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Sample records for plasmas iau colloquium

  1. IAU Colloquium 193 - A personal view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaler, S. D.

    2004-05-01

    One of the more famous (or infamous) films of all time was Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon. In this film, Kurosawa tells the story of a terrible crime... and tells it four times. Each telling is from the perspective of a different character. In this masterful film the viewer is never quite sure what really happened; each of the protagonists tells the same tale but with their own personal interpretation. Summarizing a week spent in the cold clear air of wintertime Christchurch (and that was inside the lecture hall) is indeed a daunting task. Each of us who was fortunate enough to have attended IAU Colloquium 193 came away from the meeting with our own impressions, highlights, and revelations. So by writing now about by own reflections, my goal is to rekindle yours, rather than persuade you that my summary is any more authoritative than one you might write. Of course, those of you reading this who were not at the conference are stuck with this summary - but by reading the preceding papers in this volume you, too, can have a sense of the variety we enjoyed. Below, I start with a survey of some broad themes that emerged. A few results were of the `Gee Whiz' variety, and are outlined in the next section. A few old problems were revisited by several participants, and also some new problems have emerged, and I outline them next. After a nod to two very special participants in this Colloquium, I conclude with some final thoughts.

  2. Proceedings of the eighth international colloquium on ultraviolet and x-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas (IAU colloquium 86)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume represents the Proceedings of the Eighth International Colloquium on Ultraviolet and X-Ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas. The aim of this series of colloquia has been to bring together workers in the fields of astrophysical spectroscopy, laboratory spectroscopy and atomic physics in order to exchange ideas and results on problems which are common to these different disciplines. In addition to the presented papers there was a poster paper session. (WRF)

  3. Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1998-09-14

    OAK B188 Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program. The purpose of the Travel Grant Program is to increase the awareness of plasma research. The new results and techniques of plasma research in fusion plasmas, plasma processing space plasmas, basic plasma science, etc, have broad applicability throughout science. The benefits of these results are limited by the relatively low awareness and appreciation of plasma research in the larger scientific community. Whereas spontaneous interactions between plasma scientists and other scientists are useful, a focused effort in education and outreach to other scientists is efficient and is needed. The academic scientific community is the initial focus of this effort, since that permits access to a broad cross-section of scientists and future scientists including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and research staff.

  4. COSPAR, IAU, LSI Colloquium on Lunar Dynamics and Observational Coordinate Systems: Revised abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moutsoulas, M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a colloquium on lunar dynamics and observational coordinate systems are presented. Discussions were held on the establishment of a fundamental reference system and on the lunar ephemerides. Abstracts of the subjects discussed at the meeting are submitted. Some of the topics discussed are: (1) coordinates of the Apollo retroreflectors, (2) determination of lunar baselines, (3) numerical series for the variations of lunar coordinates, (4) fundamental craters for establishing a lunar coordinate system, and (5) composite lunar gravity fields.

  5. FOREWORD: 4th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckrone, David S.; Sugar, Jack

    1993-01-01

    common. The series has also demonstrated that the dialogue between "users" and "providers" of atomic data is a two-way conversation, with atomic physicists beginning to view astrophysical and laboratory plasmas as unique sources of new information about the structure of complex atomic species. The fifth International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas is scheduled to take place in Meudon, France in 1995.

  6. FOREWORD: The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchang-Brillet, Wad Lydia; Wyart, Jean-François; Zeippen, Claude

    1996-01-01

    The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas was held in Meudon, France, from August 28 to 31 1995. It was the fifth in a series started by the Atomic Spectroscopic Group at the University of Lund, Sweden, in 1983. Then followed the meetings in Toledo, USA, Amsterdam, The Nether- lands and Gaithersburg, USA, with a three year period. The original title of the series ended with "... for Astrophysics and Fusion Research" and became more general with the 4th colloquium in Gaithersburg. The purpose of the present meeting was, in line with tradition, to bring together "producers" and "users" of atomic data so as to ensure optimal coordination. Atomic physicists who study the structure of atoms and their radiative and collisional properties were invited to explain the development of their work, emphasizing the possibilities of producing precise transition wavelengths and relative line intensities. Astrophysicists and laboratory plasma physicists were invited to review their present research interests and the context in which atomic data are needed. The number of participants was about 70 for the first three meetings, then exploded to 170 at Gaithersburg. About 140 participants, coming from 13 countries, attended the colloquium in Meudon. This large gathering was partly due to a number of participants from Eastern Europe larger than in the past, and it certainly showed a steady interest for interdisciplinary exchanges between different communities of scientists. This volume includes all the invited papers given at the conference and, in the appendix, practical information on access to some databases. All invited speakers presented their talks aiming at good communication between scientists from different backgrounds. A separate bound volume containing extended abstracts of the poster papers has been published by the Publications de l'Observatoire de Paris, (Meudon 1996), under the responsibility of

  7. IAU SOFA Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenkerk, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    SOFA (Standards Of Fundamental Astronomy) software is a resource for astronomers, provided via IAU Division 1. The library contains the latest (IAU approved) algorithms for Earth attitude - precession, nutation, Earth rotation angle, sidereal time. Does your software use time? Need to convert between, for example UTC, UT1, or TT? Then SOFA has all you need. Using SOFA you can convert between FK5 and Hipparcos positions, between geodetic and geocentric coordinates, as well as conversions between the BCRS (ICRS) or J2000.0 and both the celestial and terrestrial reference systems. All routines, Fortran or ANSI C, are available as source code or as part of a library. Visit our website at http://www.iausofa.org/ to find out more and download what you need.

  8. Final Report: Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program, September 15, 1997 - September 14, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, Richard D.

    1998-09-14

    The purpose of the Travel Grant Program is to increase the awareness of plasma research. The new results and techniques of plasma research in fusion plasmas, plasma processing space plasmas, basic plasma science, etc, have broad applicability throughout science. The benefits of these results are limited by the relatively low awareness and appreciation of plasma research in the larger scientific community. Whereas spontaneous interactions between plasma scientists and other scientists are useful, a focused effort in education and outreach to other scientists is efficient and is needed. The academic scientific community is the initial focus of this effort, since that permits access to a broad cross-section of scientists and future scientists including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and research staff.

  9. Colloquium: Nonlinear collective interactions in quantum plasmas with degenerate electron fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2011-07-01

    The current understanding of some important nonlinear collective processes in quantum plasmas with degenerate electrons is presented. After reviewing the basic properties of quantum plasmas, model equations (e.g., the quantum hydrodynamic and effective nonlinear Schroedinger-Poisson equations) are presented that describe collective nonlinear phenomena at nanoscales. The effects of the electron degeneracy arise due to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and Pauli's exclusion principle for overlapping electron wave functions that result in tunneling of electrons and the electron degeneracy pressure. Since electrons are Fermions (spin-1/2 quantum particles), there also appears an electron spin current and a spin force acting on electrons due to the Bohr magnetization. The quantum effects produce new aspects of electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) waves in a quantum plasma that are summarized in here. Furthermore, nonlinear features of ES ion waves and electron plasma oscillations are discussed, as well as the trapping of intense EM waves in quantum electron-density cavities. Specifically, simulation studies of the coupled nonlinear Schroedinger and Poisson equations reveal the formation and dynamics of localized ES structures at nanoscales in a quantum plasma. The effect of an external magnetic field on the plasma wave spectra and develop quantum magnetohydrodynamic equations are also discussed. The results are useful for understanding numerous collective phenomena in quantum plasmas, such as those in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the cores of white dwarf stars and giant planets), as well as in plasma-assisted nanotechnology (e.g., quantum diodes, quantum free-electron lasers, nanophotonics and nanoplasmonics, metallic nanostructures, thin metal films, semiconductor quantum wells, and quantum dots, etc.), and in the next generation of intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments relevant for fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion

  10. Tenth International Colloquium on UV and X-Ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Eric H.; Kahn, Steven M.

    UV and X-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas draws interest from many disciplines. Contributions from international specialists are collected together in this book from a timely recent conference. In astrophysics, the Hubble Space Telescope, Astro 1 and ROSAT observatories are now providing UV and X-ray spectra and images of cosmic sources in unprecedented detail, while the Yohkoh mission recently collected superb data on the solar corona. In the laboratory, the development of ion-trap facilities and novel laser experiments are providing vital new data on high temperature plasmas. Recent innovations in the technology of spectroscopic instrumentation are discussed. These papers constitute an excellent up-to-date review of developments in short-wavelength spectroscopy and offer a solid introduction to its theoretical and experimental foundations. These proceedings give an up-to-date review of developments in short-wavelength spectroscopy and offer a solid introduction to its theoretical and experimental foundations. Various speakers presented some of the first results from the high resolution spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, the high sensitivity far ultraviolet and X-ray spectrometers of the ASTRO 1 Observatory, the imaging X-ray spectrometer on the ROSAT Observatory, and the high resolution solar X-ray spectrometer on Yohkoh. The development of ion trap devices had brought about a revolution in laboratory investigations of atomic processes in highly charged atoms. X-ray laser experiments had not only yielded considerable insight into electron ion interactions in hot dense plasmas, but also demonstrated the versatility of laser plasmas as laboratory X-ray sources. Such measurements also motivated and led to refinements in the development of large-scale atomic and molecular codes. On the instrumental side, the design and development of the next series of very powerful short wavelength observatories had generated a large number of

  11. The International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugar, J.; Leckrone, D.

    1993-01-01

    This was the fourth in a series of colloquia begun at the University of Lund, Sweden in 1983 and subsequently held in Toledo, Ohio and Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The purpose of these meetings is to provide an international forum for communication between major users of atomic spectroscopic data and the providers of these data. These data include atomic wavelengths, line shapes, energy levels, lifetimes, and oscillator strengths. Speakers were selected from a wide variety of disciplines including astrophysics, laboratory plasma research, spectrochemistry, and theoretical and experimental atomic physics.

  12. IAU Poles and Rotation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    Every three years the IAU/IAG/COSPAR Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements of the Planets and Satellites revises tables giving the directions of the north poles rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, and asteriods and also tables of their sizes and shapes.

  13. The IAU Office for Astronomy Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Sze Leung

    2015-08-01

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) Office for Astronomy Outreach (OAO) is an IAU new office hosted at National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) at Tokyo. After the International Year of Astronomy 2009, IAU decided to establish the OAO to coordinate the international astronomical outreach efforts. The IAU Office for Astronomy Outreach (OAO) is IAU's hub for coordinating its public outreach activities around the world. The aim is to build networks to support and disseminate information to the amateur astronomy and public outreach communities, and to ultimately make it easier for the public to access information about our Universe.

  14. The IAU Office of Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    On 16 April 2011 the IAU's Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) was launched jointly by the President of the IAU and the South African Minister of Science and Technology, at the South African Astronomical Observatory in Cape Town. This OAD was set up to realise the IAU's strategic plan which aims to use astronomy as a tool for development. Communicating astronomy with the public is one of the OAD's focus areas.

  15. Presentation of the IAU National Outreach Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, B.; Belmonte, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has created the Office of for Astronomy Outreach (IAU-OAO). Its mission is to promote and coordinate the activities of astronomy outreach worldwide. For this purpose, the IAU-OAO has established a network of partners based on what was established to celebrate the International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009). The nodes of this new network (IAU National Outreach Contacts, IAU-NOC) act as National Contact Points (NCPs) statewide and their mission is to contribute to the implementation of the objectives of the IAU-OAO. The commitment of the NOC is a three-year renewal charge. The replacement or the renewal will occur during the celebration of the relevant General Assembly of the IAU. In the case of Spain, the Comisión Nacional de Astronomía (CNA) decided to appoint a Vice-NOC and NOC and the relay will occur during the next IAU General Assembly to be held in Honolulu in August 2015.

  16. IAU Public Astronomical Organisations Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canas, Lina; Cheung, Sze Leung

    2015-08-01

    The Office for Astronomy Outreach has devoted intensive means to create and support a global network of public astronomical organisations around the world. Focused on bringing established and newly formed amateur astronomy organizations together, providing communications channels and platforms for disseminating news to the global community and the sharing of best practices and resources among these associations around the world. In establishing the importance that these organizations have for the dissemination of activities globally and acting as key participants in IAU various campaigns social media has played a key role in keeping this network engaged and connected. Here we discuss the implementation process of maintaining this extensive network, the processing and gathering of information and the interactions between local active members at a national and international level.

  17. Colloquium Participants Speak.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chafe, Joanne

    1996-01-01

    Presents a summary and interpretation of responses from the participants of the Catholic-Jewish Colloquium. The participants reflect on a number of issues including the changing nature of the relationship between Judaism and Christianity, the rationale and impact of this changed relationship, the particular elements involved in the…

  18. Eleventh NASTRAN User's Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASTRAN (NASA STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS) is a large, comprehensive, nonproprietary, general purpose finite element computer code for structural analysis which was developed under NASA sponsorship. The Eleventh Colloquium provides some comprehensive general papers on the application of finite element methods in engineering, comparisons with other approaches, unique applications, pre- and post-processing or auxiliary programs, and new methods of analysis with NASTRAN.

  19. SOFA, an IAU service for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenkerk, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    Standards of Fundamental Astronomy (SOFA) is an International Astronomical Union (IAU) service that provides accessible and authoritative algorithms and procedures that implement standard models used in fundamental astronomy. SOFA consists of a dedicated web site from which the SOFA Software Collections (Fortran and ANSI C) may be downloaded and a Board t hat provides and checks the material. This talk highlights SOFA’s development, what it provides users and the IAU, as well as indicating issues that may arise in the future.

  20. Improvement of the IAU 2000 precession model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, N.; Wallace, P. T.; Chapront, J.

    2005-03-01

    The IAU 2000 precession consists of the IAU 1976 ecliptic precession (Lieske et al. [CITE], A&A, 58, 1) and the precession part of the IAU 2000A equator adopted by IAU 2000 Resolution B1.6 (Mathews et al. [CITE], J. Geophys. Res., 107, B4, 10.1029/2001JB000390). In this paper we provide a range of new expressions as possible replacements for the IAU 2000 precession. The new expressions are based upon the so-called P03 solution of Capitaine et al. ([CITE], A&A, 412, 567) for the equator and the ecliptic. In addition an improved model for the precession of the equator is discussed. This improved solution was obtained in exactly the same way as P03 but using a refined model for the contributions of the non-rigid Earth (Mathews [CITE], private communication) and revised integration constants for the precession rates resulting from fits to the most recent VLBI data. The paper reports on the procedure that was used for improving the P03 solution and on the comparisons of this solution with the MHB 2000, IAU 2000 and P03 solutions. It also discusses the choices for the solution to be put forward as a replacement for IAU 2000. We concluded that the existing VLBI data were insufficient to provide convincing evidence that the improved solutions would deliver better accuracy than the existing P03 solution, and we recommend retaining P03 as the replacement for IAU 2000. P03, which unlike the IAU 2000 precession is dynamically consistent, has the advantage of already having been used experimentally by a number of groups; the model is recalled in Tables [see full text]- [see full text]. Due to the strong dependence of the precession expressions on the precession rates and of the precession in longitude (or equivalently the celestial CIP X coordinate) on the J2 rate model, we also provide a parameterized P04 solution for these quantities as functions of those parameters. The expressions include the quantities to be used in both the equinox-based and CIO-based (i.e. referred to

  1. FOREWORD: The 9th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS 9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Wiese, Wolfgang L.; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2008-07-01

    For the first time since its inaugural meeting in Lund in 1983, the triennial international conference on Atomic Spectroscopy and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS) returned to Lund, Sweden. Lund has been a home to atomic spectroscopy since the time of Janne Rydberg, and included the pioneering work in laboratory and solar spectroscopy of Bengt Edlén, who presented the initial ASOS talk in 1983. The ninth ASOS was hosted by the Lund Observatory and the Physics Department of Lund University during from 8 to 10 August 2007 and was attended by nearly 100 registrants. An encouraging sign for the field was the number of young researchers in attendance. This volume contains the submitted contributions from the poster presentations of the conference, and represents approximately forty percent of the presented posters. A complementary volume of Physica Scripta provides the written transactions of the ASOS9 invited presentations. With these two volumes the character of ASOS9 is more fully evident, and they serve as a review of the state of atomic spectroscopy for spectrum analysis and the determination of oscillator strengths and their applications. The goal of ASOS is to be a forum for atomic spectroscopy where both the providers and users of atomic data, which includes wavelengths, energy levels, lifetimes, oscillator strengths, and line shape parameters, can meet to discuss recent advances in experimental and theoretical techniques and their application to understanding the physical processes that are responsible for producing observed spectra. The applications mainly originate from the fields of astrophysics and plasma physics, the latter including fusion energy and lighting research. As a part of ASOS9 we were honored to celebrate the retirement of Professor Sveneric Johansson. At a special session on the spectroscopy of iron, which was conducted in his honor, he presented his insights into the Fe II term system and his most recent

  2. The IAU Strategic Plan "Astronomy for Development" - the next decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George

    2015-08-01

    We summarise the rationale for the IAU Strategic Plan "Astronomy for Development 2010 - 2020" and discuss lessons learned from its implementation that are relevant to the continuation of the IAU Astronomy for Development programme after 2020.

  3. Proceedings of Colloquium 110 of the International Astronomical Union on Library and Information Services in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, George A.; Stevens-Rayburn, Sarah

    This report provides an overview of the presentations and summaries of discussions at IAU Colloquium 110, which was held in Washington, D.C., on 26-30 July 1988 and at the Goddard Space Flight Center on 1 August 1988. The topics included: the publication and acquisition of books and journals; searching for astronomical information; the handling and use of special-format materials; conservation; archiving of unpublished documents; uses of computers in libraries; astronomical databases and various aspects of the administration of astronomy libraries and services. Particular attention was paid to new developments, but the problems of astronomers and institutions in developing countries were also considered.

  4. SOFA software support for IAU 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, P. T.

    2004-05-01

    The IAU 2000 models for precession-nutation and Earth rotation offer a big step forward in accuracy. Not surprisingly, they are also larger than their predecessors (thousands of terms in some cases), but also they involve dealing with complications that previously were below practical limits on accuracy. These considerations make using standard software especially attractive, and the IAU SOFA collection provides implementations of the IAU 2000 algorithms that offer the full accuracy and yet are easy to use for everyday applications. A striking feature of the IAU 2000 models is that the ecliptic and equinox have been downgraded in status and no longer provide the zero-point in right ascension. The new origin is a point on the celestial equator close to its intersection with the ICRS prime meridian, but defined kinematically. The counterpart of Greenwich apparent sidereal time when using this new origin is the Earth Rotation Angle, which is linearly related to UT1. Though the new approach offers a number of advantages, stemming from the clean separation between Earth pole orientation and Earth rotation, it is sufficiently different from the existing equinox-based approach that many users will be reluctant or unable to make the switch. The SOFA routines cater for this by providing equal levels of support for both the classical equinox-based approach and for the new approach. The two options give results that agree to microarcsecond accuracy.

  5. The IAU Strategic Plan and its Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George

    2015-03-01

    I shall review the content of the IAU Strategic Plan (SP) to use astronomy as a tool for stimulating development globally during the decade 2010 - 2020. Considerable progress has been made in its implementation since the Plan was ratified at the last General Assembly.

  6. Second International Colloquium on Mars: Abstracts for a colloquium. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Abstracts of 110 papers relating to investigations of the planet Mars and intended for consideration at the colloquium are presented. Entries are arranged alphabetically according to the author's name.

  7. Colloquium: Nanoplasmas generated by intense radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Beg, Farhat; Ng, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Solid, liquid, and gaseous states of matter can exist and acquire unique properties when reduced in size into a nanometer domain. This Colloquium explores the approaches to produce plasmas with nanometer dimensions and the arising physical phenomena and properties associated with this extreme, nonequilibrium state of matter. Analysis of the spatial confinement, coupling, ideality, and degeneracy criteria lead to the possibilities to produce transient nanoplasma states near, in, and from solids by using ultrafast photoexcitation. These states arise through the interplay of nonequilibrium, many-body Coulomb interactions, thermal, and nonthermal effects. Examples include photoexcited electron-hole plasmas in semiconductors, transient solid-to-plasma states including warm dense matter, nanoplasmas produced by interaction of nanoclusters and nanoparticles with intense radiation, nanoplasmas in high-energy ion tracks within solids, nanoplasmas in relativistic regime, and others. Physical phenomena arising due to the localization of high-energy densities to microscales and nanoscales and their potential applications are discussed.

  8. Data Archiving: The Perspective of the IAU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. E.

    2009-08-01

    Historically, the archiving of photographic observations has been predominantly a service on behalf of the astronomical community, both local and worldwide. In parallel, efforts to ensure the long-term preservation of that material have mostly come through the community at large via its official body, the International Astronomical Union. While the rôle of the IAU is largely passive, it is vital in providing a framework in which its international Working Groups can share, manage and achieve decisions and co-operations at levels which would be difficult to reach by individual action. To serve the purposes for which they have been archived, historic data need to be kept ticking over in a healthy condition. The IAU provides an excellent forum for the activities which those needs entail.

  9. The IAU Office of Astronomy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauduit, Jean-Christophe; Govender, K.

    2014-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU), the largest body of professional astronomers in the world, has set up the Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) in partnership with the South African National Research Foundation (NRF). The OAD is located at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) in Cape Town. Its mission is to realise the IAU's Strategic Plan, which aims to use astronomy as a tool for development. It focuses on the following three main areas: "Universities and Research", "Children and Schools" and "Public Outreach". Eighteen projects worldwide have been funded for 2013 and are currently under way. More will be starting in 2014. The OAD is also setting up regional nodes and language expertise centres around the world. This presentation will describe the ongoing activities of the OAD and plans for the future.

  10. The IAU Office of Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    The IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD)†, established in March 2011 as part of the implementation of the IAU Strategic Plan, is currently located in South Africa and serves as a global coordinating centre for astronomy-for-development activities. In terms of structure the OAD is required to establish regional nodes (similar offices in different parts of the world which focus on a particular geographic or cultural region) and three task forces: (i) Astronomy for Universities and Research, (ii) Astronomy for Children and Schools, and (iii) Astronomy for the Public. This paper will describe the progress of the OAD towards the realisation of the vision `Astronomy for a better world'.

  11. The IAU Meteor Shower Nomenclature Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The International Astronomical Union at its 2006 General Assembly in Prague has adopted a set of rules for meteor shower nomenclature, a working list with designated names (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), and established a Task Group for Meteor Shower Nomenclature in Commission 22 (Meteors and Interplanetary Dust) to help define which meteor showers exist from well defined groups of meteoroids from a single parent body.

  12. Chapter VIII: Rules and Guidelines for IAU Scientific Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    The program of IAU scientific meetings is one of the most important means by which the IAU pursues its goal of promoting astronomy through international collaboration. A large fraction of the Union's budget is devoted to the support of these IAU scientific meetings. The IAU Executive Committee (EC) places great emphasis on maintaining high scientific standards, coverage of a balanced spectrum of topics, and an appropriately broad and international flavour for the program of IAU meetings. In that respect, the ICSU rules on non-discrimination in the access of qualified scientists from all parts of the world to any IAU meeting apply. The ICSU rules on non-discrimination are described in the document “Freedom, Responsibility and Universality of Science”, available on http://www.icsu.org/Gestion/img/ICSU_DOC_DOWNLOAD/2205_DD_FILE_Freedom_Responsibility_Universality_of_Science_booklet.pdf

  13. Colloquium: Topological band theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, A.; Lin, Hsin; Das, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    The first-principles band theory paradigm has been a key player not only in the process of discovering new classes of topologically interesting materials, but also for identifying salient characteristics of topological states, enabling direct and sharpened confrontation between theory and experiment. This review begins by discussing underpinnings of the topological band theory, which involve a layer of analysis and interpretation for assessing topological properties of band structures beyond the standard band theory construct. Methods for evaluating topological invariants are delineated, including crystals without inversion symmetry and interacting systems. The extent to which theoretically predicted properties and protections of topological states have been verified experimentally is discussed, including work on topological crystalline insulators, disorder and interaction driven topological insulators (TIs), topological superconductors, Weyl semimetal phases, and topological phase transitions. Successful strategies for new materials discovery process are outlined. A comprehensive survey of currently predicted 2D and 3D topological materials is provided. This includes binary, ternary, and quaternary compounds, transition metal and f -electron materials, Weyl and 3D Dirac semimetals, complex oxides, organometallics, skutterudites, and antiperovskites. Also included is the emerging area of 2D atomically thin films beyond graphene of various elements and their alloys, functional thin films, multilayer systems, and ultrathin films of 3D TIs, all of which hold exciting promise of wide-ranging applications. This Colloquium concludes by giving a perspective on research directions where further work will broadly benefit the topological materials field.

  14. IAU Project and Research Activity in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Suman

    2015-08-01

    The second half of the twentieth century has witnessed a tremendous development in the field of astronomy and space exploration. The large telescope both on the land and in the orbit, using the whole range of the electromagnetic spectra from radio waves to gamma rays are extending their range of exploration, right to the edge of the observable universe, and making astounding discoveries in the process. Many large international telescope facilities and global plans are accessible to all astronomers throughout the world, providing an inexpensive entry to cutting- edge international research for developing countries.Nepal is a mountainous country it has a wide range of climatic and altitude variations which varies from an elevation of 200 meter to ≥ 4000 meter. The average temperature varies from ≥ 25 o C to ≤ 0 to 5oC. Because of these diverse weather and climatic variation there is the potential for the establishment of sophisticated observatory/ data centre and link with each other. So, the future possible opportunity of astronomy in Nepal will be discussed. Besides Education and Research activities conducted in Tribhuvan University, Nepal under the support of International Astronomical Union (IAU) will also be highlighted. The importance brought by those two workshops conducted on data simulation supported by IAU under TF1 will also be discussed which is believed to play a vital role for the promotion and development of astronomy and astrophysics in developing countries.

  15. Nineteenth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the the Nineteenth NASTRAN Users' Colloquium held April 22 to 26, 1991 are presented. Topics covered include the application of finite elements in engineering, comparisons with other approaches, unique applications, pre- and postprocessing or auxiliary programs, and new methods of analysis with NASTRAN.

  16. Fourteenth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of a colloquium are presented along with technical papers contributed during the conference. Reviewed are general applications of finite element methodology and the specific application of the NASA Structural Analysis System, NASTRAN, to a variety of static and dynamic sturctural problems.

  17. Eighteenth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This publication is the proceedings of the Eighteenth NASTRAN Users' Colloquium held in Portland, Oregon, April 23-27, 1990. It provides some comprehensive general papers on the application of finite elements in engineering, comparisons with other approaches, unique applications, pre- and post-processing or auxiliary programs, and new methods of analysis with NASTRAN.

  18. Sixteenth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the Sixteenth NASTRAN Users' Colloquium held in Arlington, Virginia from 25 to 29 April, 1988. Technical papers contributed by participants review general application of finite element methodology and the specific application of the NASA Structural Analysis System (NASTRAN) to a variety of static and dynamic structural problems.

  19. The Second Colloquium on Petroleum Engineering Education

    SciTech Connect

    Willhite, G.P.; Forney, R.H.

    1993-11-30

    This paper describes findings from the Second Colloquium on Petroleum engineering Education. The purpose of this colloquium was to provide a forum for petroleum engineering educators and representatives from industry and government to explore critical issues facing petroleum engineering education as we move into the 21st Century. It was expected that the colloquium would identify areas where changes are needed in petroleum engineering education, to best prepare students for careers in the oil and gas industry or other, related industries.

  20. Sourcing and Communicating Cosmic Narratives -- A Role for the IAU?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, William Howard

    2015-08-01

    Communicating astronomy critically depends on crafting competent and engaging stories. IAU Commission 55 has an opportunity to take the lead in exploring and celebrating astronomical narratives. Possibilities include an online "Astro Tales" publication of astronomical stories by IAU members for the general public (that complements the trade-oriented CAP), "Profiles in Astronomy" that feature interviews with IAU members, forums featuring exceptional science communicators and their cosmic stories, writing competitions for students, and an awards program. Through some version of these endeavors, the IAU could become a major arbiter of astronomical information and outreach worldwide. In this session, Dr. Waller will use his online journal "The Galactic Inquirer" at http://galacticinquirer.net as an exemplar and encourage input from participants.

  1. Algorithm for IAU north poles and rotation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieske, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    In 1970 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) defined any object's north pole to be that axis of rotation which lies north of the solar system's invariable plane. A competing definition in widespread use at some institutions followed the 'right hand rule' whereby the 'north' axis of rotation was generally said to be that of the rotational angular momentum. In the case of the latter definition, the planet Neptune and its satellite Triton would have their 'north' poles in opposite hemispheres because Triton's angular momentum vector is in the hemisphere opposite from that of Neptune's rotation angular momentum. The IAU resolutions have been somewhat controversial in some quarters ever since their adoption. A Working Group has periodically updated the recommended values of planet and satellite poles and rotation rates in accordance with the IAU definition of north and the IAU definition of prime meridian. Neither system is completely satisfactory in the perception of all scientists, and some confusion has been generated by publishing data in the two different systems. In this paper we review the IAU definitions of north and of the location of prime meridian and we present the algorithm which has been employed in determining the rotational parameters of the natural satellites. The IAU definition of the prime meridian contains some ambiguities which in practice have been 'specified' by the numerical values published by the IAU working group but which have not yet been explicitly documented. The purpose of this paper is to explicitly document the algorithm employed by the IAU working group in specifying satellite poles and rotation rates.

  2. The IAU Early French Radio Astronomy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Boischot, A.; Delannoy, J.; Kundu, M.; Lequeux, J.; Pick, M.; Steinberg, J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006 an ambitious project was launched under the auspices of the IAU Working Group on Historic Radio Astronomy to document important developments in French radio astronomy from 1901 through to the 1960s, in a series of papers published, in English, in the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage. This successful project has now come to an end with the sixth and final paper in the series about to be published (and a new WG project, on the history of early Japanese radio astronomy, has just been launched). In this paper we discuss Nordmann's abortive attempt to detect solar radio emission in 1901, and the important roles played by staff from the École Normale Supérieure and the Institut d'Astrophysique in Paris during the 1940s through 60s in developing new radio astronomy instrumentation and pursuing a range of solar and non-solar research projects in Paris itself and at field stations established at Marcoussis, Nançay and the Haute Provence Observatory.

  3. Northern Taurids in the IAU MDC Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Z.; Svoreň, J.

    2012-11-01

    The method of indices was used to study the northern branch of the autumn (night) part of the Taurid complex. The procedure based only on mathematical statistics was applied to select the Northern Taurid meteor records from the IAU Meteor Data Center Database. Because we wanted to study especially the structure of the inner part of the Northern Taurids, we were focused on the interval of the higher activity of the stream — from the end of the Perseids activity to the beginning of the Geminids activity. We did not take into account outlying parts of the complex, which is active, according to some authors, until January. 84 orbits of the Northern Taurids were selected. 63 of 84 Northern Taurids orbits (75%) were sorted into 11 associations found in the stream. One of the associations consisting of three orbits was identified as a previously unknown northern branch of τ Arietids shower. We also found an association with orbital characteristics equal to the characteristics of showers δ Psc N and χ Ori N. Meteors in these associations were observed up to three weeks earlier compared to currently cataloged data of the showers. The orientation of the mean orbit of a 5-member association of δ Psc N, different from the general trend, indicates that this stream may not be genetically related to other members of the Taurid complex.

  4. Astronomy Thesaurus and IAU WG Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemesderfer, C.

    2012-08-01

    There has been interest lately in updated thesaurus data for astronomy. Both AIP and IOP independently initiated efforts to revise their comprehensive physics thesauri, and ADS and the IVOA have been working on similar projects. The impetus for all of this is semantic enrichment of the existing corpuses that these organizations hold. Earlier in 2012, AIP and IOP decided to combine forces on a physics thesaurus, and they engaged Access Innovations, a company with expertise in thesaurus constr uction, to help them. The team at ADS expressed interest in the project, and both publishers ag reed that they would release the astrophysics portion of the new combined thesaurus to the astronomical community. We are in the process of assigning its ownership to the AAS, although the thesaurus will be stewarded by staff affiliated with the CfA library, and the development will continue to be done under ADS guidance. All these combined efforts are being referred to as the Unified Astronomy Thesaurus (UAT). Previously, the IAU endorsed a thesaurus that was assembled in the early 1990s by Robyn and Robert Shobbrook at ANU. It was released in print, and was subsequently turned into a website. See the subsequent article for details about the UAT.

  5. SOFA-an IAU service fit for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenkerk, C.

    2015-03-01

    Standards of Fundamental Astronomy (SOFA) is an International Astronomical Union (IAU) service that provides accessible and authoritative algorithms and procedures that implement standard models used in fundamental astronomy. This paper summaries the current status, noting the changes during 2009-2012, and discusses issues that may arise in the future.

  6. Implementing the IAU 2000 Resolutions in The Astronomical Almanac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, J. A.; Kaplan, G. H.; Hilton, J. L.; Hohenkerk, C. Y.; Bell, S. A.

    2004-05-01

    The Astronomical Almanac (AsA) must satisfy the needs of a variety of users around the world, who represent a wide range of interests and sophistication levels. The book, prepared jointly by the US and UK nautical almanac offices, is based to the greatest extent possible on IAU-endorsed and other internationally recognized standards. Many users expect that the general content and format of the AsA will remain the same from year to year. Thus, changes to the AsA are made as infrequently as possible, and only after careful deliberation. The IAU resolutions on reference systems and Earth rotation adopted in 2000 represent a significant change in approach for both subject areas. To implement these resolutions in the content of the AsA, both the reference data and algorithms used must be changed, and some new tabulations added. Data in the ``IAU 2000 paradigm" will not replace data provided in the traditional or ``classical" paradigm until the needs of the user community dictate that such a change is warranted. General criteria that determine when changes are introduced into the AsA will be reviewed. Specific changes to the AsA needed to implement the IAU 2000 resolutions will be described, and several remaining issues will be discussed. These changes will be introduced beginning in the AsA for 2006, currently in preparation.

  7. The Updated IAU MDC Catalogue of Photographic Meteor Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porubcan, V.; Svoren, J.; Neslusan, L.; Schunova, E.

    2011-01-01

    The database of photographic meteor orbits of the IAU Meteor Data Center at the Astronomical Institute SAS has gradually been updated. To the 2003 version of 4581 photographic orbits compiled from 17 different stations and obtained in the period 1936-1996, additional new 211 orbits compiled from 7 sources have been added. Thus, the updated version of the catalogue contains 4792 photographic orbits (equinox J2000.0) available either in two separate orbital and geophysical data files or a file with the merged data. All the updated files with relevant documentation are available at the web of the IAU Meteor Data Center. Keywords astronomical databases photographic meteor orbits 1 Introduction Meteoroid orbits are a basic tool for investigation of distribution and spatial structure of the meteoroid population in the close surroundings of the Earth s orbit. However, information about them is usually widely scattered in literature and often in publications with limited circulation. Therefore, the IAU Comm. 22 during the 1976 IAU General Assembly proposed to establish a meteor data center for collection of meteor orbits recorded by photographic and radio techniques. The decision was confirmed by the next IAU GA in 1982 and the data center was established (Lindblad, 1987). The purpose of the data center was to acquire, format, check and disseminate information on precise meteoroid orbits obtained by multi-station techniques and the database gradually extended as documented in previous reports on the activity of the Meteor Data Center by Lindblad (1987, 1995, 1999 and 2001) or Lindblad and Steel (1993). Up to present, the database consists of 4581 photographic meteor orbits (Lindblad et al., 2005), 63.330 radar determined orbit: Harvard Meteor Project (1961-1965, 1968-1969), Adelaide (1960-1961, 1968-1969), Kharkov (1975), Obninsk (1967-1968), Mogadish (1969-1970) and 1425 video-recordings (Lindblad, 1999) to which additional 817 video meteors orbits published by Koten el

  8. Precession-nutation procedures consistent with IAU 2006 resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, P. T.; Capitaine, N.

    2006-12-01

    Context: .The 2006 IAU General Assembly has adopted the P03 model of Capitaine et al. (2003a) recommended by the WG on precession and the ecliptic (Hilton et al. 2006) to replace the IAU 2000 model, which comprised the Lieske et al. (1977) model with adjusted rates. Practical implementations of this new "IAU 2006" model are therefore required, involving choices of procedures and algorithms. Aims: .The purpose of this paper is to recommend IAU 2006 based precession-nutation computing procedures, suitable for different classes of application and achieving high standards of consistency. Methods: .We discuss IAU 2006 based procedures and algorithms for generating the rotation matrices that transform celestial to terrestrial coordinates, taking into account frame bias (B), P03 precession (P), P03-adjusted IAU 2000A nutation (N) and Earth rotation. The NPB portion can refer either to the equinox or to the celestial intermediate origin (CIO), requiring either the Greenwich sidereal time (GST) or the Earth rotation angle (ERA) as the measure of Earth rotation. Where GST is used, it is derived from ERA and the equation of the origins (EO) rather than through an explicit formula as in the past, and the EO itself is derived from the CIO locator. Results: .We provide precession-nutation procedures for two different classes of full-accuracy application, namely (i) the construction of algorithm collections such as the Standards Of Fundamental Astronomy (SOFA) library and (ii) IERS Conventions, and in addition some concise procedures for applications where the highest accuracy is not a requirement. The appendix contains a fully worked numerical example, to aid implementors and to illustrate the consistency of the two full-accuracy procedures which, for the test date, agree to better than 1 μas. Conclusions: .The paper recommends, for case (i), procedures based on angles to represent the PB and N components and, for case (ii), procedures based on series for the CIP X,Y. The two

  9. Dynamics of quiescent prominences; Proceedings of the 117th Colloquium of IAU, Hvar, Yugoslavia, Sept. 25-29, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzdjak, Vladimir (Editor); Tandberg-Hanssen, Einar (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics discussed include formation of a filament around a magnetic region, evolution of fine structures in a filament, the spatial distribution of prominence threads, high resolution analysis of quiescent prominences at NSO/Sacramento Peak Observatory, small-scale Doppler velocities in a quiescent prominence, Doppler velocity oscillations in quiescent prominences, oscillatory relaxation of an eruptive prominence, and matter flow velocities in an active region emission loop observed in H-alpha. Attention is also given to an automated procedure for measurement of prominence transverse velocities, the nonlinear evolution of magnetized filaments, thermal equilibrium of coronal loops and prominence formation, thermal instability in planar coronal strucutres, radiative transfer in cylindrical prominence threads, numerical simulation of a catastrophe model for prominence eruptions, and the law of evolution and destruction of solar prominences.

  10. The IAU's East Asian Regional Office of Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard

    2014-09-01

    At the 2012 General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), the Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) programme announced a number of exciting new partnerships to assist with the IAU's decadal strategic plan (2010-2020). These landmark decisions included establishing a new coordinating centre that aims at using astronomy as a tool for development in East Asia. The agreement covers two important functions. One is known as a Regional Node, which entails the coordination of astronomy-for-development activities in countries within the general geographical region of East Asia (in first instance China, Mongolia and the DPRK, but without placing firm geographical limits on the region). The other is known as a Language Expertise Centre which will deal with all aspects relating to (mainly) the Chinese language and culture. The impact of the latter may obviously spread well beyond the geographical region to other parts of the world.

  11. The IAU 2000 Recommendations on Reference Systems and their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, N.; McCarthy, D. D.

    2004-05-01

    Resolutions adopted by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in 2000 recommend significant improvements in the definition of the International Celestial Reference System and the procedures to be used in its realization. These recommendations correspond with the unprecedented observational accuracy that is now achievable in accessing the reference system, and deal with relativistic considerations, an improved precession-nutation formulation, and more rigorous definitions of the pole and equatorial origin of the reference system. The International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) has implemented these recommendations and maintains the necessary software and data files to allow the astronomical and geodetic communities to use them. It also continues to provide the data necessary to implement the previous definitions. These recommendations are not only addressed to the specialized astronomical community that deals with the realization or maintenance of reference systems, time scales, celestial mechanics and high accuracy astrometry. They have consequences for the whole astronomical community as they relate to the IAU precession-nutation model, the definition of Universal Time and its relationship to sidereal time and the abandonment of the intermediary reference to the ecliptic and equinox. At its 2003 General Assembly the IAU established working groups to finalize the implementation of the 2000 resolutions, namely (1) to standardize the associated new nomenclature and (2) to formulate a dynamical expression for precession consistent with the IAU 2000 precession-nutation formulation. This talk explains the reasons for these resolutions, describes their consequences for astronomers and provides the current status of their implementation. It also reports on the latest international discussions on nomenclature and educational efforts.

  12. The I.A.U. meteor shower nomenclature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The International Astronomical Union at its 2006 General Assembly in Prague has adopted a set of rules for meteor shower nomenclature, a working list with designated names (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), and established a Task Group for Meteor Shower Nomenclature in Commission 22 (Meteors and Interplanetary Dust) to help define which meteor showers exist from well defined groups of meteoroids from a single parent body.

  13. Expressions to implement the IAU 2000 definition of UT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, N.; Wallace, P. T.; McCarthy, D. D.

    2003-08-01

    This paper provides expressions to be used to implement the new definition of UT1 corresponding to the IAU 2000 resolutions either in the new (CEO-based) or classical (equinox-based) transformations between the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) and the Geocentric Celestial Reference System (GCRS). The new expression for Greenwich Sidereal Time (GST) has to be in agreement at the microarcsecond level, for one century, with the IAU 2000 expressions for the Earth Rotation Angle (ERA) and for the quantity s positioning the Celestial Ephemeris Origin (CEO) on the equator of the CIP. The computations of the new expressions using the IAU 2000 precession-nutation model are performed in such a manner as to ensure that there is no discontinuity in UT1 on 1 January 2003 and that there is equivalence of the classical and new transformations between the ITRS and GCRS relative to the rotation about the axis of the CIP when these expressions are used. The equinox offset that is considered in the computations refers to the dynamical mean equinox of J2000.0. The resulting expressions have been included in the IERS Conventions 2000.

  14. Proceedings of the Higher Education Colloquium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1973

    The Higher Education Colloquium is composed of individuals who have made significant contributions to American higher education as researchers, college or university administrators, foundation executives, or in other roles. These proceedings include the following: recognition of the efforts and excellence of Ruth E. Eckert; "New Tasks for New…

  15. IAU Working Group for Numerical Standards of Fundamental Astronomy (NSFA): Past Efforts and Future Endeavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzum, Brian; Capitaine, Nicole; Fienga, Agnès; Folkner, William M.; Fukushima, Toshio; Heinkelmann, Robert; Hilton, James L.; Hohenkerk, Catherine; Petit, Gérard; Pitjeva, Elena; Soffel, Michael; Wallace, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    In 2006, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) General Assembly (GA) established the Working Group (WG) for Numerical Standards of Fundamental Astronomy (NSFA). The NSFA WG Current Best Estimates (CBEs) were adopted at the 2009 IAU GA in Resolution B2 as the IAU (2009) System of Astronomical Constants. The IAU 2012 Resolution on the re-definition of the au was proposed by the NSFA WG. Since then, the WG has concentrated on establishing the process for maintaining the CBEs in an effort to provide a service for the IAU. The NSFA web presence documents both the IAU (2009) System of Astronomical Constants and the CBEs. All old pages of the CBEs are archived in order to document history of the CBEs. The CBE policy documents the procedures established for proposal, discussion, and voting for the adoption of new CBEs. The talk reviews the efforts of the WG and provides insight into future efforts.

  16. 10 years of the IAU Efforts for Capitalizing the Ground-Based Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, Magda; Thuillot, William

    2011-06-01

    In 2000 a new IAU working group was founded (IAU GA, Manchester): Future Development of Ground-Based Astrometry (FDGBA). It was revised in 2003 during the IAU GA in Sydney. A new one replaced it in 2006 (IAU GA, Prague): Astrometry by Small Ground-Based Telescopes (ASGBT). It was renewed for other three years during the IAU GA in Rio de Janeiro. The main aim of the working groups followed the Newsletter No. 1 of the IAU Commission 8, which says: The post-Hipparcos era has brought an element of uncertainty as to the goals and future programs for all of ground-based astrometry The purpose of the WGs was "to update and maintain information on astrometric programmes and activities carried out by small telescopes, to diffuse news through these pages and e-mails, to facilitate the collaborations and to help for the coordination of the activities, when possible, in astrometry from ground-based telescopes".

  17. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  18. IAU Office of Astronomy for Development: Task Force Children and School Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Pedro; Gomez, Edward

    2015-03-01

    The main mission of the IAU OAD Task Force on Children and School Education is to support the implementation of the pre-tertiary education part of the IAU Strategic Plan `Astronomy for Development'. In this presentation we will give an overview of the role and programme of the task force as well as a general discussion about the past, present and future IAU education activities and programmes.

  19. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  20. Catherine Cesarsky - President Elect of the International Astronomical Union (IAU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    The General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), meeting in Sydney (Australia), has appointed the ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, as President Elect for a three-year period (2003-2006). The IAU is the world's foremost organisation for astronomy, uniting almost 9000 professional scientists on all continents. The IAU General Assembly also elected Prof. Ron Ekers (Australia) as President (2003 - 2006). Dr. Cesarsky will then become President of the IAU in 2006, when the General Assembly next meets in Prague (The Czech Republic). Dr. Cesarsky is the first woman scientist to receive this high distinction. "The election of Catherine Cesarsky as President-Elect of the IAU is an important recognition for a scientist who has made impressive contributions to various areas of modern astrophysics, from cosmic rays to the interstellar medium and cosmology" , commented the outgoing IAU President, Prof. Franco Pacini. "It is also an honour and an important accolade for the European astronomical community in general and ESO in particular." Dr. Cesarsky, who assumed the function as ESO Director General in 1999, was born in France. She received a degree in Physical Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires and graduated with a PhD in Astronomy in 1971 from Harvard University (Cambridge, Mass., USA). Afterwards she worked at the California Institute of Technology (CALTECH). In 1974, she became a staff member of the Service d'Astrophysique (SAp), Direction des Sciences de la Matière (DSM), Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) (France). As Director of DSM (1994 - 1999), she was leading about 3000 scientists, engineers and technicians active within a broad spectrum of basic research programmes in physics, chemistry, astrophysics and earth sciences. Dr. Cesarsky is known for her successful research activities in several central areas of modern astrophysics. She first worked on the theory of cosmic ray propagation and acceleration, and galactic gamma

  1. The Russian Astronomical Yearbooks and IAU 2000 Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebova, N. I.; Lukashova, M. V.; Sveshnikov, M. L.

    2006-08-01

    According to IAU 2000 resolutions, a reform of IAA RAS publications has been carried out during 2003-2006. In "The Astronomical Yearbook for 2007" the ephemerides of the Sun, the Moon and major planets are based on EPM 2004 theory developed in IAA RAS with accuracy adequate to DE405/LE405. Apparent places of stars are given in FK6/HIPPARCOS system referred to ICRS, and are calculated taking into account the new IAU 2000 model of nutation and the new IERS 2003 precession model which is practically close to P03 model. The sidereal time was determined by the Earth rotation angle. Coordinates of pole X, Y, CIO locator s and the equation of the origins are also presented. Matrixes of conversions from ICRS to the true equator and the equinox of date, as well as to the celestial intermediate origin and the true equator date are given. Navigating ephemerides are issued as "The Nautical Astronomical Yearbook" and "The Nautical Astronomical Almanac" biennial on the basis of DE405/LE405, new precession-nutation model, FK6/HIPPARCOS catalogues and the classical concept of the equinox. Nevertheless, the implementation of the new CIO concept in navigating ephemerides tables cannot be planned yet. At IAA RAS, the electronic versions of astronomical yearbooks have been developed allowing to calculate topocentric ephemerides. All the calculations are made with a specialized ERA programming system created in IAA RAS using the problem-oriented programming language for the solution of problems of ephemeris and dynamic astronomy.

  2. The Sun as a variable star: Solar and stellar irradiance variations; Colloquium of the International Astronomical Union, 143rd, Boulder, CO, Jun. 20-25, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M. (Editor); Froehlich, Claus (Editor); Hudson, Hugh S. (Editor); Tobiska, W. Kent (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Variations in solar and stellar irradiances have long been of interest. An International Astronomical Union (IAU) colloquium reviewed such relevant subjects as observations, theoretical interpretations, and empirical and physical models, with a special emphasis on climatic impact of solar irradiance variability. Specific topics discussed included: (1) General Reviews on Observations of Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variability; (2) Observational Programs for Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variability; (3) Variability of Solar and Stellar Irradiance Related to the Network, Active Regions (Sunspots and Plages), and Large-Scale Magnetic Structures; (4) Empirical Models of Solar Total and Spectral Irradiance Variability; (5) Solar and Stellar Oscillations, Irradiance Variations and their Interpretations; and (6) The Response of the Earth's Atmosphere to Solar Irradiance Variations and Sun-Climate Connections.

  3. Confirmation of the chi Cygnids (CCY, IAU#757)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Tóth, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present independent confirmation of the existence of the chi Cygnid (CCY, IAU#757) meteor shower. The chi Cygnids were discovered by Peter Jenniskens within the frame of CAMS project (Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance). Thanks to the cooperation between European viDeo MeteOr Network (EDMONd), International Meteor Organization Video Meteor Network (IMO VMN) and the BRAzilian Meteor Observation Network (BRAMON) the current version of the EDMOND database (v5.02) contains 189 323 multi-station meteor orbits. This large data sample allowed confirmation of the increased activity from the chi Cygnid swarm during the night of 2015 September 14/15, and also made it possible to map the activity of this newly discovered swarm during the years 2001-2014.

  4. History of Astronomy Under the Auspices of the IAU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochhar, Rajesh; Sun, Xiaochun; Ruggles, Clive; Avilés, Juan Antonio Belmonte; Corbin, Brenda; Milone, Eugene; Norris, Raymond; Oigatto, Luisa; Sōma, Mitsuru

    2016-04-01

    International Astronomical Union was formed after the First World War although it became truly international only after the Second World War. Its Commission 41 on History of Astronomy (C41) was set up in 1948 and in a few years established itself as an active and influential unit. It has the distinction of being a joint Commission, the other partner being International Union of History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (IUHPS). Since IAU is an internationally respected body of professional astronomers, its support for history of astronomy enhances the credibility of the discipline in the eyes of scientists as well as science establishments of individual countries. C41 is committed to advancing objective and rigorous world history of astronomy taking into account all its aspects.

  5. Communication strategies and volunteer management for the IAU-OAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay

    2015-08-01

    The IAU Office of Astronomy for Development will be developing a new communication strategy to promote its projects in a way that is relevant to stakeholders and the general public. Ideas include a magazine featuring best practices within the field of astronomy for development and setting up a workflow of communication that integrates the different outputs of the office and effectively uses the information collection tools developed by OAD team members.To accomplish these tasks the OAD will also develop a community management strategy with existing tools to effectively harness the skills of OAD volunteers for communication purposes. This talk will discuss the new communication strategy of the OAD as well the expanded community management plans.

  6. El Sistema de Referencia Celeste convencional de la IAU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, E. F.

    La Unión Astronómica Internacional (IAU) recomendó la adopción de un nuevo sistema de referencia celeste baricéntrico cuyo plano fundamental y origen de ascensiones rectas estén próximos, respectivamente, al ecuador y equinoccio dinámicos J2000.0. El nuevo sistema de referencia estará materializado por las posiciones J2000.0 de radiofuentes extragalácticas determinadas con la técnica de interferometría de larga línea de base (VLBI). El Working Group on Reference Frames de la IAU (WGRF) decidió adoptar (Grasse, 1995) al sistema de referencia celeste extragaláctico del Servicio Internacional de la Rotación Terrestre (IERS) como futuro sistema de referencia celeste convencional bajo el nombre International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) y encomendó su mantenimiento futuro al IERS. El marco de referencia que materializará al ICRS contiene posiciones precisas J2000.0 de más de 600 radiofuentes extragalácticas. Las coordenadas fueron ajustadas en una única solución VLBI en la cual se incluyeron todas las observaciones realizadas hasta octubre de 1995 con la técnica de adquisición de datos VLBI Mark III. Para minimizar los errores sistemáticos que pueden afectar la calidad del marco de referencia se introdujeron mejoras sustanciales en la modelización y en la selección de datos. Un subconjunto de objetos del marco de referencia se utilizó para referir las posiciones estelares determinadas con el satélite astrométrico Hipparcos al ICRS.

  7. The impact of the New IAU Resolutions on ICRF Definition and Realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, N.

    2013-03-01

    Following the adoption of the International Celestial Reference System and Frame (ICRS and ICRF) by the IAU in 1997, several resolutions on reference systems have been passed by the IAU in 2000 and 2006 and endorsed by the IUGG in 2003 and 2007, respectively. These resolutions concern especially the transformation between the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) and the Geocentric Celestial Reference system (GCRS) that is essential for realizing the ICRS from directions of extragalactic radio sources observed from the Earth by VLBI. First, the IAU 2000 resolutions have refined the concepts and definition of the astronomical reference systems and parameters for Earth's rotation, and adopted the IAU 2000 precession-nutation. Then, the IAU 2006 resolutions have adopted a new precession model that is consistent with dynamical theories and have addressed definition, terminology or orientation issues relative to reference systems and time scales that needed to be specified after the adoption of the IAU 2000 resolutions. These in particular provide a refined definition of the pole and the origin on the equator as well as a rigorous definition of sidereal rotation of the Earth. These also allow an accurate realization of the celestial intermediate system that replaces the classical celestial system based on the true equator and equinox of date. There was an additional IUGG 2007 resolution for the terrestrial reference system. Finally, the IAU 2009 resolutions have adopted a new system of astronomical constants - including conventional values of the IAU 2000/2006 resolutions - and adopted the Second Realization, ICRF2, of the International Celestial Reference Frame. This paper recalls the main aspects of these recent IAU resolutions as well as their consequences on the concepts, definitions, nomenclature and models that are suitable for modern realizations of reference systems. The impact of these resolutions on the definition and realization of the

  8. IAU Resolution 2009 B5 - Commission 50 Draft Action Plan - Presentation and Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    IAU Resolution 2009 B5 calls on IAU members to protect the public's right to an unpolluted night sky as well as the astronomical quality of the sky around major research observatories. The multi-pronged approach of Commission 50 includes working with the lighting industry for appropriate products from the solid state revolution, arming astronomers with training and materials for presentation, selective endorsement of key protection issues, cooperation with several other IAU commissions for education and outreach, and provision of clear quantitative priorities for outdoor lighting standards.

  9. Evolutionary games on multilayer networks: a colloquium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-05-01

    Networks form the backbone of many complex systems, ranging from the Internet to human societies. Accordingly, not only is the range of our interactions limited and thus best described and modeled by networks, it is also a fact that the networks that are an integral part of such models are often interdependent or even interconnected. Networks of networks or multilayer networks are therefore a more apt description of social systems. This colloquium is devoted to evolutionary games on multilayer networks, and in particular to the evolution of cooperation as one of the main pillars of modern human societies. We first give an overview of the most significant conceptual differences between single-layer and multilayer networks, and we provide basic definitions and a classification of the most commonly used terms. Subsequently, we review fascinating and counterintuitive evolutionary outcomes that emerge due to different types of interdependencies between otherwise independent populations. The focus is on coupling through the utilities of players, through the flow of information, as well as through the popularity of different strategies on different network layers. The colloquium highlights the importance of pattern formation and collective behavior for the promotion of cooperation under adverse conditions, as well as the synergies between network science and evolutionary game theory.

  10. SPICE as an IAU Recommendation for Planetary Ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, Charles; Bachman, Nathaniel; Folkner, William M.; Hilton, James

    2015-08-01

    In 2010 the IAU Commission 4 Working Group (WG) on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides and File Format Specification was formed to define a portable standard for planetary ephemeris files. The standard would have to work for all three sources of ephemerides-NASA/JPL, Institut de mécanique céleste de calcul des éphémérides (IMCCE), and Institute of Applied Astronomy (IAA). The WG decided to base its standard on the existing "SPICE"* Spacecraft/Planet kernel (SPK) format.The SPK format was created for use with the "SPICE" information system, used by many scientists and engineers worldwide to compute the geometry needed to plan and analyze data from robotic missions. SPICE is comprised of both data files and associated software, all freely available. SPICE data files, usually referred to as "kernels," provide ephemerides and size, shape and orientation of solar system bodies; spacecraft trajectory and orientation; reference frame specifications and implementations; instrument field-of-view geometry; and time system conversion data.Standard SPICE ephemeris files use the TDB time system-the WG requested SPICE be extended to accommodate ephemerides based on the TCB time system. Extensions were also needed to accommodate the IAA ephemeris representation as well as the integrated difference between coordinate time and proper time in the form of TT-TDB and TCG-TCB.Software to read the SPK kernels defined to accommodate planetary ephemerides is available in the SPICE toolkit, and also in stand-alone kernel readers available from IMCEE and IAA.SPK is also used within the SPICE community for natural satellites, asteroids, and comets. Future IAU discussions might lead to an expansion of the work done for planets to provide more general standards for these bodies.Portions of the research described in this publication was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. Conference Report: The Sino-American Colloquium on Moral Cognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gielen, Uwe

    1987-01-01

    Offers a report on a January 1987 colloquium on moral cognition in Chinese culture. Calls for creative teamwork on longitudinal interviews to gain a more exact picture of moral development structures in non-western cultures such as Taiwan. (BSR)

  12. Supporting Papers for A Colloquium on the Vietnamese Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen Hy Quang; Duong Thanh Binh

    These papers were written as supporting documents for a colloquium on the Vietnamese language. The first catalogues and analyzes Vietnamese vowels, diphthongs, consonants and tones. The second analyzes some facets of Vietnamese syntax. (CHK)

  13. Northern Taurids in the IAU Meteor Data Center Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoren, Jan; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Husarik, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The method of indices was used to study the northern branch of the autumn (night) part of the Taurid complex. The procedure is based on mathematical statistics only and was applied to select the Northern Taurid meteor records from the IAU Meteor Data Center Database. Because we wanted to study especially the fine structure of the inner part of the Northern Taurids, we were focused on the interval of the higher activity of the stream - from the end of the activity of the Perseids until the beginning of the Geminids activity. The outlying parts of the complex, active until January according to some authors, were not taken into account. In total, 84 Northern Taurid orbits were selected. Of these 84 orbits, 63 (75%) were sorted into 11 associations found in the stream. One of the associations consisted of three orbits and was identified as a previously unknown northern branch of the Tau-Arietids. We also found an association with orbital characteristics equal to the characteristics of the Delta-Piscids North and the Chi-Orionids North. The meteors in these associations were observed up to three weeks earlier compared to the currently cataloged data of the showers. The orientation of the mean orbit of a 5-member association with the Delta-Piscids North was different from the general trend, indicating that this stream may not be genetically related to other members of the Taurid complex.

  14. Modern temporal network theory: a colloquium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter

    2015-09-01

    The power of any kind of network approach lies in the ability to simplify a complex system so that one can better understand its function as a whole. Sometimes it is beneficial, however, to include more information than in a simple graph of only nodes and links. Adding information about times of interactions can make predictions and mechanistic understanding more accurate. The drawback, however, is that there are not so many methods available, partly because temporal networks is a relatively young field, partly because it is more difficult to develop such methods compared to for static networks. In this colloquium, we review the methods to analyze and model temporal networks and processes taking place on them, focusing mainly on the last three years. This includes the spreading of infectious disease, opinions, rumors, in social networks; information packets in computer networks; various types of signaling in biology, and more. We also discuss future directions.

  15. Colloquium: Hierarchy of scales in language dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, Richard A.

    2015-11-01

    Methods and insights from statistical physics are finding an increasing variety of applications where one seeks to understand the emergent properties of a complex interacting system. One such area concerns the dynamics of language at a variety of levels of description, from the behaviour of individual agents learning simple artificial languages from each other, up to changes in the structure of languages shared by large groups of speakers over historical timescales. In this Colloquium, we survey a hierarchy of scales at which language and linguistic behaviour can be described, along with the main progress in understanding that has been made at each of them - much of which has come from the statistical physics community. We argue that future developments may arise by linking the different levels of the hierarchy together in a more coherent fashion, in particular where this allows more effective use of rich empirical data sets.

  16. Summaries of SpS17 Discussions IAU GA 2012 Special Session on Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; Parks, Bob; McKenna, Dan; Sefako, Ramotholo; Smith, Malcolm; Galadí-Enríquez, David

    2015-03-01

    To address light pollution issues, IAU Commissions 41, 46, 50, and 55 are involved in getting the word out to the public and IAU members via cultural, educational, technical; however, efforts can always improve and evolve. To carry out a successful light pollution abatement program supported by the IAU, it takes a diversity of groups, professions, and disciplines with their collective knowledge and experience. In manifesting dark skies awareness effectively, we are stronger together than we are alone; therefore, combining efforts of Commissions 41, 46, 50 and 55 with organizations like the International Dark-Sky Association, Astronomers Without Borders, The World at Night and partnering with events like Earth Hour or GLOBE at Night is a good step forward.

  17. Industrial ecology: reflections on a colloquium.

    PubMed Central

    Ausubel, J H

    1992-01-01

    Industrial ecology is the network of all industrial processes as they may interact with each other and live off each other, not only in the economic sense, but also in the sense of direct use of each other's material and energy wastes and products. This paper, which reflects upon the papers and discussions at the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Industrial Ecology on May 20-21, 1991, is structured around 10 questions. Do sociotechnical systems have long-range environmental goals? How is the concept of industrial ecology useful and timely? What are environmental technologies? Is there a systematic way to choose among alternatives for improving the ecology of technologies? What are ways to measure performance with respect to industrial ecology? What are the sources and rates of innovation in environmental technologies? How is the market economy performing with respect to industrial ecology? What will be the effect of the ecological modernization of the developed nations of the North on the developing countries of the South? How can creative interaction on environmental issues be fostered among diverse social groups? How must research and education change? PMID:11607273

  18. Colloquium: Annual modulation of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Lisanti, Mariangela; Savage, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Direct detection experiments, which are designed to detect the scattering of dark matter off nuclei in detectors, are a critical component in the search for the Universe’s missing matter. This Colloquium begins with a review of the physics of direct detection of dark matter, discussing the roles of both the particle physics and astrophysics in the expected signals. The count rate in these experiments should experience an annual modulation due to the relative motion of the Earth around the Sun. This modulation, not present for most known background sources, is critical for solidifying the origin of a potential signal as dark matter. The focus is on the physics of annual modulation, discussing the practical formulas needed to interpret a modulating signal. The dependence of the modulation spectrum on the particle and astrophysics models for the dark matter is illustrated. For standard assumptions, the count rate has a cosine dependence with time, with a maximum in June and a minimum in December. Well-motivated generalizations of these models, however, can affect both the phase and amplitude of the modulation. Shown is how a measurement of an annually modulating signal could teach us about the presence of substructure in the galactic halo or about the interactions between dark and baryonic matter. Although primarily a theoretical review, the current experimental situation for annual modulation and future experimental directions is briefly discussed.

  19. Nominal Values for Selected Solar and Planetary Quantities: IAU 2015 Resolution B3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prša, Andrej; Harmanec, Petr; Torres, Guillermo; Mamajek, Eric; Asplund, Martin; Capitaine, Nicole; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Depagne, Éric; Haberreiter, Margit; Hekker, Saskia; Hilton, James; Kopp, Greg; Kostov, Veselin; Kurtz, Donald W.; Laskar, Jacques; Mason, Brian D.; Milone, Eugene F.; Montgomery, Michele; Richards, Mercedes; Schmutz, Werner; Schou, Jesper; Stewart, Susan G.

    2016-08-01

    In this brief communication we provide the rationale for and the outcome of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) resolution vote at the XXIXth General Assembly in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 2015, on recommended nominal conversion constants for selected solar and planetary properties. The problem addressed by the resolution is a lack of established conversion constants between solar and planetary values and SI units: a missing standard has caused a proliferation of solar values (e.g., solar radius, solar irradiance, solar luminosity, solar effective temperature, and solar mass parameter) in the literature, with cited solar values typically based on best estimates at the time of paper writing. As precision of observations increases, a set of consistent values becomes increasingly important. To address this, an IAU Working Group on Nominal Units for Stellar and Planetary Astronomy formed in 2011, uniting experts from the solar, stellar, planetary, exoplanetary, and fundamental astronomy, as well as from general standards fields to converge on optimal values for nominal conversion constants. The effort resulted in the IAU 2015 Resolution B3, passed at the IAU General Assembly by a large majority. The resolution recommends the use of nominal solar and planetary values, which are by definition exact and are expressed in SI units. These nominal values should be understood as conversion factors only, not as the true solar/planetary properties or current best estimates. Authors and journal editors are urged to join in using the standard values set forth by this resolution in future work and publications to help minimize further confusion.

  20. The Changing Role of the IAU in Providing and Organising Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A. H.; McNally, D.

    2003-03-01

    We discuss the way in which the IAU has organized information and supplied it to the astronomical community (with special reference to the Telegram Bureau), to students worldwide, to other international unions, to governments and inter-governmental organizations and to the general public.

  1. An Analysis of Papers on Astronomy Education in Proceedings of IAU Meetings from 1988 to 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretones, Paulo Sergio; Megid Neto, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The authors analyzed 283 papers dealing with astronomy education published in the IAU proceedings from 1988 to 2006. The analysis was conducted to determine both the characteristics and trends of published research studies in order to determine whether researchers should consider taking new directions. The authors conclude that educational…

  2. Building on IYA2009: IAU Strategic Plan ``Astronomy for the Developing World''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Carignan, Claude; Govender, Kevin

    2011-12-01

    During the next decade the IAU intends to mobilize talented astronomers, engineers and teachers around the world, in the service of developing countries. I shall review the content of the IAU Strategic Plan 2010 - 2020 ``Astronomy for the Developing World'' and give you an update on its implementation. Astronomy is a unique tool for stimulating capacity building because it combines cutting-edge technology with fundamental science and has deep cultural roots. The plan envisages a substantial increase in IAU education and development activities during the next decade. These activities will be bottom-up, with a strong regional influence. An integrated approach tailored to the conditions and needs of each country will involve a mix of education at primary, secondary and tertiary levels and public outreach. As a crucial component of the strategy, the IAU together with the South African National Research Foundation will set up a small office to coordinate and plan the various global activities at the SAAO in Cape Town.

  3. The Twenty-First NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the Twenty-First NASTRAN Users' Colloquium held in Tampa, FL, April 26 through April 30, 1993. It provides some comprehensive general papers on the application of finite elements in engineering, comparisons with other approaches, unique applications, pre-and postprocessing with other auxiliary programs and new methods of analysis with NASTRAN.

  4. Codes, Ciphers, and Cryptography--An Honors Colloquium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karls, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    At the suggestion of a colleague, I read "The Code Book", [32], by Simon Singh to get a basic introduction to the RSA encryption scheme. Inspired by Singh's book, I designed a Ball State University Honors Colloquium in Mathematics for both majors and non-majors, with material coming from "The Code Book" and many other sources. This course became…

  5. Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. "The Colloquium on Large…

  6. Changing Currents in Second Language Writing Research: A Colloquium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Paul Kei; Canagarajah, A. Suresh; Harklau, Linda; Hyland, Ken; Warschauer, Mark

    2003-01-01

    This article is based on an invited colloqium on second language (L) writing presented at the 200 meeting of the American Association for Applied Linguistics. The colloquium featured five second language writing researchers two discussed some of the important currents that have shaped the field of second language writing. (Author/VWL)

  7. Paired and Interacting Galaxies: International Astronomical Union Colloquium No. 124

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulentic, Jack W. (Editor); Keel, William C. (Editor); Telesco, C. M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings of the International Astronomical Union Colloquium No. 124, held at the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, on December 4 to 7, are given. The purpose of the conference was to describe the current state of theoretical and observational knowledge of interacting galaxies, with particular emphasis on galaxies in pairs.

  8. MayDay Colloquium 24: The Aims of Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, David J.

    2013-01-01

    On June 20, 2012, Professor John Kratus welcomed the MayDay Group to Michigan State University for "Colloquium 24: The Aims of Music Education". On behalf of all members of the Mayday Group, the author wishes to extend his deepest gratitude to Professor Kratus and his colleagues at Michigan State for their extremely gracious and…

  9. Colloquium: Digital Technologies--Help or Hindrance for the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Elton; Bissell, Chris; Hardwick, Lorna; Jones, Allan; Ridge, Mia; Wolffe, John

    2012-01-01

    This article offers reflections arising from a recent colloquium at the Open University on the implications of the development of digital humanities for research in arts disciplines, and also for their interactions with computing and technology. Particular issues explored include the ways in which the digital turn in humanities research is also a…

  10. In search of a viable IAU-OAD Regional Node: A case for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okere, B. I.; Okoh, D. C.; Obi, I. A.; Okeke, P. N.; Opara, F. E.

    2015-03-01

    The establishment of the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) in Cape Town, South Africa, with the aim of using astronomy to stimulate development at all levels including primary, secondary and tertiary education, science research and the public understanding of science is a welcome development to consolidate the gains of IYA2009. To assist the IAU OAD office in achieving its goal of using astronomy as a tool for development, there is need to have OAD regional nodes. In this paper, we present the astronomy activities/programs required of such a Regional Node in Africa and how the Node can play a significant role to realise the vision of Astronomy for a better world!

  11. The IAU Division A Working Group on the Third Realization of the ICRF: Background, Goals, Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    The XXVIII General Assembly of the IAU (Beijing, 2012) established the Division A Working Group on the Third Realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The adopted charter of the ICRF3 Working Group includes a commitment to report on the implementation and execution plans for ICRF3 during the XXIX General Assembly of the IAU along with a targeted completion and presentation of ICRF3 in 2018 to the XXX General Assembly for adoption. This talk will discuss the background, purpose, and overall implementation plan for ICRF3, and motivate the concept, currently under consideration by the ICRF3 Working Group, that future realizations of the ICRF be based on multi-frequency astrometric data, starting with ICRF3.

  12. Waves and Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (IAU S247)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, Robert; Mendoza-Briceno, César A.

    2008-06-01

    Preface; Organizing committee; Conference participants; Address by the Scientific Organizing Committee R. Erdélyi; Progress in coronal seismology B. Roberts; Session 1. Waves and oscillations in solar and stellar interior Robert Erdélyi; Session 2. Coupling of global solar and stellar motions into the lower atmosphere Bernard Roberts; Session 3. Seismology of the lower solar atmosphere and stellar chromospheres Siraj S. Hasan; Session 4. Seismology of open versus closed magnetic structures Marcel Goossens; Session 5. Prominence seismology Jose Luis Ballester; Session 6. Dynamical processes and coupling in the magnetic atmosphere of Sun and stars Miguel Ibañez; Session 7. Wave-particle interactions in magnetized plasmas Cesar A. Mendoza-Briceño; Session 8. Solar and stellar global coronal seismology Viggo Hansteen; Session 9. Fundamental physical processes in coronae: waves, turbulence, reconnection Saku Tsuneta; Session 10. Waves and instabilities in atmospheric plasmas Arnold O. Benz; Summary of meeting Cesar A. Mendoza-Briceño; Concluding remarks A. O. Benz; Late papers; Author index.

  13. Report on the 2015 COSPAR Panel on Planetary Protection Colloquium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipkin, Victoria; Kminek, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    In consultation with the COSPAR Scientific Commissions B (Space Studies of the Earth-Moon System, Planets, and Small Bodies of the Solar System) and F (Life Sciences as Related to Space), the COSPAR Panel on Planetary Protection organised a colloquium at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, in September 2015, to cover two pertinent topics: * Icy moon sample return planetary protection requirements * Mars Special Regions planetary protection requirements These two topics were addressed in two separate sessions. Participation from European, North American and Japanese scientists reflected broad expertise from the respective COSPAR Commissions, recent NASA MEPAG Science Analysis Group and National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine/European Science Foundation Mars Special Regions Review Committee. The recommendations described in this report are based on discussions that took place during the course of the colloquium and reflect a consensus of the colloquium participants that participated in the two separate sessions. These recommendations are brought to the 2016 COSPAR Scientific Assembly for further input and discussion as part of the recognised process for updating COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy.

  14. 1984-2008. Predictions for Higher Education. From the 25th Anniversary Colloquium. [Proceedings].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardee, Melvene Draheim, Ed.

    Predictions on higher education for 1984-2009 are presented in the proceedings of a colloquium of the Institute for Studies in Higher Education of Florida State University. Presentations were made at the colloquium by 10 graduates of the university whose current positions represent administration-management, instruction, research, and student…

  15. News and Views: OAD establishes links; IAU General Assembly moves forward; Website collects astronomical heritage online; New national members; Inquiries of Heaven; Dark skies in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    The 28th General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union in Beijing was an effective and enjoyable forum for presenting and discussing research, including the announcement of measures to preserve dark skies, rationalize definitions and units of measurement and a new focus on outreach for the IAU itself. The IAU GA saw the launch of a joint UNESCO-IAU project to bring the world's astronomical heritage to a wider audience.

  16. Report of the IAU Working Group on cartographic coordinates and rotational elements: 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archinal, B.A.; A'Hearn, M.F.; Bowell, E.; Conrad, A.; Consolmagno, G.J.; Courtin, R.; Fukushima, T.; Hestroffer, D.; Hilton, J.L.; Krasinsky, G.A.; Neumann, G.; Oberst, J.; Seidelmann, P.K.; Stooke, P.; Tholen, D.J.; Thomas, P.C.; Williams, I.P.

    2010-01-01

    Every three years the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements revises tables giving the directions of the poles of rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, minor planets, and comets. This report takes into account the IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN) and the IAU Committee on Small Body Nomenclature (CSBN) definition of dwarf planets, introduces improved values for the pole and rotation rate of Mercury, returns the rotation rate of Jupiter to a previous value, introduces improved values for the rotation of five satellites of Saturn, and adds the equatorial radius of the Sun for comparison. It also adds or updates size and shape information for the Earth, Mars’ satellites Deimos and Phobos, the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, and 22 satellites of Saturn. Pole, rotation, and size information has been added for the asteroids (21) Lutetia, (511) Davida, and (2867) Šteins. Pole and rotation information has been added for (2) Pallas and (21) Lutetia. Pole and rotation and mean radius information has been added for (1) Ceres. Pole information has been updated for (4) Vesta. The high precision realization for the pole and rotation rate of the Moon is updated. Alternative orientation models for Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are noted. The Working Group also reaffirms that once an observable feature at a defined longitude is chosen, a longitude definition origin should not change except under unusual circumstances. It is also noted that alternative coordinate systems may exist for various (e.g. dynamical) purposes, but specific cartographic coordinate system information continues to be recommended for each body. The Working Group elaborates on its purpose, and also announces its plans to occasionally provide limited updates to its recommendations via its website, in order to address community needs for some updates more often than every 3 years. Brief recommendations are also made to the general

  17. Report of the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements: 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archinal, B. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bowell, E.; Conrad, A.; Consolmagno, G. J.; Courtin, R.; Fukushima, T.; Hestroffer, D.; Hilton, J. L.; Krasinsky, G. A.; Neumann, G.; Oberst, J.; Seidelmann, P. K.; Stooke, P.; Tholen, D. J.; Thomas, P. C.; Williams, I. P.

    2011-02-01

    Every three years the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements revises tables giving the directions of the poles of rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, minor planets, and comets. This report takes into account the IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN) and the IAU Committee on Small Body Nomenclature (CSBN) definition of dwarf planets, introduces improved values for the pole and rotation rate of Mercury, returns the rotation rate of Jupiter to a previous value, introduces improved values for the rotation of five satellites of Saturn, and adds the equatorial radius of the Sun for comparison. It also adds or updates size and shape information for the Earth, Mars' satellites Deimos and Phobos, the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, and 22 satellites of Saturn. Pole, rotation, and size information has been added for the asteroids (21) Lutetia, (511) Davida, and (2867) Šteins. Pole and rotation information has been added for (2) Pallas and (21) Lutetia. Pole and rotation and mean radius information has been added for (1) Ceres. Pole information has been updated for (4) Vesta. The high precision realization for the pole and rotation rate of the Moon is updated. Alternative orientation models for Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are noted. The Working Group also reaffirms that once an observable feature at a defined longitude is chosen, a longitude definition origin should not change except under unusual circumstances. It is also noted that alternative coordinate systems may exist for various (e.g. dynamical) purposes, but specific cartographic coordinate system information continues to be recommended for each body. The Working Group elaborates on its purpose, and also announces its plans to occasionally provide limited updates to its recommendations via its website, in order to address community needs for some updates more often than every 3 years. Brief recommendations are also made to the general

  18. The Establishment of an Astrophysics Course in the Philippines through the IAU TAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebre, C. P.

    2003-05-01

    The Japanese Government through its Cultural Grant-aid Program, donated a 45-cm telescope to the Government of the Philippines. It was installed at the PAGASA Astronomical Observatory in May 2000. Its installation had made the officials of PAGASA realize the need to establish an undergraduate astrophysics course in the country. The course will be more economical and practical, compared to training courses and fellowships requested from abroad. It was planned to be established in cooperation with the IAU-TAD and the National Institute of Physics of the University of the Philippines. The activity is discussed in detail in this paper.

  19. Nutation model (IAU 1980) and the corrections of its main terms from BLZ and PIP data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanović, G.; de Biasi, M. S.

    The star observations of the Belgrade visual zenith telescope (in the list of Bureau International de l'Heure (BIH) series denoted by BLZ) for the period 1960 - 1985 (about 26 years of latitude data) and the Punta Indio photographic zenith tube (denoted by PIP) for the period 1971 - 1984 (about 14 years of latitude data) were used to obtain the correction (ΔN) to the amplitude of long periodic 18.6 years nutation obliquity term. The least-square method (LSQ) was applied. The reduction of both BLZ and PIP data was in line with the IAU 1980 Nutation Model.

  20. Protection of Northern Chile as an ICOMOS/IAU ``Window to the Universe''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Malcolm G.

    2015-03-01

    Over the last two decades, La Serena's population has increased by about 70 percent. A site description of the AURA Observatory in Chile as a ``Window to the Universe`` is now available on the recently-launched UNESCO-IAU Astronomical Heritage Web Portal, www.astronomicalheritage.net This can serve as an example of possible material for the Chilean authorities, should they wish to propose the dark skies over much of northern Chile for protection as a World Scientific Heritage site. Some of the steps involved are discussed briefly here.

  1. Papers presented to the International Colloquium on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains short papers that have been accepted for the International Colloquium on Venus, August 10-12, Pasadena, California. The Program Committee consisted of Stephen Saunders (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and Sean C. Solomon (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Chairmen: Raymond Arvison (Washington University); Vassily Moroz (Institute for Space Research); Donald B. Campbell (Cornell University); Thomas Donahue (University of Michigan); James W. Head III (Brown University); Pamela Jones (Lunar and Planetary Institute); Mona Jasnow, Andrew Morrison, Timothy Pardker, Jeffrey Plaut, Ellen Stofan, Tommy Thompson, Cathy Weitz (Jet Propulsion Laboratory); Gordon Pettengil (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); and Janet Luhmann (University of California, Los Angeles).

  2. Implementation of IAU Resolution 2009 B5, "in Defence of the night sky and the right to starlight"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Richard F.; Walker, Constance Elaine

    2015-08-01

    IAU Resolution 2009 B5 calls on IAU members to protect the public`s right to an unpolluted night sky as well as the astronomical quality of the sky around major research observatories. The approach of Commission 50 - astronomical site protection - includes working with the lighting industry for appropriate products from rapidly evolving solid state technology, arming astronomers with training and materials for presentation, selective endorsement of key protection issues, cooperation with other IAU commissions for education and outreach with particular current attention to the International Year of Light, and provision of clear quantitative priorities for outdoor lighting standards. In 2012, these priorities were defined as full cut-off shielding, spectral management to minimize output shortward of 500 nm, and zone- and time-appropriate lighting levels. Revisiting the specifics of these priorities will be a topic for current discussion.

  3. Consistency Problems in the Improvement of the IAU Precession-Nutation Theories: Effects of the Dynamical Ellipticity Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escapa, Alberto; Ferrándiz, José M.; Baenas, Tomás; Getino, Juan; Navarro, Juan F.; Belda-Palazón, Santiago

    2016-03-01

    The complexity of the modeling of the rotational motion of the Earth in space has produced that no single theory has been adopted to describe it in full. Hence, it is customary using at least a theory for precession and another one for nutation. The classic approach proceeds by deriving some of the fundamental parameters from the precession theory, like, e.g., the dynamical ellipticity Hd, and then using those values in the nutation theory. The former IAU 1976 precession and IAU 1980 nutation theories followed that scheme. Along with the improvement of the accuracy of the determination of Earth orientation parameters, IAU 1980 was superseded by IAU2000, based on the application of the MHB2000 transfer function to the previous rigid Earth analytical theory REN2000. The latter was derived while the precession model IAU 1976 was still in force, therefore it used the corresponding values for some of the fundamental parameters, as the precession rate, associated to the dynamical ellipticity. The new precession model P03 was adopted as IAU 2006. That change introduced some inconsistency since P03 used different values for some of the fundamental parameters that MHB2000 inherited from REN2000. Besides, the derivation of the basic Earth parameters of MHB2000 itself comprised a fitted variation of the dynamical ellipticity adopted in the background rigid theory. Due to the strict requirements of accuracy of the present and coming times, the magnitude of the inconsistencies originated by this twofold approach is no longer negligible as earlier, hence the need of discussing the effects of considering slightly different values for H_d in precession and nutation theories.

  4. Confirmation and characterization of IAU temporary meteor showers in EDMOND database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornoš, L.; Matlovič, P.; Rudawska, R.; Tóth, J.; Hajduková, M., Jr.; Koukal, J.; Piffl, R.

    2014-07-01

    The European viDeo MeteOr Network Database (EDMOND) is a database of video meteor orbits resulting from cooperation and data sharing among several European national networks and the International Meteor Organization Video Meteor Network, IMO VMN, (Kornosš et al., 2014, Proc. IMC 2013). At present, the 4th version of the EDMOND database, which contains 83369 video meteor orbits, has been released. The first results of the database analysis, in which we studied minor streams, are presented. Using the radiant-geocentric velocity method we identified 267 meteor showers, among them 67 established showers and 200 from the working list of the IAU MDC. Making a more detailed examination, we clearly identified 22 showers of 65 pro tempore showers of the working list of the IAU MDC (updated in August 2013). The identification of 18 meteor showers was questionable, while 25 showers were not found. For all the identified temporary meteor showers, we list the weighted mean orbital elements, the radiant position and the geocentric velocity.

  5. Universality, Diversity, Interdependence: The Missions of IAU. Policy Outline 1990-1995. International Association of Universities General Conference (9th, Helsinki, Finland, August 5-11, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Association of Universities, Paris (France).

    This policy outline was issued to guide the work of the International Association of Universities (IAU) as it develops policy for the further development of services, outreach, and partnerships. Services being rendered or developed by IAU's International Universities Bureau are described to provide a departure point for policy considerations.…

  6. Colloquium: 100 years of mass spectrometry: Perspectives and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Simon; Jjunju, Fred P. M.; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is widely regarded as the most sensitive and specific general purpose analytical technique. More than a century has passed for MS since the ground-breaking work of Nobel laureate Sir Joseph John Thomson in 1913. This Colloquium aims to (1) give an historical overview of the major instrumentation achievements that have driven mass spectrometry forward in the past century, including those leading up to the initial work of Thomson, (2) provide the nonspecialist with an introduction to MS, and (3) highlight some key applications of MS and explore the current and future trends. Because of the vastness of the subject area and quality of the manifold research efforts that have been undertaken over the last 100 years, which have contributed to the foundations and subsequent advances in mass spectrometry, it should be understood that not all of the key contributions may have been included in this Colloquium. Mass spectrometry has embraced a multitude of scientific disciplines and to recognize all of the achievements is an impossible task, such has been the diverse impact of this invaluable technique. Scientific progress is usually made via the cumulative effort of a large number of researchers; the achievements reported herein are only a representation of that effort.

  7. Dynamics of localized disturbances in engineering flows: a report on Euromech Colloquium 353

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfs, Jan; Oertel, Herbert, Jr.

    1997-09-01

    Euromech Colloquium 353, held at the University of Karlsruhe, Germany, 1 3 April 1996 brought together scientists working in the field of localized disturbances of flows in order to discuss new developments and the potential for application. The colloquium attracted a total of 56 participants from nine European countries, i.e. France, Germany, The Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine and United Kingdom as well as from the US and Israel.

  8. Report of the IAU Working Group on cartographic coordinates and rotational elements: 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archinal, Brent A.; A’Hearn, Michael F.; Bowell, Edward; Conrad, Al; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Courtin, Regis; Fukushima, Toshio; Hestroffer, Daniel; Hilton, James L.; Krasinsky, Georgij A.; Neumann, Gregory; Oberst, Jurgen; Seidelmann, P. Kenneth; Stooke, Philip; Tholen, David J.; Thomas, Peter C.; Williams, Iwan P.

    2010-01-01

    Every three years the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements revises tables giving the directions of the poles of rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, minor planets, and comets. This report takes into account the IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN) and the IAU Committee on Small Body Nomenclature (CSBN) definition of dwarf planets, introduces improved values for the pole and rotation rate of Mercury, returns the rotation rate of Jupiter to a previous value, introduces improved values for the rotation of five satellites of Saturn, and adds the equatorial radius of the Sun for comparison. It also adds or updates size and shape information for the Earth, Mars’ satellites Deimos and Phobos, the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter, and 22 satellites of Saturn. Pole, rotation, and size information has been added for the asteroids (21) Lutetia, (511) Davida, and (2867) Šteins. Pole and rotation information has been added for (2) Pallas and (21) Lutetia. Pole and rotation and mean radius information has been added for (1) Ceres. Pole information has been updated for (4) Vesta. The high precision realization for the pole and rotation rate of the Moon is updated. Alternative orientation models for Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn are noted. The Working Group also reaffirms that once an observable feature at a defined longitude is chosen, a longitude definition origin should not change except under unusual circumstances. It is also noted that alternative coordinate systems may exist for various (e.g. dynamical) purposes, but specific cartographic coordinate system information continues to be recommended for each body. The Working Group elaborates on its purpose, and also announces its plans to occasionally provide limited updates to its recommendations via its website, in order to address community needs for some updates more often than every 3 years. Brief recommendations are also made to the

  9. Report of the IAU/IAG Working Group on cartographic coordinates and rotational elements: 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seidelmann, P.K.; Archinal, B.A.; A'Hearn, M.F.; Conrad, A.; Consolmagno, G.J.; Hestroffer, D.; Hilton, J.L.; Krasinsky, G.A.; Neumann, G.; Oberst, J.; Stooke, P.; Tedesco, E.F.; Tholen, D.J.; Thomas, P.C.; Williams, I.P.

    2007-01-01

    Every three years the IAU/IAG Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements revises tables giving the directions of the poles of rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, minor planets, and comets. This report introduces improved values for the pole and rotation rate of Pluto, Charon, and Phoebe, the pole of Jupiter, the sizes and shapes of Saturn satellites and Charon, and the poles, rotation rates, and sizes of some minor planets and comets. A high precision realization for the pole and rotation rate of the Moon is provided. The expression for the Sun's rotation has been changed to be consistent with the planets and to account for light travel time ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  10. The Goal of the IAU/IAG Joint Working Group on the Theory of Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrandiz, J. M.; Gross, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012 the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU) initiated a process to establish a Joint Working Group (JWG) on theory of Earth rotation with the purpose of promoting the development of improved theories of the Earth rotation which reach the accuracy required to meet the needs of the near future as recommended by, e.g. GGOS, the Global Geodetic Observing System of the IAG. The JWG was approved by both organizations in April 2013 with the chairs being the two authors of this paper. Its structure comprises three Sub Working Groups (SWGs) addressing Precession/Nutation, Polar Motion and UT1, the Numerical Solutions and Validation, respectively. The SWGs should work in parallel for the sake of efficiency, but should keep consistency as an overall goal. This paper offers a view of the objectives and scope of the JWG and reports about its initial activities and plans.

  11. Main Objectives for this I.A.U. Special Session on Innovation in Teaching/ Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Ros, R. M.

    2006-08-01

    In the IAU resolution on the Value of Astronomy Education, passed by the IAU's General Assembly in 2003, it was recommended: to include astronomy in school curricula, to assist schoolteachers in their training and backup, and to inform teachers about available resources. The aim of this Special Session 2 on "Innovation in Teaching/Learning Astronomy" is to contribute to the implementation of these recommendations, introducing innovative points of view regarding methods of teaching and learning. Astronomers from all countries—developed or developing—will be equally interested. New methods of dissemination of information are making big changes in the opportunity of spreading astronomical knowledge. The World Wide Web continues to expand its reach, and the Astronomy Picture of the Day reaches the homepage of millions. The new phenomenon of podcasts is spreading rapidly. Astronomy attracts many young people to education in important fields in science and technology. But in many countries, astronomy is not part of the standard curriculum, and teachers do not receive adequate education and support. Still, many scientific and educational societies and government agencies have produced materials and educational resources in astronomy for all educational levels. Technology is used in astronomy both for obtaining observations and for teaching. In any case, it is useful to take their special opportunity to learn about the situation in different countries, to exchange opinions, and to collect information in order to continue, over at least the next triennium, the activities related to promoting astronomy throughout the world. In particular, we would like to invite all participants to explain their positive original experiences so they can be adapted for other regions. Everyone is invited to exchange their initiatives and to try to involve other countries in common projects. All of us are in the same boat. http://www.communicatingastronomy.org/innovation2006/

  12. Colloquium: Statistical mechanics of money, wealth, and income

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovenko, Victor M.; Rosser, J. Barkley, Jr.

    2009-10-01

    This Colloquium reviews statistical models for money, wealth, and income distributions developed in the econophysics literature since the late 1990s. By analogy with the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution of energy in physics, it is shown that the probability distribution of money is exponential for certain classes of models with interacting economic agents. Alternative scenarios are also reviewed. Data analysis of the empirical distributions of wealth and income reveals a two-class distribution. The majority of the population belongs to the lower class, characterized by the exponential (“thermal”) distribution, whereas a small fraction of the population in the upper class is characterized by the power-law (“superthermal”) distribution. The lower part is very stable, stationary in time, whereas the upper part is highly dynamical and out of equilibrium.

  13. Colloquium: Geometry and optimal packing of twisted columns and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2015-04-01

    This Colloquium presents recent progress in understanding constraints and consequences of close-packing geometry of filamentous or columnar materials possessing nontrivial textures, focusing, in particular, on the common motifs of twisted and toroidal structures. The mathematical framework is presented that relates spacing between linelike, filamentous elements to their backbone orientations, highlighting the explicit connection between the interfilament metric properties and the geometry of non-Euclidean surfaces. The consequences of the hidden connection between packing in twisted filament bundles and packing on positively curved surfaces, like the Thomson problem, are demonstrated for the defect-riddled ground states of physical models of twisted filament bundles. The connection between the "ideal" geometry of fibrations of curved three-dimensional space, including the Hopf fibration, and the non-Euclidean constraints of filament packing in twisted and toroidal bundles is presented, with a focus on the broader dependence of metric geometry on the simultaneous twisting and folding of multifilament bundles.

  14. Report on the International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology (Rome, 12–14 March 2014)

    PubMed Central

    Ewer, Michael; Gianni, Luca; Pane, Fabrizio; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Steiner, Rudolf K; Wojnowski, Leszek; Yeh, Edward T; Carver, Joseph R; Lipshultz, Steven E; Minotti, Giorgio; Armstrong, Gregory T; Cardinale, Daniela; Colan, Steven D; Darby, Sarah C; Force, Thomas L; Kremer, Leontien CM; Lenihan, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Sawyer, Douglas B; Suter, Thomas M; Swain, Sandra M; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2014-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a relatively new discipline that focuses on the cardiovascular sequelae of anti-tumour drugs. As any other young adolescent discipline, cardio-oncology struggles to define its scientific boundaries and to identify best standards of care for cancer patients or survivors at risk of cardiovascular events. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was held in Rome, Italy, 12–14 March 2014, with the aim of illuminating controversial issues and unmet needs in modern cardio-oncology. This colloquium embraced contributions from different kind of disciplines (oncology and cardiology but also paediatrics, geriatrics, genetics, and translational research); in fact, cardio-oncology goes way beyond the merging of cardiology with oncology. Moreover, the colloquium programme did not review cardiovascular toxicity from one drug or the other, rather it looked at patients as we see them in their fight against cancer and eventually returning to everyday life. This represents the melting pot in which anti-cancer therapies, genetic backgrounds, and risk factors conspire in producing cardiovascular sequelae, and this calls for screening programmes and well-designed platforms of collaboration between one key professional figure and another. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was promoted by the Menarini International Foundation and co-chaired by Giorgio Minotti (Rome), Joseph R Carver (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States), and Steven E Lipshultz (Detroit, Michigan, United States). The programme was split into five sessions of broad investigational and clinical relevance (what is cardiotoxicity?, cardiotoxicity in children, adolescents, and young adults, cardiotoxicity in adults, cardiotoxicity in special populations, and the future of cardio-oncology). Here, the colloquium chairs and all the session chairs briefly summarised what was said at the colloquium. Topics and controversies were reported on behalf of all members of the working group

  15. Report on the international colloquium on cardio-oncology (rome, 12-14 march 2014).

    PubMed

    Ewer, Michael; Gianni, Luca; Pane, Fabrizio; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Steiner, Rudolf K; Wojnowski, Leszek; Yeh, Edward T; Carver, Joseph R; Lipshultz, Steven E; Minotti, Giorgio; Armstrong, Gregory T; Cardinale, Daniela; Colan, Steven D; Darby, Sarah C; Force, Thomas L; Kremer, Leontien Cm; Lenihan, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Sawyer, Douglas B; Suter, Thomas M; Swain, Sandra M; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2014-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a relatively new discipline that focuses on the cardiovascular sequelae of anti-tumour drugs. As any other young adolescent discipline, cardio-oncology struggles to define its scientific boundaries and to identify best standards of care for cancer patients or survivors at risk of cardiovascular events. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was held in Rome, Italy, 12-14 March 2014, with the aim of illuminating controversial issues and unmet needs in modern cardio-oncology. This colloquium embraced contributions from different kind of disciplines (oncology and cardiology but also paediatrics, geriatrics, genetics, and translational research); in fact, cardio-oncology goes way beyond the merging of cardiology with oncology. Moreover, the colloquium programme did not review cardiovascular toxicity from one drug or the other, rather it looked at patients as we see them in their fight against cancer and eventually returning to everyday life. This represents the melting pot in which anti-cancer therapies, genetic backgrounds, and risk factors conspire in producing cardiovascular sequelae, and this calls for screening programmes and well-designed platforms of collaboration between one key professional figure and another. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was promoted by the Menarini International Foundation and co-chaired by Giorgio Minotti (Rome), Joseph R Carver (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States), and Steven E Lipshultz (Detroit, Michigan, United States). The programme was split into five sessions of broad investigational and clinical relevance (what is cardiotoxicity?, cardiotoxicity in children, adolescents, and young adults, cardiotoxicity in adults, cardiotoxicity in special populations, and the future of cardio-oncology). Here, the colloquium chairs and all the session chairs briefly summarised what was said at the colloquium. Topics and controversies were reported on behalf of all members of the working group of

  16. Washington Colloquium on Science and Society, Second Series (Held at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. 1965-1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeds, Morton, Ed.

    This is the report of the third Washington Colloquium on Science and Society. It contains the papers presented by the eight main speakers and the rebuttal and discussion which followed. The theme of the colloquium was "Changing Man in a Changing Environment," and the papers presented aspects of this theme as seen by different specialists in…

  17. Final Update of the IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides and File Format Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, James L.

    2015-08-01

    The IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides recommends the use of the Spacecraft and Planet Kernel (SPK) format to provide a uniform format for the position ephemerides of planets and other natural solar system bodies, and the use of the Planetary Constants Kernel (PCK) for the orientation of these bodies. These formats are used by the SPICE system, developed by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The working group's final report is currently undergoing final preparations for publication. A long version of this report will be available at the IAU Commission 4 - Ephemerides (or its successor) web site. This long version will contain a full description of that portion of the SPK and PCK formats required to duplicate these file types for this application.

  18. Report on the ESO/OPTICON/IAU Summer School ''Modern Instruments, their Science Case, and Practical Data Reduction''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabath, P.; Dennefeld, M.; Gerbaldi, M.; Paunzen, E.; Karas, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Astronomical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences organised, jointly with its local partners from Masaryk University, and international partners OPTICON, ESO and the IAU, a two-week practical training course in astronomy for young researchers. The summer school is briefly summarised: lectures covered a wide range of theoretical and observational topics and the emphasis of the practical work was on the analysis of archival data.

  19. Adaptive auditory feedback control of the production of formant trajectories in the Mandarin triphthong /iau/ and its pattern of generalization.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shanqing; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Guenther, Frank H; Perkell, Joseph S

    2010-10-01

    In order to test whether auditory feedback is involved in the planning of complex articulatory gestures in time-varying phonemes, the current study examined native Mandarin speakers' responses to auditory perturbations of their auditory feedback of the trajectory of the first formant frequency during their production of the triphthong /iau/. On average, subjects adaptively adjusted their productions to partially compensate for the perturbations in auditory feedback. This result indicates that auditory feedback control of speech movements is not restricted to quasi-static gestures in monophthongs as found in previous studies, but also extends to time-varying gestures. To probe the internal structure of the mechanisms of auditory-motor transformations, the pattern of generalization of the adaptation learned on the triphthong /iau/ to other vowels with different temporal and spatial characteristics (produced only under masking noise) was tested. A broad but weak pattern of generalization was observed; the strength of the generalization diminished with increasing dissimilarity from /iau/. The details and implications of the pattern of generalization are examined and discussed in light of previous sensorimotor adaptation studies of both speech and limb motor control and a neurocomputational model of speech motor control. PMID:20968374

  20. Recent activities in Armenia related to IAU ROAD and strategic plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2015-08-01

    Armenia is one of the candidates to host a Regional Office of Astronomy for Development (ROAD), namely in the Middle East region. Armenia is a county of ancient astronomy and is also rich in modern astronomical facilities and infrastructures, hence may serve as a regional center for various activities. Recently we have conducted a number of new activities related to astronomy for development. A meeting “Relation of Astronomy to other Sciences, Culture and Society” (RASCS) was organized by Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) and Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) in Oct 2014 in Byurakan. Astronomers, philosophers, biologists, historians, archaeologists, philologists, linguists, artists, and other specialists took part in the meeting. The meeting was important from the point of view of increasing the visibility of astronomy as a leader in interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary sciences. Activities related to Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture (AAC), as encouraged by a number of international organizations (UNESCO, IAU, ISAAC, SEAC, etc.), were initiated as well. Armenia is especially rich in astronomical heritage issues and this area may strongly support the ROAD project. Discussions on the future Armenian-Iranian collaboration in astronomy were carried out, including an Armenian-Iranian Astronomical Workshop to be held in Oct 2015 in Byurakan.

  1. The IAU2000 Standards: The Newly Adopted Time, Coordinates, and Reference Frames.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standish, E. M.

    2003-08-01

    Over the past dozen years or so, the IAU has been deluged with resolutions from Division I (Fundamental Astronomy) regarding dynamics, reference frames, fundamental time-scales, earth orientation, etc. Some of the resolutions are merely cosmetic in nature, detailing the basic foundations which have been used by serious researchers for many years. Some of the other resolutions, however, will have a direct affect upon a number of different fields of study. Sooner or later, these changes will actually be implemented, and they will affect anyone doing precision-type work in astronomy, geophysics, and related fields. As with most changes, there are pros and cons; these will be discussed. On a more practical level, the following questions will be addressed: What major areas of astrometry will be affected? What specific items will change? What does one need to know in order to survive the changes? What does one have to do in order to not be adversely affected? The research described in this publication was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. IAU Working Group on International Data Access for Solar and Heliospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, R. D.; Hill, F.; Hurlburt, N.; Roberts, A.

    2004-05-01

    Division II (Sun and Heliosphere) of the IAU has initiated a Working Group to study the archiving, retrieval and distribution of solar and heliospheric data. The goal of the Working Group is to facilitate the use of available solar and heliospheric data that are archived in a large number of computers scattered all over the world. The intent of the Working Group is to help coordinate the existing and growing data exchange through the Internet and work with the virtual observatory initiatives to propose guidelines for exchange at an international level and encourage participation in the projects. The Working Group is working with the virtual observatory initiatives to ensure that they develop standards and employ techniques that are acceptable to the worldwide solar and heliospheric communities and to encourage interoperability between the projects. The EGSO, VSO, CoSEC and VSPO projects are all part of the Working Group and would also like to encourage the communities to help develop standards and participate in the virtual observatory projects. The aims of and objectives the Working Group will be discussed and feedback from the audience is encouraged.

  3. Colloquium: Physical approaches to DNA sequencing and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2008-01-01

    With the continued improvement of sequencing technologies, the prospect of genome-based medicine is now at the forefront of scientific research. To realize this potential, however, a revolutionary sequencing method is needed for the cost-effective and rapid interrogation of individual genomes. This capability is likely to be provided by a physical approach to probing DNA at the single-nucleotide level. This is in sharp contrast to current techniques and instruments that probe (through chemical elongation, electrophoresis, and optical detection) length differences and terminating bases of strands of DNA. Several physical approaches to DNA detection have the potential to deliver fast and low-cost sequencing. Central to these approaches is the concept of nanochannels or nanopores, which allow for the spatial confinement of DNA molecules. In addition to their possible impact in medicine and biology, the methods offer ideal test beds to study open scientific issues and challenges in the relatively unexplored area at the interface between solids, liquids, and biomolecules at the nanometer length scale. This Colloquium emphasizes the physics behind these methods and ideas, critically describes their advantages and drawbacks, and discusses future research opportunities in the field.

  4. Report of the COSPAR mars special regions colloquium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kminek, G.; Rummel, J.D.; Cockell, C.S.; Atlas, R.; Barlow, N.; Beaty, D.; Boynton, W.; Carr, M.; Clifford, S.; Conley, C.A.; Davila, A.F.; Debus, A.; Doran, P.; Hecht, M.; Heldmann, J.; Helbert, J.; Hipkin, V.; Horneck, G.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Meyer, M.; Newsom, H.; Ori, G.G.; Parnell, J.; Prieur, D.; Raulin, F.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Spry, J.A.; Stabekis, P.E.; Stackebrandt, E.; Vago, J.; Viso, M.; Voytek, M.; Wells, L.; Westall, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the findings of a COSPAR Mars Special Regions Colloquium held in Rome in 2007. We review and discuss the definition of Mars Special Regions, the physical parameters used to define Mars Special Regions, and physical features on Mars that can be interpreted as Mars Special Regions. We conclude that any region experiencing temperatures > -25 ??C for a few hours a year and a water activity > 0.5 can potentially allow the replication of terrestrial microorganisms. Physical features on Mars that can be interpreted as meeting these conditions constitute a Mars Special Region. Based on current knowledge of the martian environment and the conservative nature of planetary protection, the following features constitute Mars Special regions: Gullies and bright streaks associated with them, pasted-on terrain, deep subsurface, dark streaks only on a case-by-case basis, others to be determined. The parameter definition and the associated list of physical features should be re-evaluated on a regular basis. ?? 2010 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Colloquium: Fractional calculus view of complexity: A tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    2014-10-01

    The fractional calculus has been part of the mathematics and science literature for 310 years. However, it is only in the past decade or so that it has drawn the attention of mainstream science as a way to describe the dynamics of complex phenomena with long-term memory, spatial heterogeneity, along with nonstationary and nonergodic statistics. The most recent application encompasses complex networks, which require new ways of thinking about the world. Part of the new cognition is provided by the fractional calculus description of temporal and topological complexity. Consequently, this Colloquium is not so much a tutorial on the mathematics of the fractional calculus as it is an exploration of how complex phenomena in the physical, social, and life sciences that have eluded traditional mathematical modeling become less mysterious when certain historical assumptions such as differentiability are discarded and the ordinary calculus is replaced with the fractional calculus. Exemplars considered include the fractional differential equations describing the dynamics of viscoelastic materials, turbulence, foraging, and phase transitions in complex social networks.

  6. Report of the proceedings of the Colloquium and Workshop on Multiscale Coupled Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Colloquium and Workshop on Multiscale Coupled Modeling was held for the purpose of addressing modeling issues of importance to planning for the Cooperative Multiscale Experiment (CME). The colloquium presentations attempted to assess the current ability of numerical models to accurately simulate the development and evolution of mesoscale cloud and precipitation systems and their cycling of water substance, energy, and trace species. The primary purpose of the workshop was to make specific recommendations for the improvement of mesoscale models prior to the CME, their coupling with cloud, cumulus ensemble, hydrology, air chemistry models, and the observational requirements to initialize and verify these models.

  7. Astronomy development in Serbia in view of the IAU Strategic Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanacković, Olga

    2015-03-01

    An overview of astronomy development in Serbia in view of the goals envisaged by the IAU Strategic Plan is given. Due attention is paid to the recent reform of education at all levels. In the primary schools several extra topics in astronomy are introduced in the physics course. Attempts are made to reintroduce astronomy as a separate subject in the secondary schools. Special emphasis is put to the role and activities of the Petnica Science Center the biggest center for informal education in SE Europe, and to a successful participation of the Serbian team in International astronomy olympiads. Astronomy topics are taught at all five state universities in Serbia. At the University of Belgrade and Novi Sad students can enroll in astronomy from the first study year. The students have the training at the Ondrejov Observatory (Czech Republic) and at the astronomical station on the mountain Vidojevica in southern Serbia. Astronomy research in Serbia is performed at the Astronomical Observatory, Belgrade and the Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade. There are about 70 researchers in astronomy in Serbia (and about as many abroad) who participate in eight projects financed by the Ministry of Education and Science and in several international cooperations and projects: SREAC, VAMDC, Belissima (recruitment of experienced expatriate researchers), Astromundus (a 2-year joint master program with other four European universities), LSST. One of the goals in near future is twinning between universities in the SEE region and worldwide. The ever-increasing activities of 20 amateur astronomical societies are also given.

  8. Dark Skies Africa: an NOAO and IAU OAD Program on Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; Tellez, D.; Pompea, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The IAU’s Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) awarded the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) with a grant to deliver a “Dark Skies Outreach to Sub-Saharan Africa” program to institutions in 12 African countries during 2013. The program helped students identify wasteful and inefficient lighting and provided ways to reduce consumption and to keep energy costs in check. The goal was to inspire students to be responsible stewards in helping their community safeguard one of Africa’s natural resources - a dark night sky. Thirteen kits made by the NOAO Education and Public Outreach group were sent to coordinators at university, science center and planetarium-type institutions in 12 African countries and to the IAU OAD. The program’s kit included complete instructional guides and supplies for six activities and a project on energy conservation and responsible lighting. The six activities were taught to the coordinators in a series of six Google+ Hangout sessions scheduled from June to mid-November. The coordinators at the institutions in the twelve countries in turn trained local teachers in junior and senior high schools. The Google+ Hangout sessions also included instruction on carrying out evaluations. From the end of November until mid-December students from the different African countries shared final class projects (such as posters or powerpoints) on the program’s website. The entire program was designed to help coordinators and educators work with students, parents and the community to identify dark sky resource, lighting and energy issues and to assess their status, efficiency and effectiveness. Participants will take away from the presentation new techniques on using Google+ Hangout sessions to instruct and sustain a community of coordinators and educators through distance learning as well as immersing them (and their students) in Project Based Learning after a scaffolded sequence of activities.

  9. Colloquium: Non-Markovian dynamics in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry, and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markovian stochastic process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modeled phenomenologically by means of a dynamical semigroup with a corresponding time-independent generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics of the open system typically leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence, correlations, and entanglement. Here recent theoretical results on the rich non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems are discussed, paying particular attention to the rigorous mathematical definition, to the physical interpretation and classification, as well as to the quantification of quantum memory effects. The general theory is illustrated by a series of physical examples. The analysis reveals that memory effects of the open system dynamics reflect characteristic features of the environment which opens a new perspective for applications, namely, to exploit a small open system as a quantum probe signifying nontrivial features of the environment it is interacting with. This Colloquium further explores the various physical sources of non-Markovian quantum dynamics, such as structured environmental spectral densities, nonlocal correlations between environmental degrees of freedom, and correlations in the initial system-environment state, in addition to developing schemes for their local detection. Recent experiments addressing the detection, quantification, and control of

  10. Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Colloquium. Crisis, Challenge, and Change: Perspectives in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburgh Univ., PA. Council of Graduate Students in Education.

    Graduate students and faculty from within and outside of the University of Pittsburgh community were among the presenters at this colloquium on educational change and challenge. The papers include: Academic Freedom, Anti-Communism, and the McCarthy Era (Steve Aby); The Finnish Contribution to the American Workers' Education Movement (Richard J.…

  11. A Colloquium on Environment, Ethics, and Education (Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, July 14-16, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob, Ed.

    The papers in this proceedings explore two themes: "what environmental ethics can do for teachers," and "what teachers can do for environmental ethics." The papers are: "A Colloquium on Environment, Ethics, and Education: Considering the Context" (Bob Jickling); "Planning for the Future: Workshop Observations and Recommendations" (Colloquium…

  12. The Proceedings for the Colloquium on Diversity in Education Abroad: How to Change the Picture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrin, Carl A., Ed.; Dadzie, Suzanne, Ed.; MacDonald, Sandra A., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The Academy for Educational Development (AED) Colloquium on Diversity in Education Abroad: How to Change the Picture was conceived of as a collaborative effort between the speakers, presenters, and participants. This publication presents the papers presented by the speakers. These are: (1) What We Know about Diversity in Education Abroad: State of…

  13. Colloquium--Toward a Reconceptualization of "Language" and "Acquisition" in SLA Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellermann, John; Olsher, David

    2010-01-01

    Held at the American Association for Applied Linguistics Annual Conference, Denver, CO, USA; 21 March 2009. This all-day colloquium was part of an ongoing discussion of ways that methods and frameworks from micro-ethnography, Conversation Analysis (CA), and Vygotskian Sociocultural Theory are re-specifying "language" and "acquisition" from a…

  14. Invited Colloquium on Negotiating the Complexities of Multilingual Assessment, AAAL Conference 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menken, Kate; Shohamy, Elana

    2015-01-01

    The invited colloquium on New Directions in Language Assessment held at the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) annual meeting in Portland, Oregon on March 22, 2014 brought together an international panel of scholars to together explore the possibilities and challenges of translanguaging and bi/multilingual approaches in…

  15. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 19th International Colloquium on Magnetic Films and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Inoue, J.

    2007-03-01

    The 19th International Colloquium on Magnetic Films and Surfaces (ICMFS 2006) was held on 14-18 August 2006 at the Sendai International Center in Sendai, Japan. The purpose of the Colloquium was to bring together scientists working on magnetic thin films and surfaces and to provide an opportunity for presentation and discussion of recent experimental and theoretical advances in the field. 285 scientists from 17 countries (Japan: 167, overseas: 118) participated in the Colloquium, as well as 6 family members. There were 56 oral and 178 poster presentations. The oral presentations consisted of 3 plenary talks, 23 invited talks and 30 contributed talks. The number of presentations by scientific category are as follows: Spin dependent transport: 43 Magnetic storage/memory: 9 Magnetization reversal and fast dynamics: 15 Spin injection and spin transfer torque: 26 Magnetic thin films and multilayers: 71 High spin polarization materials: 17 Hard and soft magnetic materials: 3 Magneto-optics: 5 Characterization techniques for thin films and surfaces: 7 Exchange coupling: 13 Micro- and nanopatterned magnetic structures: 18 Micromagnetic modelling: 2 One of the characteristics of the present Colloquium is an increase in the number of presentations in the field of spin-electronics, as seen above. This Cluster Issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics includes several important papers in this rapidly developing field. We believe that, in the future, the field of magnetic materials will maintain its popularity and, on top of that, other fields such as spintronics materials, materials related to life sciences and medicine and also materials related to the environment will be investigated further. The ICMFS Conference started in London in 1964, and is now one of the world-wide conferences on magnetism. The Colloquium has been held in Japan four times now: the previous ones being the 5th ICMFS in the Mount Fuji area, the 10th at Yokohama and the 17th at Kyoto, which was

  16. Report of the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements of the Planets and Satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, M.E.; Abalakin, V.K.; Cross, C.A.; Duncombe, R.L.; Masursky, H.; Morando, B.; Owen, T.C.; Seidelmann, P.K.; Sinclair, A.T.; Wilkins, G.A.; Tjuflin, Y.S.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is the entire report of the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements of the Planets and Satellites, including three annexes. Tables give the recemmended values for the directions of the north poles of rotation and the prime meridians of the planets and satellites. Reference surfaces for mapping these bodies are described. The annexes discuss the guiding principles, given in the body of the report, present explanatory notes, and provide a bibliography of the rotational elements and reference surfaces of the planets and satellites, definitions, and algebraic expressions of relevant parameters. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  17. Dark Skies Africa: a Prototype Project with the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance Elaine; Tellez, Daniel; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2015-08-01

    The IAU’s Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) awarded the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) with a grant to deliver a “Dark Skies Outreach to Sub-Saharan Africa” program to institutions in 12 African countries during 2013: Algeria, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, Ghana, Zambia, South Africa, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia and Senegal. The program helped students identify wasteful and inefficient lighting and provided ways to reduce consumption and to keep energy costs in check. The goal was to inspire students to be responsible stewards in helping their community safeguard one of Africa’s natural resources - a dark night sky.Thirteen kits made by the NOAO Education and Public Outreach group were sent to coordinators at university, science center and planetarium-type institutions in the 12 countries and to the IAU OAD. The program’s kit included complete instructional guides and supplies for six hands-on activities (e.g., on the importance of shielding lights and using energy efficient bulbs) and a project on energy conservation and responsible lighting (through energy audits). The activities were taught to the coordinators in a series of six Google+ Hangout sessions scheduled from June to mid-November. The coordinators at the institutions in turn trained local teachers in junior and senior high schools. The Google+ Hangout sessions also included instruction on carrying out evaluations. From the end of November until mid-December students from the different African countries shared final class projects (such as posters or powerpoints) on the program’s website.The entire program was designed to help coordinators and educators work with students, parents and the community to identify dark sky resource, lighting and energy issues and to assess their status, efficiency and effectiveness. The audience will take away from the presentation lessons learned on how well the techniques succeeded in using Google+ Hangout sessions to instruct and

  18. PREFACE: XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP) (Group30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, Fred; De Schepper, Hennie; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2015-04-01

    The XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP), also known as the Group30 conference, took place in Ghent (Belgium) from Monday 14 to Friday 18 July 2014. The conference was organised by Ghent University (Department of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics, and Department of Mathematical Analysis). The website http://www.group30.ugent.be is still available. The ICGTMP is one of the traditional conference series covering the most important topics of symmetry which are relevant to the interplay of present-day mathematics and physics. More than 40 years ago a group of enthusiasts, headed by H. Bacry of Marseille and A. Janner of Nijmegen, initiated a series of annual meetings with the aim to provide a common forum for scientists interested in group theoretical methods. At that time most of the participants belonged to two important communities: on the one hand solid state specialists, elementary particle theorists and phenomenologists, and on the other mathematicians eager to apply newly-discovered group and algebraic structures. The conference series has become a meeting point for scientists working at modelling physical phenomena through mathematical and numerical methods based on geometry and symmetry. It is considered as the oldest one among the conference series devoted to geometry and physics. It has been further broadened and diversified due to the successful applications of geometric and algebraic methods in life sciences and other areas. The first four meetings took place alternatively in Marseille and Nijmegen. Soon after, the conference acquired an international standing, especially following the 1975 colloquium in Nijmegen and the 1976 colloquium in Montreal. Since then it has been organized in many places around the world. It has become a bi-annual colloquium since 1990, the year it was organized in Moscow. This was the first time the colloquium took place in Belgium. There were 246 registered

  19. Large-Scale Sequencing: The Future of Genomic Sciences Colloquium

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret Riley; Merry Buckley

    2009-01-01

    Genetic sequencing and the various molecular techniques it has enabled have revolutionized the field of microbiology. Examining and comparing the genetic sequences borne by microbes - including bacteria, archaea, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes - provides researchers insights into the processes microbes carry out, their pathogenic traits, and new ways to use microorganisms in medicine and manufacturing. Until recently, sequencing entire microbial genomes has been laborious and expensive, and the decision to sequence the genome of an organism was made on a case-by-case basis by individual researchers and funding agencies. Now, thanks to new technologies, the cost and effort of sequencing is within reach for even the smallest facilities, and the ability to sequence the genomes of a significant fraction of microbial life may be possible. The availability of numerous microbial genomes will enable unprecedented insights into microbial evolution, function, and physiology. However, the current ad hoc approach to gathering sequence data has resulted in an unbalanced and highly biased sampling of microbial diversity. A well-coordinated, large-scale effort to target the breadth and depth of microbial diversity would result in the greatest impact. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium to discuss the scientific benefits of engaging in a large-scale, taxonomically-based sequencing project. A group of individuals with expertise in microbiology, genomics, informatics, ecology, and evolution deliberated on the issues inherent in such an effort and generated a set of specific recommendations for how best to proceed. The vast majority of microbes are presently uncultured and, thus, pose significant challenges to such a taxonomically-based approach to sampling genome diversity. However, we have yet to even scratch the surface of the genomic diversity among cultured microbes. A coordinated sequencing effort of cultured organisms is an appropriate place to begin

  20. Colloquium and Report on Systems Microbiology: Beyond Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Merry R. Buckley

    2004-12-13

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium June 4-6, 2004 to confer about the scientific promise of systems microbiology. Participants discussed the power of applying a systems approach to the study of biology and to microbiology in particular, specifics about current research efforts, technical bottlenecks, requirements for data acquisition and maintenance, educational needs, and communication issues surrounding the field. A number of recommendations were made for removing barriers to progress in systems microbiology and for improving opportunities in education and collaboration. Systems biology, as a concept, is not new, but the recent explosion of genomic sequences and related data has revived interest in the field. Systems microbiology, a subset of systems biology, represents a different approach to investigating biological systems. It attempts to examine the emergent properties of microorganisms that arise from the interplay of genes, proteins, other macromolecules, small molecules, organelles, and the environment. It is these interactions, often nonlinear, that lead to the emergent properties of biological systems that are generally not tractable by traditional approaches. As a complement to the long-standing trend toward reductionism, systems microbiology seeks to treat the organism or community as a whole, integrating fundamental biological knowledge with genomics, metabolomics, and other data to create an integrated picture of how a microbial cell or community operates. Systems microbiology promises not only to shed light on the activities of microbes, but will also provide biology the tools and approaches necessary for achieving a better understanding of life and ecosystems. Microorganisms are ideal candidates for systems biology research because they are relatively easy to manipulate and because they play critical roles in health, environment, agriculture, and energy production. Potential applications of systems microbiology research

  1. University, Government, and the Foreign Graduate Student; A Summary of the Colloquium on the Foreign Graduate Student, Held at Wingspread, Racine, Wisconsin, March 30-31, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    This booklet contains a summary of the colloquium discussion including the major observations and recommendations, and three of the papers that were presented. The colloquium discussion focussed on a number of broad questions in relation to foreign graduate student programs: (1) prospects, assumptions, policies; and responsibilities from the…

  2. Toward Mastery Leadership in Access, Assessment, and Developmental Education: Summary Report of a Colloquium Held in Traverse City, Michigan, July, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyser, John S., Ed.; Floyd, Deborah L., Ed.

    In July 1986, a colloquium was convened to develop a position paper on access, assessment, and developmental education. This colloquium report contains the keynote speeches presented at the event, along with a statement developed by the participants regarding the issues. First, introductory material describes the purposes, sponsorship, and group…

  3. Report of the IAU Commission Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides and File Format Specification: Update September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, J.; Acton, C.; Arlot, J.-E.; Bell, S.; Capitaine, N.; Fienga, A.; Folkner, W.; Gastineau, M.; Pavlov, D.; Pitjeva, E.; Skripnichenko, V.; Wallace, P.

    2015-08-01

    The IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides recommends the use of the Spacecraft and Planet Kernel (SPK) file format to provide a uniform format for the position ephemerides of planets and other natural solar system bodies. The Working Group also recommends the use of the binary Planetary Constants Kernel (PCK) format ephemeris file for the orientation of a body. It further recommends supporting data be stored in a text PCK. Since the previous report: - Some minor changes have been made to the formats for the coordinate time ephemeris, data types 20: Chebyshev Polynomials (Velocity Only) and 120: Chebyshev Polynomials (TCB:Velocity Only). - the working group's final report is currently undergoing review by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to assure it correctly describes these file formats.

  4. Best Practices for Creating an Observatory or Telescope Bibliography from the IAU Commission 5 Working Group on Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerstrom, J.

    2015-04-01

    Telescope bibliographies have been used for many years to illustrate the scholarly impact of a particular facility. Often, however, the methods used to create these bibliographies were developed independently and not always shared. As a result, it is often difficult to judge the relative impact among facilities. Best Practices for Creating an Observatory or Telescope Bibliography was developed following discussions at the International Astronomical Union's Commission 5 Working Group on Libraries meeting at the 2012 IAU General Assembly in Beijing. This community-driven document identifies the basic components needed to create a bibliography policy that is transparent and the results of which are intended to be reproducible and retrievable by any entity to within a 5% error rate. This paper will review the details of the document as well as its history, progress, and future.

  5. Report of the IAU Commission 4 Working Group on standardizing access to ephemerides and File format specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, J.; Acton, A.; Arlot, J.-E.; Bell, , S. A.; Capitaine, N.; Fienga, A.; Folkner, W. M.; Gastineau, M.; Pavlov, D.; Pitjeva, E. V.; Skripnichenko, V. I.; Wallace, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    The IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides recommends the use of the Spacecraft and Planet Kernel (SPK) file format to provide a uniform format for the position ephemerides of planets and other natural solar system bodies, and the use of the binary Planetary Constants Kernel (PCK) format for the orientation of a body. It further recommends supporting data be stored in a text PCK. These formats are used by the SPICE system developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A new data type, Type 20: Chebyshev (Velocity Only) has been added. Other changes to the specification are new object identification numbers for coordinate time ephemerides, and a set of three new data types that uses the TCB rather than the TDB timescale.

  6. Microbial Production of Energy Colloquium- March 10-12, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Merry Buckley; Judy Wall

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  7. The Sackler Colloquium on promises and perils in nanotechnology for medicine

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Robert H.; Lim, Shuang-fang

    2008-01-01

    The Sackler Colloquium entitled “Nanomaterials in Biology and Medicine: Promises and Perils” was held on April 10–11, 2007. We have been able to assemble a representative sampling of 17 of the invited talks ranging over the topics presented. Any new technology carries with it both a promise of transforming the way we do things and the possibility that there are unforeseen consequences. The papers collected here represent a cross-section of these issues. As an example, we present our own work on nano-upconversion phosphors as an example of this new class of nanomaterials with potential use in medicine and biology. PMID:18981427

  8. The Sackler Colloquium on promises and perils in nanotechnology for medicine.

    PubMed

    Austin, Robert H; Lim, Shuang-fang

    2008-11-11

    The Sackler Colloquium entitled "Nanomaterials in Biology and Medicine: Promises and Perils" was held on April 10-11, 2007. We have been able to assemble a representative sampling of 17 of the invited talks ranging over the topics presented. Any new technology carries with it both a promise of transforming the way we do things and the possibility that there are unforeseen consequences. The papers collected here represent a cross-section of these issues. As an example, we present our own work on nano-upconversion phosphors as an example of this new class of nanomaterials with potential use in medicine and biology. PMID:18981427

  9. Appendix: Final Update of the IAU Division A Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides and File Format Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, James L.; Acton, Charles; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Bell, Steven A.; Capitaine, Nicole; Fienga, Agnès; Folkner, William M.; Gastineau, Mickaël; Pavlov, Dmitry; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Skripnichenko, Vladimir I.; Wallace, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides recommends the use of the Spacecraft and Planet Kernel (SPK) format to provide a uniform format for the position ephemerides of planets and other natural solar system bodies, and the use of the Planetary Constants Kernel (PCK) for the orientation of these bodies. These formats are used by the SPICE system, developed by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The working group's final report is currently undergoing final preparations for publication. A long version of this report will be available at the IAU Commission 4: Ephemerides (or its successor) web site. This long version will contain a full description of that portion of the SPK and PCK formats required to duplicate these file types for this application.

  10. Astronomy for a Better World: IAU OAD Task Force-1 Programs for Advancing Astronomy Education and Research in Universities in Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward; Kolenberg, Katrien

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the IAU Commission 46 and Office for Astronomy Development (OAD) programs that support advancing Astronomy education and research primarily in universities in developing countries. The bulk of these operational activities will be coordinated through the OAD's newly installed Task Force 1. We outline current (and future) IAU/OAD Task Force-1 programs that promote the development of University-level Astronomy at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Among current programs discussed are the past and future expanded activities of the International School for Young Astronomers (ISYA) and the Teaching Astronomy for Development (TAD) programs. The primary role of the ISYA program is the organization of a three week School for students for typically M.Sc. and Ph.D students. The ISYA is a very successful program that will now be offered more frequently through the generous support of the Kavli Foundation. The IAU/TAD program provides aid and resources for the development of teaching, education and research in Astronomy. The TAD program is dedicated to assist countries that have little or no astronomical activity, but that wish to develop or enhance Astronomy education. Over the last ten years, the ISYA and TAD programs have supported programs in Africa, Asia, Central America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, South East and West Asia, and South America. Several examples are given. Several new programs being considered by OAD Task Force-1 are also discussed. Other possible programs being considered are the introduction of modular Astronomy courses into the university curricula (or improve present courses) as well as providing access to ``remote learning`` courses and Virtual Astronomy labs in developing countries. Another possible new program would support visits of astronomers from technically advanced countries to spend their sabbatical leaves teaching and advising University Astronomy programs in developing countries. Suggestions for new Task Force -1

  11. Higher Education in Federal Systems. Proceedings of an International Colloquium (Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, May 8-10, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Douglas, Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains the proceedings of an international colloquium on higher education in federal countries with complex divisions of responsibility for the many facets of higher education. The volume is organized in four parts. Part I contains one paper, "The Federal Context for Higher Education" by Ronald L. Watts and a description of the…

  12. Supervision and the Teacher: The Odd Couple. Papers Presented at the New York State Association of Foreign Language Teachers Colloquium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Born, Warren C., Ed.

    This compilation of papers presented at the New York State Association of Foreign Language Teachers Colloquium focuses on the interrelated roles of the foreign language teacher and the language program supervisor. The following papers are included: (1) "The Foreign Language Curriculum: A Joint Venture" by Charles Blake; (2) "Updated Observation…

  13. Colombo Plan Intra-Regional Technician Training Colloquium (6th, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, April 21-25, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo Plan Bureau (Sri Lanka).

    Proceedings of the Sixth Colloquium on Intra-Regional Technical Training sponsored jointly by the Colombo Plan and the Government of Malaysia are presented in this report. Four working papers are presented centered around three main areas of concern: influence of technical education on economic development; how the status of technicians could be…

  14. College Scholarship Service Colloquium on Student Loan Counseling & Debt Management. Proceedings (Denver, Colorado, December 2-4, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY. Coll. Scholarship Service.

    Student loan counseling and debt management are discussed in three papers, six commentaries, and a panel discussion from a College Scholarship Service colloquium. In "Fulfilling the Institution's Responsibilities to Student Borrowers," Theodore J. Marchese discusses a shift in student financial aid marked by the ascendency of loans instead of…

  15. Official Languages and the Economy. New Canadian Perspectives. Papers Presented at a Colloquium (Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, May 5, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Heritage, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Papers from a colloquium on the relationship between Canada's official languages and its economy include: "Economic Dimensions of Minority and Foreign Language Use: An International Overview" (Karim H. Karim); "European Research on the economics of Language: Recent Results and Relevance to Canada" (Francois Grin); "Reflections on Some Economic…

  16. Proceeding of the International Scientific Colloquium: MATHEMATICS AND CHILDREN (How to Teach and Learn Mathematics) (Osijek, Croatia, April 13, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlekovic, Margita, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of the Organisational Committee of the international scientific colloquium Mathematics and Children is to encourage additional scientific research in the field of mathematics teaching in Croatia. The development of science and education is a part of a long-term Education Sector Development Plan 2005-2010. Following the example of…

  17. Scientist to scientist colloquium steering committee planning session. Summary report of the proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The reason for holding a scientific colloquium of this nature is to bring together the most active scientific researchers for cross-disciplinary exchanges. As one scientist commented, it is a way to compensate for over-specialization. As a scientist/administrator noted, it helps administrators to have access to high-level scientific information in a setting where they can ask stupid questions. At a meeting of between 80 and 100 people small group exchanges are possible, allowing more in-depth discussion. In five days of meetings, there are many opportunities for a great number of these exchanges. The Keystone Process facilitates intermingling across disciplines and encourages debate. Because this meeting is unlike discipline-specific meetings, presenters must write a talk specifically for an interdisciplinary audience, touching on various scientific and social implications of their work. They use this opportunity to practice addressing a broad audience which includes their peers from other /fields, university administrators, industry executives, government officials, and members of the media who will help bring forefront scientific findings to the public. This report discusses purpose, funding, and outcome of the colloquium.

  18. Synopsis of the 6th Walker's Cay Colloquium on Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kast, W Martin; Levitsky, Hyam; Marincola, Francesco M

    2004-01-01

    The 6th annual Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy Colloquium at Walker's Cay was held under the auspices of the Albert B. Sabin Vaccine Institute on March 10–13, 2004. The Colloquium consisted of a select group of 34 scientists representing academia, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. The main goal of this gathering was to promote in a peaceful and comfortable environment exchanges between basic and clinical science. The secondary benefit was to inspire novel bench to bedside ventures and at the same time provide feed back about promising and/or disappointing clinical results that could help re-frame some scientific question or guide the design of future trials. Several topics were covered that included tumor antigen discovery and validation, platforms for vaccine development, tolerance, immune suppression and tumor escape mechanisms, adoptive T cell therapy and dendritic cell-based therapies, clinical trials and assessment of response. Here we report salient points raised by speakers or by the audience during animated discussion that followed each individual presentation. PMID:15212694

  19. PREFACE: XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP) (Group30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, Fred; De Schepper, Hennie; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2015-04-01

    The XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP), also known as the Group30 conference, took place in Ghent (Belgium) from Monday 14 to Friday 18 July 2014. The conference was organised by Ghent University (Department of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics, and Department of Mathematical Analysis). The website http://www.group30.ugent.be is still available. The ICGTMP is one of the traditional conference series covering the most important topics of symmetry which are relevant to the interplay of present-day mathematics and physics. More than 40 years ago a group of enthusiasts, headed by H. Bacry of Marseille and A. Janner of Nijmegen, initiated a series of annual meetings with the aim to provide a common forum for scientists interested in group theoretical methods. At that time most of the participants belonged to two important communities: on the one hand solid state specialists, elementary particle theorists and phenomenologists, and on the other mathematicians eager to apply newly-discovered group and algebraic structures. The conference series has become a meeting point for scientists working at modelling physical phenomena through mathematical and numerical methods based on geometry and symmetry. It is considered as the oldest one among the conference series devoted to geometry and physics. It has been further broadened and diversified due to the successful applications of geometric and algebraic methods in life sciences and other areas. The first four meetings took place alternatively in Marseille and Nijmegen. Soon after, the conference acquired an international standing, especially following the 1975 colloquium in Nijmegen and the 1976 colloquium in Montreal. Since then it has been organized in many places around the world. It has become a bi-annual colloquium since 1990, the year it was organized in Moscow. This was the first time the colloquium took place in Belgium. There were 246 registered

  20. Colloquium: The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox: From concepts to applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, M. D.; Drummond, P. D.; Bowen, W. P.; Cavalcanti, E. G.; Lam, P. K.; Bachor, H. A.; Andersen, U. L.; Leuchs, G.

    2009-10-15

    This Colloquium examines the field of the Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) gedanken experiment, from the original paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen, through to modern theoretical proposals of how to realize both the continuous-variable and discrete versions of the EPR paradox. The relationship with entanglement and Bell's theorem are analyzed, and the progress to date towards experimental confirmation of the EPR paradox is summarized, with a detailed treatment of the continuous-variable paradox in laser-based experiments. Practical techniques covered include continuous-wave parametric amplifier and optical fiber quantum soliton experiments. Current proposals for extending EPR experiments to massive-particle systems are discussed, including spin squeezing, atomic position entanglement, and quadrature entanglement in ultracold atoms. Finally, applications of this technology to quantum key distribution, quantum teleportation, and entanglement swapping are examined.

  1. Federal science funding priorities, anti-terrorism debated at AAAS Colloquium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    John Marburger, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy has said that some federal science agencies not slated to receive big increases in the administration's proposed fiscal year 2003 budget could do better in upcoming years.In remarks on 11 April at a colloquium on science and technology policy, Marburger defended the Bush administration's push for increasing research funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other administration priorities, and he cautioned that tough budget decisions have to be made in light of the current tight economic climate and the large number of potential scientific opportunities. But he also said that funding levels for some agencies and science areas could increase at a later date during the administration's tenure.

  2. Reshaped destinies: confronting our human future the need for and promise of an interdisciplinary colloquium.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Louis M; Noll, Rebekka C

    2008-12-01

    The genomic revolution is bringing with it simultaneous needs for both scientists and nonscientists to understand and assess, in an unvarnished and nonjudgmental way, the implications of genometry. This is the field of science and technology that is taking the genetic code and what we have learned from its secrets, and reshaping our individual and collective human destinies. Together with the editor-in-chief of Gender Medicine, the authors propose an interdisciplinary group-populated by those in science, law, ethics, social policy, and the interested public-to observe, understand, and disseminate information about what is occurring in the fields of biology and chemistry that is the driving force of the genomic revolution. This article discusses the background to the Redefined Destinies Colloquium (RDC) and summarizes 4 of the topics the RDC is studying. PMID:19108807

  3. Oklo and the Speed of Light at SLAC’s Next Colloquium!

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Steve Lamoreaux

    2005-11-07

    Natural nuclear reactors? Changes in the speed of light? If either of these concepts seem implausible to you now they certainly won’t once Dr. Steve Lamoreaux (LANL) delivers his SLAC Colloquium lecture in the Panofsky Auditorium on November 7th at 4:15 pm entitled The Oklo Natural Reactor and the Time Variability of the Fundamental Constants of Nature. This lecture is a rare opportunity to learn not only about Oklo’s incredible natural nuclear reactors but also to gain understanding about how the present-day study of these sites may alter our understanding of fundamental constants such as the speed of light. This event is a must-see for the curious!

  4. Cellular Interactions and Signaling in NeuroAIDS: Emerging Issues Colloquium

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harthi, Lena; Buch, Shilpa; Geiger, Jonathan D.; Gendelman, Howard E.; He, Johnny; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.; Kolson, Dennis L.; Rappaport, Jay; Roy, Sabita; Zheng, Jialin; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    On May 23, 2013 scientific leaders in the neuroAIDS community met at the University of Nebraska Medical Center to discuss cellular interaction and signaling for the third annual human immunodeficiency virus and neuroAIDS colloquium. The meeting continues a series of contemporary scientific issues related to how virus effects the nervous system. In 2011 the focus was on animal models and in 2012 in biomarkers. Here, our 2013 meeting featured ten presentations from outstanding scientists examining how inter- and intra-cellular processes contribute to neuropathogenesis. Talks highlighted emerging issues, findings, and potential therapies, followed by a panel discussion in which controversies in the field and gaps in our current knowledge were identified. The panel discussion was transcribed into the article and published as a field perspective. A link is available where all of the presentations and the concluding discussion can be seen and heard. PMID:24789373

  5. Proceedings of the 127th Colloquium of the International Astronomical Union Reference Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, James A.; Smith, Clayton A.; Kaplan, George H.

    Both invited oral and poster papers were presented on topics ranging from theoretical relativistic considerations to new observational programs and results. Partial contents include a report of the Subgroup on Time; preliminary report of the work of the Subgroup on Coordinate Frames and Origins; activity report of the IAU Working Group on reference system: subgroup on astronomical constants; relativistic hierarchy of reference systems and time scales; relativistic celestial mechanics and reference frames; current status of the astrometric capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensors; necessary procedures to reach an agreeable reference frame: counterproposal to the circular letter no. 4 of Kovalevsky; stability of the extragalactic reference frame realized by VLBI; The ZMOA-1990 nutation series; and long-period perturbations in terrestrial reference frames.

  6. MayDay Colloquium 23: The End(s) of Music Education? A Call for Re-Visioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    In the summer of 2011 (June 16-19), the MayDay Group met in Salt Lake City, Utah (USA) for MayDay Colloquium 23, with presentations and discussions on the theme,"The End(s) of Music Education? A Call for Re-Visioning": In a time of rapidly changing political processes, power relations, and policies, music educators are challenged to…

  7. IAU Symposium 317 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of the halo yields fundamental information on the formation and evolution of galaxies: this was quite exhaustively discussed at this very important symposium. I present a brief personal summary of the meeting, outlining those points that I found more exciting and suggestive. I also remarked a few areas that were possibly not enough expanded. I found this research field extremely interesting and I think there are great expectations for new developments in the next few years, thanks to the new large spectroscopic surveys and the ESA GAIA satellite.

  8. EDITORIAL: Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manske, E.; Froehlich, T.

    2012-07-01

    The 56th International Scientific Colloquium was held from 12th to 16th September 2011 at the Ilmenau University of Technology in Germany. This event was organized by the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering under the title: 'Innovation in Mechanical Engineering—Shaping the Future' and was intended to reflect the entire scope of modern mechanical engineering. In three main topics many research areas, all involving innovative mechanical engineering, were addressed, especially in the fields of Precision Engineering and Precision Measurement Technology, Mechatronics and Ambient-Assisted Living and Systems Technology. The participants were scientists from 21 countries, and 166 presentations were given. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions on 'Precision Engineering and Precision Measurement Technology'. Over three days the conference participants discussed novel scientific results in two sessions. The main topics of these sessions were: Measurement and Sensor Technology Process measurement Laser measurement Force measurement Weighing technology Temperature measurement Measurement dynamics and Nanopositioning and Nanomeasuring Technology Nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machines Nanometrology Probes and tools Mechanical design Signal processing Control and visualization in NPM devices Significant research results from the Collaborative Research Centre SFB 622 'Nanopositioning and Nanomeasuring Machines' funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) were presented as part of this topic. As the Chairmen, our special thanks are due to the International Programme Committee, the Organization Committee and the conference speakers as well as colleagues from the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology who helped make the conference a success. We would like to thank all the authors for their contributions, the referees for their time spent reviewing the contributions and their valuable comments, and the whole

  9. The Colloquium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    HÉCTOR A.A brief introductory survey of Unified Field Mechanics (UFM) is given from the perspective of a Holographic Anthropic Multiverse cosmology in 12 `continuous-state' dimensions. The paradigm with many new parameters is cast in a scale-invariant conformal covariant Dirac polarized vacuum utilizing extended HD forms of the de Broglie-Bohm and Cramer interpretations of quantum theory. The model utilizes a unique form of M-Theory based in part on the original hadronic form of string theory that had a variable string tension, TS and included a tachyon. The model is experimentally testable, thus putatively able to demonstrate the existence of large-scale additional dimensionality (LSXD), test for QED violating tight-bound state spectral lines in hydrogen `below' the lowest Bohr orbit, and surmount the quantum uncertainty principle utilizing a hyperincursive Sagnac Effect resonance hierarchy.

  10. Colloquium: Time-reversal violation with quantum-entangled B mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, J.; Martínez-Vidal, F.

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry transformations have been proven a bedrock tool for understanding the nature of particle interactions, formulating, and testing fundamental theories. Based on the up to now unbroken C P T symmetry, the violation of the C P symmetry between matter and antimatter by weak interactions, discovered in the decay of kaons in 1964 and observed more recently in 2001 in B mesons, strongly suggests that the behavior of these particles under weak interactions must also be asymmetric under time reversal T . However, until recent years there has not been a direct detection of the expected time-reversal violation in the time evolution of any system. This Colloquium examines the field of time-reversal symmetry breaking in the fundamental laws of physics. For transitions, its observation requires an asymmetry with exchange of initial and final states. A discussion is given of the conceptual basis for such an exchange with unstable particles, using the quantum properties of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement available at B meson factories combined with the decay as a filtering measurement. The method allows a clear-cut separation of different transitions between flavor and C P eigenstates in the decay of neutral B mesons. These ideas have been implemented for the experiment by the BABAR Collaboration at SLAC's B factory. The results, presented in 2012, prove beyond any doubt the violation of time-reversal invariance in the time evolution between these two states of the neutral B meson.

  11. Costa Rica Variable Star Observation Program: Continuation of the research started in the Second Astronomical Observation Regional Campaign TAD/IAU Tegucigalpa Honduras, 1998.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya Rodriguez, E.

    1998-11-01

    In the last months of January and February, it was the Second Astronomical Observation Regional Campaign TAD/IAU in the Suyapa Astronomical Observatory, Tegucigalpa, Honduras; sponsored by the International Astronomical Union, Honduras Government and the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Honduras. In that opportunity, during the campaign, it began a variable star observation program, according to international regulation of the American Association of Variable Stars Observers (AAVSO). The activities were about the use of general experimental techniques that allow people to do studies naked eye, with telescopes or photometers depending on the observed star magnitude. The continuation in Costa Rica of that research added to some gotten results will be presented in this work.

  12. Summary Report on the Transportation Combustion Engine Efficiency Colloquium Held at USCAR, March 3 and 4, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C Stuart; Graves, Ronald L; Caton, Jerald A; Wagner, Robert M

    2010-11-01

    This report summarizes results from an invited two-day colloquium of twenty-nine combustion engine experts from academia, industry, and national labs that was convened March 3rd and 4th, 2010, at the headquarters of the United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) in Southfield, Michigan. The colloquium was held at the request of The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT) to review and assess the current state of transportation combustion engine technology from theoretical and practical perspectives. In the ensuing discussions, the experts were able to reach a broad consensus on some important questions regarding current fuel efficiency limits. They also identified technology barriers and recommended specific near and longer-term R&D priorities for DOE's consideration. Internal combustion engines currently play a dominant role in U.S. transportation and are expected to continue to do so well beyond 2020 [1]. Because of this, the Department of Energy (DOE) has placed high priority on promoting technologies that maximize combustion engine fuel efficiency while minimizing greenhouse gas emissions. Identification of the most promising paths to achieve these goals has recently become more complicated as non-traditional transportation fuels and hybrid electric vehicles become widely available. To reassess the state of combustion engine science and identify new opportunities for technology breakthroughs, an invited colloquium of combustion engine experts was convened on March 3rd and 4th, 2010, at the headquarters of the United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) in Southfield, Michigan. The colloquium objectives were: (1) Review and assess the current state of transportation combustion engine technology from both theoretical and practical perspectives; (2) Arrive at a consensus on the theoretical and practical fuel efficiencies that can be achieved; and (3) Recommend near and longer-term R&D priorities for

  13. Colloquium: Biophysical principles of undulatory self-propulsion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-07-01

    Biological locomotion, movement within environments through self-deformation, encompasses a range of time and length scales in an organism. These include the electrophysiology of the nervous system, the dynamics of muscle activation, the mechanics of the skeletal system, and the interaction mechanics of such structures within natural environments like water, air, sand, and mud. Unlike the many studies of cellular and molecular scale biophysical processes, movement of entire organisms (like flies, lizards, and snakes) is less explored. Further, while movement in fluids like air and water is also well studied, little is known in detail of the mechanics that organisms use to move on and within flowable terrestrial materials such as granular media, ensembles of small particles that collectively display solid, fluid, and gaslike behaviors. This Colloquium reviews recent progress to understand principles of biomechanics and granular physics responsible for locomotion of the sandfish, a small desert-dwelling lizard that "swims" within sand using undulation of its body. Kinematic and muscle activity measurements of sand swimming using high speed x-ray imaging and electromyography are discussed. This locomotion problem poses an interesting challenge: namely, that equations that govern the interaction of the lizard with its environment do not yet exist. Therefore, complementary modeling approaches are also described: resistive force theory for granular media, multiparticle simulation modeling, and robotic physical modeling. The models reproduce biomechanical and neuromechanical aspects of sand swimming and give insight into how effective locomotion arises from the coupling of the body movement and flow of the granular medium. The argument is given that biophysical study of movement provides exciting opportunities to investigate emergent aspects of living systems that might not depend sensitively on biological details.

  14. Colloquium: Multimessenger astronomy with gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Baret, Bruny; Bartos, Imre; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Chassande-Mottin, Eric; Corsi, Alessandra; Di Palma, Irene; Dietz, Alexander; Donzaud, Corinne; Eichler, David; Finley, Chad; Guetta, Dafne; Halzen, Francis; Jones, Gareth; Kandhasamy, Shivaraj; Kotake, Kei; Kouchner, Antoine; Mandic, Vuk; Márka, Szabolcs; Márka, Zsuzsa; Moscoso, Luciano; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Piran, Tsvi; Pradier, Thierry; Romero, Gustavo E.; Sutton, Patrick; Thrane, Eric; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Waxman, Eli

    2013-10-01

    Many of the astrophysical sources and violent phenomena observed in our Universe are potential emitters of gravitational waves and high-energy cosmic radiation, including photons, hadrons, and presumably also neutrinos. Both gravitational waves (GW) and high-energy neutrinos (HEN) are cosmic messengers that may escape much denser media than photons. They travel unaffected over cosmological distances, carrying information from the inner regions of the astrophysical engines from which they are emitted (and from which photons and charged cosmic rays cannot reach us). For the same reasons, such messengers could also reveal new, hidden sources that have not been observed by conventional photon-based astronomy. Coincident observation of GWs and HENs may thus play a critical role in multimessenger astronomy. This is particularly true at the present time owing to the advent of a new generation of dedicated detectors: the neutrino telescopes IceCube at the South Pole and ANTARES in the Mediterranean Sea, as well as the GW interferometers Virgo in Italy and LIGO in the United States. Starting from 2007, several periods of concomitant data taking involving these detectors have been conducted. More joint data sets are expected with the next generation of advanced detectors that are to be operational by 2015, with other detectors, such as KAGRA in Japan, joining in the future. Combining information from these independent detectors can provide original ways of constraining the physical processes driving the sources and also help confirm the astrophysical origin of a GW or HEN signal in case of coincident observation. Given the complexity of the instruments, a successful joint analysis of this combined GW and HEN observational data set will be possible only if the expertise and knowledge of the data is shared between the two communities. This Colloquium aims at providing an overview of both theoretical and experimental state of the art and perspectives for GW and HEN

  15. Colloquium: Majorana fermions in nuclear, particle, and solid-state physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Steven R.; Franz, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Ettore Majorana (1906-1938) disappeared while traveling by ship from Palermo to Naples in 1938. His fate has never been fully resolved and several articles have been written that explore the mystery itself. His demise intrigues us still today because of his seminal work, published the previous year, that established symmetric solutions to the Dirac equation that describe a fermionic particle that is its own antiparticle. This work has long had a significant impact in neutrino physics, where this fundamental question regarding the particle remains unanswered. But the formalism he developed has found many uses as there are now a number of candidate spin-1 /2 neutral particles that may be truly neutral with no quantum number to distinguish them from their antiparticles. If such particles exist, they will influence many areas of nuclear and particle physics. Most notably the process of neutrinoless double beta decay can exist only if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. Hence, many efforts to search for this process are underway. Majorana's influence does not stop with particle physics, however, even though that was his original consideration. The equations he derived also arise in solid-state physics where they describe electronic states in materials with superconducting order. Of special interest here is the class of solutions of the Majorana equation in one and two spatial dimensions at exactly zero energy. These Majorana zero modes are endowed with some remarkable physical properties that may lead to advances in quantum computing and, in fact, there is evidence that they have been experimentally observed. This Colloquium first summarizes the basics of Majorana's theory and its implications. It then provides an overview of the rich experimental programs trying to find a fermion that is its own antiparticle in nuclear, particle, and solid-state physics.

  16. The International Scientific Colloquium MATHEMATICS AND CHILDREN (The Math Teacher) = Treci medunarodni znanstveni skup MATEMATIKA I DIJETE (Ucitelj matematike) (3rd, Osijek, Croatia, March 18, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlekovic, Margita, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    In the monograph The Math Teacher (following the Third International Scientific Colloquium Mathematics and Children in 2011), the term "teacher" designates a person who teaches mathematics, and the context of each article reveals whether this implies the teacher at a pre-school institution, a school or a university instructor. In Croatia, much…

  17. PREFACE: SPECIAL SECTION OF THE JOURNAL OF AIR & WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FOR PARTICULATE MATTER: ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, EXPOSURE AND THE FOURTH COLLOQUIUM ON PM AND HUMAN HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This dedicated issue of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association contains 17 peer-reviewed scientific papers that were presented at the specialty conference, “Particulate Matter: Atmospheric Sciences, Exposure and the Fourth Colloquium on PM and Human Health,” that w...

  18. A Colloquium Review of Pirates of the Cell: The Story of Viruses from Molecule to Microbe, with Selected Readings from Popular Periodicals and Research Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagerstown Junior Coll., MD.

    This colloquium book review (occasioned by Andrew Scott's "Pirates of the Cell") contains seven selected readings from popular periodicals and research journals. It is designed to eliminate some of the mental barriers that many have to topics like molecular biology and virology. Included are: (1) "What Is A Virus?" (William D. Elliot); (2) "The…

  19. Actes du colloque sur le bilinguisme, Universite de Neuchatel, 14/15 Septembre, 1981 (Proceedings of the Colloquium on Bilingualism, University of Neuchatel, September 14-15, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRANEL, 1982

    1982-01-01

    This issue contains proceedings of a colloquium on linguistics at the University of Neuchatel: (1) "Propositions epistemologiques pour une etude du bilinguisme (Epistemological Propositions for a Study of Bilingualism)," by B. Py; (2) "Comment on di ca? Prolegomenes a une etude de la composante semantique du langage des migrants (How Do You Say…

  20. Food, Hunger, and Agricultural Issues. Proceedings of a Colloquium on Future U.S. Development Assistance (Morrilton, Arkansas, February 17-19, 1988). Development Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clubb, Deborah, Ed.; Ligon, Polly C., Ed.

    Colloquium participants were asked to make informed guesses about whether developing countries can grow and equitably distribute the food they need over the next decade, what the international development community should do to help in both production and distribution, and what role the United States should play in the development process. The 17…

  1. Teaching the Teachers on Building Climatology. (CIB Steering Group S 4, Colloquium, Stockholm, September 4-6, 1972). CIB Proceedings No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Swedish Inst. for Building Research, Stockholm.

    This publication comprises a collection of papers and synopses of discussions dating from the "Teaching the Teachers in Building Climatology" colloquium which was held under the auspices of the International Council for Building Research (CIB) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The papers deal with the use of various meteorological…

  2. Actes des journees de linguistique: Colloque sur la recherche etudiante (Proceedings of the Linguistics Conference: Colloquium on Student Research) (Quebec, Canada, March 18-19, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepage, Danielle, Ed.; Dominik, Annette, Ed.

    Presentations by students at a colloquium on student research on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the University of Laval's Faculty of Letters, March 18-19, 1988, include: "Une enquete sur la qualite du francais ecrit au Quebec"; "Amenagement linguistique et neologie"; "Analyse syntaxique des 'arrets et retours' en arabe morocain parle";…

  3. Invited Colloquium--on Publishing in Applied Linguistics: A Forum on Innovation and Challenges in a Changing World, AAAL Conference 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Under the leadership of then 1st vice president and program chair Aneta Pavlenko, Temple University, the 2014 AAAL conference had as one of its focal areas the changing scene of publishing in a digital and global age. Within an array of offerings addressing the theme, this three-hour invited colloquium, organized by Heidi Byrnes, Georgetown…

  4. Construct Validity in Psychological Measurement; Proceedings of a Colloquium on Theory and Application in Education and Employment (Henry Chauncey Conference Center, Princeton, New Jersey, October 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Personnel Management, Washington, DC.

    The stimulus for this colloquium was the convergence of several significant developments bearing on the construct validation of standardized tests and other assessment methods. Of these developments, some were fundamental to psychology as a science; others reflected socio-political pressures on measurement in education and employment. The ten…

  5. The satellites of Jupiter; Proceedings of the Fifty-seventh Colloquium, Kailua, Hawaii, May 13-16, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Among the topics covered by the colloquium on the satellites of Jupiter are: the internal energy and thermophysics of the surface of Io, plume volcanism on Io, the photometric variability of Io, the near-surface flow of volcanic gases on Io, and the sodium emission cloud of Io and its north-south asymmetry. Also considered are: the physical processes and origins of Jupiter's ring and its possible effect on the Jovian inner plasmasphere, the composition of such moons of Jupiter as Amalthea, Ganymede, Europa and Callisto and their lithospheric and ice evolutions. Particular attention is given such topographic features as the domes and grooved terrain on Ganymede, water frost and ice, and the photometric properties of these outer satellites of Jupiter.

  6. “Astronomy for a Better World”: IAU/OAD Task Force One Activities to Develop Astronomy Education and Research at Universities in the Developing World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Kolenberg, Katrien

    2015-08-01

    The Task Force (1) on Astronomy for Universities & Research (TF-1) was established in 2012 as part of the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD). This Task Force drives activities related to astronomy education and research at universities mainly in the developing world. Astronomy is used to stimulate research and education in STEM fields and to develop and promote astronomy in regions of the world where there is little or no astronomy. There is also potential for developing research in the historical and cultural aspects of astronomy which may prove important for stimulating an interest in the subject in communities where there is yet no established interest in the science.Since the establishment of the OAD, over 25 TF-1 programs have been funded (or partially funded) to support a wide variety of interesting and innovative astronomy programs in Africa, Asia, South-East Asia, Middle-East, and in South & Central America. Nearly every aspect of development has been supported. These programs include supporting: regional astronomy training schools, specialized workshops, research visits, university twinning programs, distance learning projects, university astronomy curriculum development, as well as small telescope and equipment grants. In addition, a large new program - Astrolab - was introduced (by J-P De Greve and Michele Gerbaldi) to bring starlight” into the class room. In the Astrolab program students carry out and reduce CCD photometry secured by them using remotely controlled telescopes. Results from pilot programs will be discussed.OAD TF-1 programs will be discussed along with future plans for improving and expanding these programs to bring astronomy education and research to a greater number of people and indeed to use Astronomy for a Better World. Information and advice will also be provided about applying for support in the future.

  7. On the research progress of Descartes-Subproject: "Advances in the integration of the equations of the Earth's rotation in the framework of the new parameters adopted by the IAU 2000 Resolutions"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folgueira, M.; Capitaine, N.; Souchay, J.

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the research European DESCARTES-Subproject entitled: ''Advances in the integration of the equations of the Earth’s rotation in the framework of the new parameters adopted by the IAU 2000 Resolutions", describing the scientific approach, the aims and objectives of the work and its successive steps. Firstly, we give a brief overview of the role of the variables in the description of the rotational dynamics of the Earth. Then, we summarize the different mathematical methods used to carry out our investigations, which include analytical, semi-analytical and numerical approaches, in order to obtain the solution with microarcsecond accuracy.

  8. Educational interventions to improve antibiotic use in the community: report from the International Forum on Antibiotic Resistance (IFAR) colloquium, 2002.

    PubMed

    Finch, Roger G; Metlay, Joshua P; Davey, Peter G; Baker, Lee J

    2004-01-01

    National and international strategies for the control of antibiotic resistance recommend education for health-care professionals and the public to promote prudent antibiotic use. This paper, based on discussions at the 2002 colloquium of the International Forum on Antibiotic Resistance (IFAR), provides an international discourse between theoretical approaches to behaviour change and practical experience gained in large-scale antibiotic use educational campaigns. Interventions are more likely to be effective if their aim is to change behaviour, rather than provide information. They should target all relevant groups, especially parents, children, day-care staff, and health-care professionals. They should use clear and consistent messages concerning bacterial versus viral infection, prudent antibiotic use, symptomatic treatment, and infection-control measures (eg, handwashing). Campaigns should use a range of communications using pilot-testing, strong branding, and sociocultural adaptation. Prime-time television is likely to be the most effective public medium, while academic detailing is especially useful for health-care professionals. Multifaceted interventions can improve antibiotic prescribing to some degree. However, there are few data on their effects on resistance patterns and patient outcomes, and on their cost-effectiveness. Current research aims include the application of behaviour-change models, the development and validation of prudent antibiotic prescribing standards, and the refinement of tools to assess educational interventions. PMID:14720568

  9. Colloquium on Phobos-Mars Mission, Paris, France, Oct. 23-27, 1989, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blamont, J. E.

    1991-02-01

    A preliminary analysis of results obtained from the Phobos-Mars missions is presented. Topics include solar X-ray observation with the RF-15 instrument, new insights on cosmic gamma-ray bursts from the APEX experiment, EUV observations of solar flares from Mars, short term variability of the power spectrum of 5-min oscillations of the sun, and results of the LET experiment. Plasma waves around Mars, tails of Phobos and Deimos in the solar wind and in the Martian magnetosphere, the HARP plasma experiment onboard the Phobos 2 spacecraft, Martian atmosphere studies from the ISM experiment, low-energy charged particles in near Martian space from SLED and LET experiments aboard the Phobos 2 spacecraft, and submillimeter observations of CO in Mars' atmosphere are also discussed. Results of TV imaging of Phobos, color decorrelation for the Phobos mission camera experiment, slope variations on the surface of Phobos, and an interpretation of the surface brightness of Phobos are given.

  10. Vinculacion Entre La Educacion Y El Mundo Del Trabajo: Informe Final. (Coloquio Regional Caracas, Venezuela, Septiembre 2-6, 1985) = The Linkage Between Education and Employment: Final Report of the Regional Colloquium (Caracas, Venezuela, September 2-6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    At this regional colloquium 13 papers were presented concerning the relationship between education and employment. Themes addressed were: (1) the transformation of the workplace by technology and science; (2) the future of the disadvantaged population as a consequence of the technological revolution; and (3) the resulting changes in the education…

  11. Philological Papers: Special Issue Devoted to the Teacher in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature and Film. Volume 36. Papers Presented at the West Virginia University's Annual Colloquium (13th, Morgantown, West Virginia, September 29-October 1, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Armand E., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains papers read at West Virginia University's Colloquium on "The Teacher in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature and Film" including the following 12 articles listed with their authors: "A Second Pair of Eyes: The Editor as Teacher" (Hart L. Wegner); "Don Juan Goes to the Movies" (Armand E. Singer); "The Teacher in Jean…

  12. Significant Wilderness Qualities: Can They Be Identified and Monitored? Proceedings of the Annual NOLS [National Outdoor Leadership School] Wilderness Research Colloquium (3rd, Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming, August 10-15, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, David N., Comp.; Lucas, Robert C., Comp.

    This report is a compilation of the papers presented at a colloquium on wilderness management and a synopsis of discussions held during the conference. The conference theme was how to determine and monitor the most significant features and qualities of the wilderness resource. Generally, participants identify solitude; pollution-free air and…

  13. Linguistic Insights in Applied Linguistics. Collection d'"Etudes linguistiques," No. 14. Papers from the Neuchatel Colloquium in Applied Linguistics in collaboration with AIMAV, AILA, CILA, and the University of Neuchatel (2nd, May 25-26, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, S. P., Ed.; Roulet, E., Ed.

    Papers from the 1973 Neuchatel Colloquium in Applied Linguistics are presented. Contents are as follows: "Karttunen's Types of Implication in English and German: A Contrastive Study," W. Abraham; "The Relevance of Generative Semantics for Language Teaching," R. Dirven; "'Be' plus 'ing' Revisited," H. Adamczeski; "The So-Called Deep Structures and…

  14. The 2008 Charles H. Thompson Lecture-Colloquium Presentation: From Du Bois to Obama--The Education of Peoples of African Descent in the United States in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Carol D.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the text of a lecture delivered by American Educational Research Association President Carol D. Lee at the 29th Annual Charles H. Thompson Lecture-Colloquium Series which was held on November 5, 2008. In her lecture, Lee discussed several points of similarities between W. E. B. Du Bois and President Barack Obama. These…

  15. Engineering and Technology Education for the 21st Century. A Report from the Regional Colloquium on Engineering and Technology Education for the 21st Century (Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand, February 11-14, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettle, Kevin C., Ed.

    This colloquium was held with the purposes of promoting cooperation and collaboration among engineering education institutions in the Mekong subregion and establishing the linkage with engineering institutions in France; to promote university-industry collaboration in the field of engineering and technology education; to establish a network of…

  16. Apprendre a vivre ensemble grace a l'enseignement de l'histoire et de la geographie. Rapport final du colloque sur le theme. (Learning To Live Together Thanks to the Teaching of History and Geography. Final Report on a Colloquium on That Theme.) Proceedings of a Colloquium Organized Jointly by the International Bureau of Education (UNESCO) and the University of Geneva (Geneva, Switzerland, June 12, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Yves, Ed.; Mouzoune, Abdelkrim, Ed.

    These Proceedings contain 14 chapters (or papers) from a colloquium on learning to live together in peaceful co-existence thanks to the teaching of history and geography. All the papers in the Proceedings are in French, but each paper has both an English summary and a Spanish summary. The 14 papers are, as follows: (1) "Introduction" (Yves Andre;…

  17. Preface (Solar Physics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M.; Frohlich, Claus; Hudson, Hugh S.

    1994-01-01

    The IAU Colloquium No. 143, 'The Sun as a Variable Star: Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variations', was held June 20-25, 1993, at the Clarion House, Boulder, Colorado. The main objective of this colloquium was to review the most recent results on the observations, theoretical interpretations, empirical and physical models of the variations observed in solar and stellar irradiances. A special emphasis of the colloquium was to discuss the results gained on the climatic impact of solar irradiance variability.

  18. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  19. Comets: Gases, ices, grains and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkening, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    The program and abstracts of the 97 papers delivered at the colloquium are presented. Cometary nuclei, comet dust, the coma, ion tails, several comet missions, and cometary origin and evolution were discussed.

  20. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  1. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  2. Southeastern Science Policy Colloquium

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, F.

    1995-06-22

    This conference covers four main topics: (1) Southeastern Labor Market and its Impact on Corporate/Industry Development; (2) New Issues for Science and Technology in the Year 2000 and Beyond; (3) The Role of Academia in Developing the Labor Force of the Southeast; and (4) K-12 Education: Challenges for the 21st Century.

  3. Science and Society Colloquium

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-10

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  4. Tenth NASTRAN User's Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The development of the NASTRAN computer program, a general purpose finite element computer code for structural analysis, was discussed. The application and development of NASTRAN is presented in the following topics: improvements and enhancements; developments of pre and postprocessors; interactive review system; the use of harmonic expansions in magnetic field problems; improving a dynamic model with test data using Linwood; solution of axisymmetric fluid structure interaction problems; large displacements and stability analysis of nonlinear propeller structures; prediction of bead area contact load at the tire wheel interface; elastic plastic analysis of an overloaded breech ring; finite element solution of torsion and other 2-D Poisson equations; new capability for elastic aircraft airloads; usage of substructuring analysis in the get away special program; solving symmetric structures with nonsymmetric loads; evaluation and reduction of errors induced by Guyan transformation.

  5. Science and Society Colloquium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  6. Seventh NASTRAN User's Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The general application of finite element methodology and the specific application of NASTRAN to a wide variety of static and dynamic structural problems are described. Topics include: fluids and thermal applications, NASTRAN programming, substructuring methods, unique new applications, general auxiliary programs, specific applications, and new capabilities.

  7. Colloquium: The neutron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Geoffrey L; Wietfeldt, F

    2011-01-01

    The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. It played a key role in the early Universe as it determined the ratio of neutrons to protons during the era of primordial light element nucleosynthesis. Neutron decay is physically related to important processes in solar physics and neutrino detection. The mean neutron lifetime has been the subject of more than 20 major experiments done, using a variety of methods, between 1950 and the present. The most precise recent measurements have stated accuracies approaching 0.1%, but are not in good agreement as they differ by as much as 5 sigma using quoted uncertainties. The history of neutron lifetime measurements is reviewed and the different methods used are described, giving important examples of each. The discrepancies and some systematic issues in the experiments that may be responsible are discussed, and it is shown by means of global averages that the neutron lifetime is likely to lie in the range of 880 884 s. Plans and prospects for future experiments are considered that will address these systematic issues and improve our knowledge of the neutron lifetime.

  8. Dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Winske, D.; Keinigs, R.; Lemons, D.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of dusty plasmas at the Laboratory. While dusty plasmas are found in space in galactic clouds, planetary rings, and cometary tails, and as contaminants in plasma enhanced fabrication of microelectronics, many of their properties are only partially understood. Our work has involved both theoretical analysis and self-consistent plasma simulations to understand basic properties of dusty plasmas related to equilibrium, stability, and transport. Such an understanding can improve the control and elimination of plasma dust in industrial applications and may be important in the study of planetary rings and comet dust tails. We have applied our techniques to the study of charging, dynamics, and coagulation of contaminants in plasma processing reactors for industrial etching and deposition processes and to instabilities in planetary rings and other space plasma environments. The work performed in this project has application to plasma kinetics, transport, and other classical elementary processes in plasmas as well as to plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities.

  9. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  10. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    second one to (3) Fusion and (4) Laboratory Plasmas. The 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics was organized by Chalmers University of Technology. It gathered about 500 participants from 40 countries. Large delegations came from the USA, France, West Germany, Japan, the USSR, and India, the number of participants from these countries ranging from 100 to 20. Sweden had about 50 participating scientists. There were a total of about 20 from the other Scandinavian countries. The principal sponsor of the conference was IUPAP, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. The conference also had a number of co-sponsors like IAU, the International Astronomical Union, URSI, the International Union of Radio Science, EPS, the European Physical Society, and EURATOM-FUSION. The conference was supported by Swedish Industry and Swedish Research Boards. The previous ICPP, held in Nagoya two years ago, was the first attempt to combine two types of conferences: the Plasma Theory Conference, first held in Kiev in the Soviet Union in 1971, and the Waves and Instabilities Congress, held for the first time in Innsbruck, Austria in 1973. As a consequence of the success of the Nagoya conference it was decided by the International Organizing Committee of the ICPP that the 1982 conference should also be of the combined type. The 1982 ICPP in Göteborg was thus a Joint Conference of the Fifth Kiev International Conference in Plasma Theory and the Fifth International Congress on Waves and Instabilities in Plasmas. During the conference in Göteborg the International Organizing Committee had a meeting and it was decided that also the next International Conference on Plasma Physics will be of the combined type. It will be held in Lausanne, Switzerland in 1984. The International Organizing Committee on the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics comprised about 40 plasma physics scientists from all over the world, who represented various sections of plasma physics. I would

  11. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  12. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  13. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1961-08-22

    A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

  14. Unmatter Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2015-11-01

    ``Unmatter Plasma'' is a novel form of plasma, exclusively made of matter and its antimatter counterpart. An experiment (2015) on matter-antimatter plasma [or unmatter plasma] was recently successful at the Astra Gemini laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxford, United Kingdom. The experiment that was made has produced electron-positron plasma. The positron is the antimatter of the electron, having an opposite charge of the electron, but the other properties are the same. Unmatter is considered as a combination of matter and antimatter. For example electron-positron is a type of unmatter. We coined the word ``unmatter'' (2004) that means neither matter nor antimatter, but something in between. Besides matter and antimatter there may exist unmatter (as a new form of matter) in accordance with the neutrosophy theory that between an entity and its opposite there exist intermediate entities.

  15. Plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  16. A creative approach to the development of an agenda for knowledge utilization: outputs from the 11th international knowledge utilization colloquium (KU 11).

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Joyce E; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Davies, Huw T O; McCormack, Brendan

    2012-12-01

    A group of researchers and practitioners interested in advancing knowledge utilization met as a colloquium in Belfast (KU 11) and used a "world café" approach to exploit the social capital and shared understanding built up over previous events to consider the research and practice agenda. We considered three key areas of relevance to knowledge use: (1) understanding the nature of research use, influence and impact; (2) blended and collaborative approaches to knowledge production and use; and (3) supporting sustainability and spread of evidence-informed innovations. The approach enabled the development of artifacts that reflected the three areas and these were analyzed using a creative hermeneutic approach. The themes that emerged and which are outlined in this commentary are not mutually exclusive. There was much overlap in the discussions and therefore of the themes, reflecting the complex nature of knowledge translation work. The agenda that has emerged from KU 11 also reflects the participatory and creative approach in which the meeting was structured and focused, and therefore emphasizes the processual, relational and contingent nature of some of the challenges we face. The past 20 years has seen an explosion in activity around understanding KU, and we have learned much about the difficulties. Whilst the agenda for the next decade may be becoming clearer, colloquia such as KU 11, using creative and engaging approaches, have a key role to play in dissecting, articulating and sharing that agenda. In this way, we also build an ever-expanding international community that is dedicated to working towards increasing the chances of success for better patient care. PMID:22849391

  17. Bilinguisme et biculturalisme: Theories et pratiques professionnelles. Actes du 2eme colloque d'orthophomie/logopedie (Neuchatel, 17-18 septembre, 1992). (Bilingualism and Biculturalism: Theories and Professional Practices. Colloquium on Orthophony/Logopedy (2nd, Neuchatel, Switzerland, September 17-18, 1992)).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Py, Bernard, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The conference papers from a colloquium on issues in bilingualism and biculturalism include: "Le bilinguisme et biculturalisme: essai de definition" ("Bilingualism and Biculturalism: Attempt at Definition") (Francois Grosjean); "La variation individuelle dans l'acquisition d'une langue seconde" ("Individual Variation in Second Language…

  18. The Ages of Stars (IAU S258)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Soderblom, David R.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2009-06-01

    Preface; Part I. The Milky Way and Nearby Galaxies Guido De Marchi; Part II. Ages of Young Stars Michal Simon; Part III. Models of Stars and Tests of Models Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Globular Clusters and Old Open Clusters Rosemary Wyse; Part V. White Dwarfs Robert Rood; Part VI. Brown Dwarfs Michael Liu; Part VII. Age-related Properties of Solar-type Stars Fred Walter; Part VIII. Asteroseismology and the Sun Jeff Valenti; Part IX. Nucleochronology John Stauffer; Author index; Object index; Subject index.

  19. Cosmic Magnetic Fields (IAU S259)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Beckman, John E.

    2009-06-01

    Preface K. G. Strassmeier, A. G. Kosovichev and J. E. Beckman; Organising committee; Conference photograph; Conference participants; Session 1. Interstellar magnetic fields, star-forming regions and the Death Valley Takahiro Kudoh and Elisabeta de Gouveia Dal Pino; Session 2. Multi-scale magnetic fields of the Sun; their generation in the interior, and magnetic energy release Nigel O. Weiss; Session 3. Planetary magnetic fields and the formation and evolution of planetary systems and planets; exoplanets Karl-Heinz Glassmeier; Session 4. Stellar magnetic fields: cool and hot stars Swetlana Hubrig; Session 5. From stars to galaxies and the intergalactic space Dimitry Sokoloff and Bryan Gaensler; Session 6. Advances in methods and instrumentation for measuring magnetic fields across all wavelengths and targets Tom Landecker and Klaus G. Strassmeier; Author index; Object index; Subject index.

  20. ESO at the IAU General Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The 25th General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union was held in Sydney,Australia, from 13-24 July 2003. For two weeks the world of professional astronomy descended on Darling Harbour. In the early days it was used for receiving fresh produce and timber from Parramatta and the north coast, but with time had become a somewhat derelict dock area. Following massive redevelopment of the old wharves in the course of the 1980s, it now constitutes a spectacular example of contemporary urban renovation, with shopping malls, hotels, restaurants, museums and other leisure facilities, as well as the magnificent Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre (SCEC).

  1. Organic Matter in Space (IAU S251)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun; Sanford, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Preface; From the local organising committee; Organising committee; Conference participants; Opening address of Symposium 251 C. Cesarsky; Session I. Observations of organic compounds beyond the Solar System William Irvine, Ewine van Dishoeck, Yvonne Pendleton and Hans Olofsson; Session II. Organic compounds within the Solar System Scott Sandford, Ernst Zinner and Dale Cruikshank; Session III. Laboratory analogues of organic compounds in space Max Bernstein and Thomas Henning; Banquet speech; Author index; Object index.

  2. Organic Matter in Space (IAU S251)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun; Sanford, Scott

    2008-10-01

    Preface; From the local organising committee; Organising committee; Conference participants; Opening address of Symposium 251 C. Cesarsky; Session I. Observations of organic compounds beyond the Solar System William Irvine, Ewine van Dishoeck, Yvonne Pendleton and Hans Olofsson; Session II. Organic compounds within the Solar System Scott Sandford, Ernst Zinner and Dale Cruikshank; Session III. Laboratory analogues of organic compounds in space Max Bernstein and Thomas Henning; Banquet speech; Author index; Object index.

  3. Plasma Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  4. Plasma Rain

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 19, 2010 AIA observed one of the largest prominence eruptions in years. The huge structure erupts, but a great deal of the plasma (hundreds of millions of tons) is unable to escape the gra...

  5. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  6. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

    1962-04-10

    A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

  7. Plasma Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Radio communication with space probes requires sending signals through the Earth's ionosphere and usually the solar wind. During planetary flybys, the signal may also pass through the ionosphere of another planet. These ionized media can perturb the radio signal in a variety of ways. Examples of these perturbations are variations in the electrical length between the spacecraft and the ground station, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized signals, amplitude and phase scintillations, and spectral and angular broadening. These plasma effects can have undesirable influences on telemetry performance and thus need to be understood from a communications engineering viewpoint. The plasma effects are, however, useful from a scientific viewpoint, since the effects on the communications link can often be inverted to estimate the physical conditions in the plasma.

  8. X-ray, EUV, UV and Optical Emissivities of Asrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1996-01-01

    In this reporting period we have concentrated on evaluating the available collision strength and dielectronic recombination data and on incorporating the iron L-shell collision strengths of Duane Liedahl (computed with HULLAC) in the code. We have published the first major results, an evaluation of the M-shell collisional data for iron based on SERTS and EUVE data. We have critically compared the existing X-ray emission codes as a follow-on to the Napa HEAD meeting in 1994. We are using ASCA spectra and EUVE spectra to further test the reliability of the codes by testing whether a single set of model parameters can account for the entire observed spectrum. We have written a review of the emission spectra of hot astrophysical plasmas emphasizing some lesser-known processes. We have also considered the effects of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions on emission line spectra. N. Brickhouse presented a colloquium on the use of spectral models for EUV Astrophysics at Auburn U in February 1995. All three of us participated actively in the Rates, Codes, & Astrophysics Workshop in July 1995, sponsored by the AXAF Science Center, serving on the organizing committee, chairing a session on atomic rate uncertainties, and presenting papers on photoionized plasmas and spectral fitting approaches.

  9. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  10. BOOK REVIEW : Future Professional Communication in Astronomy. Proceedings of the Colloquium held at the Palace of the Academies, Brussels, 10-13 June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Heck, A.; Houziaux, L.

    These are the timely and well-edited proceedings of a colloquium dealing with the present state and the future of "communication'' in astronomy. While communication in the past was mainly restricted to printed journals, conferences and colloquia, things have changed dramatically in the last decades. Journals have gone online, and runs of paper copies are slowly declining. 25 astronomers and representatives of various publishing institutions met in Brussels in June 2007 to discuss the future and the different options of information communication and -exchange. 16 contributions are supplemented by summaries of discussions held at the meeting. After a general overview of one of the organizers, who has played a key role in various aspects of information exchange, several representatives discuss future plans of their publications: K.B. Marvel presents the AAS journals (ApJ parts I and II, ApJS, AJ, which are just being transferred from the University of Chicago Press to Institute of Physics Publishing). P. Murdin represents the RAS and its main journal, the MNRAS. "Open Access'' is of course one of the key words of this conference. Producing a journal (either on paper or electronically) is expensive. For the AAS journals, these costs are shared between authors andsubscribers. Future plans are to abandon "paper copies'' at all, although "printable pages'' will continue to be provided. For MNRAS, it is the subscribers who pay. And if it would have "open access'', authors would have to be charged for publication.Some research funding agencies demand that scientific results that they have sponsored should appear online, and freely available (at least after a certaintime). Various approaches were outlined by representatives of publishers (Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, Elsevier, EDP Sciences). S. Plaszczynski introduced a project for "open access'' in the field of high energy physics. To replace "repositories'' and collections of "preprints'' that may have never made it to the

  11. Division E Commission 49: Interplanetary Plasma and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ingrid; Manoharan, P. K.; Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Briand, Carine; Chashei, Igor V.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Lario, David; Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Malandraki, Olga; Kontar, Eduard; Richardson, John D.

    2016-04-01

    After a little more than forty years of work related to the interplanetary plasma and the heliosphere the IAU's Commission 49 was formally discontinued in 2015. The commission started its work when the first spacecraft were launched to measure the solar wind in-situ away from Earth orbit, both inward and outward from 1 AU. It now hands over its activities to a new commission during an era of space research when Voyager 1 measures in-situ the parameters of the local interstellar medium at the edge of the heliosphere. The commission will be succeeded by C.E3 with a similar area of responsibility but with more focused specific tasks that the community intends to address during the coming several years. This report includes a short description of the motivation for this commission and of the historical context. It then describes work from 2012 to 2015 during the present solar cycle 24 that has been the weakest in the space era so far. It gave rise to a large number of studies on solar energetic particles and cosmic rays. Other studies addressed e.g. the variation of the solar wind structure and energetic particle fluxes on long time scales, the detection of dust in the solar wind and the Voyager measurements at the edge of the heliosphere. The research is based on measurements from spacecraft that are at present operational and motivated by the upcoming Solar Probe + and Solar Orbiter missions to explore the vicinity of the Sun. We also report here the progress on new and planned radio instruments and their importance for heliospheric studies. Contributors to this report are Carine Briand, Yoichiro Hanaoka, Eduard Kontar, David Lario, Ingrid Mann, John D. Richardson.

  12. The unexpected confluence of plasma physics and climate science: On the lives and legacies of Norman Rostoker and Sherry Rowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The Norman Rostoker Memorial Symposium brought together approximately 150 attendees to share their recent work and to reflect on the contributions of Norman Rostoker to the field of plasma physics and the advancement of fusion as a source of renewable clean energy. The field has changed considerably in a few short decades, with theoretical advances and technological innovations evolving in lock step. Over those same decades, our understanding of human induced climate change has also evolved; measurable changes in Earth's physical, chemical, and biological processes have already been observed, and these will likely intensify in the coming decades. Never before has the need for clean energy been more pronounced, or the need for transformative solutions more pressing. As scientists work with legislators, journalists, and the public to take actions to address the threat of climate change, there is much to be learned from the legacies of innovators like Norman Rostoker, who have tackled complex problems with scientific insight and determination even when the odds were stacked against them. I write this from the perspective on an Earth system scientist who studies photosynthesis and the biogeochemistry of the oceans, and my statements about plasma physics and Norman Rostoker are based on information I gathered from the colloquium and from many enjoyable conversations with his friends and colleagues.

  13. "Colloquium": A Conversation about Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nist, Elizabeth A.

    Small community or vocational colleges often face the problem of trying to run quality academic programs with adjunct or part-time faculty who have little contact with the regular faculty and little say in policy-making. The Utah Valley Community College writing program, which successfully combined regular and adjunct faculty in planning and…

  14. Sixth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Papers are presented on NASTRAN programming, and substructuring methods, as well as on fluids and thermal applications. Specific applications and capabilities of NASTRAN were also delineated along with general auxiliary programs.

  15. Third International Colloquium on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Abstracts of papers concerning the geology and geophysics of Mars, volcanism on Mars, the Mars atmosphere, and the long term history of the atmosphere-cap-regolith volatile regime are presented. Formation of the Mars surface, climatology, gravity and magnetism, atmospheric boundary layers, and interpretation of Viking imagery and Earth-based observations are considered.

  16. Fifteenth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Numerous applications of the NASA Structural Analysis (NASTRAN) computer program, a general purpose finite element code, are discussed. Additional features that can be added to NASTRAN, interactive plotting of NASTRAN data on microcomputers, mass modeling for bars, the design of wind tunnel models, the analysis of ship structures subjected to underwater explosions, and buckling analysis of radio antennas are among the topics discussed.

  17. Twelfth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    NASTRAN is a large, comprehensive, nonproprietary, general purpose finite element computer code for structural analysis. The Twelfth Users' Colloquim provides some comprehensive papers on the application of finite element methods in engineering, comparisons with other approaches, unique applications, pre and post processing or auxiliary programs, and new methods of analysis with NASTRAN.

  18. First colloquium in biological sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.N.; Strand, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains over 150 papers. Some of the topics include: biochemistry, biological sciences, biomedical sciences, biophysics, and microbiology. There are also plenary lectures on such areas as genetic dissection of viral virulence, and gonadal hormones and brain development.

  19. Ninth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The general application of finite element methodology and the specific application of NASTRAN to a wide variety of static and dynamic structural problems is addressed. Comparison with other approaches and new methods of analysis with nastran are included.

  20. Thirteenth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The application of finite element methods in engineering is discussed and the use of NASTRAN is compared with other approaches. Specific applications, pre- and post-processing or auxiliary programs, and additional methods of analysis with NASTRAN are covered.

  1. IRIS Mission Operations Director's Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carvalho, Robert; Mazmanian, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Pursuing the Mysteries of the Sun: The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) Mission. Flight controllers from the IRIS mission will present their individual experiences on IRIS from development through the first year of flight. This will begin with a discussion of the unique nature of IRISs mission and science, and how it fits into NASA's fleet of solar observatories. Next will be a discussion of the critical roles Ames contributed in the mission including spacecraft and flight software development, ground system development, and training for launch. This will be followed by experiences from launch, early operations, ongoing operations, and unusual operations experiences. The presentation will close with IRIS science imagery and questions.

  2. Colloquium: Water's controversial glass transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Böhmer, Roland; Fujara, Franz; Gainaru, Catalin; Geil, Burkhard; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Water is the most common and, judged from its numerous anomalous properties, the weirdest of all known liquids and the complexity of its pressure-temperature map is unsurpassed. A major obstacle on the way to a full understanding of water's structure and dynamics is the hard-to-explore territory within this map, colloquially named the no man's land. Many experiments suggest that just before stepping across its low-temperature border, amorphous ices undergo glass-to-liquid transitions while other interpretations emphasize the importance of underlying disordered (nano)crystalline states. Prospects for reconciling the conflicting views regarding the nature of water's glass transitions are discussed.

  3. Twentieth NASTRAN (R) Users' Colloquium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are presented. Some comprehensive general papers are presented on applications of finite elements in engineering, comparisons with other approaches, unique applications, pre and post processing with other auxiliary programs, and new methods of analysis with NASTRAN.

  4. Plasma Free Metanephrines

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Plasma Free Metanephrines Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... known as: Plasma Metanephrines Formal name: Fractionated Plasma Free Metanephrines (Metanephrine and Normetanephrine) Related tests: Catecholamines ; Urine ...

  5. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  6. Plasma Dictionary Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Don; Heeter, Robert; Alvarez, Mitch

    2000-10-01

    In response to many inquiries for a list of plasma terms, a database driven Plasma Dictionary website (plasmadictionary.llnl.gov) was created that allows users to submit new terms, search for specific terms or browse alphabetic listings. The Plasma Dictionary website contents began with the Fusion & Plasma Glossary terms available at the Fusion Energy Educational website (fusedweb.llnl.gov). Plasma researchers are encouraged to add terms and definitions. By clarifying the meanings of specific plasma terms, it is envisioned that the primary use of the Plasma Dictionary website will be by students, teachers, researchers, and writers for (1) Enhancing literacy in plasma science, (2) Serving as an educational aid, (3) Providing practical information, and (4) Helping clarify plasma writings. The Plasma Dictionary website has already proved useful in responding to a request from the CRC Press (www.crcpress.com) to add plasma terms to its CRC physics dictionary project (members.aol.com/physdict/).

  7. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  8. Communication through plasma sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-10-15

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  9. Plasma sweeper. [Patents

    DOEpatents

    Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

    1982-10-25

    A device is described for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from RF power introducing means to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the RF power introducing means. Means are described for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  10. Basic plasma physics II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, A. A.; Sudan, R. N.

    The basic physics of classical ideal plasmas is presented in reviews of recent theoretical and experimental investigations, with an emphasis on nonlinear interactions violating the assumptions of weak turbulence. Topics examined include Kolmogorov spectra, parametric instabilities in magnetoactive plasmas, collapse and self-focusing of Langmuir waves, collective dissipation and transport, spontaneous reconnection of magnetic-field lines in a collisionless plasma, collective-beam/plasma interaction, numerical particle simulations, diagnostic techniques based on the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a plasma, diagnostics for magnetically confined high-temperature plasmas, and relativistic electron-beam/plasma interaction with self-fields. Diagrams, graphs, spectra, and drawings of experimental apparatus are provided.