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Sample records for plasmid induces anti-cd40

  1. Induced PD-L1 expression mediates acquired resistance to agonistic anti-CD40 treatment.

    PubMed

    Zippelius, Alfred; Schreiner, Jens; Herzig, Petra; Müller, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    CD40 stimulation on antigen-presenting cells (APC) allows direct activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, independent of CD4⁺ T-cell help. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies have been demonstrated to induce beneficial antitumor T-cell responses in mouse models of cancer and early clinical trials. We report here that anti-CD40 treatment induces programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) upregulation on tumor-infiltrating monocytes and macrophages, which was strictly dependent on T cells and IFNγ. PD-L1 expression could be counteracted by coadministration of antibodies blocking the PD-1 (programmed death-1)/PD-L1 axis as shown for T cells from tumor models and human donors. The combined treatment was highly synergistic and induced complete tumor rejection in about 50% of mice bearing MC-38 colon and EMT-6 breast tumors. Mechanistically, this was reflected by a strong increase of IFNγ and granzyme-B production in intratumoral CD8⁺ T cells. Concomitant CTLA-4 blockade further improved rejection of established tumors in mice. This study uncovers a novel mechanism of acquired resistance upon agonistic CD40 stimulation and proposes that the concomitant blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis is a viable therapeutic strategy to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:25623164

  2. Human Anti-CD40 Antibody and Poly IC:LC Adjuvant Combination Induces Potent T Cell Responses in the Lung of Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth A; Liang, Frank; Lindgren, Gustaf; Sandgren, Kerrie J; Quinn, Kylie M; Darrah, Patricia A; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A; Kedl, Ross M; Loré, Karin

    2015-08-01

    Nonlive vaccine platforms that induce potent cellular immune responses in mucosal tissue would have broad application for vaccines against infectious diseases and tumors. Induction of cellular immunity could be optimized by targeted activation of multiple innate and costimulatory signaling pathways, such as CD40 or TLRs. In this study, we evaluated immune activation and elicitation of T cell responses in nonhuman primates after immunization with peptide Ags adjuvanted with an agonistic anti-CD40Ab, with or without the TLR3 ligand poly IC:LC. We found that i.v. administration of the anti-CD40Ab induced rapid and transient innate activation characterized by IL-12 production and upregulated costimulatory and lymph node homing molecules on dendritic cells. Using fluorescently labeled Abs for in vivo tracking, we found that the anti-CD40Ab bound to all leukocytes, except T cells, and disseminated to multiple organs. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses were significantly enhanced when the anti-CD40Ab was coadministered with poly IC:LC compared with either adjuvant given alone and were almost exclusively compartmentalized to the lung. Notably, Ag-specific T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage were sustained at ∼5-10%. These data indicate that systemic administration of anti-CD40Ab may be particularly advantageous for vaccines and/or therapies that require T cell immunity in the lung. PMID:26123354

  3. Intratumoral delivery of low doses of anti-CD40 mAb combined with monophosphoryl lipid A induces local and systemic antitumor effects in immunocompetent and T cell-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Van De Voort, Tyler J.; Felder, Mildred A. R.; Yang, Richard K.; Sondel, Paul M.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody was combined with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a nontoxic derivative of LPS and agonist of toll-like receptor 4, to assess the immunomodulatory and antitumor synergy between the two agents in mice. Anti-CD40 was capable of priming macrophages to subsequent ex vivo activation by MPL in immunocompetent and T cell-depleted mice. Intraperitoneal injections of anti-CD40+MPL induced additive to synergistic suppression of poorly immunogenic B16-F10 melanoma growing subcutaneously in syngeneic mice. When anti-CD40+MPL were injected directly into the subcutaneous tumor, the combination treatment was more effective, even with a 25-fold reduction in dose. Low-dose intratumoral treatment also slowed the growth of a secondary tumor growing simultaneously at a distant, untreated site. Antitumor effects were also induced in immunodeficient SCID mice and in T cell-depleted C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, our results show that the antitumor effects of anti-CD40 are enhanced by subsequent treatment with MPL, even in T cell-deficient hosts. These preclinical data suggest that an anti-CD40+MPL combined regimen is appropriate for clinical testing in human patients, including cancer patients that may be immunosuppressed from prior chemotherapy. PMID:23211623

  4. Human Anti-CD40 Antibody and Poly IC:LC Adjuvant Combination Induces Potent T Cell Responses in the Lung of Non-Human Primates1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Elizabeth A; Liang, Frank; Lindgren, Gustaf; Sandgren, Kerrie J; Quinn, Kylie M; Darrah, Patricia A; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A; Kedl, Ross M; Loré, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Non-live vaccine platforms that induce potent cellular immune responses in mucosal tissue would have broad application for vaccines against infectious diseases and tumors. Induction of cellular immunity could be optimized by targeted activation of multiple innate and co-stimulatory signaling pathways, such as CD40 or toll-like receptors (TLRs). In this study, we evaluated immune activation and elicitation of T cell responses in non-human primates (NHPs) after immunization with peptide antigens adjuvanted with an agonistic αCD40Ab, with or without the TLR3 ligand poly IC:LC. We found that intravenous administration of the αCD40Ab induced rapid and transient innate activation characterized by IL-12 production and upregulated co-stimulatory and lymph node homing molecules on dendritic cells. Using fluorescently-labeled Abs for in vivo tracking, the αCD40Ab bound to all leucocytes, except T cells, and disseminated to multiple organs. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were significantly enhanced when the αCD40Ab was co-administered with poly IC:LC compared to either adjuvant given alone and were almost exclusively compartmentalized to the lung. Notably, antigen-specific T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage were sustained at ~5–10%. These data indicate that systemic administration of αCD40Ab may be particularly advantageous for vaccines and/or therapies requiring T cell immunity in the lung. PMID:26123354

  5. Synergy between anti-CD40 MAb and Epstein-Barr virus in activation and transformation of human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiyama, L; Kieran, J; Boyle, P; Wetzel, G D

    1997-01-01

    For human B lymphocytes, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a polyclonal activator, inducing both proliferation and Ig secretion. It is also a transforming virus capable of generating immortalized B cell lines. These early and late functions of EBV are not apparently connected. The receptor for EBV, CD21, also serves as a receptor for some complement components and is called CR2. This molecule associates with CD19 and TAPA-1 on the surface of B cells. This complex is involved in signaling B cells and participates in many responses. We have observed that simultaneous ligation of CD40 and the CD21 complex, by exposure to anti-CD40 MAbs and EBV, enhances both the short-term proliferation as well as the long-term transformation rate of human B lymphocytes. B cell proliferation shows synergy between anti-CD40 MAb and EBV. CD19 also appears to be involved in the synergistic activation of B cells through CD40 and CD21, since ligation of CD19 with anti-CD19 MAbs, either prior to or concomitant with exposure to anti-CD40 and EBV, markedly inhibits both proliferation and subsequent B cell transformation. These observations do not elucidate the mechanisms of B cell transformation employed by EBV but the do suggest a relationship between early proliferation and later transformation induced by the virus. Anti-CD40 enhances both these effects and anti-CD19 is capable of inhibiting both. PMID:9265505

  6. Preparation of anti-CD40 antibody modified magnetic PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Kan, Bing; Gou, MaLing; Zhang, Juan; Guo, Gang; Huang, Ning; Zhao, Xia; Qian, ZhiYong

    2011-04-01

    Antibody modified magnetic polymeric microspheres have potential biomedical application. In this paper, anti-CD40 antibody modified magnetic poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL, PCEC) microspheres were prepared. First, PCL-PEG-PCL triblock copolymer was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization, followed by reaction with succinic anhydride, creating carboxylated PCL-PEG-PCL copolymer. Then, magnetite nanoparticles were encapsulated into carboxylated PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres, forming magnetic PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres with carboxyl group on their surface. Catalyzed by EDC/NHS, the anti-CD40 antibody was linked to these magnetic PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres, thus forming anti-CD40 modified PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres. These anti-CD40 antibody modified magnetic PCL-PEG-PCL microspheres may have potential application in cell separation. PMID:21702366

  7. The antileukemia activity of a human anti-CD40 antagonist antibody, HCD122, on human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Klabunde, Sha; Lin, Karen; Georgakis, Georgios V.; Cherukuri, Anu; Holash, Jocelyn; Goldbeck, Cheryl; Xu, Xiaomei; Kadel, Edward E.; Lee, Sang Hoon; Aukerman, Sharon Lea; Jallal, Bahija; Aziz, Natasha; Weng, Wen-Kai; Wierda, William; O'Brien, Susan; Younes, Anas

    2008-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by the surface expression of CD20, CD5 antigens, as well as the receptor CD40. Activation of CD40 by its ligand (CD40L) induces proliferation and rescues the cells from spontaneous and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. CD40 activation also induces secretion of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IL-8, and GM-CSF, which are involved in tumor cell survival, migration, and interaction with cells in the tumor microenvironment. Here we demonstrate that in primary B-CLL tumor cells, the novel antagonist anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody, HCD122, inhibits CD40L-induced activation of signaling pathways, proliferation and survival, and secretion of cytokines. Furthermore, HCD122 is also a potent mediator of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), lysing B-CLL cells more efficiently than rituximab in vitro, despite a significantly higher number of cell surface CD20 binding sites compared with CD40. Unlike rituximab, however, HCD122 (formerly CHIR-12.12) does not internalize upon binding to the cells. Our data suggest that HCD122 may inhibit B-CLL growth by blocking CD40 signaling and by ADCC-mediated cell lysis. PMID:18497318

  8. Combination anti-CD137 and anti-CD40 antibody therapy in murine myc-driven hematological cancers.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Jennifer A; Matthews, Geoffrey M; Shortt, Jake; Faulkner, David; Pegram, Hollie J; Duong, Connie P M; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Sharp, Leslie L; Huhn, Richard D; Darcy, Phillip K; Johnstone, Ricky W; Kershaw, Michael H

    2014-08-01

    In order to stimulate antigen presentation and T cell activity against cancer, we treated three different tumor models in mice with the monoclonal antibodies anti-CD40 plus anti-CD137 (BiMab). In a subcutaneous transplantable MC38 colon cancer model, there was significant enhancement in the survival of mice following BiMab treatment. Anti-CD40 has shown considerable success against lymphoma in previous studies by other investigators, and we also showed in this study that, in a model of Eμ-Myc lymphoma, there was a statistically significant enhancement of survival of mice following BiMab treatment. Following the success of the BiMab treatment in the previous two models, we wished to determine if it would be successful in a mouse model of multiple myeloma. Firstly, we tested a transplantable model of disease in which multiple myeloma cells derived from Vk*MYC mice were injected intravenously. A minor proportion of anti-CD137 and BiMab treated mice experienced prolongation of life beyond 250 days. Then we tested the therapy in a spontaneously occurring multiple myeloma model, in Vk*MYC transgenic mice. The majority of mice treated survived longer than control mice, although statistical significance was not demonstrated. PMID:24934848

  9. [Regulatory B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody inhibit CD4(+)T cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Keng; Tao, Lei; Su, Jianbing; Zhang, Yueyang; Zou, Binhua; Wang, Yiyuan; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-09-01

    Objective To observe the immunosuppressive function of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in vitro after activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) and anti-CD40 mAb. Methods Mice splenic CD5(+)CD1d(high)B cells and CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells were sorted by flow cytometry. These B cells were first stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours, and then co-cultured with purified CD4(+)T cells. The interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression in the activated Bregs and other B cell subset, as well as the proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) expression in the CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3 mAb plus anti-CD28 mAb were determined by flow cytometry. Results CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN plus anti-CD40 mAb blocked the up-regulated CD4(+)T proliferation and significantly reduced the IFN-γ level. At the same time, activated CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells showed no inhibitory effect on CD4(+)T cells. Further study revealed that IL-10 expression in the CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells were much higher than that in the CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells after stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours. Conclusion CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb have immune inhibitory effects on CD4(+)T cell activation in vitro , which possibly due to IL-10 secretion. PMID:27609568

  10. Inducible Escherichia coli fermentation for increased plasmid DNA production.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P; Williams, James A

    2006-11-01

    Bacterial plasmids are the vectors of choice for DNA vaccines and short-term gene therapeutics. Growing plasmid DNA by microbial (Escherichia coli) fermentation is usually combined with alkaline lysis/chromatography methods of purification. To date, typical plasmid fermentation media and processes result in yields of 100-250 mg of plasmid DNA/l of culture medium, using standard high-copy pUC origin-containing plasmids. In order to address this initial and yield-limiting upstream step, we identified novel fermentation control parameters for fed-batch fermentation. The resulting fermentation strategies significantly increased specific plasmid yield with respect to cell mass while enhancing plasmid integrity and maintaining supercoiled DNA content. Fed-batch fermentation yield exceeding 1000 mg of plasmid DNA/l was obtained after reduction of plasmid-mediated metabolic burden during growth, and yields up to 1500 mg of plasmid DNA/l have been achieved with optimized plasmid backbones. Interestingly, by inducing high plasmid levels after sufficient biomass accumulation at low temperature and restricted growth, cells were able to tolerate significantly higher plasmid quantities than cells grown by conventional processes. This 5-10-fold increase in plasmid yield dramatically decreases plasmid manufacturing costs and improves the effectiveness of downstream purification by reducing the fraction of impurities. PMID:16819941

  11. Anti-CD40 antibody and toll-like receptor 3 ligand restore dendritic cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity suppressed by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Li; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Jen, Yu-Wei; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2016-01-01

    The influence of morphine on host immunity and the underlying mechanism are still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the influence of morphine on dendritic cells (DCs), its possible mechanism of action, and the molecules that could reverse these effects. Morphine suppressed DC maturation, antigen presenting abilities, and the ability to activate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Morphine-treated DCs also secreted higher concentrations of IL-10, but lower IL-6 and TNF-α. Morphine-treated DCs showed decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reduced p38 dephosphorylation. The in vivo administration of immuno-modulators, anti-CD40 Ab and TLR3 ligand-poly(I:C), enhanced antigen-specific immunity, promoted the anti-tumor effects, and prolonged the survival of morphine-treated, tumor-bearing mice by promoting the maturation and function of BMM-derived DCs by enhancing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation. We concluded that morphine can inhibit DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity by suppressing DC maturation and function. Immuno-modulators, such as anti-CD40 Abs and TLR agonists, can restore the DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Use of immuno-modulators could serve as a useful approach to overcome the immunocompromised state generated by morphine. PMID:27186393

  12. Anti-tumour synergy of cytotoxic chemotherapy and anti-CD40 plus CpG-ODN immunotherapy through repolarization of tumour-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Buhtoiarov, Ilia N; Sondel, Paul M; Wigginton, Jon M; Buhtoiarova, Tatiana N; Yanke, Eric M; Mahvi, David A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effectiveness of monoclonal anti-CD40 + cytosine–phosphate–guanosine-containing oligodeoxynucleotide 1826 (CpG-ODN) immunotherapy (IT) in mice treated with multidrug chemotherapy (CT) consisting of vincristine, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin. Combining CT with IT led to synergistic anti-tumour effects in C57BL/6 mice with established B16 melanoma or 9464D neuroblastoma. CT suppressed the functions of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, but primed naïve peritoneal macrophages (Mφ) to in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), resulting in augmented nitric oxide (NO) production. IT, given after CT, did not restore the responsiveness of T cells and NK cells, but further activated Mφ to secrete NO, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-12p40 and to suppress the proliferation of tumour cells in vitro. These functional changes were accompanied by immunophenotype alterations on Mφ, including the up-regulation of Gr-1. CD11b+F4/80+Mφ comprised the major population of B16 tumour-infiltrating leucocytes. CT + IT treatment up-regulated molecules associated with the M1 effector Mφ phenotype [CD40, CD80, CD86, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-12] and down-regulated molecules associated with the M2 inhibitory Mφ phenotype (IL-4Rα, B7-H1, IL-4 and IL-10) on the tumour-associated Mφ compared with untreated controls. Together, the results show that CT and anti-CD40 + CpG-ODN IT synergize in the induction of anti-tumour effects which are associated with the phenotypic repolarization of tumour-associated Mφ. PMID:21039467

  13. Investigation of plasmid-induced growth defect in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia; Sydow, Anne; Schempp, Florence; Becher, Daniela; Schewe, Hendrik; Schrader, Jens; Buchhaupt, Markus

    2016-08-10

    Genetic engineering in bacteria mainly relies on the use of plasmids. But despite their pervasive use for physiological studies as well as for the design and optimization of industrially used production strains, only limited information about plasmid induced growth defects is available for different replicons and organisms. Here, we present the identification and characterization of such a phenomenon for Pseudomonas putida transformants carrying the pBBR1-derived plasmid pMiS1. We identified the kanamycin resistance gene and the transcription factor encoding rhaR gene to be causal for the growth defect in P. putida. In contrast, this effect was not observed in Escherichia coli. The plasmid-induced growth defect was eliminated after introduction of a mutation in the plasmid-encoded rep gene, thus enabling construction of the non-toxic variant pMiS4. GFP reporters construct analyses and qPCR experiments revealed a distinctly lowered plasmid copy number for pMiS4, which is probably the reason for alleviation of the growth defect by this mutation. Our work expands the knowledge about plasmid-induced growth defects and provides a useful low-copy pBBR1 replicon variant. PMID:27287537

  14. Anti-CD40 Ab- or 8-oxo-dG-enhanced Treg cells reduce development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via down-regulating migration and activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gwan Ui; Kim, Nam Goo; Jeoung, Dooil; Ro, Jai Youl

    2013-07-15

    This study investigated whether anti-CD40 Ab and 8-oxo-dG attenuate mast cell migration and EAE development. Anti-CD40 Ab and 8-oxo-dG reduced EAE scores, mast cell numbers, expression of adhesion molecules, OX40L and Act1, levels of TNF-α, LTs, expression of cytokines, and co-localization of Treg cells and mast cells, all of which are increased in EAE-brain tissues. Each treatment enhanced Treg cells, expression of OX40, and cytokines related to suppressive function of Treg cells in EAE brain tissues. Act-BMMCs with Treg cells reduced expression of OX40L and CCL2/CCR2, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, [Ca²⁺]i levels, release of mediators, various signaling molecules, Act1 related to IL-17a signals versus those in act-BMMCs without Treg cells. The data suggest that IL-10- and IL-35-producing Foxp3⁺-Treg cells, enhanced by anti-CD40 Ab or 8-oxo-dG, suppress migration of mast cells through down-regulating the expression of adhesion molecules, and suppress mast cell activation through cell-to-cell cross-talk via OX40/OX40L in EAE development. PMID:23622820

  15. Proton-induced direct and indirect damage of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Vyšín, Luděk; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Štěpán, Václav; Moretto-Capelle, Patrick; Bugler, Beatrix; Legube, Gaelle; Cafarelli, Pierre; Casta, Romain; Champeaux, Jean Philippe; Sence, Martine; Vlk, Martin; Wagner, Richard; Štursa, Jan; Zach, Václav; Incerti, Sebastien; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie

    2015-08-01

    Clustered DNA damage induced by 10, 20 and 30 MeV protons in pBR322 plasmid DNA was investigated. Besides determination of strand breaks, additional lesions were detected using base excision repair enzymes. The plasmid was irradiated in dry form, where indirect radiation effects were almost fully suppressed, and in water solution containing only minimal residual radical scavenger. Simultaneous irradiation of the plasmid DNA in the dry form and in the solution demonstrated the contribution of the indirect effect as prevalent. The damage composition slightly differed when comparing the results for liquid and dry samples. The obtained data were also subjected to analysis concerning different methodological approaches, particularly the influence of irradiation geometry, models used for calculation of strand break yields and interpretation of the strand breaks detected with the enzymes. It was shown that these parameters strongly affect the results. PMID:26007308

  16. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  17. Inducible expression of photoacoustic reporter gene tyrosinase in cells using a single plasmid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tyrosinase is a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging since tyrosinase is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of melanin, a pigment capable of producing strong photoacoustic signals. We previously created a cell line capable of inducible tyrosinase expression (important due to toxicity of melanin) by stably transfecting tyrosinase in MCF-7 Tet-OnR cell line (Clontech) which expresses a doxycycline-controlled transactivator. Unfortunately, Clontech provides few Tet-On Advanced cell lines making it difficult to have inducible tyrosinase expression in cell lines not provided by Clontech. In order to simplify the creation of cell lines with inducible expression of tyrosinase, we created a single plasmid that encodes both the transactivator as well as tyrosinase. PCR was used to amplify both the transactivator and tyrosinase from the Tet-OnR Advanced and pTRE-Tight-TYR plasmids, respectively. Both PCR products were cloned into the pEGFP-N1 plasmid and the newly created plasmid was transfected into ZR-75-1, MCF-7, and MIA PaCa-1 cells using lipofectamine. After several days, brown melanin was only observed in cells incubated with doxycycline, suggesting that the newly created single plasmid allowed inducible tyrosinase expression in many different cells lines.

  18. Plasmid-mediated VEGF gene transfer induces cardiomyogenesis and reduces myocardial infarct size in sheep.

    PubMed

    Vera Janavel, G; Crottogini, A; Cabeza Meckert, P; Cuniberti, L; Mele, A; Papouchado, M; Fernández, N; Bercovich, A; Criscuolo, M; Melo, C; Laguens, R

    2006-08-01

    We have recently reported that in pigs with chronic myocardial ischemia heart transfection with a plasmid encoding the 165 isoform of human vascular endothelial growth factor (pVEGF165) induces an increase in the mitotic index of adult cardiomyocytes and cardiomyocyte hyperplasia. On these bases we hypothesized that VEGF gene transfer could also modify the evolution of experimental myocardial infarct. In adult sheep pVEGF165 (3.8 mg, n=7) or empty plasmid (n=7) was injected intramyocardially 1 h after coronary artery ligation. After 15 days infarct area was 11.3+/-1.3% of the left ventricle in the VEGF group and 18.2+/-2.1% in the empty plasmid group (P<0.02). The mechanisms involved in infarct size reduction (assessed in additional sheep at 7 and 10 days after infarction) included an increase in early angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, a decrease in peri-infarct fibrosis, a decrease in myofibroblast proliferation, enhanced cardiomyoblast proliferation and mitosis of adult cardiomyocytes with occasional cytokinesis. Resting myocardial perfusion (99mTc-sestamibi SPECT) was higher in VEGF-treated group than in empty plasmid group 15 days after myocardial infarction. We conclude that plasmid-mediated VEGF gene transfer reduces myocardial infarct size by a combination of effects including neovascular proliferation, modification of fibrosis and cardiomyocyte regeneration. PMID:16572192

  19. Replication-induced transcription of an autorepressed gene: The replication initiator gene of plasmid P1

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Chattoraj, Dhruba K.

    2000-01-01

    The replication origin of plasmid P1 contains an array of five repeats (iterons) that bind the plasmid-encoded initiator RepA. Within the array lies the repA promoter, which becomes largely repressed on RepA binding (autorepression). One might expect that extra iterons produced on plasmid replication would titrate RepA and release the repression. The promoter, however, is induced poorly by extra iterons. The P1 copy number is reduced by extra iterons in the presence of the autorepressed repA gene but not when additional RepA is provided from constitutive sources. It has been proposed that the iteron-bound RepA couples with the promoter-bound RepA and thereby maintains repression. Although not the product of replication, we find that the act of replication itself can renew RepA synthesis. Replication apparently cleans the promoter of bound RepA and provides a window of opportunity for repA transcription. We propose that replication-induced transcription is required to ensure initiator availability in a system that is induced poorly when challenged with additional initiator binding sites. PMID:10840063

  20. The indigenous Pseudomonas plasmid pQBR103 encodes plant-inducible genes, including three putative helicases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Xian; Lilley, Andrew K; Bailey, Mark J; Rainey, Paul B

    2004-12-27

    Plasmid pQBR103 ( approximately 400 kb) is representative of many self-transmissible, mercury resistant plasmids observed in the Pseudomonas community colonising the phytosphere of sugar beet. A promoter trapping strategy (IVET) was employed to identify pQBR103 genes showing elevated levels of expression on plant surfaces. Thirty-seven different plant-inducible gene fusions were isolated that were silent in laboratory media, but active in the plant environment. Three of the fusions were to DNA sequences whose protein products show significant homology to DNA-unwinding helicases. The three helicase-like genes, designated helA, helB and helC, are restricted to a defined group of related Pseudomonas plasmids. They are induced in both the root and shoot environments of sugar beet seedlings. Sequence analysis of the three plasmid-encoded helicase-like genes shows that they are phylogenetically distinct and likely to have independent evolutionary histories. The helA gene is predicted to encode a protein of 1121 amino acids, containing conserved domains found in the ultraviolet (UV) resistance helicase, UvrD. A helA knockout mutant was constructed and no phenotypic changes were found with plasmid-conferred UV resistance or plasmid conjugation. The other 34 fusions are unique with no homologues in the public gene databases, including the Pseudomonas genomes. These data demonstrate the presence of plant responsive genes in plasmid DNA comprising a component of the genomes of plant-associated bacteria. PMID:16329852

  1. SURVIVAL AND DEGRADATIVE CAPACITY OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA INDUCED OR CONSTITUTIVELY EXPRESSING PLASMID-MEDIATED DEGRADATION OF 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETATE (TFD) IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survival of genetically altered Pseudonomas putida strains harboring an inducible plasmid, pRO101, or a constitutive plasmid, pRO103, was compared. hese plasmids encoded for the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (TFD) to 2-chloromaleylacetate, and the maintenance of eithe...

  2. Low energy electron induced damage to plasmid DNA pQE30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. V. K.; Pota, Tasneem; Peri, Dinakar; Dongre, Anushka D.; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2012-07-01

    Low energy electrons (LEEs) are produced in copious amounts by the primary radiation used in radiation therapy. The damage caused to the DNA by these secondary electrons in the energy range 5-22 eV has been studied to understand their possible role in radiation induced damage. Electrons are irradiated on dried films of plasmid DNA (pQE30) and analysed using agarose gel electrophoresis. Single strand breaks (SSBs) induced by LEE to supercoiled plasmid DNA show resonance structures at 7, 12, and 15 eV for low doses and 6, 10, and ˜18 eV at saturation doses. The present measurements have an overall agreement with the literature that LEEs resonantly induce SSBs in DNA. Resonant peaks in the SSBs induced by LEEs at 7, 12, and 15 eV with the lowest employed dose in the current study are somewhat different from those reported earlier by two groups. The observed differences are perhaps related to the irradiation dose, conditions and the nature of DNA employed, which is further elaborated.

  3. Low energy electron induced damage to plasmid DNA pQE30

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. V. K.; Pota, Tasneem; Peri, Dinakar; Dongre, Anushka D.; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2012-07-28

    Low energy electrons (LEEs) are produced in copious amounts by the primary radiation used in radiation therapy. The damage caused to the DNA by these secondary electrons in the energy range 5-22 eV has been studied to understand their possible role in radiation induced damage. Electrons are irradiated on dried films of plasmid DNA (pQE30) and analysed using agarose gel electrophoresis. Single strand breaks (SSBs) induced by LEE to supercoiled plasmid DNA show resonance structures at 7, 12, and 15 eV for low doses and 6, 10, and {approx}18 eV at saturation doses. The present measurements have an overall agreement with the literature that LEEs resonantly induce SSBs in DNA. Resonant peaks in the SSBs induced by LEEs at 7, 12, and 15 eV with the lowest employed dose in the current study are somewhat different from those reported earlier by two groups. The observed differences are perhaps related to the irradiation dose, conditions and the nature of DNA employed, which is further elaborated.

  4. Induced mutagenesis of plasmid and chromosomal genes inserted into the plasmid DNA. II. Mutagenic action of chemical factors

    SciTech Connect

    Esipova, V.V.; Vedunova, S.L.; Kriviskii, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    Following the study of the mutagenic action of UV and ..gamma..-radiation on plasmid DNA in vitro, they investigated the induction of mutations under the influence of chemical mutagens on the same DNA of plasmid RSF2124, determining the synthesis of colicine E1 and resistance to ampicillin. The inactivating action of the mutagen was assessed from the yield of transformants resistant to the antibiotic and the mutagenic effect from the loss by colonies of transformants that were capable of releasing colicine into the external medium. In these experiments they mainly used chemical compounds whose mutagenic effect if well known in other systems (transforming and transfecting DNA, microbial viruses). As a result all mutagens tested for their activity were divided into four groups: first group, those exceeding the level of mutagenesis by more than 100-fold above the spontaneous background (hydroxylamine, O-methylhydroxylamine); second group, those exceeding it by a factor of 10 (UV radiation (lambda = 254 nm), W-mutagenesis, ionizing radiation, nitrous acid, mitomycin C); third group, those exceeding it by a factor of <10 (indirect UV mutagenesis, nitrous acid, ..beta..-chloroethyldiethylamine hydrochloride, nitrosoguanidine); fourth group, no mutagenic effect (acridine orange, ethyl methane sulfonate, sodium azide, 0-..beta..-diethylaminoethylhydroxylamine).

  5. Damage to dry plasmid DNA induced by nanosecond XUV-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Eva; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Ludék; Burian, Tomáš; Grisham, Michael E.; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J.; Juha, Libor

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugar and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. The complexity of lesions produced in DNA by ionizing radiations is thought to depend on the amount of energy deposited at the site of each lesion. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9 nm radiation provided by a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Different surface doses were delivered with a repetition rate of a few Hz and an average pulse energy ~ 1 μJ. A simple model DNA molecule, i.e., dried closed-circular plasmid DNA (pBR322), was irradiated. The agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. Results are compared with a previous study of plasmid DNA irradiated with a single sub-nanosecond 1-keV X-ray pulse produced by a large-scale, double-stream gas puff target, illuminated by sub-kJ, near-infrared (NIR) focused laser pulses at the PALS facility (Prague Asterix Laser System).

  6. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA: plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage contribution increasing towards the Bragg peak. Therefore, 12C ions at the spread-out Bragg peak (dose averaged LET∞ = 189 ± 15 keV/ μm) and in the plateau region of the Bragg curve (LET = 40 keV/ μm) were employed and the radical scavenger concentration in the plasmid solution was varied to quantify the indirect effect. In order to minimize the influence of 12C break-up fragments, a relatively low initial energy of 90 MeV/nucleon was employed for the carbon ions. DNA damage has been quantified by subsequent electrophoresis on agarose gels. We find that strand breaks due to both indirect and direct effects are systematically higher in the plateau region as compared to the Bragg peak region with the difference being smallest at high scavenging capacities. In view of the fact that the relative biological effectiveness for many biological endpoints is maximum at the Bragg peak our findings imply that DNA damage at the Bragg peak is qualitatively most severe.

  7. Molecular and genetic analysis of the transferred DNA regions of the root-inducing plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes.

    PubMed Central

    White, F F; Taylor, B H; Huffman, G A; Gordon, M P; Nester, E W

    1985-01-01

    The T-DNA regions of the root-inducing (Ri) plasmid pRiA4b of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were characterized. Two regions, designated TL-DNA and TR-DNA, were found to be integrated and stably maintained in the plant genome. The TL-DNA spanned a 15- to 20-kilobase region of pRiA4b and was separated from the TR-DNA region by at least 15 kilobases of nonintegrated plasmid DNA. The TR-DNA region also spanned a 15- to 20-kilobase region of pRiA4b and included a region of homology to the tms morphogenic loci of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Eighteen deletions and 95 transposon insertions were generated in the T-DNA regions and tested for alterations in virulence. Insertions into four loci in the TL-DNA affected the morphology of root formation of Kalanchoë diagremontiana leaves and stems, but had no visible effects on other host plants. Insertions into two loci (tms-1 and tms-2) in the TR-DNA eliminated virulence symptoms on all plants tested, with the exception of K. diagremontiana stems, where sparse root formation occurred. Complementation experiments with Ri and Ti plasmid T-DNA mutations indicate that the tms genes of the two plasmids serve similar functions and suggest a functional relationship between one or more genes of the TL-DNA and the cytokinin synthesis locus tmr of the Ti plasmid. Images PMID:4044524

  8. Single- and double-strand breaks induced in plasmid DNA irradiated by ultra-soft X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayard, B.; Touati, A.; Sage, E.; Abel, F.; Champion, C.; Chetoui, A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the molecular consequences of a carbon K photo-ionization located on DNA, dry pBS plasmid samples were irradiated with ultra-soft X-rays at energies below and above the carbon K-threshold (E_K=278 eV). Single- and double-strand breaks (ssb and dsb) were quantified after resolution of the three plasmid forms (supercoiled, relaxed circular, linear) by gel electrophoresis. A factor of 1.2 was found between the doses required at 250 eV and 380 eV to induce the same number of dsb per plasmid. Dans le but d'étudier les conséquences à l'échelle moléculaire d'une photo- ionisation en couche K du carbone de l'ADN, des dépots de plasmides ont été irradiés à sec par des X ultra-mous d'énergies situées de part et d'autre du seuil d'ionisation en couche interne du carbone (E_K=278 eV). Les taux de cassures simple- et double-brin (ssb et dsb) ont été quantifiées après résolution des trois formes de plasmide (surenroulé, circulaire relaché, linéaire) par électrophorèse. Un facteur de 1.2 a été mesuré entre les doses nécessaires à 250 eV et 380 eV pour produire le même nombre de dsb par plasmide.

  9. Site-specific recombinase strategy to create induced pluripotent stem cells efficiently with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Karow, Marisa; Chavez, Christopher L; Farruggio, Alfonso P; Geisinger, Jonathan M; Keravala, Annahita; Jung, W Edward; Lan, Feng; Wu, Joseph C; Chen-Tsai, Yanru; Calos, Michele P

    2011-11-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have revolutionized the stem cell field. iPSCs are most often produced by using retroviruses. However, the resulting cells may be ill-suited for clinical applications. Many alternative strategies to make iPSCs have been developed, but the nonintegrating strategies tend to be inefficient, while the integrating strategies involve random integration. Here, we report a facile strategy to create murine iPSCs that uses plasmid DNA and single transfection with sequence-specific recombinases. PhiC31 integrase was used to insert the reprogramming cassette into the genome, producing iPSCs. Cre recombinase was then used for excision of the reprogramming genes. The iPSCs were demonstrated to be pluripotent by in vitro and in vivo criteria, both before and after excision of the reprogramming cassette. This strategy is comparable with retroviral approaches in efficiency, but is nonhazardous for the user, simple to perform, and results in nonrandom integration of a reprogramming cassette that can be readily deleted. We demonstrated the efficiency of this reprogramming and excision strategy in two accessible cell types, fibroblasts and adipose stem cells. This simple strategy produces pluripotent stem cells that have the potential to be used in a clinical setting. PMID:21898697

  10. Analysis of Plasmid Deletion Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsevich, E.; Stepanova, A.; Sprincova, A.; Koltovaya, N.

    2007-11-01

    The article is dedicated to the research of plasmid system YCpL2 with help of quantitative analysis of deletion formation. The cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were irradiated by γ-ray with the flux of 0.7 Gy/min and energy of 1.3 MeV as well as heavy ion beam 11B with energy 32 MeV/n. The deletion of plasmid DNA has been analyzed by genetic and restriction analysis.

  11. Analysis of Plasmid Deletion Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsevich, E.; Stepanova, A.; Koltovaya, N.; Sprincova, A.

    2007-11-26

    The article is dedicated to the research of plasmid system YCpL2 with help of quantitative analysis of deletion formation. The cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were irradiated by {gamma}-ray with the flux of 0.7 Gy/min and energy of 1.3 MeV as well as heavy ion beam {sup 11}B with energy 32 MeV/n. The deletion of plasmid DNA has been analyzed by genetic and restriction analysis.

  12. Delivery of rhBMP-2 Plasmid DNA Complexes via a PLLA/Collagen Electrospun Scaffold Induces Ectopic Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Komatsu, David E; Hadjiargyrou, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The development of effective strategies for gene delivery is a critical goal in DNA-based tissue engineering. Previously, our laboratory utilized the process of electrospinning to fabricate plasmid DNA-based polymeric scaffolds. Although there lease of DNA was robust, the in vitro transfection efficiency was low. In order to optimize these results, we recently modified our approach and utilized a strategy to adsorb plasmid DNA transfection complexes onto a PLLA/Collagen I electrospun scaffold for the delivery of recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2). BMP-2 was selected since it is currently clinically used to stimulate osteogenesis. Initially, we tested this approach using β-gal plasmid DNA complexes adsorbed onto PLLA/Collagen I scaffolds and obtained a transfection efficiency of 41% of that of the positive control (over 90%, DNA complexes in solution). Next, we utilized the same approach using the rhBMP-2 plasmid DNA complexes with the pre-osteoblastic. cell line, MC3T3, and detected robust (13-fold) expression of rhBMP-2 mRNA following transfection. Lastly, a mouse muscle pouch model was used to evaluate in vivo gene delivery efficacy and ectopic bone inducing capability of the scaffold adsorbed rhBMP-2 transfection complexes. Results showed that both rhBMP-2mRNA and protein were expressed and stimulated some ectopic bone formation. As such, adsorption of plasmid DNA complexes can be an effective strategy for tissue engineering in vivo, but further research is required to optimize our approach and obtain a clinically meaningful tissue response. PMID:27319221

  13. Characterization of SFO-1, a plasmid-mediated inducible class A beta-lactamase from Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Inoue, M

    1999-02-01

    Enterobacter cloacae 8009 produced an inducible class A beta-lactamase which hydrolyzed cefotaxime efficiently. It also hydrolyzed other beta-lactams except cephamycins and carbapenems. The activity was inhibited by clavulanic acid and imipenem. The bla gene was transferable to Escherichia coli by electroporation of plasmid DNA. The molecular mass of the beta-lactamase was 29 kDa and its pI was 7.3. All of these phenotypic characteristics of the enzyme except for inducible production resemble those of some extended-spectrum class A beta-lactamases like FEC-1. The gene encoding this beta-lactamase was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the beta-lactamase was homologous to the AmpA sequences of the Serratia fonticola chromosomal enzyme (96%), MEN-1 (78%), Klebsiella oxytoca chromosomal enzymes (77%), TOHO-1 (75%), and FEC-1 (72%). The conserved sequences of class A beta-lactamases, including the S-X(T)-X(S)-K motif, in the active site were all conserved in this enzyme. On the basis of the high degree of homology to the beta-lactamase of S. fonticola, the enzyme was named SFO-1. The ampR gene was located upstream of the ampA gene, and the AmpR sequence of SFO-1 had homology with the AmpR sequences of the chromosomal beta-lactamases from Citrobacter diversus (80%), Proteus vulgaris (68%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (60%). SFO-1 was also inducible in E. coli. However, a transformant harboring plasmid without intact ampR produced a small amount of beta-lactamase constitutively, suggesting that AmpR works as an activator of ampA of SFO-1. This is the first report from Japan describing an inducible plasmid-mediated class A beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:9925524

  14. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells by simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of lentiviruses to reprogram human somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells could limit their therapeutic usefulness due to the integration of viral DNA sequences into the genome of the recipient cell. Recent work has demonstrated that human iPS cells can be generated using episomal plasmids, excisable transposons, adeno or sendai viruses, mRNA, or recombinant proteins. While these approaches offer an advance, the protocols have some drawbacks. Commonly the procedures require either subcloning to identify human iPS cells that are free of exogenous DNA, a knowledge of virology and safe handling procedures, or a detailed understanding of protein biochemistry. Results Here we report a simple approach that facilitates the reprogramming of human somatic cells using standard techniques to transfect expression plasmids that encode OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, and LIN28 without the need for episomal stability or selection. The resulting human iPS cells are free of DNA integration, express pluripotent markers, and form teratomas in immunodeficient animals. These iPS cells were also able to undergo directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like and cardiac myocyte-like cells in culture. Conclusions Simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors is sufficient to generate human iPS cells from primary fibroblasts that are free of exogenous DNA integrations. This approach is highly accessible and could expand the use of iPS cells in the study of human disease and development. PMID:20682060

  15. Novel method for quantifying radiation-induced single-strand-break yields in plasmid DNA highlights 10-fold discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Balagurumoorthy, Pichumani; Adelstein, S James; Kassis, Amin I

    2011-10-15

    The widely used agarose gel electrophoresis method for assessing radiation-induced single-strand-break (SSB) yield in plasmid DNA involves measurement of the fraction of relaxed-circular (C) form that migrates independently from the intact supercoiled (SC) form. We rationalized that this method may underestimate the SSB yield since the position of the relaxed-circular form is not altered when the number of SSB per DNA molecule is >1. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a novel method that directly probes and quantifies SSBs. Supercoiled (3)H-pUC19 plasmid samples were irradiated with γ-rays, alkali-denatured, dephosphorylated, and kinated with γ-[(32)P]ATP, and the DNA-incorporated (32)P activities were used to quantify the SSB yields per DNA molecule, employing a standard curve generated using DNA molecules containing a known number of SSBs. The same irradiated samples were analyzed by agarose gel and SSB yields were determined by conventional methods. Comparison of the data demonstrated that the mean SSB yield per plasmid DNA molecule of [21.2±0.59]×10(-2)Gy(-1) as measured by direct probing is ~10-fold higher than that obtained from conventional gel-based methods. These findings imply that the SSB yields inferred from agarose gels need reevaluation, especially when they were utilized in the determination of radiation risk. PMID:21741945

  16. Neutralization of venom-induced hemorrhage by equine antibodies raised by immunization with a plasmid encoding a novel P-II metalloproteinase from the lancehead pitviper Bothrops asper.

    PubMed

    Arce-Estrada, Viviana; Azofeifa-Cordero, Gabriela; Estrada, Ricardo; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Flores-Díaz, Marietta

    2009-01-14

    In this work, the cDNA encoding a novel P-II type metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper venom glands was cloned, sequenced and used for DNA immunization of animals with accelerated DNA-coated tungsten microparticles and the helius Gene Gun system. Specific antibodies against B. asper venom antigens were induced in mice co-immunized with the plasmid encoding the P-II metalloproteinase together with an expression plasmid encoding the murine IL-2. Similarly, specific antibodies against B. asper venom antigens were also induced in a horse co-immunized with the plasmid encoding the P-II metalloproteinase, together with a plasmid encoding the equine IL-6. The equine antibodies induced by immunization with the P-II metalloproteinase encoding plasmid cross react with several proteins of B. asper, Crotalus durissus durissus, and Lachesis stenophrys venoms in western blot, demonstrating antigenic similarity between the cloned metalloproteinase and other metalloproteinases present in these venoms. Furthermore, the equine antibodies induced by immunization with the P-II metalloproteinase encoding plasmid completely neutralized the hemorrhagic activity of the whole B. asper venom and partially the hemorrhagic activity of C. durissus durissus venom. The neutralizing ability of the produced antibodies raises, for the first time, the possibility of developing therapeutic antivenoms in horses by DNA immunization using tungsten microparticles. PMID:19013207

  17. Novel synthetic plasmid and Doggybone™ DNA vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection from lethal influenza challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Patel, Ami; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hensley, Scott E; Ragwan, Edwin; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Rothwell, Paul J; Extance, Jonathan P; Caproni, Lisa J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines (NAVs) are a promising alternative to conventional influenza vaccines with the potential to increase influenza vaccine availability due to their simplicity in design and rapid speed of production. NAVs can also target multiple influenza antigens and control flu variants. Traditionally NAVs have been DNA plasmids however, we are continuing to explore new methods that may enhance vaccine efficacy. Recently new focus has been on RNA cassettes as NAVs. RNA vaccines combine conceptual advantages in that they focus on delivery of only the coding cassette. However, RNA vaccines have a short half-life and cause interferon-induced fevers. Here we describe a new NAV approach where we study delivery of a linear DNA cassette [Doggybone™ linear closed DNA [(dbDNA™)] produced by an enzymatic process that yields an antigen expression cassette comprising a promoter, DNA antigen, poly A tail, and telomeric ends. This focused approach has many of the advantages of plasmid DNA as well as a minimal cassette size similar to RNA strategies. For this study, we characterized the specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and determined the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers induced by dbDNA™ and compared the responses with those of an optimized plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the same H1N1 influenza A/PR/8/34 HA gene. Immunizations with the constructs resulted in similar humoral and cellular immune responses. Both constructs induced high-titer HI antibodies and fully protected animals from lethal viral challenge. The data obtained from this study provides important validation for further development of novel vector approaches. PMID:26091432

  18. Ti plasmid-specified chemotaxis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C1 toward vir-inducing phenolic compounds and soluble factors from monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants.

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, A M; Watson, M D; Loake, G J; Shaw, C H

    1988-01-01

    Twelve phenolic compounds with related structures were analyzed for their ability to act as chemoattractants for Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C1 and as inducers of the Ti plasmid virulence operons. The results divided the phenolic compounds into three groups: compounds that act as strong vir inducers and are chemoattractants for A. tumefaciens C58C1 harboring the nopaline Ti plasmid pDUB1003 delta 31, but not the isogenic cured strain; compounds that are at best weak vir inducers and are weak chemoattractants for Ti plasmid-harboring and cured A. tumefaciens C58C1; and compounds that are vir noninducers and are also nonattractants. A strong correlation between vir-inducing ability and Ti plasmid requirement for chemotaxis is thus established. In addition, chemical structure rules for vir induction and chemotaxis are outlined. Positive chemotaxis toward root and shoot homogenates from monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants was observed. At low extract concentrations, chemotaxis was enhanced by the presence of Ti plasmid. The chemoattractants do not derive from intact cell walls. Lack of attraction is not responsible for the apparent block to monocot transformation by A. tumefaciens. PMID:3410827

  19. Virulence Plasmid of Rhodococcus equi Contains Inducible Gene Family Encoding Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Barbara A.; Prescott, John F.; Palmer, Guy H.; Takai, Shinji; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Alperin, Debra C.; Hines, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals. This facultative intracellular pathogen produces similar lesions in immunocompromised humans, particularly in AIDS patients. Virulent strains of R. equi bear a large plasmid that is required for intracellular survival within macrophages and for virulence in foals and mice. Only two plasmid-encoded proteins have been described previously; a 15- to 17-kDa surface protein designated virulence-associated protein A (VapA) and an antigenically related 20-kDa protein (herein designated VapB). These two proteins are not expressed by the same R. equi isolate. We describe here the substantial similarity between VapA and VapB. Moreover, we identify three additional genes carried on the virulence plasmid, vapC, -D, and -E, that are tandemly arranged downstream of vapA. These new genes are members of a gene family and encode proteins that are approximately 50% homologous to VapA, VapB, and each other. vapC, -D, and -E are found only in R. equi strains that express VapA and are highly conserved in VapA-positive isolates from both horses and humans. VapC, -D, and -E are secreted proteins coordinately regulated by temperature with VapA; the proteins are expressed when R. equi is cultured at 37°C but not at 30°C, a finding that is compatible with a role in virulence. As secreted proteins, VapC, -D, and -E may represent targets for the prevention of rhodococcal pneumonia. An immunologic study using VapA-specific antibodies and recombinant Vap proteins revealed no evidence of cross-reactivity despite extensive sequence similarity over the carboxy terminus of all four proteins. PMID:11159951

  20. Heterologous protection in pigs induced by a plasmid-cured and crp gene-deleted Salmonella choleraesuis live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chun-Yen; Wang, Shiang-Yiu; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Huang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Jen-Jin; Hong, Li-Shian; Shiau, Ai-Li; Tsai, Jeng-Liang; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2007-10-10

    In this study, we exploited a crp (cAMP receptor protein) gene-deleted, virulence plasmid-cured Salmonella choleraesuis mutant with decreased carbon source utilization, designated S.C.-Deltacrp/vpl(-), as a live vaccine strain. Normal weight gain with no clinical signs was observed in pigs immunized with high doses of S.C.-Deltacrp/vpl(-) live vaccine. Vaccination in pregnant sows induced high maternal antibodies, which could prevent piglets from Salmonella infection. Moreover, serial transmission of the vaccine strain in piglets produced no evidence of reversion to virulence. Furthermore, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from immunized piglets also developed Salmonella specific T-cell proliferative response in vitro. Our results indicate that immunogenic antigens in S.C.-Deltacrp/vpl(-) can induce adequate immunity to protect pigs against challenge with a heterologous virulent strain. Thus, this mutant holds promise for the development of a new live S. choleraesuis vaccine. PMID:17825957

  1. Complementation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing aux mutants by genes from the TR-region of the Ri plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    PubMed Central

    Offringa, I. A.; Melchers, L. S.; Regensburg-Tuink, A. J. G.; Costantino, P.; Schilperoort, R. A.; Hooykaas, P. J. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we provide information indicating that the agropine-type root-inducing (Ri) plasmid pRi1855 of Agrobacterium rhizogenes contains functional genes for auxin production (aux) in the right transferred DNA (T-DNA) region (TR-region). These genes were cloned and introduced into the T-region of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmids of mutants of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying an aux mutation. Depending on the Ri aux gene present, the oncogenicity of the Ti aux-1 and/or aux-2 mutations was restored, showing that the Ri aux genes are able to complement the Ti aux genes. Agrobacterium strains with an agropine-type Ri plasmid not only cause hairy root on certain plant species, but they also induce tumors on other plant species. In this paper it is shown that a mutation in either of the aux genes in the Ri plasmid leads to a total loss of tumorigenicity and a strongly diminished rhizogenicity of the host bacterium, revealing that the aux genes are important for tumor and root induction. Agrobacterium strains containing the TR-region but not the TL (left)-region of the Ri plasmid are still tumorigenic on certain plant species but are no longer capable of hairy-root induction. Images PMID:16593762

  2. A Histone-Like Protein Induces Plasmid DNA to Form Liquid Crystals in Vitro and Gene Compaction in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyong; Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Fan, Shenglan; Yao, Yanchen

    2013-01-01

    The liquid crystalline state is a universal phenomenon involving the formation of an ordered structure via a self-assembly process that has attracted attention from numerous scientists. In this study, the dinoflagellate histone-like protein HCcp3 is shown to induce super-coiled pUC18 plasmid DNA to enter a liquid crystalline state in vitro, and the role of HCcp3 in gene condensation in vivo is also presented. The plasmid DNA (pDNA)-HCcp3 complex formed birefringent spherical particles with a semi-crystalline selected area electronic diffraction (SAED) pattern. Circular dichroism (CD) titrations of pDNA and HCcp3 were performed. Without HCcp3, pUC18 showed the characteristic B conformation. As the HCcp3 concentration increased, the 273 nm band sharply shifted to 282 nm. When the HCcp3 concentration became high, the base pair (bp)/dimer ratio fell below 42/1, and the CD spectra of the pDNA-HCcp3 complexes became similar to that of dehydrated A-form DNA. Microscopy results showed that HCcp3 compacted the super-coiled gene into a condensed state and that inclusion bodies were formed. Our results indicated that HCcp3 has significant roles in gene condensation both in vitro and in histone-less eukaryotes in vivo. The present study indicates that HCcp3 has great potential for applications in non-viral gene delivery systems, where HCcp3 may compact genetic material to form liquid crystals. PMID:24322443

  3. Formation of plasmid DNA strand breaks induced by low-energy ion beam: indication of nuclear stopping effects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Jiang, B; Chen, Y; Ding, X; Liu, X; Chen, C; Guo, X; Yin, G

    1998-07-01

    Plasmid pGEM 3zf(+) was irradiated by nitrogen ion beam with energies between 20 and 100 keV and the fluence kept as 1x10(12)ions/cm2. The irradiated plasmid was assayed by neutral electrophoresis and quantified by densitometry. The yields of DNA with single-strand and double-strand breaks first increased then decreased with increasing ion energy. There was a maximal yield value in the range of 20-100 keV. The relationship between DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) cross-section and linear energy transfer (LET) also showed a peak-shaped distribution. To understand the physical process during DNA strand breaks, a Monte Carlo calculation code known as TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) was used to simulate energy losses due to nuclear stopping and to electronic stopping. It can be assumed that nuclear stopping plays a more important role in DNA strand breaks than electronic stopping in this energy range. The physical mechanisms of DNA strand breaks induced by a low-energy ion beam are also discussed. PMID:9728742

  4. In vivo electroporation of plasmids encoding GM-CSF or interleukin-2 into existing B16 melanomas combined with electrochemotherapy induces long-term antitumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Heller, L; Pottinger, C; Jaroszeski, M J; Gilbert, R; Heller, R

    2000-12-01

    When cancer cells, including melanoma cells, are genetically altered to secrete cytokines, irradiated and injected into subjects, long-term antitumour immunity is induced. Optimally, existing melanomas induced to produce cytokines in vivo could stimulate this same immune response. Although in vivo electroporation enhances plasmid expression, electroporation of plasmids encoding granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-2 (IL2) into B16 mouse melanomas did not significantly alter tumour growth at the concentration tested. Electrochemotherapy, which causes short-term, complete regressions of treated tumour but no resistance to challenge, was combined with plasmid delivery. The combination treatment resulted in the induction of long-term immunity to recurrence and resistance to challenge in up to 25% of mice. PMID:11198480

  5. Chromosomal and Plasmid-Encoded Factors of Shigella flexneri Induce Secretogenic Activity Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shea-Donohue, Terez; Barry, Eileen M.; Kaper, James B.; Fasano, Alessio; Nataro, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen that causes millions of cases of watery or bloody diarrhea annually, resulting in significant global mortality. Watery diarrhea is thought to arise in the jejunum, and subsequent bloody diarrhea occurs as a result of invasion of the colonic epithelium. Previous literature has demonstrated that Shigella encodes enterotoxins, both chromosomally and on the 220 kilobase virulence plasmid. The Shigella Enterotoxins 1 and 2 (ShET1 and ShET2) have been shown to increase water accumulation in the rabbit ileal loop model. In addition, these toxins increase the short circuit current in rabbit tissue mounted in Ussing chambers, which is a model for the ion exchange that occurs during watery diarrhea. In this study, we sought to validate the use of mouse jejunum in Ussing chamber as an alternative, more versatile model to study bacterial pathogenesis. In the process, we also identified enterotoxins in addition to ShET1 and ShET2 encoded by S. flexneri. Through analysis of proteins secreted from wildtype bacteria and various deletion mutants, we have identified four factors responsible for enterotoxin activity: ShET1 and Pic, which are encoded on the chromosome; ShET2 (encoded by sen or ospD3), which requires the type-III secretion system for secretion; and SepA, an additional factor encoded on the virulence plasmid. The use of mouse jejunum serves as a reliable and reproducible model to identify the enterotoxins elaborated by enteric bacteria. Moreover, the identification of all Shigella proteins responsible for enterotoxin activity is vital to our understanding of Shigella pathogenicity and to our success in developing safe and effective vaccine candidates. PMID:23166804

  6. Chromosomal and plasmid-encoded factors of Shigella flexneri induce secretogenic activity ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Faherty, Christina S; Faherty, Christina; Harper, Jill M; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Barry, Eileen M; Kaper, James B; Fasano, Alessio; Nataro, James P

    2012-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen that causes millions of cases of watery or bloody diarrhea annually, resulting in significant global mortality. Watery diarrhea is thought to arise in the jejunum, and subsequent bloody diarrhea occurs as a result of invasion of the colonic epithelium. Previous literature has demonstrated that Shigella encodes enterotoxins, both chromosomally and on the 220 kilobase virulence plasmid. The ShigellaEnterotoxins 1 and 2 (ShET1 and ShET2) have been shown to increase water accumulation in the rabbit ileal loop model. In addition, these toxins increase the short circuit current in rabbit tissue mounted in Ussing chambers, which is a model for the ion exchange that occurs during watery diarrhea. In this study, we sought to validate the use of mouse jejunum in Ussing chamber as an alternative, more versatile model to study bacterial pathogenesis. In the process, we also identified enterotoxins in addition to ShET1 and ShET2 encoded by S. flexneri. Through analysis of proteins secreted from wildtype bacteria and various deletion mutants, we have identified four factors responsible for enterotoxin activity: ShET1 and Pic, which are encoded on the chromosome; ShET2 (encoded by sen or ospD3), which requires the type-III secretion system for secretion; and SepA, an additional factor encoded on the virulence plasmid. The use of mouse jejunum serves as a reliable and reproducible model to identify the enterotoxins elaborated by enteric bacteria. Moreover, the identification of all Shigella proteins responsible for enterotoxin activity is vital to our understanding of Shigella pathogenicity and to our success in developing safe and effective vaccine candidates. PMID:23166804

  7. A plasmid-encoded two-component regulatory system involved in copper-inducible transcription in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Khunajakr, N; Liu, C Q; Charoenchai, P; Dunn, N W

    1999-03-18

    Two regulatory genes (lcoR and lcoS) were identified from a plasmid-borne lactococcal copper resistance determinant and characterized by transcriptional fusion to the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat). RT-PCR analysis indicates that lcoR and lcoS are organized within an operon, controlling the transcription of cat in a copper-inducible manner. The amino acid sequences deduced from lcoR and lcoS show homology to the response and sensor proteins of known two-component regulatory systems. Deletion within either lcoS or both genes inactivated the copper-dependent activity, suggesting the presence of no trans-acting lcoR and lcoS homologs in the lactococcal host chromosome. The transcription start site involved in copper induction was mapped by primer extension. PMID:10095123

  8. Immunization with plasmid DNA encoding hepatitis C virus envelope E2 antigenic domains induces antibodies whose immune reactivity is linked to the injection mode.

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, I; Maertens, G; Major, M E; Vitvitski, L; Dubuisson, J; Fournillier, A; De Martynoff, G; Trepo, C; Inchauspe, G

    1997-01-01

    Plasmids expressing different domains of the hepatis C virus (HCV) envelope E2 glycoprotein from a genotype 1a isolate were constructed to compare the immunogenic potential of E2 in nucleic acid-based immunizations. One plasmid, pCIE2t, expressed a C-terminally truncated form of E2, while others, pS2.SE2A to pS2.SE2E, encoded the adjacent 60-amino-acid (aa) sequences of E2 (inserts A to E) expressed as a fusion with the hepatitis B virus surface antigen. BALB/c mice were given injections of the plasmids intramuscularly (i.m.) or intraepidermally (i.e.) via a gene gun (biolistic introduction), and induced humoral immune responses were evaluated. The i.e. injections resulted in higher seroconversion rates and antibody titers, up to 100-fold, than did the i.m. injections (P = 0.01 to 0.04). Three restricted immunogenic domains, E2A (aa 384 to 443), E2C (aa 504 to 555), and E2E (aa 609 to 674), that yielded antibody titers ranging from 1:59 to > 1:43,700 could be identified. Subtype 1a- and 1b-derived E2 antigens and synthetic peptides were used in Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses, which revealed that the cross-reactivity of the plasmid-induced antibodies was linked both to the type of antigen expressed and to the injection mode. Induced anti-E2 antibodies could immunoprecipitate noncovalent E1E2 complexes believed to exist on the surface of HCV virions. This study allowed us to identify restricted immunogenic domains within E2 and demonstrated that different routes of injection of HCV E2 plasmids can result in quantitatively and qualitatively different humoral immune responses. PMID:9261444

  9. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    King, Deborah F. L.; McKay, Paul F.; Mann, Jamie F. S.; Jones, C. Bryn; Shattock, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM) delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN) and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice. Results Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity. Significance These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines. PMID:26544970

  10. Plasmid DNA immunization with Trypanosoma cruzi genes induces cardiac and clinical protection against Chagas disease in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Pérez-Leyva, M Magdalena; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Rosales-Encina, J Luis; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Reyes, Pedro A; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2012-01-01

    The only existing preventive measure against American trypanosomosis, or Chagas disease, is the control of the transmitting insect, which has only been effective in a few South American regions. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. Here, we present the clinical and cardiac levels of protection induced by expression to Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding the TcSP and TcSSP4 proteins in the canine model. Physical examination, diagnostic chagasic serology, and serial electrocardiograms were performed before and after immunization, as well as after experimental infection. We found that immunization with recombinant plasmids prevented hyperthermia in the acute phase of experimental infection and produced lymphadenomegaly as an immunological response against the parasite and additionally prevented heart rate elevation (tachycardia) in the acute and/or chronic stages of infection. Immunization with T. cruzi genes encoding the TcSP and TcSSP4 antigens diminished the quality and quantity of the electrocardiographic abnormalities, thereby avoiding progression to more severe developments such as right bundle branch block or ventricular premature complexes in a greater number of dogs. PMID:23148870

  11. Plasmid DNA immunization with Trypanosoma cruzi genes induces cardiac and clinical protection against Chagas disease in the canine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The only existing preventive measure against American trypanosomosis, or Chagas disease, is the control of the transmitting insect, which has only been effective in a few South American regions. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. Here, we present the clinical and cardiac levels of protection induced by expression to Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding the TcSP and TcSSP4 proteins in the canine model. Physical examination, diagnostic chagasic serology, and serial electrocardiograms were performed before and after immunization, as well as after experimental infection. We found that immunization with recombinant plasmids prevented hyperthermia in the acute phase of experimental infection and produced lymphadenomegaly as an immunological response against the parasite and additionally prevented heart rate elevation (tachycardia) in the acute and/or chronic stages of infection. Immunization with T. cruzi genes encoding the TcSP and TcSSP4 antigens diminished the quality and quantity of the electrocardiographic abnormalities, thereby avoiding progression to more severe developments such as right bundle branch block or ventricular premature complexes in a greater number of dogs. PMID:23148870

  12. Modulation of Total Body Irradiation Induced Life Shortening by Systemic Intravenous MnSOD-Plasmid Liposome Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epperly, Michael W.; Smith, Tracy; Wang, Hong; Schlesselman, James; Franicola, Darcy; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether systemic administration of MnSOD-PL protected mice from the acute hematopoietic syndrome as well as delayed death following total body irradiation (TBI), C57BL/6J mice received intravenously 100μl liposomes containing 100μg of human MnSOD-transgene plasmid 24 hours prior to 9.5 Gy or 1.0 Gy. The dose of 9.5 Gy was lethal to 42% of irradiated control female and 74% of irradiated control male mice respectively at 30 days with bone marrow hypocellularity consistent with the hematopoietic syndrome. A statistically significant increase in survival was detected in MnSOD-PL treated compared to 9.5 Gy irradiated control female mice out to 400 days, and in male mice out to 340 days. The incidence of tumors was similar between surviving groups. Between 350 to 600 days, outcome was similar for both MnSOD-PL treated and control irradiated groups consistent with aging with no difference in gross or microscopic pathologic evidence of tumors. Male and female mice receiving 1.0 Gy TBI showed irradiation induced life shortening after 120 days that was decreased by MnSOD-PL administration, and was associated with no increase in rate of tumor associated death. Therefore, systemic MnSOD-PL radioprotective gene therapy is not associated with a detectably higher incidence of late carcinogenesis. PMID:19024650

  13. Selective ploidy ablation, a high-throughput plasmid transfer protocol, identifies new genes affecting topoisomerase I–induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Robert J.D.; González-Barrera, Sergio; Sunjevaric, Ivana; Alvaro, David; Ciccone, Samantha; Wagner, Marisa; Rothstein, Rodney

    2011-01-01

    We have streamlined the process of transferring plasmids into any yeast strain library by developing a novel mating-based, high-throughput method called selective ploidy ablation (SPA). SPA uses a universal plasmid donor strain that contains conditional centromeres on every chromosome. The plasmid-bearing donor is mated to a recipient, followed by removal of all donor-strain chromosomes, producing a haploid strain containing the transferred plasmid. As proof of principle, we used SPA to transfer plasmids containing wild-type and mutant alleles of DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) into the haploid yeast gene-disruption library. Overexpression of Top1 identified only one sensitive mutation, rpa34, while overexpression of top1-T722A allele, a camptothecin mimetic, identified 190 sensitive gene-disruption strains along with rpa34. In addition to known camptothecin-sensitive strains, this set contained mutations in genes involved in the Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex, the kinetochore, and vesicle trafficking. We further show that mutations in several ESCRT vesicle trafficking components increase Top1 levels, which is dependent on SUMO modification. These findings demonstrate the utility of the SPA technique to introduce plasmids into the haploid gene-disruption library to discover new interacting pathways. PMID:21173034

  14. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  15. LONG-TERM STARVATION-INDUCED LOSS OF APPARENT ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN CELLS CONTAINING THE PLASMID PSA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and a Pseudomonas sp. strain 133B containing the pSa plasmid were starved in well water for up to 523 days. There were two patterns of apparent antibiotic resistance loss observed. In Pseudomonas sp. strain 133B, there was no apparent lo...

  16. Immunity to experimental fowl typhoid in chickens induced by a virulence plasmid-cured derivative of Salmonella gallinarum.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, P A

    1990-01-01

    Chickens were immunized by two intramuscular inoculations at 1 and 14 days of age with virulence plasmid-cured derivatives of Salmonella gallinarum and were challenged 14 days later by oral inoculation of ca. 50 50% lethal doses (LD50) of fully virulent S. gallinarum 9. Mortality in the nonimmunized and immunized groups were 36 and 3%, respectively. This difference was highly significant (P less than 0.01). A significant reduction in mortality was also produced following oral challenge with 5,000 LD50 doses. The LD50 values by intramuscular inoculation of the challenge organism into nonimmunized and immunized chickens were log10 (0.13 +/- 1.57) and (9.74 +/- 2.72), respectively. Immunization was effective whether chickens were immunized at 1 and 14 days of age or at 21 and 35 days of age. Serum agglutinins were present in immunized chickens. Immunization with plasmid-cured Salmonella pullorum gave less protection, and immunization with Escherichia coli K-12 possessing the virulence plasmid of S. gallinarum gave none. The plasmid-cured S. gallinarum was made both rough by virulent bacteriophage activity and nalidixic acid resistant (Nalr) to produce a strain designated 9VP-phi rNalr. It was compared with a Nalr mutant of the rough 9R vaccine strain designated 9 Nalr for virulence and immunogenicity. 9VP-phi rNalr was slightly less protective and less virulent than was the 9R vaccine strain. PMID:2194968

  17. DNA vaccination of mice with a plasmid encoding Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid protein mimics the B-cell response induced by virus infection.

    PubMed

    Koletzki, D; Schirmbeck, R; Lundkvist, A; Meisel, H; Krüger, D H; Ulrich, R

    2001-11-17

    Inoculation of naked DNA has been applied for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against different viral infections. To study the humoral immune response induced by DNA vaccination we cloned the entire nucleocapsid protein-encoding sequence of the Puumala hantavirus strain Vranica/Hällnäs into the CMV promoter-driven expression unit of the plasmid pcDNA3, generating pcDNA3-VR1. A single dose injection of 50 microg of plasmid DNA into each M. tibialis anterior of BALB/c mice induced a high-titered antibody response against the nucleocapsid protein as documented 6 and 11 weeks after immunisation. PEPSCAN analysis of a serum pool of the pcDNA3-VR1-vaccinated animals revealed antibodies reacting with epitopes covering the whole nucleocapsid protein. The epitope-specificity of the immune response induced by DNA vaccination seems to reflect the antibody response in experimentally virus-infected bank voles (the natural host of the Puumala virus) and humans. The data suggest that DNA vaccination could be used for the identification of highly immunogenic epitopes in viral proteins. PMID:11035190

  18. Preparation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression plasmids.

    PubMed

    Drew, David; Kim, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Expression plasmids for Saccharomyces cerevisiae offer a wide choice of vector copy number, promoters of varying strength and selection markers. These expression plasmids are usually shuttle vectors that can be propagated both in yeast and bacteria, making them useful in gene cloning. For heterologous production of membrane proteins, we used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion technology which was previously developed in the Escherichia coli system. We designed an expression plasmid carrying an inducible GAL1 promoter, a gene encoding a membrane protein of interest and the GFP-octa-histidine sequence. Here we describe construction of multi-copy yeast expression plasmids by homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae. PMID:22454112

  19. Plasmid mediated enhancement of uv resistance in Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Miehl, R.; Miller, M.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 38.5-Mdal plasmid of Streptococcus faecalis subdp. zymogenes has been shown to enhance survival following uv irradiation. In addition, the presence of this plasmid increases the mutation frequencies following uv irradiation and enhanced W-reactivation. The data presented indicate that S. faecalis has an inducible error-prone repair system and that the plasmid enhances these repair functions.

  20. Identification of DHA-23, a novel plasmid-mediated and inducible AmpC beta-lactamase from Enterobacteriaceae in Northern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wen-Shyang; Wang, Nai-Yu; Feng, Jou-An; Weng, Li-Chuan; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: AmpC β-lactamases are classified as Amber Class C and Bush Group 1. AmpC β-lactamases can hydrolyze broad and extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and are not inhibited by β-lactamase inhibitors such as clavulanic acid. This study was conducted to identify DHA-23, a novel plasmid-mediated and inducible AmpC β-lactamase obtained from Enterobacteriaceae. Methods: A total of 210 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates were collected from a medical center (comprising two branches) in Northern Taiwan during 2009–2012. AmpC β-lactamase genes were analyzed through a polymerase chain reaction using plasmid DNA templates and gene sequencing. The genetic relationships of the isolates were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis following the digestion of intact genomic DNA by using XbaI. Results: Three enterobacterial isolates (one Escherichia coli and two Klebsiella pneumoniae) were obtained from three hospitalized patients. All three isolates were resistant or intermediately susceptible to all β-lactams, and exhibited reduced susceptibility to carbapenems. These three isolates expressed a novel AmpC β-lactamase, designated DHA-23, approved by the curators of the Lahey website. DHA-23 differs from DHA-1 and DHA-6 by one amino acid substitution (Ser245Ala), exhibiting three amino acid changes compared with DHA-7 and DHA-Morganella morganii; three amino acid changes compared with DHA-3; four amino acid changes compared with DHA-5; and eight amino acid changes compared with DHA-2 (>97% identity). This AmpC β-lactamase is inducible using a system involving ampR. Conclusion: This is the first report to address DHA-23, a novel AmpC β-lactamase. DHA-type β-lactamases are continuous threat in Taiwan. PMID:25999942

  1. Plasmid-protein relaxation complexes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Novick, R

    1976-09-01

    Protein-deoxyribonucleic acid relaxation complexes have been demonstrated for six Staphylococcus aureus plasmids out of sixteen examined. Four of these encode stretomycin resistence, have molecular weights of about 2.7 x 10(6), and are isolated as supercoiled molecules that are virtally 100% relaxable by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate. It is probable that these four isolates represent a single widely disseminated plasmid species. The other two plasmids showing relaxation complexes have molecular weights of about 3 x 10(6) and encode chloramphenicol resistance. The complexes in these cases are unstable, and it has not been possible to induce more than 50% relaxation by any of the standard treatments. Ten other plasmids do not show detectable complexes. These include three penicillinase plasmids, four tetracycline-resistance plasmids, one plasmid carrying kanamycin-neomycin resistance, and finally, two chloramphenicol-resistance plasmids. PMID:956124

  2. Plasmid maintenance and protein overproduction in selective recycle bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ogden, K L; Davis, R H

    1991-02-20

    A new plasmid construct has been used in conjunction with selective recycle to successfully maintain otherwise unstable plasmid-bearing E. coli cells in a continuous bioreactor and to produce significant amounts of the plasmid-encoded protein beta-lactamase. The plasmid is constructed so that pilin expression, which leads to bacterial flocculation, is under control of the tac operon. The plasmid-bearing cells are induced to flocculate in the separator, whereas cell growth and product synthesis occur in the main fermentation vessel without the inhibiting effects of pilin production. Selective recycle allows for the maintenance of the plasmid-bearing cells by separating flocculent, plasmid-bearing cells from nonflocculent, segregant cells in an inclined settler, and recycling only the plasmid-bearing cells to the reactor. As a result, product expression levels are maintained that are more than ten times the level achieved without selective recycle. All experimental data agree well with theoretical predictions. PMID:18597374

  3. Demonstration of ligand decoration, and ligand-induced perturbation, of G-quadruplexes in a plasmid using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mela, Ioanna; Kranaster, Ramon; Henderson, Robert M; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Edwardson, J Michael

    2012-01-17

    G-Quadruplexes are nucleic acid secondary structures consisting of a planar arrangement of four guanine residues. Potential G-quadruplex-forming sequences are widely distributed throughout the genome. Significantly, they are present in telomeres and are enriched in gene promoters and first introns, raising the possibility that perturbation of G-quadruplex stability might have therapeutic potential, for example in the treatment of cancer. Ligands that interact selectively with G-quadruplexes include both proteins and small molecules, although the interactions between ligands and their G-quadruplex targets have been monitored using indirect methods. In addition, the G-quadruplex targets have often been short DNA fragments. Here, we have used atomic force microscopy imaging to examine directly at the single-molecule level the interaction of ligands with G-quadruplexes generated during transcription of a plasmid containing a G-rich insert. We show that the structures produced during transcription are decorated specifically by the single-chain antibody HF1 and by the nuclear protein PARP-1, both of which are known to recognize G-quadruplexes. Our results provide clear structural evidence of G-quadruplex formation in a transcription-dependent case and demonstrate directly how small-molecule stabilizers and destabilizers can manipulate these structures in a biochemically functional system. PMID:22225525

  4. Pulmonary irradiation-induced expression of VCAM-I and ICAM-I is decreased by manganese superoxide dismutase-plasmid/liposome (MnSOD-PL) gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Sikora, Christine A; DeFilippi, Stacy J; Gretton, Joan E; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Archer, Herbert; Carlos, Timothy; Guo, HongLiang; Greenberger, Joel S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity is a major complication of total body irradiation used in preparation of patients for bone marrow transplantation. The mechanism of the late pulmonary damage manifested by fibrosis is unknown. In C57BL/6NHsd mice, manganese superoxide dismutase-plasmid/liposome (MnSOD-PL) intratracheal injection 24 hours prior to 20 Gy single-fraction irradiation to both lungs significantly reduced late irradiation damage. Single intratracheal injections of MnSOD-PL, at concentrations as low as 250 microg of plasmid DNA, in a constant volume of 78 microL of liposomes, reduced late damage. To determine whether a slowly proliferating population of cells in the lung was responsible for initiation of fibrosis and was altered by MnSOD-PL therapy, 20 Gy total lung-irradiated mice were examined at serial time points for bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake in sites of cell division. There was low-level, but nonsignificant, increased cell proliferation detected at 80 days, with a significant increase at 100 days, 120 days, and at the time of death. Immunohistochemical assay for up-regulation of adhesion molecules associated with recruitment, transendothelial migration, and proliferation of bronchoalveolar macrophages revealed significant up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) at 100 days with further increases up to the time of death. Increases were first detected in endothelin-positive endothelial cells. MnSOD-PL administration prior to irradiation decreased both BrdU incorporation and delayed expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. The data indicate that the appearance of late irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with the up-regulation of adhesion molecules and suggest that potential targets for intervention may focus on the pulmonary vascular endothelium. PMID:12014807

  5. COMPLEX FRAMESHIFT MUTATIONS MEDIATED BY PLASMID PKM101: MUTATIONAL MECHANISMS DEDUCED FROM 4-AMINOBIPHENYL-INDUCED MUTATION SPECTRA IN SALMONELLA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used colony probe hybridization and PCR/DNA sequencing to determine the mutations -aminobiphenyl (4-AB) +S9-induced revertants of the -1 frameshift allele in 2,300 4-aminobiphenyl of the base-substitution allele hisD3052 in strains TA1978, TA1538, and TA98 and were at strains ...

  6. Prime-boost vaccination with plasmid DNA followed by recombinant vaccinia virus expressing BgGARP induced a partial protective immunity to inhibit Babesia gibsoni proliferation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shinuo; Mousa, Ahmed Abdelmoniem; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Zhou, Mo; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Masatani, Tatsunori; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Shinya; Xuan, Xuenan

    2013-12-01

    A heterologous prime-boost vaccination regime with DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus (rvv) vectors expressing relevant antigens has been shown to induce effective immune responses against several infectious pathogens. In this study, we describe the effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy by immunizing dogs with a recombinant plasmid followed by vaccinia virus, both of which expressed the glutamic acid-rich protein (BgGARP) of Babesia gibsoni. The dogs immunized with the prime-boost regime developed a significantly high level of specific antibodies against BgGARP when compared with the control groups. The antibody level was strongly increased after a booster immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus. Two weeks after the booster immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing BgGARP, the dogs were challenged with B. gibsoni parasite. The dogs immunized with the prime-boost regime showed partial protection, manifested as a significantly low level of parasitemia. These results indicated that this type of DNA/rvv prime-boost immunization approach may have use against B. gibsoni infection in dogs. PMID:24338330

  7. Rejoining of gamma-radiation-induced single-strand breaks in plasmid DNA by human cell extracts: Dependence on the concentration of the hydroxyl radical scavenger, Tris

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkins, P.S.; Fairman, M.P.; O`Neill, P.

    1996-01-01

    The rejoining of single-strand breaks induced by {gamma} irradiation in plasmid DNA under different scavenging conditions is described using human cell extracts. As the scavenging capacity of the irradiated solution increases from 1.5 X 10{sup 7} to 3 X 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} using Tris-HCl as a scavenger, the ratio of single- to double-strand breaks is reduced from {approx}70:1 to 40:1. After irradiation, a proportion of DNA molecules have no initial strand breaks but contain damage that is converted to strand breaks when incubated either at 37{degrees}C or in the presence of cellular extract. Repair of damage by the extracts is dependent upon the scavenging capacity of the irradiated solution. Optimal rejoining is observed when the scavenging capacity is <1.5 X 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}, and results in the repair of some initial strand breaks. As the scavenging capacity increases to 3 X 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} the proportion of breaks repaired is significantly reduced. The relative increase in the yield of double-strand breaks and reduced repairability of single-strand breaks at a scavenging capacity of 3 X 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} is consistent with the concept that the severity of damage increases upon increasing the scavenger concentration. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Expression Plasmids for Use in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Zordan, Rebecca E.; Ren, Yuxia; Pan, Shih-Jung; Rotondo, Giuseppe; Peñas, Alejandro De Las; Iluore, Joseph; Cormack, Brendan P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a series of CEN/ARS episomal plasmids containing different Candida glabrata promoters, allowing for a range of constitutive or regulated expression of proteins in C. glabrata. The set of promoters includes three constitutive promoters (EGD2pr, HHT2pr, PDC1pr), two macrophage/phagocytosis-induced promoters (ACO2pr, LYS21pr), and one nutritionally regulated promoter (MET3pr). Each promoter was cloned into two plasmid backbones that differ in their selectable marker, URA3, or the dominant-selectable NAT1 gene, which confers resistance to the drug nourseothricin. Expression from the 12 resulting plasmids was assessed using GFP as a reporter and flow cytometry or quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction to assess expression levels. Together this set of plasmids expands the toolkit of expression vectors available for use with C. glabrata. PMID:23934995

  9. Plasmids in Frankia sp.

    PubMed

    Normand, P; Simonet, P; Butour, J L; Rosenberg, C; Moiroud, A; Lalonde, M

    1983-07-01

    A method to achieve cell lysis and isolate Frankia sp. plasmid DNA was developed. A screening of Frankia sp. strains belonging to different host compatibility groups (Alnus sp., Elaeagnus sp., Ceanothus sp.) showed that, of 39 strains tested, 4 (strains Cp11, ARgN22d, ArI3, and EUN1f) possessed plasmids ranging in size from 7.1 to 32.2 kilobase pairs as estimated from agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. A total of 11 plasmids were detected. PMID:6863219

  10. Natural plasmids of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, A J

    1995-01-01

    Among eukaryotes, plasmids have been found in fungi and plants but not in animals. Most plasmids are mitochondrial. In filamentous fungi, plasmids are commonly encountered in isolates from natural populations. Individual populations may show a predominance of one type, but some plasmids have a global distribution, often crossing species boundaries. Surveys have shown that strains can contain more than one type of plasmid and that different types appear to be distributed independently. In crosses, plasmids are generally inherited maternally. Horizontal transmission is by cell contact. Circular plasmids are common only in Neurospora spp., but linear plasmids have been found in many fungi. Circular plasmids have one open reading frame (ORF) coding for a DNA polymerase or a reverse transcriptase. Linear plasmids generally have two ORFs, coding for presumptive DNA and RNA polymerases with amino acid motifs showing homology to viral polymerases. Plasmids often attain a high copy number, in excess of that of mitochondrial DNA. Linear plasmids have a protein attached to their 5' end, and this is presumed to act as a replication primer. Most plasmids are neutral passengers, but several linear plasmids integrate into mitochondrial DNA, causing death of the host culture. Inferred amino acid sequences of linear plasmid ORFs have been used to plot phylogenetic trees, which show a fair concordance with conventional trees. The circular Neurospora plasmids have replication systems that seem to be evolutionary intermediates between the RNA and the DNA worlds. PMID:8531891

  11. Analysis of mutations induced by replication of UV-damaged plasmid DNA in HeLa cell extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, M.P.; El-Saleh, S.; Dixon, K.

    1995-12-31

    We have used an SV40-based shuttle vector, pZ189, to investigate the capacity of HeLa cell extracts to reproduce the in vivo process of mutation fixation. We showed previously that when UV-irradiated pZ189 is replicated in these extracts, bypass of UV photoproducts occurs, resulting in base substitution mutations in the supF gene of the vector. Here we report the DNA sequence characterization of a collection of 60 of these UV-induced mutants. Most of the mutations observed are single or tandem double base substitutions at dipyrimidine sites; of these, approximately 90% are G:C{r_arrow}A:T transitions. Mutations are observed predominantly at a few sites, in particular at positions 155 and 156 in the supF sequence. No dramatic differences in the mutation spectrum were observed when the orientation of the supF gene was reversed with respect to the SV40 origin of replication, suggesting that mutation fixation occurs similarly on both the leading and the lagging strands for DNA replication. Generally, the mutational hot spots observed when UV-irradiated pZ189 was passaged in human or monkey cells in culture. Thus, it appears that the replication and mutagenesis of UV-damaged templates in HeLa cell extracts accurately reflects these processes in the intact cell. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Inducing Humoral and Cellular Responses to Multiple Sporozoite and Liver-Stage Malaria Antigens Using Exogenous Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, B.; Talbott, K. T.; Balakrishnan, A.; Cisper, N.; Morrow, M. P.; Hutnick, N. A.; Myles, D. J.; Shedlock, D. J.; Obeng-Adjei, N.; Yan, J.; Kayatani, A. K. K.; Richie, N.; Cabrera, W.; Shiver, R.; Khan, A. S.; Brown, A. S.; Yang, M.; Wille-Reece, U.; Birkett, A. J.; Sardesai, N. Y.

    2013-01-01

    A vaccine candidate that elicits humoral and cellular responses to multiple sporozoite and liver-stage antigens may be able to confer protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria; however, a technology for formulating and delivering such a vaccine has remained elusive. Here, we report the preclinical assessment of an optimized DNA vaccine approach that targets four P. falciparum antigens: circumsporozoite protein (CSP), liver stage antigen 1 (LSA1), thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP), and cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS). Synthetic DNA sequences were designed for each antigen with modifications to improve expression and were delivered using in vivo electroporation (EP). Immunogenicity was evaluated in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs) and assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay, and flow cytometry. In mice, DNA with EP delivery induced antigen-specific IFN-γ production, as measured by ELISpot assay and IgG seroconversion against all antigens. Sustained production of IFN-γ, interleukin-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha was elicited in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments. Furthermore, hepatic CD8+ lymphocytes produced LSA1-specific IFN-γ. The immune responses conferred to mice by this approach translated to the NHP model, which showed cellular responses by ELISpot assay and intracellular cytokine staining. Notably, antigen-specific CD8+ granzyme B+ T cells were observed in NHPs. Collectively, the data demonstrate that delivery of gene sequences by DNA/EP encoding malaria parasite antigens is immunogenic in animal models and can harness both the humoral and cellular arms of the immune system. PMID:23897618

  13. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  14. Cationized gelatin hydrogels mixed with plasmid DNA induce stronger and more sustained gene expression than atelocollagen at calvarial bone defects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, K; Shibata, T; Shimada, A; Ideno, H; Nakashima, K; Tabata, Y; Nifuji, A

    2016-01-01

    Gene transduction of exogenous factors at local sites in vivo is a promising approach to promote regeneration of tissue defects owing to its simplicity and capacity for expression of a variety of genes. Gene transduction by viral vectors is highly efficient; however, there are safety concerns associated with viruses. As a method for nonviral gene transduction, plasmid DNA delivery is safer and simpler, but requires an efficient carrier substance. Here, we aimed to develop a simple, efficient method for bone regeneration by gene transduction and to identify optimal conditions for plasmid DNA delivery at bone defect sites. We focused on carrier substances and compared the efficiencies of two collagen derivatives, atelocollagen, and gelatin hydrogel, as substrates for plasmid DNA delivery in vivo. To assess the efficiencies of these substrates, we examined exogenous expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) by fluorescence microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. GFP expression at the bone defect site was higher when gelatin hydrogel was used as a substrate to deliver plasmids than when atelocollagen was used. Moreover, the gelatin hydrogel was almost completely absorbed at the defect site, whereas some atelocollagen remained. When a plasmid harboring bone morphogenic protein 2 was delivered with the substrate to bony defect sites, more new bone formation was observed in the gelatin group than in the atelocollagen group. These results suggested that the gelatin hydrogel was more efficient than atelocollagen as a substrate for local gene delivery and may be a superior material for induction of bone regeneration. PMID:26848778

  15. Sequence and Role in Virulence of the Three Plasmid Complement of the Model Tumor-Inducing Bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335

    PubMed Central

    Bardaji, Leire; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Sundin, George W.; Ramos, Cayo; Murillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 is a model for the study of the molecular basis of disease production and tumor formation in woody hosts, and its draft genome sequence has been recently obtained. Here we closed the sequence of the plasmid complement of this strain, composed of three circular molecules of 78,357 nt (pPsv48A), 45,220 nt (pPsv48B), and 42,103 nt (pPsv48C), all belonging to the pPT23A-like family of plasmids widely distributed in the P. syringae complex. A total of 152 coding sequences were predicted in the plasmid complement, of which 38 are hypothetical proteins and seven correspond to putative virulence genes. Plasmid pPsv48A contains an incomplete Type IVB secretion system, the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector gene hopAF1, gene ptz, involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, and three copies of a gene highly conserved in plant-associated proteobacteria, which is preceded by a hrp box motif. A complete Type IVA secretion system, a well conserved origin of transfer (oriT), and a homolog of the T3SS effector gene hopAO1 are present in pPsv48B, while pPsv48C contains a gene with significant homology to isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase, type 1. Several potential mobile elements were found on the three plasmids, including three types of MITE, a derivative of IS801, and a new transposon effector, ISPsy30. Although the replication regions of these three plasmids are phylogenetically closely related, their structure is diverse, suggesting that the plasmid architecture results from an active exchange of sequences. Artificial inoculations of olive plants with mutants cured of plasmids pPsv48A and pPsv48B showed that pPsv48A is necessary for full virulence and for the development of mature xylem vessels within the knots; we were unable to obtain mutants cured of pPsv48C, which contains five putative toxin-antitoxin genes. PMID:22022435

  16. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  17. Plasmid detection, characterization and ecology

    PubMed Central

    Smalla, Kornelia; Jechalke, Sven; Top, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids are important vehicles for rapid adaptation of bacterial populations to changing environmental conditions. To reduce the cost of plasmid carriage, it is thought that only a fraction of a local population carries plasmids or is permissive to plasmid uptake. Plasmids provide various accessory traits which might be beneficial under particular conditions. The genetic variation generated by plasmid carriage within populations ensures the robustness towards environmental change. Plasmid-mediated gene transfer plays an important role not only in the mobilization and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes but also in the spread of degradative pathways and pathogenicity determinants of pathogens. Here we summarize the state-of-the-art methods to study the occurrence, abundance and diversity of plasmids in environmental bacteria. Increasingly, cultivation independent total community DNA methods are being used to characterize and quantify the diversity and abundance of plasmids in relation to various biotic and abiotic factors. An improved understanding of the ecology of plasmids and their hosts is crucial in the development of intervention strategies for antibiotic resistance gene spread. We discuss the potentials and limitations of methods used to determine the host range of plasmids as the ecology of plasmids is tightly linked to their hosts. The recent advances in sequencing technologies provide an enormous potential for plasmid classification, diversity and evolution studies but numerous challenges still exist. PMID:26104560

  18. Electrotransfer of Plasmid Vector DNA into Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    Wolff et al. (1990) first reported that plasmid DNA injected into skeletal muscle is taken up by muscle cells and the genes in the plasmid are expressed for more than two months thereafter, although the transfected DNA does not usually undergo chromosomal integration (Wolff et al., 1991, 1992). However, the relatively low expression levels attained by this method have hampered its applications for uses other than as a DNA vaccine (Davis et al., 1995). There are a number of reports analyzing the conditions that affect the efficiency of gene transfer by intramuscular DNA injection and assessing the fine structures of expression plasmid vectors that may affect expression levels (Davis et al., 1993; Liang et al., 1996; Norman et al., 1997). Furthermore, various attempts were done to improve the efficiency of gene transfer by intramus cular DNA injection. Consequently, regenerating muscle was shown to produce 80-fold or more protein than did normal muscle, following injection of an expression plas-mid. Muscle regeneration was induced by treatment with cardiotoxin or bupivacaine (Wells, 1993; Vitadello et al., 1994). We previously demonstrated that by combining a strong promoter and bupivacaine pretreatment intramuscular injection of an IL-5 expression plasmid results in IL-5 production in muscle at a level sufficient to induce marked proliferation of eosinophils in the bone marrow and eosinophil infiltration of various organs (Tokui et al., 1997). It was also reported that a single intramuscular injection of an erythropoietin expression plasmid produced physiologically significant elevations in serum erythropoietin levels and increased hematocrits in adult mice (Tripathy et al., 1996). Hematocrits in these animals remained elevated at >60% for at least 90 days after a single injection. However, improvements to this method have not been sufficient to extend its applications including clinical use.

  19. Nonconjugative Plasmids Encoding Sulfanilamide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Susumu; Inoue, Kunio; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    1977-01-01

    Nonconjugative plasmids encoding sulfanilamide (Sa) resistance were demonstrated at a high frequency in Shigella and Escherichia coli strains resistant to sulfanilamide. These Sa plasmids were all compatible with the standard plasmids used in compatibility testing. The sizes of seven Sa plasmids were measured by electron microscopy and ranged from 1.79 to 2.08 μm, corresponding to 3.5 to 3.9 megadaltons. Images PMID:334067

  20. Toxin plasmids of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  1. Cloning and analysis of a large plasmid pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis revealed a novel plasmid organization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueying; Peng, Donghai; Dong, Zhaoxia; Zhu, Lei; Guo, Suxia; Sun, Ming

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report a rapid cloning strategy for large native plasmids via a contig linkage map by BAC libraries. Using this method, we cloned a large plasmid pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tenebrionis strain YBT-1765. Complete sequencing showed that pBMB165 is 77,627 bp long with a GC-content of 35.36%, and contains 103 open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence analysis and comparison reveals that pBMB165 represents a novel plasmid organization: it mainly consists of a pXO2-like replicon and mobile genetic elements (an inducible prophage BMBTP3 and a set of transposable elements). This is the first description of this plasmid organization pattern, which may result from recombination events among the plasmid replicon, prophage and transposable elements. This plasmid organization reveals that the prophage BMBTP3 may use the plasmid replicon to maintain its genetic stability. Our results provide a new approach to understanding co-evolution between bacterial plasmids and bacteriophage. PMID:24312580

  2. A Recombinant DNA Plasmid Encoding the sIL-4R-NAP Fusion Protein Suppress Airway Inflammation in an OVA-Induced Mouse Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Fu, Guo; Ji, Zhenyu; Huang, Xiabing; Ding, Cong; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xiaolong; Du, Mingxuan; Wang, Ting; Kang, Qiaozhen

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease. It was prevalently perceived that Th2 cells played the crucial role in asthma pathogenesis, which has been identified as the important target for anti-asthma therapy. The soluble IL-4 receptor (sIL-4R), which is the decoy receptor for Th2 cytokine IL-4, has been reported to be effective in treating asthma in phase I/II clinical trail. To develop more efficacious anti-asthma agent, we attempt to test whether the Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a novel TLR2 agonist, would enhance the efficacy of sIL-4R in anti-asthma therapy. In our work, we constructed a pcDNA3.1-sIL-4R-NAP plasmid, named PSN, encoding fusion protein of murine sIL-4R and HP-NAP. PSN significantly inhibited airway inflammation, decreased the serum OVA-specific IgE levels and remodeled the Th1/Th2 balance. Notably, PSN is more effective on anti-asthma therapy comparing with plasmid only expressing sIL-4R. PMID:27209195

  3. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  4. Conjugative Plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Pachulec, Emilia; van der Does, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM) determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones) and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants) have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233) or containing Dutch (pEP5289) or American (pEP5050) type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1α, β, γ, δ and ε subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids conjugated efficiently between

  5. Replication of Staphylococcal Multiresistance Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Neville; Apisiridej, Sumalee; Berg, Tracey; O'Rourke, Brendon A.; Curnock, Steve; Dyke, Keith G. H.; Skurray, Ronald A.

    2000-01-01

    Based on structural and functional properties, three groups of large staphylococcal multiresistance plasmids have been recognized, viz., the pSK1 family, pSK41-like conjugative plasmids, and β-lactamase–heavy-metal resistance plasmids. Here we describe an analysis of the replication functions of a representative of each of these plasmid groups. The replication initiation genes from the Staphylococcus aureus plasmids pSK1, pSK41, and pI9789::Tn552 were found to be related to each other and to the Staphylococcus xylosus plasmid pSX267 and are also related to rep genes of several plasmids from other gram-positive genera. Nucleotide sequence similarity between pSK1 and pI9789::Tn552 extended beyond their rep genes, encompassing upstream divergently transcribed genes, orf245 and orf256, respectively. Our analyses revealed that genes encoding proteins related to the deduced orf245 product are variously represented, in several types of organization, on plasmids possessing six seemingly evolutionarily distinct types of replication initiation genes and including both theta-mode and rolling-circle replicons. Construction of minireplicons and subsequent functional analysis demonstrated that orf245 is required for the segregational stability of the pSK1 replicon. In contrast, no gene equivalent to orf245 is evident on the conjugative plasmid pSK41, and a minireplicon encoding only the pSK41 rep gene was found to exhibit a segregational stability approaching that of the parent plasmid. Significantly, the results described establish that many of the large multiresistance plasmids that have been identified in clinical staphylococci, which were formerly presumed to be unrelated, actually utilize an evolutionarily related theta-mode replication system. PMID:10735859

  6. Modulation of In Utero Total Body Irradiation Induced Newborn Mouse Growth Retardation by Maternal Manganese Superoxide Dismutase-Plasmid Liposome (MnSOD-PL) Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epperly, Michael W.; Smith, Tracy; Zhang, Xichen; Greenberger, Benjamin; Komanduri, Paavani; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the effects of Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plasmid liposome (PL) maternal radioprotection on fetal mice, timed pregnant female mice (E14 gestation) were irradiated to 3.0 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) dose, and the number, weight, and growth and development over 6 months after birth of newborn mice was quantitated compared to irradiated controls. Maternal MnSOD-PL treatment at E13 improved pup survival at birth (5.4 ± 0.9/litter compared to irradiated 3.0 Gy controls 4.9 ± 1.1. There was no statistically significant difference in newborn abnormalities, male to female ratio in newborn litters, or other evidence of teratogenesis in surviving newborn mice from MnSOD-PL treated compared to irradiated controls. However, E13 3Gy irradiated pups from gene therapy treated mothers showed a significant increase in both growth and overall survival over 6 months after birth (p = 0.0022). To determine if transgene product crossed the placenta pregnant E13 mice were injected I.V. with hemagglutinin-epitope-tagged MnSOD (100 μgm plasmid in 100 μl liposomes), then 24 hours later fetal mice, placentas, and maternal tissues were removed and tested by both immunohistochemistry and RTPCR for transgene and product. There was no evidence of transgene or product in placenta or any fetal tissue while maternal liver was positive by both assays. The data provide evidence for fetal radioprotection by maternal MnSOD-PL gene therapy before irradiation which is mediated by an indirect bystander effect and is associated with a significant improvement in both survival at birth and growth and development of newborn mice. PMID:21248791

  7. Modulation of in utero total body irradiation induced newborn mouse growth retardation by maternal manganese superoxide dismutase-plasmid liposome (MnSOD-PL) gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Epperly, M W; Smith, T; Zhang, X; Goff, J P; Franicola, D; Greenberger, B; Komanduri, P; Wang, H; Greenberger, J S

    2011-06-01

    To determine the effects of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plasmid liposome (PL) maternal radioprotection on fetal mice, timed pregnant female mice (E14 gestation) were irradiated to 3.0 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) dose, and the number, weight and growth and development over 6 months after birth of newborn mice was quantitated compared with irradiated controls. Maternal MnSOD-PL treatment at E13 improved pup survival at birth (5.4±0.9 per litter) compared with non-irradiated 3.0 Gy controls 4.9±1.1. There was no statistically significant difference in newborn abnormalities, male to female ratio in newborn litters, or other evidence of teratogenesis in surviving newborn mice from MnSOD-PL treated compared with irradiated controls. However, E14 3 Gy irradiated pups from gene therapy-treated mothers showed a significant increase in both growth and overall survival over 6 months after birth (P=0.0022). To determine if transgene product crossed the placenta pregnant E13 mice were injected intravenously with hemagglutinin-epitope-tagged MnSOD (100 μg plasmid in 100 μl liposomes), then after 24 h, fetal mice, placentas and maternal tissues were removed and tested by both immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-PCR for transgene and product. There was no evidence of transgene or product in placenta or any fetal tissue while maternal liver was positive by both assays. The data provide evidence for fetal radioprotection by maternal MnSOD-PL gene therapy before irradiation, which is mediated by an indirect bystander effect and is associated with a significant improvement in both survival at birth and growth and development of newborn mice. PMID:21248791

  8. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  9. Plasmid acquisition in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.; Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, bacteria often show an increased resistance to antibiotics. Bacteria can develop resistance to an antibiotic after transformation, the acquisition of DNA, usually in the form of a plasmid containing a gene for resistance to one or more antibiotics. In order to study the capacity of bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics in microgravity, we have modified the standard protocol for transformation of Escherichia coli for use in the NASA-flight-certified hardware package, The Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA). Here we report on the ability of E. coli to remain competent for long periods of time at temperatures that are readily available on the Space Shuttle, and present some preliminary flight results.

  10. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  11. Evolved plasmid-host interactions reduce plasmid interference cost.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hirokazu; Wegrzyn, Katarznya; Loftie-Eaton, Wesley; Johnson, Jenny; Deckert, Gail E; Rogers, Linda M; Konieczny, Igor; Top, Eva M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic selection drives adaptation of antibiotic resistance plasmids to new bacterial hosts, but the molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. We previously showed that a broad-host-range plasmid was poorly maintained in Shewanella oneidensis, but rapidly adapted through mutations in the replication initiation gene trfA1. Here we examined if these mutations reduced the fitness cost of TrfA1, and whether this was due to changes in interaction with the host's DNA helicase DnaB. The strains expressing evolved TrfA1 variants showed a higher growth rate than those expressing ancestral TrfA1. The evolved TrfA1 variants showed a lower affinity to the helicase than ancestral TrfA1 and were no longer able to activate the helicase at the oriV without host DnaA. Moreover, persistence of the ancestral plasmid was increased upon overexpression of DnaB. Finally, the evolved TrfA1 variants generated higher plasmid copy numbers than ancestral TrfA1. The findings suggest that ancestral plasmid instability can at least partly be explained by titration of DnaB by TrfA1. Thus under antibiotic selection resistance plasmids can adapt to a novel bacterial host through partial loss of function mutations that simultaneously increase plasmid copy number and decrease unfavorably high affinity to one of the hosts' essential proteins. PMID:27121483

  12. Plasmid-free T7-based Escherichia coli expression systems.

    PubMed

    Striedner, Gerald; Pfaffenzeller, Irene; Markus, Luchner; Nemecek, Sabine; Grabherr, Reingard; Bayer, Karl

    2010-03-01

    In order to release host cells from plasmid-mediated increases in metabolic load and high gene dosages, we developed a plasmid-free, T7-based E. coli expression system in which the target gene is site-specifically integrated into the genome of the host. With this system, plasmid-loss, a source of instability for conventional expression systems, was eliminated. At the same time, system leakiness, a challenging problem with recombinant systems, was minimized. The efficiency of the T7 RNA polymerase compensates for low gene dosage and provides high rates of recombinant gene expression without fatal consequences to host metabolism. Relative to conventional pET systems, this system permits improved process stability and increases the host cell's capacity for recombinant gene expression, resulting in higher product yields. The stability of the plasmid-free system was proven in chemostat cultivation for 40 generations in a non-induced and for 10 generations in a fully induced state. For this reason plasmid-free systems benefit the development of continuous production processes with E. coli. However, time and effort of the more complex cloning procedure have to be considered in relation to the advantages of plasmid-free systems in upstream-processing. PMID:19891007

  13. Effect of plasmid pTENT2 on severity of porcine post-weaning diarrhoea induced by an O149 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Priti S; Gyles, Carlton L; Friendship, Robert M; Poppe, Cornelis; Kozak, Gosia K; Boerlin, Patrick

    2008-10-15

    A particularly virulent O149:H10 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clone harbours a newly characterized plasmid pTENT2 carrying the tetracycline-resistance tetA and the virulence genes estA, paa, and sepA that were not present in less virulent clones. The objectives of this study were to assess whether the additional genes on pTENT2 played a role in the increased severity of post-weaning diarrhoea and if they provided any potential advantage for the emergence of the highly virulent clone. Groups of pigs were dosed orally with isogenic pTENT2-positive and pTENT2-negative ETEC strains, and the clinical and pathological changes were compared between the groups. Two additional groups were given the pTENT2-positive strains and maintained on feed with or without chlortetracycline to assess the effect of subtherapeutic levels of tetracycline on the short-term persistence of the ETEC O149:H10 clone. The severity of diarrhoea within the first few hours post-inoculation was significantly increased (p=0.0408) in animals receiving pTENT2-positive strains as compared to animals receiving pTENT2-negative strains. There were no consistent or significant histopathological differences between any of the groups and no significant difference in the persistence of ETEC between groups. PMID:18502055

  14. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-01-01

    T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF) co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity. PMID:26602876

  15. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-12-01

    T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF) co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity. PMID:26602876

  16. Co-administration of plasmid expressing IL-12 with 14-kDa Schistosoma mansoni fatty acid-binding protein cDNA alters immune response profiles and fails to enhance protection induced by Sm14 DNA vaccine alone.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Cristina T; Pacífico, Lucila G G; Barsante, Michele M; Rassi, Tatiana; Cassali, Geovanni D; Oliveira, Sérgio C

    2006-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is an endemic disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. DNA-based vaccine is a promising strategy to induce protective immunity against schistosomiasis, since both humoral and cellular immune responses are involved in parasite elimination. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Sm14 cDNA alone or in association with a plasmid expressing murine interleukin (IL)-12 to induce protection against challenge infection. Mice were immunized with four doses of the DNA vaccine and the levels of protection were determined by worm burden recovery after challenge infection. Specific antibody production to rSm14 was determined by ELISA, and cytokine production was measured in splenocyte culture supernatants stimulated with rSm14 and in bronchoalveolar lavage of vaccinated mice after challenge infection. DNA immunization with pCI/Sm14 alone induced 40.5% of worm reduction. However, the use of pCI/IL-12 as adjuvant to pCI/Sm14 immunization failed to enhance protection against challenge infection. Protection induced by pCI/Sm14 immunization correlates with specific IgG antibody production against Sm14, Th1 type of immune response with high levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma and low levels of IL-4 in splenocyte culture supernatants and in bronchoalveolar lavage after challenge infection. IL-12 co-administration with pCI/Sm14 induced a significant production of nitric oxide in splenocyte culture supernatants and also lymphocyte suppression, with reduced percentage of T cells producing IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. PMID:16914349

  17. Non-integrating episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of human amniotic fluid stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells in chemically defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Slamecka, Jaroslav; Salimova, Lilia; McClellan, Steven; van Kelle, Mathieu; Kehl, Debora; Laurini, Javier; Cinelli, Paolo; Owen, Laurie; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Weber, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) represent an attractive potential cell source for fetal and pediatric cell-based therapies. However, upgrading them to pluripotency confers refractoriness toward senescence, higher proliferation rate and unlimited differentiation potential. AFSC were observed to rapidly and efficiently reacquire pluripotency which together with their easy recovery makes them an attractive cell source for reprogramming. The reprogramming process as well as the resulting iPSC epigenome could potentially benefit from the unspecialized nature of AFSC. iPSC derived from AFSC also have potential in disease modeling, such as Down syndrome or β-thalassemia. Previous experiments involving AFSC reprogramming have largely relied on integrative vector transgene delivery and undefined serum-containing, feeder-dependent culture. Here, we describe non-integrative oriP/EBNA-1 episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of AFSC into iPSC and culture in fully chemically defined xeno-free conditions represented by vitronectin coating and E8 medium, a system that we found uniquely suited for this purpose. The derived AF-iPSC lines uniformly expressed a set of pluripotency markers Oct3/4, Nanog, Sox2, SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 in a pattern typical for human primed PSC. Additionally, the cells formed teratomas, and were deemed pluripotent by PluriTest, a global expression microarray-based in-silico pluripotency assay. However, we found that the PluriTest scores were borderline, indicating a unique pluripotent signature in the defined condition. In the light of potential future clinical translation of iPSC technology, non-integrating reprogramming and chemically defined culture are more acceptable. PMID:26654216

  18. Large plasmids of avian Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Doetkott, D M; Nolan, L K; Giddings, C W; Berryhill, D L

    1996-01-01

    The plasmid DNA of 30 Escherichia coli isolates from chickens was extracted and examined using techniques designed to isolate large plasmids. This plasmid DNA was examined for the presence of certain known virulence-related genes including cvaC, traT, and some aerobactin-related sequences. Seventeen of the 30 isolates contained from one to four plasmids greater than 50 kb in size. Eleven of these 17 strains possessed plasmids greater than 100 kb in size. Therefore, E. coli isolates of chickens frequently contain large plasmids, and many of these plasmids are likely to contain virulence-related sequences. PMID:8980827

  19. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George A.; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat. PMID:25584197

  20. Stability of Penicillinase Plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, L. H.; Dyke, K. G. H.

    1971-01-01

    The isolation of mutants of Staphylococcus aureus that are affected in the stability of penicillinase plasmids is described. One mutation is plasmid borne and results in nonreplication of the plasmid at 42 C. A second type of mutation is host-borne and gives rise to instability of both mcrI and mcrII penicillinase plasmids but not a tetracycline-resistant plasmid. Images PMID:4105036

  1. A polymerization-based method to construct a plasmid containing clustered DNA damage and a mismatch.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Momoko; Akamatsu, Ken; Shikazono, Naoya

    2016-10-01

    Exposure of biological materials to ionizing radiation often induces clustered DNA damage. The mutagenicity of clustered DNA damage can be analyzed with plasmids carrying a clustered DNA damage site, in which the strand bias of a replicating plasmid (i.e., the degree to which each of the two strands of the plasmid are used as the template for replication of the plasmid) can help to clarify how clustered DNA damage enhances the mutagenic potential of comprising lesions. Placement of a mismatch near a clustered DNA damage site can help to determine the strand bias, but present plasmid-based methods do not allow insertion of a mismatch at a given site in the plasmid. Here, we describe a polymerization-based method for constructing a plasmid containing clustered DNA lesions and a mismatch. The presence of a DNA lesion and a mismatch in the plasmid was verified by enzymatic treatment and by determining the relative abundance of the progeny plasmids derived from each of the two strands of the plasmid. PMID:27449134

  2. Direct and Auger Electron-Induced, Single- and Double-Strand Breaks on Plasmid DNA Caused by 99mTc-Labeled Pyrene Derivatives and the Effect of Bonding Distance.

    PubMed

    Reissig, Falco; Mamat, Constantin; Steinbach, Joerg; Pietzsch, Hans-Juergen; Freudenberg, Robert; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos; Caballero, Julio; Kotzerke, Joerg; Wunderlich, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that 99mTc causes radical-mediated DNA damage due to Auger electrons, which were emitted simultaneously with the known γ-emission of 99mTc. We have synthesized a series of new 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives with varied distances between the pyrene moiety and the radionuclide. The pyrene motif is a common DNA intercalator and allowed us to test the influence of the radionuclide distance on damages of the DNA helix. In general, pUC 19 plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between the radiotracers and DNA that results in single-strand breaks (SSB) or double-strand breaks (DSB). The resulting DNA fragments were separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. Direct DNA damage and radical-induced indirect DNA damage by radiolysis products of water were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. We demonstrated that Auger electrons directly induced both SSB and DSB in high efficiency when 99mTc was tightly bound to the plasmid DNA and this damage could not be completely prevented by DMSO, a free radical scavenger. For the first time, we were able to minimize this effect by increasing the carbon chain lengths between the pyrene moiety and the 99mTc nuclide. However, a critical distance between the 99mTc atom and the DNA helix could not be determined due to the significantly lowered DSB generation resulting from the interaction which is dependent on the type of the 99mTc binding motif. The effect of variable DNA damage caused by the different chain length between the pyrene residue and the Tc-core as well as the possible conformations of the applied Tc-complexes was supplemented with molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The effectiveness of the DNA-binding 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives was demonstrated by comparison to non-DNA-binding 99mTcO4-, since nearly all DNA damage caused by 99mTcO4- was prevented by incubating with DMSO. PMID:27583677

  3. Signal structure for transcriptional activation in the upstream regions of virulence genes on the hairy-root-inducing plasmid A4.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, T; Takanami, M; Oka, A

    1989-01-01

    The inducibility of the vir genes (virA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -G) on pRiA4 was examined at the transcriptional level, and the RNA-starting sites were determined by S1-nuclease mapping and primer-extension experiments. All of these genes were inducible, while virA, -E, and -G were transcribed even under noninducing conditions. Each transcription of virB, -C, -D, and -E was initiated at one particular site, but that of virA and -G occurred at two and three sites, respectively, depending on the conditions used. In the DNA region upstream from each inducible transcript, one or more blocks of six base-pairs, 5'TGATAACT3' (vir box), were found to be placed characteristically. These blocks were phasing with an interval of 11 base-pairs, and the most upstream one in each upstream region was preceded by an additional block in the inverted orientation. Although the distance between the block(s) and the promoter varied with the vir gene, every block was placed in a phase nearly opposite to the -35 and -10 regions of the promoter. Images PMID:2479910

  4. Evidence for plasmid-encoded virulence factors in the phytopathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382.

    PubMed Central

    Meletzus, D; Bermphol, A; Dreier, J; Eichenlaub, R

    1993-01-01

    The tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382, which causes bacterial wilt, harbors two plasmids pCM1 (27.5 kb) and pCM2 (72 kb). After curing of the plasmids, bacterial derivatives were still proficient in the ability to colonize the host plant and in the production of exopolysaccharides but exhibited a reduced virulence. When one of the two plasmids is lost, there is a significant delay in the development of wilting symptoms after infection and a plasmid-free derivative is not able to induce disease symptoms. By cloning of restriction fragments of both plasmids in the plasmid-free strain CMM100, two DNA fragments which restored the virulent phenotype were identified. Further analysis suggested that a fragment of plasmid pCM1 encodes an endocellulase which is involved in the expression of the pathogenic phenotype. Images PMID:8458855

  5. Use of locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides to add functionality to plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hertoghs, Kirsten M. L.; Ellis, Jonathan H.; Catchpole, Ian R.

    2003-01-01

    The available reagents for the attachment of functional moieties to plasmid DNA are limiting. Most reagents bind plasmid DNA in a non-sequence- specific manner, with undefined stoichiometry, and affect DNA charge and delivery properties or involve chemical modifications that abolish gene expression. The design and ability of oligonucleotides (ODNs) containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) to bind supercoiled, double-stranded plasmid DNA in a sequence-specific manner are described for the first time. The main mechanism for LNA ODNs binding plasmid DNA is demonstrated to be by strand displacement. LNA ODNs are more stably bound to plasmid DNA than similar peptide nucleic acid (PNA) ‘clamps’ for procedures such as particle-mediated DNA delivery (gene gun). It is shown that LNA ODNs remain associated with plasmid DNA after cationic lipid-mediated transfection into mammalian cells. LNA ODNs can bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner so that binding does not interfere with plasmid conformation or gene expression. Attachment of CpG-based immune adjuvants to plasmid by ‘hybrid’ phosphorothioate–LNA ODNs induces tumour necrosis factor-α production in the macrophage cell line RAW264.7. This observation exemplifies an important new, controllable methodology for adding functionality to plasmids for gene delivery and DNA vaccination. PMID:14530430

  6. A plasmid in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Knudson, G B; Mikesell, P

    1980-01-01

    Sixteen strains from the six serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were examined for the presence of extrachromosomal genetic elements by a modified cleared lysate procedure, dye-buoyant centrifugation, and agarose gel electrophoresis. Two strains, Atlanta-1 and Atlanta-2 from serogroup II, each contained a plasmid of cryptic function with a molecular weight of ca. 30 megadaltons. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7429628

  7. Cardiac-targeting magnetic lipoplex delivery of SH-IGF1R plasmid attenuate norepinephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy in murine heart.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiping; Li, Xuebiao; Kong, Minjian; Jiang, Daming; Dong, Aiqiang; Shen, Zhonghua; Duan, Qunjun

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a number of molecular mechanisms contributing to the initiation of cardiac hypertrophy response to pressure overload. IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor), an important oncogene, is overexpressed in hypertrophic heart and mediates the hypertrophic pathology process. In this study, we applied with liposomal magnetofection that potentiated gene transfection by applying an external magnetic field to enhance its transfection efficiency. Liposomal magnetofection provided high efficiency in transgene expression in vivo. In vivo, IGF1R-specific-shRNA (small-hairpin RNA) by magnetofection inhibited IGF1R protein expression by 72.2 ± 6.8, 80.7 ± 9.6 and 84.5 ± 5.6%, at 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively, after pGFPshIGF1R injection, indicating that liposomal magnetofection is a promising method that allows the targeting of gene therapy for heart failure. Furthermore, we found that the treated animals (liposomal magnetofection with shIGF1R) showed reduced septal and posterior wall thickness, reduced HW:BWs (heart weight-to-body weights) compared with controls. Moreover, we also found that liposomal magnetofection-based shIGF1R transfection decreased the expression level of p-ERK (phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase)1/2, p-AKT1 (phosphorylated protein kinase B1) compared with untreated hearts. These results suggested that liposomal magnetofection-mediated IGF1R-specific-shRNA may be a promising method, and suppression the IGF1R expression inhibited norepinephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophic process via inhibiting PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/AKT pathway. PMID:24965872

  8. Cardiac-targeting magnetic lipoplex delivery of SH-IGF1R plasmid attenuate norepinephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy in murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiping; Li, Xuebiao; Kong, Minjian; Jiang, Daming; Dong, Aiqiang; Shen, Zhonghua; Duan, Qunjun

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a number of molecular mechanisms contributing to the initiation of cardiac hypertrophy response to pressure overload. IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor), an important oncogene, is overexpressed in hypertrophic heart and mediates the hypertrophic pathology process. In this study, we applied with liposomal magnetofection that potentiated gene transfection by applying an external magnetic field to enhance its transfection efficiency. Liposomal magnetofection provided high efficiency in transgene expression in vivo. In vivo, IGF1R-specific-shRNA (small-hairpin RNA) by magnetofection inhibited IGF1R protein expression by 72.2±6.8, 80.7±9.6 and 84.5±5.6%, at 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively, after pGFPshIGF1R injection, indicating that liposomal magnetofection is a promising method that allows the targeting of gene therapy for heart failure. Furthermore, we found that the treated animals (liposomal magnetofection with shIGF1R) showed reduced septal and posterior wall thickness, reduced HW:BWs (heart weight-to-body weights) compared with controls. Moreover, we also found that liposomal magnetofection-based shIGF1R transfection decreased the expression level of p-ERK (phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase)1/2, p-AKT1 (phosphorylated protein kinase B1) compared with untreated hearts. These results suggested that liposomal magnetofection-mediated IGF1R-specific-shRNA may be a promising method, and suppression the IGF1R expression inhibited norepinephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophic process via inhibiting PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/AKT pathway. PMID:24965872

  9. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Background Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Results Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Conclusion Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via

  10. Chromate resistance plasmid in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, L H; Chakrabarty, A M; Ehrlich, H L

    1983-01-01

    Chromate resistance of Pseudomonas fluorescens LB300, isolated from chromium-contaminated sediment in the upper Hudson River, was found to be plasmid specified. Loss of the plasmid (pLHB1) by spontaneous segregation or mitomycin C curing resulted in a simultaneous loss of chromate resistance. Subsequent transformation of such strains with purified pLHB1 plasmid DNA resulted in a simultaneous re-acquisition of the chromate resistance phenotype and the plasmid. When pLHB1 was transferred by conjugation to Escherichia coli, the plasmid still conferred chromate resistance. PMID:6309741

  11. Bacterial Plasmids in Antarctic Natural Microbial Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Hiromi; Sullivan, Cornelius W.; Shizuya, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    Samples of psychrophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria were collected from sea ice, seawater, sediments, and benthic or ice-associated animals in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. A total of 155 strains were isolated and tested for the presence of plasmids by DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. Thirty-one percent of the isolates carried at least one kind of plasmid. Bacterial isolates taken from sediments showed the highest plasmid incidence (42%), and isolates from seawater showed the lowest plasmid incidence (20%). Plasmids were significantly more frequent in the strains which had been first isolated from low-nutrient media (46%) than in the strains which had been isolated from high-nutrient media (25%). Multiple forms of plasmids were observed in two-thirds of the plasmid-carrying strains. A majority of the plasmids detected were estimated to have a mass of 10 megadaltons or less. Among 48 plasmid-carrying strains, 7 showed antibiotic resistance. It is concluded that bacterial plasmids are ubiquitous in natural microbial assemblages of the pristine marine ecosystem of Antarctica. Images PMID:16346621

  12. Virulence Plasmids of Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Li, Jihong; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Moore, Robert J; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded virulence factors are important in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria. Unlike many other bacteria, the most common virulence factors encoded by plasmids in Clostridium and Bacillus species are protein toxins. Clostridium perfringens causes several histotoxic and enterotoxin diseases in both humans and animals and produces a broad range of toxins, including many pore-forming toxins such as C. perfringens enterotoxin, epsilon-toxin, beta-toxin, and NetB. Genetic studies have led to the determination of the role of these toxins in disease pathogenesis. The genes for these toxins are generally carried on large conjugative plasmids that have common core replication, maintenance, and conjugation regions. There is considerable functional information available about the unique tcp conjugation locus carried by these plasmids, but less is known about plasmid maintenance. The latter is intriguing because many C. perfringens isolates stably maintain up to four different, but closely related, toxin plasmids. Toxin genes may also be plasmid-encoded in the neurotoxic clostridia. The tetanus toxin gene is located on a plasmid in Clostridium tetani, but the botulinum toxin genes may be chromosomal, plasmid-determined, or located on bacteriophages in Clostridium botulinum. In Bacillus anthracis it is well established that virulence is plasmid determined, with anthrax toxin genes located on pXO1 and capsule genes on a separate plasmid, pXO2. Orthologs of these plasmids are also found in other members of the Bacillus cereus group such as B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. In B. thuringiensis these plasmids may carry genes encoding one or more insecticidal toxins. PMID:26104459

  13. Plasmid copy number underlies adaptive mutability in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sano, Emiko; Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Aboubechara, John Paul; Quiñones-Soto, Semarhy; Roth, John R

    2014-11-01

    The origin of mutations under selection has been intensively studied using the Cairns-Foster system, in which cells of an Escherichia coli lac mutant are plated on lactose and give rise to 100 Lac+ revertants over several days. These revertants have been attributed variously to stress-induced mutagenesis of nongrowing cells or to selective improvement of preexisting weakly Lac+ cells with no mutagenesis. Most revertant colonies (90%) contain stably Lac+ cells, while others (10%) contain cells with an unstable amplification of the leaky mutant lac allele. Evidence is presented that both stable and unstable Lac+ revertant colonies are initiated by preexisting cells with multiple copies of the F'lac plasmid, which carries the mutant lac allele. The tetracycline analog anhydrotetracycline (AnTc) inhibits growth of cells with multiple copies of the tetA gene. Populations with tetA on their F'lac plasmid include rare cells with an elevated plasmid copy number and multiple copies of both the tetA and lac genes. Pregrowth of such populations with AnTc reduces the number of cells with multiple F'lac copies and consequently the number of Lac+ colonies appearing under selection. Revertant yield is restored rapidly by a few generations of growth without AnTc. We suggest that preexisting cells with multiple F'lac copies divide very little under selection but have enough energy to replicate their F'lac plasmids repeatedly until reversion initiates a stable Lac+ colony. Preexisting cells whose high-copy plasmid includes an internal lac duplication grow under selection and produce an unstable Lac+ colony. In this model, all revertant colonies are initiated by preexisting cells and cannot be stress induced. PMID:25173846

  14. Activity of T-DNA borders in plant cell transformation by mini-T plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jen, G C; Chilton, M D

    1986-05-01

    By using a binary vector system, we examined the requirements for border sequences in T-DNA transformation of plant genomes. Mini-T plasmids consisting of small replicons with different extents of pTiT37 T-DNA were tested for plant tumor-inducing ability in Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 containing helper plasmid pAL4404 (which encodes virulence genes needed for T-DNA transfer). Assays of these bacteria on carrot disks, Kalanchoë leaves, and SR1 Nicotiana tabacum plantlets showed that mini-T plasmid containing full length T-DNA including left and right borders was highly virulent, as were mini-T plasmids containing all onc (oncogenicity) genes and only the right border. In contrast, mini-T plasmids containing all onc genes and only the left border induced tumors only rarely, and a mini-T plasmid containing all onc genes but no T-DNA borders was completely avirulent. Southern hybridization analyses of tumor DNA showed that T-DNA border sequences delimited the extent of the two-border mini-T plasmid transferred and integrated into the plant genome. When only one T-DNA border was present, it formed one end of the transferred DNA, and the other end mapped in the vector sequences. The implications of these results for the mechanism of T-DNA transfer and integration are discussed. PMID:3009403

  15. Autonomous plasmid-like replication of a conjugative transposon

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Catherine A.; Babic, Ana; Grossman, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), a.k.a. conjugative transposons, are mobile genetic elements involved in many biological processes, including pathogenesis, symbiosis, and the spread of antibiotic resistance. Unlike conjugative plasmids that are extra-chromosomal and replicate autonomously, ICEs are integrated in the chromosome and replicate passively during chromosomal replication. It is generally thought that ICEs do not replicate autonomously. We found that when induced, Bacillus subtilis ICEBs1 undergoes autonomous plasmid-like replication. Replication was unidirectional, initiated from the ICEBs1 origin of transfer, oriT, and required the ICEBs1-encoded relaxase NicK. Replication also required several host proteins needed for chromosomal replication, but did not require the replicative helicase DnaC or the helicase loader protein DnaB. Rather, replication of ICEBs1 required the helicase PcrA that is required for rolling circle replication of many plasmids. Transfer of ICEBs1 from the donor required PcrA, but did not require replication, indicating that PcrA, and not DNA replication, facilitates unwinding of ICEBs1 DNA for horizontal transfer. Although not needed for horizontal transfer, replication of ICEBs1 was needed for stability of the element. We propose that autonomous plasmid-like replication is a common property of ICEs and contributes to the stability and maintenance of these mobile genetic elements in bacterial populations. PMID:19943900

  16. Stress responses in pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica with reference to the stability of the virulence plasmid in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yersinia enterocolitica has been associated with food-borne illness, most often due the ingestion of pork products. The pathogenic effects induced by a Y. enterocolitica infection are caused by the interplay of chromosomal genes and a virulence plasmid, pYV. Generally, the plasmid is lost during g...

  17. [Integration of plasmids into E. coli K12 chromosomes, caused by a Bordetella transposon].

    PubMed

    Sivov, I G; Beliavskiĭ, O A; karataev, G I

    2000-01-01

    Transposition of Bordetella pertussis transposon in E. coli chromosome has been studied on a model of exclusion of donor multicopy pKK3 plasmid with coumermicin. TnBP3 induced the formation of co-integrates between the plasmid and chromosome. The structure of co-integrate was determined. Facts of exclusion of integrated structure and transposon transposition within integrated plasmid into new sites on a recipient chromosome were detected. Relationship between these processes and activity of bacterial cell recombination system has been determined. PMID:10876766

  18. PENICILLINASE PLASMID DNA FROM Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Mark G.; Gordon, C. N.; Novick, Richard P.; Warner, Robert C.

    1969-01-01

    A penicillinase plasmid from Staphylococcus aureus and three of its derivatives, all previously identified as extrachromosomal genetic elements, have been isolated in high yield as circular duplex DNA molecules. The wild-type plasmid was found by contour-length measurements of electron micrographs to have a molecular weight of 18.6 × 106 daltons. Two plasmids with deletions encompassing six and eight of the eleven known plasmid cistrons had molecular weights of 16.4 × 106 and 15.3 × 106 daltons, respectively. This information was used to establish approximate physical distances for the genetic map. A high-frequency transducing element also derived from the plasmid had a molecular weight of approximately 24 × 106 daltons. Although each plasmid preparation appeared homogeneous by ultracentrifugal analysis, electron micrographs always revealed the presence of a low percentage of complex oligomeric forms, particularly circular and catenated dimers. Images PMID:5260933

  19. Electroporation of plasmid DNA to swine muscle.

    PubMed

    Bodles-Brakhop, Angela M; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Broderick, Kate; Khan, Amir S

    2011-01-01

    For plasmid-mediated gene therapy applications, a major limitation to scale up from rodents to large animals is the low expression level of injected plasmid DNA. The electroporation technique, which results in the passage of foreign material through the cell membrane, is one method that has been shown to be effective at improving local plasmid uptake and consequently, expression levels. Previous studies have determined that optimized electroporation parameters (such as electric field intensity, number of pulses, lag time between plasmid injections and electroporations, and optimal plasmid formulation conditions) are dependent on the target muscle type and individual species. Here, we provide a detailed protocol to optimize conditions for the successful intramuscular electroporation of plasmid DNA to swine, a large animal model. Our results suggest that the technique is safe and effective for veterinary applications. Furthermore, these results provide evidence for the feasibility of upcoming human applications. PMID:21194033

  20. Homemade Site Directed Mutagenesis of Whole Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Mark; Boonrod, Kajohn

    2009-01-01

    Site directed mutagenesis of whole plasmids is a simple way to create slightly different variations of an original plasmid. With this method the cloned target gene can be altered by substitution, deletion or insertion of a few bases directly into a plasmid. It works by simply amplifying the whole plasmid, in a non PCR-based thermocycling reaction. During the reaction mutagenic primers, carrying the desired mutation, are integrated into the newly synthesized plasmid. In this video tutorial we demonstrate an easy and cost effective way to introduce base substitutions into a plasmid. The protocol works with standard reagents and is independent from commercial kits, which often are very expensive. Applying this protocol can reduce the total cost of a reaction to an eighth of what it costs using some of the commercial kits. In this video we also comment on critical steps during the process and give detailed instructions on how to design the mutagenic primers. PMID:19488024

  1. pLS101 plasmid vector

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Balganesh, T.S.

    1985-02-19

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb ma1M gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb Tcr DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. pLS010 plasmid vector

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.; Balganesh, Tanjore S.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb malM gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb T.sub.c r DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems.

  3. Natural plasmid transformation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Suh-Der; Fang, Suh-Sen; Chen, Mei-Jye; Chien, Jun-Yi; Lee, Chih-Chun; Tsen, Darwin Han-Lin

    2002-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli does not have a natural transformation process, strains of E. coli can incorporate extracellular plasmids into cytoplasm 'naturally' at low frequencies. A standard method was developed in which stationary phase cells were concentrated, mixed with plasmids, and then plated on agar plates with nutrients which allowed cells to grow. Transformed cells could then be selected by harvesting cells and plating again on selective agar plates. Competence developed in the lag phase, but disappeared during exponential growth. As more plasmids were added to the cell suspension, the number of transformants increased, eventually reaching a plateau. Supercoiled monomeric or linear concatemeric DNA could transform cells, while linear monomeric DNA could not. Plasmid transformation was not related to conjugation and was recA-independent. Most of the E. coli strains surveyed had this process. All tested plasmids, except pACYC184, could transform E. coli. Insertion of a DNA fragment containing the ampicillin resistance gene into pACYC184 made the plasmid transformable. By inserting random 20-base-pair oligonucleotides into pACYC184 and selecting for transformable plasmids, a most frequent sequence was identified. This sequence resembled the bacterial interspersed medium repetitive sequence of E. coli, suggesting the existence of a recognition sequence. We conclude that plasmid natural transformation exists in E. coli. PMID:12065899

  4. CONSTRUCTION OF PLASMIDS FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of selftransmissible and nonselftransmissible (cloning vector) plasmids constructed to compare results from different laboratory tests and plasmid systems. Plasmids were designed to overcome problems of reproducibility, confusion due to use of differ...

  5. Eclipse period during replication of plasmid R1: contributions from structural events and from the copy-number control system.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan A; Berg, Otto G; Dasgupta, Santanu; Nordström, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    The eclipse period (the time period during which a newly replicated plasmid copy is not available for a new replication) of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli was determined with the classic Meselson-Stahl density-shift experiment. A mini-plasmid with the wild-type R1 replicon and a mutant with a thermo-inducible runaway-replication phenotype were used in this work. The eclipses of the chromosome and of the wild-type plasmid were 0.6 and 0.2 generation times, respectively, at temperatures ranging from 30 degrees C to 42 degrees C. The mutant plasmid had a similar eclipse at temperatures up to 38 degrees C. At 42 degrees C, the plasmid copy number increased rapidly because of the absence of replication control and replication reached a rate of 350-400 plasmid replications per cell and cell generation. During uncontrolled replication, the eclipse was about 3 min compared with 10 min at controlled replication (the wild-type plasmid at 42 degrees C). Hence, the copy-number control system contributed significantly to the eclipse. The eclipse in the absence of copy-number control (3 min) presumably is caused by structural requirements: the covalently closed circular plasmid DNA has to regain the right degree of superhelicity needed for initiation of replication and it takes time to assemble the initiation factors. PMID:14507381

  6. Mini-F plasmid genes that couple host cell division to plasmid proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, T; Hiraga, S

    1983-01-01

    A mechanism for stable maintenance of plasmids, besides the replication and partition mechanisms, has been found to be specified by genes of a mini-F plasmid. An oriC plasmid carrying both a mini-F segment necessary for partition [coordinates 46.4-49.4 kilobase pairs (kb) on the F map] and another segment (42.9-43.6 kb), designated ccd (coupled cell division), is more stably maintained than are oriC plasmids carrying only the partition segment; the stability is comparable to that of the parental mini-F plasmid. When replication of a plasmid carrying ccd is prevented and the plasmid copy number decreases, to as few as one per cell, host cell division is inhibited, but not increase of turbidity or chromosome replication. Appearance of plasmid-free segregants is therefore effectively prevented under such conditions. Experimental results suggest that reduction of the copy number of plasmids carrying the ccd region causes an inhibition of cell division and that the ccd region can be dissected into two functional regions; one (ccdB) inhibits cell division and the other (ccdA) releases the inhibition. The interplay of the ccdA and ccdB genes promotes stable plasmid maintenance by coupling host cell division to plasmid proliferation. PMID:6308648

  7. Yeast telomere repeat sequence (TRS) improves circular plasmid segregation, and TRS plasmid segregation involves the RAP1 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Longtine, M S; Enomoto, S; Finstad, S L; Berman, J

    1992-01-01

    Telomere repeat sequences (TRSs) can dramatically improve the segregation of unstable circular autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion analysis demonstrated that yeast TRSs, which conform to the general sequence (C(1-3)A)n, are able to stabilize circular ARS plasmids. A number of TRS clones of different primary sequence and C(1-3)A tract length confer the plasmid stabilization phenotype. TRS sequences do not appear to improve plasmid replication efficiency, as determined by plasmid copy number analysis and functional assays for ARS activity. Pedigree analysis confirms that TRS-containing plasmids are missegregated at low frequency and that missegregated TRS-containing plasmids, like ARS plasmids, are preferentially retained by the mother cell. Plasmids stabilized by TRSs have properties that distinguish them from centromere-containing plasmids and 2 microns-based recombinant plasmids. Linear ARS plasmids, which include two TRS tracts at their termini, segregate inefficiently, while circular plasmids with one or two TRS tracts segregate efficiently, suggesting that plasmid topology or TRS accessibility interferes with TRS segregation function on linear plasmids. In strains carrying the temperature-sensitive mutant alleles rap1grc4 and rap1-5, TRS plasmids are not stable at the semipermissive temperature, suggesting that RAP1 protein is involved in TRS plasmid stability. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an ARS plasmid was stabilized by the addition of S. pombe telomere sequence, suggesting that the ability to improve the segregation of ARS plasmids is a general property of telomere repeats. PMID:1569937

  8. High-level plasmid-mediated gentamicin resistance and pheromone response of plasmids present in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Shiojima, M; Tomita, H; Tanimoto, K; Fujimoto, S; Ike, Y

    1997-01-01

    Eleven pheromone-responding plasmids encoding erythromycin or gentamicin resistance were isolated from multiresistant clinical Enterococcus faecalis isolates. The plasmids were classified into six types with respect to their pheromone responses. The three erythromycin resistance plasmids responded to different pheromones. Of the eight gentamicin resistance plasmids, four plasmids responded to same pheromone. Southern hybridization studies showed that the genes involved in regulation of the pheromone response were conserved in the drug resistance plasmids. PMID:9056018

  9. PlasmID: a centralized repository for plasmid clone information and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Dongmei; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Hu, Yanhui; Taycher, Elena; Rolfs, Andreas; Kramer, Jason; Williamson, Janice; LaBaer, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    The Plasmid Information Database (PlasmID; ) was developed as a community-based resource portal to facilitate search and request of plasmid clones shared with the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC) DNA Resource Core. PlasmID serves as a central data repository and enables researchers to search the collection online using common gene names and identifiers, keywords, vector features, author names and PubMed IDs. As of October 2006, the repository contains >46 000 plasmids in 98 different vectors, including cloned cDNA and genomic fragments from 26 different species. Moreover, the clones include plasmid vectors useful for routine and cutting-edge techniques; functionally related sets of human cDNA clones; and genome-scale gene collections for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Vibrio cholerae. Information about the plasmids has been fully annotated in adherence with a high-quality standard, and clone samples are stored as glycerol stocks in a state-of-the-art automated −80°C freezer storage system. Clone replication and distribution is highly automated to minimize human error. Infor-mation about vectors and plasmid clones, including downloadable maps and sequence data, is freely available online. Researchers interested in requesting clone samples or sharing their own plasmids with the repository can visit the PlasmID website for more information. PMID:17132831

  10. Generalized Transduction of Small Yersinia enterocolitica Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Hertwig, Stefan; Popp, Andreas; Freytag, Barbara; Lurz, Rudi; Appel, Bernd

    1999-01-01

    To study phage-mediated gene transfer in Yersinia, the ability of Yersinia phages to transduce naturally occurring plasmids was investigated. The transduction experiments were performed with a temperate phage isolated from a pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strain and phage mixtures isolated from sewage. Small plasmids (4.3 and 5.8 kb) were transduced at a frequency of 10−5 to 10−7/PFU. However, we could not detect the transduction of any indigenous virulence plasmid (ca. 72 kb) in pathogenic Yersinia strains. Transductants obtained by infection with the temperate phage were lysogenic and harbored the phage genome in their chromosomes. PMID:10473387

  11. BIP induces mice CD19(hi) regulatory B cells producing IL-10 and highly expressing PD-L1, FasL.

    PubMed

    Tang, Youfa; Jiang, Qing; Ou, Yanghui; Zhang, Fan; Qing, Kai; Sun, Yuanli; Lu, Wenjie; Zhu, Huifen; Gong, Feili; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that B cells possess a regulatory function in mouse models of autoimmune diseases. Regulatory B cells can modulate immune response through many types of molecular mechanisms, including the production of IL-10 and the expression of PD-1 Ligand and Fas Ligand, but the microenvironmental factors and mechanisms that induce regulatory B cells have not been fully identified. BIP (binding immunoglobulin protein), a member of the heat shock protein 70 family, is a type of evolutionarily highly conserved protein. In this article, we have found that IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells are discrete cell populations, but enriched in CD19(hi) cells. BIP can induce IL-10-producing splenic B cells, IL-10 secretion and B cells highly expressing PD-L1 and FasL. CD40 signaling acts in synergy with BIP to induce regulatory B cells. BIP increased surface CD19 molecule expression intensity and IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells induced by BIP share the CD19(hi) phenotype. Furthermore, B cells treated with BIP and anti-CD40 can lead to suppression of T cell proliferation and the effect is partially IL-10-dependent and mainly BIP-induced. Taken together, our findings identify a novel function of BIP in the induction of regulatory B cells and add a new reason for the therapy of autoimmune disorders or other inflammatory conditions. PMID:26655428

  12. Plasmids as Tools for Containment.

    PubMed

    García, José L; Díaz, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    Active containment systems are a major tool for reducing the uncertainty associated with the introduction of monocultures, genetically engineered or not, into target habitats for a large number of biotechnological applications (e.g., bioremediation, bioleaching, biopesticides, biofuels, biotransformations, live vaccines, etc.). While biological containment reduces the survival of the introduced organism outside the target habitat and/or upon completion of the projected task, gene containment strategies reduce the lateral spread of the key genetic determinants to indigenous microorganisms. In fundamental research, suicide circuits become relevant tools to address the role of gene transfer, mainly plasmid transfer, in evolution and how this transfer contributes to genome plasticity and to the rapid adaptation of microbial communities to environmental changes. Many lethal functions and regulatory circuits have been used and combined to design efficient containment systems. As many new genomes are being sequenced, novel lethal genes and regulatory elements are available, e.g., new toxin-antitoxin modules, and they could be used to increase further the current containment efficiencies and to expand containment to other organisms. Although the current containment systems can increase the predictability of genetically modified organisms in the environment, containment will never be absolute, due to the existence of mutations that lead to the appearance of surviving subpopulations. In this sense, orthogonal systems (xenobiology) appear to be the solution for setting a functional genetic firewall that will allow absolute containment of recombinant organisms. PMID:26104372

  13. Topological Behavior of Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, N. Patrick; Vologodskii, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the B-form structure of DNA by Watson and Crick led to an explosion of research on nucleic acids in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, and genetics. Powerful techniques were developed to reveal a myriad of different structural conformations that change B-DNA as it is transcribed, replicated, and recombined and as sister chromosomes are moved into new daughter cell compartments during cell division. This article links the original discoveries of superhelical structure and molecular topology to non-B form DNA structure and contemporary biochemical and biophysical techniques. The emphasis is on the power of plasmids for studying DNA structure and function. The conditions that trigger the formation of alternative DNA structures such as left-handed Z-DNA, inter- and intra-molecular triplexes, triple-stranded DNA, and linked catenanes and hemicatenanes are explained. The DNA dynamics and topological issues are detailed for stalled replication forks and for torsional and structural changes on DNA in front of and behind a transcription complex and a replisome. The complex and interconnected roles of topoisomerases and abundant small nucleoid association proteins are explained. And methods are described for comparing in vivo and in vitro reactions to probe and understand the temporal pathways of DNA and chromosome chemistry that occur inside living cells. PMID:26104708

  14. Plasmid DNA fermentation strategies: influence on plasmid stability and cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2012-03-01

    In order to provide sufficient pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA material, it is essential to gain a comprehensive knowledge of the bioprocesses involved; so, the development of protocols and techniques that allow a fast monitoring of process performance is a valuable tool for bioprocess design. Regarding plasmid DNA production, the metabolic stress of the host strain as well as plasmid stability have been identified as two of the key parameters that greatly influence plasmid DNA yields. The present work describes the impact of batch and fed-batch fermentations using different C/N ratios and different feeding profiles on cell physiology and plasmid stability, investigating the potential of these two monitoring techniques as valuable tools for bioprocess development and design. The results obtained in batch fermentations showed that plasmid copy number values suffered a pronounced increase at the end of almost all fermentation conditions tested. Regarding fed-batch fermentations, the strategies with exponential feeding profiles, in contrast with those with constant feeding, showed higher biomass and plasmid yields, the maximum values obtained for these two parameters being 95.64 OD(600) and 344.3 mg plasmid DNA (pDNA)/L, respectively, when using an exponential feed rate of 0.2 h(-1). Despite the results obtained, cell physiology and plasmid stability monitoring revealed that, although higher pDNA overall yields were obtained, this fermentation exhibited lower plasmid stability and percentage of viable cells. In conclusion, this study allowed clarifying the bioprocess performance based on cell physiology and plasmid stability assessment, allowing improvement of the overall process and not only plasmid DNA yield and cell growth. PMID:22089386

  15. SIMPLAS: A Simulation of Bacterial Plasmid Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This article describes a computer simulation of bacterial physiology during growth in a chemostat. The program was designed to help students to appreciate and understand the related effects of parameters which influence plasmid persistence in bacterial populations. (CW)

  16. Shigella sonnei plasmids: evidence that a large plasmid is necessary for virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Sansonetti, P J; Kopecko, D J; Formal, S B

    1981-01-01

    Virulent form I Shigella sonnei strains contain a 120-megadalton plasmid that is absent in their form II derivatives, which are always avirulent and devoid of O side chains. In the present study, 165 biochemical and antibiotic traits were assessed, but no experimentally useful phenotype could be associated with this large form I plasmid. Therefore, the form I plasmids of several S. sonnei strains were tagged with the antibiotic resistance transposons Tn3, Tn5, or Tn10. Transposon-tagged form I plasmids were not self-transmissible, but could be mobilized by the plasmid R386. Form II S. sonnei transconjugants for the form I plasmid acquired both virulence and the ability to synthesize form I antigen, establishing that these properties are plasmid mediated. Further studies indicate that this 120-megadalton form I plasmid is physically unstable in any of several host bacteria and suggest that it is a member of the FI incompatibility group. Also, two commonly observed, small plasmids of S. sonnei, of 3.2 and 3.9 megadaltons, were shown to encode either colicin E1 production or resistance to streptomycin and sulfonamide, respectively. Images PMID:6271687

  17. Construction of pTM series plasmids for gene expression in Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Bao, Yanqing; Gao, Jianpeng; Liu, Jiameng; Wang, Shaohui; Sun, Yingjie; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-04-01

    Brucellosis, the most common widespread zoonotic disease, is caused by Brucella spp., which are facultative, intracellular, Gram-negative bacteria. With the development of molecular biology techniques, more and more virulence-associated factors have been identified in Brucella spp. A suitable plasmid system is an important tool to study virulence genes in Brucella. In this study, we constructed three constitutive replication plasmids (pTM1-Cm, pTM2-Amp, and pTM3-Km) using the replication origin (rep) region derived from the pBBR1-MCS vector. Also, a DNA fragment containing multiple cloning sites (MCSs) and a terminator sequence derived from the pCold vector were produced for complementation of the deleted genes. Besides pGH-6×His, a plasmid containing the groE promoter of Brucella spp. was constructed to express exogenous proteins in Brucella with high efficiency. Furthermore, we constructed the inducible expression plasmid pZT-6×His, containing the tetracycline-inducible promoter pzt1, which can induce expression by the addition of tetracycline in the Brucella culture medium. The constructed pTM series plasmids will play an important role in the functional investigation of Brucella spp. PMID:26851674

  18. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Marciano, R. S.; Guimarães, O. R.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

  19. Denitrification by Alcaligenes eutrophus is plasmid dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Römermann, D; Friedrich, B

    1985-01-01

    Curing of the hydrogenase-specifying megaplasmid pHG indigenous to strains of the facultative lithoautotrophic bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus was correlated with a loss of denitrifying ability (Nitd). The retransfer of plasmid pHG1 reconstituted the Nitd phenotype. Plasmid-free mutants were still capable of converting some nitrate to nitrite, but they did not metabolize nitrite under anaerobic conditions. PMID:3886640

  20. Loss of plasmids containing cloned inserts coding for novobiocin resistance or novobiocin sensitivity in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, J K; Spikes, D; Ledbetter, M

    1984-01-01

    Plasmids pNov1 and pNov1s , coding for resistance and sensitivity to novobiocin, respectively, were readily lost from wild-type Haemophilus influenzae but retained in a strain lacking an inducible defective prophage. The plasmid loss could be partly or wholly eliminated by a low-copy-number mutation in the plasmid or by the presence of certain antibiotic resistance markers in the host chromosome. Release of both phage HP1c1 , measured by plaque assay, and defective phage, measured by electron microscopy, was increased when the plasmids were present. The frequency of recombination between pNov1 and the chromosome, causing the plasmid to be converted to pNov1s , could under some circumstances be decreased from the normal 60 to 70% to below 10% by the presence of a kanamycin resistance marker in the chromosome. This suggested that a gene product coded for by the plasmid, the expression of which was affected by the kanamycin resistance marker, was responsible for the high recombination frequency. Evidence was obtained from in vitro experiments that the gene product was a gyrase. Images PMID:6327644

  1. Virulence of an emerging pathogenic lineage of Vibrio nigripulchritudo is dependent on two plasmids.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Frédérique; Labreuche, Yannick; Davis, Brigid M; Iqbal, Naeem; Mangenot, Sophie; Goarant, Cyrille; Mazel, Didier; Waldor, Matthew K

    2011-02-01

    Vibrioses are the predominant bacterial infections in marine shrimp farms. Vibrio nigripulchritudo is an emerging pathogen of the cultured shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris in New Caledonia and other regions in the Indo-Pacific. The molecular determinants of V. nigripulchritudo pathogenicity are unknown; however, molecular epidemiological studies have revealed that recent pathogenic V. nigripulchritudo isolates from New Caledonia all cluster into a monophyletic clade and contain a small plasmid, pB1067. Here, we report that a large plasmid, pA1066 (247 kb), can also serve as a marker for virulent V. nigripulchritudo, and that an ancestral version of this plasmid was likely acquired prior to other virulence-linked markers. Additionally, we demonstrate that pA1066 is critical for the full virulence of V. nigripulchritudo in several newly developed experimental models of infection. Plasmid pB1067 also contributes to virulence; only strains containing both plasmids induced the highest level of shrimp mortality. Thus, it appears that these plasmids, which are absent from non-pathogenic isolates, may be driving forces, as well as markers, for the emergence of a pathogenic lineage of V. nigripulchritudo. PMID:20825454

  2. Virulence of an emerging pathogenic lineage of Vibrio nigripulchritudo is dependent on two plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, Frédérique; Labreuche, Yannick; Davis, Brigid M; Iqbal, Naeem; Mangenot, Sophie; Goarant, Cyrille; Mazel, Didier; Waldor, Matthew K

    2011-01-01

    Summary Vibrioses are the predominant bacterial infections in marine shrimp farms. Vibrio nigripulchritudo is an emerging pathogen of the cultured shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris in New Caledonia and other regions in the Indo-Pacific. The molecular determinants of V. nigripulchritudo pathogenicity are unknown; however, molecular epidemiological studies have revealed that recent pathogenic V. nigripulchritudo isolates from New Caledonia all cluster into a monophyletic clade and contain a small plasmid, pB1067. Here, we report that a large plasmid, pA1066 (247 kb), can also serve as a marker for virulent V. nigripulchritudo, and that an ancestral version of this plasmid was likely acquired prior to other virulence-linked markers. Additionally, we demonstrate that pA1066 is critical for the full virulence of V. nigripulchritudo in several newly developed experimental models of infection. Plasmid pB1067 also contributes to virulence; only strains containing both plasmids induced the highest level of shrimp mortality. Thus, it appears that these plasmids, which are absent from non-pathogenic isolates, may be driving forces, as well as markers, for the emergence of a pathogenic lineage of V. nigripulchritudo. PMID:20825454

  3. Propagation of pSC101 plasmids defective in binding of integration host factor.

    PubMed Central

    Biek, D P; Cohen, S N

    1992-01-01

    Integration host factor (IHF), a multifunctional protein of E. coli, normally is required for the replication of plasmid pSC101. T. T. Stenzel, P. Patel, and D. Bastia (Cell 49:709-717, 1987) have reported that IHF binds to a DNA locus near the pSC101 replication origin and enhances a static bend present in this region; mutation of the IHF binding site affects the plasmid's ability to replicate. We report here studies indicating that the requirement for IHF binding near the pSC101 replication origin is circumvented partially or completely by (i) mutation of the plasmid-encoded repA (replicase) gene or the chromosomally encoded topA gene, (ii) the presence on the plasmid of the pSC101 partition (par) locus, or (iii) replacement of the par locus by a strong transcriptional promoter. With the exception of the repA mutation, the factors that substitute for a functional origin region IHF binding site are known to alter plasmid topology by increasing negative DNA supercoiling, as does IHF itself. These results are consistent with the proposal that IHF binding near the pSC101 replication origin promotes plasmid replication by inducing a conformational change leading to formation of a repA-dependent DNA-protein complex. A variety of IHF-independent mechanisms can facilitate formation of the putative replication-initiation complex. PMID:1310092

  4. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  5. Engineering large functional plasmids for biosafety.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Chris; Shank, Caroline; Santiago, Clayton; Wilson, James W

    2013-11-01

    Large bacterial plasmid constructs (generally 25-100 kb, but can be greater), such as those engineered with DNA encoding specific functions such as protein secretion or specialized metabolism, can carry antibiotic resistance genes and/or conjugation systems that typically must be removed before use in medical or environmental settings due to biosafety concerns. However, a convenient in vivo recombineering approach for intact large plasmids to sequentially remove multiple different genes using non-antibiotic selection methods is not described in the literature to our knowledge. We developed strategies and reagents for convenient removal of antibiotic resistance markers and conjugation genes while retaining non-antibiotic-based plasmid selection to increase practical utility of large engineered plasmids. This approach utilizes targeted lambda Red recombination of PCR products encoding the trpE and asd genes and as well as FLP/FRT-mediated marker removal. This is particularly important given that use of restriction enzymes with plasmids of this size is extremely problematic and often not feasible. This report provides the first example of the trpE gene/tryptophan prototrophy being used for recombineering selection. We applied this strategy to the plasmids R995+SPI-1 and R995+SPI-2 which encode cloned type III secretion systems to allow protein secretion and substrate delivery to eukaryotic cells. The resulting constructs are functional, stably maintained under conditions where the original constructs are unstable, completely defective for conjugative transfer, and transferred via electroporation. PMID:24055203

  6. Immobilization of plasmid DNA in bacterial ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Peter; Tabrizi, Chakameh Azimpour; Walcher, Petra; Haidinger, Wolfgang; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Werner

    2005-02-16

    The development of novel delivery vehicles is crucial for the improvement of DNA vaccine efficiency. In this report, we describe a new platform technology, which is based on the immobilization of plasmid DNA in the cytoplasmic membrane of a bacterial carrier. This technology retains plasmid DNA (Self-Immobilizing Plasmid, pSIP) in the host envelope complex due to a specific protein/DNA interaction during and after protein E-mediated lysis. The resulting bacterial ghosts (empty bacterial envelopes) loaded with pDNA were analyzed in detail by real time PCR assays. We could verify that pSIP plasmids were retained in the pellets of lysed Escherichia coli cultures indicating that they are efficiently anchored in the inner membrane of bacterial ghosts. In contrast, a high percentage of control plasmids that lack essential features of the self-immobilization system were expelled in the culture broth during the lysis process. We believe that the combination of this plasmid immobilization procedure and the protein E-mediated lysis technology represents an efficient in vivo technique for the production of non-living DNA carrier vehicles. In conclusion, we present a "self-loading", non-living bacterial DNA delivery vector for vaccination endowed with intrinsic adjuvant properties of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope. PMID:15681093

  7. Enhancement of allergic skin wheal responses and in vitro allergen-specific IgE production by computer-induced stress in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-04-01

    Computer-induced stress enhanced allergen-specific skin wheal responses in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) while it failed to do so in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). Computer-induced stress also enhanced plasma levels of substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in patients with AD, but not with AR. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with combination of IL-4, IL-10, anti-CD40 mAb, and allergen produced allergen-specific IgE production in both patients with AD and AR. Computer-induced stress enhanced allergen-specific IgE production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with AD, but not from patients with AR. This is the first report that computer-induced stress enhances allergen-specific responses with concomitant increase of plasma levels of SP and VIP specifically in patients with AD. Since AD is often aggravated by stress, these finding may have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of AD. PMID:12676575

  8. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet interactions with plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Cox, L. J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Graham, W. G.; Gans, T.; Currell, F. J.

    2011-01-24

    The effect of a cold (<40 deg. C) radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the DNA forms post-treatment. The experimental data are fitted to a rate equation model that allows for quantitative determination of the rates of single and double strand break formation. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks.

  9. Curing Both Virulent Mega-Plasmids from Bacillus anthracis Wild-Type Strain A16 Simultaneously Using Plasmid Incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongshu; Gao, Zhiqi; Wang, Huagui; Feng, Erling; Zhu, Li; Liu, Xiankai; Wang, Hengliang

    2015-10-28

    Plasmid-cured derivative strains of Bacillus anthracis are frequently used in laboratory studies. Plasmid incompatibility, which does not increase the risk of chromosomal mutation, is a useful method for plasmid curing. However, in bacteria containing multiple plasmids, it often requires the sequential introduction of multiple, specific incompatibility plasmids. This lengthy process renders the traditional plasmid incompatibility method inefficient and mutation-prone. In this study, we successfully cured plasmids pXO1 and pXO2 from B. anthracis A16 simultaneously using only one recombinant incompatible plasmid, pKORT, to obtain a plasmid-free strain, designated A16DD. This method may also be useful for the simultaneous, one-step curing of multiple plasmids from other bacteria, including Bacillus thuringiensis and Yersinia pestis. PMID:26059513

  10. In vivo visualization of type II plasmid segregation: bacterial actin filaments pushing plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher S.; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2007-01-01

    Type II par operons harness polymerization of the dynamically unstable actin-like protein ParM to segregate low-copy plasmids in rod-shaped bacteria. In this study, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to follow plasmid dynamics and ParM assembly in Escherichia coli. Plasmids lacking a par operon undergo confined diffusion with a diffusion constant of 5 × 10−5 μm2/s and a confinement radius of 0.28 μm. Single par-containing plasmids also move diffusively but with a larger diffusion constant (4 × 10−4 μm2/s) and confinement radius (0.42 μm). ParM filaments are dynamically unstable in vivo and form spindles that link pairs of par-containing plasmids and drive them rapidly (3.1 μm/min) toward opposite poles of the cell. After reaching the poles, ParM filaments rapidly and completely depolymerize. After ParM disassembly, segregated plasmids resume diffusive motion, often encountering each other many times and undergoing multiple rounds of ParM-dependent segregation in a single cell cycle. We propose that in addition to driving segregation, the par operon enables plasmids to search space and find sister plasmids more effectively. PMID:18039937

  11. Host range conferred by the virulence-specifying plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Loper, J E; Kado, C I

    1979-01-01

    The host range of Agrobacterium tumefaciens 1D1109, known to induce crown gall only on grapevine (Vitis spp.), was extended to include many plant species by transferring a tumor-inducing plasmid (pTi) from strain 1D1, a broad-host-range pathogen. The pTi plasmid was mobilized by the conjugative plasmid pRK2, which was inserted into 1D1 by mating with Escherichia coli J53(pRK2). The resulting transconjugants were screened for their ability to induce crown gall tumors on hosts other than grapevine by inoculation into sunflower. Transconjugants that were virulent on sunflower were then tested on 36 different host plants and compared with host-limited strain 1D1109 and the donor strain. Two transconjugants induced tumors on the same 28 plant species as those of the original plasmid donor 1D1(pRK2) (pTi). These results show that pRK2 promoted transfer of the pTi plasmid and suggest that the pTi plasmid rather than the A. tumefaciens chromosome determined the host range of the pathogen. Insertion of pRK2 alone did not extend the host range of strain 1D1109. Insertion of pS-a into A. tumefaciens 1D1 by mating with E. coli J53-1 (pS-a) resulted in the concomitant loss of pTi and virulence. There appears to be incompatibility between pTi and pS-a. Images PMID:457613

  12. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, C.; Santos, J. N.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm-2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms.

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pNA6 reveals the high plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Xu, Yan; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-10-10

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem in health care and is of widespread public concern. Conjugative plasmids are the most important vectors in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we determined the complete sequence of plasmid pNA6, a plasmid which was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to ampicillin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole. The complete sequence of plasmid pNA6 was 52,210bp in length with an average G+C content of 52.70%. Plasmid pNA6 belongs to the IncU group by sequence queries against the GenBank database. This plasmid has a typical IncU backbone and shows the highest similarities with plasmid RA3 and plasmid pFBAOT6. Plasmid pNA6 carries a class 1 integron consisting of aacA4, ereA and dfrA1 genes. Moreover, plasmid pNA6 also harbors a blaTEM-1-containing complex structure which inserted into the replication region and maintenance region. This insertion site has never been found on other IncU plasmids. The sequencing of plasmid pNA6 will add new sequence information to IncU family plasmids and enhance our understanding of the plasticity of IncU family plasmids. PMID:27374151

  14. Construction of ploidy series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the plasmid YCplac33-GHK.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lihua; Li, Xiaoyang; Wang, Cong; Cao, Xiaohong; Wang, Haiyong

    2013-04-01

    An effective approach, using the plasmid YCplac33-GHK, is developed to construct a ploidy series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. YCplac33-GHK harbors the HO gene under the control of galactose-inducible promoter and KanMX4 as the selective marker. The simple method can solve the problem of industrial applications of strains with resistance genes. PMID:23430413

  15. BioShuttle-mediated Plasmid Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Klaus; von Brasch, Leonie; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Ehemann, Volker; Jenne, Juergen; Spring, Herbert; Debus, Juergen; Didinger, Bernd; Rittgen, Werner; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2007-01-01

    An efficient gene transfer into target tissues and cells is needed for safe and effective treatment of genetic diseases like cancer. In this paper, we describe the development of a transport system and show its ability for transporting plasmids. This non-viral peptide-based BioShuttle-mediated transfer system consists of a nuclear localization address sequence realizing the delivery of the plasmid phNIS-IRES-EGFP coding for two independent reporter genes into nuclei of HeLa cells. The quantification of the transfer efficiency was achieved by measurements of the sodium iodide symporter activity. EGFP gene expression was measured with Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and quantified with biostatistical methods by analysis of the frequency of the amplitude distribution in the CLSM images. The results demonstrate that the “BioShuttle”-Technology is an appropriate tool for an effective transfer of genetic material carried by a plasmid. PMID:18026568

  16. Plasmid DNA from the acetotrophic methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans

    SciTech Connect

    Sowers, K.R.; Gunsalus, R.P. )

    1988-10-01

    Nine acetotrophic and three methylotrophic strains of methane-producing bacteria were screened for the presence of plasmid DNA. Plasmids were detected in three marine isolates, including Methanosarcina acetivorans. All three plasmids appeared to be similar based on size and restriction site analyses. The plasmid from M. acetivorans, designated pC2A, was approximately 5.1 kilobase pairs in size and was estimated to be present in a low copy number of six plasmids per genome. Multimers were also observed. A restriction map was constructed. The function of this plasmid is cryptic.

  17. Isolation and screening of plasmids from the epilithon which mobilize recombinant plasmid pD10.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K E; Weightman, A J; Fry, J C

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the potential of bacteria from river epilithon to mobilize a recombinant catabolic plasmid, pD10, encoding 3-chlorobenzoate degradation and kanamycin resistance. Fifty-four mobilizing plasmids were exogenously isolated by triparental matings between strains of Pseudomonas putida and epilithic bacteria from the River Taff (South Wales, United Kingdom). Frequencies for mobilization ranged from 1.7 x 10(-8) to 4.5 x 10(-3) per recipient at 20 degrees C. The sizes of the mobilizing plasmids isolated ranged from 40 kb to over 200 kb, and 19 of 54 were found to encode mercury resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin was also found but not resistance to UV light or various heavy metals. Eight plasmids of epilithic bacteria, analyzed by comparing restriction fragmentation patterns, showed significant differences between those isolated from different independent matings. Optimal temperatures for mobilization of pD10 were between 15 and 25 degrees C. Four mercury resistance plasmids were found to be broad host range, transferring mercury resistance and mobilizing pD10 readily to representative species of beta- and gamma-purple bacteria. In general, frequencies of pD10 mobilization by plasmids of epilithic bacteria were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than conjugal transfer frequencies. Thus, there is a high potential for exchange of recombinant genes introduced into the epilithon by mobilization between a variety of bacterial species. Images PMID:1599248

  18. Self-transmissible plasmids in staphylococci that encode resistance to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G L; Johnston, J L

    1983-01-01

    High-level resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin was transferred between staphylococci of the same and different species by filter mating. Resistance and transfer proficiency were mediated by plasmids ranging from 38 to 54 kilobases in size. All of the plasmids encoded intermediate resistance to amikacin and netilmicin and resistance to ethidium bromide; some encoded beta-lactamase production. None of these plasmids carried resistance to other antibiotics or heavy metals. Transfer of antibiotic resistance occurred by a mechanism similar to that of conjugation, because it was DNase resistant, required cell-to-cell contact, and did not appear to involve phage. The participation of phage in transfer appeared to be unlikely because mijtomicin C-induced lysates of donor isolates did not mediate transfer, filter mating transfer proceeded at high frequency between nonlysogenic donor and recipient cells, and transfer of the aminoglycoside resistance plasmid mobilized the transfer of as many as five additional plasmids. All 17 gentamicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and all 6 Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates obtained from an outbreak of staphylococcal infections in a newborn nursery contained conjugative plasmids, as did all 6 gentamicin-resistant S. aureus isolates from bacteremic adults. However, only 3 of 10 gentamicin-resistant S. epidermidis isolates from colonized cardiac surgery patients and 1 of 2 S. epidermidis isolates from patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis transferred gentamicin resistance by filter mating. The recent increase in nosocomial infections caused by gentamicin-resistant staphylococci may be partially explained by the evolution of self-transmissible plasmids in these isolates. Images PMID:6625557

  19. Spread of Plasmids Carrying Multiple GES Variants.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Bogaerts, Pierre; Bauraing, Caroline; Huang, Te-Din; Bonnin, Rémy A; Glupczynski, Youri; Naas, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    Five GES-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates that displayed an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype harbored two GES variants: GES-7 ESBL and GES-6 carbapenemase. In all isolates, the two GES alleles were located on the same integron that was inserted into an 80-kb IncM1 self-conjugative plasmid. Whole-genome sequencing suggested in vivo horizontal gene transfer of the plasmid along with clonal diffusion of Enterobacter cloacae To our knowledge, this is the first description in Europe of clustered Enterobacteriaceae isolates carrying two GES β-lactamases, of which one has extended activity toward carbapenems. PMID:27216071

  20. Mobilization of Morganocin 174 Plasmid and Kinetics of Morganocin Production in Proteus and Escherichia coli Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Morganocin 174 is coded by a plasmid, Mor174. The plasmid is not self-transmissible but may be mobilized by resistance factor R772. Morganocin synthesis in all Proteus and Providencia strains carrying Mor174 was characterized by a longer lag period after induction and higher titers than in Escherichia coli B(Mor174). The low titers obtained in E. coli B(Mor174) are due to a heatstable inhibitor produced by this strain. Synthesis of morganocin is not constitutive and may be induced by ultraviolet irradiation or mitomycin C. Morganocin production is not influenced by the growth medium of the organism. Images PMID:324393

  1. Long-term survival of intestinal allografts induced by costimulation blockade, busulfan and donor bone marrow infusion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong; Wang, Jun; Dong, Ying; Adams, Andrew B; Shirasugi, Nozomu; Kim, Oliver; Hart, John; Newton-West, Marvin; Pearson, Thomas C; Larsen, Christian P; Newell, Kenneth A

    2003-09-01

    Tolerance-inducing strategies that infuse donor bone marrow cells in conjunction with costimulation blockade have not been applied to intestinal transplantation. Intestines from BALB/c mice were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients treated with anti-CD40L mAb, CTLA4-Ig, donor bone marrow, and busulfan. The majority of mice transplanted after completion of this regimen developed hematopoietic macrochimerism, although the degree of chimerism varied widely between recipients, and experienced long-term allograft survival. T cells from these mice demonstrated donor-specific hyporesponsiveness in vitro. However, T cells from chimeric mice proliferated to donor alloantigen in vivo. Furthermore, chimeric mice bearing intestinal allografts were capable of rejecting subsequently placed donor-strain skin grafts. These data suggest that although long-term allograft survival occurs in the absence of acute or chronic rejection, recipient mice are not completely unresponsive to donor alloantigens. When intestinal transplantation was performed at the time of initial bone marrow infusion (initiation of the chimerism protocol), most recipients failed to develop chimerism and promptly rejected the intestinal allograft. Although this is the most effective protocol that we have tested using this stringent model of transplantation, our observations suggest that modifications will be necessary before it can be reliably applied to the transplantation of highly immunogeneic organs like the intestine. PMID:12919088

  2. Murine Langerin+ dermal dendritic cells prime CD8+ T cells while Langerhans cells induce cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H; Mairhofer, David G; Steinman, Ralph M; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Skin dendritic cells (DCs) control the immunogenicity of cutaneously administered vaccines. Antigens targeted to DCs via the C-type lectin Langerin/CD207 are cross-presented to CD8+ T cells in vivo. We investigated the relative roles of Langerhans cells (LCs) and Langerin+ dermal DCs (dDCs) in different vaccination settings. Poly(I:C) and anti-CD40 agonist antibody promoted cytotoxic responses upon intradermal immunization with ovalbumin (OVA)-coupled anti-Langerin antibodies (Langerin/OVA). This correlated with CD70 upregulation in Langerin+ dDCs, but not LCs. In chimeric mice where Langerin targeting was restricted to dDCs, CD8+ T-cell memory was enhanced. Conversely, providing Langerin/OVA exclusively to LCs failed to prime cytotoxicity, despite initial antigen cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells. Langerin/OVA combined with imiquimod could not prime CD8+ T cells and resulted in poor cytotoxicity in subsequent responses. This tolerance induction required targeting and maturation of LCs. Altogether, Langerin+ dDCs prime long-lasting cytotoxic responses, while cross-presentation by LCs negatively influences CD8+ T-cell priming. Moreover, this highlights that DCs exposed to TLR agonists can still induce tolerance and supports the existence of qualitatively different DC maturation programs. PMID:25085878

  3. Effect of degradative plasmid CAM-OCT on responses of Pseudomonas bacteria to UV light

    SciTech Connect

    McBeth, D.L.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of plasmid CAM-OCT on responses to UV irradiation was compared in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in Pseudomonas putida, and in Pseudomonas putida mutants carrying mutations in UV response genes. CAM-OCT substantially increased both survival and mutagenesis in the two species. P. aeruginosa strains without CAM-OCT exhibited much higher UV sensitivity than did P. putida strains. UV-induced mutagenesis of plasmid-free P. putida was easily detected in three different assays (two reversion assays and one forward mutation assay), whereas UV mutagenesis of P. aeruginosa without CAM-OCT was seen only in the forward mutation assay. These results suggest major differences in DNA repair between the two species and highlight the presence of error-prone repair functions on CAM-OCT. A number of P. putida mutants carrying chromosomal mutations affecting either survival or mutagenesis after UV irradiation were isolated, and the effect of CAM-OCT on these mutants was determined. All mutations producing a UV-sensitive phenotype in P. putida were fully suppressed by the plasmid, whereas the plasmid had a more variable effect on mutagenesis mutations, suppressing some and producing no suppression of others. On the basis of the results reported here and results obtained by others with plasmids carrying UV response genes, it appears that CAM-OCT may differ either in regulation or in the number and functions of UV response genes encoded.

  4. The Virulence Plasmid of Yersinia, an Antihost Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guy R.; Boland, Anne; Boyd, Aoife P.; Geuijen, Cecile; Iriarte, Maite; Neyt, Cécile; Sory, Marie-Paule; Stainier, Isabelle

    1998-01-01

    The 70-kb virulence plasmid enables Yersinia spp. (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica) to survive and multiply in the lymphoid tissues of their host. It encodes the Yop virulon, an integrated system allowing extracellular bacteria to disarm the cells involved in the immune response, to disrupt their communications, or even to induce their apoptosis by the injection of bacterial effector proteins. This system consists of the Yop proteins and their dedicated type III secretion apparatus, called Ysc. The Ysc apparatus is composed of some 25 proteins including a secretin. Most of the Yops fall into two groups. Some of them are the intracellular effectors (YopE, YopH, YpkA/YopO, YopP/YopJ, YopM, and YopT), while the others (YopB, YopD, and LcrV) form the translocation apparatus that is deployed at the bacterial surface to deliver the effectors into the eukaryotic cells, across their plasma membrane. Yop secretion is triggered by contact with eukaryotic cells and controlled by proteins of the virulon including YopN, TyeA, and LcrG, which are thought to form a plug complex closing the bacterial secretion channel. The proper operation of the system also requires small individual chaperones, called the Syc proteins, in the bacterial cytosol. Transcription of the genes is controlled both by temperature and by the activity of the secretion apparatus. The virulence plasmid of Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis also encodes the adhesin YadA. The virulence plasmid contains some evolutionary remnants including, in Y. enterocolitica, an operon encoding resistance to arsenic compounds. PMID:9841674

  5. A Eukaryotic Expression Plasmid Carrying Chicken Interleukin-18 Enhances the Response to Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaokang; Zhang, Chunjie; Wu, Tingcai; Li, Yinju

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is an important cytokine involved in innate and acquired immunity. In this study, we cloned the full-length chicken IL-18 (ChIL-18) gene from specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicken embryo spleen cells and provided evidence that the ChIL-18 gene in a recombinant plasmid was successfully expressed in chicken DT40 cells. ChIL-18 significantly enhanced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) mRNA expression in chicken splenocytes, which increased IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by macrophages. The potential genetic adjuvant activity of the ChIL-18 plasmid was examined in chickens by coinjecting ChIL-18 plasmid and inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. ChIL-18 markedly elevated serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers and anti-hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (anti-HN)-specific antibody levels, induced the secretion of both Th1- (IFN-γ) and Th2- (interleukin-4) type cytokines, promoted the proliferation of T and B lymphocytes, and increased the populations of CD3+ T cells and their subsets, CD3+ CD4+ and CD3+ CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, a virus challenge revealed that ChIL-18 contributed to protection against Newcastle disease virus challenge. Taken together, our data indicate that the coadministration of ChIL-18 plasmid and NDV vaccine induces a strong immune response at both the humoral and cellular levels and that ChIL-18 is a novel immunoadjuvant suitable for NDV vaccination. PMID:25355794

  6. The plant GABA signaling downregulates horizontal transfer of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence plasmid.

    PubMed

    Lang, Julien; Gonzalez-Mula, Almudena; Taconnat, Ludivine; Clement, Gilles; Faure, Denis

    2016-05-01

    In the tumor-inducing (Ti) Agrobacterium tumefaciens, quorum sensing activates the horizontal transfer of the virulent Ti plasmid. In pure culture, this process can be impaired by the A. tumefaciens BlcC lactonase, whose expression is induced by gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). It was therefore hypothesized that host GABA content might modulate quorum sensing and virulence gene dissemination during A. tumefaciens infection. We examined GABA metabolism and transport in Arabidopsis thaliana tumors combining transcriptomic, metabolomic and histological approaches. In addition, using genetically modified plants and bacteria, we evaluated the impact of plant host GABA content on Ti plasmid dissemination. The results showed that GABA and free proline, which acts as an antagonist of GABA uptake in A. tumefaciens, accumulated in wild-type tumors relative to uninfected plant tissues. Moreover, comparisons of tumors induced on Col-0 and her1 plants showed that the increase in the plant GABA : proline ratio was associated with both the upregulated expression of the blcC gene and the decreased dissemination of Ti plasmid in tumor-colonizing A. tumefaciens populations. This work demonstrates experimentally that the variation in the GABA content in plant tumors can interfere with the dissemination of A. tumefaciens Ti plasmids, and therefore highlights plant GABA content as an important trait in the struggle against pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26714842

  7. DISTRIBUTION OF PLASMIDS IN GROUNDWATER BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria isolated from groundwater aquifer core materials of pristine aquifers at Lula and Pickett, Oklahoma, and from a site with a history of aromatic hydrocarbon contamination and natural renovation located at Conroe, Texas, were screened for the presence of plasmid Deoxyribon...

  8. DYNAMICS OF PLASMID TRANSFER ON SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A protocol was developed to study the dynamics of growth and plasmid transfer in surface populations of bacteria. his method allows for quantitative estimates of cell population densities over time, as well as microscopic observations of colony growth and interactions. sing this ...

  9. Persistent, Toxin-Antitoxin System-Independent, Tetracycline Resistance-Encoding Plasmid from a Dairy Enterococcus faecium Isolate▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinhui; Alvarez, Valente; Harper, Willis James; Wang, Hua H.

    2011-01-01

    A tetracycline-resistant (Tetr) dairy Enterococcus faecium isolate designated M7M2 was found to carry both tet(M) and tet(L) genes on a 19.6-kb plasmid. After consecutive transfer in the absence of tetracycline, the resistance-encoding plasmid persisted in 99% of the progenies. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the 19.6-kb plasmid contained 28 open reading frames (ORFs), including a tet(M)-tet(L)-mob gene cluster, as well as a 10.6-kb backbone highly homologous (99.9%) to the reported plasmid pRE25, but without an identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) plasmid stabilization system. The derived backbone plasmid without the Tetr determinants exhibited a 100% retention rate in the presence of acridine orange, suggesting the presence of a TA-independent plasmid stabilization mechanism, with its impact on the persistence of a broad spectrum of resistance-encoding traits still to be elucidated. The tet(M)-tet(L) gene cluster from M7M2 was functional and transmissible and led to acquired resistance in Enterococcus faecalis OG1RF by electroporation and in Streptococcus mutans UA159 by natural transformation. Southern hybridization showed that both the tet(M) and tet(L) genes were integrated into the chromosome of S. mutans UA159, while the whole plasmid was transferred to and retained in E. faecalis OG1RF. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) indicated tetracycline-induced transcription of both the tet(M) and tet(L) genes of pM7M2. The results indicated that multiple mechanisms might have contributed to the persistence of antibiotic resistance-encoding genes and that the plasmids pM7M2, pIP816, and pRE25 are likely correlated evolutionarily. PMID:21784909

  10. Plasminogen activator/coagulase gene of Yersinia pestis is responsible for degradation of plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sodeinde, O A; Sample, A K; Brubaker, R R; Goguen, J D

    1988-01-01

    The related family of virulence plasmids found in the three major pathogens of the genus Yersinia all have the ability to encode a set of outer membrane proteins. In Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, these proteins are major constituents of the outer membrane when their synthesis is fully induced. In contrast, they have been difficult to detect in Y. pestis. It has recently been established that Y. pestis does synthesize these proteins, but that they are rapidly degraded due to some activity determined by the 9.5-kilobase plasmid commonly found in Y. pestis strains. We show that mutations in the pla gene of this plasmid, which encodes both the plasminogen activator and coagulase activities, blocked this degradation. A cloned 1.4-kilobase DNA fragment carrying pla was also sufficient to cause degradation in the absence of the 9.5-kilobase plasmid. Images PMID:2843471

  11. Compositional discordance between prokaryotic plasmids and host chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    van Passel, Mark WJ; Bart, Aldert; Luyf, Angela CM; van Kampen, Antoine HC; van der Ende, Arie

    2006-01-01

    Background Most plasmids depend on the host replication machinery and possess partitioning genes. These properties confine plasmids to a limited range of hosts, yielding a close and presumably stable relationship between plasmid and host. Hence, it is anticipated that due to amelioration the dinucleotide composition of plasmids is similar to that of the genome of their hosts. However, plasmids are also thought to play a major role in horizontal gene transfer and thus are frequently exchanged between hosts, suggesting dinucleotide composition dissimilarity between plasmid and host genome. We compared the dinucleotide composition of a large collection of plasmids with that of their host genomes to shed more light on this enigma. Results The dinucleotide frequency, coined the genome signature, facilitates the identification of putative horizontally transferred DNA in complete genome sequences, since it was found to be typical for a certain genome, and similar between related species. By comparison of the genome signature of 230 plasmid sequences with that of the genome of each respective host, we found that in general the genome signature of plasmids is dissimilar from that of their host genome. Conclusion Our results show that the genome signature of plasmids does not resemble that of their host genome. This indicates either absence of amelioration or a less stable relationship between plasmids and their host. We propose an indiscriminate lifestyle for plasmids preserving the genome signature discordance between these episomes and host chromosomes. PMID:16480495

  12. Germline Competent Pluripotent Mouse Stem Cells Generated by Plasmid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hong; Su, Yu-Hsiu; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Chuang, Chin-Kai

    2016-07-01

    We developed nonintegrated methods to reprogram mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using pig pOct4, pSox2, and pc-Myc as well as human hKLF4, hAID, and hTDG that were carried by plasmid vectors. The 4F method employed pOct4, pSox2, pc-Myc, and hKLF4 to derive iPSC clones with naive embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like morphology. These 4F clones expressed endogenous mouse Nanog protein and could generate chimeras. In addition to the four conventional reprogramming factors used in the 4F method, hAID and hTDG were utilized in a 6F method to increase the conversion efficiency of reprogramming by approximately five-fold. One of the 6F plasmid derived iPSC (piPSC) clones was shown to be germline transmission competent. PMID:26980563

  13. Plasmids captured in C. metallidurans CH34: defining the PromA family of broad-host-range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Van der Auwera, Géraldine A; Król, Jaroslaw E; Suzuki, Haruo; Foster, Brian; Van Houdt, Rob; Brown, Celeste J; Mergeay, Max; Top, Eva M

    2009-08-01

    The self-transmissible, broad-host-range (BHR) plasmid pMOL98 was previously isolated from polluted soil using a triparental plasmid capture approach and shown to possess a replicon similar to that of the BHR plasmids pSB102 and pIPO2. Here, complete sequence analysis and comparative genomics reveal that the 55.5 kb nucleotide sequence of pMOL98 shows extensive sequence similarity and synteny with the BHR plasmid family that now includes pIPO2, pSB102, pTER331, and pMRAD02. They share a plasmid backbone comprising replication, partitioning and conjugative transfer functions. Comparison of the variable accessory regions of these plasmids shows that the majority of natural transposons, as well as the mini-transposon used to mark the plasmids, are inserted in the parA locus. The transposon unique to pMOL98 appears to have inserted from the chromosome of the recipient strain used in the plasmid capture procedure. This demonstrates the necessity for careful screening of plasmids and host chromosomes to avoid mis-interpretation of plasmid genome content. The presence of very similar BHR plasmids with different accessory genes in geographically distinct locations suggests an important role in horizontal gene exchange and bacterial adaptation for this recently defined plasmid group, which we propose to name "PromA". PMID:19259779

  14. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET), a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Val F; de Toro, María; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages. PMID:25522143

  15. Plasmid Flux in Escherichia coli ST131 Sublineages, Analyzed by Plasmid Constellation Network (PLACNET), a New Method for Plasmid Reconstruction from Whole Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M.; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ–proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages. PMID:25522143

  16. Gene and cell survival: lessons from prokaryotic plasmid R1.

    PubMed

    de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo; Pimentel, Belén

    2007-05-01

    Plasmids are units of extrachromosomal genetic inheritance found in all kingdoms of life. They replicate autonomously and undergo stable propagation in their hosts. Despite their small size, plasmid replication and gene expression constitute a metabolic burden that compromises their stable maintenance in host cells. This pressure has driven the evolution of strategies to increase plasmid stability--a process accelerated by the ability of plasmids to transfer horizontally between cells and to exchange genetic material with their host and other resident episomal DNAs. These abilities drive the adaptability and diversity of plasmids and their host cells. Indeed, survival functions found in plasmids have chromosomal homologues that have an essential role in cellular responses to stress. An analysis of these functions in the prokaryotic plasmid R1, and of their intricate interrelationships, reveals remarkable overall similarities with other gene- and cell-survival strategies found within and beyond the prokaryotic world. PMID:17471262

  17. The 2 micron plasmid purloins the yeast cohesin complex

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shwetal; Yang, Xian Mei; Chan, Clarence S.; Dobson, Melanie J.; Jayaram, Makkuni; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian

    2002-01-01

    The yeast 2 micron plasmid achieves high fidelity segregation by coupling its partitioning pathway to that of the chromosomes. Mutations affecting distinct steps of chromosome segregation cause the plasmid to missegregate in tandem with the chromosomes. In the absence of the plasmid stability system, consisting of the Rep1 and Rep2 proteins and the STB DNA, plasmid and chromosome segregations are uncoupled. The Rep proteins, acting in concert, recruit the yeast cohesin complex to the STB locus. The periodicity of cohesin association and dissociation is nearly identical for the plasmid and the chromosomes. The timely disassembly of cohesin is a prerequisite for plasmid segregation. Cohesin-mediated pairing and unpairing likely provides a counting mechanism for evenly partitioning plasmids either in association with or independently of the chromosomes. PMID:12177044

  18. Plasmid-associated aggregation in Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, M.W.; Fee, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Thermus thermophilus HB8, a moderate thermophile, exhibits visible aggregation when growing on a rich broth. Strain HB8 also contains two cryptic plasmids. The authors isolated cured strains from HB8 and observed that loss of the 47-MDa plasmid was correlated with loss of aggregation. An enrichment procedure was developed for aggregating cells and used to demonstrate that aggregation was restored upon transformation of a cured strain with plasmid DNA. The aggregation phenotype of transformed cells was variably stable; most did not retain either the plasmid or the phenotype for prolonged periods of growth. Hybridization experiments using a partial sequence from the 47-MDa plasmid suggested the presence of a repeated DNA sequence on this plasmid and on the chromosome. This is the first report of a phenotype associated with a plasmid from a Thermus strain.

  19. Modulation of Cytokine Production by Drugs with Antiepileptic or Mood Stabilizer Properties in Anti-CD3- and Anti-CD40-Stimulated Blood In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Hajo; Schönherr, Jeremias; Petersein, Charlotte; Munzer, Alexander; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Bauer, Katrin; Sack, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Increased cytokine production possibly due to oxidative stress has repeatedly been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Recent in vitro and animal studies of valproic acid (VPA) report antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, and suppression of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We tested the effect of drugs with antiepileptic or mood stabilizer properties, namely, primidone (PRM), carbamazepine (CBZ), levetiracetam (LEV), lamotrigine (LTG), VPA, oxcarbazepine (OXC), topiramate (TPM), phenobarbital (PB), and lithium on the production of the following cytokines in vitro: interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, and TNF-α. We performed a whole blood assay with stimulated blood of 14 healthy female subjects. Anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3, combined with 5C3 antibody against CD40, was used as stimulant. We found a significant reduction of IL-1 and IL-2 levels with all tested drugs other than lithium in the CD3/5C3-stimulated blood; VPA led to a decrease in IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and TNF-α production, which substantiates and adds knowledge to current hypotheses on VPA's anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:24757498

  20. Plasmid-Cured Chlamydia caviae Activates TLR2-Dependent Signaling and Retains Virulence in the Guinea Pig Model of Genital Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Lauren C.; Darville, Toni; Chandra-Kuntal, Kumar; Andrews, Charles W.; Zurenski, Matthew; Mintus, Margaret; AbdelRahman, Yasser M.; Belland, Robert J.; Ingalls, Robin R.; O'Connell, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the conserved “cryptic” plasmid from C. trachomatis and C. muridarum is pleiotropic, resulting in reduced innate inflammatory activation via TLR2, glycogen accumulation and infectivity. The more genetically distant C. caviae GPIC is a natural pathogen of guinea pigs and induces upper genital tract pathology when inoculated intravaginally, modeling human disease. To examine the contribution of pCpGP1 to C. caviae pathogenesis, a cured derivative of GPIC, strain CC13, was derived and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Transcriptional profiling of CC13 revealed only partial conservation of previously identified plasmid-responsive chromosomal loci (PRCL) in C. caviae. However, 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) treatment of GPIC and CC13 resulted in reduced transcription of all identified PRCL, including glgA, indicating the presence of a plasmid-independent glucose response in this species. In contrast to plasmid-cured C. muridarum and C. trachomatis, plasmid-cured C. caviae strain CC13 signaled via TLR2 in vitro and elicited cytokine production in vivo similar to wild-type C. caviae. Furthermore, inflammatory pathology induced by infection of guinea pigs with CC13 was similar to that induced by GPIC, although we observed more rapid resolution of CC13 infection in estrogen-treated guinea pigs. These data indicate that either the plasmid is not involved in expression or regulation of virulence in C. caviae or that redundant effectors prevent these phenotypic changes from being observed in C. caviae plasmid-cured strains. PMID:22292031

  1. Protection from ischemic heart injury by a vigilant heme oxygenase-1 plasmid system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao Liang; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Y Clare; Qian, Keping; Shen, Leping; Phillips, M Ian

    2004-04-01

    Although human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) could provide a useful approach for cellular protection in the ischemic heart, constitutive overexpression of hHO-1 may lead to unwanted side effects. To avoid this, we designed a hypoxia-regulated hHO-1 gene therapy system that can be switched on and off. This vigilant plasmid system is composed of myosin light chain-2v promoter and a gene switch that is based on an oxygen-dependent degradation domain from the hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha. The vector can sense ischemia and switch on the hHO-1 gene system, specifically in the heart. In an in vivo experiment, the vigilant hHO-1 plasmid or saline was injected intramyocardially into myocardial infarction mice or sham operation mice. After gene transfer, expression of hHO-1 was only detected in the ischemic heart treated with vigilant hHO-1 plasmids. Masson trichrome staining showed significantly fewer fibrotic areas in vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice compared with saline control (43.0%+/-4.8% versus 62.5%+/-3.3%, P<0.01). The reduction of interstitial fibrosis is accompanied by an increase in myocardial hHO-1 expression in peri-infarct border areas, concomitant with higher Bcl-2 levels and lower Bax, Bak, and caspase 3 levels in the ischemic myocardium compared with saline control. By use of a cardiac catheter, heart from vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice showed improved recovery of contractile and diastolic performance after myocardial infarction compared with saline control. This study documents the beneficial regulation and therapeutic potential of vigilant plasmid-mediated hHO-1 gene transfer. This novel gene transfer strategy can provide cardiac-specific protection from future repeated bouts of ischemic injury. PMID:14981066

  2. Monoclonal antibodies produced by muscle after plasmid injection and electroporation.

    PubMed

    Tjelle, Torunn Elisabeth; Corthay, Alexandre; Lunde, Elin; Sandlie, Inger; Michaelsen, Terje E; Mathiesen, Iacob; Bogen, Bjarne

    2004-03-01

    Antibodies are useful for the treatment of a variety of diseases. We here demonstrate that mouse muscle produced monoclonal antibodies (mAb) after a single injection of immunoglobulin genes as plasmid DNA. In vivo electroporation of muscle greatly enhanced antibody production. For chimeric antibodies, levels of 50-200 ng mAb/ml serum were obtained but levels declined after 7-14 days due to an immune response against the xenogeneic parts of the antibody. By contrast, fully mouse antibodies persisted in serum for at least 7 months. mAb produced by the muscle had correct structure, specificity, and biological effector functions. The findings were extended to a larger animal, the sheep, in which mAb serum levels of 30-50 ng/ml were obtained. Sustained levels of serum mAb, induced by single injection of Ig genes and electroporation of muscle cells, may offer significant advantages in the treatment of human diseases. PMID:15006599

  3. Plasmid R6K Replication Control

    PubMed Central

    Rakowski, Sheryl A.; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this minireview is the replication control of the 39.9-kb plasmid R6K and its derivatives. Historically, this plasmid was thought to have a narrow host range but more recent findings indicate that its derivatives can replicate in a variety of enteric and non-enteric bacterial species (Wild et al., 2004). In the four-plus decades since it was first described, R6K has proven to be an excellent model for studies of plasmid DNA replication. In part this is because of its similarities to other systems in which replication is activated and regulated by Rep protein and iteron-containing DNA. However its apparent idiosynchracies have also added to its significance (e.g., independent and co-dependent replication origins, and Rep dimers that stably bind iterons). Here, we survey the current state of knowledge regarding R6K replication and place individual regulatory elements into a proposed homeostatic model with implications for the biological significance of R6K and its multiple origins of replication. PMID:23474464

  4. Regulatory T Cells Suppress Natural Killer Cells during Plasmid DNA Vaccination in Mice, Blunting the CD8+ T Cell Immune Response by the Cytokine TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Frimpong-Boateng, Kwesi; van Rooijen, Nico; Geiben-Lynn, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Background CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses to self- and foreign-antigens. Tregs may also suppress early innate immune responses to vaccine antigens and might decrease vaccine efficacy. NK and NKT cells are the first responders after plasmid DNA vaccination and are found at the site of inoculation. Earlier reports demonstrated that NKT cells could improve plasmid DNA efficacy, a phenomenon not found for NK cells. In fact, it has been shown that under certain disease conditions, NK cells are suppressed by Tregs via their release of IL-10 and/or TGFβ. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that NK cell function is suppressed by Tregs in the setting of plasmid DNA vaccination. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we show that Tregs directly inhibit NK cell function during plasmid DNA vaccination by suppressing the potentially 10-fold, NK cell-mediated, augmentation of plasmid DNA antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. We found that this phenomenon is dependent on the secretion of cytokine TGFβ by Tregs, and independent of IL-10. Conclusions Our data indicate a crucial function for Tregs in blocking plasmid DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses, revealing potentially novel strategies for improving the efficiency of plasmid DNA vaccines including chemical- or antibody-induced localized blockage of Treg-mediated suppression of NK cells at the site of plasmid DNA vaccine inoculation. PMID:20808850

  5. The use of plasmid R1162 and derivatives for gene cloning in the methanol-utilizing Pseudomonas AM1.

    PubMed

    Gautier, F; Bonewald, R

    1980-01-01

    A physical map for plasmid R1162 (Sm, Su, IncP4) was constructed. Neither EcoRI, PstI nor EcaI cut within a region essential for replication, molbilization or streptomycin resistence. Plasmid R1162 can replicate in E. coli as well as in Pseudomonas species and shows a strong dependence for DNA polymerase I in E. coli. By RP4 induced mobilization, R1162 can be transferred from E. coli to Pseudomonas AM1. A hybrid plasmid pFG7 (MW=8.4 x 10(6), Sm, Su, Ap, Tc) was constructed between pBR322 and R1162, which allows the selection of hybrid plasmids by insertional inactivation with the restriction enzymes HindIII, BamHI, SalI, ClaI. Transformation of E. coli SK1592 with Ecal-cut and ligated R1162-DNA and Pseudomonas AMI-DNA and subsequent mobilization of the hybrid plasmids into Pseudomonas AM1/M15a (methanol dehydrogenase-) led to the isolation of Pseudomonas AM1/M15a colonies, which could grow on methanol again. Back-conjugation into E. coli SK1592, subsequent mobilization studies and plasmid analysis suggests that the gene for Pseudomonas methanol dehydrogenase has been cloned in this vector. PMID:6248728

  6. Construction of plasmid-free Escherichia coli for the production of arabitol-free xylitol from corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Su, Buli; Zhang, Zhe; Wu, Mianbin; Lin, Jianping; Yang, Lirong

    2016-01-01

    High costs and low production efficiency are a serious constraint to bio-based xylitol production. For industrial-scale production of xylitol, a plasmid-free Escherichia coli for arabitol-free xylitol production from corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate has been constructed. Instead of being plasmid and inducer dependent, this strain relied on multiple-copy integration of xylose reductase (XR) genes into the chromosome, where their expression was controlled by the constitutive promoter P43. In addition, to minimize the flux from L-arabinose to arabitol, two strategies including low XR total activity and high selectivity of XR has been adopted. Arabitol was significantly decreased using plasmid-free strain which had lower XR total activity and an eight point-mutations of XR with a 27-fold lower enzyme activity toward L-arabinose was achieved. The plasmid-free strain in conjunction with this mutant XR can completely eliminate arabitol formation in xylitol production. In fed-batch fermentation, this plasmid-free strain produced 143.8 g L−1 xylitol at 1.84 g L−1 h−1 from corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate. From these results, we conclude that this route by plasmid-free E. coli has potential to become a commercially viable process for xylitol production. PMID:27225023

  7. Analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTiC58 replication region with a novel high-copy-number derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, D R; Hagiya, M; Kado, C I

    1985-01-01

    The origin of replication, ori, of the nopaline tumor-inducing plasmid, pTiC58, mapped in a region that shares sequence homology with octopine plasmids pTiAch5 and pTiB6. Within this region, the minimum amount of DNA necessary for maintaining autonomous replication was a 2.6-kilobase region, which also comprised the incompatibility function inc. pTiC58 derivatives containing inc were incompatible with Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmids pTiC58, pTiD1439, pTiAch5, pTi15955, and pTiA5 and were compatible with A. rhizogenes plasmid pRi12. Situated adjacent to the origin region was a 1.5-kilobase par segment involved in stable inheritance of pTiC58 under nonselective growth conditions. When par was present, plasmid maintenance approached that of the wild-type pTiC58. Rapid loss from the cell population was observed for plasmids not containing this locus. Another 1.5-kilobase region, cop, positively regulated pTiC58 copy number, enabling certain pTiC58 derivatives to exist at a copy number up to 80 times higher than that of wild-type pTiC58. Deletions within the cop locus resulted in reduced copy number. The ori/inc regions were flanked on either side by the par and cop loci. Images PMID:3972769

  8. Construction of plasmid-free Escherichia coli for the production of arabitol-free xylitol from corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Su, Buli; Zhang, Zhe; Wu, Mianbin; Lin, Jianping; Yang, Lirong

    2016-01-01

    High costs and low production efficiency are a serious constraint to bio-based xylitol production. For industrial-scale production of xylitol, a plasmid-free Escherichia coli for arabitol-free xylitol production from corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate has been constructed. Instead of being plasmid and inducer dependent, this strain relied on multiple-copy integration of xylose reductase (XR) genes into the chromosome, where their expression was controlled by the constitutive promoter P43. In addition, to minimize the flux from L-arabinose to arabitol, two strategies including low XR total activity and high selectivity of XR has been adopted. Arabitol was significantly decreased using plasmid-free strain which had lower XR total activity and an eight point-mutations of XR with a 27-fold lower enzyme activity toward L-arabinose was achieved. The plasmid-free strain in conjunction with this mutant XR can completely eliminate arabitol formation in xylitol production. In fed-batch fermentation, this plasmid-free strain produced 143.8 g L(-1) xylitol at 1.84 g L(-1) h(-1) from corncob hemicellulosic hydrolysate. From these results, we conclude that this route by plasmid-free E. coli has potential to become a commercially viable process for xylitol production. PMID:27225023

  9. Distinct Humoral and Cellular Immunity Induced by Alternating Prime-boost Vaccination Using Plasmid DNA and Live Viral Vector Vaccines Expressing the E Protein of Dengue Virus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    George, Junu A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus, which belongs to the Flavivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family, causes fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) with infection risk of 2.5 billion people worldwide. However, approved vaccines are still not available. Here, we explored the immune responses induced by alternating prime-boost vaccination using DNA vaccine, adenovirus, and vaccinia virus expressing E protein of dengue virus type 2 (DenV2). Methods Following immunization with DNA vaccine (pDE), adenovirus (rAd-E), and/or vaccinia virus (VV-E) expressing E protein, E protein-specific IgG and its isotypes were determined by conventional ELISA. Intracellular CD154 and cytokine staining was used for enumerating CD4+ T cells specific for E protein. E protein-specific CD8+ T cell responses were evaluated by in vivo CTL killing activity and intracellular IFN-γ staining. Results Among three constructs, VV-E induced the most potent IgG responses, Th1-type cytokine production by stimulated CD4+ T cells, and the CD8+ T cell response. Furthermore, when the three constructs were used for alternating prime-boost vaccination, the results revealed a different pattern of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. i) Priming with VV-E induced higher E-specific IgG level but it was decreased rapidly. ii) Strong CD8+ T cell responses specific for E protein were induced when VV-E was used for the priming step, and such CD8+ T cell responses were significantly boosted with pDE. iii) Priming with rAd-E induced stronger CD4+ T cell responses which subsequently boosted with pDE to a greater extent than VV-E and rAd-E. Conclusion These results indicate that priming with live viral vector vaccines could induce different patterns of E protein- specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses which were significantly enhanced by booster vaccination with the DNA vaccine. Therefore, our observation will provide valuable information for the establishment of optimal prime-boost vaccination against

  10. Linear and Circular Plasmid Content in Borrelia burgdorferi Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Radha; Kalu, Ogori; Purser, Joye; Norris, Steven; Stevenson, Brian; Schwartz, Ira

    2003-01-01

    The genome of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is composed of a linear chromosome and more than 20 linear and circular plasmids. Typically, plasmid content analysis has been carried out by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and confirmed by Southern hybridization. However, multiple plasmids of virtually identical sizes (e.g., lp28 and cp32) complicate the interpretation of such data. The present study was undertaken to investigate the complete plasmid complements of B. burgdorferi clinical isolates cultivated from patients from a single region where early Lyme disease is endemic. A total of 21 isolates obtained from the skin biopsy or blood samples of Lyme disease patients were examined for their complete plasmid complements by Southern hybridization and plasmid-specific PCR analysis. All clinical isolates harbored at least six of the nine previously characterized cp32s. Fourteen isolates harbored all B31-like linear plasmids, and seven isolates simultaneously lacked lp56, lp38, and some segments of lp28-1. The distinctive plasmid profile observed in these seven isolates was specific to organisms that had ribosomal spacer type 2 and pulsed-field gel type A, which implies a clonal origin for this genotype. The presence of nearly identical complements of multiple linear and circular plasmids in all of the human isolates suggests that these plasmids may be particularly necessary for infection, adaptation, and/or maintenance in the infected host. PMID:12819050

  11. Determination of Plasmid Segregational Stability in a Growing Bacterial Population.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively used as cloning vectors for a number of genes for academic and commercial purposes. Moreover, attenuated bacteria carrying recombinant plasmids expressing genes with anti-tumor activity have shown promising therapeutic results in animal models of cancer. Equitable plasmid distribution between daughter cells during cell division, i.e., plasmid segregational stability, depends on many factors, including the plasmid copy number, its replication mechanism, the levels of recombinant gene expression, the type of bacterial host, and the metabolic burden associated with all these factors. Plasmid vectors usually code for antibiotic-resistant functions, and, in order to enrich the culture with bacteria containing plasmids, antibiotic selective pressure is commonly used to eliminate plasmid-free segregants from the growing population. However, administration of antibiotics can be inconvenient for many industrial and therapeutic applications. Extensive ongoing research is being carried out to develop stably-inherited plasmid vectors. Here, I present an easy and precise method for determining the kinetics of plasmid loss or maintenance for every ten generations of bacterial growth in culture. PMID:26846807

  12. Properties of IncP-2 plasmids of Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, G A; Sutton, L; Knobel, L; Mammen, P

    1983-01-01

    Thirty IncP-2 R plasmids from isolates of Pseudomonas spp. of diverse geographical origins were examined for the production of resistance properties. All the plasmids determined resistance to tellurite and all inhibited the propagation of certain DNA phages, although several patterns of phage inhibition were detected. Of the 30 plasmids, 29 determined resistance to streptomycin, 28 determined resistance to mercuric ion, and 24 determined resistance to sulfonamide. Resistance to other antibiotics, to compounds of arsenic, boron, or chromium, and to UV irradiation was less common. The degradative plasmid CAM also belonged to this group. When CAM was introduced into recipients carrying an IncP-2 R plasmid, recombinant plasmids were often formed in which antibiotic resistance and the ability to grow on camphor were transferred together to further recipients or were lost together in a strain in which IncP-2 plasmids were unstable. Such hybrid plasmid formation was rec dependent. CAM and other IncP-2 plasmids that determine UV light resistance demonstrated UV-enhanced, nonpolarized transfer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. By agarose gel electrophoresis, all IncP-2 R plasmids and CAM were ca. 300 X 10(6) in molecular weight. PMID:6638986

  13. Plasmid replicon typing of commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M; Johnson, Sara J; Logue, Catherine M; White, David G; Doetkott, Curt; Nolan, Lisa K

    2007-03-01

    Despite the critical role of plasmids in horizontal gene transfer, few studies have characterized plasmid relatedness among different bacterial populations. Recently, a multiplex PCR replicon typing protocol was developed for classification of plasmids occurring in members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, a simplified version of this replicon typing procedure which requires only three multiplex panels to identify 18 plasmid replicons is described. This method was used to screen 1,015 Escherichia coli isolates of avian, human, and poultry meat origin for plasmid replicon types. Additionally, the isolates were assessed for their content of several colicin-associated genes. Overall, a high degree of plasmid variability was observed, with 221 different profiles occurring among the 1,015 isolates examined. IncFIB plasmids were the most common type identified, regardless of the source type of E. coli. IncFIB plasmids occurred significantly more often in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) and retail poultry E. coli (RPEC) than in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and avian and human fecal commensal E. coli isolates (AFEC and HFEC, respectively). APEC and RPEC were also significantly more likely than UPEC, HFEC, and AFEC to possess the colicin-associated genes cvaC, cbi, and/or cma in conjunction with one or more plasmid replicons. The results suggest that E. coli isolates contaminating retail poultry are notably similar to APEC with regard to plasmid profiles, with both generally containing multiple plasmid replicon types in conjunction with colicin-related genes. In contrast, UPEC and human and avian commensal E. coli isolates generally lack the plasmid replicons and colicin-related genes seen in APEC and RPEC, suggesting limited dissemination of such plasmids among these bacterial populations. PMID:17277222

  14. Characterization of toxin plasmids in Clostridium perfringens type C isolates.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Abhijit; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2010-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C isolates cause enteritis necroticans in humans or necrotizing enteritis and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. Type C isolates always produce alpha toxin and beta toxin but often produce additional toxins, e.g., beta2 toxin or enterotoxin. Since plasmid carriage of toxin-encoding genes has not been systematically investigated for type C isolates, the current study used Southern blot hybridization of pulsed-field gels to test whether several toxin genes are plasmid borne among a collection of type C isolates. Those analyses revealed that the surveyed type C isolates carry their beta toxin-encoding gene (cpb) on plasmids ranging in size from ∼65 to ∼110 kb. When present in these type C isolates, the beta2 toxin gene localized to plasmids distinct from the cpb plasmid. However, some enterotoxin-positive type C isolates appeared to carry their enterotoxin-encoding cpe gene on a cpb plasmid. The tpeL gene encoding the large clostridial cytotoxin was localized to the cpb plasmids of some cpe-negative type C isolates. The cpb plasmids in most surveyed isolates were found to carry both IS1151 sequences and the tcp genes, which can mediate conjugative C. perfringens plasmid transfer. A dcm gene, which is often present near C. perfringens plasmid-borne toxin genes, was identified upstream of the cpb gene in many type C isolates. Overlapping PCR analyses suggested that the toxin-encoding plasmids of the surveyed type C isolates differ from the cpe plasmids of type A isolates. These findings provide new insight into plasmids of proven or potential importance for type C virulence. PMID:20823204

  15. Characterization of Plasmid pOR1 from Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale and Construction of a Shuttle Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Ruud; Chansiripornchai, Niwat; Gaastra, Wim; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterium Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale has been recognized as an emerging pathogen in poultry since about 10 years ago. Knowledge of this bacterium and its mechanisms of virulence is still very limited. Here we report the development of a transformation system that enables genetic modification of O. rhinotracheale. The system is based on a cryptic plasmid, pOR1, that was derived from an O. rhinotracheale strain of serotype K. Sequencing indicated that the plasmid consisted of 14,787 nucleotides. Sequence analysis revealed one replication origin and several rep genes that control plasmid replication and copy number, respectively. In addition, pOR1 contains genes with similarity to a heavy-metal-transporting ATPase, a TonB-linked siderophore receptor, and a laccase. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that these genes were transcribed. Other putative open reading frames exhibited similarities with a virulence-associated protein in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and a number of genes coding for proteins with unknown function. An Escherichia coli-O. rhinotracheale shuttle plasmid (pOREC1) was constructed by cloning the replication origin and rep genes from pOR1 and the cfxA gene from Bacteroides vulgatus, which codes for resistance to the antibiotic cefoxitin, into plasmid pGEM7 by using E. coli as a host. pOREC1 was electroporated into O. rhinotracheale and yielded cefoxitin-resistant transformants. The pOREC1 isolated from these transformants was reintroduced into E. coli, demonstrating that pOREC1 acts as an independent replicon in both E. coli and O. rhinotracheale, fulfilling the criteria for a shuttle plasmid that can be used for transformation, targeted mutagenesis, and the construction of defined attenuated vaccine strains. PMID:15466524

  16. Plasmid Capture by the Bacillus thuringiensis Conjugative Plasmid pXO16▿

    PubMed Central

    Timmery, Sophie; Modrie, Pauline; Minet, Olivier; Mahillon, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Conjugation, mobilization, and retromobilization are three related mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. They have been extensively studied in gram-negative species, where retromobilization, the capture of DNA from a recipient by a donor cell, was shown to result from two successive steps: the transfer of the conjugative plasmid from the donor to the recipient followed by the retrotransfer of the mobilizable plasmid to the donor. This successive model was established for gram-negative bacteria but was lacking experimental data from the gram-positive counterparts. In the present work, the mobilization and retromobilization abilities of the conjugative plasmid pXO16 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis were studied using the mobilizable plasmids pUB110 and pE194 and the “nonmobilizable” element pC194 lacking the mob and oriT features (all from Staphylococcus aureus). Experimental data suggested a successive model, since different retromobilization frequencies were observed between the small plasmids. More importantly, retromobilization was shown to be delayed by 50 and 150 min for pUB110 and pE194, respectively, compared to pXO16 conjugation. Natural liquid foods (cow milk, soy milk, and rice milk) were used to evaluate the putative ecological impact of these transfers. In cow and soy milk, conjugation, mobilization, and retromobilization were shown to occur at frequencies of 8.0 × 10−1, 1.0 × 10−2, and 1.2 × 10−4 transconjugants per recipient, respectively. These data are comparable to those obtained with LB medium and about 10-fold lower than in the case of rice milk. Taken together, these results emphasize the potential role of plasmid capture played by B. thuringiensis in natural environments. PMID:19181805

  17. Plasmids enriched with CpG motifs activate human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro and enhance th-1 immune responses to hepatitis B surface antigen in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihui; Cao, Jie; Liao, Xiaoling; Ke, Jinshan; Zhu, Shiying; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhongtian

    2011-06-01

    T helper-1 (Th-1)-type immune responses play an important role in viral clearance during infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Unmethylated CpG motifs present in bacterial DNA can activate toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) signals and act as potent adjuvants to induce Th-1-type immune responses. Here, a mini-plasmid with 812 base pairs in length was constructed and used as a vector to prepare a series of plasmids containing 3-21 copies of D-type CpG motifs. In vitro, these CpG-enriched plasmids strongly stimulated proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and enhanced secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). The responses of the PBMCs from healthy individuals to the plasmids were stronger than those obtained from HBV-infected individuals. Contrary to the strong Th-2-biased response induced by surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) plus alum adjuvant, immunization of BALB/c mice with HBsAg plus these plasmids induced a strong Th-1-biased response. The plasmids increased the titers of HBsAg-specific total immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG(2a). HBsAg-specific IL-2 and IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity were also enhanced in the presence of the plasmids. The strength of the immune responses positively correlated with the number of CpG motifs in the plasmids. These results indicate that the use of CpG-enriched plasmids as an adjuvant to recombinant HBsAg could provide a promising and cost-effective approach for the development of efficacious therapeutic vaccines against HBV infection. PMID:21668361

  18. Linear plasmid vector for cloning of repetitive or unstable sequences in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Godiska, Ronald; Mead, David; Dhodda, Vinay; Wu, Chengcang; Hochstein, Rebecca; Karsi, Attila; Usdin, Karen; Entezam, Ali; Ravin, Nikolai

    2010-04-01

    Despite recent advances in sequencing, complete finishing of large genomes and analysis of novel proteins they encode typically require cloning of specific regions. However, many of these fragments are extremely difficult to clone in current vectors. Superhelical stress in circular plasmids can generate secondary structures that are substrates for deletion, particularly in regions that contain numerous tandem or inverted repeats. Common vectors also induce transcription and translation of inserted fragments, which can select against recombinant clones containing open reading frames or repetitive DNA. Conversely, transcription from cloned promoters can interfere with plasmid stability. We have therefore developed a novel Escherichia coli cloning vector (termed 'pJAZZ' vector) that is maintained as a linear plasmid. Further, it contains transcriptional terminators on both sides of the cloning site to minimize transcriptional interference between vector and insert. We show that this vector stably maintains a variety of inserts that were unclonable in conventional plasmids. These targets include short nucleotide repeats, such as those of the expanded Fragile X locus, and large AT-rich inserts, such as 20-kb segments of genomic DNA from Pneumocystis, Plasmodium, Oxytricha or Tetrahymena. The pJAZZ vector shows decreased size bias in cloning, allowing more uniform representation of larger fragments in libraries. PMID:20040575

  19. MAR-mediated integration of plasmid vectors for in vivo gene transfer and regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The in vivo transfer of naked plasmid DNA into organs such as muscles is commonly used to assess the expression of prophylactic or therapeutic genes in animal disease models. Results In this study, we devised vectors allowing a tight regulation of transgene expression in mice from such non-viral vectors using a doxycycline-controlled network of activator and repressor proteins. Using these vectors, we demonstrate proper physiological response as consequence of the induced expression of two therapeutically relevant proteins, namely erythropoietin and utrophin. Kinetic studies showed that the induction of transgene expression was only transient, unless epigenetic regulatory elements termed Matrix Attachment Regions, or MAR, were inserted upstream of the regulated promoters. Using episomal plasmid rescue and quantitative PCR assays, we observed that similar amounts of plasmids remained in muscles after electrotransfer with or without MAR elements, but that a significant portion had integrated into the muscle fiber chromosomes. Interestingly, the MAR elements were found to promote plasmid genomic integration but to oppose silencing effects in vivo, thereby mediating long-term expression. Conclusions This study thus elucidates some of the determinants of transient or sustained expression from the use of non-viral regulated vectors in vivo. PMID:24295286

  20. Proteomic profiling of salivary gland after nonviral gene transfer mediated by conventional plasmids and minicircles

    PubMed Central

    Geguchadze, Ramaz; Wang, Zhimin; Zourelias, Lee; Perez-Riveros, Paola; Edwards, Paul C; Machen, Laurie; Passineau, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared gene transfer efficiency and host response to ultrasound-assisted, nonviral gene transfer with a conventional plasmid and a minicircle vector in the submandibular salivary glands of mice. Initially, we looked at gene transfer efficiency with equimolar amounts of the plasmid and minicircle vectors, corroborating an earlier report showing that minicircle is more efficient in the context of a physical method of gene transfer. We then sought to characterize the physiological response of the salivary gland to exogenous gene transfer using global proteomic profiling. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that sonoporation alone, without a gene transfer vector present, had virtually no effect on the salivary gland proteome. However, when a plasmid vector was used, we observed profound perturbations of the salivary gland proteome that compared in magnitude to that seen in a previous report after high doses of adeno-associated virus. Finally, we found that gene transfer with a minicircle induces only minor proteomic alterations that were similar to sonoporation alone. Using mass spectrometry, we assigned protein IDs to 218 gel spots that differed between plasmid and minicircle. Bioinformatic analysis of these proteins demonstrated convergence on 68 known protein interaction pathways, most notably those associated with innate immunity, cellular stress, and morphogenesis. PMID:25414909

  1. Sequence of two plasmids from Clostridium perfringens chicken necrotic enteritis isolates and comparison with C. perfringens conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Valeria R; Costa, Marcio; Eikmeyer, Felix; Blom, Jochen; Prescott, John F

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-six isolates of Clostridium perfringens of different MLST types from chickens with necrotic enteritis (NE) (15 netB-positive) or from healthy chickens (6 netB-positive, 5 netB-negative) were found to contain 1-4 large plasmids, with most netB-positive isolates containing 3 large and variably sized plasmids which were more numerous and larger than plasmids in netB-negative isolates. NetB and cpb2 were found on different plasmids consistent with previous studies. The pathogenicity locus NELoc1, which includes netB, was largely conserved in these plasmids whereas NeLoc3, present in the cpb2 containing plasmids, was less well conserved. A netB-positive and a cpb2-positive plasmid were likely to be conjugative, and the plasmids were completely sequenced. Both plasmids possessed the intact tcp conjugative region characteristic of C. perfringens conjugative plasmids. Comparative genomic analysis of nine CpCPs, including the two plasmids described here, showed extensive gene rearrangements including pathogenicity locus and accessory gene insertions around rather than within the backbone region. The pattern that emerges from this analysis is that the major toxin-containing regions of the variety of virulence-associated CpCPs are organized as complex pathogenicity loci. How these different but related CpCPs can co-exist in the same host has been an unanswered question. Analysis of the replication-partition region of these plasmids suggests that this region controls plasmid incompatibility, and that CpCPs can be grouped into at least four incompatibility groups. PMID:23189158

  2. Identification and sequence homology relationships of plasmids from various micrococci

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    Plasmids have been found in strains of the following Micrococcus species M. nishinomiyaensis (9/22), M. luteus (8/47), and M. agilis (1/5). No plasmids were detected in strains of M. lylae (0/16) or M. sedentarius (0/20). Thirty-eight antibiotics and 23 inorganic salts were screened in an attempt to determine plasmid function. None of these antibiotics and inorganic salts were found to be associated with the presence or absence of plasmid DNA within these strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration experiments and curing experiments in which phenotypic change occurred without plasmid loss are the basis for this conclusion. Hydrocarbon biosynthesis parameters in certain Micrococcus strains previously analyzed were also shown not to be clearly associated to the presence or absence of plasmid DNA.

  3. Community-wide plasmid gene mobilization and selection

    PubMed Central

    Sentchilo, Vladimir; Mayer, Antonia P; Guy, Lionel; Miyazaki, Ryo; Green Tringe, Susannah; Barry, Kerrie; Malfatti, Stephanie; Goessmann, Alexander; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; van der Meer, Jan R

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids have long been recognized as an important driver of DNA exchange and genetic innovation in prokaryotes. The success of plasmids has been attributed to their independent replication from the host's chromosome and their frequent self-transfer. It is thought that plasmids accumulate, rearrange and distribute nonessential genes, which may provide an advantage for host proliferation under selective conditions. In order to test this hypothesis independently of biases from culture selection, we study the plasmid metagenome from microbial communities in two activated sludge systems, one of which receives mostly household and the other chemical industry wastewater. We find that plasmids from activated sludge microbial communities carry among the largest proportion of unknown gene pools so far detected in metagenomic DNA, confirming their presumed role of DNA innovators. At a system level both plasmid metagenomes were dominated by functions associated with replication and transposition, and contained a wide variety of antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. Plasmid families were very different in the two metagenomes and grouped in deep-branching new families compared with known plasmid replicons. A number of abundant plasmid replicons could be completely assembled directly from the metagenome, providing insight in plasmid composition without culturing bias. Functionally, the two metagenomes strongly differed in several ways, including a greater abundance of genes for carbohydrate metabolism in the industrial and of general defense factors in the household activated sludge plasmid metagenome. This suggests that plasmids not only contribute to the adaptation of single individual prokaryotic species, but of the prokaryotic community as a whole under local selective conditions. PMID:23407308

  4. Identification of plasmid partition function in coryneform bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kurusu, Yasurou; Satoh, Yukie; Inui, Masayuki; Kohama, Keiko; Kobayashi, Miki; Terasawa, Masato; Yukawa, Hideaki )

    1991-03-01

    The authors have identified and characterized a partition function that is required for stable maintenance of plasmids in the coryneform bacteria Brevibacterium flavum MJ233 and Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831. This function is localized to a HindIII-NspV fragment (673 bp) adjacent to the replication region of the plasmid, named pBY503, from Brevibacterium stationis IFO 12144. The function was independent of copy number control and was not associated directly with plasmid replication functions. This fragment was able to stabilize the unstable plasmids in cis but not in trans.

  5. Analysis of Genetic Toggle Switch Systems Encoded on Plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinger, Adiel; Biham, Ofer

    2009-08-01

    Genetic switch systems with mutual repression of two transcription factors, encoded on plasmids, are studied using stochastic methods. The plasmid copy number is found to strongly affect the behavior of these systems. More specifically, the average time between spontaneous switching events quickly increases with the number of plasmids. It was shown before that for a single copy encoded on the chromosome, the exclusive switch is more stable than the general switch. Here we show that when the switch is encoded on a sufficiently large number of plasmids, the situation is reversed and the general switch is more stable than the exclusive switch. These predictions can be tested experimentally using methods of synthetic biology.

  6. Ultrasensitive plasmid mapping by high performance capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Maschke, H E; Frenz, J; Belenkii, A; Karger, B L; Hancock, W S

    1993-01-01

    This paper compares high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) and conventional slab electrophoresis in mapping of four closely related plasmids with three different restriction enzymes. The plasmids express full length and truncated forms of a growth factor receptor oncogene product and were digested with HpaII, HaeIII and RsaI. The resulting oligonucleotide fragments were under 2000 base pairs in length, a size well suited to separation by HPCE with linear polyacrylamide as a sieving matrix. Plasmid mapping is an essential tool in biotechnology both for the design of an expression system and for monitoring the stability of the expression system during fermentation. HPCE can yield much higher resolution of oligonucleotides than attainable in conventional agarose gel electrophoretic procedures for plasmid mapping. In the examples described here, the HpaII digests provided the surest identification of individual plasmids in the HPCE analysis and could discriminate among all four plasmids. In conventional slab electrophoresis, however, the RsaI digests provided the best discrimination, although two of the plasmids in this system yielded essentially identical electrophoretic patterns. Hence the optimal restriction enzyme for plasmid mapping applications with HPCE may differ from that selected on the basis of conventional slab gel analysis, and the former technique can provide higher discrimination among related plasmids. The advantages of the HPCE format with respect to speed, low sample consumption and resolution are described. PMID:8354236

  7. Impact of plasmid quality on lipoplex-mediated transfection.

    PubMed

    De La Vega, Jonathan; Braak, Bas Ter; Azzoni, Adriano R; Monteiro, Gabriel A; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates the impact of quality attributes (impurity content, plasmid charge, and compactness) of plasmid DNA isolated with different purification methodologies on the characteristics of lipoplexes prepared thereof (size, zeta potential, stability) and on their ability to transfect mammalian cells. A 3.7 kb plasmid with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter gene, Lipofectamine®-based liposomes, and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were used as models. The plasmid was purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC)/gel filtration, and with three commercial kits, which combine the use of chaotropic salts with silica membranes/glass fiber fleeces. The HIC-based protocol delivered a plasmid with the smallest hydrodynamic diameter (144 nm) and zeta potential (-46.5 mV), which is virtually free from impurities. When formulated with Lipofectamine®, this plasmid originated the smallest (146 nm), most charged (+13 mV), and most stable lipoplexes. In vitro transfection experiments further showed that these lipoplexes performed better in terms of plasmid uptake (∼500,000 vs. ∼100,000-200,000 copy number/cell), transfection efficiency (50% vs. 20%-40%), and GFP expression levels (twofold higher) when compared with lipoplexes prepared with plasmids isolated using commercial kits. Overall our observations highlight the potential impact that plasmid purification methodologies can have on the outcome of gene transfer experiments and trials. PMID:23996350

  8. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans. PMID:24629900

  9. Photonic plasmid stability of transformed Salmonella typhimurium: A comparison of three unique plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acquiring a highly stable photonic plasmid in transformed Salmonella typhimurium for use in biophotonic studies of bacterial tracking in vivo is critical to experimental paradigm development. The objective of this study was to determine stability of transformed Salmonella typhimurium (S. typh-lux) u...

  10. Photonic Plasmid Stability of Transformed Salmonella Typhimurium: A Comparison of Three Unique Plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Acquiring a highly stable photonic plasmid in transformed Salmonella Typhimurium for use in biophotonic studies of bacterial tracking in vivo is critical to experimental paradigm development. The objective of this study was to determine stability of transformed Salmonella Typhimurium (S....

  11. Plasmids for heterologous expression in Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, N D; Highlander, S K

    1997-02-28

    New cloning and expression vectors that replicate both in Pasteurella haemolytica and in Escherichia coli were constructed based on a native sulfonamide (SuR) and streptomycin (SmR) resistant plasmid of P. haemolytica called pYFC1. Each shuttle vector includes an MCS and a selectable antibiotic resistance marker that is expressed in both organisms. Plasmid pNF2176 carries the P. haemolytica ROB-1 beta-lactamase gene (blaP, ApR) and pNF2214 carries the Tn903 aph3 kanamycin resistance (KmR) element. The expression vector, pNF2176, was created by placing the MCS downstream of the sulfonamide gene promoter (PsulII) on pYFC1; this was used to clone and express the promoterless Tn9 chloramphenicol resistance gene (cat, CmR) in P. haemolytica (pNF2200). A promoter-probe vector (pNF2283) was constructed from pNF2200 by deleting PsulII. PMID:9074498

  12. Sequence and properties of pIM13, a macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance plasmid from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Monod, M; Denoya, C; Dubnau, D

    1986-01-01

    We initiated a study of pIM13, a multicopy, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS) plasmid first isolated from a strain of Bacillus subtilis and described by Mahler and Halvorson (J. Gen. Microbiol. 120:259-263, 1980). The copy number of this plasmid was about 200 in B. subtilis and 30 in Staphylococcus aureus. The MLS resistance determinant of pIM13 was shown to be highly homologous to ermC, an inducible element on the S. aureus plasmid pE194. The product of the pIM13 determinant was similar in size to that of ermC and immunologically cross-reactive with it. The MLS resistance of pIM13 was expressed constitutively. The complete base sequence of pIM13 is presented. The plasmid consisted of 2,246 base pairs and contained two open reading frames that specified products identified in minicell extracts. One was a protein of 16,000 molecular weight, possibly required for replication. The second was the 29,000-molecular-weight MLS resistance methylase. The regulatory region responsible for ermC inducibility was missing from pIM13, explaining its constitutivity. The remainder of the pIM13 MLS determinant was nearly identical to ermC. The ends of the region of homology between pIM13 and pE194 were associated with hyphenated dyad symmetries. A segment partially homologous to one of these termini on pIM13 and also associated with a dyad was found in pUB110 near the end of a region of homology between that plasmid and pBC16. The entire sequence of pIM13 was highly homologous to that of pE5, an inducible MLS resistance plasmid from S. aureus that differs from pIM13 in copy control. Images PMID:3087948

  13. Identification of hairy root loci in the T-regions of Agrobacterium rhizogenes Ri plasmids.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, F; Berkaloff, A; Richaud, F

    1986-07-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes induces root formation at the wound site of inoculation in plants and inserts a fragment of its plasmid (Ri) into the plant nuclear DNA. Parts of the transferred region (T-region) of the Ri plasmid of A. rhizogenes strain A4 or 8196 are cloned in Escherichia coli. Insertions of the E. coli lacZ coding region into the hybrid plasmids were made in vivo using transduction by miniMu. Twenty insertions localized in the TL-DNA of pRiA4 (or pRi1855) and 2 inserts in the T-DNA of pRi8196 were obtained in E. coli. One of the TL-DNA insertions is saved up because it is linked to an internal T-DNA deletion; the others because they confer a lactose plus phenotype on E. coli; this indicates that the T-DNA harbours sequences that are expressed in E. coli. Fifteen of these T-DNA insertions were transfered to Agrobacterium where they substitute the corresponding wild-type T-DNA of the Ri plasmid by homologous recombination. These strains corresponding to insertion-directed mutagenesis were used to inoculate Daucus carota slices and stems and leaves of Kalanchoe daigremontiana. The two insertions strains obtained in the T-DNA of pRi8196 are avirulent on K. daigremontiana; but their phenotypes differ on D. carota slices, suggesting that insertions affect distinct loci on the T-DNA involved in hairy root formation. Only one insertion out of the twenty obtained in the TL-DNA of pRiA4 (or 1855) induces a loss of virulence on leaves of K. daigremontiana. However the TL-DNA deletion harbouring strain induces a loss of virulence on D. carota and K. daigremontiana (stems and leaves), confirming the importance of the TL-DNA for hairy root induction. re]19850711 rv]19851230 ac]19860114. PMID:24307326

  14. Molecular identification of Acetobacter isolates from submerged vinegar production, sequence analysis of plasmid pJK2-1 and application in the development of a cloning vector.

    PubMed

    Trcek, J; Raspor, P; Teuber, M

    2000-03-01

    Three new Acetobacter strains were isolated from vinegar. By plasmid profiling they were recognized as genotypically different from each other. Sequencing of the genes for 16S and 23S rRNA and DNA-DNA hybridization of total DNA against DNA of all type strains of Acetobacter identified Acetobacter strains JK2 and V3 as A. europaeus, and Acetobacter strain JK3 as A. intermedius. In contrast to the type strain of A. europaeus (DSM 6160), A. europaeus JK2 and V3 do not require acetic acid for growth and can be successfully transferred between media with and without acetic acid. This phenotypic characteristic enables convenient handling of both strains in genetic studies. Plasmid pJK2-1 from A. europaeus JK2 was used as the basis for shuttle plasmid construction with the aim of developing an efficient vector system for these strains. The entire nucleotide sequence of pJK2-1 was determined. High amino acid identities were found for three open reading frames: Rep (replication protein); Dinjl (DNA damage inducible enzyme); and Dinj2 proteins. A recombinant plasmid pUCJK2-1 (5.6 kb) consisting of the entire plasmid pJK2-1 and the entire plasmid pUC18 was successfully used in transformation experiments. Plasmid pJT2 (5.8 kb) was constructed from pUCJK2-1 with the aim of reactivating the lacZ' gene. PMID:10772468

  15. Linear plasmids in plant mitochondria: peaceful coexistences or malicious invasions?

    PubMed

    Handa, Hirokazu

    2008-01-01

    Plant mitochondria contain small extrachromosomal DNAs in addition to a large and complex main mitochondrial genome. These molecules can be regarded as extrachromosomal replicons or plasmids, of which there are two forms, circular and linear. Linear mitochondrial plasmids are present in many fungi and in some plants, but they seem to be absent from most animal cells. They usually have a common structural feature, called an invertron, that is characterized by the presence of terminal inverted repeats and proteins covalently attached to their 5 termini. Linear mitochondrial plasmids possess one to six ORFs that can encode unknown proteins but often code for the DNA and RNA polymerases. Although the functions of most linear plasmids in plant mitochondria are unknown, some plasmids may be associated with mitochondrial genome rearrangements and may have phenotypic effects due to their integration into mitochondrial genome. The Brassica 11.6-kb plasmid, one of the linear mitochondrial plasmids in plants, shows a non-maternal inheritance, in contrast to mitochondrial genomes. The origin of these plasmids is still a mystery, but indirect evidence indicates the possibility of horizontal transfer from fungal mitochondria. In this review, the main features of these unique DNAs present in plant mitochondria are described. PMID:18326073

  16. Purification of large plasmids with methacrylate monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Krajnc, Nika Lendero; Smrekar, Franci; Cerne, Jasmina; Raspor, Peter; Modic, Martina; Krgovic, Danijela; Strancar, Ales; Podgornik, Ales

    2009-08-01

    The rapid evolution of gene therapy and DNA vaccines results in an increasing interest in producing large quantities of pharmaceutical grade plasmid DNA. Most current clinical trials involve plasmids of 10 kb or smaller in size, however, future requirements for multigene vectors including extensive control regions may require the production of larger plasmids, e. g., 20 kb and bigger. The objective of this study was to examine certain process conditions for purification of large plasmids with the size of up to 93 kb. Since there is a lack of knowledge about production and purification of bigger plasmid DNA, cell lysis and storage conditions were investigated. The impact of chromatographic system and methacrylate monolithic column on the degradation of plasmid molecules under nonbinding conditions at different flow rates was studied. Furthermore, capacity measurements varying salt concentration in loading buffer were performed and the capacities up to 13 mg of plasmid per mL of the monolithic column were obtained. The capacity flow independence in the range from 130 to 370 cm/h was observed. Using high resolution monolithic column the separation of linear and supercoiled isoforms of large plasmids was obtained. Last but not least, since the baseline separation of RNA and pDNA was achieved, the one step purification on larger CIM DEAE 8 mL tube monolithic column was performed and the fractions were analyzed by CIM analytical monolithic columns. PMID:19598166

  17. Rapid compensatory evolution promotes the survival of conjugative plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ellie; Dytham, Calvin; Hall, James P. J.; Guymer, David; Spiers, Andrew J.; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Conjugative plasmids play a vital role in bacterial adaptation through horizontal gene transfer. Explaining how plasmids persist in host populations however is difficult, given the high costs often associated with plasmid carriage. Compensatory evolution to ameliorate this cost can rescue plasmids from extinction. In a recently published study we showed that compensatory evolution repeatedly targeted the same bacterial regulatory system, GacA/GacS, in populations of plasmid-carrying bacteria evolving across a range of selective environments. Mutations in these genes arose rapidly and completely eliminated the cost of plasmid carriage. Here we extend our analysis using an individual based model to explore the dynamics of compensatory evolution in this system. We show that mutations which ameliorate the cost of plasmid carriage can prevent both the loss of plasmids from the population and the fixation of accessory traits on the bacterial chromosome. We discuss how dependent the outcome of compensatory evolution is on the strength and availability of such mutations and the rate at which beneficial accessory traits integrate on the host chromosome. PMID:27510852

  18. An oligonucleotide microarray to characterize multidrug resistant plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria plasmids are fragments of extra-chromosomal double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that can contain a variety of genes beneficial to the host organism like antibiotic drug resistance. Many of the Enterobacteriaceae carry multiple drug resistance (MDR) genes on large plasmids of replic...

  19. Functional identification of Xylella fastidiosa plasmid replication and stability factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strain RIV11 harbors a 25 kbp plasmid (pXFRIV11) belonging to the incP1 incompatibility group. Replication and stability factors of pXFRIV11 were identified and used to construct plasmids able to replicate in both Xf and Escherichia coli. Sequences required for replication i...

  20. Horizontal gene transfer of stress resistance genes through plasmid transport.

    PubMed

    Shoeb, Erum; Badar, Uzma; Akhter, Jameela; Shams, Hina; Sultana, Maria; Ansari, Maqsood A

    2012-03-01

    The horizontal gene transfer of plasmid-determined stress tolerance was achieved under lab conditions. Bacterial isolates, Enterobacter cloacae (DGE50) and Escherichia coli (DGE57) were used throughout the study. Samples were collected from contaminated marine water and soil to isolate bacterial strains having tolerance against heavy metals and antimicrobial agents. We have demonstrated plasmid transfer, from Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(-) strain (DGE50) to Amp(-)Cu(-)Zn(+) strain (DGE57), producing Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(+) transconjugants (DGE(TC50→57)) and Amp(+)Cu(-)Zn(+) transformants (DGE(TF50→57)). DGE57 did not carry any plasmid, therefore, it can be speculated that zinc tolerance gene in DGE57 is located on chromosome. DGE50 was found to carry three plasmids, out of which two were transferred through conjugation into DGE57, and only one was transferred through transformation. Plasmid transferred through transformation was one out of the two transferred through conjugation. Through the results of transformation it was revealed that the genes of copper and ampicillin tolerance in DGE50 were located on separate plasmids, since only ampicillin tolerance genes were transferred through transformation as a result of one plasmid transfer. By showing transfer of plasmids under lab conditions and monitoring retention of respective phenotype via conjugation and transformation, it is very well demonstrated how multiple stress tolerant strains are generated in nature. PMID:22805823

  1. Inc A/C Plasmids in Multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria plasmids are fragments of extra-chromosomal double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that can contain a variety of genes beneficial to the survival of the host bacteria. Classification and tracking of plasmids is beneficial because they are potentially a medium of horizontal gene transf...

  2. DNA repair in cells sensitive and resistant to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Host cell reactivation of damaged plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheibani, N.; Jennerwein, M.M.; Eastman, A. )

    1989-04-04

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) has a broad clinical application as an effective anticancer drug. However, development of resistance to the cytotoxic effects is a limiting factor. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of resistance, the authors have employed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair using a cis-DDP-damaged plasmid vector. The efficiency of DNA repair was assayed by measuring the activity of an enzyme coded for by the plasmid vector. The plasmid expression vector pRSV cat contains the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a configuration which permits expression in mammalian cells. The plasmid was transfected into repair-proficient and -deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, and CAT activity was subsequently measured in cell lysates. In the repair-deficient cells, one cis-DDP adduct per cat gene was sufficient to eliminate expression. An equivalent inhibition of CAT expression in the repair-proficient cells did not occur until about 8 times the amount of damage was introduced into the plasmid. These results implicate DNA intrastrand cross-links as the lesions responsible for the inhibition of CAT expression. This assay was used to investigate the potential role of DNA repair in mediating cis-DDP resistance in murine leukemia L1210 cells. The assay readily detects the presence or absence of repair and confirms that these resistant L1210 cells have an enhanced capacity for repair of cis-DDP-induced intrastrand cross-links.

  3. Plasmid DNA is internalized from the apical plasma membrane of the salivary gland epithelium in live animals

    PubMed Central

    Sramkova, Monika; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Non viral-mediated gene delivery represents an alternative way to express the gene of interest without inducing immune responses or other adverse effects. Understanding the mechanisms by which plasmid DNAs are delivered to the proper target in vivo is a fundamental issue that needs to be addressed in order to design more effective strategies for gene therapy. As a model system, we have used the submandibular salivary glands in live rats and we have recently shown that reporter transgenes can be expressed in different cell populations of the glandular epithelium, depending on the modality of administration of plasmid DNA. Here, by using a combination of immunofluorescence and intravital microscopy, we have explored the relationship between the pattern of transgenes expression and the internalization of plasmid DNA. We found that plasmid DNA is internalized: 1) by all the cells in the salivary gland epithelium, when administered alone 2) by large ducts, when mixed with empty adenoviral particles, and 3) by acinar cells upon stimulation of compensatory endocytosis. Moreover, we showed that plasmid DNA utilizes different routes of internalization, and evades both the lysosomal degradative pathway and the retrograde pathway towards the Golgi apparatus. This study clearly shows that in vivo approaches have the potential to address fundamental questions on the cellular mechanisms regulating gene delivery. PMID:22544351

  4. Plasmid pORF-hTRAIL targeting to glioma using transferrin-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Chen; Hong, Bo; Hao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A gene drug delivery system for glioma therapy based on transferrin (Tf)-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) was prepared. Gene drug, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (hTRAIL)-encoding plasmid open reading frame (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail), was condensed by Tf-modified PAMAM to form nanoparticles (NPs). PAMAM-PEG-Tf/DNA NPs showed higher cellular uptake, in vitro gene expression, and cytotoxicity than PAMAM-PEG/DNA NPs in C6 cells. The in vivo targeting efficacy of NPs was visualized by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. Tf-modified NPs showed obvious glioma-targeting trend. Plasmid encoding green fluorescence protein (GFP) was also condensed by modified or unmodified PAMAM to evaluate the in vivo gene expression level. The PAMAM-PEG-Tf/plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescence protein (pEGFP) NPs exhibited higher GFP expression level than PAMAM-PEG/pEGFP NPs. TUNEL assay revealed that Tf-modified NPs could induce much more tumor apoptosis. The median survival time of PAMAM-PEG-Tf/Trail-treated rats (28.5 days) was longer than that of rats treated with PAMAM-PEG/Trail (25.5 days), temozolomide (24.5 days), PAMAM-PEG-Tf/pEGFP (19 days), or saline (17 days). The therapeutic effect was further confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. This study demonstrated that targeting gene delivery system had potential application for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26719669

  5. Plasmid pORF-hTRAIL targeting to glioma using transferrin-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Chen; Hong, Bo; Hao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A gene drug delivery system for glioma therapy based on transferrin (Tf)-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) was prepared. Gene drug, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (hTRAIL)-encoding plasmid open reading frame (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail), was condensed by Tf-modified PAMAM to form nanoparticles (NPs). PAMAM-PEG-Tf/DNA NPs showed higher cellular uptake, in vitro gene expression, and cytotoxicity than PAMAM-PEG/DNA NPs in C6 cells. The in vivo targeting efficacy of NPs was visualized by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. Tf-modified NPs showed obvious glioma-targeting trend. Plasmid encoding green fluorescence protein (GFP) was also condensed by modified or unmodified PAMAM to evaluate the in vivo gene expression level. The PAMAM-PEG-Tf/plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescence protein (pEGFP) NPs exhibited higher GFP expression level than PAMAM-PEG/pEGFP NPs. TUNEL assay revealed that Tf-modified NPs could induce much more tumor apoptosis. The median survival time of PAMAM-PEG-Tf/Trail-treated rats (28.5 days) was longer than that of rats treated with PAMAM-PEG/Trail (25.5 days), temozolomide (24.5 days), PAMAM-PEG-Tf/pEGFP (19 days), or saline (17 days). The therapeutic effect was further confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. This study demonstrated that targeting gene delivery system had potential application for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26719669

  6. Plasmid addiction systems: perspectives and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jens; Klinter, Stefan; Schneider, Cornelia; Voss, Isabella; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Biotechnical production processes often operate with plasmid-based expression systems in well-established prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts such as Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. Genetically engineered organisms produce important chemicals, biopolymers, biofuels and high-value proteins like insulin. In those bioprocesses plasmids in recombinant hosts have an essential impact on productivity. Plasmid-free cells lead to losses in the entire product recovery and decrease the profitability of the whole process. Use of antibiotics in industrial fermentations is not an applicable option to maintain plasmid stability. Especially in pharmaceutical or GMP-based fermentation processes, deployed antibiotics must be inactivated and removed. Several plasmid addiction systems (PAS) were described in the literature. However, not every system has reached a full applicable state. This review compares most known addiction systems and is focusing on biotechnical applications. PMID:21255361

  7. Impact of carbondiimide crosslinker used for magnetic carbon nanotube mediated GFP plasmid delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yuzhi; Xu, Peng; He, Chuan; Yang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Min; Xing, James; Chen, Jie

    2011-07-01

    1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbondiimide hydrochloride (EDC) is commonly used as a crosslinker to help bind biomolecules, such as DNA plasmids, with nanostructures. However, EDC often remains, after a crosslink reaction, in the micro-aperture of the nanostructure, e.g., carbon nanotube. The remaining EDC shows positive green fluorescent signals and makes a nanostructure with a strong cytotoxicity which induces cell death. The toxicity of EDC was confirmed on a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and two leukemic cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1). The MCF-7 cells mainly underwent necrosis after treatment with EDC, which was verified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) annexin V staining, video microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). If the EDC was not removed completely, the nanostructures with remaining EDC produced a green fluorescent background that could interfere with flow cytometry (FACS) measurement and result in false information about GFP plasmid delivery. Effective methods to remove residual EDC on macromolecules were also developed.

  8. Production of single- and double-strand breaks in plasmid DNA by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Hamelin, C.

    1985-02-01

    Agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy were used to determine the type of lesions produced in DNA by ozone. This strong oxidizing agent was found to relax, linearize, then degrade native plasmid (pAT153) DNA molecules in solution. Ozone, like ionizing radiation, thus produced DNA breakage. To ascertain this point, wild-type and radiosensitive strains of Escherichia coli were transfected with control or ozonated plasmid DNA, and the host cells were selected for antibiotic resistance. A significant reduction in the transforming ability of pAT153 was observed following ozonation. Mutants deficient in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks yielded less ampicillin- or tetracycline-resistant clones than repair-proficient strains. In E. coli, the same gene products are probably involved in the repair of both radiation- and ozone-induced DNA breaks.

  9. Comparative study of the lethal effects of near-UV light (360 nm) and 8-methoxypsoralen plus near-UV on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Paramio, J.M.; Bauluz, C.; de Vidania, R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have studied the lethality produced on pBR322 by near-UV radiation and by 8-Methoxypsoralen plus near-UV (PUV treatment). Samples of pBR322 DNA were irradiated with increasing fluences of 360 nm-light either in the absence or presence of 400 molecules of 8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) per plasmid molecule. They have estimated to what extent the global lethality of PUVA treatment is due to the presence of psoralen adducts in DNA or to radiation itself. In order to analyse the involvement of DNA repair mechanisms in the removal of plasmid lesions, several strains of E. coli (differing in their repair capacities) they are used as recipients of the treated plasmids. Results showed that excision and recombination participate in the repair of near-UV-induced plasmid lesions. Repair of PUV-induced lesions showed an even greater requirement of the excision pathway. Besides, a slight increase on plasmid mutation frequencies was observed after near-UV or PUV treatment in wild type and uvrA cells. Estimation of the contribution of 8-MOP to the global lethality of PUV treatment showed that only the excision pathway was involved in removing psoralen adducts from plasmid DNA, suggesting the involvement of the recombinational pathway in the repair of near-UV-derived lesions.

  10. Characterization of the temperate bacteriophage phi adh and plasmid transduction in Lactobacillus acidophilus ADH.

    PubMed Central

    Raya, R R; Kleeman, E G; Luchansky, J B; Klaenhammer, T R

    1989-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus ADH is lysogenic and harbors an inducible prophage, phi adh. Bacteriophage were detected in cell lysates induced by treatment with mitomycin C or UV light. Electron microscopy of lysates revealed phage particles with a hexagonal head (62 nm) and a long, noncontractile, flexible tail (398 nm) ending in at last five short fibers. Phage phi adh was classified within Bradley's B1 phage group and the Siphoviridae family. The phi adh genome is a linear double-stranded DNA molecule of 41.7 kilobase pairs with cohesive ends: a physical map of the phi adh genome was constructed. A prophage-cured derivative of strain ADH, designated NCK102, was isolated from cells that survived UV exposure. NCK102 did not exhibit mitomycin C-induced lysis, but broth cultures lysed upon addition of phage. Phage phi adh produced clear plaques on NCK102 in media containing 10 mM CaCl2 at pH values between 5.2 and 5.5. A relysogenized derivative (NCK103) of NCK102 was isolated that exhibited mitomycin C-induced lysis and superinfection immunity to phage phi adh. Hybridization experiments showed that the phi adh genome was present in the ADH and NCK103 chromosomes, but absent in NCK102. These results demonstrated classic lytic and lysogenic cycles of replication for the temperate phage phi adh induced from L. acidophilus ADH. Phage phi adh also mediates transduction of plasmid DNA. Transductants of strain ADH containing pC194, pGK12, pGB354, and pVA797 were detected at frequencies in the range of 3.6 x 10(-8) to 8.3 x 10(-10) per PFU. Rearrangements or deletions were not detected in these plasmids as a consequence of transduction. This is the first description of plasmid transduction in the genus Lactobacillus. Images PMID:2508554

  11. Plasmid Copy Number Determination by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Anindyajati; Artarini, A Anita; Riani, Catur; Retnoningrum, Debbie S

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant therapeutic proteins are biopharmaceutical products that develop rapidly for years. Recombinant protein production in certain hosts requires vector expression harboring the gene encoding the corresponding protein. Escherichia coli is the prokaryote organism mostly used in recombinant protein production, commonly using a plasmid as the expression vector. Recombinant protein production is affected by plasmid copy number harboring the encoded gene, hence the determination of plasmid copy number also plays an important role in establishing a recombinant protein production system. On the industrial scale, a low copy number of plasmids are more suitable due to their better stability. In the previous study we constructed pCAD, a plasmid derived from the low copy number pBR322 plasmid. This study was aimed to confirm pCAD's copy number by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Plasmid copy number was determined by comparing the quantification signal from the plasmid to those from the chromosome. Copy number was then calculated by using a known copy number plasmid as a standard. Two pairs of primers, called tdk and ori, were designed for targeting a single gene tdk in the chromosome and a conserved domain in the plasmid's ori, respectively. Primer quality was analyzed in silico using PrimerSelect DNASTAR and PraTo software prior to in vitro evaluation on primer specificity and efficiency as well as optimization of qPCR conditions. Plasmid copy number determination was conducted on E. coli lysates harboring each plasmid, with the number of cells ranging from 10(2)-10(5) cells/μL. Cells were lysed by incubation at 95ºC for 10 minutes, followed by immediate freezing at -4°C. pBR322 plasmid with the copy number of ~19 copies/cell was used as the standard, while pJExpress414-sod plasmid possessing the high copy number pUC ori was also determined to test the method being used. In silico analysis based on primer-primer and primer-template interactions showed

  12. Sociobiological Control of Plasmid Copy Number in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Watve, Mukta M.; Dahanukar, Neelesh; Watve, Milind G.

    2010-01-01

    All genes critical for plasmid replication regulation are located on the plasmid rather than on the host chromosome. It is possible therefore that there can be copy-up “cheater” mutants. In spite of this possibility, low copy number plasmids appear to exist stably in host populations. We examined this paradox using a multilevel selection model. Simulations showed that, a slightly higher copy number mutant could out-compete the wild type. Consequently, another mutant with still higher copy number could invade the first invader. However, the realized benefit of increasing intra-host fitness was saturating whereas that of inter-host fitness was exponential. As a result, above a threshold, intra-host selection was overcompensated by inter-host selection and the low copy number wild type plasmid could back invade a very high copy number plasmid. This led to a rock-paper-scissor (RPS) like situation that allowed the coexistence of plasmids with varied copy numbers. Furthermore, another type of cheater that had lost the genes required for conjugation but could hitchhike on a conjugal plasmid, could further reduce the advantage of copy-up mutants. These sociobiological interactions may compliment molecular mechanisms of replication regulation in stabilizing the copy numbers. PMID:20195362

  13. An updated view of plasmid conjugation and mobilization in Staphylococcus.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Joshua P; Kwong, Stephen M; Murphy, Riley J T; Yui Eto, Karina; Price, Karina J; Nguyen, Quang T; O'Brien, Frances G; Grubb, Warren B; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    The horizontal gene transfer facilitated by mobile genetic elements impacts almost all areas of bacterial evolution, including the accretion and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistance genes in the human and animal pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Genome surveys of staphylococcal plasmids have revealed an unexpected paucity of conjugation and mobilization loci, perhaps suggesting that conjugation plays only a minor role in the evolution of this genus. In this letter we present the DNA sequences of historically documented staphylococcal conjugative plasmids and highlight that at least 3 distinct and widely distributed families of conjugative plasmids currently contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus. We also review the recently documented "relaxase-in trans" mechanism of conjugative mobilization facilitated by conjugative plasmids pWBG749 and pSK41, and discuss how this may facilitate the horizontal transmission of around 90% of plasmids that were previously considered non-mobilizable. Finally, we enumerate unique sequenced S. aureus plasmids with a potential mechanism of mobilization and predict that at least 80% of all non-conjugative S. aureus plasmids are mobilizable by at least one mechanism. We suggest that a greater research focus on the molecular biology of conjugation is essential if we are to recognize gene-transfer mechanisms from our increasingly in silico analyses. PMID:27583185

  14. Analysis of chromosomal integration and deletions of yeast plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Philippsen, P; Davis, R W

    1977-01-01

    Plasmid DNAs from six strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared. Three different plasmids were found, designated Scp 1, Scp 2 and Scp 3, with monomer lengths of 6.19, 6.06 and 5.97 kilobases as referenced to sequenced phiX174 DNA. DNA from each of the plasmids was inserted into a lambda vector DNA. Hybrid phage containing inserted DNA of the desired size were enriched by genetic selection and their DNAs analysed by rapid techniques. All three plasmids share the same organization, two unique sequences separated by two inverted repeats, and share basically the same DNA sequences. Scp 2 and Scp 3 differ from Scp 1 by missing a unique HpaI site and by having small overlapping deletions in the same region. The HpaI site in Scp 1 is, therefore, in a nonessential region and suitable for insertion of foreign DNA in the potential use of the yeast plasmid as a vector. Hybridization of labelled cloned plasmid DNA to restriction fragments of linear yeast DNA separated on agarose gels showed that the plasmid DNA was not stably integrated into the yeast chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:331256

  15. Plasmid incidence in bacteria from deep subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Hicks, R.J.; Li, S.W.; Brockman, F.J. )

    1988-12-01

    Bacteria were isolated from deep terrestrial subsurface sediments underlying the coastal plain of South Carolina. A total of 163 isolates from deep sediments, surface soil, and return drill muds were examined for plasmid DNA content and resistance to the antibiotics penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. MICs of Cu{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, and Hg{sup 2+} for each isolate were also determined. The overall frequency of plasmid occurrence in the subsurface bacteria was 33%. Resistance was most frequent to penicillin (70% of all isolates), ampicillin (49%), and carbenicillin (32%) and was concluded to be related to the concentrations of the individual antibiotics in the disks used for assaying resistance and to the production of low levels of {beta}-lactamase. The frequencies of resistance to penicillin and ampicillin were significantly greater for isolates bearing plasmids than for plasmidless isolates; however, resistance was not transferable to penicillin-sensitive Escherichia coli. Hybridization of subsurface bacterial plasmids and chromosomal DNA with a whole-TOL-plasmid (pWWO) probe revealed some homology of subsurface bacterial plasmid and chromosomal DNAs, indicating a potential for those bacterial to harbor catabolic genes on plasmids or chromosomes. The incidences of antibiotic resistance and MICs of metals for subsurface bacteria were significantly different from those drill mud bacteria, ruling out the possibility that bacteria from sediments were derived from drill muds.

  16. Fractional precipitation of plasmid DNA from lysate by CTAB.

    PubMed

    Lander, Russel J; Winters, Michael A; Meacle, Francis J; Buckland, Barry C; Lee, Ann L

    2002-09-30

    Preparative-scale purification of plasmid DNA has been attempted by diverse methods, including precipitation with solvents, salts, and detergents and chromatography with ion-exchange, reversed-phase, and size-exclusion columns. Chromatographic methods such as hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), reversed phase chromatography (RPC), and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) are the only effective means of eliminating the closely related relaxed and denatured forms of plasmid as well as endotoxin to acceptable levels. However, the anticipated costs of manufacturing-scale chromatography are high due to (a) large projected volumes of the high-dosage therapeutic molecule and (b) restricted loading of the large plasmid molecule in the pores of expensive resins. As an alternative to chromatography, we show herein that precipitation with the cationic detergent, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), is effective for selective precipitation of plasmid DNA from proteins, RNA, and endotoxin. Moreover, CTAB affords novel selectivity by removal of host genomic DNA and even the more closely related relaxed and denatured forms of plasmid as earlier, separate fractions. Finally, plasmid that has been precipitated by CTAB can be purified by selectively dissolving under conditions of controlled salt concentration. The selectivity mechanism is most likely based upon conformational differences among the several forms of DNA. As such, CTAB precipitation provides an ideal nonchromatographic capture step for the manufacture of plasmid DNA. PMID:12209800

  17. An updated view of plasmid conjugation and mobilization in Staphylococcus

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Joshua P.; Kwong, Stephen M.; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Yui Eto, Karina; Price, Karina J.; Nguyen, Quang T.; O'Brien, Frances G.; Grubb, Warren B.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The horizontal gene transfer facilitated by mobile genetic elements impacts almost all areas of bacterial evolution, including the accretion and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistance genes in the human and animal pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Genome surveys of staphylococcal plasmids have revealed an unexpected paucity of conjugation and mobilization loci, perhaps suggesting that conjugation plays only a minor role in the evolution of this genus. In this letter we present the DNA sequences of historically documented staphylococcal conjugative plasmids and highlight that at least 3 distinct and widely distributed families of conjugative plasmids currently contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus. We also review the recently documented “relaxase-in trans” mechanism of conjugative mobilization facilitated by conjugative plasmids pWBG749 and pSK41, and discuss how this may facilitate the horizontal transmission of around 90% of plasmids that were previously considered non-mobilizable. Finally, we enumerate unique sequenced S. aureus plasmids with a potential mechanism of mobilization and predict that at least 80% of all non-conjugative S. aureus plasmids are mobilizable by at least one mechanism. We suggest that a greater research focus on the molecular biology of conjugation is essential if we are to recognize gene-transfer mechanisms from our increasingly in silico analyses. PMID:27583185

  18. Plasmid incidence in bacteria from deep subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, J K; Hicks, R J; Li, S W; Brockman, F J

    1988-12-01

    Bacteria were isolated from deep terrestrial subsurface sediments underlying the coastal plain of South Carolina. A total of 163 isolates from deep sediments, surface soil, and return drill muds were examined for plasmid DNA content and resistance to the antibiotics penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. MICs of Cu, Cr, and Hg for each isolate were also determined. The overall frequency of plasmid occurrence in the subsurface bacteria was 33%. Resistance was most frequent to penicillin (70% of all isolates), ampicillin (49%), and carbenicillin (32%) and was concluded to be related to the concentrations of the individual antibiotics in the disks used for assaying resistance and to the production of low levels of beta-lactamase. The frequencies of resistance to penicillin and ampicillin were significantly greater for isolates bearing plasmids than for plasmidless isolates; however, resistance was not transferable to penicillin-sensitive Escherichia coli. Hybridization of subsurface bacterial plasmids and chromosomal DNA with a whole-TOL-plasmid (pWWO) probe revealed some homology of subsurface bacterial plasmid and chromosomal DNAs, indicating a potential for those bacteria to harbor catabolic genes on plasmids or chromosomes. The incidences of antibiotic resistance and MICs of metals for subsurface bacteria were significantly different from those for drill mud bacteria, ruling out the possibility that bacteria from sediments were derived from drill muds. PMID:16347789

  19. Molecular classification of IncP-9 naphthalene degradation plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Izmalkova, T.Y.; Mavrodi, D.V.; Sokolov, S.L.; Kosheleva, I.A.; Smalla, K.; Thomas, C.M.; Boronin, A.M.

    2006-07-15

    A large collection of naphthalene-degrading fluorescent Pseudomonas strains isolated from sites contaminated with coal tar and crude oil was screened for the presence of IncP-9 plasmids. Seventeen strains were found to carry naphthalene catabolic plasmids ranging in size from 83 to 120kb and were selected for further study. Results of molecular genotyping revealed that 15 strains were closely related to P. putida, one to P. fluorescens, and one to P. aeruginosa. All catabolic plasmids found in these strains, with the exception of pBS216, pSN11, and p8909N-1, turned out to belong to IncP-9 {beta}-subgroup. Plasmids pBS216, pSN11, and p8909N-1 were identified as members of IncP-9 {delta}-subgroup. One plasmid, pBS2, contains fused replicons of IncP-9 {beta} and IncP-7 groups. RFLP analyses of the naphthalene catabolic plasmids revealed that organisation of the replicon correlates well with the overall plasmid structure. Comparative PCR studies with conserved oligonucleotide primers indicated that genes for key enzymes of naphthalene catabolism are highly conserved among all studied plasmids. Three bacterial strains, P. putida BS202, P. putida BS3701, and P. putida BS3790, were found to have two different salicylate hydroxylase genes one of which has no similarity to the 'classic' enzyme encoded by nahG gene. Discovery of a large group of plasmid with unique nahR suggested that the regulatory loop may also represent a variable part of the pathway for catabolism of naphthalene in fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

  20. Separation of plasmid DNA topoisomers by multimodal chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silva-Santos, A Rita; Alves, Cláudia P A; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Azevedo, Ana M

    2016-06-15

    The ability to analyze the distribution of topoisomers in a plasmid DNA sample is important when evaluating the quality of preparations intended for gene therapy and DNA vaccination or when performing biochemical studies on the action of topoisomerases and gyrases. Here, we describe the separation of supercoiled (sc) and open circular (oc) topoisomers by multimodal chromatography. A medium modified with the ligand N-benzyl-N-methyl ethanolamine and an elution scheme with increasing NaCl concentration are used to accomplish the baseline separation of sc and oc plasmid. The utility of the method is demonstrated by quantitating topoisomers in a purified plasmid sample. PMID:27033004

  1. Characterization of ampicillin resistance plasmids from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Totten, P A; Handsfield, H H; Peters, D; Holmes, K K; Falkow, S

    1982-01-01

    Seven strains of Haemophilus ducreyi from diverse geographic origins were analyzed for their plasmid content. All strains were multiply resistant, but only resistance to ampicillin was transferred to Escherichia coli by transformation. The H. ducreyi plasmids encoding for ampicillin resistance were 7.4, 5.7, and 3.6 megadaltons and encoded for part or all of TnA, and ampicillin transposon. The relatedness of these plasmids was examined by restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA-DNA homology with isolated DNA fragments from TnA. Images PMID:6282212

  2. Infrared laser effects at fluences used for treatment of dentin hypersensitivity on DNA repair in Escherichia coli and plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Teixeira, Gleica; da Silva Marciano, Roberta; da Silva Sergio, Luiz Philippe; Castanheira Polignano, Giovanni Augusto; Roberto Guimarães, Oscar; Geller, Mauro; de Paoli, Flavia; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-12-01

    Low-intensity infrared lasers are proposed in clinical protocols based on biostimulative effects, yet dosimetry is inaccurate and their effects on DNA at therapeutic doses are controversial. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared laser on survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. E. coli cultures were exposed to laser (808 nm, 100 mW, 40 and 60 J/cm2) to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, bacterial plasmids were exposed to laser to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile and action of DNA repair enzymes. Data indicate low-intensity infrared laser has no effect on survival of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III, but decreases the survival of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and endonuclease III deficient cells in stationary growth phase, induces bacterial filamentation, does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels and does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with endonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and exonuclease III. Our findings show that low-intensity laser exposure causes DNA lesions at sub-lethal level and induces cellular mechanisms involved in repair of oxidative lesions in DNA. Studies about laser dosimetry and safety strategies are necessary for professionals and patients exposed to low-intensity lasers at therapeutic doses.

  3. Mendelian transmission of genes introduced into plants by the Ti plasmids of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Otten, L; De Greve, H; Hernalsteens, J P; Van Montagu, M; Schieder, O; Straub, J; Schell, J

    1981-01-01

    Insertion of the bacterial transposon Tn7 was used to obtain mutants of an octopine Ti plasmid. Crown gall tumours induced on tobacco by an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain carrying a particular mutant Ti plasmid (pGV2100) were found to give rise to shoots. These shoots were grown in vitro and one of them (rGV-1) was found to contain the T-DNA specific enzyme lysopine dehydrogenase (LpDH) and to form roots. After transfer to soil, rGV-1 developed into a morphologically and functionally normal tobacco plant. All cells of the regenerant and of vegetatively produced offspring were shown, by cloning of leaf protoplasts, to contain T-DNA and LpDH activity, rGV-1 and vegetatively produced offspring flowered normally. Plantlets obtained from haploid anther cultures were tested for LpDH activity. Forty-one percent of these plantlets were LpDH positive. Moreover, both self-pollination of rGV-1 and crosses between rGV-1 and normal tobacco plants showed that the LpDH character was transmitted both through the pollen and through the eggs of rGV-1 as a single dominant factor with Mendelian segregation ratios typical for monohybrid crosses. By repeated selfing, homozygous plants were obtained which bred true with respect to LpDH. The importance of these findings with respect to the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Ti plasmids for genetic engineering in plants is discussed. PMID:6948997

  4. Construction and characterization of gelonin and saporin plasmids for toxic gene-based cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Ah; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-05-01

    Toxic gene therapy (or suicidal gene therapy) is gaining enormous interest, specifically for the treatment of cancer. The success of this therapy lies in several crucial factors, including the potency of gene products to kill the transfected tumor cells and the transfection ability of the transfection vehicles. To address the potency problem, in the present study, we engineered two separate mammalian transfection plasmids (pSAP and pGEL) containing genes encoding ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), gelonin and saporin. After the successful preparation and amplification of the plasmids, they were tested on various cancer cell lines (HeLa, U87, 9L, and MDA-MB-435) and a noncancerous cell line (293 HEK) using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as the transfection agent. Transfection studies performed under varying gene concentration, incubation time, and gene-to-PEI ratios revealed that, compared to the treatment of pGFP (GFP expression plasmid)/PEI, both pGEL/PEI and pSAP/PEI complexes could induce significantly augmented cytotoxic effects at only 2 μg/mL gene concentration. Importantly, these cytotoxic effects were observed universally in all tested cancer cell lines. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of pGEL and pSAP as effective gene candidates for the toxic gene-based cancer therapy. PMID:27008027

  5. Asbestos fibers mediate transformation of monkey cells by exogenous plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.D.; Fasy, T.M.; Kohtz, D.S.; Kohtz, J.D.; Johnson, E.M. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have tested the ability of chrysotile asbestos fibers to introduce plasmid DNA into monkey COS-7 cells and the ability of this DNA to function in both replication and gene expression. Chrysotile fibers are at least as effective as calcium phosphate in standard transfection assays at optimal ratios of asbestos to DNA. After transfection with chrysotile, a minor percentage of introduced plasmid DNA bearing a simian virus 40 origin of replication replicates after 24 hr. Fragmentation of entering DNA is more prominent with asbestos than with calcium phosphate, and after 72 hr most DNA introduced by asbestos is associated with chromosomal DNA. Cells transfected with plasmid p11-4, bearing the p53 protooncogene, express this gene. Cells transfected with pSV2-neo express a gene conferring resistance of antibiotic G418, allowing isolation of colonies of transformed cells after 18 days. The introduction of exogenous DNA into eukaryotic cells could cause mutations in several ways and thus contribute to asbestos-induced oncogenesis.

  6. Construtcion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin B plasmid recombinant and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Song, Qifa; Liao, Fang; Ye, Siying; Cui, Bing; Xiong, Ping

    2005-01-01

    A prokaryotic expression recombinant plasmid pET-PIB to express porin B (PIB) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in E. coli DE3 was constructed in order to provide a basis of research in detection, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against the pathogen infection. The gene encoding PIB was amplified by PCR from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and cloned into prokaryotic expression plasmid pET-28a(+) to construct a pET-PIB recombinant, which was verified by restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. Protein PIB was expressed in E. coli DE3 induced with IPTG. The antigenicity of the expressed protein was evaluated by indirect ELISA. Rabbits were immunized with the protein and serum was collected after immunization. To assess the immunogenicity of the protein, the titer of serum to protein PIB was determined by ELISA. DNA sequence analysis showed that the nucleic acid sequence of PIB gene was 99.28% of homology compared with that (NGPIB18) published in GenBank. A 41 kD fused protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and was proven to have reactivity with anti-PIB polyclonal antibody from mouse. A polyclonal antibody to PIB of 1:4000 titer determined by indirect EISA was obtained from rabbit immunized with the purified product. Recombinant plasmid encoding PIB of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was constructed. Protein PIB with antigenicity and immunogenicity was successfully expressed. PMID:16201262

  7. Molecular cloning, purification, and properties of a plasmid-encoded chloramphenicol acetyltransferase from Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, S; Cardoso, M

    1991-01-01

    A small chloramphenicol resistance (Cmr) plasmid of approximately 3.75 kb, designated pSCS5, was isolated from Staphylococcus haemolyticus. This plasmid encoded an inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT; EC 2.3.1.28). The cat gene of pSCS5 was cloned into the Escherichia coli plasmid vector pBluescript SKII+. It differed in its nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence from the cat genes described previously in staphylococci and other gram-positive bacteria. The CAT enzyme was purified from cell-free lysates by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, and fast protein liquid chromatography. The native enzyme had an Mr of 70,000 and was composed of three identical subunits, each with an Mr of approximately 23,000. Its isoelectric point was at pH 6.15. CAT from pSCS5 exhibited Km values of 2.81 and 51.8 microM for chloramphenicol and acetyl coenzyme A, respectively. The optimum pH for activity was 7.8. CAT encoded by pSCS5 proved to be relatively heat stable, but sensitive to mercury ions. The observed differences in the nucleotide sequence and the biochemical characteristics of the enzyme allowed the identification of the pSCS5-encoded CAT from S. haemolyticus as a CAT variant different from those described previously in gram-positive bacteria. Images PMID:1929282

  8. Development of a Transformation System for Chlamydia trachomatis: Restoration of Glycogen Biosynthesis by Acquisition of a Plasmid Shuttle Vector

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yibing; Kahane, Simona; Cutcliffe, Lesley T.; Skilton, Rachel J.; Lambden, Paul R.; Clarke, Ian N.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis remains one of the few major human pathogens for which there is no transformation system. C. trachomatis has a unique obligate intracellular developmental cycle. The extracellular infectious elementary body (EB) is an infectious, electron-dense structure that, following host cell infection, differentiates into a non-infectious replicative form known as a reticulate body (RB). Host cells infected by C. trachomatis that are treated with penicillin are not lysed because this antibiotic prevents the maturation of RBs into EBs. Instead the RBs fail to divide although DNA replication continues. We have exploited these observations to develop a transformation protocol based on expression of β-lactamase that utilizes rescue from the penicillin-induced phenotype. We constructed a vector which carries both the chlamydial endogenous plasmid and an E.coli plasmid origin of replication so that it can shuttle between these two bacterial recipients. The vector, when introduced into C. trachomatis L2 under selection conditions, cures the endogenous chlamydial plasmid. We have shown that foreign promoters operate in vivo in C. trachomatis and that active β-lactamase and chloramphenicol acetyl transferase are expressed. To demonstrate the technology we have isolated chlamydial transformants that express the green fluorescent protein (GFP). As proof of principle, we have shown that manipulation of chlamydial biochemistry is possible by transformation of a plasmid-free C. trachomatis recipient strain. The acquisition of the plasmid restores the ability of the plasmid-free C. trachomatis to synthesise and accumulate glycogen within inclusions. These findings pave the way for a comprehensive genetic study on chlamydial gene function that has hitherto not been possible. Application of this technology avoids the use of therapeutic antibiotics and therefore the procedures do not require high level containment and will allow the analysis of genome function by

  9. Development of a transformation system for Chlamydia trachomatis: restoration of glycogen biosynthesis by acquisition of a plasmid shuttle vector.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Kahane, Simona; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Skilton, Rachel J; Lambden, Paul R; Clarke, Ian N

    2011-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis remains one of the few major human pathogens for which there is no transformation system. C. trachomatis has a unique obligate intracellular developmental cycle. The extracellular infectious elementary body (EB) is an infectious, electron-dense structure that, following host cell infection, differentiates into a non-infectious replicative form known as a reticulate body (RB). Host cells infected by C. trachomatis that are treated with penicillin are not lysed because this antibiotic prevents the maturation of RBs into EBs. Instead the RBs fail to divide although DNA replication continues. We have exploited these observations to develop a transformation protocol based on expression of β-lactamase that utilizes rescue from the penicillin-induced phenotype. We constructed a vector which carries both the chlamydial endogenous plasmid and an E.coli plasmid origin of replication so that it can shuttle between these two bacterial recipients. The vector, when introduced into C. trachomatis L2 under selection conditions, cures the endogenous chlamydial plasmid. We have shown that foreign promoters operate in vivo in C. trachomatis and that active β-lactamase and chloramphenicol acetyl transferase are expressed. To demonstrate the technology we have isolated chlamydial transformants that express the green fluorescent protein (GFP). As proof of principle, we have shown that manipulation of chlamydial biochemistry is possible by transformation of a plasmid-free C. trachomatis recipient strain. The acquisition of the plasmid restores the ability of the plasmid-free C. trachomatis to synthesise and accumulate glycogen within inclusions. These findings pave the way for a comprehensive genetic study on chlamydial gene function that has hitherto not been possible. Application of this technology avoids the use of therapeutic antibiotics and therefore the procedures do not require high level containment and will allow the analysis of genome function by

  10. Cloning and sequencing of a plasmid-borne gene (opd) encoding a phosphotriesterase.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, C S; Harper, L L; Wild, J R

    1988-01-01

    Plasmid pCMS1 was isolated from Pseudomonas diminuta MG, a strain which constitutively hydrolyzes a broad spectrum of organophosphorus compounds. The native plasmid was restricted with PstI, and individual DNA fragments were subcloned into pBR322. A recombinant plasmid transformed into Escherichia coli possessed weak hydrolytic activity, and Southern blotting with the native plasmid DNA verified that the DNA sequence originated from pCMS1. When the cloned 1.3-kilobase fragment was placed behind the lacZ' promoter of M13mp10 and retransformed into E. coli, clear-plaque isolates with correctly sized inserts exhibited isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside-inducible whole-cell activity. Sequence determination of the M13 constructions identified an open reading frame of 975 bases preceded by a putative ribosome-binding site appropriately positioned upstream of the first ATG codon in the open reading frame. An intragenic fusion of the opd gene with the lacZ gene produced a hybrid polypeptide which was purified by beta-galactosidase immunoaffinity chromatography and used to confirm the open reading frame of opd. The gene product, an organophosphorus phosphotriesterase, would have a molecular weight of 35,418 if the presumed start site is correct. Eighty to ninety percent of the enzymatic activity was associated with the pseudomonad membrane fractions. When dissociated by treatment with 0.1% Triton and 1 M NaCl, the enzymatic activity was associated with a molecular weight of approximately 65,000, suggesting that the active enzyme was dimeric. Images PMID:2834339