles exposure to high temperature during coating preparation, can lead to improvement in both crystallinity and phase purity of CaP. In this study, laser engineered net shaping (LENS(TM)) was used to coat Ti metal with CaP. LENS(TM) processing enabled generation of Ti+TCP (tricalcium phosphate) composite coating with diffused interface, that also increased the coating hardness to 1049+/-112 Hv compared to a substrate hardness of 200+/-15 Hv. In vitro bone cell-material interaction studies confirmed the bioactivity of TCP coatings. Antimicrobial properties of the TCP coatings were improved by silver (Ag) electrodeposition. Along with LENS(TM), radio frequency induction plasma spray, equipped with supersonic plasma nozzle, was used to prepare HA coatings on Ti with improved crystallinity and phase purity. The coating was made of multigrain HA particles of ˜200 nm in size, which consisted of 15--20 nm HA grains. In vitro bone cell-material interaction and in vivo rat model studies confirmed the HA coatings to be bioactive. Furthermore, incorporation of Sr2+ improved bone cell of HA coatings interaction. A combination of LENS(TM) and plasma spray was used to fabricate a compositionally graded HA coatings on Ti where the microstructure varied from pure HA at the surface to pure Ti substrate with a diffused Ti+TCP composite region in between. The plasma spray system was used to synthesize spherical HA nano powder from

  6. Erosion-resistance of plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Z.; Zhang, X.; Song, J.

    1999-12-01

    Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}/NiCr, ZrO{sub 2}/NiCr, WTiC{sub 2}/NiCr, and X40 were plasma sprayed on the substrate 1Cr18NI9Ti in order to solve the erosion wear at high temperature encountered in the oil-refining industry. A series of properties of the coatings, including their microstructure, hardness, and erosion-behavior, have been tested. The test results show that the properties of the coatings have a significant effect on their erosion-resistant performance. Good erosion-resistant materials need to be hard and tough. Both Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}/NiCr and X40 have good erosion resistance at elevated temperature.

  7. Prediction of cyclic delamination lives of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrates with considering wear and dissolutions.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Kojima, Daisuke; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    This study aims at developing the prediction model of cyclic delamination lives of plasma-sprayed HAp coating on Ti-6Al-4V substrate by considering wear by interface contacts and dissolution effect by Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). Delamination of HAp coating can lead to loosening of implants stem and final failure in vivo. In the fracture mechanism of interfaces between HAp coating with Ti substrates, only adhesive strength (interracial tensile strength) or fatigue behavior by longitudinal cracking have been observed. Cyclic delamination mechanism by considering various loading modes and corrosion effect has not been revealed yet. The interface delamination rates by cyclic loading were much higher than those by static loading tests. The result clearly demonstrated that the interface demalination behaviors are dominated not by maximum stress, but by stress range. Surface profile measurement and SEM observation also demonstrated damages by interface contact or third body wear at delamination tips of HAp coating only in the cases of compressions. The mechanisms of acceleration on the delaminations are third-body wear or wedge effect by worn particles which increased mean stress level during cyclic loading. Cyclic loading tests under SBF also revealed that cyclic delamination lives were shortened probably due to crevice corrosion at interfaces. Dissolutions at the tips of delaminations were observed by SEM images under tensile loading condition in SBF. Linearly adding the effects of wear and dissolutions into Paris law could successfully predict the delamination lives of HAp coating for various loading ratios in SBF. PMID:27498422

  8. Thermal Expansion of Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S V.; Palczer, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic Cu-8%Cr, Cu-26%Cr, Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, NiAl and NiCrAlY monolithic coatings were fabricated by vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal expansion property measurements between 293 and 1223 K. The corrected thermal expansion, (DL/L(sub 0) varies with the absolute temperature, T, as (DL/L(sub 0) = A(T - 293)(sup 3) + BIT - 293)(sup 2) + C(T - 293) + D, where, A, B, C and D are thermal, regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for all of the coatings except for data obtained on the Cu-8%Cr and Cu-26%Cr coatings in the first heat-up cycle, which deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation is attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during the spraying of the coatings, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle. In the cases of Cu-8%Cr and NiAl, the thermal expansion data were observed to be reproducible for three specimens. The linear expansion data for Cu-8% Cr and Cu-26%Cr agree extremely well with rule of mixture (ROM) predictions. Comparison of the data for the Cu-8%Cr coating with literature data for Cr and Cu revealed that the thermal expansion behavior of this alloy is determined by the Cu-rich matrix. The data for NiAl and NiCrAlY are in excellent agreement with published results irrespective of composition and the methods used for processing the materials. The implications of these results on coating GRCop-84 copper alloy combustor liners for reusable launch vehicles are discussed.

  9. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of plasma-sprayed bioactive akermanite coatings.

    PubMed

    Yi, Deliang; Wu, Chengtie; Ma, Xubing; Ji, Heng; Zheng, Xuebin; Chang, Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings on titanium (Ti) alloys play an important role in orthopedic applications. In this study, akermanite (Ca(2)MgSi(2)O(7)) bioactive coatings are prepared through a plasma spraying technique. The bonding strength between the coatings and Ti-6Al-4V substrates is around 38.7-42.2 MPa, which is higher than that of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings reported previously. The prepared akermanite coatings reveal a distinct apatite-mineralization ability in simulated body fluid. Furthermore, akermanite coatings support the attachment and proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). The proliferation rate of BMSCs on akermanite coatings is obviously higher than that on HA coatings. PMID:23159958

  10. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  11. Influence of plasma spraying deposition process on optical properties of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belka, Radosław; Kowalski, Szymon; Żórawski, Wojciech; Suchańska, Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is a well-known bioceramic, nonorganic material of the bones of the vertebrate responsible for their mechanical durability. In human bones it occupies 60-80 % of the volume depending on a number of factors. Synthetic HAp is valued in bone endoprosthetic to its high biocompatibility. It is widely used to fill cavities of bone and as the coating of bone implants to increase their biocompatibility and adhesion to bone surface. In this paper a diffuse reflectance spectra of plasma-spraying deposited hydroxyapatite were presented and compared with pure powder samples. Optical band gap were estimated basing on Kubelka-Munk functions and Tauc plot extrapolation. We found that deposition process affects the value of band gap.

  12. Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Berndt, C. C.; Herman, H.

    1983-01-01

    Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed 8 wt pct-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings and powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction. Step scanning was used for increased peak resolution. Plasma spraying of the YSZ powder into water or onto a steel substrate to form a coating reduced the cubic and monoclinic phases with a simultaneous increase in the tetragonal phase. Heat treatment of the coating at 1150 C for 10 h in an Ar atmosphere increased the amount of cubic and monoclinic phases. The implications of these transformations on coating performance and integrity are discussed.

  13. Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, K. E.; Lagedrost, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed materials were determined for the following plasma sprayed materials: CaO - stabilized ZrO2, Y2O3 - stabilized ZerO2, Al2O3, HfO2 Mo, nichrome, NiAl, Mo-ZrO2, and MoAl2O3 mixtures. In all cases the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed materials was found to be considerably lower than that of the bulk material. The flash-laser thermal diffusivity technique was used both for diffusivity determination of single-layer materials and to determine the thermal contact resistance at the interface of two-layer specimens.

  14. Tensile adhesion test measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings are briefly studied, including a critical analysis of the experimental scatter for duplicate tests. The application of a simple method which presents adhesion strength data in a fracture mechanics perspective is demonstrated. Available data are analyzed in a way which suggests an approach to finding the overall defect contribution to reducing the apparent strength of coatings.

  15. Porosity in plasma sprayed alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ilavsky, J.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Goland, A.N.; Long, G.G.; Krueger, S.; Allen, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the porosity of plasma sprayed deposits of alumina in as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions. SANS results were compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and water immersion techniques. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering yields a volume-weighted effective pore radius (R{sub eff}), for pores with sizes between 0.08 and 10{mu}m, the pore volume in this size region, and from the Porod region, the surface area of pores of all sizes.

  16. Development of plasma spray coated cylinder liners

    SciTech Connect

    Tricard, M.; Hagan, J.; Redington, P.; Subramanian, K.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-09-01

    Improved fuel economy and reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, such insulation will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150 C to over 300 C. Since existing ring/liner materials cannot withstand these higher operating temperatures alternatives are needed for this critical tribological interface. This paper describes the development of a cost effective ID grinding technique for machining the bores of plasma sprayed diesel engine cylinder liners.

  17. Properties of magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite and the plasma coatings based on it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyasnikova, A. V.; Pichkhidze, S. Ya.; Dudareva, O. A.; Markelova, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite is synthesized and deposited by plasma spraying, and the coating and the products of hydroxyapatite decomposition are analyzed. The phase composition of magnesium- substituted hydroxyapatite deposited by plasma spraying undergoes changes. The coating consisting of molten magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite powder particles with pores between them has a homogeneous structure over the surface and throughout the internal structure and adhesion characteristics that exceed those of hydroxyapatite coatings.

  18. Crystallization behavior of plasma-sprayed lanthanide magnesium hexaaluminate coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-liang; Meng, Hui-min; Tang, Jing

    2014-12-01

    LaMgAl11O19 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying. The crystallization behavior of the coatings and the synthesis mechanism of LaMgAl11O19 powders were researched. The results showed that the plasma-sprayed coatings contained some amorphous phase, and LaMgAl11O19 powders were partially decomposed into Al2O3, LaAlO3, and MgAl2O4 in the plasma spraying process. The amorphous phase was recrystallized at a temperature of approximately 1174.9°C, at which level the decomposed Al2O3, LaAlO3, and MgAl2O4 reacted again. The resynthesis temperature of LaMgAl11O19 in the plasma-sprayed coatings was lower than that of LaMgAl11O19 in the original raw powders. The synthesis mechanism of LaMgAl11O19 powders can be summarized as follows: during the first part of the overall reaction, La2O3 reacts with Al2O3 to form LaAlO3 at approximately 900°C, and then LaAlO3 further reacts with Al2O3 and MgAl2O4 to produce LaMgAl11O19 at approximately 1200°C.

  19. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  20. HVOF and plasma sprayed molybdenum coatings -- microstructure and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, S.; Kreye, H.

    1995-12-31

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spray experiments were carried out to investigate the oxidation mechanism of molybdenum in the spray process and to determine how the various process parameters affect the microstructure and properties of the coatings. HVOF coatings exhibit their highest hardness and wear resistance at an oxygen content of 6 to 8% by weight. Such an oxygen level can be achieved with Mo and Mo-MoO{sub 2} composite powders as well. In the plasma spray process oxidation of molybdenum is less pronounced and Mo-MoO{sub 2} composite powders containing 6 to 8% oxygen have to be used to obtain similar properties as compared to HVOF-coatings. When Mo-Mo{sub 2}C composite powders are used oxidation of molybdenum becomes greatly reduced and highly wear resistant coatings are obtained at a low hardness level in both spray processes.

  1. Nano-structural bioactive gradient coating fabricated by computer controlled plasma-spraying technology.

    PubMed

    Ning, C Y; Wang, Y J; Lu, W W; Qiu, Q X; Lam, R W M; Chen, X F; Chiu, K Y; Ye, J D; Wu, G; Wu, Z H; Chow, S P

    2006-10-01

    The poor mechanical property of hydroxyapatite was the major problem for load bearing and implant coating in clinical applications. To overcome this weakness, a bioactive gradient coating with a special design composition of hydroxyapatite (HA), ZrO2, Ti, bioglass was developed. This 120 microm coating with an upper layer of 30-50 microm porous HA produced by computer controlled plasma spraying which maintained energy level of the plasma which ensure proper melting of powder. The crystal size of the coating was 18.6-26.2 nm. Transformation of t-ZrO2 to m-ZrO2 reduced the thermal stress that weakened the coating and lowered down interfacial strength of the coating and metal substrate. Thermal stress of sprayed coating was 16.4 MPa which was much smaller than the sample without thermal treatment of 67.1 MPa. Interfacial strength between the coating and metal substrate was 53 MPa which is much higher than conventional Hydroxyapatite coating. Based on XRD analysis crystallinity of HA approached 98%. Therefore, high temperature treatment improved long term stability of the coating through improved crystallinity of hydroxyapatite and reduced other impure calcium phosphate phase. PMID:16977384

  2. Analytical and mechanical testing of high velocity oxy-fuel thermal sprayed and plasma sprayed calcium phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Haman, J D; Chittur, K K; Crawmer, D E; Lucas, L C

    1999-01-01

    Plasma spraying (PS) is the most frequently used coating technique for implants; however, in other industries a cheaper, more efficient process, high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spraying (HVOF), is in use. This process provides higher purity, denser, more adherent coatings than plasma spraying. The primary objective of this work was to determine if the use of HVOF could improve the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate coatings. Previous studies have shown that HVOF calcium phosphate coatings are more crystalline than plasma sprayed coatings. In addition, because the coatings are exposed to more complex loading profiles in vivo than standard ASTM tensile tests provide, a secondary objective of this study was to determine the applicability of four-point bend testing for these coatings. Coatings produced by HVOF and PS were analyzed by profilometry, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, four-point bend, and ASTM C633 tensile testing. HVOF coatings were found to have lower amorphous calcium phosphate content, higher roughness values, and lower ASTM C633 bond strengths than PS coatings; however, both coatings had similar crystal unit cell sizes, phases present (including hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and tetracalcium phosphate), and four-point bend bond strengths. Thus, the chemical, structural, and mechanical results of this study, in general, indicate that the use of HVOF to produce calcium phosphate coatings is equivalent to those produced by plasma spraying. PMID:10556851

  3. Plasma-sprayed CaTiSiO5 ceramic coating on Ti-6Al-4V with excellent bonding strength, stability and cellular bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chengtie; Ramaswamy, Yogambha; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Guocheng; Zreiqat, Hala

    2008-01-01

    Novel Ca-Si-Ti-based sphene (CaTiSiO5) ceramics possess excellent chemical stability and cytocompatibility. The aim of this study was to prepare sphene coating on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) for orthopaedic applications using the plasma spray method. The phase composition, surface and interface microstructure, coating thickness, surface roughness and bonding strength of the plasma-sprayed sphene coating were analysed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and the standard mechanical testing of the American Society for Testing and Materials, respectively. The results indicated that sphene coating was obtained with a uniform and dense microstructure at the interface of the Ti-6Al-4V surface and the thickness and surface roughness of the coating were approximately 150 and 10 μm, respectively. Plasma-sprayed sphene coating on Ti-6Al-4V possessed a significantly improved bonding strength and chemical stability compared with plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HAp) coating. Plasma-sprayed sphene coating supported human osteoblast-like cell (HOB) attachment and significantly enhanced HOB proliferation and differentiation compared with plasma-sprayed HAp coating and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V. Taken together, plasma-sprayed sphene coating on Ti-6Al-4V possessed excellent bonding strength, chemical stability and cellular bioactivity, indicating its potential application for orthopaedic implants. PMID:18664431

  4. Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler; Kulkarni, Anand

    2009-04-15

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

  5. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

  6. Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Xie, L.; Gell, M.; Padture, N. P.; Cetegen, B.; Ozturk, A.; Ma, X.; Roth, J.; Xiao, T. D.; Bryant, P. E. C.

    2004-03-01

    A novel process, solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS), is presented for depositing thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), in which aqueous chemical precursors are injected into a standard direct current plasma spray system. The resulting coatings microstructure has three unique features: (1) ultra fine splats (1 µm), (2) nanometer and micron-sized interconnected porosity, and (3) closely spaced, through-thickness cracks. Coatings over 3 mm thick can be readily deposited using the SPPS process. Coating durability is excellent, with SPPS coatings showing, in furnace cycling tests, 2.5 times the spallation life of air plasma coatings (APS) and 1.5 times the life of electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) coatings. The conductivity of SPPS coatings is lower than EB-PVD coatings and higher than the best APS coatings. Manufacturing cost is expected to be similar to APS coatings and much lower than EB-PVD coatings. The SPPS deposition process includes droplet break-up and material arriving at the deposition surface in various physical states ranging from aqueous solution, gel phase, to fully-molten ceramic. The relation between the arrival state of the material and the microstructure is described.

  7. Plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, H. H.; Logan, W. R.; Harada, Y.

    1982-01-01

    One of the most important criterion for acceptable commercial application of a multiple phase composition is uniformity and reproducibility. This means that the performance characteristics of the coat - e.g., its lubricating properties, bond strength to the substrate, and thermal properties - can be readily predicted to give a desired performance. The improvement of uniformity and reproducibility of the coats, the oxidation behavior at three temperature ranges, the effect of bond coat and the effect of preheat treatment as measured by adhesive strength tests, coating examination procedures, and physical property measurements were studied. The following modifications improved the uniformity and reproducibility: (1) changes and closer control in the particle size range of the raw materials used, (2) increasing the binder content from 3.2% to 4.1% (dried weight), and (3) analytical processing procedures using step by step checking to assure consistency.

  8. Plasma-spraying synthesis of high-performance photocatalytic TiO2 coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo; Shibata, Yoshitaka; Maeda, Masakatsu; Miyano, Yasuyuki; Murai, Kensuke; Ohmori, Akira

    2014-08-01

    Anatase (A-) TiO2 is a photocatalytic material that can decompose air-pollutants, acetaldehyde, bacteria, and so on. In this study, three kinds of powder (A-TiO2 without HAp, TiO2 + 10mass%HAp, and TiO2+30mass%HAp, where HAp is hydroxyapatite and PBS is polybutylene succinate) were plasma sprayed on biodegradable PBS substrates. HAp powder was mixed with A-TiO2 powder by spray granulation in order to facilitate adsorption of acetaldehyde and bacteria. The crystal structure was almost completely maintained during the plasma spray process. HAp enhanced the decomposition of acetaldehyde and bacteria by promoting adsorption. A 10mass% HAp content was the most effective for decomposing acetaldehyde when plasma preheating of the PBS was not carried out before the plasma spraying. The plasma preheating of PBS increased the yield rate of the spray process and facilitated the decomposition of acetaldehyde by A-TiO2 coatings without HAp. HAp addition improved photocatalytic sterilization when plasma preheating of the PBS was performed.

  9. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces. PMID:27091306

  10. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces. PMID:27091306

  11. Smart coating technology by gas tunnel type plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akira

    2008-10-01

    Nano-science & technology is one of the most important scientific fields, and the material processing using the nano-technology is now advanced towards more precise and controllable smart stage. Regarding thermal processing, plasma system with high precise, has been expected for smart thermal processing. The gas tunnel type plasma system developed by the author exhibits high energy density and also high efficiency. Among the applications to the various thermal processing, one practical application is plasma spraying of ceramics such as A12O3 and ZrO2. The characteristics of these ceramic coatings were superior to the conventional ones. The ZrO2 composite coating has the possibility of the development of high functionally graded TBC (thermal barrier coating). In this study, the performance such as the mechanical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the alumina/zirconia functionally graded TBCs produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying was investigated and discussed. The results showed that the alumina/zirconia composite system exhibited the improvement of mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. Now, one of the advanced plasma application, a smart coating technology, is expected to obtain the desired characteristics of ceramics with improved corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, and wear resistance.

  12. Program for plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for preparing composite powders of the three coating components was developed and a procedure that can be used in applying uniform coatings of the composite powders was demonstrated. Composite powders were prepared by adjusting particle sizes of the components and employing a small amount of monoaluminum phosphate as an inorganic binder. Quantitative microscopy (image analysis) was found to be a convenient method of characterizing the composition of the multiphase plasma-sprayed coatings. Area percentages and distribution of the components were readily obtained by this method. The adhesive strength of the coating to a nickel-chromium alloy substrate was increased by about 40 percent by a heat treatment of 20 hours at 650 C.

  13. High resolution video monitoring of coating thickness during plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to monitoring the thickness of plasma sprayed coatings during application is described. The method employs a high resolution video camera and width analyzer to accurately measure the dimensions of samples having simple geometries. This approach is best suited for cylindrical or flat substrates but it may also work for selected locations on more complex geometries. Measurement accuracy is a function of specimen dimensions and extent of magnification. Tolerances of plus or minus 0.5 mil (0.13 mm) on final coating thickness can be achieved. Additionally, the plot of cumulative coating thickess versus the number of passes has proven to be a useful diagnostic tool. While the ideal plot is linear, strong deviations from linearity - indicating the need for corrective action - may be observed.

  14. Deposition of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite-based biocompatible composite by reactive plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Dragoş, Uţu

    2012-02-01

    Titanium nitride is a bioceramic material successfully used for covering medical implants due to the high hardness meaning good wear resistance. Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic that contributes to the restoration of bone tissue, which together with titanium nitride may contribute to obtaining a superior composite in terms of mechanical and bone tissue interaction matters. The paper presents the experimental results in obtaining composite layers of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite by reactive plasma spraying in ambient atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that in both cases of powders mixtures used (10% HA + 90% Ti; 25% HA + 75% Ti), hydroxyapatite decomposition occurred; in variant 1 the decomposition is higher compared with the second variant. Microstructure of the deposited layers was investigated using scanning electron microscope, the surfaces presenting a lamellar morphology without defects such as cracks or microcracks. Surface roughness values obtained vary as function of the spraying distance, presenting higher values at lower thermal spraying distances.

  15. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  16. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 1170 K (1650 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma spray of Nichrome matrix composite contains dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. Coatings can be applied to bearing journals and bearing bores. Coating was easily machinable and had excellent bond strength on substrate metal.

  17. Plasma sprayed rutile titania-nanosilver antibacterial coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinjin; Zhao, Chengjian; Zhou, Jingfang; Li, Chunxia; Shao, Yiran; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Yingchun

    2015-11-01

    Rutile titania (TiO2) coatings have superior mechanical properties and excellent stability that make them preferential candidates for various applications. In order to prevent infection arising from bacteria, significant efforts have been focused on antibacterial TiO2 coatings. In the study, titania-nanosilver (TiO2/Ag) coatings with five different kinds of weight percentages of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by plasma spray. The feedstock powders, which had a composition of rutile TiO2 powders containing 1-10,000 ppm AgNPs, were double sintered and deposited on stainless steel substrates with optimized spraying parameters. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to analysize the phase composition and surface morphology of TiO2/Ag powders and coatings. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were employed to examine the antibacterial activity of the as-prepared coatings by bacterial counting method. The results showed that silver existed homogeneously in the TiO2/Ag coatings and no crystalline changed happened in the TiO2 structure. The reduction ratios on the TiO2/Ag coatings with 10 ppm AgNPs were as high as 94.8% and 95.6% for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively, and the TiO2/Ag coatings with 100-1000 ppm AgNPs exhibited 100% bactericidal activity against E. coli and S. aureus, which indicated the TiO2/Ag coatings with more than 10 ppm AgNPs had strong antibacterial activity. Moreover, the main factors influencing the antibacterial properties of TiO2/Ag coatings were discussed with grain size and the content of silver as well as the microstructure of the coatings.

  18. Improved uniformity of multiphase ceramic-metal plasma-sprayed coats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, H. H.; Logan, W. R.; Harada, Y.; Jacobson, T. P.; Sliney, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Processing-technology development of a multiphase, self-lubricating, plasma-spray powder resulted in greater uniformity and reproducibility of plasma-sprayed coats. The effect of particle-size variation, binder concentration, and reproducible processing parameters are reported. Greater adhesive strengths of coats to substrates were achieved by particle-size variation, use of an intermediate bond coat such as Ni-Cr, or heat treatment. Quantitative analyses of polished, coated specimens are also given.

  19. Wear and microstructural integrity of ceramic plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Lynn C.

    1999-10-01

    In this work a series of ceramic plasma sprayed (PS) coatings, both alumina- and chromia-based, were sprayed according to a matrix of deposition parameters in order to produce a broad range of microstructures. To investigate the effect of splat size on the coating response, a series of mono-crystalline a -alumina powders with very narrow particle size ranges, nominally 5, 10 and 18 microns in diameter, was sprayed. The coatings were extensively characterized for a variety of microstructural features, including porosity, the angular distribution and density of microcracks as well as the lamellar, or splat, dimensions, using techniques of metallurgical analysis and electron microscopy. The coatings were then evaluated using a series of micromechanical techniques, including indentation, controlled scratch testing, abrasion and dry particle erosion, to investigate their response to different contact situations. It was found that the microstructural features with the most influence on the behaviour of ceramic PS coatings during contact, or wear, by hard particles include, in order of importance: (1) macro-porosity, (2) horizontal crack density, (3) degree of flattening of the splats and (4) volume of unmelted particles, which are all linked to the level and strength of interlamellar bonding in the coating. The major effect of the inter-lamellar bonding in ceramic PS coatings was seen in the wear mechanism transitions. As the level of inter-splat bonding in the coating decreases, the contact load at which the transition from plastic deformation to splat fracture and debonding occurs does as well. However, the load at which catastrophic brittle fracture and spalling occur is increased. All of the micromechanical and wear methods evaluated in the present work were sensitive to differences in the coating microstructures to varying degrees. The low load abrasion results showed the most sensitivity to the microstructural differences of the coatings, followed by controlled

  20. Smart Coating Technology by Gas Tunnel Type Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, A.

    2008-07-01

    Nano-science & technology is one of the most important scientific fields, and the material processing using the nano-technology is now advanced towards more precise and controllable smart stage. Regarding thermal processing, an important key should be the the performance of the applied heat source. A plasma is fundamentally the most superior heat source, because of high temperature, high energy density, easy controllable, etc. Therefore more precious plasma system has been expected for smart thermal processing. The gas tunnel type plasma system developed by the author has high energy density and also high efficiency. The concept and the feature of this plasma system are explained and the applications to the various thermal processing are described in this report. One practical application is plasma spraying of ceramics such as Al_2O_3 and ZrO_2. The characteristics of these ceramic coatings were superior to the conventional ones. The ZrO_2 composite coating has the possibility of the development of high functionally graded TBC (thermal barrier coating). Another application of gas tunnel type plasma is surface modification of metals. For example the TiN films were formed in a very short time of 5 s. Now, advanced plasma application of spraying methods as a smart coating technology is expected to obtain the desired characteristics of ceramics such as corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, and wear resistance by reducing the porosity and increasing the coating density. One application of the smart coating technology is a formation of the metallic glass coating with high function, and another is Hydroxiapatite coating for bio-medical application. The formation process of those coatings and the coating characteristics were investigated in this study.

  1. Suspension plasma spraying of nanostructured WC-12Co coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghaus, J. Oberste; Marple, B.; Moreau, C.

    2006-12-01

    Nanostructured WC-12% Co coatings were deposited by suspension plasma spraying of submicron feedstock powders, using an internal injection plasma torch. The liquid carrier used in this approach allows for controlled injection of much finer particles than in conventional thermal spraying, leading to thin coatings with a fine surface finish. A polyethylene-imine (PEI) dispersant was used to stabilize the colloidal suspension in an ethanol carrier. In-flight particle states were measured for a number of operating conditions of varying plasma gas flow rates, feed rates, and standoff distances and were related to the resulting microstructure, phase composition (EDS, SEM, XRD), and Vickers hardness. High in-flight particle velocities (>800 m/s) were generated, leading to dense coatings. It was observed that the coating quality was generally compromised by the high temperature and reactivity of the small particles. To compensate for this shortcoming, the suspension feed rate was adjusted, thereby varying the thermal load on the plasma. Results showed that a slightly larger agglomerate size, in conjunction with low particle jet temperatures, could somewhat limit the decomposition of WC into brittle W2C/W3C and amorphous cobalt containing binder phases.

  2. Plasma sprayed coatings as surface treatments of aluminum adherends

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.D.; Whisnant, P.L.; Groff, G.B.; Shaffer, D.K.

    1996-12-31

    Plasma sprayed coatings have been evaluated as surface treatments for aluminum substrates being prepared for adhesive bonding. Blends of an aluminum-silicon alloy and polyester give the best performance. To establish durability performance, wedge tests were done using four common epoxy adhesives without primers. In all cases, the 60%Al-Si/40%polyester coating gave results superior to those of FPL-etched specimens and, in some cases, performance equivalent to PAA specimens. This roughness provides excellent opportunity for mechanical interlocking or physical bonding and allows a complex interphase to be formed as the adhesive penetrates into the coating. Crack growth measurements and subsequent failure analysis using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that crack propagation occurs within this complex interphase. The results also show that the aluminum and polyester components are synergistic and blends of the two give better performance than either component by itself The aluminum gives strength to the coating while the polyester provides toughness and improves moisture resistance.

  3. Effects of Feedstock Decomposition and Evaporation on the Composition of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Schlegel, N.; Guignard, A.; Vaßen, R.; Guillon, O.

    2015-10-01

    Emerging new applications and growing demands of plasma-sprayed coatings have initiated the development of new plasma spray processes. One of them is suspension plasma spraying (SPS). The use of liquid feedstock such as suspensions yields higher flexibility compared to the conventional atmospheric plasma spray processes as even submicron-to nano-sized particles can be processed. This allows achieving particular microstructural features, e.g., porous segmented or columnar-structured thermal barrier coatings. To exploit the potentials of such novel plasma spray processes, the plasma-feedstock interaction must be understood better. In this study, decomposition and evaporation of feedstock material during SPS were investigated, since particular difficulties can occur with respect to stoichiometry and phase composition of the deposits. Plasma conditions were analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Experimental results are given, namely for gadolinium zirconate and for lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite deposition. Moreover, the applied OES approach is validated by comparison with the simpler actinometry method.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of plasma-sprayed HA/SiO(2) coatings for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Morks, M F

    2008-01-01

    Fused silica powder has been mixed with hydroxyapatite (HA) powder and plasma sprayed by using gas tunnel-type plasma jet. The influence of silica content (10 wt% and 20 wt%) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of HA-silica coatings was investigated. For investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of HA-silica coatings, SUS 304 stainless steel was used as substrate material. The spraying was carried out on roughened substrate in an atmospheric chamber. Scanning electron microscope micrographs of cross-sectioned HA/SiO(2) coatings showed that the sprayed HA coatings with 10 and 20 wt% SiO(2) have dense structure with low porosity compared to the pure HA coatings. On the other hand, as the amount of silica was increased the coatings became denser, harder and exhibited high abrasive wear resistance. The presence of silica significantly improved the adhesive strength of HA/SiO(2) coatings mainly due to the increase in bonding strength of the coating at the interface. PMID:19627776

  5. Phase transformation and wear studies of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings containing various mol% of yttria

    SciTech Connect

    Aruna, S.T. Balaji, N.; Rajam, K.S.

    2011-07-15

    Plasma sprayable grade zirconia powders doped with various mol% of yttria (0, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 mol%) were synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation route. The coprecipitation conditions were adjusted such that the powders possessed good flowability in the as calcined condition and thus avoiding the agglomeration step like spray drying. Identical plasma spray parameters were used for plasma spraying all the powders on stainless steel plates. The powders and plasma sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Zirconia powders are susceptible to phase transformations when subjected to very high temperatures during plasma spraying and XRD is insensitive to the presence of some non crystalline phases and hence Raman spectroscopy was used as an important tool. The microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings showed a bimodal distribution containing fully melted and unmelted zones. The microhardness and wear resistance of the plasma sprayed coatings were determined. Among the plasma sprayed coatings, 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia coating containing pure tetragonal zirconia showed the highest wear resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} Preparation plasma sprayable YSZ powders without any agglomeration process and plasma spraying {yields} Phase transformation studies of plasma sprayed YSZ coatings by XRD and Raman spectroscopy {yields} Microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings exhibited bimodal distribution {yields} Plasma sprayed 3 mol% YSZ coating exhibited the highest wear resistance {yields} Higher wear resistance is due to the higher fracture toughness of tetragonal 3 mol% YSZ phase.

  6. Young's Moduli of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pawlik, R.; Loewenthal, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic metallic copper alloy and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold spray (CS) or the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition processes. Dynamic elastic modulus property measurements were conducted on these monolithic coating specimens between 300 K and 1273 K using the impulse excitation technique. The Young's moduli decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature at all temperatures except in the case of the CS Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and VPS NiCrAlY, where deviations from linearity were observed above a critical temperature. It was observed that the Young's moduli for VPS Cu-8%Cr were larger than literature data compiled for Cu. The addition of 1%Al to Cu- 8%Cr significantly increased its Young's modulus by 12 to 17% presumably due to a solid solution effect. Comparisons of the Young s moduli data between two different measurements on the same CS Cu- 23%Cr-5%Al specimen revealed that the values measured in the first run were about 10% higher than those in the second run. It is suggested that this observation is due to annealing of the initial cold work microstructure resulting form the cold spray deposition process.

  7. Electrocatalytically Active Nickel-Based Electrode Coatings Formed by Atmospheric and Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasibeig, M.; Mousavi, M.; Ben Ettouill, F.; Moreau, C.; Wuthrich, R.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ni-based electrode coatings with enhanced surface areas, for hydrogen production, were developed using atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and suspension plasma spray (SPS) processes. The results revealed a larger electrochemical active surface area for the coatings produced by SPS compared to those produced by APS process. SEM micrographs showed that the surface microstructure of the sample with the largest surface area was composed of a large number of small cauliflower-like aggregates with an average diameter of 10 μm.

  8. Plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coating for NiAl-based intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Doychak, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system consists of two layers of a zirconia-yttria ceramic. The first layer is applied by low pressure plasma spraying. The second layer is applied by conventional atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. This facilitates the attachment of a durable thermally insulating ceramic coating directly to the surface of a highly oxidation resistant NiAl-based intermetallic alloy after the alloy has been preoxidized to promote the formation of a desirable Al2O3 scale.

  9. Surface characterization and cytotoxicity analysis of plasma sprayed coatings on titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Zia Ur; Shabib, Ishraq; Haider, Waseem

    2016-10-01

    In the realm of biomaterials, metallic materials are widely used for load bearing joints due to their superior mechanical properties. Despite the necessity for long term metallic implants, there are limitations to their prolonged use. Naturally, oxides of titanium have low solubilities and form passive oxide film spontaneously. However, some inclusion and discontinuity spots in oxide film make implant to adopt the decisive nature. These defects heighten the dissolution of metal ions from the implant surface, which results in diminishing bio-integration of titanium implant. To increase the long-term metallic implant stability, surface modifications of titanium alloys are being carried out. In the present study, biomimetic coatings of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite and titanium were applied to the surface of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V. Surface morphology and surface chemistry were studied using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were carried out in order to study their electrochemical behavior. Moreover, cytotoxicity analysis was conducted for osteoblast cells by performing MTS assay. It is concluded that both hydroxyapatite and titanium coatings enhance corrosion resistance and improve cytocompatibility. PMID:27287167

  10. Engineering the Microstructure of Solution Precursor Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolissi, G.; Chazelas, C.; Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the fundamental reactions that occur in-flight during the solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) of solutions containing Zr- and Y-based salts in water or ethanol solvent. The effect of plasma jet composition (pure Ar, Ar-H2 and Ar-He-H2 mixtures) on the mechanical break-up and thermal treatment of the solution, mechanically injected in the form of a liquid stream, was investigated. Observation of the size evolution of the solution droplets in the plasma flow by means of a laser shadowgraphy technique, showed that droplet break-up was more effective and solvent evaporation was faster when the ethanol-based solution was injected into binary or ternary plasma gas mixtures. In contrast with water-based solutions, residual liquid droplets were always detected at the substrate location. The morphology and structure of the material deposited onto stainless steel substrates during single-scan experiments were characterised by SEM, XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy and were shown to be closely related to in-flight droplet behaviour. In-flight pyrolysis and melting of the precursor led to well-flattened splats, whereas residual liquid droplets at the substrate location turned into non pyrolysed inclusions. The latter, although subsequently pyrolysed by the plasma heat during the deposition of entire coatings, resulted in porous "sponge-like" structures in the deposit.

  11. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  12. Oxidation and degradation of a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens consisting of single-crystal superalloy substrates, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed 7.5 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia top coatings was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis at 1150{degrees}C for up to 200 hours. Coating durability was assessed by furnace cycling at 1150{degrees}C. Coatings and reaction products were identified by x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  13. Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Barrier Applications Against Molten Uranium Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Pragatheeswaran, A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramic coatings are applied on engineering components for protecting them from large thermal load and hot corrosion. Choices of coating material for protection against hot corrosion by uranium are few, because of its high reactivity. Yttrium oxide has a high melting temperature and is inert towards uranium. Therefore, yttrium oxide coatings are effective as a barrier against hot corrosion by uranium and its alloys. This paper gives a summary of the developmental work on plasma-sprayed yttria coatings for corrosion barrier applications against molten uranium. Results show that plasma-sprayed yttria coatings offer a long-term solution to hot corrosion problems.

  14. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  15. Atmosphere corrosion behavior of plasma sprayed and laser remelted coatings on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Gongying; Wong, T. T.; An, Geng; MacAlpine, J. M. K.

    2006-01-01

    Nickel and chromium coatings were produced using plasma spraying and laser remelting on the copper sheet. The corrosion test was carried out in an acidic atmosphere, and the corrosive behaviors of both coatings and original copper samples were investigated by using an impedance comparison method. Experimental results show that nickel and chromium coatings display better corrosion resistance properties relative to the original pure copper sample. The corrosion rate of chromium coating is less than that of nickel coating, and corrosion resistances of laser remelted nickel and chromium samples are better than those of plasma sprayed samples. The corrosion deposit film of copper is loose compared with nickel and chromium.

  16. Life modeling of atmospheric and low pressure plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Argarwal, P.; Duderstadt, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The cycles-to-failure vs cycle duration data for three different thermal barrier coating systems, which consist of atmospheric pressure plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 over similarly deposited or low pressure plasma sprayed Ni-base alloys, are presently analyzed by means of the Miller (1980) oxidation-based life model. Specimens were tested at 1100 C for heating cycle lengths of 1, 6, and 20 h, yielding results supporting the model's value.

  17. Influence of Microstructure on Thermal Properties of Axial Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Curry, Nicholas; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Joshi, Shrikant; Vilemova, Monika; Pala, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    Suspension plasma spraying is a relatively new thermal spaying technique to produce advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and enables production of coatings with a variety of structures—highly dense, highly porous, segmented, or columnar. This work investigates suspension plasma-sprayed TBCs produced using axial injection with different process parameters. The influence of coating microstructure on thermal properties was of specific interest. Tests carried out included microstructural analysis, phase analysis, determination of porosity, and pore size distribution, as well as thermal diffusivity/conductivity measurements. Results showed that axial suspension plasma spraying process makes it possible to produce various columnar-type coatings under different processing conditions. Significant influence of microstructural features on thermal properties of the coatings was noted. In particular, the process parameter-dependent microstructural attributes, such as porosity, column density, and crystallite size, were shown to govern the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the coating.

  18. Oxidation Control of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Coatings Using Dry-Ice Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Dong, Shujuan; Coddet, Pierre; Hansz, Bernard; Grosdidier, Thierry; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed FeAl coatings has been remarkably limited because of oxidation and phase transformation during the high-temperature process of preparation. In the present work, FeAl intermetallic coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying combined with dry-ice blasting. The microstructure, oxidation, porosity, and surface roughness of FeAl intermetallic coatings were investigated. The results show that a denser FeAl coating with a lower content of oxide and lower degree of phase transformation can be achieved because of the cryogenic, the cleaning, and the mechanical effects of dry-ice blasting. The surface roughness value decreased, and the adhesive strength of FeAl coating increased after the application of dry-ice blasting during the atmospheric plasma spraying process. Moreover, the microhardness of the FeAl coating increased by 72%, due to the lower porosity and higher dislocation density.

  19. Feasibility study of plasma sprayed Al2O3 coatings as diffusion barrier on CFC components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Zhao, Lidong; Kopp, Nils; Warda, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) materials are increasingly applied as sample carriers in modern furnaces. Only their tendency to react with different metals at high temperatures by C-diffusion is a disadvantage, which can be solved by application of diffusion barriers. Within this study the feasibility of plasma sprayed Al2O3 coatings as diffusion barrier was studied. Al2O3 coatings were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS). The coatings were investigated in terms of their microstructure, bonding to CFC substrates and thermal stability. The results showed that Al2O3 could be well deposited onto CFC substrates. The coatings had a good bonding and thermal shock behavior at 1060°C. At higher temperature of 1270°C, crack network formed within the coating, showing that the plasma sprayed Al2O3 coatings are limited regarding to their application temperatures as diffusion barrier on CFC components.

  20. Characterisation of the TiO2 coatings deposited by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, M. L.; Benea, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma spraying of materials such as ceramics and non-metals, which have high melting points, has become a well-established commercial process. Such coatings are increasingly used in aerospace, automobile, textile, medical, printing and electrical industries to impart proprieties such as corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, wear resistance, etc. One of the most important characteristics of thermal barrier coatings is the ability to undergo fast temperature changes without failing, the so called thermal shock resistance. The formation of residual stresses in plasma sprayed ceramic and metallic coatings is a very complex process. Several factors, such as substrate material, substrate thickness, physical properties of both the substrate and the coating material, deposition rate, relative velocity of the plasma torch, etc. determine the final residual stress state of the coating at room temperature. Our objective is to characterize the titanium oxide and aluminium oxide coatings deposited by plasma spraying in structural terms, the resistance to thermal shock and residual stresses.

  1. Plasma spray processing of TiC-based coatings for sliding wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Mahesh

    Titanium carbide-reinforced metallic coatings, produced by plasma spraying, can be used for sliding wear resistant applications. The sliding wear properties of such coatings are governed to a large extent by the strength, structure and stability of the bond interface between the carbide and the metallic phases. In the present investigation, the microstructure and sliding wear properties of plasma sprayed metal-bonded TiC coatings containing up to 90 v/o carbide have been studied. It was shown that alloying of the metallic phase improved carbide retention in TiC cermets due to better interface bonding, and increased wear resistance and lowered sliding coefficient of friction. TiC-based coatings were produced from both physically blended and synthesized feed powders. It was observed that the precursor TiC-based powder morphology and structure greatly affected the plasma sprayed coating microstructures and the resultant physical and mechanical characteristics. Physical blending of powders induced segregation during spraying, leading to somewhat lower deposit efficiencies and coating uniformity, while synthesized and alloyed titanium carbide/metal composite powders reduced problems of segregation and reactions associated with plasma spraying of physically blended powders where the TiC was in direct contact with the plasma jet. To understand oxidation effects of the environment, Ti and TiC-based coatings were produced under low pressure (VPS), air plasma (APS) and shrouded plasma sprayed conditions. APS Ti and TiC-based powders with reactive matrices suffered severe oxidation decomposition during flight, leading to poor deposition efficiencies and oxidized microstructures. High particle temperatures and cold air plasma spraying. Coating oxidation due to reactions of the particles with the surrounding air during spraying reduced coating hardness and wear resistance. TiC-with Ti or Ti-alloy matrix coatings with the highest hardness, density and wear resistance was

  2. High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.; Yang, L.; Xu, Z.

    2004-08-01

    High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on carbon substrates have been studied by annealing and cyclic heat loading. The recrystallization temperature and an activation energy QR=126 kJ/mol for grain growth of tungsten coating by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) were estimated, and the microstructural changes of multi-layer tungsten and rhenium interface pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) with anneal temperature were investigated. Cyclic load tests indicated that pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating could withstand 1000 cycles at 33-35 MW/m 2 heat flux and 3 s pulse duration, and inert gas plasma spray (IPS)-tungsten coating showed local cracks by 300 cycles but did not induce failure by further cycles. However, the failure of pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating by fatigue cracking was observed under higher heat load (55-60 MW/m 2) for 420 and 230 cycles, respectively.

  3. Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Coatings Synthesized by the Liquid Precursor Plasma Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yanfeng; Song, Lei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Yi; Huang, Tao; Chen, Jiyong; Wu, Yao; Wu, Fang

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the liquid precursor plasma spraying process was used to manufacture P2O5-Na2O-CaO-SiO2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings (BGCCs), where sol and suspension were used as feedstocks for plasma spraying. The effect of precursor and spray parameters on the formation and crystallinity of BGCCs was systematically studied. The results indicated that coatings with higher crystallinity were obtained using the sol precursor, while nanostructured coatings predominantly consisting of amorphous phase were synthesized using the suspension precursor. For coatings manufactured from suspension, the fraction of the amorphous phase increased with the increase in plasma power and the decrease in liquid precursor feed rate. The coatings synthesized from the suspension plasma spray process also showed a good in vitro bioactivity, as suggested by the fast apatite formation when soaking into SBF.

  4. Use of plasma sprayed coatings as surface treatments for aluminum adherends

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.D.; Whisnant, P.L.; Groff, G.B.

    1996-12-31

    Surface treatments for metal adherends prior to adhesive bonding typically use chromates and/or strong acids and bases. Such materials are hazardous to personnel and harmful to the environment following disposal. To reduce release of these substances into the environment and lower disposal costs, plasma spray treatments are being developed as surface treatments for aluminum adherends. These treatments eliminate liquid and gaseous wastes and provide bond strength and durability comparable to that provided by the conventional chemical treatments. They have other potential advantages of being more suited for repair/refurbishment and less sensitive to metallurgical differences from alloy to alloy. Plasma sprayed coatings are used in a variety of applications where a coating tailored for specific properties is needed that may or may not be chemically or structurally similar to the base substrate. Plasma spraying has been shown to provide excellent high-temperature bond performance with titanium (unlike conventional oxidation treatments) and durability approaching that of phosphoric acid anodization for aluminum. Success has also been reported using other coatings on aluminum, titanium, and steel. Plasma spraying has the important advantage of versatility. A wide range of coatings (metals, ceramics, and polymers) can be deposited onto an equally wide range of substrates, and the coating properties can be optimized for a given application, independent of the substrate. Because of this versatility, plasma-sprayed coatings have been used for wear resistance, thermal barriers, EMI/RF shielding, corrosion resistance, slip/slide resistance, and biocompatibility in addition to adhesion.

  5. Structural, Mechanical and Erosion Properties of Yttrium Oxide Coatings by Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying for Electronics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Junya; Tang, Zhaolin; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Sato, Kazuto; Burgess, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Yttrium oxide (Y2O3) coatings have been prepared by axial suspension plasma spraying with fine powders. It is clarified that the coatings have high hardness, low porosity, high erosion resistance against CF4 -containing plasma and retention of smooth eroded surface. This suggests that the axial suspension plasma spraying of Y2O3 is applicable to fabricating equipment for electronic devices, such as dry etching. Surface morphologies of the slurry coatings with splats are similar to conventional plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coatings, identified from microstructural analysis. Dense coating structures with no lamellar boundaries have been seen, which is apparently different from the conventional coatings. It has also been found that crystal structure of the suspension coatings mainly composed of metastable monoclinic phase, whereas the powders and the conventional plasma spray coatings have stable cubic phase. Mechanism of coating formation by plasma spraying with fine powder slurries is discussed based on the results.

  6. Investigation on the suitability of plasma sprayed Fe Cr Al coatings as tritium permeation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, C.; Stein-Fechner, K.; Serra, E.; Glasbrenner, H.; Benamati, G.

    1999-08-01

    Results on the fabrication of a tritium permeation barrier by spraying Fe-Cr-Al powders are described. The sprayed coatings were deposited at temperatures below the Ac1 temperature of the ferritic-martensitic steel substrate and no post-deposition heat treatment was applied. The aim of the investigation was the determination of the efficiency of the coatings to act as tritium permeation barrier. Metallurgical investigations as well as hydrogen isotope permeation measurements were carried out onto the produced coatings. The depositions were performed on ferritic-martensitic steels by means of three types of spray techniques: high velocity oxy fuel, air plasma spray and vacuum plasma spray.

  7. New generation of plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Mullite is promising as a protective coating for silicon-based ceramics in aggressive high-temperature environments. Conventionally plasma-sprayed mullite on SiC tends to crack and debond on thermal cycling. It is shown that this behavior is due to the presence of amorphous mullite in the conventionally sprayed mullite. Heating the SiC substrate during the plasma spraying eliminated the amorphous phase and produced coatings with dramatically improved properties. The new coating exhibits excellent adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 to 1400 C. Preliminary tests showed good resistance to Na2CO3-induced hot corrosion.

  8. Performance comparison of plasma spray and physical vapor deposition BC23 coatings in the LM2500

    SciTech Connect

    Wortman, D.J.

    1985-11-01

    Operation of US Navy Component Improvement Program LM2500 engines on the GTS Callaghan has provided an at-sea test bed for evaluation of hot corrosion on gas turbine engine components. In a presentation at a previous International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings, (ICMC), comparison of several coatings applied by physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques were compared after LM2500 service. A three-step coating BC23 consisting of PVD CoCrAl followed by codeposition of hafnium and aluminum and an electroplated platinum layer was identified as the most corrosion-resistant coating of several PVD coatings tested. In this paper, a plasma sprayed version of BC23 is compared to the three-step BC23 coating on LM2500 Stage 2 HPT blades from the GTS Callaghan. The plasma sprayed coating PBC23 was produced by an argon-shrouded plasma spray process using prealloyed CoCrAlHfPt powder. The results showed that in this application, where low temperature hot corrosion (type 2) is the predominant mode of corrosion, the plasma sprayed coatings had less attack. These results are compared to laboratory hot corrosion tests and microprobe analysis to explain the improved corrosion resistance of PBC23.

  9. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  10. Efficiency of surface cleaning by a glow discharge for plasma spraying coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Kashapov, N. F.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Fadeev, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of the quality of cleaning steel surfaces by a glow discharge for plasma spraying. Shows the results of measurements of the angle of surface wetting and bond strength of the plasma coating to the surface treated. The dependence of the influence of the glow discharge power, chamber pressure, distance between the electrodes and the processing time of the surface on cleaning efficiency. Optimal fields of factors is found. It is shown increase joint strength coating and base by 30-80% as a result of cleaning the substrate surface by a glow discharge plasma spraying.

  11. Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of AlN Coatings: Influence of Aluminum Feedstock Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-03-01

    Feedstock powder characteristics (size distribution, morphology, shape, specific mass, and injection rate) are considered to be one of the key factors in controlling plasma-sprayed coatings microstructure and properties. The influence of feedstock powder characteristics to control the reaction and coatings microstructure in reactive plasma spraying process (RPS) is still unclear. This study, investigated the influence of feedstock particle size in RPS of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings, through plasma nitriding of aluminum (Al) feedstock powders. It was possible to fabricate AlN-based coatings through plasma nitriding of all kinds of Al powders in atmospheric plasma spray (APS) process. The nitriding ratio was improved with decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder, due to improving the nitriding reaction during flight. However, decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder suppressed the coatings thickness. Due to the loss of the powder during the injection, the excessive vaporization of fine Al particles and the completing nitriding reaction of some fine Al particles during flight. The feedstock particle size directly affects on the nitriding, melting, flowability, and the vaporization behaviors of Al powders during spraying. It concluded that using smaller particle size powders is useful for improving the nitriding ratio and not suitable for fabrication thick AlN coatings in reactive plasma spray process. To fabricate thick AlN coatings through RPS, enhancing the nitriding reaction of Al powders with large particle size during spraying is required.

  12. Failure of PVD/plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeria, V.; Andritschky, M.; Gruhn, H.; Mallener, W.; Buchkremer, H.; Stoever, D.

    1995-12-31

    ZrO{sub 2}7Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} plasma sprayed coatings (PS top coating) were applied on high temperature Ni-based alloys precoated by Physical Vapor Deposition with a thin, dense, stabilized zirconia coating (PVD bond coat). The PS coatings were applied by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (APS) and Inert gas Plasma Spraying (IPS at 2 bar) for different substrate temperatures. The thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were tested by furnace isothermal cycling and flame thermal cycling at maximum temperatures between 1,000 C and 1,150 C. The temperature gradients within the duplex PVD/PS thermal barrier coatings during the thermal cycling process were modeled using an unsteady heat transfer program. This modeling enables the authors to calculate the transient thermal strains and stresses which contribute to a better understanding of the failure mechanisms of the TBC during thermal cycling. They have also studied experimentally the adherence and failure modes of these coating systems during this high temperature testing. The TBC failure mechanism during thermal cycling is discussed in the light of coating transient stresses and substrate oxidation.

  13. Tailored plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings for aircraft gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennisi, F. J.; Gupta, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen plasma sprayed coating systems, nine based on the NiCoCrAly chemistry and nine based on the CoCrAly composition, were evaluated to identify coating systems which provide equivalent or superior life to that shown by the electron beam physical vapor deposited NiCoCrAly and CoCrAly coatings respectively. NiCoCrAly type coatings were examined on a single crystal alloy and the CoCrAly based coatings were optimized on the B1900+ Hf alloy. Cyclic burner rig oxidation and hot corrosion and tensile ductility tests used to evaluate the various coating candidates. For the single crystal alloy, a low pressure chamber plasma sprayed NiCoCrAly + Si coating exhibited a 2x oxidation life improvement at 1394 K (2050 F) over the vapor deposited NiCoCrAly material while showing equivalent tensile ductility. A silicon modified low pressure chamber plasma sprayed CoCrAly coating was found to be more durable than the baseline vapor deposited CoCrAly coating on the B1900+ Hf alloy.

  14. Improved plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings for aircraft gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennisi, F. J.; Gupta, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen plasma sprayed coating systems, nine based on the NiCoCrAlY chemistry and nine based on the CoCrAlY composition, were evaluated to identify coating systems which will provide equivalent or superior life to that shown by the electron beam physical vapor deposited NiCoCrAlY and CoCrAlY coatings respectively. NiCoCrAlY-type coatings were examined on a single crystal alloy and the CoCrAlY based coatings were optimized on the B1900 + Hf alloy. Cyclic burner rig oxidation and hot corrosion and tensile ductility tests were used to evaluate the various coating candidates. For the single crystal alloy, a low pressure chamber plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY + Si coating exhibited a 2X oxidation life improvement at 1121 C (2050 F) over the vapor deposited NiCoCrAlY material while showing equivalent tensile ductility. A silicon modified low pressure chamber plasma sprayed CoCrAlY coating was found to be more durable than the baseline vapor deposited CoCrAlY coating on the B1900 + Hf alloy.

  15. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-05-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  16. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  17. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M A; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Taylor, T A; Meier, G H

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  18. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to reduce fuel consumption of current commercial aircraft engines, methods were investigated for improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for use on vane platforms in the JT9D turbofan engine. Increased durability concepts under evaluation include use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application. Initial burner rig tests conducted at temperatures of 1010 C (1850 F) indicate that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coating systems were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 100-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  19. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation is reported of improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for the vane platforms in the JT9d turbofan engine. The program aims for reduced fuel consumption of commercial aircraft engines; the use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application are being evaluated. The initial burner rig tests at temperatures up to 1010 C indicated that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coatings were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 1000-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  20. Developing empirical relationships to estimate porosity and Young's modulus of plasma sprayed YSZ coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Rajendran, R.

    2014-03-01

    Plasma spraying process is an effective thermal spray process to deposit thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on the components of propulsion and land based gas turbines to enhance its performance. In this work, empirical relationships were developed to estimate TBCs performance characteristics (porosity and Young's modulus) of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings by incorporating independently controllable atmospheric plasma spray operational parameters (input power, standoff distance and powder feed rate) using response surface methodology (RSM). A central composite rotatable design with three factors and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Within the scope of the design space, the input power and the standoff distance appeared to be the most significant two parameters affecting the coating quality characteristics among the three investigated process parameters. Further, correlating the spray parameters with coating properties enables identification of characteristics regime to achieve desired quality of YSZ coatings.

  1. A review on calcium phosphate coatings produced using a sputtering process--an alternative to plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunzhi; Kim, Kyo-Han; Ong, Joo L

    2005-01-01

    New promising techniques for depositing hydroxyapatite (HA) and calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings on medical devices are continuously being investigated. Given the vast number of experimental deposition process currently available, this review will focus only on CaP and/or HA coatings produced using the sputtering process. This review will discuss the characterization of sputtered CaP coatings before and after post-deposition treatments and tissue responses to some of the characterized coating surfaces. From the studies observed in the literature, current research on sputtered CaP coatings has shown some promises that may eliminate some of the problems associated with the plasma-spraying process. It has been generally accepted that sputtered HA and CaP coatings improve bone strength and initial osseointegration rate. However, optimal coating properties required to achieve maximal bone response are yet to be reported. As such, the use of well-characterized sputtered CaP and/or HA surfaces in the evaluation of biological responses should be well documented to avoid controversial results. In addition, future investigations of the sputtering process should include clinical trials, to continue the understanding of bone responses to coated-implant surfaces of different properties, and the possibility of coupling sputtered HA and CaP coatings with growth factors. PMID:15262475

  2. Broadband Plasma-Sprayed Anti-reflection Coating for Millimeter-Wave Astrophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, O.; Lee, A.; Raum, C.; Suzuki, A.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a plasma-sprayed anti-reflection (AR) coating technology for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics which achieves minimal dissipative loss and broad bandwidth and is easily and accurately applied. Plasma spraying is a coating process through which melted or heated materials are sprayed onto a substrate. The dielectric constants of the plasma-sprayed coatings were tuned between 2.7 and 7.9 by mixing hollow ceramic microspheres with alumina powder as the base material and varying the plasma energy of the spray. By spraying low loss ceramic materials with a tunable dielectric constant, we can apply multiple layers of AR coating for broadband millimeter-wave detection. At 300 K, we achieved a fractional bandwidth of 106 over 90% transmission using a three-layer AR coating. Applying ceramic coatings on ceramic lenses offers an additional benefit of preventing cryogenic delamination of the coatings. We report on methodology of coating application and measurement of uniformity, repeatability, transmission property, and cryogenic adhesion performance.

  3. D. C. Plasma-Sprayed Coatings of Nanostructured Alumina-Titania-Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xian-liang; Liu, Min

    2002-10-01

    Nanocrystalline powders of w(Al2O3) = 95%, w(TiO2) = 3%, and w(SiO2) = 2%, were reprocessed into agglomerated particles for plasma spraying, by using consecutive steps of ball milling, slurry forming, spray drying, and heat treatment. D. C. plasma was used to spray the agglomerated nanocrystalline powders, and resultant coatings were deposited on the substrate of stainless steel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the morphology of the agglomerated powders and the cross section of the alumina-titania-silica coatings. Experimental results show that the agglomerated noncrystalline particles are spherical, with a size from (10-90) μm. The flow ability of the nanocrystalline powders is greatly improved after the reprocessing. The coatings deposited by the plasma spraying are mainly of nanostructure. Unlike conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, no laminar layer could be found in the nanostructured coatings. Although the nanostructured coatings have a lower microhardness than conventional microstructured coatings, the toughness of the nanostructured ceramic coatings is significantly improved.

  4. Failure of physical vapor deposition/plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings during thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, V.; Andritschky, M.; Gruhn, H.; Malléner, W.; Buchkremer, H. P.; Stöver, D.

    2000-06-01

    ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 plasma-sprayed (PS) coatings were applied on high-temperature Ni-based alloys precoated by physical vapor deposition with a thin, dense, stabilized zirconia coating (PVD bond coat). The PS coatings were applied by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and inert gas plasma spraying (IPS) at 2 bar for different substrate temperatures. The thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were tested by furnace isothermal cycling and flame thermal cycling at maximum temperatures between 1000 and 1150 °C. The temperature gradients within the duplex PVD/PS thermal barrier coatings during the thermal cycling process were modeled using an unsteady heat transfer program. This modeling enables calculation of the transient thermal strains and stresses, which contributes to a better understanding of the failure mechanisms of the TBC during thermal cycling. The adherence and failure modes of these coating systems were experimentally studied during the high-temperature testing. The TBC failure mechanism during thermal cycling is discussed in light of coating transient stresses and substrate oxidation.

  5. Broadband Plasma-Sprayed Anti-reflection Coating for Millimeter-Wave Astrophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, O.; Lee, A.; Raum, C.; Suzuki, A.

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a plasma-sprayed anti-reflection (AR) coating technology for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics which achieves minimal dissipative loss and broad bandwidth and is easily and accurately applied. Plasma spraying is a coating process through which melted or heated materials are sprayed onto a substrate. The dielectric constants of the plasma-sprayed coatings were tuned between 2.7 and 7.9 by mixing hollow ceramic microspheres with alumina powder as the base material and varying the plasma energy of the spray. By spraying low loss ceramic materials with a tunable dielectric constant, we can apply multiple layers of AR coating for broadband millimeter-wave detection. At 300 K, we achieved a fractional bandwidth of 106 over 90% transmission using a three-layer AR coating. Applying ceramic coatings on ceramic lenses offers an additional benefit of preventing cryogenic delamination of the coatings. We report on methodology of coating application and measurement of uniformity, repeatability, transmission property, and cryogenic adhesion performance.

  6. Processing-microstructure-properties relationships in small-particle plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawdsley, Jennifer Renee

    The objective of this study was to determine processing-microstructure-properties relationships for small-particle plasma-sprayed (SPPS) ceramic coatings. Plasma-sprayed yttria partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, which are used to protect superalloys from heat and the environment in turbine engines, and plasma-sprayed alumina coatings, which are being investigated as a potential replacement for chrome in corrosion protection applications, were fabricated using SPPS technology and their microstructure and pertinent properties were examined. The properties of plasma-sprayed YSZ and alumina coatings were investigated with designed experiments. The parameters varied include power, spray distance, total plasma gas flow, percent hydrogen in the plasma gas, injector angle, injector offset and carrier gas flow. The variations in thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and hardness for the YSZ SPPS coatings were found to correlate to the variations in density, which were related to the processing variables. It was found that surface roughness was related to the amount of splashing and debris associated with the single splats. In four-point bending strain tolerance and fatigue tests, the SPPS YSZ coatings showed very little acoustic emission activity, except in the case of tensile fatigue of a coating without network cracks. Small angle X-ray scattering experiments revealed that SPPS YSZ coatings have significantly less submicron intersplat porosity than conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, and that the pore and microcrack scattering area decreases with heat treatment due to the sintering of microcracks and small pores. The SPPS alumina coatings were optimized to produce a coating with excellent corrosion protection capabilities. It was found that the hardest SPPS alumina coatings did not provide the best corrosion protection due to unique porosity defect structures associated with surface bumps in the coatings. The surface bumps were

  7. Surface modification of air plasma spraying WC-12%Co cermet coating by laser melting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, M.; Ajmal, M.; Nusair Khan, A.; Hussain, A.; Akhter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Tungsten carbide cermet powder with 12%Co was deposited on stainless steel substrate by air plasma spraying method. Two types of coatings were produced i.e. thick (430 µm) and thin (260 µm) with varying porosity and splat morphology. The coated samples were treated with CO2 laser under the shroud of inert atmosphere. A series of experimentation was done in this regard, to optimize the laser parameters. The plasma sprayed coated surfaces were then laser treated on the same parameters. After laser melting the treated surfaces were characterized and compared with as-sprayed surfaces. It was observed that the thickness of the sprayed coatings affected the melt depth and the achieved microstructures. It was noted that phases like Co3W3C, Co3W9C4 and W were formed during the laser melting in both samples. The increase in hardness was attributed to the formation of these phases.

  8. Process Conditions and Microstructures of Ceramic Coatings by Gas Phase Deposition Based on Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Hospach, A.; Zotov, N.; Vaßen, R.

    2013-03-01

    Plasma spraying at very low pressure (50-200 Pa) is significantly different from atmospheric plasma conditions (APS). By applying powder feedstock, it is possible to fragment the particles into very small clusters or even to evaporate the material. As a consequence, the deposition mechanisms and the resulting coating microstructures could be quite different compared to conventional APS liquid splat deposition. Thin and dense ceramic coatings as well as columnar-structured strain-tolerant coatings with low thermal conductivity can be achieved offering new possibilities for application in energy systems. To exploit the potential of such a gas phase deposition from plasma spray-based processes, the deposition mechanisms and their dependency on process conditions must be better understood. Thus, plasma conditions were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. Coating experiments were performed, partially at extreme conditions. Based on the observed microstructures, a phenomenological model is developed to identify basic growth mechanisms.

  9. In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

  10. A model for residual stress evolution in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, B. G.; Singh, J. P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2000-02-28

    Ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that residual stress in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings is a function of the local interface geometry. The stress profile of a simulated rough interface characterized by ``peaks'' and ``valleys'' was modeled with a finite-element approach that accounted for thermal mismatch, oxide scale growth, and top coat sintering. Dependence of the stress profile on interface geometry and microstructure was investigated, and the results were compared with measured stresses.

  11. Microstructure and thermal behaviour of plasma sprayed zirconia/alumina composite coating.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Ando, Y; Kurokawa, K; Hejwowski, T

    2011-10-01

    In thermal barrier coatings (TBC), failure occurs near or at the interface between the metallic bondcoat and topcoat. On high temperature conditions, an oxide scale which is named thermally grown oxide (TGO) occurs along the bond/topcoat interface. For diminishing the creation of TGO, a dense coating with low residual stress and thermal stress buffer layer was preferable. High hardness ceramic coatings could be obtained by gas tunnel type plasma spraying, and the deposited coating had superior property in comparison with those deposited by conventional type plasma spray method. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying system was utilized to produce a zirconia/alumina functionally graded thermal barrier coating and discussed its physical and mechanical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the coating are discussed. Consequently, the proposed system exhibited superior mechanical properties and oxidation resistance at the expenses of a slightly lower thermal insulating effect. This interlayer is preferred in order to minimize the detrimental effect of the phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 to alpha-Al2O3. PMID:22400271

  12. Neural network analysis for erosion wear of nickel-aluminide coatings on steel by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. C.; Chaithanya, M.; Satapathy, Alok; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Sreekumar, K. P.

    2010-02-01

    In the present investigation plasma spray inter metallic coating of Nickel-aluminide was deposited on mild steel substrates. The response of plasma sprayed nickel-aluminide coatings to the impingement of such solid particles has been presented in this work. Nickel pre-mixed with alumina powder is deposited on mild steel substances by atmospheric plasma spraying at various operating power level. The coatings are subjected to erosion wear test. An erosion test setup developed in our laboratory is used to simulate real time erosive situations. Dry silica sand of average particle size 400 micron is used as the erodent. The erosion rate is calculated on the basis of 'coating mass losses. The erosion studies are made and different velocities and impingement angles. A computational technique (ANN analysis) is used to predict the rate of erosion wear under various operational conditions. This technique involves database training to predict property parameter evolutions in process having large number of interdependent variables. This paper presents the database construction, implementation protocol and also the set of predicted results related to the erosion wear rate of nickel-aluminide coating. It is shown that the erosion wear is strongly influenced by the angle of impact. The test is conducted at room temperature i.e.27°C and 60% RH. Ni3Al coatings deposited at different power levels (10, 12, 16, 20, 24 kW) are found to exhibit different wear rate under similar test conditions.

  13. Synthesis of NiCr2O4 spinel coatings with high emissivity by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen-Qi; Cheng, Xu-Dong; Ye, Wei-Ping; Min, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Air plasma spraying (APS) was used to produce high emissivity coatings with a NiCr2O4 spinel structure. The relationship between the emissivity and the crystal structure was investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses show that NiCr2O4 spinel has been fabricated with the space group Fd3 m. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs show that the coating consists of a laminated structure with homogeneous grains and high porosity because of the unique feature of plasma spraying. The emissivity measurement and Fourier transformation infrared radiation (FT-IR) spectra show that NiCr2O4 has a high emissivity of about 0.91 because of its special spinel structure. APS is a suitable method to produce high emissivity coatings.

  14. Microscopic, crystallographic and adherence properties of plasma-sprayed calcium phosphate coatings on Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufekci, Eser

    Recently, plasma-spayed titanium implants have become very popular in the dentistry because of their biocompatibility and ability of providing osseointegration with the surrounding bone. Although there are numerous published studies on these materials, information and standards are still lacking. This study investigated the miscrostructural, crystallographic and adherence properties of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V substrates. The microstructures of the coatings and the elemental interdiffusion near the coating/substrate interface were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with x-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction analyses performed on Ti-6Al-4V coupons prepared with different percent crystallinities have provided structural information such as degree of crystallinity, phases present, average crystallite size, as well as the residual stresses within the coating. For evaluation of the adherence of the coatings to the substrates, experimental rods were subjected to torsion. The fracture surfaces were analyzed using SEM/EDS to develop a new methodology to determine the percent adherence of the coatings. SEM studies indicated that the surface microstructures of commercial dental implants were consistent with the plasma-spraying. In cross-section, coatings exhibited minimal porosity and limited interdiffusion of titanium and calcium at the coating/substrate interface. X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that the highest crystallinity coatings consisted of almost entirely HA and an amorphous calcium phosphate phase. As the coating crystallinity decreased, increasing amounts of alpha- and beta-tricalcium phosphate and tetracalcium phosphate were detected. The mean percent crystallinity for the three sets of coatings ranged from 50-60%. The mean HA crystallite size for the three sets of coatings ranged from about 0.02-0.04 mum. Differences in mean interplanar spacings for three selected

  15. Mechanical and Tribological Behavior of Ni(Al)-Reinforced Nanocomposite Plasma Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, B.

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical and tribological behavior and microstructural evolutions of the Ni(Al)-reinforced nanocomposite plasma spray coatings were studied. At first, the feedstock Ni(Al)-15 wt.% (Al2O3-13% TiO2) nanocomposite powders were prepared using low-energy mechanical milling of the pure Ni and Al powders as well as Al2O3-13% TiO2 nanoparticle mixtures. The characteristics of the powder particles and the prepared coatings depending on their microstructures were examined in detail. The results showed that the feedstock powders after milling contained only α-Ni solid solution with no trace of the intermetallic phase. However, under the air plasma spraying conditions, the NiAl intermetallic phase in the α-Ni solid solution matrix appeared. The lack of nickel aluminide formation during low-energy ball milling is beneficial hence, the exothermic reaction can occur between Ni and Al during plasma spraying, improving the adhesive strength of the nanocomposite coatings. The results also indicated that the microhardness of the α-Ni phase was 3.91 ± 0.23 GPa and the NiAl intermetallic phase had a mean microhardness of 5.69 ± 0.12 GPa. The high microhardness of the nanocomposite coatings must be due to the presence of the reinforcing nanoparticles. Due to the improvement in mechanical properties, the Ni(Al) nanocomposite coatings showed significant modifications in wear resistance with low frictional coefficient.

  16. Specific Measurements of In-Flight Droplet and Particle Behavior and Coating Microstructure in Suspension and Solution Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.; Goutier, S.; Vardelle, A.

    2015-12-01

    The plasma spraying of suspensions of sub-micro- or nano-sized particles and of solutions of chemicals precursors produces finely structured coatings that have generally enhanced properties compared to conventional plasma-sprayed coatings. However, most techniques used in conventional plasma spraying are no more adapted to experimentally observe the behavior of the liquid feedstock in the plasma jet and investigate the effect of the operating conditions on liquid fragmentation in droplets, solid particles released by solvent evaporation or formed from the chemical precursors. Also, specific techniques have to be used to study the coating formation and characterize its microstructure. This paper aims to present the main techniques developed or adapted, up to now, to study the plasma-liquid feedstock interactions and characterize the coatings achieved by suspension and solution plasma spraying.

  17. The durability of adhesively bonded titanium: Performance of plasma-sprayed polymeric coating pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.; Dillard, J.; Dillard, D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of a surface treatment of an adherend is to promote highly stable adhesive-adherend interactions; high stability is accomplished by making the chemistry of the adherend and adhesive compatible. The common surface preparations used to enhance durability include grit blasting, chromic acid or sodium hydroxide anodization, and other chemical treatments for titanium. As interest has grown in the development of environmentally benign surface treatments, other methods have been explored. In this study, plasma-sprayed polymeric materials have been evaluated as a surface coating pretreatment for adhesively bonding titanium alloy. Polyimide and polyether powders were plasm-sprayed onto grit-blasted titanium-6Al-4V. The alloy was adhesively bonded using a high performance polyimide adhesive. The coating was characterized using surface sensitive analytical measurements. The durability performance of the plasma-sprayed adherends was compared to the performance for chromic acid anodized titanium. Among the plasma-sprayed coatings, a LaRC-TPI polyimide-based coating exhibited performance comparable to that for chromic acid anodized specimens.

  18. Recent Trends in Newly Developed Plasma-Sprayed and Sintered Coatings for Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bsat, Suzan; Speirs, Andrew; Huang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    The current paper aims to review recent trends (2011 to 2015) in newly developed plasma-sprayed and sintered coatings for implant applications. Recent developments in plasma-sprayed and sintered coatings have focused on improving biological performance, bacterial growth resistance, and mechanical properties, predominantly of HA and glass ceramics. The majority of these improvements are attributed to the addition of dopants. To improve biological performance, trace elements, such as Zn and Mg, both of which are found in bone, were added to replicate the functions they provide for the skeletal system. Though bacterial growth resistance is traditionally improved by Ag dopant, the addition of new dopants such as CeO2 and Zn were explored as well. Great effort has also been made to improve coating adherence and reduce stresses by minimizing coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and substrate through the addition of elements such as Zn and Mg or the inclusion of a buffer layer. For sintering process in particular, there was an emphasis on reducing sintering temperature through modification of 45S5 Bioglass. New plasma spray and sintering technologies aimed at reducing high-temperature exposure are briefly introduced as well. These include microplasma spray and spark plasma sintering.

  19. Feather-like Structured YSZ Coatings at Fast Rates by Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozawa, A.; Eguchi, K.; Kambara, M.; Yoshida, T.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings have been attained by plasma spray physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) with fine YSZ powders at high power. The coating structures were found to change significantly with the powder feeding rates but less with the substrate temperature and the rate of the substrate rotation, and a porous feather like structure was attained at 500 Torr (666.6 millibar) and a rate of >200 μm/min. Such a coating produces porosity reaching >50%, thermal conductivity as small as 0.5 W/mK and lower infra-red transmittance compared to the sprayed splat coating with identical thickness.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of free standing, plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings, including strength, fracture toughness, fatigue, constitutive relation, elastic modulus, and directionality, has been determined under various loading-specimen configurations. This report presents and describes a summary of mechanical properties of the plasma-sprayed coating material to provide them as a design database.

  1. Research and development of plasma sprayed tungsten coating on graphite and copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Fu; Tao, Shunyan; Cao, Yunzhen; Xu, Zengyu; Liu, Yong; Noda, N.

    2007-06-01

    Vacuum plasma sprayed tungsten coating on graphite and copper substrates has been prepared. VPS-W coated graphite has multilayered silicon and tungsten interface pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) and VPS-W coated copper has graded transition interlayer. VPS-W coating was characterized, and then the high heat flux properties of the coating were examined. Experimental results indicated that both VPS-W coated graphite and VPS-W coated copper could endure 1000 cycles without visible failure under a heat flux of approximately 5 MW/m2 absorbed power density and 5 s pulse duration. A comparison between the present VPS-W coated graphite and VPS-W coated carbon fiber composite (CX-2002U) with Re interface made by Plansee Aktiengesllshaft was carried out. Results show that both Re and Si are suitable as intermediate layer for tungsten coating on carbon substrates.

  2. Microstructure investigation of plasma sprayed alumina 13 weight percent titania coatings from nanocrystalline feed powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goberman, Daniel George

    The development of constituent phases and microstructure in air plasma sprayed alumina (Al2O3) thirteen weight percent titania (TiO2) coatings from reconstituted nanocrystalline feed powder (nanopowder) was investigated as a function of processing conditions and compared to a conventional coating created from micron-sized feed powder. The microstructure of the nanopowder coating was found to consist of a mixture of two distinct regions; one was completely melted and quenched as splats, and the other partially melted with a particulate microstructure retained from the starting powder. The melted regions predominantly consisted of gamma-Al2O 3 with dissolved Ti4+ that varied in morphology and size from a few nanometers to several microns. Based upon these experimental observations, a theory is developed that explains the mechanism behind the morphological differences observed across the melted splat structures. In addition, differences between the melted structures in the nanopowder coatings and the conventional coating are explained using this theory. The partially melted regions were found to be primarily submicrometer-sized alpha-Al2O 3 particles in an amorphous TiO2 matrix containing small amounts of gamma-Al2O3 with dissolved Ti4+ . For the nanopowder coatings, the ratio of the melted splat microstructure to the particulate microstructure and thus the ratio of the gamma-Al 2O3 to alpha-Al2O3 can be controlled by a plasma spray parameter, defined as the critical plasma spray parameter (CPSP). The conventional coating microstructure was insensitive to CPSP, consisting primarily of fully melted splats. The ability to vary the microstructure of the nanopowder coating through CPSP has resulted in bimodal distributions of microstructure and grain size that have allowed these coatings to significantly surpass the conventional coating in several measures of mechanical properties.

  3. Sintering and Interface Strain Tolerance of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Leissler, George W.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot section SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. A coating system consisting of a zirconia-based oxide topcoat (thermal barrier) and a mullite/BSAS silicate inner coat (environmental barrier) is often considered a model system for the CMC applications. However, the coating sintering, and thermal expansion mismatch between the zirconia oxide layer and the silicate environmental barrier/CMC substrate will be of major concern at high temperature and under thermal cycling conditions. In this study, the sintering behavior of plasma-sprayed freestanding zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings and mullite (and/or barium-strontium-aluminosilicate, i.e., BSAS) environmental barrier coatings was determined using a dilatometer in the temperature range of 1200-1500 C. The effects of test temperature on the coating sintering kinetics were systematically investigated. The plasma-sprayed zirconia-8wt.%yttria and mullite (BSAS) two-layer composite coating systems were also prepared to quantitatively evaluate the interface strain tolerance of the coating system under thermal cycling conditions based on the dilatomentry. The cyclic response of the coating strain tolerance behavior and interface degradation as a function of cycle number will also be discussed.

  4. Multi-scale Phenomena and Structures Observed in Fabrication of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Using Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Seiji; Murakami, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Itoh, Kaita; Shinoda, Kentaro; Zhang, Xiancheng

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) fabricated by plasma spray can exhibit a wide range of microstructures due to differences in feedstock powders and spraying conditions. Since different microstructures naturally result in different thermal and mechanical properties and service life as thermal barrier coatings, it is of great importance to understand the relationship among the feedstock characteristics, spray conditions and the coating microstructures. Recent research efforts of the author's group to understand fundamental phenomena in plasma spraying of TBC are reviewed from microscopic to macroscopic viewpoints, i.e., direct observation of single droplet impact of molten zirconia by an ultra fast video camera, detection of acoustic emission (AE) signals during plasma spraying by using laser AE technique, and in-situ measurement of the curvature and temperature of a substrate during plasma spraying, from which strain-stress relationships and residual stresses of TBC can be evaluated.

  5. Remaining Fatigue Life Assessment of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Philippe; Gitzhofer, François; Fauchais, Pierre; Boulos, Maher

    2010-09-01

    Ceramic functional coatings are frequently applied to structural materials, covering a wide range of thermomechanical and electrochemical applications. The main limiting feature is their reliability when subjected to cyclic transient thermal stresses. The study described in this article is a continuation of earlier research study focused on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the thermomechanical aging effects in ceramic coatings. Here, emphasis is placed on the usefulness of combining AE short-term monitoring with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict the performance of such coatings when subjected to cyclic thermal loads. The FEM study presented in this article is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent approach, of the stress fields that developed within the coatings during the post-deposition cooling step and the thermal cycling. Experiments were conducted using yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Alumina (Al2O3) ceramic coatings combined with a NiCr-based intermetallic bond coat.

  6. Laser surface modification of electroplated, physically vapor deposited and plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.

    1996-05-01

    Lasers are used to modify surface characteristics in order to improve properties for a variety of industrial applications. Typical surface alterations include: transformation hardening, melting, cladding, alloying, coating, and smoothing. This paper is a critical review that covers surface alloying. It concentrates on coatings applied by electroplating, plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition and the resultant properties obtained after laser treatment. In many cases, significant improvement in properties such as corrosion resistance, wear resistance, creep strength, porosity, and structure was noted after coatings were exposed to a laser treatment. 112 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. A Novel Plasma-Sprayed Nanostructured Coating with Agglomerated-Unsintered Feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Deming; Gao, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    In this article, an unusual agglomerated powder of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) that did not undergo calcination was introduced as a feedstock for thermal spray deposition using internal injection atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and the very-low-pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) methods at an ambient pressure of 100-150 Pa. The results show that the microstructure of the coating is influenced not only by the spray parameters (such as arc gas composition, ambient pressure, and arc current) but also by the manufacture process of the agglomerates particularly the sintering process. The microstructure of the coating exhibited a bimodal structure if the APS method was used; in this case, the microstructure resembles that of other nanostructured coatings using regular agglomerated-sintered feedstock. A coating having a novel fully nano-equiaxed structure with a microporosity of 10-15% was first successfully deposited using VLPPS with 20Ar-30He SLPM plasma gas flows at a current of 500 A. The experimental results suggest that the nano-scale equiaxed structure in the coating is directly formed from original nanoparticles that had undergone melting, while inside the nozzle they were subsequently solidified on the substrate. The VLPPS method, which offers some unique advantages over the conventional plasma spray process, is generic in nature and can potentially be used to deposit a wide variety of ceramic coatings for diverse applications. The thermal conductivity values of the fully nanostructured and bimodal structured coatings were measured, and the microstructures of the coating both in the as-sprayed state and after heat treatment for 10 h at 1300 °C were investigated.

  8. Preparation of Porous Hydroxyapatite Tablets and Porous Hydroxyapatite Coatings for Orthopaedic Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-González, M.

    2004-09-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite tablets and coatings on metal substrates were obtained by the addition of polymeric additives and liofilization. Both tablets and coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. Coatings obtained by plasma spraying also exhibited interconnected porous of 100 μm while coatings obtained by laser ablation did not show any porosity. The diffraction patterns of the deposited HA were similar to that of the powder obtained by the precipitation method suggesting that no significant changes occurred during the coating procedure.

  9. Characteristics of Ceramic Coatings Made by Thin Film Low Pressure Plasma Spraying (LPPS-TF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospach, Andreas; Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert; Stöver, Detlev

    2012-06-01

    The thin film low pressure plasma spray process (LPPS-TF) has been developed with the aim of efficient depositing uniform and thin coatings with large area coverage by plasma spraying. At high power input (~150 kW) and very low pressure (~100 Pa) the plasma jet properties change considerably and it is even possible to evaporate the powder feedstock material providing advanced microstructures of the deposits. This relatively new technique bridges the gap between conventional plasma spraying and physical vapor deposition. In addition, the resulting microstructures are unique and can hardly be obtained by other processes. In this paper, microstructures made by LPPS-TF are shown and the columnar layer growth by vapor deposition is demonstrated. In addition to the ceramic materials TiO2, Al2O3 or MgAl2O4, the focus of the research was placed on partially yttria-stabilized zirconia. Variations of the microstructures are shown and discussed concerning potential coating applications.

  10. Column Formation in Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Coatings and Resultant Thermal Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, Kent; Krane, Matthew; Trice, Rodney; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Besser, Matthew; Sordelet, Daniel; Ilavsky, Dr. Jan; Almer, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  11. Column Formation in Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Coatings and Resultant Thermal Properties

    SciTech Connect

    VanEvery, Kent; Krane, Matthew J.M.; Trice, Rodney W; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace; Besser, Matthew; Sordelet, Daniel; Ilavsky, Jan; Almer, Jonathan

    2012-03-19

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k{sub th}) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k{sub th} values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k{sub th} of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k{sub th} increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  12. Column formation in suspension plasma-sprayed coatings and resultant thermal properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, K.; Krane, M. J. M.; Trice, R. W.; Wang, H.; Porter, W.; Besser, M.; Sordelet, D.; Ilavsky, J.; Almer, J.

    2011-06-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  13. Fabrication of Aluminum Nitride Coatings by Reactive Plasma Spraying and Evaluation of Its Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Motohiro; Lee, Chaechul; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Takahashi, Koyata

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has excellent properties such as high corrosion resistance, hardness and thermal conductivity. In this study, AlN coatings were fabricated by reactive plasma spraying by using Al-AlN mixed powder for feedstock. The optimal mixing ratio of Al-AlN particles and spray conditions were investigated. Al-AlN particles were injected into Ar/N2 plasma and were deposited onto graphite substrate. It was possible to fabricate the coatings using Al-10˜40 wt.%AlN powders for feedstock. Especially, using Al-20 wt.%AlN and Al-30 wt.%AlN powders enabled to fabricate dense coatings which consisted of almost completely AlN phase. The nitride phase concentration in the coatings was controlled by RF power and N2 gas flow rate in the plasma gas. Furthermore, it became clear that the hardness of the coatings depended on the nitride concentration in the coatings. The thermal conductivity of the coating was achieved 71.2 (W/m•K). Therefore, it was possible to fabricate AlN based coatings with high thermal conductivity by reactive plasma spraying by using Al-AlN mixed powder.

  14. Fabrication and Wear Behavior of Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed 6061Al-SiCp Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailor, Satish; Mohanty, R. M.; Sharma, V. K.; Soni, P. R.

    2014-10-01

    6061Al powder with 15 wt.% SiC particulate (SiCp) reinforcement was mechanically alloyed (MA) in a high-energy attrition mill. The MA powder was then plasma sprayed onto weathering steel (Cor-Ten A242) substrate using an atmospheric plasma spray process. Results of particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy show that the addition of SiC particles as the reinforcement influences on the matrix grain size and morphology. XRD studies revealed embedment of SiCp in the MA-processed composite powder, and nanocrystals in the MA powder and the coating. Microstructural studies showed a uniform distribution of reinforced SiC particles in the coating. The porosity level in the coating was as low as 2% while the coating hardness was increased to 232VHN. The adhesion strength of the coatings was high and this was attributed to higher degree of diffusion at the interface. The wear rate in the coatings was evaluated using a pin-on-disk type tribometer and found to decrease by 50% compared to the 6061Al matrix coating. The wear mechanism in the coating was delamination and oxidative type.

  15. High temperature tribological properties of plasma-sprayed metallic coatings containing ceramic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dallaire, S.; Legoux, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    For sealing a moving metal component with a dense silica-based ceramic pre-heated at 800 C, coatings with a low coefficient of friction and moderate wear loss are required. As reported previously, plasma-sprayed coatings containing solid lubricants could reduce sliding wear in high-temperature applications. Plasma-sprayed metal-based coatings containing ceramic particles have been considered for high temperature sealing. Selected metal powders (NiCoCrAlY, CuNi, CuNiIn, Ag, Cu) and ceramic particles (boron nitride, Zeta-B ceramic) were agglomerated to form suitable spray powders. Plasma-sprayed composite coatings and reference materials were tested in a modified pin-on-disc apparatus in which the stationary disc consisted of a dense silica-based ceramic piece initially heated at 800 C and allowed to cool down during tests. The influence of single exposure and repeated contacts with a dense silica-based ceramic material pre-heated to 800 C on the coefficient of friction, wear loss and damage to the ceramic piece was evaluated. Being submitted to a single exposure at high temperature, coatings containing malleable metals such as indium, silver and copper performed well. The outstanding tribological characteristics of the copper-Zeta-B ceramic coating was attributed to the formation of a glazed layer on the surface of this coating which lasted over exposures to high temperature. This glazed layer, composed of fine oxidation products, provided a smooth and polished surface and helped maintaining the coefficient of friction low.

  16. Microstructure and abrasion resistance of plasma sprayed titania coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctibor, P.; Neufuss, K.; Chraska, P.

    2006-12-01

    Agglomerated titania nanopowder and a “classical” titania were sprayed by the high throughput water-stabilized plasma (WSP) and thoroughly compared. Optical microscopy with image analysis as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry were used for quantification of porosity. Results indicate that the “nano” coatings in general exhibit finer pores than coatings of the “conventional” micron-sized powders. Mechanical properties such as Vickers microhardness and slurry abrasion response were measured and linked to the structural investigation. Impact of the variation in the slurry composition on wear resistance of tested coatings and on character of the wear damage is discussed. The overall results, however, suggest that the “nano” coatings properties are better only for carefully selected sets of spraying parameters, which seem to have a very important impact.

  17. Monitoring Delamination of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings by Reflectance-Enhanced Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Highly scattering plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) present a challenge for optical diagnostic methods to monitor TBC delamination because scattering attenuates light transmitted through the TBC and usually degrades contrast between attached and delaminated regions of the TBC. This paper presents a new approach where reflectance-enhanced luminescence from a luminescent sublayer incorporated along the bottom of the TBC is used to identify regions of TBC delamination. Because of the higher survival rate of luminescence reflecting off the back surface of a delaminated TBC, the strong scattering exhibited by plasma-sprayed TBCs actually accentuates contrast between attached and delaminated regions by making it more likely that multiple reflections of luminescence off the back surface occur before exiting the top surface of the TBC. A freestanding coating containing sections designed to model an attached or delaminated TBC was prepared by depositing a luminescent Eu-doped or Er-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent layer below a plasma-sprayed undoped YSZ layer and utilizing a NiCr backing layer to represent an attached substrate. For specimens with a Eu-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer, luminescence intensity maps showed excellent contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections even at a plasma-sprayed overlayer thickness of 300 m. Discernable contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections was not observed for specimens with a Er-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer because luminescence from Er impurities in the undoped YSZ layer overwhelmed luminescence originating form the Er-doped YSZ sublayer.

  18. Reactive Plasma-Sprayed Aluminum Nitride-Based Coating Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Egota, Kazumi; Okamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Recently, thick aluminum nitride/alumina (AlN/Al2O3) composite coatings were successfully fabricated through the reactive plasma spraying of fine Al2O3/AlN mixture in the N2/H2 atmospheric plasma. The coatings consist of AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and α-Al2O3 phases. This study will evaluate the thermal conductivity of these complicated plasma-sprayed coatings and optimize the controlling aspects. Furthermore, the influence of the process parameters on the coatings thermal conductivity will be investigated. The fabricated coatings showed very low thermal conductivity (2.43 W/m K) compared to the AlN sintered compacts. It is attributed to the phase composition of the fabricated coatings, oxide content, and porosity. The presence of Al2O3, Al5O6N and the high coating porosity decreased its thermal conductivity. The presence of oxygen in the AlN lattice creates Al vacancies which lead to phonon scattering and therefore suppressed the thermal conductivity. The formation of γ-Al2O3 phase in the coating leads to further decrease in its conductivity, due to its lower density compared to the α-phase. Moreover, the high porosity of the coating strongly suppressed the conductivity. This is due to the complicated microstructure of plasma spray coatings (splats, porosity, and interfaces, particularly in case of reactive spray process), which obviously lowered the conductivity. Furthermore, the measured coating density was lower than the AlN value and suppressed the coating conductivity. In addition, the spraying parameter showed a varied effect on the coating phase composition, porosity, density, and therefore on its conductivity. Although the N2 gas flow improved the nitride content, it suppressed the thermal conductivity gradually. It is attributed to the further increase in the porosity and further decrease in the density of the coatings with the N2 gas. Furthermore, increasing the arc did not show a significant change on the coating thermal conductivity. On the other hand

  19. Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxylapatite-Based Coatings: Chemical, Mechanical, Microstructural, and Biomedical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Robert B.

    2016-06-01

    This contribution discusses salient properties and functions of hydroxylapatite (HA)-based plasma-sprayed coatings, including the effect on biomedical efficacy of coating thickness, phase composition and distribution, amorphicity and crystallinity, porosity and surface roughness, cohesion and adhesion, micro- and nano-structured surface morphology, and residual coating stresses. In addition, it will provide details of the thermal alteration that HA particles undergo in the extremely hot plasma jet that leads to dehydroxylated phases such as oxyhydroxylapatite (OHA) and oxyapatite (OA) as well as thermal decomposition products such as tri-(TCP) and tetracalcium phosphates (TTCP), and quenched phases such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). The contribution will further explain the role of ACP during the in vitro interaction of the as-deposited coatings with simulated body fluid resembling the composition of extracellular fluid (ECF) as well as the in vivo responses of coatings to the ECF and the host tissue, respectively. Finally, it will briefly describe performance profiles required to fulfill biological functions of osteoconductive bioceramic coatings designed to improve osseointegration of hip endoprostheses and dental root implants. In large parts, the content of this contribution is a targeted review of work done by the author and his students and coworkers over the last two decades. In addition, it is considered a stepping stone toward a standard operation procedure aimed at depositing plasma-sprayed bioceramic implant coatings with optimum properties.

  20. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (< 10 microns) single layers to be deposited and multilayer coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  1. Improvement of Ceramic Coatings for Electrostatic Adsorption Force Using Vacuum Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Jun-Ichi; Yamasaki, Ryo; Tani, Kazumi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    The purpose of this study is to improve ceramic coatings having a high stable electrostatic adsorption force. The use of the coating is for the Johnsen-Rahbek force type electrostatic chucks used to fix silicon wafers inside vacuum chambers for processes such as Etch, CVD and PVD for semiconductor manufacturers. Previously the authors developed a dielectric substance ceramic coating for electrostatic chucks using Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (APS). This ceramic coating was not suitable because of its unstable electrostatic adsorption force. In a subsequent study, Vacuum Plasma Sprayed (VPS) Al2O3-7.5mass%TiO2 coating was investigated. As a result, it was found that the VPS coating has stable electrical resistivity and adsorption force. The dielectric constant of VPS Al2O3-TiO2 coating was sufficient for application to electrostatic chuck. On the other hand, it was suggested from results with respect to residual adsorption force and duration time after power off that the residual adsorption characteristic was not adequate.

  2. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings were successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They were evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore, wide temperature spectrum, self-lubricating compositions.

  3. Effect of Porosity on Photocatalytic Activity of Plasma-Sprayed TiO2 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Chaudhary, Ujwal; Das, Santanu; Godavarty, Anuradha; Agarwal, Arvind

    2013-10-01

    The effect of porosity on photocatalytic activity of plasma-sprayed TiO2 coating on steel substrate is studied by varying processing parameters viz. plasma power and powder feed rate. The relationship between porosity content and methylene blue (MB) dye decomposition rate was established to correlate coating microstructure and its photocatalytic activity. The coating with the highest porosity content exhibited best photocatalytic efficiency. The same processing parameters were used to deposit TiO2 coating on FTO glass. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coating on FTO was 2.5 times better than TiO2 coating on the steel substrate. TiO2 coating on FTO glass contains bimodal porosity distribution (micropores and submicron pores) which accelerated MB decomposition by accelerated diffusion of ionic species.

  4. Researching for Corrosion-Resistance Performance of Laser-Hybrid Plasma Spraying NiCr-Cr3C2 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu-qing; Li, Qi-lian; Gong, Shui-li; Wang, Chun

    In this paper, the NiCr-Cr3C2 coating was prepared by laser-hybrid plasma spraying (LHPS)technology, the NSS (Neutral Salt Spraying) test results showed that the LHPS NiCr-Cr3C2 coating had good corrosion-resistance performance comparing with the base material and the APS (air plasma spraying) coating. A SEM (scanning electron microscope) was used to analyze corrosion morphology of the samples, The LHPS coating overcame many shortcomings of the conventional spraying coatings such as poor bonding strength, many porosities, many cracks and so on. LHPS is able to improve the bonding strength as the interfaces are melted and joined by the laser simultaneously with plasma spraying. The coating achieves metallurgy bonding and its microstructure becomes more compact and therefore its corrosion-resistance performance is greatly improved.

  5. Enhancement of Functional Ceramic Coating Performance by Gas Tunnel Type Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akira

    2016-02-01

    A high-precision plasma system has been pursued for advanced thermal processing. The gas tunnel type plasma jet device developed by the author exhibits high energy density and also high efficiency. Among its various applications is the plasma spraying of ceramics such as Al2O3 and ZrO2. The performance of these ceramic coatings is superior to conventional ones. Properties such as the mechanical and chemical properties of the zirconia coatings were reported in previous studies. In this study, the enhancement of the performance of functional ceramic coatings by the gas tunnel type plasma spraying method was carried out using different powders. Results show that the alumina/zirconia composite system exhibited improvements of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The alumina/zirconia composite coating has the potential for use as a high functionally graded thermal barrier coating. Another application of the gas tunnel type plasma is for surface modification of metals. As an example, TiN films were formed in 5 s and, thick TiN coatings were easily obtained by gas tunnel type plasma reactive spraying.

  6. Characterization of Microstructure and Thermal Properties of YSZ Coatings Obtained by Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying (ASPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per

    2015-10-01

    The paper aims at demonstrating various microstructures which can be obtained using the suspension spraying technique and their respective significance in enhancing the thermal insulation property of a thermal barrier coating. Three different types of coating microstructures are discussed which were produced by the Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying. Detailed characterization of coatings was then performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized for microstructure evaluations; x-ray diffraction for phase analysis; water impregnation, image analysis, and mercury intrusion porosimetry for porosity analysis, and laser flash analysis for thermal diffusivity measurements were used. The results showed that Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying can generate vertically cracked, porous, and feathery columnar-type microstructures. Pore size distribution was found in micron, submicron, and nanometer range. Higher overall porosity, the lower density of vertical cracks or inter-column spacing, and higher inter-pass porosity favored thermal insulation property of the coating. Significant increase in thermal diffusivity and conductivity was found at higher temperature, which is believed to be due to the pore rearrangement (sintering and pore coarsening). Thermal conductivity values for these coatings were also compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) thermal barrier coatings from the literature and found to be much lower.

  7. Suspension Plasma Spraying of Sub-micron Silicon Carbide Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarok, F.; Espallargas, N.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal spraying of silicon carbide (SiC) material is a challenging task since SiC tends to decompose during atmospheric spraying process. The addition of metal or ceramic binders is necessary to facilitate the bonding of SiC particles, allowing SiC composite coating to be deposited. In the conventional procedures, the binders are added through mechanical mixing of powder constituents, making it difficult to achieve homogeneous distribution. In the new procedure proposed in this work, the binder is delivered as a nano-film of the surface of the individual SiC particles through co-precipitation treatment. Suspension plasma spray (SPS) coating technique has been used with the aim at avoiding the decomposition of SiC typically expected with atmospheric techniques, such as atmospheric plasma spray. The deposited SiC coatings by SPS showed identical SiC phase peak as identified in the suspension feedstock, indicating that the nano-film binder was able to protect SiC particles from decomposition. Further analysis by XPS revealed that SiC particles underwent some minor oxidation. Unfortunately, all the SiC coatings exhibited poor mechanical performance due to low cohesive strength, high porosity, and powdery structure making the coatings vulnerable to grain pull-out. This was due to the absence of sintering process during the spraying process contributing to the low performance of SiC SPS coatings.

  8. Plasma Spray Deposition of Lanthanum Phosphate and Phase Structure of the Resultant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pragatheeswaran, A.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Bhandari, Subhankar; Ramachandran, K.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma-sprayed lanthanum phosphate coatings were prepared on stainless steel substrates at different input powers from 16 to 24 kW. Coatings were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that the as-sprayed coatings consist of lanthanum ortho (LaPO4), poly(La2P4O13), and oxy(La3PO7) phosphates. Subsequent heat treatment of the coatings resulted in the recombination of the La-polyphosphate and La-oxyphosphate to form LaPO4. SEM images of microstructure of the coatings and coating-substrate interface showed micro-cracks, voids, and porosity that were found to decrease with deposition power.

  9. Dissolution of Plasma-Sprayed Wollastonite Coatings: The Effects of Microstructure Coupled with Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weize; Xuan, Fuzhen; Liang, Jiachun; Wang, Luobin

    2012-09-01

    Wollastonite coatings are deposited on the U-shape titanium alloy coupons by atmospheric plasma spraying at substrate temperatures of room temperature and 400 °C, respectively. The effects of applied stresses and microstructure on the dissolution behavior of wollastonite coatings have been investigated. The dissolution rate is characterized by the ion concentration changes of Ca, Si, and P in the SBF solution. The coatings deposited at room temperature show higher porosity and lower crystallinity, and further higher dissolution rate is observed, compared with the coatings deposited at a substrate temperature of 400 °C. Applied tensile stresses promote the coating dissolution. The effect of compressive stresses on the dissolution of coatings depends on the balance between the hindrance effect and the promotion action caused by the debonding and/or peeling off. The stress condition cannot change the phase transformation process when the substrate crystal structure is adverse for the apatite precipitation.

  10. Microstructures of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings by Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenyi; Guo, Hongbo; Gao, Lihua; Wei, Liangliang; Gong, Shengkai; Xu, Huibin

    2015-02-01

    As a novel processing technology, plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) has exhibited potential capability to shape the sprayed coating microstructures. In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were produced at spray distances in the range of 450-1400 mm by PS-PVD. The morphologies of the coatings, going from a denser type of layer to the columnar structure, along the axial and radial directions of the plasma plume were studied. Along the axial direction, five YSZ coating microstructures including "dense lamellar structure," "closely packed columnar structure," "quasi-columnar structure with more nanoparticles," "EB-PVD-like columnar structure," and "quasi-columnar structure with less nanoparticles" were achieved, respectively. Along the radial direction, similar microstructures of coatings were obtained. A simple structure spatial distribution model was developed for demonstrating the mapping of various YSZ coating microstructures.

  11. Microwave absorption property of plasma spray W-type hexagonal ferrite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shicheng; Liu, Yi; Tian, Haoliang; Tong, Hui; Liu, Yuxin; Xu, Binshi

    2015-03-01

    In order to enhance the adhesion strength of microwave absorbing materials, W-type hexagonal ferrite coating is fabricated by plasma spray. The feedstock of ferrite powders is synthesized by solid-state reaction and spray dried process. Microstructures of the coating are analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectra (EDS). Hexagonal ferrite coating is successfully deposited on the substrate with adhesion strength of 28 MPa. The magnetic property of ferrite samples is measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is lower than ferrite powder. Reflection loss of the hexagonal ferrite coating is measured in frequency of 2-18 GHz. The result shows that the coating is suitable for electromagnetic wave absorbers in Ku-band.

  12. Effect of the thickness on properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings deposited by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Zhijian; Tao Shunyan; Zhou Xiaming

    2011-01-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings with different thicknesses (160, 320, 480 and 640 {mu}m) were deposited on stainless steel substrate by plasma spraying. The variation in microstructural characteristics and properties of coatings with various thicknesses was investigated. Powders morphology and the microstructure of as-sprayed coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The microhardness was measured using a Vickers' indentor. The corrosion behaviour of plasma-sprayed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings in 1 N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at a temperature of 25 deg. C was evaluated by electrochemistry method. Experimental results indicated that surface roughness showed no obvious dependence on the coating thickness. However, the porosity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was increased with increased thickness. The enhanced coating thickness also resulted in decreasing microhardness and reduced corrosion resistance. In this study, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating with thickness of 160 {mu}m possesses the lowest porosity, the highest hardness and superior corrosion resistance. Research Highlights: {yields} Increase of coating thickness shows no obvious effect on phase composition and surface roughness of plasma sprayed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings. {yields} Variation of porosity and microhardness presents dependence on coating thickness parameter. {yields} Increasing coating thickness leads to reduced corrosion resistance of plasma sprayed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating.

  13. The behavior of high-purity, low-density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, Yanar NM

    2009-12-01

    Research on the behavior of high-purity, low-density (85%) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The microstructure of the APS topcoats is one variable in this study intended to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation and to minimize the thermal conduction through the YSZ layer. The specimens were evaluated using cyclic oxidation tests and important properties of the TBCs, such as resistance to sintering and phase transformation, were determined. The high purity resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in significant durability during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, CTE of the superalloy substrate and the nature of the thermal exposure.

  14. Thermal stability studies of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings deposited on pure tantalum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, A.; Anupama, P.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Sreekumar, K. P.; Satpute, R. U.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2010-02-01

    Plasma sprayed Yttrium oxide is used for coating of crucibles and moulds that are used at high temperature to handle highly reactive molten metals like uranium, titanium, chromium, and beryllium. The alloy bond layer is severely attacked by the molten metal. This commonly used layer contributes to the impurity addition to the pure liquid metal. Yttrium oxide was deposited on tantalum substrates (25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk and 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk) by atmospheric plasma spray technique with out any bond coat using optimized coating parameters. Resistance to thermal shock was evaluated by subjecting the coated specimens, to controlled heating and cooling cycles between 300K to 1600K in an induction furnace in argon atmosphere having <= 0.1ppm of oxygen. The experiments were designed to examine the sample tokens by both destructive and non-destructive techniques, after a predetermined number of thermal cycles. The results upto 24 thermal cycles of 25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk coupons and upto 6 cycles of 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk coupons are discussed. The coatings produced with the optimized parameters were found to exhibit excellent thermal shock resistance.

  15. Mathematical analysis of thermoelastic characteristics in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings.

    PubMed

    Go, Jaegwi; Jungo, Yeon-Gil; Kim, Seokchan; Ali, Md Afsar; Paik, Ungyu

    2012-02-01

    The thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been analyzed using mathematical modeling. Two types of TBC model, cylinder and circular disk which are commercial plasma-sprayed TBCs, subjecting to symmetric temperature distribution to the radial and longitudinal directions, respectively, were taken into consideration. Based on the thermoelastic theories, a second order ordinary differential equation was derived for the cylinder model and a pair of partial differential equations were set up for the circular disk model. The analytic solution was obtained from the ordinary differential equation, while a finite volume method was developed for numerical solutions to the pair of partial differential equations due to the complexity of governing equations. The thermoelastic characteristics of TBC models, such as temperature distributions, displacements, and stresses, were displayed according to the obtained solutions. The rate of heat conduction in the section of the top coat is relatively slow in comparison with the substrate, and no profound difference appears in the temperature distribution between two TBC models. The highest longitudinal tensile stress is expressed at the bond coat of both models, and the substrate is under the compressive stresses to the circumferential direction. While the cylinder expands to the positive longitudinal direction only, the expansion in the circular disk occurs to both the positive and negative longitudinal directions. Relatively large displacement and stresses exhibit in the cylinder as compared with the circular disk. In the circular disk, the stresses to the radial direction undulate at each section, and the displacement profile displays that the width of the circular disk is slightly narrowed. The results demonstrate that the mechanical and thermal properties of the top and bond coats are the crucial factors to be considered in controlling the thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed

  16. Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Overlay Coatings for GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liners for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Barrett, C.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B.; Robinson,; Thorn, G.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center, and designated as GRCop-84, is currently being considered for use as combustor chamber liners and nozzle ramps in NASA s future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). However, past experience has shown that unprotected copper alloys undergo an environmental attack called "blanching" in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Potential for sulfidation attack of the liners in hydrocarbon-fueled engines is also of concern. Protective overlay coatings alloys are being developed for GRCop-84. The development of this coatings technology has involved a combination of modeling, coatings development and characterization, and process optimization. Coatings have been low pressure plasma sprayed on GRCop-84 substrates of various geometries and shapes. Microstructural, mechanical property data and thermophysical results on the coated substrates are presented and discussed.

  17. Preparation of Lanthanum Zirconate Coatings by the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. Z.; Coyle, T.; Zhao, D.

    2014-06-01

    Solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) can synthesize powders and deposit the coatings synchronously. The lanthanum zirconate coatings are deposited by SPPS in the present study, and the dense coating can be obtained through changing the precursor solution. The addition of urea can change the heat exchange process for some precursor mixtures. However, almost no effect can be found on the microstructure of powder and coating by the addition of urea. The extra heat energy caused by the addition of urea is so small, as compared with the heat input by the present plasma jet, so that the heating effect can be ignored. The porosity of coatings increase when the LaCl3·7H2O instead of La(NO3)3·6H2O reacts with Zr(CH3CO2)4.

  18. Titanium Dioxide Coating Prepared by Use of a Suspension-Solution Plasma-Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lingzhong; Coyle, Thomas W.; Chien, Ken; Pershin, Larry; Li, Tiegang; Golozar, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were prepared from titanium isopropoxide solution containing nano TiO2 particles by use of a plasma-spray process. The effects of stand-off distance on coating composition and microstructure were investigated and compared with those for pure solution precursor and a water-based suspension of TiO2. The results showed that the anatase content of the coating increased with increasing stand-off distance and the rate of deposition decreased with increasing spray distance. Anatase nanoparticles in solution were incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation whereas most of the TiO2 in the precursor solution was transformed into rutile. The microstructure of preserved anatase particles bound by rutile improved the efficiency of deposition of the coating. The amount of anatase phase can be adjusted by variation of the ratio of solution to added anatase TiO2 nanoparticles.

  19. A design of experiment study of plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, T.J. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.); Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Wilson, G.C. ); Riggs, W.L. II ); Rotolico, A.J.; Nerz, J.E. )

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of the plasma spraying of alumina-titania powder is presented in this paper. This powder system is being used to fabricate heater tubes that emulate nuclear fuel tubes for use in thermal-hydraulic testing. Coating experiments were conducted using a Taguchi fractional-factorial design parametric study. Operating parameters were varied around the typical spray parameters in a systematic design of experiments in order to display the range of plasma processing conditions and their effect on the resultant coating. The coatings were characterized by hardness and electrical tests, image analysis, and optical metallography. Coating qualities are discussed with respect to dielectric strength, hardness, porosity, surface roughness, deposition efficiency, and microstructure. The attributes of the coatings are correlated with the changes in operating parameters.

  20. A design of experiment study of plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, T.J.; Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Wilson, G.C.; Riggs, W.L. II; Rotolico, A.J.; Nerz, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    An experimental study of the plasma spraying of alumina-titania powder is presented in this paper. This powder system is being used to fabricate heater tubes that emulate nuclear fuel tubes for use in thermal-hydraulic testing. Coating experiments were conducted using a Taguchi fractional-factorial design parametric study. Operating parameters were varied around the typical spray parameters in a systematic design of experiments in order to display the range of plasma processing conditions and their effect on the resultant coating. The coatings were characterized by hardness and electrical tests, image analysis, and optical metallography. Coating qualities are discussed with respect to dielectric strength, hardness, porosity, surface roughness, deposition efficiency, and microstructure. The attributes of the coatings are correlated with the changes in operating parameters.

  1. Columnar-Structured Mg-Al-Spinel Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N.; Ebert, S.; Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2015-01-01

    The suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process has been developed to permit the feeding of sub-micrometer-sized powder into the plasma plume. In contrast to electron beam-physical vapor deposition and plasma spray-physical vapor deposition, SPS enables the cost-efficient deposition of columnar-structured coatings. Due to their strain tolerance, these coatings play an important role in the field of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In addition to the cost-efficient process, attention was turned to the TBC material. Nowadays, yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as standard TBC material. However, its long-term application at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is problematic. At these high temperatures, phase transitions and sintering effects lead to the degradation of the TBC system. To overcome those deficits of YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel was chosen as TBC material. Even though it has a lower melting point (~2135 °C) and a higher thermal conductivity (~2.5 W/m/K) than YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel provides phase stability at high temperatures in contrast to YSZ. The Mg-Al-spinel deposition by SPS resulted in columnar-structured coatings, which have been tested for their thermal cycling lifetime. Furthermore, the influence of substrate cooling during the spraying process on thermal cycling behavior, phase composition, and stoichiometry of the Mg-Al-spinel has been investigated.

  2. High Anatase Rate Titanium Dioxide Coating Deposition by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Kondo, Toshiki; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Titanium dioxide is a promising photocatalyst material because of the magnificent properties of this material where it is able to remove the air pollution substance and the deodorizing function. Generally, the deposition method of a titanium dioxide coating is carried out by an organic system binder but the powerful photocatalytic reaction will degrades the binder. Therefore, thermal spray is considered to be the alternative method but this method will induce crystallization transformation of titanium dioxide from anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity to rutile phase with low photocatalyst which caused by high heat input. Since our microwave plasma spraying device is operable at low power comparing with conventional high power plasma spray, the reduce effect of the heat input onto the particles at the time of spraying can be achieved and coating deposition with high rate of anatase phase is expected. Therefore, in this research, the coating deposition by controlling the heat input into the spray particle which can be resulted in high rate of anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity was conducted. By controlled condition, coating with optimum anatase rate of 83% is able to be fabricated by this method.

  3. Neutron and X-ray diffraction of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Herman, H.; Singhal, S. P.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    ZrO2-7.8mol. pct. YO1.5, a fused powder, and ZrO2-8.7mol. pct. YO1.5, a prereacted powder, were plasma-sprayed onto steel substrates. Neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction of the as-received powder, the powder plasma sprayed into water, as-sprayed coatings, and coatings heat-treated for 10 and 100 h were carried out to study phase transformations and ordering of the oxygen ions on the oxygen sublattice. The as-received fused powder has a much lower monoclinic percentage than does the pre-reacted powder, this resulting in a much lower monoclinic percentage in the coating. Heat treatment increases the percentages of the cubic and monoclinic phases, while decreasing the tetragonal content. An ordered tetragonal phase is detected by the presence of extra neutron diffraction peaks. These phase transformations and ordering will result in volume changes. The implications of these transformations on the performance of partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings is discussed.

  4. Effect of oxide addition on plasma sprayed alumina-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meidong

    Plasma spray feed powders of Al2O3, Al2O 3-TiO2, Al2O3-CeO2, and Al2O3-ZrO2 were prepared using a spray-dry and sintering method. Coatings of these powders were deposited onto metal substrates under a same set of plasma spraying parameters. Coating properties such as phase composition, degree of melting, splat thickness, microhardness, indentation fracture resistance, molten region "nanohardness", and abrasive wear resistance were investigated. These results indicate that compared with pure Al2O3 coating, the addition of secondary oxides, such as TiO2, CeO2, and ZrO2, enhances the degree of melting and splat deformability on impact, reduces splat thickness, increases coating microhardness and fracture resistance, and improves coating abrasive wear resistance. The correlation of secondary oxide addition and the resulting changes on coating microstructures and mechanical properties compared with pure alumina coating was theorized. Coatings from three different Al2O3/13TiO2 feed powders were also compared to in detail. It is demonstrated that the degree of mixing of the Al 2O3 and TiO2 ingredients in the feed powder has immense impact on the phase composition, microstructure, hardness, crack growth resistance, and abrasive wear performance of the coatings. A high degree of mixing of Al2O3 and TiO2 in the powder state results in more uniform microstructure, higher hardness, higher crack growth resistance, and consequently better abrasive wear resistance of the coating.

  5. Nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yanfeng; Song, Lei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Yi; Huang, Tao; Wu, Yao; Chen, Jiyong; Wu, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings have great potential in dental and orthopedic medical implant applications, due to its excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. However, most of the coating preparation techniques either produce only thin thickness coatings or require tedious preparation steps. In this study, a new attempt was made to deposit bioactive glass-ceramic coatings on titanium substrates by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, triethyl phosphate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate solutions were mixed together to form a suspension after hydrolysis, and the liquid suspension was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying of P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings. The in vitro bioactivities of the as-deposited coatings were evaluated by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 4 h, 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The as-deposited coating and its microstructure evolution behavior under SBF soaking were systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructure had been successfully synthesized by the LPPS technique and the synthesized coatings showed quick formation of a nanostructured HCA layer after being soaked in SBF. Overall, our results indicate that the LPPS process is an effective and simple method to synthesize nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with good in vitro bioactivity.

  6. Thermal Shock Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited Using Low-Energy Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings have been frequently used as a thermal protective layer on the metal or alloy component surfaces. In the present study, ZrO2-7%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were successfully deposited by DC (direct current) plasma spray process under very low pressure conditions (less than 1 mbar) using low-energy plasma guns F4-VB and F100. The experiments were performed to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of different TBC specimens which were heated to 1373 K at a high-temperature cycling furnace and held for 0.5 h, followed by air cooling at room temperature for 0.2 h. For comparison, a corresponding atmospheric plasma spray (APS) counterpart was also elaborated to carry out the similar experiments. The results indicated that the very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) coatings displayed better thermal shock resistance. Moreover, the failure mechanism of the coatings was elucidated.

  7. Laser Cladding to Improve Oxidation Behavior of Air Plasma-Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, M. Mudassar; Shahid, Muhammad; Nusair Khan, A.; Mehmood, K.

    2015-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr coating on stainless steel (AISI-304) substrate was re-melted using CO2 laser to remove the inherent defects, i.e., porosity, splat boundaries, and oxides of air plasma-sprayed coating. The (1) uncoated, (2) air plasma-sprayed, and (3) laser-re-melted specimens were exposed to cyclic oxidation at 900 °C for a hundred cycles run. The oxidation products were characterized using XRD and SEM. Weight changes were determined after every 4th cycle; Uncoated samples showed severe oxidation indicated by substantial weight loss, whereas air plasma-coated samples demonstrated noticeable weight gain. However, oxidation resistance of laser-cladded samples was found to be significantly improved as the samples showed negligible weight change; porosity within the coating was minimized with an improvement in interface quality causing reduction in delamination damage.

  8. Plasma Spray-PVD: Plasma Characteristics and Impact on Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2012-12-01

    Typical plasma characteristics of the plasma spray-physical vapour deposition (PS-PVD) process were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. Electron temperatures were determined by Boltzmann plots while temperatures of the heavy species as well as electron densities were obtained by broadening analysis of spectral lines. The results show how the plasma properties and thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are affected by the admixture of hydrogen and the ambient chamber pressure. Some experimental examples of PS-PVD coatings demonstrate the impact on feedstock treatment and deposited microstructures.

  9. Development and evaluation of suspension plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings as thermal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Every, Kent J.

    The insulating effects from thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines allow for increased operational efficiencies and longer service lifetimes. Consequently, improving TBCs can lead to enhanced gas turbine engine performance. This study was conducted to investigate if yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, the standard industrial choice for TBCs, produced from nano-sized powder could provide better thermal insulation than current commericial YSZ coatings generated using micron-sized powders. The coatings for this research were made via the recently developed suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process. With SPS, powders are suspended in a solvent containing dispersing agents; the suspension is then injected directly into a plasma flow that evaporates the solvent and melts the powder while transporting it to the substrate. Although related to the industrial TBC production method of air plasma spraying (APS), SPS has two important differences---the ability to spray sub-micron diameter ceramic particles, and the ability to alloy the particles with chemicals dissolved in the solvent. These aspects of SPS were employed to generate a series of coatings from suspensions containing ˜100 nm diameter YSZ powder particles, some of which were alloyed with neodymium and ytterbium ions from the solvent. The SPS coatings contained columnar structures not observed in APS TBCs; thus, a theory was developed to explain the formation of these features. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was tested to evaluate the effects of these unique microstructures and the effects of the alloying process. The results for samples in the as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions were compared to conventional YSZ TBCs. This comparison showed that, relative to APS YSZ coatings, the unalloyed SPS samples typically exhibited higher as-sprayed and lower heat-treated thermal conductivities. All thermal conductivity values for the alloyed samples were lower than conventional YSZ TBCs

  10. COMPARISON OF THERMAL PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATING DEPOSITED ON IN738 USING STANDARD AIR PLASMA SPRAY WITH 100HE PLASMA SPRAY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Uppu, N.; Mensah, P.F.; Ofori, D.

    2006-07-01

    A typical blade material is made of Nickel super alloy and can bear temperatures up to 950°C. But the operating temperature of a gas turbine is above the melting point of super alloy nearly at 1500°C. This could lead to hot corrosions, high temperature oxidation, creep, thermal fatigue may takes place on the blade material. Though the turbine has an internal cooling system, the cooling is not adequate to reduce the temperature of the blade substrate. Therefore to protect the blade material as well as increase the efficiency of the turbine, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be used. A TBC coating of 250 μm thick can reduce the temperature by up to 200° C. Air Plasma Spray Process (APS) and High Enthalpy Plasma Spray Process (100HE) were the processes used for coating the blades with the TBCs. Because thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperature, it is desired that these processes yield very low thermal conductivities at high temperatures in order not to damage the blade. An experiment was carried out using Flash line 5000 apparatus to compare the thermal conductivity of both processes.The apparatus could also be used to determine the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of the TBCs. 75 to 2800 K was the temperature range used in the experimentation. It was found out that though 100HE has high deposition efficiency, the thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperatures whiles APS yielded low thermal conductivities.

  11. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; Gibbs, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg atmore » 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.« less

  12. Tungsten Coating on Low Activation Vanadium Alloy by Plasma Spray Process

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Takuya; Muroga, Takeo; Noda, Nobuaki; Kawamura, Masashi; Ise, Hideo; Kurishita, Hiroaki

    2005-05-15

    Tungsten (W) coating on fusion candidate V-4Cr-4Ti (NIFS-HEAT-2) substrate was demonstrated with plasma spray process for the purpose of applying to protection of the plasma facing surface of a fusion blanket. Increase in plasma input power and temperature of the substrate was effective to reduce porosity of the coating, but resulted in hardening of the substrate and degradation of impact property at 77 K. The hardening seemed to be due to contamination with gaseous impurities and deformation by thermal stress during the coating process. Since all the samples showed good ductility at room temperature, further heating seems to be acceptable for the vanadium substrate. The fracture stress of the W coating was estimated from bending tests as at least 313 MPa, which well exceeds the design stress for the vanadium structure in fusion blanket.

  13. Nanocomposite Lanthanum Zirconate Thermal Barrier Coating Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaohui; Wang, You; Wang, Liang; Hao, Guangzhao; Sun, Xiaoguang; Shan, Fan; Zou, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    This work seeks to develop an innovative nanocomposite thermal barrier coating (TBC) exhibiting low thermal conductivity and high durability compared with that of current TBCs. To achieve this objective, nanosized lanthanum zirconate particles were selected for the topcoat of the TBC system, and a new process—suspension plasma spray—was employed to produce desirable microstructural features: the nanocomposite lanthanum zirconate TBC contains ultrafine splats and high volume porosity, for lower thermal conductivity, and better durability. The parameters of plasma spray experiment included two main variables: (i) spray distance varying from 40 to 80 mm and (ii) the concentration of suspension 20, 25, and 30 wt.%, respectively. The microstructure of obtained coatings was characterized with scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. The porosity of coatings is in the range of 6-10%, and the single phase in the as-sprayed coatings was pyrochlore lanthanum zirconate.

  14. Hot Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Behavior of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Conventional and Nanostructured Zirconia Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Mohsen; Keyvani, Ahmad; Heydarzadeh Sohi, Mahmoud

    Conventional and nanostructured zirconia coatings were deposited on In-738 Ni super alloy by atmospheric plasma spray technique. The hot corrosion resistance of the coatings was measured at 1050°C using an atmospheric electrical furnace and a fused mixture of vanadium pent oxide and sodium sulfate respectively. According to the experimental results nanostructured coatings showed a better hot corrosion resistance than conventional ones. The improved hot corrosion resistance could be explained by the change of structure to a dense and more packed structure in the nanocoating. The evaluation of mechanical properties by nano indentation method showed the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of the YSZ coating increased substantially after hot corrosion.

  15. Effect of Zr on microstructure of metallic glass coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Kuroda, T; Kimura, H; Inoue, A

    2012-06-01

    Metallic glass is one of the most attractive advanced materials, and many researchers have conducted various developmental research works. Metallic glass is expected to be used as a functional material because of its excellent physical and chemical functions such as high strength and high corrosion resistance. However, the application for small size parts has been carried out only in some industrial fields. In order to widen the industrial application fields, a composite material is preferred for the cost performance. In the coating processes of metallic glass with the conventional deposition techniques, there is a difficulty to form thick coatings due to their low deposition rate. Thermal spraying method is one of the potential candidates to produce metallic glass composites. Metallic glass coatings can be applied to the longer parts and therefore the application field can be widened. The gas tunnel plasma spraying is one of the most important technologies for high quality ceramic coating and synthesizing functional materials. As the gas tunnel type plasma jet is superior to the properties of other conventional type plasma jets, this plasma has great possibilities for various applications in thermal processing. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying was used to form the metallic glass coatings on the stainless-steel substrate. The microstructure and surface morphology of the metallic glass coatings were examined using Fe-based metallic glass powder and Zr-based metallic glass powder as coating material. For the mechanical properties the Vickers hardness was measured on the cross section of both the coatings and the difference between the powders was compared. PMID:22905546

  16. PLASMA SPRAYED Ni-Al COATINGS FOR SAFE ENDING HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.; OTTERSON,D.; BERNDT,C.C.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AIB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand. It was determined that the Ni-Al coatings could be applied to a depth of two inches on the tube ends. When sprayed on flat coupons the coatings exhibited relatively high adhesion strength and microhardness. Polarization curves showed that the coating performance was variable. Measured corrosion potentials indicated that the Ni-Al coatings are active towards steel coated with thermally conductive polymers, thereby suggesting preferential corrosion. Corrosion also occurred on the coated coupons tested in the volcanic pool. This may have been exacerbated by the difficulty in applying a uniform coating to the coupon edges. The Ni-Al coatings applied to the tubes had significant porosity and did not provide adequate corrosion protection. This is associated with

  17. Preparation of artificial canine femoral stem with HA-Ti ladder-type coating on plasma-sprayed pure Ti substrate and its performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xianlin; Li, Jingfeng; Yang, Shuhua; Zheng, Qixin; Zou, Zhenwei

    2012-03-01

    An ideal, biological-type, artificial femoral stem prosthesis has good stability and improved bone-prosthesis bonding capacity. In the current study, pure hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated, cementless, artificial femoral stems were prepared by adopting different plasma spray powers and distances and were tested in terms of shear strength. The pure titanium (Ti) substrates, HA coatings, and composite Ti-HA ladder-type coatings prepared under vacuum and atmospheric conditions were examined to compare the shear strengths, microscopic constitutions, and structures of the coatings. The coating was fabricated and the bond strength was improved by adopting 35 kW of spray power and an 80 mm spray distance. The comparisons show that the shear strength of the Ti coating prepared under vacuum conditions was higher than that of the coating prepared under atmospheric conditions (P < 0.05). Moreover, the pressure-shear strength of the Ti + HAG + Ti + V group coating was statistically significantly different from those of the HA + Ti + V and HA + Ti + A groups (P < 0.05). The coatings were compared using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectrum analysis. The composite HA-Ti ladder-type coating group, where pure Ti substrate was sprayed onto the Ti alloy under vacuum conditions, had a successive laminate structure. In addition, the intergranular bond in the HA surface layer on the gradient coating was compact and highly crystallized. Under vacuum conditions, the plasma-sprayed layer was characterized by higher tightness, moderate porosity, higher bonding strength to HA, and higher HA crystallinity. The proposed coating can be used in new, cementless, artificial femoral stems with improved bone-prosthesis bonding capacity and stability.

  18. High temperature damping behavior of plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Chia, C. T.; Gu, Y. W.; Boey, F. Y. C.

    2002-09-01

    There is a trend to design the turbine coating and the substrate as in integral, layered, engineering assembly. Under the harsh environment of the turbine engine, a failure in one component can quickly lead to failure in other components. Materials that are used in structural applications are prone to mechanical vibration, which, when not attenuated, will lead to fatigue of components and shortening of life cycle. Therefore, it is necessary to examine the thermal stability and dynamic mechanical properties of coatings under dynamic conditions. In addition to these noise reduction and vibration amplitude control motivated objectives, however, mechanical energy dissipation processes also find intrinsic applications in cases for which a thorough understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the damping response of the material is required. This article describes the damping behavior and mechanisms that exist in plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY coatings.

  19. Microstructure of Nanostructured TIO2 Coating Prepared by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying and its Photocatalytic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qinghe; Huang, Hui; Zhou, Chungen

    The starting nano-TiO2 feedstock was agglomerated by spray-drying process. Nano-TiO2 coatings on transparent glasses were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The variation of the anatase content, porosity and grain size with the arc current is investigated extensively. Result shows that the nano-TiO2 phase is composed of anatase and rutile phase. The content of anatase in the sprayed coatings decreased and the grain size increased with the arc current increasing, and the porosity first increased and then decreased. As-sprayed nano-TiO2 coatings obtained at the spraying current of 400 A have the best photocatalytic property due to the synergistic effect of the fractions of anatase phase and the rate of porosity.

  20. Investigations of Local Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed FeCr Nanocomposite Coating by SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi; Shu, Mingyong; Zhong, Qingdong; Zhang, Junliang; Zhou, Qiongyu; Bui, Quoc Binh

    2016-02-01

    FeCr alloy coating can be sprayed on low-carbon steel to improve the corrosion resistance because of FeCr alloy's high anti-corrosion capacity. In this paper, Fe microparticles/Cr nanoparticles coating (NFC) and FeCr microparticles coating (MFC) were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying and NFC was heat-treated under hydrogen atmosphere at 800 °C (HNFC). EDS mapping showed no penetration of Ni in MFC and NFC while penetration of Ni occurred in HNFC. X-ray diffraction results indicated the form of the NiCrFe (bcc) solid solution in HNFC. SECM testing in 3.5 (wt.%) NaCl revealed that the anti-corrosion capacity of NFC improved compared with MFC, while HNFC improved further.

  1. Improvement in the properties of plasma-sprayed metallic, alloy and ceramic coatings using dry-ice blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shujuan; Song, Bo; Hansz, Bernard; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Dry-ice blasting, as an environmental-friendly method, was introduced into atmospheric plasma spraying for improving properties of metallic, alloy and ceramic coatings. The deposited coatings were then compared with coatings plasma-sprayed using conventional air cooling in terms of microstructure, temperature, oxidation, porosity, residual stress and adhesion. It was found that a denser steel or CoNiCrAlY alloy coating with a lower content of oxide can be achieved with the application of dry-ice blasting during the plasma spraying. In addition, the adhesive strength of Al 2O 3 coating deposited with dry-ice blasting exceeded 60 MPa, which was nearly increased by 30% compared with that of the coating deposited with conventional air cooling. The improvement in properties of plasma-sprayed metallic, alloy and ceramic coatings caused by dry-ice blasting was attributed to the decrease of annulus-ringed disk like splats, the better cooling efficiency of dry-ice pellets and even the mechanical effect of dry-ice impact.

  2. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  3. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-06-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  4. Analysis of retrieved hydroxyapatite-coated hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K. A.; Walsh, W.; Swarts, E.

    2004-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings are used extensively on orthopaedic devices to improve the adhesion of bone to the prosthesis. This approach increases the integrity and longevity of the implanted prosthesis. Four HAp-coated hip components recovered from patients during revision surgery were investigated for bone attachment and coating modification after storage in ethanol or formaldehyde. Orthopedic components displayed preferable bone attachment on microtextured areas and little bone on smoother areas. The coating microstructure differed between three coatings that remained on the prosthesis surface, ranging from completely crystalline coatings made by vacuum plasma spraying to less crystalline coatings manufactured by air plasma spraying. Coating failure for the lower crystallinity coatings was observed by a crack at the interface that was possibly caused by the dissolution of an amorphous phase. While higher crystallinity coatings degraded by coating delamination, the lower crystallinity coating produced loose particulate on the outer coating surface. Coating morphology as observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) displayed lamellae fracture, chemical dissolution, osteoclastic resorption, and precipitation in agreement with previously identified in-vitro events. The coating longevity appeared to be extended in those areas subject to lower levels of stress and more bone coverage.

  5. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe/Mo composite amorphous coatings prepared by air plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-ping; Xing, Ya-zhe; Zhang, Feng-ying; Hao, Jian-min

    2012-07-01

    Fe/Mo composite coatings were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS) using Fe-based and Mo-based amorphous and nanocrystalline mixed powders. Microstructural studies show that the composite coatings present a layered structure with low porosity due to adding the self-bonded Mo-based alloy. Corrosion behaviors of the composite coatings, the Fe-based coatings and the Mo-based coatings were investigated by electrochemical measurements and salt spray tests. Electrochemical results show that the composite coatings exhibit a lower polarization current density and higher corrosion potentials than the Fe-based coating when tested in 3.5wt% NaCl solutions, indicating superior corrosion resistance compared with the Fe-based coating. Also with the increase in addition of the Mo-based alloy, a raised corrosion resistance, inferred by an increase in corrosion potential and a decrease in polarization current density, can be found. The results of salt spray tests again show that the corrosion resistance is enhanced by adding the Mo-based alloy, which helps to reduce the porosity of the composite coatings and enhance the stability of the passive films.

  6. Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Fe-Si Nanocomposite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi; Meng, Xinjing; Zhong, Qingdong; Yang, Jian; Shu, Mingyong; Han, Hongbo; Bui, QuocBinh

    2016-06-01

    In this study, Fe-Si nanoparticle composite coating (FSN) and Fe-Si microparticle composite coating (FSM) were prepared via atmospheric plasma spraying, and FSN was thermally treated under hydrogen atmosphere at 1120 °C for holding time of 2.5 h (TFSN). Under transmission electron microscopy, many unmelted nanoscale particles were observed in FSN, while no substantial particles were found in TFSN. On scanning electron microscopy analysis, pores and cracks were observed in FSM and FSN, while no defects were found in TFSN. Scanning electrochemical microscopy testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl for 5 h revealed that FSM underwent severe pitting corrosion, FSN showed relatively minor pitting corrosion, and TFSN had no pitting corrosion.

  7. Creep of plasma-sprayed-ZrO2 thermal-barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.; Bill, R. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed-zirconia thermal-barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 6900, 13,800, and 24,100 kPa (1000, 2000, and 3500 psi) and temperatures of 1100, 1250, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, MgO, and two different concentrations of Y2O3. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate while the stress, particle size, and porosity had a lesser effect. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, S.

    1995-11-09

    Our lab has been working with plasma spraying of both high pressure gas atomized (HPGA) and cast and crushed quasicrystal powders. A major component of this research includes comparative studies of PAS coatings formed with starting powders prepared by both techniques. In addition, a thorough investigation of the effects of starting powder particle size on coating microstructure is included. During the course of the overall research, an interest developed in forming Al-Cu-Fe materials with finer grain sizes. Therefore, a brief study was performed to characterize the effect of adding boron to Al-Cu-Fe materials prepared by different techniques. In addition to characterizing the microstructural features of the above materials, oxidation and wear behavior was also examined.

  10. Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Fe-Si Nanocomposite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi; Meng, Xinjing; Zhong, Qingdong; Yang, Jian; Shu, Mingyong; Han, Hongbo; Bui, QuocBinh

    2016-04-01

    In this study, Fe-Si nanoparticle composite coating (FSN) and Fe-Si microparticle composite coating (FSM) were prepared via atmospheric plasma spraying, and FSN was thermally treated under hydrogen atmosphere at 1120 °C for holding time of 2.5 h (TFSN). Under transmission electron microscopy, many unmelted nanoscale particles were observed in FSN, while no substantial particles were found in TFSN. On scanning electron microscopy analysis, pores and cracks were observed in FSM and FSN, while no defects were found in TFSN. Scanning electrochemical microscopy testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl for 5 h revealed that FSM underwent severe pitting corrosion, FSN showed relatively minor pitting corrosion, and TFSN had no pitting corrosion.

  11. Post-treatment of Plasma-Sprayed Amorphous Ceramic Coatings by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chraska, T.; Pala, Z.; Mušálek, R.; Medřický, J.; Vilémová, M.

    2015-04-01

    Alumina-zirconia ceramic material has been plasma sprayed using a water-stabilized plasma torch to produce free standing coatings. The as-sprayed coatings have very low porosity and are mostly amorphous. The amorphous material crystallizes at temperatures above 900 °C. A spark plasma sintering apparatus has been used to heat the as-sprayed samples to temperatures above 900 °C to induce crystallization, while at the same time, a uniaxial pressure of 80 MPa has been applied to their surface. After such post-treatment, the ceramic samples are crystalline and have very low open porosity. The post-treated material exhibits high hardness and significantly increased flexural strength. The post-treated samples have a microstructure that is best described as nanocomposite with the very small crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix.

  12. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the

  13. Study on plasma-spraying coating bioactive ceramics onto silicon nitride surface as composite endosteal implants.

    PubMed

    Xu, L L; Shi, S J

    1997-01-01

    The successful key of endosteal implants depends on the properties of implant materials which are very important for oral implantology at the present. Because silicon nitride has high strength and hydroxylapatite (HA) and flourapatite (FA) have good biocompatibility. In this paper, we apply silicon nitride as base material. Plasma spray HA, FA onto its surface as composite endosteal implants. Physical and chemical properties test, includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), EDAX and bonding strength test (push-out test). The results indicate: after plasma-spraying coating, crystalline phase of HA and FA unchanged and form a lot of pores among the crystal particles. Those pores benefit bone growing into them. It is very important for implants to be fixed in bone for long time, Ca/P ratio has no significant change. Bonding strength test results indicate: Si3N4-HA 23.6MPa, Si3N4-FA 27.12 MPa are higher than that of Ti-HA 15.07 MPa. On the basis of these studies, they are kinds of ideal implant materials. PMID:9731426

  14. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of Supersonic Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu; Ding, Chunhua; Li, Hongqiang; Han, Zhihai; Ding, Bingjun; Wang, Tiejun; Yu, Lie

    2013-10-01

    In this work, Y2O3 stabilized zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were deposited by conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and high efficiency supersonic atmospheric plasma spraying (SAPS), respectively. The effect of Al2O3 layer stability on the isothermal growth behavior of thermally grown oxides (TGOs) was studied. The results revealed that the Al2O3 layer experienced a three-stage change process, i.e., (1) instantaneous growth stage, (2) steady-state growth stage, and (3) depletion stage. The thickness of Al2O3 scale was proved to be an important factor for the growth rate of TGOs. The SAPS-TBCs exhibited a higher Al2O3 stability and better oxidation resistance as compared with the APS-TBCs. Additionally, it was found that inner oxides, especially nucleated on the top of the crest, continually grew and swallowed the previously formed Al2O3 layer, leading to the granulation and disappearance of continuous Al2O3 scale, which was finally replaced by the mixed oxides and spinel.

  15. Characterization of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited by Low-Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-jiang; Yin, Shuo; Song, Chen; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Liao, Han-lin

    2016-02-01

    The research presented here aimed to apply plasma spraying at a low pressure of 100 Pa for fabricating the columnar structure or dense coatings. These coatings with different structures were elaborated from the vapor condensation and molten droplets, respectively, using the agglomerated YSZ powders and a relatively low power commercial F4-VB torch. It was shown that the crystallite size of coating deposited from the vapor condensation at a spraying distance of 200 mm was reduced to 17.1 nm from 43.7 nm of the feedstock. Observations indicated that a thin columnar structured coating was produced out of the line of sight of projection. In the line of sight of projection, the hybrid structured coating was obtained. The relatively dense coating was fabricated using a specifically designed extended nozzle. Investigations by means of optical emission spectroscopy were performed to analyze the nature of the plasma jet with YSZ powders. The Vickers microhardness was also conducted. It was found that the relatively dense coating showed a higher value in comparison to the hybrid structure coating, up to 1273 ± 56 Hv100g.

  16. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  17. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings have been successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They have been evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self-lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore 'wide temperature spectrum,' self-lubricating compositions.

  18. Assessment of plasma sprayed coatings to modify surface friction for railroad applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Heidi Lynn

    For the past hundred years, railroads have been an important means of transportation for passengers and freight. Over the years train traffic, speeds, and loads have increased steadily leading to a more severe wheel/rail environment that exceeds the design limits of the steels thus causing increased wear, decreased rail life, and higher maintenance costs. The cost of controlling friction and the resulting damage is an area of ever-increasing concern. One potential method of modifying friction is by changing the surface properties of the rail. The work reported herein was carried out as part of a larger effort to modify surface friction of rails. The original focus of this research was to use high velocity air plasma spraying to develop friction enhancing coatings for the rail surface. Using the methodology developed at the Oregon Graduate Institute, the plasma spray parameters were optimized and the coatings were tested on the Amsler machine under rolling/sliding wear conditions to determine viability prior to full scale testing. Stainless steel and composite 1080 steel were investigated as potential materials for increasing friction. Poor results with these coatings shifted the research focus to understanding the durability of the coatings and to failure analysis of initial 1080 steel full scale samples tested by the Facility for Accelerated Service Testing that had failed prematurely. After re-optimization of parameters and preparation methodologies further full scale samples (1080 steel/nylon) were tested and failure analysis was performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of coatings from the tested samples. The laboratory scale Amsler test did not appear to be a good indicator of the performance of the coating in full scale tests, because variations in microstructure were caused by differences in sample size, geometry and spraying methods when scaling up from a small Amsler roller to a large rail sample. The

  19. Plasma sprayed manganese-cobalt spinel coatings: Process sensitivity on phase, electrical and protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su Jung; Pala, Zdenek; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel (Mn1.5Co1.5O4, MCO) coatings are prepared by the air plasma spray (APS) process to examine their efficacy in serving as protective coatings from Cr-poisoning of the cathode side in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). These complex oxides are susceptible to process induced stoichiometric and phase changes which affect their functional performance. To critically examine these effects, MCO coatings are produced with deliberate modifications to the spray process parameters to explore relationship among process conditions, microstructure and functional properties. The resultant interplay among particle thermal and kinetic energies are captured through process maps, which serve to characterize the parametric effects on properties. The results show significant changes to the chemistry and phase composition of the deposited material resulting from preferential evaporation of oxygen. Post deposition annealing recovers oxygen in the coatings and allows partial recovery of the spinel phase, which is confirmed through thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements. In addition, coatings with high density after sintering show excellent electrical conductivity of 40 S cm-1 at 800 °C while simultaneously providing requisite protection characteristics against Cr-poisoning. This study provides a framework for optimal evaluation of MCO coatings in intermediate temperature SOFCs.

  20. Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Splat Bonding for CMAS and Corrosion Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yao, Shu-Wei; Wang, Li-Shuang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-01-01

    The infiltration of molten CMAS in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) at high temperature is significantly affected by the microstructure of the ceramic coating. Enhancing the bonding ratio between splats can reduce the interconnected pores and suppress the infiltration of the molten CMAS into the coating. In this study, a dual-layered (DL) TBC with the dense 8YSZ on the top of the conventional porous 8YSZ was proposed to enhance CMAS corrosion of atmospheric plasma-sprayed YSZ. The dense YSZ coating with improved lamellar bonding was deposited at a higher deposition temperature. The microstructure of the coatings before and after CMAS attack test was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was clearly revealed that by adjusting the microstructure and applying a dense ceramic layer with the improved interface bonding on the top of porous TBC, the infiltration of CMAS into porous YSZ coating can be effectively suppressed. Moreover, by designing DL TBCs, the thermal conductivity of the TBC system exhibits a limited increase. Thus with the design of DL structure, the TBCs with high CMAS corrosion resistance and low thermal conductivity can be achieved.

  1. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Conventional and Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, E.; Bannier, E.; Salvador, M. D.; Bonache, V.; García, J. C.; Morgiel, J.; Grzonka, J.

    2010-09-01

    WC-12%Co coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying using conventional and nanostructured powders and two secondary plasmogenous gases (He and H2). Coating microstructure and phase composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray diffraction techniques (XRD) techniques. This study examined wear and friction properties of the coatings under dry friction conditions. SEM was used to analyze abraded surface microstructure. Coating microhardness and fracture toughness were also determined. All coatings displayed strong decarburization as a result of WC decomposition, which gave rise to the formation of secondary phases (W2C and W). A very fine undissolved WC crystalline dispersion coexisted with these new phases. TEM observation confirmed that the matrix was predominantly amorphous and filled with block-type, frequently dislocated crystallites. Wear was observed to follow a three-body abrasive mechanism, since debris between the ball and the coating surface was detected. The main wear mechanism was based on subsurface cracking, owing to the arising debris. WC grain decomposition and dissolution were concluded to be critical factors in wear resistance. The level of decomposition and dissolution could be modified by changing the plasmogenous gas or feed powder grain size. The influence of the plasmogenous gas on wear resistance was greater than the influence of feedstock particle size.

  2. Sintering and Creep Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia and Hafnia Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The sintering and creep of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings under high temperature conditions are complex phenomena. Changes in thermomechanical and thermophysical properties and in the stress response of these coating systems as a result of the sintering and creep processes are detrimental to coating thermal fatigue resistance and performance. In this paper, the sintering characteristics of ZrO2-8wt%y2O3, ZrO2-25wt%CeO2-2.5wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6w%NiO- 9wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6wt%Sc2O3-2wt%y2O3 and HfO2-27wt%y2O3 coating materials were investigated using dilatometry. It was found that the HfO2-Y2O3 and baseline ZrO2-Y2O3 exhibited the best sintering resistance, while the NiO-doped ZrO2-Y2O3 showed the highest shrinkage strain rates during the tests. Higher shrinkage strain rates of the coating materials were also observed when the specimens were tested in Ar+5%H2 as compared to in air. This phenomenon was attributed to an enhanced metal cation interstitial diffusion mechanism under the reducing conditions. It is proposed that increased chemical stability of coating materials will improve the material sintering resistance.

  3. Microstructure and Electrochemical Behavior of Fe-Based Amorphous Metallic Coatings Fabricated by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Wang, L.; He, D. Y.; Wang, F. C.; Liu, Y. B.

    2011-01-01

    A Fe48Cr15Mo14C15B6Y2 alloy with high glass forming ability (GFA) was selected to prepare amorphous metallic coatings by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The as-deposited coatings present a dense layered structure and low porosity. Microstructural studies show that some nanocrystals and a fraction of yttrium oxides formed during spraying, which induced the amorphous fraction of the coatings decreasing to 69% compared with amorphous alloy ribbons of the same component. High thermal stability enables the amorphous coatings to work below 910 K without crystallization. The results of electrochemical measurement show that the coatings exhibit extremely wide passive region and relatively low passive current density in 3.5% NaCl and 1 mol/L HCl solutions, which illustrate their superior ability to resist localized corrosion. Moreover, the corrosion behavior of the amorphous coatings in 1 mol/L H2SO4 solution is similar to their performance under conditions containing chloride ions, which manifests their flexible and extensive ability to withstand aggressive environments.

  4. The low cycle fatigue behavior of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C, but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  5. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  6. Studies on the Sliding Wear Performance of Plasma Spray Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Balraj; Singh, Bhupinder

    2010-01-01

    Two metallic powders namely Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al were coated on AISI 309 SS steel by shrouded plasma spray process. The wear behavior of the bare, Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al-coated AISI 309 SS steel was investigated according to ASTM Standard G99-03 on a Pin-on-Disc Wear Test Rig. The wear tests were carried out at normal loads of 30 and 50 N with a sliding velocity of 1 m/s. Cumulative wear rate and coefficient of friction (μ) were calculated for all the cases. The worn-out surfaces were then examined by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Both the as-sprayed coatings exhibited typical splat morphology. The XRD analysis indicated the formation of Ni phase for the Ni-20Cr coating and Ni3Al phase for the Ni3Al coating. It has been concluded that the plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al coatings can be useful to reduce the wear rate of AISI 309 SS steel. The coatings were found to be adherent to the substrate steel during the wear tests. The plasma-sprayed Ni3Al coating has been recommended as a better choice to reduce the wear of AISI 309 SS steel, in comparison with the Ni-20Cr coating.

  7. An Assessment of the Residual Stresses in Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Coatings on an Advanced Copper Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Agarwal, A.; Lachtrupp, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling studies were conducted on low pressure plasma sprayed (LPPS) NiAl top coat applied to an advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy (GRCop-84) substrate using Ni as a bond coat. A thermal analysis suggested that the NiAl and Ni top and bond coats, respectively, would provide adequate thermal protection to the GRCop-84 substrate in a rocket engine operating under high heat flux conditions. Residual stress measurements were conducted at different depths from the free surface on coated and uncoated GRCop-84 specimens by x-ray diffraction. These data are compared with theoretically estimated values assessed by a finite element analysis simulating the development of these stresses as the coated substrate cools down from the plasma spraying temperature to room temperature.

  8. Very low pressure plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating using a low-energy plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a more economical low-energy plasma source was used to perform a very low pressure plasma-spray (VLPPS) process. The plasma-jet properties were analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Moreover, yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (YSZ) was elaborated by a F100 low-power plasma gun under working pressure of 1 mbar, and the substrate specimens were partially shadowed by a baffle-plate during plasma spraying for obtaining different coating microstructures. Based on the SEM observation, a column-like grain coating was deposited by pure vapor deposition at the shadowed region, whereas, in the unshadowed region, the coating exhibited a binary microstructure which was formed by a mixed deposition of melted particles and evaporated particles. The mechanical properties of the coating were also well under investigation.

  9. Research on the Friction and Wear Behavior at Elevated Temperature of Plasma-Sprayed Nanostructured WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Gou, Guoqing; Tu, Mingjing; Liu, Yan

    2010-02-01

    Nanostructured and ultra-fine WC-Co coatings were prepared by plasma spray. The friction and wear behavior at elevated temperature and failure mechanism were investigated. The results indicated that the sliding wear resistance of nanostructured coating is better than that of ultra-fine coating at high temperature. The wear mechanism is different between ultra-fine coating and nanostructured coating. Brittle fracture and adhesive wear dominate in ultra-fine coating followed with abrasive wear. Toughness fracture and abrasive wear dominate in nanostructured coating followed with adhesive wear.

  10. Vapors and Droplets Mixture Deposition of Metallic Coatings by Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautherin, B.; Planche, M.-P.; Bolot, R.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.; Montavon, G.

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, the very low pressure plasma-spraying (VLPPS) process has been intensely developed and implemented to manufacture thin, dense and finely structured ceramic coatings for various applications, such as Y2O3 for diffusion barriers, among other examples. This paper aims at presenting developments carried out on metallic coatings. Aluminum was chosen as a demonstrative material due to its "moderate" vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 38.23 KJ cm-3) compared to the one of copper (i.e., 55.33 KJ cm-3), cobalt (i.e., 75.03 KJ cm-3), or even tantalum (i.e., 87.18 KJ cm-3). The objective of this work is primarily to better understand the behavior of a solid precursor injected into the plasma jet leading to the formation of vapors and to better control the factors affecting the coating structure. Nearly dense aluminum coatings were successfully deposited by VLPPS at 100 Pa with an intermediate power plasma torch (i.e., Sulzer Metco F4 type gun with maximum power of 45 kW). Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was implemented to study and analyze the vapor behavior into the plasma jet. Simplified CFD modeling allowed better understanding of some of the thermo-physical mechanisms. The effect of powder-size distribution, substrate temperature and spray distance were studied. The phase composition and microstructural features of the coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. Moreover, Vickers microhardness measurements were implemented.

  11. Plasma Sprayed Ni-Al Coatings for Safe Ending Heat Exchanger Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Berndt, C.C.; Otterson, D.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AlB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand.

  12. Plasma Sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) Coatings for Corrosion Protection and Adhesion Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Groff, G. B.; Rooney, M.; Cooke, A. V.; Boothe, R.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) coatings are being developed under the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program's (SPIP) Bondlines Package. These coatings are designed as a steel case preparation treatment prior to insulation lay-up. Other uses include the exterior of steel cases and bonding surfaces of nozzle components. They provide excellent bondability - rubber insulation and epoxy bonds fail cohesively within the polymer - for both fresh surfaces and surfaces having undergone natural and accelerated environmental aging. They have passed the MSFC requirements for protection of inland and sea coast environment. Because BOSS coatings are inherently corrosion resistant, they do not require preservation by greases or oils. The reduction/elimination of greases and oils, known bondline degraders, can increase SRM reliability, decrease costs by reducing the number of process steps, and decrease environmental pollution by reducing the amount of methyl chloroform used for degreasing and thus reduce release of the ozone-depleting chemical in accordance with the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol. The coatings can potential extend the life of RSRM case segments and nozzle components by eliminating erosion due to multiple grit blasting during each use cycle and corrosion damage during marine recovery. Concurrent work for the Air Force show that other BOSS coatings give excellent bondline strength and durability for high-performance structures of aluminum and titanium.

  13. Preparation of Aluminum Coatings by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying and Dry-Ice Blasting and Their Corrosion Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shu-Juan; Song, Bo; Zhou, Gen-Shu; Li, Chang-Jiu; Hansz, Bernard; Liao, Han-Lin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Aluminum coating, as an example of spray coating material with low hardness, was deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying while dry-ice blasting was applied during the deposition process. The deposited coatings were characterized in terms of microstructure, porosity, phase composition, and the valence states. The results show that the APS aluminum coatings with dry-ice blasting present a porosity of 0.35 ± 0.02%, which is comparable to the bulk material formed by the mechanical compaction. In addition, no evident oxide has been detected, except for the very thin and impervious oxide layer at the outermost layer. Compared to plasma-sprayed Al coatings without dry-ice blasting, the adhesion increased by 52% for Al substrate using dry-ice blasting, while 25% for steel substrate. Corrosion behavior of coated samples was evaluated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous using electrochemistry measurements. The electrochemical results indicated that APS Al coating with dry-ice blasting was more resistant to pitting corrosion than the conventional plasma-sprayed Al coating.

  14. Indigenous hydroxyapatite coated and bioactive glass coated titanium dental implant system – Fabrication and application in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Surajit; Kundu, Debabrata; Datta, Someswar; Basu, Debabrata; Soundrapandian, Chidambaram

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of different bioactive materials as coating on dental implant to restore tooth function is a growing trend in modern Dentistry. In the present study, hydroxyapatite and the bioactive glass-coated implants were evaluated for their behavior in osseous tissue following implantation in 14 patients. Materials and Methods: Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite formulated and prepared for coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Hydroxyapatite coating was applied on the implant surface by air plasma spray technique and bioactive glass coating was applied by vitreous enameling technique. Their outcome was assessed after 6 months in vivo study in human. Results: Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass coating materials were nontoxic and biocompatible. Uneventful healing was observed with both types of implants. Conclusion: The results showed bioactive glass is a good alternative coating material for dental implant. PMID:22028507

  15. Sliding Wear Response of Nanostructured YSZ Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossman, S.; Chicot, D.; Decoopman, X.; Iost, A.; van Gorp, A.; Meillot, E.; Puchi-Cabrera, E. S.; Santana, Y. Y.; Staia, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Nanostructured yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings for applications in high-temperature environments can be deposited by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) techniques. The present research has been conducted in order to study the sliding wear response of a SPS ZrO2-8% mol. Y2O3 coating (75 μm in thickness) deposited onto a Haynes 230 substrate, using pin-on-disc tests. Some of the coated samples were subsequently heat-treated for 1 h at 300 and 600 °C. Samples characterization prior and after the wear tests was carried out by SEM, EDS, XRD and optical profilometry techniques. Instrumented indentation was employed to determine elastic modulus and hardness. The results have shown that the as-sprayed and heat-treated samples experienced severe wear (10-13 m3/Nm) and the worst wear performance corresponded to the sample heat treated at 600 °C. Such a behavior could be related to both the structural changes that took place during heat treatment and the nature and level of the residual stresses in the coatings. In general, the morphologies of the wear tracks observed by SEM have shown a smoothing of the surface, brittle fracture, smearing and grain pull-out.

  16. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; Gibbs, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg at 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Yttria- and Ceria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Obtained by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łatka, Leszek; Cattini, Andrea; Chicot, Didier; Pawłowski, Lech; Kozerski, Stefan; Petit, Fabrice; Denoirjean, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Plasma generated by the SG-100 torch was applied to spray suspension formulated with the use of ZrO2 + 8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ) and ZrO2 + 24 wt.% CeO2 + 2.5 wt.% Y2O3 (24CeYSZ) as solid phases. The suspensions were formulated with the use of 20 wt.% solid phase, 40 wt.% water, and 40 wt.% ethanol. The plasma spray parameters were optimized by keeping constant: (a) the electric power of 40 kW and (b) the working gas compositions of 45 slpm for Ar and 5 slpm for H2. On the other hand, the spray distance was varied from 40 to 60 mm and the torch linear speed was varied from 300 to 500 mm/s. The coatings were sprayed onto stainless steel substrates, and their thicknesses were in the range from 70 to 110 μm. The coating microstructures were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. Mechanical properties were tested with the different methods including the indentation and scratch tests. The indentation test, carried out with various loads ranging from 100 to 10,000 mN, enabled to determine elastic modulus and Martens microhardness. Young's modulus of the coatings was in the range of 71-107 GPa for 8YSZ and 68-130 GPa for 24CeYSZ coatings. The scratch test enabled the authors to find the scratch macrohardness.

  18. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  19. Columnar-Structured Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) by Thin Film Low-Pressure Plasma Spraying (LPPS-TF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospach, Andreas; Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert; Stöver, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    The very low-pressure plasma Spray (VLPPS) process has been developed with the aim of depositing uniform and thin coatings with coverage of a large area by plasma spraying. At typical pressures of 100-200 Pa, the characteristics of the plasma jet change compared to conventional low-pressure plasma-spraying processes (LPPS) operating at 5-20 kPa. The combination of plasma spraying at low pressures with enhanced electrical input power has led to the development of the LPPS-TF process (TF = thin film). At appropriate parameters, it is possible to evaporate the powder feedstock material providing advanced microstructures of the deposits. This technique offers new possibilities for the manufacturing of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Besides the material composition, the microstructure is an important key to reduce thermal conductivity and to increase strain tolerance. In this regard, columnar microstructures deposited from the vapor phase show considerable advantages. Therefore, physical vapor deposition by electron beam evaporation (EB-PVD) is applied to achieve such columnar-structured TBCs. However, the deposition rate is low, and the line-of-sight nature of the process involves specific restrictions. In this article, the deposition of TBCs by the LPPS-TF process is shown. How the evaporation of the feedstock powder could be improved and to what extent the deposition rates could be increased were investigated.

  20. Anisotropic Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at High Temperature Determined by Ultrasonic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qin; Zhu, Jianguo; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are of great scientific and technological significance for the design and fabrication of TBC systems. The ultrasonic method combined with a sing-around method for mechanical properties measurement of TBC is deduced and the elastic modulus can be determined in the spray, or longitudinal, direction, and the transverse direction. Tested specimens of plasma-sprayed TBC are detached from the substrate and treated with thermal exposure at 1400 °C. The elastic moduli along the longitudinal and transverse directions of the TBCs are measured by different types of ultrasonic waves combined with a sing-around method, while the Poisson's ratio is also obtained simultaneously. The experimental results indicate that the magnitude of longitudinal elastic modulus is larger than that of the transverse one, and thus the plasma-sprayed TBC has an anisotropic mechanical property. Moreover, the elastic moduli along both longitudinal and transverse directions change with high-temperature exposure time, which consists of a rapid increasing stage followed by a slow decreasing stage. In addition, the magnitude of Poisson's ratio increases slightly from 0.05 to 0.2 with the high-temperature exposure time. Generally, the microstructures in the plasma-sprayed coatings and their evolution in a high-temperature environment are the main causes of the varying anisotropic mechanical properties.

  1. Programable Plasma-Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.; Toth, I.

    1982-01-01

    NASA-funded research led to development of automated plasma-spray system programable and reproducible. System utilizes standard plasma-spray equipment with noncoherent light-measuring system and microprocessor. System monitors and controls surface contours and coating thickness. Other advantages of system are consistant coating reproducibility, exact blending and feathering operations, ability to handle complex shapes and ease of changing spray parameters.

  2. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography for Inspection of Highly Scattering Ceramic Media: Glass Powders and Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, J.; Moreau, C.; Lévesque, D.; Dufour, M.; Boulos, M. I.

    2006-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to collect images of spherical glass powders with mean diameter ranging from 10 to 150 microns. Appropriate peak distance measurements on image interferograms provide a good approximation of particle size distribution. The relationship between the light penetration depth inside powders and the particle diameter is also discussed based on Mie theory. Thereafter, OCT images of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings are presented as well as an approach for establishing light penetration depth inside zirconia coatings.

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography for Inspection of Highly Scattering Ceramic Media: Glass Powders and Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J.; Boulos, M. I.; Moreau, C.; Levesque, D.; Dufour, M.

    2006-03-06

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to collect images of spherical glass powders with mean diameter ranging from 10 to 150 microns. Appropriate peak distance measurements on image interferograms provide a good approximation of particle size distribution. The relationship between the light penetration depth inside powders and the particle diameter is also discussed based on Mie theory. Thereafter, OCT images of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings are presented as well as an approach for establishing light penetration depth inside zirconia coatings.

  5. Improved Oxidation Life of Segmented Plasma Sprayed 8YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2004-03-01

    Unconventional plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were produced and evaluated by interrupted or cyclic furnace oxidation life testing. First, approximately 250 µm thick 8YSZ coatings were directly sprayed onto grit blasted surfaces of PWA 1484, without a bond coat, to take advantage of the excellent oxidation resistance of this superalloy. For nominal sulfur (S) contents of 1 ppmw, total coating separation took place at relatively short times (200 h at 1100°C). Reductions in the S content, by melt desulfurization commercially (0.3 ppmw) or by hydrogen (H2) annealing in the laboratory (0.01 ppmw), improved scale adhesion and extended life appreciably, by factors of 5-10. However, edge-initiated failure persisted, producing massive delamination as one sheet of coating. Secondly, surfaces of melt desulfurized PWA 1484 were machined with a grid of grooves or ribs (˜250 µm wide and high), resulting in a segmented TBC surface macrostructure, for the purpose of subverting this failure mechanism. In this case, failure occurred only as independent, single-segment events. For grooved samples, 1100 °C segment life was extended to ˜1000h for 5 mm wide segments, with no failure observed out to 2000 h for segments ≤2.5 mm wide. Ribbed samples were even more durable, and segments ≤6 mm remained intact for 2000 h. Larger segments failed by buckling at times inversely related to the segment width and decreased by oxidation effects at higher temperatures. This critical buckling size was consistent with that predicted for elastic buckling of a TBC plate subject to thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Thus, low S substrates demonstrate appreciable coating lives without a bond coat, while rib segmenting extends life considerably.

  6. Dry Sliding Behavior of Sub-Micrometer-Sized Suspension Plasma Sprayed Ceramic Oxide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darut, Geoffrey; Ben-Ettouil, Fadhel; Denoirjean, Alain; Montavon, Ghislain; Ageorges, Hélène; Fauchais, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Almost half of the energy produced by an automotive engine is dissipated by friction in the cylinders, the clutch, etc. In the context of reduction of the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to mitigate climate global warming (CGW), reduction of energy losses due to friction is a critical issue. Surface treatments appear in such a context, as never than before, to be able to provide pertinent solutions to improve sliding behavior of mechanical parts. Numerous studies have clearly shown that decreasing the scale of coating structure below the micrometer scale was leading to an improvement of its tribological behavior in terms of friction coefficient and wear rate thanks to improved mechanical properties, the toughness in particular. Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS) appears as a thermal spray process to be able to manufacture thick (i.e., a few tens of micrometers) coatings exhibiting a sub-micrometer-sized or even a nanometer-sized architecture, while keeping the versatility and flexibility of the thermal spray routes: i.e., the ability to process a wide range of material natures onto a wide range of substrate materials of various geometries. This article aims at studying the tribological behavior of several ceramic oxide composite coatings under dry conditions. The structural scale and the effect of composition are considered in particular.

  7. Electromagnetic and Mechanical Properties of Silica-Aluminosilicates Plasma Sprayed Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipri, F.; Bartuli, C.; Valente, T.; Casadei, F.

    2007-12-01

    The physico-chemical and thermo-mechanical properties of aluminosilicate ceramics (high-melting point, low thermal expansion coefficient, excellent thermal shock resistance, low-density and good corrosion resistance) make this class of materials a good option for high-temperature structural applications. Al2O3-SiO2 compounds show an excellent refractory behavior allowing a wide use as wear-resistant thermal barrier coatings, in metallurgical and glass plants and in high temperature heat exchangers. Moreover, the low values of thermal expansion coefficient and of complex permittivity allow to extend the use of this ceramic for microelectronic devices, radome for antennas and electromagnetic windows for microwaves and infrared. The present article presents the results of an extensive experimental activity carried out to produce thick aluminosilicate coatings by plasma-spray technique. The APS deposition parameters were optimized on the basis of a surface response approach, as specified by design of experiments (DoE) methodologies. Samples were tested for phase composition, total porosity, microstructure, microhardness, deposition efficiency, fracture toughness, and modulus of rupture. Finally, coatings were characterized for their particularly interesting electromagnetic properties: complex permittivity was measured at microwave frequency using a network analyzer with wave guide.

  8. Relative contributions of chemistry and topography to the osseointegration of hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Tanzer, M; Harvey, E J; Krygier, J J; Bobyn, J D

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to ascertain the relative contributions of surface chemistry and topography to the osseointegration of hydroxyapatite-coated implants. A canine femoral intramedullary implant model was used to compare the osseous response to commercially pure titanium implants that were either polished, grit-blasted, plasma-sprayed with hydroxyapatite, or plasma-sprayed with hydroxyapatite and masked with a very thin layer of titanium using physical vapor deposition (titanium mask). The titanium mask isolated the chemistry of the underlying hydroxyapatite layer without functionally changing its surface topography and morphologic features. At 12 weeks, the bone-implant specimens were prepared for undecalcified thin section histologic evaluation and serial transverse sections were quantified with backscattered scanning electron microscopy for the percentage of bone apposition to the implant surface. Bone apposition averaged 3% for the polished implants and 23% for the grit-blasted implants. Bone apposition to the hydroxyapatite-coated implants averaged 74% whereas bone apposition to the titanium mask implants averaged 59%. Although there was significantly greater osseointegration with the hydroxyapatite-coated implants, 80% of the maximum bone forming response to the implant surfaces developed with the titanium mask implants. This simple, controlled experiment revealed that topography is the dominant factor governing bone apposition to hydroxyapatite-coated implants. PMID:12461353

  9. Quasistatic vs. Dynamic Modulus Measurements Of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Morscher, G. N.; Choi, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been demonstrated to exhibit nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior by quasistatic cyclic compression and cylindrical punch indentation measurements. In particular, the instantaneous (tangential) elastic modulus increases with applied stress and exhibits significant hysteresis during cycling. Sound velocity (dynamic) measurements also show an increase in TBC modulus with applied compressive stress, but in contrast show no significant hysteresis for the modulus during cycling. The nonlinear elastic behavior of the TBCs evidenced by these tests is attributed to coating compaction and internal sliding. The differences between the quasistatic and dynamic measurements are explained by the relative absence of the effect of internal sliding in the dynamic modulus measurements. By incorporating short load reversals into the larger loading cycle and measuring the instantaneous modulus at the start of each load reversal, the effects of internal sliding can be substantially reduced in the quasistatic measurements, and the resulting modulus values show good agreement with the modulus values determined by dynamic sound velocity measurements.

  10. Plasma spray coating of spray-dried Cr2O3/wt.% TiO2 powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. K.; Lee, D. W.; Ha, G. H.

    2001-03-01

    An agglomerated Cr2O3/wt.%TiO2 powder has been fabricated by the spray drying process under different parameters. The spray-dried powder has well-agglomerated particles of spherical shape. In the conditions of the high slurry feed rate and low binder concentration in the slurry, the powder has large cavities inside some particles and ruggedness over their surface. The optimum plasma spray feed rate has been found by examining the spraying behavior of the powder and melted state of particles. The plasma spray coating has been performed under different process variables such as spraying distance and plasma power. These parameters strongly affect the characteristics of the coated layer: microstructure, hardness, and bond strength.